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Sample records for cortical axon outgrowth

  1. Interplay between kinesin-1 and cortical dynein during axonal outgrowth and microtubule organization in Drosophila neurons.

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    del Castillo, Urko; Winding, Michael; Lu, Wen; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-12-28

    In this study, we investigated how microtubule motors organize microtubules in Drosophila neurons. We showed that, during the initial stages of axon outgrowth, microtubules display mixed polarity and minus-end-out microtubules push the tip of the axon, consistent with kinesin-1 driving outgrowth by sliding antiparallel microtubules. At later stages, the microtubule orientation in the axon switches from mixed to uniform polarity with plus-end-out. Dynein knockdown prevents this rearrangement and results in microtubules of mixed orientation in axons and accumulation of microtubule minus-ends at axon tips. Microtubule reorganization requires recruitment of dynein to the actin cortex, as actin depolymerization phenocopies dynein depletion, and direct recruitment of dynein to the membrane bypasses the actin requirement. Our results show that cortical dynein slides 'minus-end-out' microtubules from the axon, generating uniform microtubule arrays. We speculate that differences in microtubule orientation between axons and dendrites could be dictated by differential activity of cortical dynein.

  2. Multifunctional Silk Nerve Guides for Axon Outgrowth

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    Tupaj, Marie C.

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a critical issue as 2.8% of trauma patients present with this type of injury, estimating a total of 200,000 nerve repair procedures yearly in the United States. While the peripheral nervous system exhibits slow regeneration, at a rate of 0.5 mm -- 9 mm/day following trauma, this regenerative ability is only possible under certain conditions. Clinical repairs have changed slightly in the last 30 years and standard methods of treatment include suturing damaged nerve ends, allografting, and autografting, with the autograft the gold standard of these approaches. Unfortunately, the use of autografts requires a second surgery and there is a shortage of nerves available for grafting. Allografts are a second option however allografts have lower success rates and are accompanied by the need of immunosuppressant drugs. Recently there has been a focus on developing nerve guides as an "off the shelf" approach. Although some natural and synthetic guidance channels have been approved by the FDA, these nerve guides are unfunctionalized and repair only short gaps, less than 3 cm in length. The goal of this project was to identify strategies for functionalizing peripheral nerve conduits for the outgrowth of neuron axons in vitro . To accomplish this, two strategies (bioelectrical and biophysical) were indentified for increasing axon outgrowth and promoting axon guidance. Bioelectrical strategies exploited electrical stimulation for increasing neurite outgrowth. Biophysical strategies tested a range of surface topographies for axon guidance. Novel methods were developed for integrating electrical and biophysical strategies into silk films in 2D. Finally, a functionalized nerve conduit system was developed that integrated all strategies for the purpose of attaching, elongating, and guiding nervous tissue in vitro. Future directions of this work include silk conduit translation into a rat sciatic nerve model in vivo for the purpose of repairing long

  3. Effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on the axonal outgrowth through activation of PI3K/AKT signaling in primary cortical neurons followed oxygen-glucose deprivation injury.

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    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transplantation with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs improves the survival of neurons and axonal outgrowth after stroke remains undetermined. Here, we investigated whether PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is involved in these therapeutic effects of BMSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1 BMSCs and cortical neurons were derived from Sprague-Dawley rats. The injured neurons were induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation (OGD, and then were respectively co-cultured for 48 hours with BMSCs at different densities (5×10(3, 5×10(5/ml in transwell co-culture system. The average length of axon and expression of GAP-43 were examined to assess the effect of BMSCs on axonal outgrowth after the damage of neurons induced by OGD. (2 The injured neurons were cultured with a conditioned medium (CM of BMSCs cultured for 24 hours in neurobasal medium. During the process, we further identified whether PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is involved through the adjunction of LY294002 (a specific phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor. Two hours later, the expression of pAKT (phosphorylated AKT and AKT were analyzed by Western blotting. The length of axons, the expression of GAP-43 and the survival of neurons were measured at 48 hours. RESULTS: Both BMSCs and CM from BMSCs inreased the axonal length and GAP-43 expression in OGD-injured cortical neurons. There was no difference between the effects of BMSCs of 5×10(5/ml and of 5×10(3/ml on axonal outgrowth. Expression of pAKT enhanced significantly at 2 hours and the neuron survival increased at 48 hours after the injured neurons cultured with the CM, respectively. These effects of CM were prevented by inhibitor LY294002. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: BMSCs promote axonal outgrowth and the survival of neurons against the damage from OGD in vitro by the paracrine effects through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  4. Cdk5 Regulation of the GRAB-Mediated Rab8-Rab11 Cascade in Axon Outgrowth.

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    Furusawa, Kotaro; Asada, Akiko; Urrutia, Pamela; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-25

    Neurons communicate with each other through their axons and dendrites. However, a full characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in axon and dendrite formation is still incomplete. Neurite outgrowth requires the supply of membrane components for surface expansion. Two membrane sources for axon outgrowth are suggested: Golgi secretary vesicles and endocytic recycling endosomes. In non-neuronal cells, trafficking of secretary vesicles from Golgi is regulated by Rab8, a member of Rab small GTPases, and that of recycling endosomes is by Rab11, another member of Rabs. However, whether these vesicles are coordinately or independently transported in growing axons is unknown. Herein, we find that GRAB, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab8, is a novel regulator of axon outgrowth. Knockdown of GRAB suppressed axon outgrowth of cultured mouse brain cortical neurons. GRAB mediates the interaction between Rab11A and Rab8A, and this activity is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser169 and Ser180 by Cdk5-p35. The nonphosphorylatable GRAB mutant S169/180A promoted axonal outgrowth to a greater extent than did the phosphomimetic GRAB mutant S169/180D. Phosphorylation of GRAB suppressed its guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and its ability to recruit Rab8A- to Rab11A-positive endosomes. In vivo function of GRAB and its Cdk5-phophorylation were shown in migration and process formation of developing neurons in embryonic mouse brains. These results indicate that GRAB regulates axonal outgrowth via activation and recruitment of Rab8A- to Rab11A-positive endosomes in a Cdk5-dependent manner. While axon outgrowth requires membrane supply for surface expansion, the molecular mechanisms regulating the membrane transport in growing axons remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that GRAB, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab8, is a novel regulator of axon outgrowth. GRAB promotes the axonal membrane transport by mediating the interaction between Rab11 and Rab

  5. Network structure implied by initial axon outgrowth in rodent cortex: empirical measurement and models.

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    Cahalane, Diarmuid J; Clancy, Barbara; Kingsbury, Marcy A; Graf, Ethan; Sporns, Olaf; Finlay, Barbara L

    2011-01-11

    The developmental mechanisms by which the network organization of the adult cortex is established are incompletely understood. Here we report on empirical data on the development of connections in hamster isocortex and use these data to parameterize a network model of early cortical connectivity. Using anterograde tracers at a series of postnatal ages, we investigate the growth of connections in the early cortical sheet and systematically map initial axon extension from sites in anterior (motor), middle (somatosensory) and posterior (visual) cortex. As a general rule, developing axons extend from all sites to cover relatively large portions of the cortical field that include multiple cortical areas. From all sites, outgrowth is anisotropic, covering a greater distance along the medial/lateral axis than along the anterior/posterior axis. These observations are summarized as 2-dimensional probability distributions of axon terminal sites over the cortical sheet. Our network model consists of nodes, representing parcels of cortex, embedded in 2-dimensional space. Network nodes are connected via directed edges, representing axons, drawn according to the empirically derived anisotropic probability distribution. The networks generated are described by a number of graph theoretic measurements including graph efficiency, node betweenness centrality and average shortest path length. To determine if connectional anisotropy helps reduce the total volume occupied by axons, we define and measure a simple metric for the extra volume required by axons crossing. We investigate the impact of different levels of anisotropy on network structure and volume. The empirically observed level of anisotropy suggests a good trade-off between volume reduction and maintenance of both network efficiency and robustness. Future work will test the model's predictions for connectivity in larger cortices to gain insight into how the regulation of axonal outgrowth may have evolved to achieve efficient

  6. Signaling mechanisms in cortical axon growth, guidance and branching

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    Katherine eKalil

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise wiring of cortical circuits during development depends upon axon extension, guidance and branching to appropriate targets. Motile growth cones at axon tips navigate through the nervous system by responding to molecular cues, which modulate signaling pathways within axonal growth cones. Intracellular calcium signaling has emerged as a major transducer of guidance cues but exactly how calcium signaling pathways modify the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton to evoke growth cone behaviors and axon branching is still mysterious. Axons must often pause in their outgrowth while their branches extend into targets. Some evidence suggests a competition between growth of axons and branches but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Since it is difficult to study growing axons deep within the mammalian brain, much of what we know about signaling pathways and cytoskeletal dynamics has come from studies of axonal growth cones, in many cases from non-mammalian species, growing in tissue culture. Consequently it is not well understood how guidance cues relevant to mammalian neural development in vivo signal to the growth cone cytoskeleton during axon outgrowth and guidance. In this review we describe our recent work in dissociated cultures of developing rodent sensorimotor cortex in the context of the current literature on molecular guidance cues, calcium signaling pathways and cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate growth cone behaviors. A major challenge is to relate findings in tissue culture to mechanisms of cortical development in vivo. Toward this goal, we describe our recent work in cortical slices, which preserve the complex cellular and molecular environment of the mammalian brain but allow direct visualization of growth cone behaviors and calcium signaling. Findings from this work suggest that mechanisms regulating axon growth and guidance in dissociated culture neurons also underlie development of cortical connectivity in vivo.

  7. Docosahexaenoic Acid Promotes Axon Outgrowth by Translational Regulation of Tau and Collapsin Response Mediator Protein 2 Expression.

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    Mita, Toshinari; Mayanagi, Taira; Ichijo, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Kentaro; Otsuka, Kotaro; Sakai, Akio; Sobue, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    n-3 PUFAs are essential for neuronal development and brain function. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying their biological effects remain unclear. Here we examined the mechanistic action of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most abundant n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain. We found that DHA treatment of cortical neurons resulted in enhanced axon outgrowth that was due to increased axon elongation rates. DHA-mediated axon outgrowth was accompanied by the translational up-regulation of Tau and collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), two important axon-related proteins, and the activation of Akt and p70 S6 kinase. Consistent with these findings, rapamycin, a potent inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), prevented DHA-mediated axon outgrowth and up-regulation of Tau and CRMP2. In addition, DHA-dependent activation of the Akt-mTOR-S6K pathway enhanced 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract-dependent translation of Tau and CRMP2. Therefore, our results revealed an important role for the Akt-mTOR-S6K pathway in DHA-mediated neuronal development.

  8. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

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    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase co-regulate axonal outgrowth of mouse retinal ganglion cells

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    Gaublomme, Djoere; Buyens, Tom; De Groef, Lies

    2014-01-01

    regenerative therapies, an improved understanding of axonal outgrowth and the various molecules influencing it, is highly needed. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of zinc-dependent proteases that were sporadically reported to influence axon outgrowth. Using an ex vivo retinal explant model...

  10. Sonic Hedgehog Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of Primary Cortical Neurons Through Up-Regulating BDNF Expression.

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    He, Weiliang; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Xiangjian; He, Junna; Xie, Yanzhao

    2016-04-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted glycoprotein factor, can activate the Shh pathway, which has been implicated in neuronal polarization involving neurite outgrowth. However, little evidence is available about the effect of Shh on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons and its potential mechanism. Here, we revealed that Shh increased neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons, while the Shh pathway inhibitor (cyclopamine, CPM) partially suppressed Shh-induced neurite outgrowth. Similar results were found for the expressions of Shh and Patched genes in Shh-induced primary cortical neurons. Moreover, Shh increased the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) not only in lysates and in culture medium but also in the longest neurites of primary cortical neurons, which was partially blocked by CPM. In addition, blocking of BDNF action suppressed Shh-mediated neurite elongation in primary cortical neurons. In conclusion, these findings suggest that Shh promotes neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons at least partially through modulating BDNF expression.

  11. Salubrinal inhibits the expression of proteoglycans and favors neurite outgrowth from cortical neurons in vitro.

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    Barreda-Manso, M Asunción; Yanguas-Casás, Natalia; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    After CNS injury, astrocytes and mesenchymal cells attempt to restore the disrupted glia limitans by secreting proteoglycans and extracellular matrix proteins (ECMs), forming the so-called glial scar. Although the glial scar is important in sealing the lesion, it is also a physical and functional barrier that prevents axonal regeneration. The synthesis of secretory proteins in the RER is under the control of the initiation factor of translation eIF2α. Inhibiting the synthesis of secretory proteins by increasing the phosphorylation of eIF2α, might be a pharmacologically efficient way of reducing proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins present in the glial scar. Salubrinal, a neuroprotective drug, decreased the expression and secretion of proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins induced by EGF or TGFβ, maintaining eIF2α phosphorylated. Besides, Salubrinal also reduced the transcription of proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins, suggesting that it induced the degradation of non-translated mRNA. In a model in vitro of the glial scar, cortical neurons grown on cocultures of astrocytes and fibroblasts with TGFβ treated with Salubrinal, showed increased neurite outgrowth compared to untreated cells. Our results suggest that Salubrinal may be considered of therapeutic value facilitating axonal regeneration, by reducing overproduction and secretion of proteoglycans and profibrotic protein inhibitors of axonal growth.

  12. Antipsychotic drugs alter neuronal development including ALM neuroblast migration and PLM axonal outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Donohoe, Dallas R; Weeks, Kathrine; Aamodt, Eric J; Dwyer, Donard S

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly being prescribed for children and adolescents, and are used in pregnant women without a clear demonstration of safety in these populations. Global effects of these drugs on neurodevelopment (e.g., decreased brain size) have been reported in rats, but detailed knowledge about neuronal effects and mechanisms of action are lacking. Here we report on the evaluation of a comprehensive panel of antipsychotic drugs in a model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans) that is widely used to study neuronal development. Specifically, we examined the effects of the drugs on neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in mechanosensory neurons visualized with green fluorescent protein expressed from the mec-3 promoter. Clozapine, fluphenazine, and haloperidol produced deficits in the development and migration of ALM neurons and axonal outgrowth in PLM neurons. The defects included failure of neuroblasts to migrate to the proper location, and excessive growth of axons past their normal termination point, together with abnormal morphological features of the processes. Although the antipsychotic drugs are potent antagonists of dopamine and serotonin receptors, the neurodevelopmental deficits were not rescued by co-incubation with serotonin or the dopaminergic agonist, quinpirole. Other antipsychotic drugs, risperidone, aripiprazole, quetiapine, trifluoperazine and olanzapine, also produced modest, but detectable, effects on neuronal development. This is the first report that antipsychotic drugs interfere with neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in a developing nervous system.

  13. A novel role for PTEN in the inhibition of neurite outgrowth by Myelin-associated glycoprotein in cortical neurons

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    Perdigoto, Ana Luisa; Chaudhry, Nagarathnamma; Barnes, Gregory N.; Filbin, Marie T.; Carter, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Axonal regeneration in the central nervous system is prevented, in part, by inhibitory proteins expressed by myelin, including Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Although injury to the corticospinal tract can result in permanent disability, little is known regarding the mechanisms by which MAG affects cortical neurons. Here, we demonstrate that cortical neurons plated on MAG expressing CHO cells, exhibit a striking reduction in process outgrowth. Interestingly, none of the receptors previously implicated in MAG signaling, including the p75 neurotrophin receptor or gangliosides, contributed significantly to MAG-mediated inhibition. However, blocking the small GTPase Rho or its downstream effector kinase, ROCK, partially reversed the effects of MAG on the neurons. In addition, we identified the lipid phosphatase PTEN as a mediator of MAG’s inhibitory effects on neurite outgrowth. Knockdown or gene deletion of PTEN or over expression of activated AKT in cortical neurons resulted in significant, although partial, rescue of neurite outgrowth on MAG-CHO cells. Moreover, MAG decreased the levels of phospho-Akt, suggesting that it activates PTEN in the neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a novel pathway activated by MAG in cortical neurons involving the PTEN/PI3K/AKT axis. PMID:20869442

  14. A developmental timing switch promotes axon outgrowth independent of known guidance receptors.

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    Katherine Olsson-Carter

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To form functional neuronal connections, axon outgrowth and guidance must be tightly regulated across space as well as time. While a number of genes and pathways have been shown to control spatial features of axon development, very little is known about the in vivo mechanisms that direct the timing of axon initiation and elongation. The Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite specific motor neurons (HSNs extend a single axon ventrally and then anteriorly during the L4 larval stage. Here we show the lin-4 microRNA promotes HSN axon initiation after cell cycle withdrawal. Axons fail to form in lin-4 mutants, while they grow prematurely in lin-4-overexpressing animals. lin-4 is required to down-regulate two inhibitors of HSN differentiation--the transcriptional regulator LIN-14 and the "stemness" factor LIN-28--and it likely does so through a cell-autonomous mechanism. This developmental switch depends neither on the UNC-40/DCC and SAX-3/Robo receptors nor on the direction of axon growth, demonstrating that it acts independently of ventral guidance signals to control the timing of HSN axon elongation.

  15. PACAP enhances axon outgrowth in cultured hippocampal neurons to a comparable extent as BDNF.

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    Katsuya Ogata

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP exerts neurotrophic activities including modulation of synaptic plasticity and memory, hippocampal neurogenesis, and neuroprotection, most of which are shared with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare morphological effects of PACAP and BDNF on primary cultured hippocampal neurons. At days in vitro (DIV 3, PACAP increased neurite length and number to similar levels by BDNF, but vasoactive intestinal polypeptide showed much lower effects. In addition, PACAP increased axon, but not dendrite, length, and soma size at DIV 3 similarly to BDNF. The PACAP antagonist PACAP6-38 completely blocked the PACAP-induced increase in axon, but not dendrite, length. Interestingly, the BDNF-induced increase in axon length was also inhibited by PACAP6-38, suggesting a mechanism involving PACAP signaling. K252a, a TrkB receptor inhibitor, inhibited axon outgrowth induced by PACAP and BDNF without affecting dendrite length. These results indicate that in primary cultured hippocampal neurons, PACAP shows morphological actions via its cognate receptor PAC1, stimulating neurite length and number, and soma size to a comparable extent as BDNF, and that the increase in total neurite length is ascribed to axon outgrowth.

  16. The influence of electrospun fibre size on Schwann cell behaviour and axonal outgrowth

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    Gnavi, S., E-mail: sara.gnavi@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Fornasari, B.E., E-mail: benedettaelena.fornasari@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Tonda-Turo, C., E-mail: chiara.tondaturo@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); Ciardelli, G., E-mail: gianluca.ciardelli@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); CNR-IPCF UOS, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Zanetti, M., E-mail: marco.zanetti@unito.it [Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, University of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); Geuna, S., E-mail: stefano.geuna@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Perroteau, I., E-mail: isabelle.perroteau@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Fibrous substrates functioning as temporary extracellular matrices can be prepared easily by electrospinning, yielding fibrous matrices suitable as internal fillers for nerve guidance channels. In this study, gelatin micro- or nano-fibres were prepared by electrospinning by tuning the gelatin concentration and solution flow rate. The effect of gelatin fibre diameter on cell adhesion and proliferation was tested in vitro using explant cultures of Schwann cells (SC) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Cell adhesion was assessed by quantifying the cell spreading area, actin cytoskeleton organization and focal adhesion complex formation. Nano-fibres promoted cell spreading and actin cytoskeleton organization, increasing cellular adhesion and the proliferation rate. However, both migration rate and motility, quantified by transwell and time lapse assays respectively, were greater in cells cultured on micro-fibres. Finally, there was more DRG axon outgrowth on micro-fibres. These data suggest that the topography of electrospun gelatin fibres can be adjusted to modulate SC and axon organization and that both nano- and micro-fibres are promising fillers for the design of devices for peripheral nerve repair. - Highlights: • Electrospinning used to produce gelatin nano- and micro-fibre matrices. • Nano-fibre matrices promote Schwann cell organization and increase proliferation rate. • Micro-fibre matrices promote Schwann cell migration. • Micro-fibre matrices promote axonal outgrowth.

  17. KSRP modulation of GAP-43 mRNA stability restricts axonal outgrowth in embryonic hippocampal neurons.

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    Clark W Bird

    Full Text Available The KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP promotes the decay of AU-rich element (ARE-containing mRNAs. Although KSRP is expressed in the nervous system, very little is known about its role in neurons. In this study, we examined whether KSRP regulates the stability of the ARE-containing GAP-43 mRNA. We found that KSRP destabilizes this mRNA by binding to its ARE, a process that requires the presence of its fourth KH domain (KH4. Furthermore, KSRP competed with the stabilizing factor HuD for binding to these sequences. We also examined the functional consequences of KSRP overexpression and knockdown on the differentiation of primary hippocampal neurons in culture. Overexpression of full length KSRP or KSRP without its nuclear localization signal hindered axonal outgrowth in these cultures, while overexpression of a mutant protein without the KH4 domain that has less affinity for binding to GAP-43's ARE had no effect. In contrast, depletion of KSRP led to a rise in GAP-43 mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in axonal length, both in KSRP shRNA transfected cells and neurons cultured from Ksrp(+/- and Ksrp(-/- embryos. Finally we found that overexpression of GAP-43 rescued the axonal outgrowth deficits seen with KSRP overexpression, but only when cells were transfected with GAP-43 constructs containing 3' UTR sequences targeting the transport of this mRNA to axons. Together, our results suggest that KSRP is an important regulator of mRNA stability and axonal length that works in direct opposition to HuD to regulate the levels of GAP-43 and other ARE-containing neuronal mRNAs.

  18. A new role for TIMP-1 in modulating neurite outgrowth and morphology of cortical neurons.

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    Adlane Ould-yahoui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1 displays pleiotropic activities, both dependent and independent of its inhibitory activity on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. In the central nervous system (CNS, TIMP-1 is strongly upregulated in reactive astrocytes and cortical neurons following excitotoxic/inflammatory stimuli, but no information exists on its effects on growth and morphology of cortical neurons. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that 24 h incubation with recombinant TIMP-1 induced a 35% reduction in neurite length and significantly increased growth cones size and the number of F-actin rich microprocesses. TIMP-1 mediated reduction in neurite length affected both dendrites and axons after 48 h treatment. The effects on neurite length and morphology were not elicited by a mutated form of TIMP-1 inactive against MMP-1, -2 and -3, and still inhibitory for MMP-9, but were mimicked by a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor. MMP-9 was poorly expressed in developing cortical neurons, unlike MMP-2 which was present in growth cones and whose selective inhibition caused neurite length reductions similar to those induced by TIMP-1. Moreover, TIMP-1 mediated changes in cytoskeleton reorganisation were not accompanied by modifications in the expression levels of actin, betaIII-tubulin, or microtubule assembly regulatory protein MAP2c. Transfection-mediated overexpression of TIMP-1 dramatically reduced neuritic arbour extension in the absence of detectable levels of released extracellular TIMP-1. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, TIMP-1 emerges as a modulator of neuronal outgrowth and morphology in a paracrine and autrocrine manner through the inhibition, at least in part, of MMP-2 and not MMP-9. These findings may help us understand the role of the MMP/TIMP system in post-lesion pre-scarring conditions.

  19. Inhibitory effects of draxin on axonal outgrowth and migration of precerebellar neurons.

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    Riyadh, M Asrafuzzaman; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ohta, Kunimasa; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2014-06-20

    The rhombic lip, a dorsal stripe of the neuroepithelium lining the edge of the fourth ventricle, is the site of origin of precerebellar neurons (PCN), which migrate tangentially towards the floor plate. After reaching the floor plate, they project their axons to the cerebellum. Although previous studies have shown that the guidance molecules Netrin/DCC and Slit/Robo have critical roles in PCN migration, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood. Here, we report that draxin, a repulsive axon guidance protein, is involved in PCN development. We found that draxin is expressed in the rhombic lip and migratory stream of some PCN in the developing hindbrain of mice. In addition, draxin inhibited neurite outgrowth and nuclei migration from rhombic lip explants. These results suggest that draxin functions as a repulsive guidance cue for PCN migration. However, we observed no significant differences in PCN distribution between draxin(-/-) and wild type embryos. Thus, draxin and other axon guidance cues may have redundant roles in PCN migration.

  20. S100B modulates IL-6 release and cytotoxicity from hypothermic brain cells and inhibits hypothermia-induced axonal outgrowth.

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    Schmitt, Katharina R L; Kern, Claudia; Lange, Peter E; Berger, Felix; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Hendrix, Sven

    2007-09-01

    Brain protection is essential during neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery. Deep hypothermia is still the most important method for achieving neuroprotection during cardiopulmonary bypass. Previously, we could demonstrate that deep hypothermia induces substantial cytotoxicity in brain cells as well as increased release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), which plays an important role in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Deep hypothermia is also associated with increased levels of the astrocytic protein S100B in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients. Since S100B may modulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and may stimulate neurite outgrowth, we have tested the hypothesis that nanomolar concentrations of S100B may increase IL-6 release from brain cells and support axonal outgrowth from organotypic brain slices under hypothermic conditions. S100B administration substantially reduced neuronal and glial cytotoxicity under hypothermic conditions. In the presence of S100B hypothermia-induced IL-6 release in primary astrocytes was significantly increased but reduced in BV-2 microglial cells and primary neurons. Surprisingly, deep hypothermia increased axonal outgrowth from brain slices and--in contrast to our hypothesis--this hypothermia-induced neurite outgrowth was inhibited by S100B. These data suggest that S100B differentially influences cytokine release and cytotoxicity from distinct brain cells and may inhibit neuroregeneration by suppressing hypothermia-induced axonal outgrowth.

  1. Axon guidance of rat cortical neurons by microcontact printed gradients.

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    Fricke, Rita; Zentis, Peter D; Rajappa, Lionel T; Hofmann, Boris; Banzet, Marko; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Meffert, Simone H

    2011-03-01

    Substrate-bound gradients expressed in numerous spatio-temporal patterns play a crucial role during the development of complex neural circuits. A deeper understanding of the axon guidance mechanism is provided by studying the effect of a defined substrate-bound cue on a confined neural network. In this study, we constructed a discontinuous substrate-bound gradient to control neuronal cell position, the path of neurite growth, and axon directionality. A variety of gradient patterns, with slight changes in slope, width, and length were designed and fabricated by microcontact printing using laminin/poly-l-lysine (PLL) or PLL alone. The gradients were tested for neurite growth and their impact on axon guidance of embryonic rat cortical neurons. The neurite length was determined and the axon was evaluated by Tau-1 immunostaining. We found that the microgradients of laminin/PLL and PLL directed neurons' adhesion, differentially controlled the neurite growth, and guided up to 84% of the axons. The effect of the protein micropattern on axon guidance and neurite growth depended on the protein and geometric parameters used. Our approach proved to be very successful in guiding axons of single multipolar neurons with very high efficiency. It could thereby be useful to engineer defined neural networks for analyzing signal processing of functional circuits, as well as to unravel fundamental questions of the axon guidance mechanism.

  2. The ErbB2 inhibitor Herceptin (Trastuzumab) promotes axonal outgrowth four weeks after acute nerve transection and repair.

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    Placheta, Eva; Hendry, J Michael; Wood, Matthew D; Lafontaine, Christine W; Liu, Edward H; Cecilia Alvarez Veronesi, M; Frey, Manfred; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2014-10-17

    Accumulating evidence suggests that neuregulin, a potent Schwann cell mitogen, and its receptor, ErbB2, have an important role in regulating peripheral nerve regeneration. We hypothesized that Herceptin (Trastuzumab), a monoclonal antibody that binds ErbB2, would disrupt ErbB2 signaling, allowing us to evaluate ErbB2's importance in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, the extent of peripheral motor and sensory nerve regeneration and distal axonal outgrowth was analyzed two and four weeks after common peroneal (CP) nerve injury in rats. Outcomes analyzed included neuron counts after retrograde labeling, histomorphometry, and protein analysis. The data analysis revealed that there was no impact of Herceptin administration on either the numbers of motor or sensory neurons that regenerated their axons but histomorphometry revealed that Herceptin significantly increased the number of regenerated axons in the distal repaired nerve after 4 weeks. Protein analysis with Western blotting revealed no difference in either expression levels of ErbB2 or the amount of activated, phosphorylated ErbB2 in injured nerves. In conclusion, administration of the ErbB2 receptor inhibitor after nerve transection and surgical repair did not alter the number of regenerating neurons but markedly increased the number of regenerated axons per neuron in the distal nerve stump. Enhanced axon outgrowth in the presence of this ErbB2 inhibitor indicates that ErbB2 signaling may limit the numbers of axons that are emitted from each regenerating neuron.

  3. TRPV2 enhances axon outgrowth through its activation by membrane stretch in developing sensory and motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Koji; Murayama, Namie; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Tominaga, Makoto

    2010-03-31

    Thermosensitive TRP (thermo TRP) channels are well recognized for their contributions to sensory transduction, responding to a wide variety of stimuli including temperature, nociceptive stimuli, touch, and osmolarity. However, the precise roles for the thermo TRP channels during development have not been determined. To explore the functional importance of thermo TRP channels during neural development, the temporal expression was determined in embryonic mice. Interestingly, TRPV2 expression was detected in spinal motor neurons in addition to the dorsal root ganglia from embryonic day 10.5 and was localized in axon shafts and growth cones, suggesting that the channel is important for axon outgrowth regulation. We revealed that endogenous TRPV2 was activated in a membrane stretch-dependent manner in developing neurons by knocking down the TRPV2 function with dominant-negative TRPV2 and TRPV2-specific shRNA and significantly promoted axon outgrowth. Thus, for the first time we revealed that TRPV2 is an important regulator for axon outgrowth through its activation by membrane stretch during development.

  4. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry; McCormick, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two o...

  5. Electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composite for nerve regeneration: electricity-stimulated neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ze; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Wang, Zhaoxu; Roberge, Christophe; Shi, Guixin; Roche, Phillippe; Li, Jiangming; Dao, Lê H

    2007-01-01

    Normal and electrically stimulated PC12 cell cultures and the implantation of nerve guidance channels were performed to evaluate newly developed electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composites. Polypyrrole (PPy) doped by butane sulfonic acid showed a significantly higher number of viable cells compared with PPy doped by polystyrenesulfonate after a 6-day culture. The PC12 cells were left to proliferate for 6 days, and the PPy-coated membranes, showing less initial cell adherence, recorded the same proliferation rate as did the noncoated membranes. Direct current electricity at various intensities was applied to the PC12 cell-cultured conductive membranes. After 7 days, the greatest number of neurites appeared on the membranes with a current intensity approximating 1.7-8.4 microA/cm. Nerve guidance channels made of conductive biodegradable composite were implanted into rats to replace 8 mm of sciatic nerve. The implants were harvested after 2 months and analyzed with immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The regenerated nerve tissue displayed myelinated axons and Schwann cells that were similar to those in the native nerve. Electrical stimulation applied through the electrically conductive biodegradable polymers therefore enhanced neurite outgrowth in a current-dependent fashion. The conductive polymers also supported sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

  6. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

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    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate.

  7. Abscisic acid induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through cortical microtubule reorganization in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Takatani, Shogo; Hirayama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed maturation, germination and various stress responses in plants. The roles of ABA in cellular growth and morphogenesis, however, remain to be explored. Here, we report that ABA induces the ectopic outgrowth of epidermal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. Seedlings of A. thaliana germinated and grown in the presence of ABA developed ectopic protrusions in the epidermal cells of hypocotyls, petioles and cotyledons. One protrusion was formed in the middle of each epidermal cell. In the hypocotyl epidermis, two types of cell files are arranged alternately into non-stoma cell files and stoma cell files, ectopic protrusions being restricted to the non-stoma cell files. This suggests the presence of a difference in the degree of sensitivity to ABA or in the capacity of cells to form protrusions between the two cell files. The ectopic outgrowth was suppressed in ABA insensitive mutants, whereas it was enhanced in ABA hypersensitive mutants. Interestingly, ABA-induced ectopic outgrowth was also suppressed in mutants in which microtubule organization was compromised. Furthermore, cortical microtubules were disorganized and depolymerized by the ABA treatment. These results suggest that ABA signaling induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through microtubule reorganization. PMID:26068445

  8. Contact-associated neurite outgrowth and branching of immature cortical interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Qian; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2003-06-01

    When juvenile interneurons arrive at the cortical environment following tangential migration, they are faced with the task of positioning themselves in cortical space in preparation for local circuit wiring. This includes integration into different cortical layers and cessation of migration at various positions to ensure adequate coverage. Little is known about the signals or mechanisms that initiate a conversion from the migratory phenotype to the arborization phenotype. This study looks at the immediate changes in interneuron morphology after culturing for 24 h in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Immature interneurons taken from different stages of corticogenesis showed increased neurite branching and outgrowth after interneuronal contacts were made. These responses were suppressed in the presence of Slit and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) if the interneurons were sourced from early to mid-stages of corticogenesis. However, interneurons taken from the late period of corticogenesis responded to Slit and BDNF by increasing branching and neurite outgrowth. These results suggest an initial interneuronal cell contact as a stimulus for propagating neuronal arborization that may lead to the formation of inhibitory neuronal circuits. In addition, we have identified the late corticogenetic period when interneurons are most sensitive to the neurite promoting effects of Slit and BDNF.

  9. A retinoic acid receptor beta agonist (CD2019) overcomes inhibition of axonal outgrowth via phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling in the injured adult spinal cord.

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    Agudo, Marta; Yip, Ping; Davies, Meirion; Bradbury, Elizabeth; Doherty, Patrick; McMahon, Stephen; Maden, Malcolm; Corcoran, Jonathan P T

    2010-01-01

    After spinal cord injury in the adult mammal, axons do not normally regrow and this commonly leads to paralysis. Retinoic acid (RA) can stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro of both the embryonic central and peripheral nervous system, via activation of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta2. We show here that regions of the adult CNS, including the cerebellum and cerebral cortex, express RARbeta2. We show that when cerebellar neurons are grown in the presence of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) which inhibits neurite outgrowth, RARbeta can be activated in a dose dependent manner by a RARbeta agonist (CD2019) and neurite outgrowth can occur via phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling. In a model of spinal cord injury CD2019 also acts through PI3K signalling to induce axonal outgrowth of descending corticospinal fibres and promote functional recovery. Our data suggest that RARbeta agonists may be of therapeutic potential for human spinal cord injuries.

  10. Restoring GM1 ganglioside expression ameliorates axonal outgrowth inhibition and cognitive impairments induced by blast traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Zilberstein, Yael; Chapman, Joab; Schreiber, Shaul; Pick, Chaim G.

    2017-01-01

    Blast induced traumatic brain injury (B-TBI) may cause various degrees of cognitive and behavioral disturbances but the exact brain pathophysiology involved is poorly understood. It was previously suggested that ganglioside alteration on the axon surface as well as axonal regenerating inhibitors (ARIs) such as myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) were involved in axonal outgrowth inhibition (AOI), leading to brain damage. GM1 ganglioside content in the brain was significantly reduced while GD1 ganglioside was not affected. The axonal regeneration was also reduced as seen by the phosphorylated NF-H expression. Moreover, B-TBI induced a significant elevation in MAG expression in the brains of the injured mice. The blast injured mice exhibited a significant decline in spatial memory as seen by the Y-maze test. In addition, the injured mice showed pronounced damage to the visual memory (as evaluated by the Novel object recognition test). A single low dose of GM1 (2 mg/kg; IP), shortly after the injury, prevented both the cognitive and the cellular changes in the brains of the injured mice. These results enlighten part of the complicated mechanism that underlies the damage induced by B-TBI and may also suggest a potential new treatment strategy for brain injuries. PMID:28112258

  11. Motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promote corticospinal tract axonal outgrowth and motor recovery after cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareen, N; Shinozaki, M; Ryan, D; Alexander, H; Amer, A; Truong, D Q; Khadka, N; Sarkar, A; Naeem, S; Bikson, M; Martin, J H

    2017-08-10

    Cervical injuries are the most common form of SCI. In this study, we used a neuromodulatory approach to promote skilled movement recovery and repair of the corticospinal tract (CST) after a moderately severe C4 midline contusion in adult rats. We used bilateral epidural intermittent theta burst (iTBS) electrical stimulation of motor cortex to promote CST axonal sprouting and cathodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) to enhance spinal cord activation to motor cortex stimulation after injury. We used Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling to direct tsDCS to the cervical enlargement. Combined iTBS-tsDCS was delivered for 30min daily for 10days. We compared the effect of stimulation on performance in the horizontal ladder and the Irvine Beattie and Bresnahan forepaw manipulation tasks and CST axonal sprouting in injury-only and injury+stimulation animals. The contusion eliminated the dorsal CST in all animals. tsDCS significantly enhanced motor cortex evoked responses after C4 injury. Using this combined spinal-M1 neuromodulatory approach, we found significant recovery of skilled locomotion and forepaw manipulation skills compared with injury-only controls. The spared CST axons caudal to the lesion in both animal groups derived mostly from lateral CST axons that populated the contralateral intermediate zone. Stimulation enhanced injury-dependent CST axonal outgrowth below and above the level of the injury. This dual neuromodulatory approach produced partial recovery of skilled motor behaviors that normally require integration of posture, upper limb sensory information, and intent for performance. We propose that the motor systems use these new CST projections to control movements better after injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Motor cortex electrical stimulation promotes axon outgrowth to brain stem and spinal targets that control the forelimb impaired by unilateral corticospinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Jason B; Kimura, Hiroki; Berrol, Lauren J; Martin, John H

    2013-04-01

    We previously showed that electrical stimulation of motor cortex (M1) after unilateral pyramidotomy in the rat increased corticospinal tract (CST) axon length, strengthened spinal connections, and restored forelimb function. Here, we tested: (i) if M1 stimulation only increases spinal axon length or if it also promotes connections to brain stem forelimb control centers, especially magnocellular red nucleus; and (ii) if stimulation-induced increase in axon length depends on whether pyramidotomy denervated the structure. After unilateral pyramidotomy, we electrically stimulated the forelimb area of intact M1, to activate the intact CST and other corticofugal pathways, for 10 days. We anterogradely labeled stimulated M1 and measured axon length using stereology. Stimulation increased axon length in both the spinal cord and magnocellular red nucleus, even though the spinal cord is denervated by pyramidotomy and the red nucleus is not. Stimulation also promoted outgrowth in the cuneate and parvocellular red nuclei. In the spinal cord, electrical stimulation caused increased axon length ipsilateral, but not contralateral, to stimulation. Thus, stimulation promoted outgrowth preferentially to the sparsely corticospinal-innervated and impaired side. Outgrowth resulted in greater axon density in the ipsilateral dorsal horn and intermediate zone, resembling the contralateral termination pattern. Importantly, as in spinal cord, increase in axon length in brain stem also was preferentially directed towards areas less densely innervated by the stimulated system. Thus, M1 electrical stimulation promotes increases in corticofugal axon length to multiple M1 targets. We propose the axon length change was driven by competition into an adaptive pattern resembling lost connections. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Axonal outgrowth is associated with increased ERK 1/2 activation but decreased caspase 3 linked cell death in Schwann cells after immediate nerve repair in rats

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    Kanje Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2 is activated by nerve damage and its activation precedes survival and proliferation of Schwann cells. In contrast, activation of caspase 3, a cysteine protease, is considered as a marker for apoptosis in Schwann cells. In the present study, axonal outgrowth, activation of ERK1/2 by phosphorylation (p-ERK 1/2 and immunoreactivity of cleaved caspase 3 were examined after immediate, delayed, or no repair of transected rat sciatic nerves. Results Axonal outgrowth, detected by neurofilament staining, was longer after immediate repair than after either the delayed or no repair conditions. Immediate repair also showed a higher expression of p-ERK 1/2 and a lower number of cleaved caspase 3 stained Schwann cells than after delayed nerve repair. If the transected nerve was not repaired a lower level of p-ERK 1/2 was found than in either the immediate or delayed repair conditions. Axonal outgrowth correlated to p-ERK 1/2, but not clearly with cleaved caspase 3. Contact with regenerating axons affected Schwann cells with respect to p-ERK 1/2 and cleaved caspase 3 after immediate nerve repair only. Conclusion The decreased regenerative capacity that has historically been observed after delayed nerve repair may be related to impaired activation of Schwann cells and increased Schwann cell death. Outgrowing axons influence ERK 1/2 activation and apoptosis of Schwann cells.

  14. gp130 cytokines are positive signals triggering changes in gene expression and axon outgrowth in peripheral neurons following injury

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    Richard eZigmond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult peripheral neurons, in contrast to adult central neurons, are capable of regeneration after axonal damage. Much attention has focused on the changes that accompany this regeneration in two places, the distal nerve segment (where phagocytosis of axonal debris, changes in the surface properties of Schwann cells, and induction of growth factors and cytokines occur and the neu-ronal cell body, where dramatic changes in cell morphology and gene expression occur. The changes in the axotomized cell body are often referred to as the cell body response. The focus of the current review is a family of cytokines, the gp130 cytokines, which have been clearly shown to function as injury signals for axotomized neurons, triggering changes in gene expression and in neurite outgrowth. These cytokines play an important role in the response to injury of sympathetic, sensory, and motor neurons. Recent studies suggest that manipulation of this cyto-kine system can also produce some regeneration by injured central neurons.

  15. Kinesin KIF4A transports integrin β1 in developing axons of cortical neurons.

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    Heintz, Tristan G; Heller, Janosch P; Zhao, Rongrong; Caceres, Alfredo; Eva, Richard; Fawcett, James W

    2014-11-01

    CNS axons have poor regenerative ability compared to PNS axons, and mature axons regenerate less well than immature embryonic axons. The loss of regenerative ability with maturity is accompanied by the setting up of a selective transport filter in axons, restricting the types of molecule that are present. We confirm that integrins (represented by subunits β1 and α5) are present in early cortical axons in vitro but are excluded from mature axons. Ribosomal protein and L1 show selective axonal transport through association with kinesin kif4A; we have therefore examined the hypothesis that integrin transport might also be in association with kif4A. Kif4A is present in all processes of immature cortical neurons cultured at E18, then downregulated by 14days in vitro, coinciding with the exclusion of integrin from axons. Kif4a co-localises with β1 integrin in vesicles in neurons and non-neuronal cells, and the two molecules co-immunoprecipitate. Knockdown of KIF4A expression with shRNA reduced the level of integrin β1 in axons of developing neurons and reduced neurite elongation on laminin, an integrin-dependent substrate. Overexpression of kif4A triggered apoptosis in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. In mature neurons expression of kif4A-GFP at a modest level did not kill the cells, and the kif4A was detectable in their axons. However this was not accompanied by an increase in integrin β1 axonal transport, suggesting that kif4A is not the only integrin transporter, and that integrin exclusion from axons is controlled by factors other than the kif4A level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal induces mitochondrial dysfunction and aberrant axonal outgrowth in adult sensory neurons that mimics features of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akude, Eli; Zherebitskaya, Elena; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K; Girling, Kimberly; Fernyhough, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Modification of proteins by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) has been proposed to cause neurotoxicity in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including distal axonopathy in diabetic sensory neuropathy. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of cultured adult rat sensory neurons to 4-HNE would result in the formation of amino acid adducts on mitochondrial proteins and that this process would be associated with impaired mitochondrial function and axonal regeneration. In addition, we compared 4-HNE-induced axon pathology with that exhibited by neurons isolated from diabetic rats. Cultured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons were incubated with varying concentrations of 4-HNE. Cell survival, axonal morphology, and level of axon outgrowth were assessed. In addition, video microscopy of live cells, western blot, and immunofluorescent staining were utilized to detect protein adduct formation by 4-HNE and to localize actively respiring mitochondria. 4-HNE induced formation of protein adducts on cytoskeletal and mitochondrial proteins, and impaired axon regeneration by approximately 50% at 3 microM while having no effect on neuronal survival. 4-HNE initiated formation of aberrant axonal structures and caused the accumulation of mitochondria in these dystrophic structures. Neurons treated with 4-HNE exhibited a distal loss of active mitochondria. Finally, the distal axonopathy and the associated aberrant axonal structures generated by 4-HNE treatment mimicked axon pathology observed in DRG sensory neurons isolated from diabetic rats and replicated aspects of neurodegeneration observed in human diabetic sensory neuropathy.

  17. Rho-independent stimulation of axon outgrowth and activation of the ERK and Akt signaling pathways by C3 transferase in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eAuer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury triggers the activation of RhoA in spinal motor and peripheral sensory neurons. RhoA activates a number of effector proteins including the Rho-associated kinase, ROCK, which targets the cytoskeleton and leads to inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Blockade of the Rho/ROCK pathway by pharmacological means improves axon regeneration after experimental injury. C3bot transferase, an exoenzyme produced by Clostridium botulinum, inactivates RhoA by ADP-ribosylation. Up to now it was not investigated thoroughly whether C3bot exerts positive effects on peripheral axon regeneration as well. In the present study, recombinant membrane permeable C3bot produced a small, but significant, axon outgrowth effect on peripheral sensory neurons dissociated from adult dorsal root ganglia of the rat. Neuronal overexpression of C3, however, did not enhance axonal growth. Moreover, transfection of plasmids encoding dominant negative RhoA or RhoA specific shRNAs failed to increase axonal growth. Furthermore, we show that the C3bot mutant, C3E174Q, which lacks RhoA inhibitory activity, still stimulates axonal growth. When analyzing possible signaling mechanisms we found that ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt are activated by C3bot and ERK is induced by the C3E174Q mutant. Upregulation of kinase activities by C3bot occurs significantly faster than inactivation of RhoA indicating a RhoA-independent pathway of action by C3bot. The induction of ERK signaling by C3bot was detected in embryonic hippocampal neurons, too. Taken together, although RhoA plays a central role for inhibition of axon outgrowth by myelin-derived inhibitors, it does not interfere with axonal growth of sensory neurons on a permissive substrate in vitro. C3bot blocks neuronal RhoA activity, but its positive effects on axon elongation and branching appear to be mediated by Rho independent mechanisms involving activation of axon growth promoting ERK and Akt kinases.

  18. Wnt-induced calcium signaling mediates axon growth and guidance in the developing corpus callosum.

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    Hutchins, B Ian; Li, Li; Kalil, Katherine

    2012-01-10

    Wnt5a gradients guide callosal axons by repulsion through Ryk receptors in vivo. We recently found that Wnt5a repels cortical axons and promotes axon outgrowth through calcium signaling in vitro. Here, using cortical slices, we show that Wnt5a signals through Ryk to guide and promote outgrowth of callosal axons after they cross the midline. Calcium transient frequencies in callosal growth cones positively correlate with axon outgrowth rates in vitro. In cortical slices, calcium release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors and calcium entry through transient receptor potential channels modulate axon growth and guidance. Knocking down Ryk inhibits calcium signaling in cortical axons, reduces rates of axon outgrowth subsequent to midline crossing, and causes axon guidance defects. Calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is required downstream of Wnt-induced calcium signaling for postcrossing callosal axon growth and guidance. Taken together, these results suggest that growth and guidance of postcrossing callosal axons by Wnt-Ryk-calcium signaling involves axon repulsion through CaMKII.

  19. Regulation of action potential waveforms by axonal GABAA receptors in cortical pyramidal neurons.

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    Yang Xia

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb of the main axon trunk of layer -5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors.

  20. Expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF 3) and caspase 3 in Schwann cells and axonal outgrowth after sciatic nerve repair in diabetic BB rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Lena; Kanje, Martin; Dolezal, Katarina; Dahlin, Lars B

    2012-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nerve regeneration in relation to the transcription factor, Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF 3), and an apoptotic marker, caspase 3, in the Schwann cells of diabetic BB rats (i.e. display type 1 diabetes phenotype). Sciatic nerves in healthy Wistar rats and in diabetic BB rats were transected and immediately repaired. Axonal outgrowth (neurofilament staining) and expression of ATF 3 and caspase 3 were quantified by immunohistochemistry after six days. There was no difference in axonal outgrowth between healthy and diabetic rats. However, the sciatic nerve in the diabetic rats exhibited a larger number of ATF 3 expressing Schwann cells at the site of the lesion and also a higher number of caspase 3 expressing Schwann cells. Similar differences were observed in the distal nerve segment between the healthy and diabetic rats. There were no correlations between the number of Schwann cells expressing ATF 3 and caspase 3. Thus, diabetic BB rats display an increased activation of ATF 3 and also a rise in apoptotic caspase 3 expressing Schwann cells, but with no discrepancy in length of axonal outgrowth after nerve injury and repair at six days. Knowledge about signal transduction mechanisms in diabetes after stress may provide new insights into the development of diabetic neuropathy and neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on neuroprotection and neurite outgrowth in primary rat cortical neurons following ischemic insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad Rakibul; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Youn Jung; Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Shin, Chan Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Han, Seol-Heui; Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-09-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi)-valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA) promote neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. In this study, we investigated whether VPA and TSA promote post-ischemic neuroprotection and neuronal restoration in rat primary cortical neurons. On 6 days in vitro (DIV), cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 90 min. Cells were returned to normoxic conditions and cultured for 1, 3, or 7 days with or without VPA and TSA. Control cells were cultured in normoxic conditions only. On 7, 9, and 13 DIV, cells were measured neurite outgrowth using the Axiovision program and stained with Tunel staining kit. Microtubule associated protein-2 immunostaining and tunel staining showed significant recovery of neurite outgrowth and post-ischemic neuronal death by VPA or TSA treatment. We also determined levels of acetylated histone H3, PSD95, GAP 43 and synaptophysin. Significant increases in all three synaptic markers and acetylated histone H3 were observed relative to non-treated cells. Post-ischemic HDACi treatment also significantly raised levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and secreted BDNF. Enhanced BDNF expression by HDACi treatment might have been involved in the post-ischemic neuroprotection and neuronal restorative effects. Our findings suggest that both VPA and TSA treatment during reoxygenation after ischemia may help post-ischemic neuroprotection and neuronal regeneration via increased BDNF expression and activation.

  2. N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine regulates Hedgehog signaling and promotes growth of cortical axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgi Kharebava

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Axonogenesis, a process for the establishment of neuron connectivity, is central to brain function. The role of metabolites derived from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 that is specifically enriched in the brain, has not been addressed in axon development. In this study, we tested if synaptamide (N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine, an endogenous metabolite of DHA, affects axon growth in cultured cortical neurons. We found that synaptamide increased the average axon length, inhibited GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1 transcription and sonic hedgehog (Shh target gene expression while inducing cAMP elevation. Similar effects were produced by cyclopamine, a regulator of the Shh pathway. Conversely, Shh antagonized elevation of cAMP and blocked synaptamide-mediated increase in axon length. Activation of Shh pathway by a smoothened (SMO agonist (SAG or overexpression of SMO did not inhibit axon growth mediated by synaptamide or cyclopamine. Instead, adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished synaptamide-mediated axon growth indicating requirement of cAMP elevation for this process. Our findings establish that synaptamide promotes axon growth while Shh antagonizes synaptamide-mediated cAMP elevation and axon growth by a SMO-independent, non-canonical pathway.

  3. Olanzapine Prevents the PCP-induced Reduction in the Neurite Outgrowth of Prefrontal Cortical Neurons via NRG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingsheng; Yu, Yinghua; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-19

    Accumulating evidence suggests that reducing neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity plays a critical role in the pathology of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) can induce symptoms of schizophrenia as well as reduce dendritic spine density and neurite growth. The antipsychotic drug olanzapine may improve these deficits. This study aimed to investigate: (1) if olanzapine prevents PCP-induced suppression of neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression; (2) if olanzapine affects the Akt-GSK3 signaling pathway; and (3) the role of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) in this process. Immunofluorescence revealed that PCP treatment for 24 hours reduces both neurite length (28.5%) and the number of neurite branches (35.6%) in primary prefrontal cortical neuron cultures. PCP reduced protein and mRNA expressions of synaptophysin (24.9% and 23.2%, respectively) and PSD95 (31.5% and 21.4%, respectively), and the protein expression of p-Akt (26.7%) and p-GSK3β (35.2%). Olanzapine co-treatment prevented these PCP-induced effects in normal neurons but not in neurons from NRG1-knockout mice. These results indicate that NRG1 mediates the preventive effects of olanzapine on the PCP-induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression. This study provides potential targets for interventions on improving the efficacy of olanzapine on preventing cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  4. The short coiled-coil domain-containing protein UNC-69 cooperates with UNC-76 to regulate axonal outgrowth and normal presynaptic organization in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Tsung Nancy

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used extensively to identify the genetic requirements for proper nervous system development and function. Key to this process is the direction of vesicles to the growing axons and dendrites, which is required for growth-cone extension and synapse formation in the developing neurons. The contribution and mechanism of membrane traffic in neuronal development are not fully understood, however. Results We show that the C. elegans gene unc-69 is required for axon outgrowth, guidance, fasciculation and normal presynaptic organization. We identify UNC-69 as an evolutionarily conserved 108-amino-acid protein with a short coiled-coil domain. UNC-69 interacts physically with UNC-76, mutations in which produce similar defects to loss of unc-69 function. In addition, a weak reduction-of-function allele, unc-69(ju69, preferentially causes mislocalization of the synaptic vesicle marker synaptobrevin. UNC-69 and UNC-76 colocalize as puncta in neuronal processes and cooperate to regulate axon extension and synapse formation. The chicken UNC-69 homolog is highly expressed in the developing central nervous system, and its inactivation by RNA interference leads to axon guidance defects. Conclusion We have identified a novel protein complex, composed of UNC-69 and UNC-76, which promotes axonal growth and normal presynaptic organization in C. elegans. As both proteins are conserved through evolution, we suggest that the mammalian homologs of UNC-69 and UNC-76 (SCOCO and FEZ, respectively may function similarly.

  5. Axonal shearing in mature cortical neurons induces attempted regeneration and the reestablishment of neurite polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, Catherine A; King, Anna E; Haas, Matilda A; O'Toole, David A; Vickers, James C; Dickson, Tracey C

    2009-12-01

    While functional recovery after injury is limited, it has become evident that the mature central nervous system does retain some ability to regenerate. This study investigated the intrinsic capacity of relatively mature cortical neurons (21 days in vitro) to respond to axonal loss. Neurons, growing as clusters on poly-L-lysine, were completely sheared of axons through chemical and mechanical disruption and transferred to either an intact astrocyte monolayer or a substrate of poly-L-lysine. Injured neurons exhibited a regenerative sprouting response that was independent of neuronal cell division or neural progenitors, as demonstrated by negative bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and the neuronal precursor intermediate filament nestin, labeling. At 24 h after injury, neurons had extended appropriately polarized neurites, demonstrated by compartmentalized microtubule-associated proteins MAP2 and tau immunolabeling. Newly sprouting axons were tipped by growth cones; however, growth cones on the tips of sprouting axons (mean area, 26.32 +/- 2.20 microm) were significantly (pregenerating neurons exhibited distinct axonal dynamics, with a significant (pneuronal structural plasticity and defining the role of astrocyte reactivity in the response to trauma.

  6. Downregulation of genes with a function in axon outgrowth and synapse formation in motor neurones of the VEGFδ/δ mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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    Lambrechts Diether

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is an endothelial cell mitogen that stimulates vasculogenesis. It has also been shown to act as a neurotrophic factor in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of the hypoxia response element of the promoter region of the gene encoding VEGF in mice causes a reduction in neural VEGF expression, and results in adult-onset motor neurone degeneration that resembles amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Investigating the molecular pathways to neurodegeneration in the VEGFδ/δ mouse model of ALS may improve understanding of the mechanisms of motor neurone death in the human disease. Results Microarray analysis was used to determine the transcriptional profile of laser captured spinal motor neurones of transgenic and wild-type littermates at 3 time points of disease. 324 genes were significantly differentially expressed in motor neurones of presymptomatic VEGFδ/δ mice, 382 at disease onset, and 689 at late stage disease. Massive transcriptional downregulation occurred with disease progression, associated with downregulation of genes involved in RNA processing at late stage disease. VEGFδ/δ mice showed reduction in expression, from symptom onset, of the cholesterol synthesis pathway, and genes involved in nervous system development, including axonogenesis, synapse formation, growth factor signalling pathways, cell adhesion and microtubule-based processes. These changes may reflect a reduced capacity of VEGFδ/δ mice for maintenance and remodelling of neuronal processes in the face of demands of neural plasticity. The findings are supported by the demonstration that in primary motor neurone cultures from VEGFδ/δ mice, axon outgrowth is significantly reduced compared to wild-type littermates. Conclusions Downregulation of these genes involved in axon outgrowth and synapse formation in adult mice suggests a hitherto unrecognized role of VEGF in the maintenance of neuronal circuitry. Dysregulation of

  7. Effect of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neurite outgrowth in primary rat cortical neurons following ischemic insult

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    Choi, Dong-Hee [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Moon Young [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jeong Hoon [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rehabilitation Medicine, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, National University Health System (Singapore); Lee, Jongmin, E-mail: leej@kuh.ac.kr [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 710 nm wavelength light (LED) has a protective effect in the stroke animal model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the effects of LED irradiation in vitro stroke model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment promotes the neurite outgrowth through MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of synaptic markers significantly increased with LED treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment protects cell death in the in vitro stroke model. -- Abstract: Objective: We previously reported that 710 nm Light-emitting Diode (LED) has a protective effect through cellular immunity activation in the stroke animal model. However, whether LED directly protects neurons suffering from neurodegeneration was entirely unknown. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neuronal protection and neuronal outgrowth in an in vitro stroke model. Materials and methods: Primary cultured rat cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reoxygenation and normal conditions. An LED array with a peak wavelength of 710 nm was placed beneath the covered culture dishes with the room light turned off and were irradiated accordingly. LED treatments (4 min at 4 J/cm{sup 2} and 50 mW/cm{sup 2}) were given once to four times within 8 h at 2 h intervals for 7 days. Mean neurite density, mean neurite diameter, and total fiber length were also measured after microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunostaining using the Axio Vision program. Synaptic marker expression and MAPK activation were confirmed by Western blotting. Results: Images captured after MAP2 immunocytochemistry showed significant (p < 0.05) enhancement of post-ischemic neurite outgrowth with LED treatment once and twice a day. MAPK activation was enhanced by LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells. The levels of synaptic markers such as PSD 95, GAP 43, and synaptophysin significantly

  8. Ultrafast laser-assisted spatially targeted optoporation into cortical axons and retinal cells in the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2017-06-01

    Visualization and assessment of the cellular structure and function require localized delivery of the molecules into specific cells in restricted spatial regions of the tissue and may necessitate subcellular delivery and localization. Earlier, we have shown ultrafast near-infrared laser beam-assisted optoporation of actin-staining molecules into cortical neurons with single-cell resolution and high efficiency. However, diffusion of optoporated molecules in soma degrades toward the growth cone, leading to difficulties in visualization of the actin network in the growth cone in cases of long axons. Here, we demonstrate optoporation of impermeable molecules to functional cortical neurons by precise laser subaxotomy near the growth cone, leading to visualization of the actin network in the growth cone. Further, we demonstrate patterned delivery of impermeable molecules into targeted retinal cells in the rat eye. The development of optoporation as a minimally invasive approach to reliably deliver exogenous molecules into targeted axons and soma of retinal neurons in vivo will enable enhanced visualization of the structure and function of the retina.

  9. Trajectory and terminal distribution of single centrifugal axons from olfactory cortical areas in the rat olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, S

    2010-08-11

    The olfactory bulb receives a large number of centrifugal fibers whose functions remain unclear. To gain insight into the function of the bulbar centrifugal system, the morphology of individual centrifugal axons from olfactory cortical areas was examined in detail. An anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, was injected into rat olfactory cortical areas, including the pars lateralis of the anterior olfactory nucleus (lAON) and the anterior part of the piriform cortex (aPC). Reconstruction from serial sections revealed that the extrabulbar segments of centrifugal axons from the lAON and those from the aPC had distinct trajectories: the former tended to innervate the pars externa of the AON before entering the olfactory bulb, while the latter had extrabulbar collaterals that extended to a variety of targets. In contrast to the extrabulbar segments, no clear differences were found between the intrabulbar segments of axons from the lAON and from the aPC. The intrabulbar segments of centrifugal axons were mainly found in the granule cell layer but a few axons extended into the external plexiform and glomerular layer. Approximately 40% of centrifugal axons innervated both the medial and lateral aspects of the olfactory bulb. The number of boutons found on single intrabulbar segments was typically less than 1000. Boutons tended to aggregate and form complex terminal tufts with short axonal branches. Terminal tufts, no more than 10 in single axons from ipsilateral cortical areas, were localized to the granule cell layer with varying intervals; some tufts formed patchy clusters and others were scattered over areas that extended for a few millimeters. The patchy, widespread distribution of terminals suggests that the centrifugal axons are able to couple the activity of specific subsets of bulbar neurons even when the subsets are spatially separated.

  10. Electrical Stimulation Using Conductive Polymer Polypyrrole Counters Reduced Neurite Outgrowth of Primary Prefrontal Cortical Neurons from NRG1-KO and DISC1-LI Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingsheng; Esrafilzadeh, Dorna; Crook, Jeremy M; Kapsa, Robert; Stewart, Elise M; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Wallace, Gordon G; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2017-02-15

    Deficits in neurite outgrowth, possibly involving dysregulation of risk genes neuregulin-1 (NRG1) and disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) have been implicated in psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Electrical stimulation using conductive polymers has been shown to stimulate neurite outgrowth of differentiating human neural stem cells. This study investigated the use of the electroactive conductive polymer polypyrrole (Ppy) to counter impaired neurite outgrowth of primary pre-frontal cortical (PFC) neurons from NRG1-knock out (NRG1-KO) and DISC1-locus impairment (DISC1-LI) mice. Whereas NRG1-KO and DISC1-LI exhibited reduced neurite length and number of neurite branches compared to wild-type controls, this was not apparent for cultures on electroactive Ppy. Additionally, the use of the Ppy substrate normalised the synaptophysin and PSD95 protein and mRNA expression whereas both are usually reduced by NRG1-KO or DISC1-LI. Our findings support the utility of Ppy mediated electrical stimulation to prevent the reduction of neurite outgrowth and related synaptic protein expression in the primary PFC neurons from NRG1-KO and DISC1-LI mice, providing proof-of-concept for treating neurodevelopmental diseases including schizophrenia.

  11. Targeting the CD80/CD86 costimulatory pathway with CTLA4-Ig directs microglia toward a repair phenotype and promotes axonal outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveau, Antoine; Nerrière-Daguin, Véronique; Vanhove, Bernard; Naveilhan, Philippe; Neunlist, Michel; Nicot, Arnaud; Boudin, Hélène

    2015-12-01

    Among the costimulatory factors widely studied in the immune system is the CD28/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4)-CD80/CD86 pathway, which critically controls the nature and duration of the T-cell response. In the brain, up-regulated expression of CD80/CD86 during inflammation has consistently been reported in microglia. However, the role of CD80/CD86 molecules has mainly been studied in a context of microglia-T cell interactions in pathological conditions, while the function of CD80/CD86 in the regulation of intrinsic brain cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we used a transgenic pig line in which neurons express releasable CTLA4-Ig, a synthetic molecule mimicking CTLA4 and binding to CD80/CD86. The effects of CTLA4-Ig on brain cells were analyzed after intracerebral transplantation of CTLA4-Ig-expressing neurons or wild-type neurons as control. This model provided in vivo evidence that CTLA4-Ig stimulated axonal outgrowth, in correlation with a shift of the nearby microglia from a compact to a ramified morphology. In a culture system, we found that the CTLA4-Ig-induced morphological change of microglia was mediated through CD86, but not CD80. This was accompanied by microglial up-regulated expression of the anti-inflammatory molecule Arginase 1 and the neurotrophic factor BDNF, in an astrocyte-dependent manner through the purinergic P2Y1 receptor pathway. Our study identifies for the first time CD86 as a key player in the modulation of microglia phenotype and suggests that CTLA4-Ig-derived compounds might represent new tools to manipulate CNS microglia.

  12. Cortical axons, isolated in channels, display activity-dependent signal modulation as a result of targeted stimulation

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    Marta K. Lewandowska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cortical axons are extremely thin processes that are difficult to study as a result of their small diameter: they are too narrow to patch while intact, and super-resolution microscopy is needed to resolve single axons. We present a method for studying axonal physiology by pairing a high-density microelectrode array with a microfluidic axonal isolation device, and use it to study activity-dependent modulation of axonal signal propagation evoked by stimulation near the soma. Up to three axonal branches from a single neuron, isolated in different channels, were recorded from simultaneously using 10-20 electrodes per channel. The axonal channels amplified spikes such that propagations of individual signals along tens of electrodes could easily be discerned with high signal to noise. Stimulation from 10 Hz up to 160 Hz demonstrated similar qualitative results from all of the cells studied: extracellular action potential characteristics changed drastically in response to stimulation. Spike height decreased, spike width increased, and latency increased, as a result of reduced propagation velocity, as the number of stimulations and the stimulation frequencies increased. Quantitatively, the strength of these changes manifested itself differently in cells at different frequencies of stimulation. Some cells’ signal fidelity fell to 80% already at 10 Hz, while others maintained 80% signal fidelity at 80 Hz. Differences in modulation by axonal branches of the same cell were also seen for many different stimulation frequencies, starting at 10 Hz. Potassium ion concentration changes altered the behavior of the cells causing propagation failures at lower concentrations and improving signal fidelity at higher concentrations.

  13. Axonal pathfinding mechanisms at the cortical midline and in the development of the corpus callosum

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    Richards L.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum is a large fiber tract that connects neurons in the right and left cerebral hemispheres. Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC is associated with a large number of human syndromes but little is known about why ACC occurs. In most cases of ACC, callosal axons are able to grow toward the midline but are unable to cross it, continuing to grow into large swirls of axons known as Probst bundles. This phenotype suggests that in some cases ACC may be due to defects in axonal guidance at the midline. General guidance mechanisms that influence the development of axons include chemoattraction and chemorepulsion, presented by either membrane-bound or diffusible molecules. These molecules are not only expressed by the final target but by intermediate targets along the pathway, and by pioneering axons that act as guides for later arriving axons. Midline glial populations are important intermediate targets for commissural axons in the spinal cord and brain, including the corpus callosum. The role of midline glial populations and pioneering axons in the formation of the corpus callosum are discussed. Finally the differential guidance of the ipsilaterally projecting perforating pathway and the contralaterally projecting corpus callosum is addressed. Development of the corpus callosum involves the coordination of a number of different guidance mechanisms and the probable involvement of a large number of molecules.

  14. Lentiviral vectors express chondroitinase ABC in cortical projections and promote sprouting of injured corticospinal axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rong-Rong; Muir, Elizabeth M; Alves, João Nuno; Rickman, Hannah; Allan, Anna Y; Kwok, Jessica C; Roet, Kasper C D; Verhaagen, Joost; Schneider, Bernard L; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Ahmed, Sherif G; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Keynes, Roger J; Fawcett, James W; Rogers, John H

    2011-09-30

    Several diseases and injuries of the central nervous system could potentially be treated by delivery of an enzyme, which might most effectively be achieved by gene therapy. In particular, the bacterial enzyme chondroitinase ABC is beneficial in animal models of spinal cord injury. We have adapted the chondroitinase gene so that it can direct secretion of active chondroitinase from mammalian cells, and inserted it into lentiviral vectors. When injected into adult rat brain, these vectors lead to extensive secretion of chondroitinase, both locally and from long-distance axon projections, with activity persisting for more than 4 weeks. In animals which received a simultaneous lesion of the corticospinal tract, the vector reduced axonal die-back and promoted sprouting and short-range regeneration of corticospinal axons. The same beneficial effects on damaged corticospinal axons were observed in animals which received the chondroitinase lentiviral vector directly into the vicinity of a spinal cord lesion.

  15. Sonic hedgehog stimulates neurite outgrowth in a mechanical stretch model of reactive-astrogliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Antonio; Gowing, Emma K; Jasoni, Christine L; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2016-02-23

    Although recovery following a stroke is limited, undamaged neurons under the right conditions can establish new connections and take on-board lost functions. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is integral for developmental axon growth, but its role after injury has not been fully examined. To investigate the effects of Shh on neuronal sprouting after injury, we used an in vitro model of glial scar, whereby cortical astrocytes were mechanically traumatized to mimic reactive astrogliosis observed after stroke. This mechanical trauma impaired neurite outgrowth from post-natal cortical neurons plated on top of reactive astrocytes. Addition of Shh to the media, however, resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in neurite outgrowth. This response was inhibited by cyclopamine and activated by oxysterol 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol, both of which modulate the activity of the Shh co-receptor Smoothened (Smo), demonstrating that Shh-mediated neurite outgrowth is Smo-dependent. In addition, neurite outgrowth was not associated with an increase in Gli-1 transcription, but could be inhibited by PP2, a selective inhibitor of Src family kinases. These results demonstrate that neurons exposed to the neurite growth inhibitory environment associated with a glial scar can be stimulated by Shh, with signaling occurring through a non-canonical pathway, to overcome this suppression and stimulate neurite outgrowth.

  16. Targeting RPTPσ with lentiviral shRNA promotes neurites outgrowth of cortical neurons and improves functional recovery in a rat spinal cord contusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heng-Xing; Li, Xue-Ying; Li, Fu-Yuan; Liu, Chang; Liang, Zhi-Pin; Liu, Shen; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Tian-Yi; Chu, Tian-Ci; Lu, Lu; Ning, Guang-Zhi; Kong, Xiao-Hong; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2014-10-24

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), the rapidly upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), the prominent chemical constituents and main repulsive factors of the glial scar, play an important role in the extremely limited ability to regenerate in adult mammals. Although many methods to overcome the inhibition have been tested, no successful method with clinical feasibility has been devised to date. It was recently discovered that receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (RPTPσ) is a functional receptor for CSPGs-mediated inhibition. In view of the potential clinical application of RNA interference (RNAi), here we investigated whether silencing RPTPσ via lentivirus-mediated RNA interference can promote axon regeneration and functional recovery after SCI. Neurites of primary rat cerebral cortical neurons with depleted RPTPσ exhibited a significant enhancement in elongation and crossing ability when they encountered CSPGs in vitro. A contusion model of spinal cord injury in Wistar rats (the New York University (NYU) impactor) was used for in vivo experiments. Local injection of lentivirus encoding RPTPσ shRNA at the lesion site promoted axon regeneration and synapse formation, but did not affect the scar formation. Meanwhile, in vivo functional recovery (motor and sensory) was also enhanced after RPTPσ depletion. Therefore, strategies directed at silencing RPTPσ by RNAi may prove to be a beneficial, efficient and valuable approach for the treatment of SCI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A simple rule for dendritic spine and axonal bouton formation can account for cortical reorganization after focal retinal lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Butz

    Full Text Available Lasting alterations in sensory input trigger massive structural and functional adaptations in cortical networks. The principles governing these experience-dependent changes are, however, poorly understood. Here, we examine whether a simple rule based on the neurons' need for homeostasis in electrical activity may serve as driving force for cortical reorganization. According to this rule, a neuron creates new spines and boutons when its level of electrical activity is below a homeostatic set-point and decreases the number of spines and boutons when its activity exceeds this set-point. In addition, neurons need a minimum level of activity to form spines and boutons. Spine and bouton formation depends solely on the neuron's own activity level, and synapses are formed by merging spines and boutons independently of activity. Using a novel computational model, we show that this simple growth rule produces neuron and network changes as observed in the visual cortex after focal retinal lesions. In the model, as in the cortex, the turnover of dendritic spines was increased strongest in the center of the lesion projection zone, while axonal boutons displayed a marked overshoot followed by pruning. Moreover, the decrease in external input was compensated for by the formation of new horizontal connections, which caused a retinotopic remapping. Homeostatic regulation may provide a unifying framework for understanding cortical reorganization, including network repair in degenerative diseases or following focal stroke.

  18. Axonal disruption in white matter underlying cortical sulcus tau pathology in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleran, Laurena; Kim, Joong Hee; Gangolli, Mihika; Stein, Thor; Alvarez, Victor; McKee, Ann; Brody, David L

    2017-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disorder associated with repetitive traumatic brain injury. One of the primary defining neuropathological lesions in CTE, based on the first consensus conference, is the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in gray matter sulcal depths. Post-mortem CTE studies have also reported myelin loss, axonal injury and white matter degeneration. Currently, the diagnosis of CTE is restricted to post-mortem neuropathological analysis. We hypothesized that high spatial resolution advanced diffusion MRI might be useful for detecting white matter microstructural changes directly adjacent to gray matter tau pathology. To test this hypothesis, formalin-fixed post-mortem tissue blocks from the superior frontal cortex of ten individuals with an established diagnosis of CTE were obtained from the Veterans Affairs-Boston University-Concussion Legacy Foundation brain bank. Advanced diffusion MRI data was acquired using an 11.74 T MRI scanner at Washington University with 250 × 250 × 500 µm(3) spatial resolution. Diffusion tensor imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging and generalized q-sampling imaging analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Following MRI acquisition, tissue sections were tested for phosphorylated tau immunoreactivity in gray matter sulcal depths. Axonal disruption in underlying white matter was assessed using two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis of myelin black gold staining. A robust image co-registration method was applied to accurately quantify the relationship between diffusion MRI parameters and histopathology. We found that white matter underlying sulci with high levels of tau pathology had substantially impaired myelin black gold Fourier transform power coherence, indicating axonal microstructural disruption (r = -0.55, p = 0.0015). Using diffusion tensor MRI, we found that fractional anisotropy (FA) was modestly (r = 0.53) but significantly (p = 0.0012) correlated

  19. IgLON cell adhesion molecules are shed from the cell surface of cortical neurons to promote neuronal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B; Fournier, Alyson E

    2015-02-13

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons.

  20. IgLON Cell Adhesion Molecules Are Shed from the Cell Surface of Cortical Neurons to Promote Neuronal Growth*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B.; Fournier, Alyson E.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons. PMID:25538237

  1. Rac-GTPases Regulate Microtubule Stability and Axon Growth of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivodar, Simona; Kalemaki, Katerina; Kounoupa, Zouzana; Vidaki, Marina; Theodorakis, Kostas; Denaxa, Myrto; Kessaris, Nicoletta; de Curtis, Ivan; Pachnis, Vassilis; Karagogeos, Domna

    2015-09-01

    Cortical interneurons are characterized by extraordinary functional and morphological diversity. Although tremendous progress has been made in uncovering molecular and cellular mechanisms implicated in interneuron generation and function, several questions still remain open. Rho-GTPases have been implicated as intracellular mediators of numerous developmental processes such as cytoskeleton organization, vesicle trafficking, transcription, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Specifically in cortical interneurons, we have recently shown a cell-autonomous and stage-specific requirement for Rac1 activity within proliferating interneuron precursors. Conditional ablation of Rac1 in the medial ganglionic eminence leads to a 50% reduction of GABAergic interneurons in the postnatal cortex. Here we examine the additional role of Rac3 by analyzing Rac1/Rac3 double-mutant mice. We show that in the absence of both Rac proteins, the embryonic migration of medial ganglionic eminence-derived interneurons is further impaired. Postnatally, double-mutant mice display a dramatic loss of cortical interneurons. In addition, Rac1/Rac3-deficient interneurons show gross cytoskeletal defects in vitro, with the length of their leading processes significantly reduced and a clear multipolar morphology. We propose that in the absence of Rac1/Rac3, cortical interneurons fail to migrate tangentially towards the pallium due to defects in actin and microtubule cytoskeletal dynamics.

  2. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Kyu Kwon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance.

  3. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  4. The functionalized amino acid (S-Lacosamide subverts CRMP2-mediated tubulin polymerization to prevent constitutive and activity-dependent increase in neurite outgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Wilson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Activity-dependent neurite outgrowth is a highly complex, regulated process with important implications for neuronal circuit remodeling in development as well as in seizure-induced sprouting in epilepsy. Recent work has linked outgrowth to collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2, an intracellular phosphoprotein originally identified as axon guidance and growth cone collapse protein. The neurite outgrowth promoting function of CRMP2 is regulated by its phosphorylation state. In this study, depolarization (potassium chloride-driven activity increased the level of active CRMP2 by decreasing its phosphorylation by GSK3β via a reduction in priming by Cdk5. To determine the contribution of CRMP2 in activity-driven neurite outgrowth, we screened a limited set of compounds for their ability to reduce neurite outgrowth but not modify voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC biophysical properties. This led to the identification of (S-lacosamide ((S-LCM, a stereoisomer of the clinically used antiepileptic drug (R-LCM (Vimpat®, as a novel tool for preferentially targeting CRMP2-mediated neurite outgrowth. Whereas (S-LCM was ineffective in targeting VGSCs, the presumptive pharmacological targets of (R-LCM, (S-LCM was more efficient than (R-LCM in subverting neurite outgrowth. Biomolecular interaction analyses revealed that (S-LCM bound to wildtype CRMP2 with low micromolar affinity, similar to (R-LCM. Through the use of this novel tool, the activity-dependent increase in neurite outgrowth observed following depolarization was characterized to be reliant on CRMP2 function. Knockdown of CRMP2 by siRNA in cortical neurons resulted in reduced CRMP2-dependent neurite outgrowth; incubation with (S-LCM phenocopied this effect. Other CRMP2-mediated processes were unaffected. (S-LCM subverted neurite outgrowth not by affecting the canonical CRMP2-tubulin association but rather by impairing the ability of CRMP2 to promote tubulin polymerization, events that are

  5. Silence regulatory protein 1 promotes axonal outgrowth in vitro%沉默调节蛋白1促进体外神经元的轴突生长

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁海乾; 李晓红; 王景景; 涂悦; 陈翀; 张赛

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨沉默调节蛋白1(Sirt1)对神经元轴突生长的影响。方法体外原代分离培养胚胎海马神经元,观察Sirt1在72 h神经元的分布表达;通过RNAi技术下调Sirt1基因,观察其对72 h神经元轴突长度的影响;通过质粒转染过表达Sirt1基因或药物白藜芦醇(RES)激活Sirt1蛋白,检测其对72 h神经元轴突长度的影响。结果免疫荧光染色结果显示Sirt1位于海马神经元的生长圆锥以及胞体和突起,尤其是轴突末端;与正常对照组(Sirt1正常表达组)相比,Sirt1表达下调可显著缩短72 h海马神经元轴突的长度[由(178.3±3.2)μm缩短到(110.2±18.30)μm,P<0.01];与正常对照组(Sirt1正常表达组)相比,基因过表达Sirt1可显著增加72 h海马神经元轴突的长度[由(178.3±3.2)μm增长到(310.6±39.5)μm,P<0.01]。与药物对照组(DMSO处理组)相比,药物RES激活Sirt1蛋白亦可显著增加72 h海马神经元轴突的长度[由(292.8±11.2)μm增长到(525.1±49.7)μm,P <0.01]。结论Sirt1在神经元的轴突生长中起着重要的作用,可作为轴突再生一个潜在的治疗靶点。%Objective To investigate the effect of silence regulatory protein 1 (Sirt1) on axonal outgrowth. Methods The hippocampal neurons was first isolated in vitro from rat embryos. The distribution and expression of Sirt1 were then detected 72 h later. The down-regulation of Sirt1 was induced by RNAi technology and up-regulation of Sirt1 was in-duced by overexpression of Sirt1 and resveratrol (RES). Immunofluorescence staining was used to examine the axon length. Results Immunofluorescence staining showed that Sirt 1 was located in neuronal cell body and neurite, especially in the distal axons. Down-regulation of Sirt1 significantly decreased axonal length compared with siRNA control group [(178.3 ± 3.2) μm vs. (110.2 ± 18.30) μm, P< 0.01 ]; Overexpression of Sirt1 significantly increased axonal length com-pared with e

  6. Snapin Recruits Dynein to BDNF-TrkB Signaling Endosomes for Retrograde Axonal Transport and Is Essential for Dendrite Growth of Cortical Neurons

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    Bing Zhou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophin signaling is crucial for neuron growth. While the “signaling endosomes” hypothesis is one of the accepted models, the molecular machinery that drives retrograde axonal transport of TrkB signaling endosomes is largely unknown. In particular, mechanisms recruiting dynein to TrkB signaling endosomes have not been elucidated. Here, using snapin deficient mice and gene rescue experiments combined with compartmentalized cultures of live cortical neurons, we reveal that Snapin, as a dynein adaptor, mediates retrograde axonal transport of TrkB signaling endosomes. Such a role is essential for dendritic growth of cortical neurons. Deleting snapin or disrupting Snapin-dynein interaction abolishes TrkB retrograde transport, impairs BDNF-induced retrograde signaling from axonal terminals to the nucleus, and decreases dendritic growth. Such defects were rescued by reintroducing the snapin gene. Our study indicates that Snapin-dynein coupling is one of the primary mechanisms driving BDNF-TrkB retrograde transport, thus providing mechanistic insights into the regulation of neuronal growth and survival.

  7. Difference in trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor between axons and dendrites of cortical neurons, revealed by live-cell imaging

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    Kohara Keigo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is sorted into a regulated secretory pathway of neurons, is supposed to act retrogradely through dendrites on presynaptic neurons or anterogradely through axons on postsynaptic neurons. Depending on which is the case, the pattern and direction of trafficking of BDNF in dendrites and axons are expected to be different. To address this issue, we analyzed movements of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged BDNF in axons and dendrites of living cortical neurons by time-lapse imaging. In part of the experiments, the expression of BDNF tagged with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was compared with that of nerve growth factor (NGF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, to see whether fluorescent protein-tagged BDNF is expressed in a manner specific to this neurotrophin. Results We found that BDNF tagged with GFP or CFP was expressed in a punctated manner in dendrites and axons in about two-thirds of neurons into which plasmid cDNAs had been injected, while NGF tagged with GFP or YFP was diffusely expressed even in dendrites in about 70% of the plasmid-injected neurons. In neurons in which BDNF-GFP was expressed as vesicular puncta in axons, 59 and 23% of the puncta were moving rapidly in the anterograde and retrograde directions, respectively. On the other hand, 64% of BDNF-GFP puncta in dendrites did not move at all or fluttered back and forth within a short distance. The rest of the puncta in dendrites were moving relatively smoothly in either direction, but their mean velocity of transport, 0.47 ± 0.23 (SD μm/s, was slower than that of the moving puncta in axons (0.73 ± 0.26 μm/s. Conclusion The present results show that the pattern and velocity of the trafficking of fluorescence protein-tagged BDNF are different between axons and dendrites, and suggest that the anterograde transport in axons may be the dominant stream of BDNF to release sites.

  8. Increasing tPA activity in astrocytes induced by multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells facilitate neurite outgrowth after stroke in the mouse.

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    Hongqi Xin

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA and its inhibitors contribute to neurite outgrowth in the central nervous system (CNS after treatment of stroke with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. In vivo, administration of MSCs to mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo significantly increased activation of tPA and downregulated PAI-1 levels in the ischemic boundary zone (IBZ compared with control PBS treated mice, concurrently with increases of myelinated axons and synaptophysin. In vitro, MSCs significantly increased tPA levels and concomitantly reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 expression in astrocytes under normal and oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD conditions. ELISA analysis of conditioned medium revealed that MSCs stimulated astrocytes to secrete tPA. When primary cortical neurons were cultured in the conditioned medium from MSC co-cultured astrocytes, these neurons exhibited a significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared to conditioned medium from astrocytes alone. Blockage of tPA with a neutralizing antibody or knock-down of tPA with siRNA significantly attenuated the effect of the conditioned medium on neurite outgrowth. Addition of recombinant human tPA into cortical neuronal cultures also substantially enhanced neurite outgrowth. Collectively, these in vivo and in vitro data suggest that the MSC mediated increased activation of tPA in astrocytes promotes neurite outgrowth after stroke.

  9. Evidence for Dysregulation of Axonal Growth and Guidance in the Etiology of ASD

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    Kathryn eMcFadden

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Current theories concerning the cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs have converged on the concept of abnormal development of brain connectivity. This concept is supported by accumulating evidence from functional imaging, DTI, and high definition fiber tracking (HDFT studies which suggest altered microstructure in the axonal tracts connecting cortical areas may underly many of the cognitive manifestations of ASD. Additionally, large-scale genomic studies implicate numerous gene candidates known or suspected to mediate neuritic outgrowth and axonal guidance in fetal and perinatal life. Neuropathological observations in postmortem ASD brain samples further support this model and include subtle disturbances of cortical lamination and subcortical axonal morphology. Of note is the relatively common finding of poor differentiation of the gray-white junction associated with an excess superficial white matter or interstitial neurons (INs. INs are thought to be remnants of the fetal subplate, a transient structure which plays a key role in the guidance and morphogenesis of thalamocortical and cortico-cortical connections and the organization of cortical columnar architecture. While not discounting the importance of synaptic dysfunction in the etiology of ASD, this paper will briefly review the cortical abnormalities and genetic evidence supporting a model of dysregulated axonal growth and guidance as key developmental processes underlying the clinical manifestations of ASD.

  10. The tumor suppressor HHEX inhibits axon growth when prematurely expressed in developing central nervous system neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew T; Venkatesh, Ishwariya; Callif, Ben L; Thiel, Laura K; Coley, Denise M; Winsor, Kristen N; Wang, Zimei; Kramer, Audra A; Lerch, Jessica K; Blackmore, Murray G

    2015-09-01

    Neurons in the embryonic and peripheral nervous system respond to injury by activating transcriptional programs supportive of axon growth, ultimately resulting in functional recovery. In contrast, neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS) possess a limited capacity to regenerate axons after injury, fundamentally constraining repair. Activating pro-regenerative gene expression in CNS neurons is a promising therapeutic approach, but progress is hampered by incomplete knowledge of the relevant transcription factors. An emerging hypothesis is that factors implicated in cellular growth and motility outside the nervous system may also control axon growth in neurons. We therefore tested sixty-nine transcription factors, previously identified as possessing tumor suppressive or oncogenic properties in non-neuronal cells, in assays of neurite outgrowth. This screen identified YAP1 and E2F1 as enhancers of neurite outgrowth, and PITX1, RBM14, ZBTB16, and HHEX as inhibitors. Follow-up experiments are focused on the tumor suppressor HHEX, one of the strongest growth inhibitors. HHEX is widely expressed in adult CNS neurons, including corticospinal tract neurons after spinal injury, but is present only in trace amounts in immature cortical neurons and adult peripheral neurons. HHEX overexpression in early postnatal cortical neurons reduced both initial axonogenesis and the rate of axon elongation, and domain deletion analysis strongly implicated transcriptional repression as the underlying mechanism. These findings suggest a role for HHEX in restricting axon growth in the developing CNS, and substantiate the hypothesis that previously identified oncogenes and tumor suppressors can play conserved roles in axon extension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Somatic membrane potential and Kv1 channels control spike repolarization in cortical axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Amanda J; Yu, Yuguo; Popovic, Marko; Zecevic, Dejan; McCormick, David A

    2011-10-26

    The shape of action potentials invading presynaptic terminals, which can vary significantly from spike waveforms recorded at the soma, may critically influence the probability of synaptic neurotransmitter release. Revealing the conductances that determine spike shape in presynaptic boutons is important for understanding how changes in the electrochemical context in which a spike is generated, such as subthreshold depolarization spreading from the soma, can modulate synaptic strength. Utilizing recent improvements in the signal-to-noise ratio of voltage-sensitive dye imaging in mouse brain slices, we demonstrate that intracortical axon collaterals and en passant presynaptic terminals of layer 5 pyramidal cells exhibit a high density of Kv1 subunit-containing ion channels, which generate a slowly inactivating K(+) current critically important for spike repolarization in these compartments. Blockade of the current by low doses of 4-aminopyridine or α-dendrotoxin dramatically slows the falling phase of action potentials in axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons. Furthermore, subthreshold depolarization of the soma broadened action potentials in collaterals bearing presynaptic boutons, an effect abolished by blocking Kv1 channels with α-dendrotoxin. These results indicate that action potential-induced synaptic transmission may operate through a mix of analog-digital transmission owing to the properties of Kv1 channels in axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons.

  12. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R., E-mail: mundy.william@epa.gov

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  13. Effects of huperzine A on secretion of nerve growth factor in cultured rat cortical astrocytes and neurite outgrowth in rat PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li TANG; Rui WANG; Xi-can TANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of huperzine A (HupA) on neuritogenic activity and the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF). Methods: After being treated with 10 μmol/L HupA, neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells was observed and counted under phase-contrast microscopy. Mitogenic activity was assayed by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Cell cytotoxicity was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)release. AChE activity, mRNA and protein expression were measured by the Ellman's method, RT-PCR, and Western blot, respectively. NGF mRNA and protein levels were determined by RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Results: Treatment of PC 12 cells with 10 μmol/L HupA for 48 h markedly increased the number of neuritebearing cells, but caused no significant alteration in cell viability or other signs of cytotoxicity. In addition to inhibiting AChE activity, 10 μmol/L HupA also increased the mRNA and protein levels of this enzyme. In addition, following 2 h exposure of the astrocytes to 10 μmol/L HupA, there was a significant up-regulation of mRNA for NGF and P75 low-affinity NGF receptor. The protein level of NGF was also increased after 24 h treatment with HupA. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that HupA has a direct or indirect neurotrophic activity, which might be beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease.

  14. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 gene NMNAT1 regulates neuronal dendrite and axon morphogenesis in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong; ZHANG Jing-yu; YANGZi-chao; LIU Ming; GANG Bao-zhi; ZHAO Qing-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Wallerian degeneration is a self-destructive process of axonal degeneration that occurs after an axonal injury or during neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease.Recent studies have found that the activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase enzyme,nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT1) can affect the rate of Wallerian degeneration in mice and drosophila.NMNAT1 protects neurons and axons from degeneration.However,the role of NMNAT1 in neurons of central nervous system is still not well understood.Methods We set up the culture of primary mouse neurons in vitro and manipulated the expression level of NMNAT1 by RNA interference and gene overexpression methods.Using electroporation transfection we can up-regulate or down-regulate NMNAT1 in cultured mouse dendrites and axons and study the neuronal morphogenesis by immunocytochemistry.In all functional assays,FK-866 (CAS 658084-64-1),a highly specific non-competitive inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase was used as a pharmacological and positive control.Results Our results showed that knocking down NMNAT1 by RNA interference led to a marked decrease in dendrite outgrowth and branching and a significant decrease in axon growth and branching in developing cortical neurons in vitro.Conclusions These findings reveal a novel role for NMNAT1 in the morphogenesis of developing cortical neurons,which indicate that the loss of function of NMNAT1 may contribute to different neurodegenerative disorders in central nervous system.

  15. Cortical gene expression in spinal cord injury and repair: insight into the functional complexity of the neural regeneration program

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    Fabian eKruse

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI results in the formation of a fibrous scar acting as a growth barrier for regenerating axons at the lesion site. We have previously shown (Klapka et al., 2005 that transient suppression of the inhibitory lesion scar in rat spinal cord leads to long distance axon regeneration, retrograde rescue of axotomized cortical motoneurons and improvement of locomotor function. Here we applied a systemic approach to investigate for the first time specific and dynamic alterations in the cortical gene expression profile following both thoracic SCI and regeneration-promoting anti-scarring treatment (AST. In order to monitor cortical gene expression we carried out microarray analyses using total RNA isolated from layer V/VI of rat sensorimotor cortex at 1-60 days post-operation (dpo. We demonstrate that cortical neurons respond to injury by massive changes in gene expression, starting as early as 1 dpo. AST, in turn, results in profound modifications of the lesion-induced expression profile. The treatment attenuates SCI-triggered transcriptional changes of genes related to inhibition of axon growth and impairment of cell survival, while upregulating the expression of genes associated with axon outgrowth, cell protection and neural development. Thus, AST not only modifies the local environment impeding spinal cord regeneration by reduction of fibrous scarring in the injured spinal cord, but, in addition, strikingly changes the intrinsic capacity of cortical pyramidal neurons towards enhanced cell maintenance and axonal regeneration.

  16. The cytoskeleton-associated protein SCHIP1 is involved in axon guidance, and is required for piriform cortex and anterior commissure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Esther; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Garcia, Marta; Moreau-Fauvarque, Caroline; Falk, Julien; Chareyre, Fabrice; Giovannini, Marco; Chédotal, Alain; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Goutebroze, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    SCHIP1 is a cytoplasmic partner of cortical cytoskeleton ankyrins. The IQCJ-SCHIP1 isoform is a component of axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier of mature axons in peripheral and central nervous systems, where it associates with membrane complexes comprising cell adhesion molecules. SCHIP1 is also expressed in the mouse developing central nervous system during embryonic stages of active axonogenesis. Here, we identify a new and early role for SCHIP1 during axon development and establishment of the anterior commissure (AC). The AC is composed of axons from the piriform cortex, the anterior olfactory nucleus and the amygdala. Schip1 mutant mice displayed early defects in AC development that might result from impaired axon growth and guidance. In addition, mutant mice presented a reduced thickness of the piriform cortex, which affected projection neurons in layers 2/3 and was likely to result from cell death rather than from impairment of neuron generation or migration. Piriform cortex neurons from E14.5 mutant embryos displayed axon initiation/outgrowth delay and guidance defects in vitro. The sensitivity of growth cones to semaphorin 3F and Eph receptor B2, two repulsive guidance cues crucial for AC development, was increased, providing a possible basis for certain fiber tract alterations. Thus, our results reveal new evidence for the involvement of cortical cytoskeleton-associated proteins in the regulation of axon development and their importance for the formation of neuronal circuits.

  17. Identification of neural outgrowth genes using genome-wide RNAi.

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    Katharine J Sepp

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available While genetic screens have identified many genes essential for neurite outgrowth, they have been limited in their ability to identify neural genes that also have earlier critical roles in the gastrula, or neural genes for which maternally contributed RNA compensates for gene mutations in the zygote. To address this, we developed methods to screen the Drosophila genome using RNA-interference (RNAi on primary neural cells and present the results of the first full-genome RNAi screen in neurons. We used live-cell imaging and quantitative image analysis to characterize the morphological phenotypes of fluorescently labelled primary neurons and glia in response to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. From the full genome screen, we focused our analysis on 104 evolutionarily conserved genes that when downregulated by RNAi, have morphological defects such as reduced axon extension, excessive branching, loss of fasciculation, and blebbing. To assist in the phenotypic analysis of the large data sets, we generated image analysis algorithms that could assess the statistical significance of the mutant phenotypes. The algorithms were essential for the analysis of the thousands of images generated by the screening process and will become a valuable tool for future genome-wide screens in primary neurons. Our analysis revealed unexpected, essential roles in neurite outgrowth for genes representing a wide range of functional categories including signalling molecules, enzymes, channels, receptors, and cytoskeletal proteins. We also found that genes known to be involved in protein and vesicle trafficking showed similar RNAi phenotypes. We confirmed phenotypes of the protein trafficking genes Sec61alpha and Ran GTPase using Drosophila embryo and mouse embryonic cerebral cortical neurons, respectively. Collectively, our results showed that RNAi phenotypes in primary neural culture can parallel in vivo phenotypes, and the screening technique can be used to identify many new

  18. Plasminogen deficiency causes reduced corticospinal axonal plasticity and functional recovery after stroke in mice.

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    Zhongwu Liu

    Full Text Available Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and neurological recovery post stroke. tPA converts the zymogen plasminogen (Plg into plasmin. In this study, using plasminogen knockout (Plg-/- mice and their Plg-native littermates (Plg+/+, we investigated the role of Plg in axonal remodeling and neurological recovery after stroke. Plg+/+ and Plg-/- mice (n = 10/group were subjected to permanent intraluminal monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. A foot-fault test and a single pellet reaching test were performed prior to and on day 3 after stroke, and weekly thereafter to monitor functional deficit and recovery. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the left motor cortex to anterogradely label the corticospinal tract (CST. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after stroke. Neurite outgrowth was also measured in primary cultured cortical neurons harvested from Plg+/+ and Plg-/- embryos. In Plg+/+ mice, the motor functional deficiency after stroke progressively recovered with time. In contrast, recovery in Plg-/- mice was significantly impaired compared to Plg+/+ mice (p0.82, p<0.01. Plg-/- neurons exhibited significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. Our data suggest that plasminogen-dependent proteolysis has a beneficial effect during neurological recovery after stroke, at least in part, by promoting axonal remodeling in the denervated spinal cord.

  19. New function of the adaptor protein SH2B1 in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced neurite outgrowth.

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    Chien-Hung Shih

    Full Text Available Neurite outgrowth is an essential process for the establishment of the nervous system. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF binds to its receptor TrkB and regulates axonal and dendritic morphology of neurons through signal transduction and gene expression. SH2B1 is a signaling adaptor protein that regulates cellular signaling in various physiological processes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of SH2B1 in the development of the central nervous system. In this study, we show that knocking down SH2B1 reduces neurite formation of cortical neurons whereas overexpression of SH2B1β promotes the development of hippocampal neurons. We further demonstrate that SH2B1β promotes BDNF-induced neurite outgrowth and signaling using the established PC12 cells stably expressing TrkB, SH2B1β or SH2B1β mutants. Our data indicate that overexpressing SH2B1β enhances BDNF-induced MEK-ERK1/2, and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways. Inhibition of MEK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT pathways by specific inhibitors suggest that these two pathways are required for SH2B1β-promoted BDNF-induced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, SH2B1β enhances BDNF-stimulated phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 at serine 727. Finally, our data indicate that the SH2 domain and tyrosine phosphorylation of SH2B1β contribute to BDNF-induced signaling pathways and neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that SH2B1β promotes BDNF-induced neurite outgrowth through enhancing pathways involved MEK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT.

  20. Glial membranes at the node of Ranvier prevent neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Phillips, Greg R; Roth, Alejandro D;

    2005-01-01

    Nodes of Ranvier are regularly placed, nonmyelinated axon segments along myelinated nerves. Here we show that nodal membranes isolated from the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals restricted neurite outgrowth of cultured neurons. Proteomic analysis of these membranes revealed several inhibito...

  1. Axonal bleb recording

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqin Hu; Yousheng Shu

    2012-01-01

    Patch-clamp recording requires direct accessibility of the cell membrane to patch pipettes and allows the investigation of ion channel properties and functions in specific cellular compartments.The cell body and relatively thick dendrites are the most accessible compartments of a neuron,due to their large diameters and therefore great membrane surface areas.However,axons are normally inaccessible to patch pipettes because of their thin structure; thus studies of axon physiology have long been hampered by the lack of axon recording methods.Recently,a new method of patchclamp recording has been developed,enabling direct and tight-seal recording from cortical axons.These recordings are performed at the enlarged structure (axonal bleb) formed at the cut end of an axon after slicing procedures.This method has facilitated studies of the mechanisms underlying the generation and propagation of the main output signal,the action potential,and led to the finding that cortical neurons communicate not only in action potential-mediated digital mode but also in membrane potential-dependent analog mode.

  2. Dcc regulates asymmetric outgrowth of forebrain neurons in zebrafish.

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    Jingxia Gao

    Full Text Available The guidance receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer ortholog UNC-40 regulates neuronal asymmetry development in Caenorhabditis elegans, but it is not known whether DCC plays a role in the specification of neuronal polarity in vertebrates. To examine the roles of DCC in neuronal asymmetry regulation in vertebrates, we studied zebrafish anterior dorsal telencephalon (ADt neuronal axons. We generated transgenic zebrafish animals expressing the photo-convertible fluorescent protein Kaede in ADt neurons and then photo-converted Kaede to label specifically the ADt neuron axons. We found that ADt axons normally project ventrally. Knock down of Dcc function by injecting antisense morpholino oligonucleotides caused the ADt neurons to project axons dorsally. To examine the axon projection pattern of individual ADt neurons, we labeled single ADt neurons using a forebrain-specific promoter to drive fluorescent protein expression. We found that individual ADt neurons projected axons dorsally or formed multiple processes after morpholino knock down of Dcc function. We further found that knock down of the Dcc ligand, Netrin1, also caused ADt neurons to project axons dorsally. Knockdown of Neogenin1, a guidance receptor closely related to Dcc, enhanced the formation of aberrant dorsal axons in embryos injected with Dcc morpholino. These experiments provide the first evidence that Dcc regulates polarized axon initiation and asymmetric outgrowth of forebrain neurons in vertebrates.

  3. Cortical region-specific engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells restores axonal sprouting to a subcortical target and achieves motor functional recovery in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

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    Mizuya eShinoyama

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE at birth could cause cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and epilepsy, which last throughout the individual’s lifetime. However, few restorative treatments for ischemic tissue are currently available. Cell replacement therapy offers the potential to rescue brain damage caused by HI and to restore motor function. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (ES-NPCs to become cortical deep layer neurons, to restore the neural network, and to repair brain damage in an HIE mouse model. ES cells stably expressing the reporter gene GFP are induced to a neural precursor state by stromal cell co-culture. Forty-hours after the induction of HIE, animals were grafted with ES-NPCs targeting the deep layer of the motor cortex in the ischemic brain. Motor function was evaluated 3 weeks after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry and neuroanatomical tracing with GFP were used to analyze neuronal differentiation and axonal sprouting. ES-NPCs could differentiate to cortical neurons with pyramidal morphology and expressed the deep layer-specific marker, Ctip2. The graft showed good survival and an appropriate innervation pattern via axonal sprouting from engrafted cells in the ischemic brain. The motor functions of the transplanted HIE mice also improved significantly compared to the sham-transplanted group. These findings suggest that cortical region specific engraftment of preconditioned cortical precursor cells could support motor functional recovery in the HIE model. It is not clear whether this is a direct effect of the engrafted cells or due to neurotrophic factors produced by these cells. These results suggest that cortical region-specific NPC engraftment is a promising therapeutic approach for brain repair.

  4. Cortical region-specific engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells restores axonal sprouting to a subcortical target and achieves motor functional recovery in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoyama, Mizuya; Ideguchi, Makoto; Kida, Hiroyuki; Kajiwara, Koji; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Maeda, Yoshihiko; Nomura, Sadahiro; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) at birth could cause cerebral palsy (CP), mental retardation, and epilepsy, which last throughout the individual's lifetime. However, few restorative treatments for ischemic tissue are currently available. Cell replacement therapy offers the potential to rescue brain damage caused by HI and to restore motor function. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (ES-NPCs) to become cortical deep layer neurons, to restore the neural network, and to repair brain damage in an HIE mouse model. ES cells stably expressing the reporter gene GFP are induced to a neural precursor state by stromal cell co-culture. Forty-hours after the induction of HIE, animals were grafted with ES-NPCs targeting the deep layer of the motor cortex in the ischemic brain. Motor function was evaluated 3 weeks after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry and neuroanatomical tracing with GFP were used to analyze neuronal differentiation and axonal sprouting. ES-NPCs could differentiate to cortical neurons with pyramidal morphology and expressed the deep layer-specific marker, Ctip2. The graft showed good survival and an appropriate innervation pattern via axonal sprouting from engrafted cells in the ischemic brain. The motor functions of the transplanted HIE mice also improved significantly compared to the sham-transplanted group. These findings suggest that cortical region specific engraftment of preconditioned cortical precursor cells could support motor functional recovery in the HIE model. It is not clear whether this is a direct effect of the engrafted cells or due to neurotrophic factors produced by these cells. These results suggest that cortical region-specific NPC engraftment is a promising therapeutic approach for brain repair.

  5. GIT1 enhances neurite outgrowth by stimulating microtubule assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-sheng Li; Li-xia Qin; Jie Liu; Wei-liang Xia; Jian-ping Li; Hai-lian Shen; Wei-Qiang Gao

    2016-01-01

    GIT1, a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein, has been reported to be involved in neurite outgrowth. However, the neu-robiological functions of the protein remain unclear. In this study, we found that GIT1 was highly expressed in the nervous system, and its expression was maintained throughout all stages of neuritogenesis in the brain. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons from GIT1 knockout mice, there was a signiifcant reduction in total neurite length per neuron, as well as in the average length of axon-like struc-tures, which could not be prevented by nerve growth factor treatment. Overexpression of GIT1 signiifcantly promoted axon growth and fully rescued the axon outgrowth defect in the primary hippocampal neuron cultures from GIT1 knockout mice. The GIT1 N terminal region, including the ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein domain, the ankyrin domains and the Spa2 homology domain, were sufifcient to enhance axonal extension. Importantly, GIT1 bound to many tubulin proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, and it accelerated microtubule assemblyin vitro. Collectively, our ifndings suggest that GIT1 promotes neurite outgrowth, at least partially by stimulating microtubule assembly. This study provides new insight into the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of GIT1-associated neuro-logical diseases.

  6. GIT1 enhances neurite outgrowth by stimulating microtubule assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-sheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GIT1, a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein, has been reported to be involved in neurite outgrowth. However, the neurobiological functions of the protein remain unclear. In this study, we found that GIT1 was highly expressed in the nervous system, and its expression was maintained throughout all stages of neuritogenesis in the brain. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons from GIT1 knockout mice, there was a significant reduction in total neurite length per neuron, as well as in the average length of axon-like structures, which could not be prevented by nerve growth factor treatment. Overexpression of GIT1 significantly promoted axon growth and fully rescued the axon outgrowth defect in the primary hippocampal neuron cultures from GIT1 knockout mice. The GIT1 N terminal region, including the ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein domain, the ankyrin domains and the Spa2 homology domain, were sufficient to enhance axonal extension. Importantly, GIT1 bound to many tubulin proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, and it accelerated microtubule assembly in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that GIT1 promotes neurite outgrowth, at least partially by stimulating microtubule assembly. This study provides new insight into the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of GIT1-associated neurological diseases.

  7. The unusual response of serotonergic neurons after CNS Injury: lack of axonal dieback and enhanced sprouting within the inhibitory environment of the glial scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Alicia L; Hu, Hongmei; Kundu, Bornali; Steinmetz, Michael P; Wylie, Christi J; Deneris, Evan S; Silver, Jerry

    2011-04-13

    Serotonergic neurons possess an enhanced ability to regenerate or sprout after many types of injury. To understand the mechanisms that underlie their unusual properties, we used a combinatorial approach comparing the behavior of serotonergic and cortical axon tips over time in the same injury environment in vivo and to growth-promoting or growth-inhibitory substrates in vitro. After a thermocoagulatory lesion in the rat frontoparietal cortex, callosal axons become dystrophic and die back. Serotonergic axons, however, persist within the lesion edge. At the third week post-injury, 5-HT+ axons sprout robustly. The lesion environment contains both growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and growth-promoting laminin. Transgenic mouse serotonergic neurons specifically labeled by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein under control of the Pet-1 promoter/enhancer or cortical neurons were cultured on low amounts of laminin with or without relatively high concentrations of the CSPG aggrecan. Serotonergic neurons extended considerably longer neurites than did cortical neurons on low laminin and exhibited a remarkably more active growth cone on low laminin plus aggrecan during time-lapse imaging than did cortical neurons. Chondroitinase ABC treatment of laminin/CSPG substrates resulted in significantly longer serotonergic but not cortical neurite lengths. This increased ability of serotonergic neurons to robustly grow on high amounts of CSPG may be partially due to significantly higher amounts of growth-associated protein-43 and/or β1 integrin than cortical neurons. Blocking β1 integrin decreased serotonergic and cortical outgrowth on laminin. Determining the mechanism by which serotonergic fibers persist and sprout after lesion could lead to therapeutic strategies for both stroke and spinal cord injury.

  8. 硫酸软骨素蛋白多糖抑制神经元轴突生长体外生物模型的建立%An in vitro Model of Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan-induced Axon Outgrowth Inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭斐; 吴晓黎; 景良; 李桂晨; 赵琛; 郭阳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish an in vitro model to study the inhibitory effect of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) on neuronal growth and axonal regeneration. Methods Different concentrations of CSPG were mixed with Texas-red Dye which has no biological toxicity ,and 5 μl of the mixture was dropped onto the center of the bottom of culture plates to form red round spots,which was called CSPG spots.SY5Y neuroblastoma cells or cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) from mice were seeded on the plates and cultured for 48 hours. The cell growth and axon extension were observed under microscope. Results In CSPG spots containing 1 and 3 μg/ml of CSPG,the growth of CGNs and SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were inhibited,and cell death occurred in the spot areas. No axon extension was found in cells outside the CSPG spots. High concentration of CSPG in the spots inhibited the growth of cells around CSPG spots. Conclusion This model mimics the CSGP-induced axon outgrowth inhibition, which can be used to study the neuronal growth and axonal regeneration after central nervous system injury.%目的 利用硫酸软骨素蛋白多糖(CSPG)的生物特性建立抑制神经元生长和轴突再生的体外生物模型.方法 将不同浓度CSPG与无生物毒性的德克萨斯红荧光染料混合,取5 μl滴在培养板的中心部位,形成边界清楚的红色圆形斑点,称CSPG圆斑(CSPG SPOT).将神经母细胞瘤SY5Y细胞和小鼠小脑颗粒细胞(CGNs)铺在含有CSPG SPOT的培养板中,48 h后观察细胞的生长情况.结果 含有1 μg/ml和3 μg/ml CSPG的SPOT分别使CGNs和神经母细胞瘤SY5Y细胞停止生长、死亡,没有发现细胞的轴突延伸到SPOT上生长.高浓度的CSPG可渗透到SPOT周围区域,使CSPG SPOT周围区域的细胞生长和轴突再生受到抑制.结论 该模型可以在体外模拟胶质细胞分泌的CSPG对神经细胞生长的抑制作用,对研究中枢神经系统损伤后神经元的生长和轴突的再生具有广泛的应用前景.

  9. Myelin-associated glycoprotein and its axonal receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaar, Ronald L; Lopez, Pablo H H

    2009-11-15

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is expressed on the innermost myelin membrane wrap, directly apposed to the axon surface. Although it is not required for myelination, MAG enhances long-term axon-myelin stability, helps to structure nodes of Ranvier, and regulates the axon cytoskeleton. In addition to its role in axon-myelin stabilization, MAG inhibits axon regeneration after injury; MAG and a discrete set of other molecules on residual myelin membranes at injury sites actively signal axons to halt elongation. Both the stabilizing and the axon outgrowth inhibitory effects of MAG are mediated by complementary MAG receptors on the axon surface. Two MAG receptor families have been described, sialoglycans (specifically gangliosides GD1a and GT1b) and Nogo receptors (NgRs). Controversies remain about which receptor(s) mediates which of MAG's biological effects. Here we review the findings and challenges in associating MAG's biological effects with specific receptors.

  10. SnoN facilitates axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

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    Jiun L Do

    Full Text Available Adult CNS neurons exhibit a reduced capacity for growth compared to developing neurons, due in part to downregulation of growth-associated genes as development is completed. We tested the hypothesis that SnoN, an embryonically regulated transcription factor that specifies growth of the axonal compartment, can enhance growth in injured adult neurons. In vitro, SnoN overexpression in dissociated adult DRG neuronal cultures significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, TGF-β1, a negative regulator of SnoN, inhibited neurite outgrowth, and SnoN over-expression overcame this inhibition. We then examined whether SnoN influenced axonal regeneration in vivo: indeed, expression of a mutant form of SnoN resistant to degradation significantly enhanced axonal regeneration following cervical spinal cord injury, despite peri-lesional upregulation of TGF-β1. Thus, a developmental mechanism that specifies extension of the axonal compartment also promotes axonal regeneration after adult CNS injury.

  11. Absence of SARM1 Rescues Development and Survival of NMNAT2-Deficient Axons

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Gilley; Giuseppe Orsomando; Isabel Nascimento-Ferreira; Michael P. Coleman

    2015-01-01

    Summary SARM1 function and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) loss both promote axon degeneration, but their relative relationship in the process is unknown. Here, we show that NMNAT2 loss and resultant changes to NMNAT metabolites occur in injured SARM1-deficient axons despite their delayed degeneration and that axon degeneration specifically induced by NMNAT2 depletion requires SARM1. Strikingly, SARM1 deficiency also corrects axon outgrowth in mice lacking NMNAT2, i...

  12. Cutaneous collateral axonal sprouting re-innervates the skin component and restores sensation of denervated Swine osteomyocutaneous alloflaps.

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    Zuhaib Ibrahim

    Full Text Available Reconstructive transplantation such as extremity and face transplantation is a viable treatment option for select patients with devastating tissue loss. Sensorimotor recovery is a critical determinant of overall success of such transplants. Although motor function recovery has been extensively studied, mechanisms of sensory re-innervation are not well established. Recent clinical reports of face transplants confirm progressive sensory improvement even in cases where optimal repair of sensory nerves was not achieved. Two forms of sensory nerve regeneration are known. In regenerative sprouting, axonal outgrowth occurs from the transected nerve stump while in collateral sprouting, reinnervation of denervated tissue occurs through growth of uninjured axons into the denervated tissue. The latter mechanism may be more important in settings where transected sensory nerves cannot be re-apposed. In this study, denervated osteomyocutaneous alloflaps (hind- limb transplants from Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC-defined MGH miniature swine were performed to specifically evaluate collateral axonal sprouting for cutaneous sensory re-innervation. The skin component of the flap was externalized and serial skin sections extending from native skin to the grafted flap were biopsied. In order to visualize regenerating axonal structures in the dermis and epidermis, 50 um frozen sections were immunostained against axonal and Schwann cell markers. In all alloflaps, collateral axonal sprouts from adjacent recipient skin extended into the denervated skin component along the dermal-epidermal junction from the periphery towards the center. On day 100 post-transplant, regenerating sprouts reached 0.5 cm into the flap centripetally. Eight months following transplant, epidermal fibers were visualized 1.5 cm from the margin (rate of regeneration 0.06 mm per day. All animals had pinprick sensation in the periphery of the transplanted skin within 3 months post

  13. The Kv2.1 K+ channel targets to the axon initial segment of hippocampal and cortical neurons in culture and in situ

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    Tamkun Michael M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kv2.1 delayed-rectifier K+ channel regulates membrane excitability in hippocampal neurons where it targets to dynamic cell surface clusters on the soma and proximal dendrites. In the past, Kv2.1 has been assumed to be absent from the axon initial segment. Results Transfected and endogenous Kv2.1 is now demonstrated to preferentially accumulate within the axon initial segment (AIS over other neurite processes; 87% of 14 DIV hippocampal neurons show endogenous channel concentrated at the AIS relative to the soma and proximal dendrites. In contrast to the localization observed in pyramidal cells, GAD positive inhibitory neurons within the hippocampal cultures did not show AIS targeting. Photoactivable-GFP-Kv2.1-containing clusters at the AIS were stable, moving μm/hr with no channel turnover. Photobleach studies indicated individual channels within the cluster perimeter were highly mobile (FRAP τ = 10.4 ± 4.8 sec, supporting our model that Kv2.1 clusters are formed by the retention of mobile channels behind a diffusion-limiting perimeter. Demonstrating that the AIS targeting is not a tissue culture artifact, Kv2.1 was found in axon initial segments within both the adult rat hippocampal CA1, CA2, and CA3 layers and cortex. Conclusion In summary, Kv2.1 is associated with the axon initial segment both in vitro and in vivo where it may modulate action potential frequency and back propagation. Since transfected Kv2.1 initially localizes to the AIS before appearing on the soma, it is likely multiple mechanisms regulate Kv2.1 trafficking to the cell surface.

  14. Poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-ε-caprolactone promotes axonal growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nogueira Rocha

    Full Text Available Mammalian central nervous system (CNS neurons do not regenerate after injury due to the inhibitory environment formed by the glial scar, largely constituted by myelin debris. The use of biomaterials to bridge the lesion area and the creation of an environment favoring axonal regeneration is an appealing approach, currently under investigation. This work aimed at assessing the suitability of three candidate polymers - poly(ε-caprolactone, poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-ε-caprolactone (P(TMC-CL (11∶89 mol% and poly(trimethylene carbonate - with the final goal of using these materials in the development of conduits to promote spinal cord regeneration. Poly(L-lysine (PLL coated polymeric films were tested for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. At similar PLL film area coverage conditions, neuronal polarization and axonal elongation was significantly higher on P(TMC-CL films. Furthermore, cortical neurons cultured on P(TMC-CL were able to extend neurites even when seeded onto myelin. This effect was found to be mediated by the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β signaling pathway with impact on the collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4, suggesting that besides surface topography, nanomechanical properties were implicated in this process. The obtained results indicate P(TMC-CL as a promising material for CNS regenerative applications as it promotes axonal growth, overcoming myelin inhibition.

  15. The microtubule-stabilizing drug Epothilone D increases axonal sprouting following transection injury in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, Mariana; Blizzard, Catherine A; Chuckowree, Jyoti A; Dawkins, Edgar; Gasperini, Robert J; Young, Kaylene M; Dickson, Tracey C

    2015-05-01

    Neuronal cytoskeletal alterations, in particular the loss and misalignment of microtubules, are considered a hallmark feature of the degeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Therefore, microtubule-stabilizing drugs are attractive potential therapeutics for use following TBI. The best-known drug in this category is Paclitaxel, a widely used anti-cancer drug that has produced promising outcomes when employed in the treatment of various animal models of nervous system trauma. However, Paclitaxel is not ideal for the treatment of patients with TBI due to its limited blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Herein we have characterized the effect of the brain penetrant microtubule-stabilizing agent Epothilone D (Epo D) on post-injury axonal sprouting in an in vitro model of CNS trauma. Epo D was found to modulate axonal sprout number in a dose dependent manner, increasing the number of axonal sprouts generated post-injury. Elevated sprouting was observed when analyzing the total population of injured neurons, as well as in selective analysis of Thy1-YFP-labeled excitatory neurons. However, we found no effect of Epo D on axonal sprout length or outgrowth speed. These findings indicate that Epo D specifically affects injury-induced axonal sprout generation, but not net growth. Our investigation demonstrates that primary cultures of cortical neurons are tolerant of Epo D exposure, and that Epo D significantly increases their regenerative response following structural injury. Therefore Epo D may be a potent therapeutic for enhancing regeneration following CNS injury. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'.

  16. APP independent and dependent effects on neurite outgrowth are modulated by the receptor associated protein, RAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billnitzer, Andrew J.; Barskaya, Irina; Yin, Cailing; Perez, Ruth G.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its secreted form, sAPP, contribute to the development of neurons in hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Full-length APP binds the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), which stimulates APP endocytosis. LRP also contributes to neurite growth. Furthermore, the receptor associated protein (RAP) binds LRP in a manner that blocks APP-LRP interactions. To elucidate APP contributions to neurite growth for full-length APP and sAPP, we cultured wild type (WT) and APP knockout (KO) neurons in sAPPα and/or RAP and measured neurite outgrowth at 1 day in vitro. Our data reveal that WT neurons had less axonal outgrowth including less axon branching. RAP treatment potentiated the inhibitory effects of APP. KO neurons had significantly more outgrowth and branching, especially in response to RAP, effects which were also associated with ERK2 activation. Our results affirm a major inhibitory role by full-length APP on all aspects of axonal and dendritic outgrowth, and show that RAP-LRP binding stimulated axon growth independently of APP. These findings support a major role for APP as an inhibitor of neurite growth and reveal novel signaling functions for LRP that may be disrupted by Alzheimer’s pathology or therapies aimed at APP processing. PMID:23061396

  17. APP independent and dependent effects on neurite outgrowth are modulated by the receptor associated protein (RAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billnitzer, Andrew J; Barskaya, Irina; Yin, Cailing; Perez, Ruth G

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its secreted form, sAPP, contribute to the development of neurons in hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Full-length APP binds the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), which stimulates APP endocytosis. LRP also contributes to neurite growth. Furthermore, the receptor associated protein (RAP) binds LRP in a manner that blocks APP-LRP interactions. To elucidate APP contributions to neurite growth for full-length APP and sAPP, we cultured wild type (WT) and APP knockout (KO) neurons in sAPPα and/or RAP and measured neurite outgrowth at 1 day in vitro. Our data reveal that WT neurons had less axonal outgrowth including less axon branching. RAP treatment potentiated the inhibitory effects of APP. KO neurons had significantly more outgrowth and branching, especially in response to RAP, effects which were also associated with ERK2 activation. Our results affirm a major inhibitory role by full-length APP on all aspects of axonal and dendritic outgrowth, and show that RAP-LRP binding stimulated axon growth independently of APP. These findings support a major role for APP as an inhibitor of neurite growth and reveal novel signaling functions for LRP that may be disrupted by Alzheimer's pathology or therapies aimed at APP processing. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Neurite outgrowth in human iPSC-derived neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data on morphology of rat and human neurons in cell cultureThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Druwe, I., T. Freudenrich , K. Wallace , T. Shafer , and W. Mundy. Comparison of Human Induced PluripotentStem Cell-Derived Neurons and Rat Primary CorticalNeurons as In Vitro Models of Neurite Outgrowth. Applied In vitro Toxicology. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Larchmont, NY, USA, 2(1): 26-36, (2016).

  19. Cyclic AMP stimulates neurite outgrowth of lamprey reticulospinal neurons without substantially altering their biophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale, T; Frisch, E B; McClellan, A D

    2013-08-15

    Reticulospinal (RS) neurons are critical for initiation of locomotor behavior, and following spinal cord injury (SCI) in the lamprey, the axons of these neurons regenerate and restore locomotor behavior within a few weeks. For lamprey RS neurons in culture, experimental induction of calcium influx, either in the growth cone or cell body, is inhibitory for neurite outgrowth. Following SCI, these neurons partially downregulate calcium channel expression, which would be expected to reduce calcium influx and possibly provide supportive conditions for axonal regeneration. In the present study, it was tested whether activation of second messenger signaling pathways stimulates neurite outgrowth of lamprey RS neurons without altering their electrical properties (e.g. spike broadening) so as to possibly increase calcium influx and compromise axonal growth. First, activation of cAMP pathways with forskolin or dbcAMP stimulated neurite outgrowth of RS neurons in culture in a PKA-dependent manner, while activation of cGMP signaling pathways with dbcGMP inhibited outgrowth. Second, neurophysiological recordings from uninjured RS neurons in isolated lamprey brain-spinal cord preparations indicated that dbcAMP or dbcGMP did not significantly affect any of the measured electrical properties. In contrast, for uninjured RS neurons, forskolin increased action potential duration, which might have increased calcium influx, but did not significantly affect most other electrical properties. Importantly, for injured RS neurons during the period of axonal regeneration, forskolin did not significantly alter their electrical properties. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of cAMP signaling by dbcAMP stimulates neurite outgrowth, but does not alter the electrical properties of lamprey RS neurons in such a way that would be expected to induce calcium influx. In conclusion, our results suggest that activation of cAMP pathways alone, without compensation for possible

  20. Motor neuron synapse and axon defects in a C. elegans alpha-tubulin mutant.

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    Renee Baran

    Full Text Available Regulation of microtubule dynamics underlies many fundamental cellular mechanisms including cell division, cell motility, and transport. In neurons, microtubules play key roles in cell migration, axon outgrowth, control of axon and synapse growth, and the regulated transport of vesicles and structural components of synapses. Loss of synapse and axon integrity and disruption of axon transport characterize many neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, mutations that specifically alter the assembly or stability of microtubules have been found to directly cause neurodevelopmental defects or neurodegeneration in vertebrates. We report here the characterization of a missense mutation in the C-terminal domain of C. elegans alpha-tubulin, tba-1(ju89, that disrupts motor neuron synapse and axon development. Mutant ju89 animals exhibit reduction in the number and size of neuromuscular synapses, altered locomotion, and defects in axon extension. Although null mutations of tba-1 show a nearly wild-type pattern, similar axon outgrowth defects were observed in animals lacking the beta-tubulin TBB-2. Genetic analysis reveals that tba-1(ju89 affects synapse development independent of its role in axon outgrowth. tba-1(ju89 is an altered function allele that most likely perturbs interactions between TBA-1 and specific microtubule-associated proteins that control microtubule dynamics and transport of components needed for synapse and axon growth.

  1. Novel RNA- and FMRP-binding protein TRF2-S regulates axonal mRNA transport and presynaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peisu; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Liu, Yong; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Ioannis, Grammatikakis; Martindale, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Yang, In Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-11-20

    Despite considerable evidence that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate mRNA transport and local translation in dendrites, roles for axonal RBPs are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a non-telomeric isoform of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2-S) is a novel RBP that regulates axonal plasticity. TRF2-S interacts directly with target mRNAs to facilitate their axonal delivery. The process is antagonized by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Distinct from the current RNA-binding model of FMRP, we show that FMRP occupies the GAR domain of TRF2-S protein to block the assembly of TRF2-S-mRNA complexes. Overexpressing TRF2-S and silencing FMRP promotes mRNA entry to axons and enhances axonal outgrowth and neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Our findings suggest a pivotal role for TRF2-S in an axonal mRNA localization pathway that enhances axon outgrowth and neurotransmitter release.

  2. Dendrosomatic Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons Regulates Axon Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling components in the neurons of the hippocampus raises a question about what role the Shh signaling pathway may play in these neurons. We show here that activation of the Shh signaling pathway stimulates axon elongation in rat hippocampal neurons. This Shh-induced effect depends on the pathway transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli1. The axon itself does not respond directly to Shh; instead, the Shh signal transduction originates from the somatodendritic region of the neurons and occurs in neurons with and without detectable primary cilia. Upon Shh stimulation, Smo localization to dendrites increases significantly. Shh pathway activation results in increased levels of profilin1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein. Mutations in Pfn1's actin-binding sites or reduction of Pfn1 eliminate the Shh-induced axon elongation. These findings indicate that Shh can regulate axon growth, which may be critical for development of hippocampal neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although numerous signaling mechanisms have been identified that act directly on axons to regulate their outgrowth, it is not known whether signals transduced in dendrites may also affect axon outgrowth. We describe here a transcellular signaling pathway in embryonic hippocampal neurons in which activation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptors in dendrites stimulates axon growth. The pathway involves the dendritic-membrane-associated Shh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli, which induces the expression of the gene encoding the actin-binding protein profilin 1. Our findings suggest scenarios in which stimulation of Shh in dendrites results in accelerated outgrowth of the axon, which therefore reaches its presumptive postsynaptic target cell more quickly. By this mechanism, Shh may play critical roles in the development of hippocampal neuronal circuits. PMID:26658865

  3. Axon initial segment Kv1 channels control axonal action potential waveform and synaptic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Maarten H P; Letzkus, Johannes J; Stuart, Greg J

    2007-08-16

    Action potentials are binary signals that transmit information via their rate and temporal pattern. In this context, the axon is thought of as a transmission line, devoid of a role in neuronal computation. Here, we show a highly localized role of axonal Kv1 potassium channels in shaping the action potential waveform in the axon initial segment (AIS) of layer 5 pyramidal neurons independent of the soma. Cell-attached recordings revealed a 10-fold increase in Kv1 channel density over the first 50 microm of the AIS. Inactivation of AIS and proximal axonal Kv1 channels, as occurs during slow subthreshold somatodendritic depolarizations, led to a distance-dependent broadening of axonal action potentials, as well as an increase in synaptic strength at proximal axonal terminals. Thus, Kv1 channels are strategically positioned to integrate slow subthreshold signals, providing control of the presynaptic action potential waveform and synaptic coupling in local cortical circuits.

  4. Selective stimulation of dendrite outgrowth from identified corticospinal neurons by homotopic astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Dijkstra, S.; Bar, P.R.; Joosten, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    Corticospinal neurons were identified in primary cultures of cortical neurons established from rats that had been injected with a fluorescent tracer to retrogradely label the corticospinal tract. We measured neurite outgrowth from corticospinal neurons after they had been co-cultured with astrocytes

  5. Serum and CNTF stimulate oligodendroglia and reduce fiber outgrowth from striatal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl-Jørgensen, A; Ostergaard, K; Pedersen, E B; Zimmer, J

    1999-05-01

    Organotypic slice cultures of newborn rat striatal tissue displayed an exceptionally dense and fasciculated outgrowth of GABAergic fibers when grown in a chemically defined medium, compared to serum-containing medium. The enhanced fiber growth was not the result of an increased density of GABAergic neurons in the cultures, but coincided with a marked reduction of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase)-immunoreactive cells within and around the cultures. An inverse, causal relationship between the number of CNPase-positive cells, presumably of oligodendroglial lineage, and GABAergic fiber outgrowth was further evidenced by the observation that addition of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) to the chemically defined medium resulted in both an increase in CNPase-positive cells and a decrease in GABAergic fiber outgrowth. The observations suggest that CNTF and serum indirectly inhibit axonal growth by stimulating oligodendroglial cells.

  6. Retinoic acid signaling in axonal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika ePuttagunta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following an acute central nervous system injury, axonal regeneration and functional recovery are extremely limited. This is due to an extrinsic inhibitory growth environment and the lack of intrinsic growth competence. Retinoic acid (RA signaling, essential in developmental dorsoventral patterning and specification of spinal motor neurons, has been shown through its receptor, the transcription factor RA receptor β2 (RARß2, to induce axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury (SCI. Recently, it has been shown that in dorsal root ganglia neurons, cAMP levels were greatly increased by lentiviral RARβ2 expression and contributed to neurite outgrowth. Moreover, RARβ agonists, in cerebellar granule neurons and in the brain in vivo, induced phosphoinositide 3-kinase dependent phosphorylation of AKT that was involved in RARβ-dependent neurite outgrowth. More recently, RA-RARß pathways were shown to directly transcriptionally repress a member of the inhibitory Nogo receptor complex, Lingo-1, under an axonal growth inhibitory environment in vitro as well as following spinal injury in vivo. This perspective focuses on these newly discovered molecular mechanisms and future directions in the field.

  7. Histone Acetylation Inhibitors Promote Axon Growth in Adult DRG neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shen; Nazif, Kutaiba; Smith, Alexander; Baas, Peter W; Smith, George M

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic mechanisms that guide damaged axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury remain poorly understood. Manipulation of posttranslational modifications of key proteins in mature neurons could re-invigorate growth machinery after injury. One such modification is acetylation, a reversible process controlled by two enzyme families acting in opposition, the Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) and the Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs). While acetylated histones in the nucleus is associated with upregulation of growth promoting genes, de-acetylated tubulin in the axoplasm is associated with more labile microtubules, conducive to axon growth. In this study we investigated the effects of HAT inhibitors and HDAC inhibitors on cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. We found that inhibition of HATs, using Anacardic Acid or CPTH2, improved axon outgrowth, while inhibition of HDACs using TSA or Tubacin, inhibited axon growth. Furthermore, Anacardic Acid increased the number of axons able to cross an inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) border. Histone acetylation, but not tubulin acetylation levels, was affected by HAT inhibitors, whereas tubulin acetylation levels were increased in the presence of HDAC inhibitor Tubacin. Although microtubule stabilizing drug taxol did not have an effect on the lengths of DRG axons, nocodazole decreased axon lengths. While the mechanistic basis will require future studies, our data show that inhibitors of HAT can augment axon growth in adult DRG neurons, with the potential of aiding axon growth over inhibitory substrates produced by the glial scar. PMID:25702820

  8. Neurite outgrowth induced by a synthetic peptide ligand of neural cell adhesion molecule requires fibroblast growth factor receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, L C; Doherty, P; Holm, A;

    2000-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM is involved in axonal outgrowth and target recognition in the developing nervous system. In vitro, NCAM-NCAM binding has been shown to induce neurite outgrowth, presumably through an activation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs). We have recently...... identified a neuritogenic ligand, termed the C3 peptide, of the first immunoglobulin (lg) module of NCAM using a combinatorial library of synthetic peptides. Here we investigate whether stimulation of neurite outgrowth by this synthetic ligand of NCAM involves FGFRs. In primary cultures of cerebellar neurons...... from wild-type mice, the C3 peptide stimulated neurite outgrowth. This response was virtually absent in cultures of cerebellar neurons from transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of the FGFR1. Likewise, in PC12E2 cells transiently expressing a dominant-negative form of the mouse FGFR1...

  9. A Wnt-Frz/Ror-Dsh pathway regulates neurite outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Song

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges to understand the organization of the nervous system has been to determine how axon guidance molecules govern axon outgrowth. Through an unbiased genetic screen, we identified a conserved Wnt pathway which is crucial for anterior-posterior (A/P outgrowth of neurites from RME head motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. The pathway is composed of the Wnt ligand CWN-2, the Frizzled receptors CFZ-2 and MIG-1, the co-receptor CAM-1/Ror, and the downstream component Dishevelled/DSH-1. Among these, CWN-2 acts as a local attractive cue for neurite outgrowth, and its activity can be partially substituted with other Wnts, suggesting that spatial distribution plays a role in the functional specificity of Wnts. As a co-receptor, CAM-1 functions cell-autonomously in neurons and, together with CFZ-2 and MIG-1, transmits the Wnt signal to downstream effectors. Yeast two-hybrid screening identified DSH-1 as a binding partner for CAM-1, indicating that CAM-1 could facilitate CWN-2/Wnt signaling by its physical association with DSH-1. Our study reveals an important role of a Wnt-Frz/Ror-Dsh pathway in regulating neurite A/P outgrowth.

  10. mTOR Signaling in Epilepsy: Insights from Malformations of Cortical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crino, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade enhanced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-signaling cascade has been identified in focal malformations of cortical development (MCD) subtypes, which have been collectively referred to as “mTORopathies.” Mutations in mTOR regulatory genes (e.g., TSC1, TSC2, AKT3, DEPDC5) have been associated with several focal MCD highly associated with epilepsy such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), hemimegalencephaly (HME; brain malformation associated with dramatic enlargement of one brain hemisphere), and cortical dysplasia. mTOR plays important roles in the regulation of cell division, growth, and survival, and, thus, aberrant activation of the cascade during cortical development can cause dramatic alterations in cell size, cortical lamination, and axon and dendrite outgrowth often observed in focal MCD. Although it is widely believed that structural alterations induced by hyperactivated mTOR signaling are critical for epileptogenesis, newer evidence suggests that mTOR activation on its own may enhance neuronal excitability. Clinical trials with mTOR inhibitors have shown efficacy in the treatment of seizures associated with focal MCD. PMID:25833943

  11. Evidence for the Role of MAP1B in Axon Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Avila, Jesus; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons obtained from a hypomorphous MAP1B mutant mouse line display a selective and significant inhibition of axon formation that reflects a delay in axon outgrowth and a reduced rate of elongation. This phenomenon is paralleled by decreased microtubule formation and dynamics, which is dramatic at the distal axonal segment, as well as in growth cones, where the more recently assembled microtubule polymer normally predominates. These neurons also have aberrant growth cone formation and increased actin-based protrusive activity. Taken together, this study provides direct evidence showing that by promoting microtubule dynamics and regulating cytoskeletal organization MAP1B has a crucial role in axon formation. PMID:11452005

  12. Diverse modes of axon elaboration in the developing neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of axonal arbors is a critical step in the establishment of precise neural circuits, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms of axonal elaboration in the neocortex. We used in vivo two-photon time-lapse microscopy to image axons in the neocortex of green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice over the first 3 wk of postnatal development. This period spans the elaboration of thalamocortical (TC and Cajal-Retzius (CR axons and cortical synaptogenesis. Layer 1 collaterals of TC and CR axons were imaged repeatedly over time scales ranging from minutes up to days, and their growth and pruning were analyzed. The structure and dynamics of TC and CR axons differed profoundly. Branches of TC axons terminated in small, bulbous growth cones, while CR axon branch tips had large growth cones with numerous long filopodia. TC axons grew rapidly in straight paths, with frequent interstitial branch additions, while CR axons grew more slowly along tortuous paths. For both types of axon, new branches appeared at interstitial sites along the axon shaft and did not involve growth cone splitting. Pruning occurred via retraction of small axon branches (tens of microns, at both CR and TC axons or degeneration of large portions of the arbor (hundreds of microns, for TC axons only. The balance between growth and retraction favored overall growth, but only by a slight margin. Given the identical layer 1 territory upon which CR and TC axons grow, the differences in their structure and dynamics likely reflect distinct intrinsic growth programs for axons of long projection neurons versus local interneurons.

  13. Small-molecule inhibitors at the PSD-95/nNOS interface protect against glutamate-induced neuronal atrophy in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, M V; O'Toole, E; Connor, T; Harkin, A

    2015-08-20

    Glutamate and nitric oxide (NO) are important regulators of dendrite and axon development in the central nervous system. Excess glutamatergic stimulation is a feature of many pathological conditions and manifests in neuronal atrophy and shrinkage with eventual neurodegeneration and cell death. Here we demonstrate that treatment of cultured primary cortical rat neurons for 24h with glutamate (500μM) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) (100-500μM) combined with glycine suppresses neurite outgrowth. A similar reduction of neurite outgrowth was observed with the NO precursor l-arginine and NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (100 and 300μM). The NMDA-receptor (NMDA-R) antagonists ketamine and MK-801 (10nM) counteracted the NMDA/glycine-induced reduction in neurite outgrowth and the neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) inhibitor 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] imidazole (TRIM) (100nM) counteracted both the NMDA/glycine and l-arginine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, targeting soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a downstream target of NO, with the sGC inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10μM) also protected against l-arginine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. Since the NMDA-R is functionally coupled to nNOS via the postsynaptic protein 95kDa (PSD-95), inhibitors of the PSD-95/nNOS interaction were tested for their ability to protect against glutamate-induced suppression in neurite outgrowth. Treatment with the small-molecule inhibitors of the PSD-95/nNOS interface 2-((1H-benzo[d] [1,2,3]triazol-5-ylamino) methyl)-4,6-dichlorophenol (IC87201) (10 and 100nM) and 4-(3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxy-benzylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (ZL-006) (10 and 100nM) attenuated NMDA/glycine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. These data support the hypothesis that targeting the NMDA-R/PSD-95/nNOS interaction downstream of NMDA-R promotes neurotrophic effects by preventing neurite shrinkage in response to excess glutamatergic stimulation. The PSD-95/n

  14. A Loss-of-Function Screen for Phosphatases that Regulate Neurite Outgrowth Identifies PTPN12 as a Negative Regulator of TrkB Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Dubreuil, Véronique; Miozzo, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in function of the neurotrophin BDNF are associated with neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. BDNF promotes axonal outgrowth and branching, regulates dendritic tree morphology and is important for axonal regeneration after injury, responses that largely...... activation of ERK1/2. We also found PTPN12 to negatively regulate phosphorylation of p130cas and FAK, proteins with previously described functions related to cell motility and growth cone behavior. Our data provide the first comprehensive survey of phosphatase function in NT signaling and neurite outgrowth...

  15. Morphometry of Axons in Optic Nerves of Siamese's Twins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzu Gu; Zhenping Zhang; Qi Lin; Jiongji Liang; Wenyu Lu; Xiulan Ye; A A Sadun

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the development of optic nerve, we examined four optic nerves from Siameses Twins by absolute counts of axons.Methods: Mean axon diameter, mean axon density, totally axonal population and optic nerve area were noted for each optic nerve. The mean axon diameter and the mean axon density were compared between paraxial (inner sectors)and cortical (outer sectors)areas of the nerves.Results: More myelinated axons were seen in the inner sectors as compared to the outer sectors(average 11 axons/1 000 μm2 in inner sectors and 34 axons/l 000 μm2 in outer sectors( P=0. 036) . The myelinated fibers were also smaller(63 microns) in the outer sectors as compared to the inner sectors(72 microns) ( P = 0. 001 ). The average cross sectors area for the four 40 week stage optical nerves of Siamese Twins was 3.32 × 103 as compared to 1 million axons for 32-week-old normals.Conclusion: Our finding of fewer axonal number and small myelinated fibers in the Siamese Twins suggests hypoplasia. Myelination was more abnormal in the paraxial optic nerve than that in the peripheral sectors, suggesting anomalous development of optic nerve peripherally and delayed developnent centrally. Axonal density is higher in inner sectors than that in outer sectors, suggesting delayed development of the outer nerve sector.

  16. Primary neuron culture for nerve growth and axon guidance studies in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheyan Chen

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio is a widely used model organism in genetics and developmental biology research. Genetic screens have proven useful for studying embryonic development of the nervous system in vivo, but in vitro studies utilizing zebrafish have been limited. Here, we introduce a robust zebrafish primary neuron culture system for functional nerve growth and guidance assays. Distinct classes of central nervous system neurons from the spinal cord, hindbrain, forebrain, and retina from wild type zebrafish, and fluorescent motor neurons from transgenic reporter zebrafish lines, were dissociated and plated onto various biological and synthetic substrates to optimize conditions for axon outgrowth. Time-lapse microscopy revealed dynamically moving growth cones at the tips of extending axons. The mean rate of axon extension in vitro was 21.4±1.2 µm hr(-1 s.e.m. for spinal cord neurons, which corresponds to the typical ∼0.5 mm day(-1 growth rate of nerves in vivo. Fluorescence labeling and confocal microscopy demonstrated that bundled microtubules project along axons to the growth cone central domain, with filamentous actin enriched in the growth cone peripheral domain. Importantly, the growth cone surface membrane expresses receptors for chemotropic factors, as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Live-cell functional assays of axon extension and directional guidance demonstrated mammalian brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF-dependent stimulation of outgrowth and growth cone chemoattraction, whereas mammalian myelin-associated glycoprotein inhibited outgrowth. High-resolution live-cell Ca(2+-imaging revealed local elevation of cytoplasmic Ca(2+ concentration in the growth cone induced by BDNF application. Moreover, BDNF-induced axon outgrowth, but not basal outgrowth, was blocked by treatments to suppress cytoplasmic Ca(2+ signals. Thus, this primary neuron culture model system may be useful for studies of neuronal development

  17. IL-6 promotes regeneration and functional recovery after cortical spinal tract injury by reactivating intrinsic growth program of neurons and enhancing synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Wen, Huizhong; Ou, Shan; Cui, Jian; Fan, Dehua

    2012-07-01

    Most neurons in adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) fail to regenerate their axons after injury. Peripherally conditioned primary sensory neurons have an increased capacity to regenerate their central processes. Recent studies demonstrate that a conditioning lesion increased intrinsic growth capability is associated with the up-regulation of a group of growth-associated genes, one of the most established is interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which IL-6 exerts its beneficial effect on axonal regeneration and functional recovery remain to be elucidated. The purpose of this study is to further investigate the molecular mechanisms of IL-6 in promoting regeneration and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we demonstrate that in vitro administration of IL-6 enhances neurite outgrowth of neurons on an inhibitory substrate myelin proteins, accompanied by increased expression of growth-associated genes GAP-43, SPRR1A and Arginase I. In vivo, intrathecal delivery of IL-6 for 7 days after cortical spinal tract injury induces synaptic rearrangements of sprouting axons and increases the expression of mTOR in neurons surrounding the lesion site, accompanied by improved functional recovery. In conclusion, our results show that IL-6 increases the expression of growth-associated genes and induces the expression of mTOR in lesion adjacent neurons, resulting in reactivating the intrinsic growth program of neurons to promote axonal regrowth and functional recovery after SCI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Downstream of tyrosine kinase/docking protein 6, as a novel substrate of tropomyosin-related kinase C receptor, is involved in neurotrophin 3-mediated neurite outgrowth in mouse cortex neurons

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    Yuan Jian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The downstream of tyrosine kinase/docking protein (Dok adaptor protein family has seven members, Dok1 to Dok7, that act as substrates of multiple receptor tyrosine kinase and non-receptor tyrosine kinase. The tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk receptor family, which has three members (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, are receptor tyrosine kinases that play pivotal roles in many stages of nervous system development, such as differentiation, migration, axon and dendrite projection and neuron patterning. Upon related neurotrophin growth factor stimulation, dimerisation and autophosphorylation of Trk receptors can occur, recruiting adaptor proteins to mediate signal transduction. Results In this report, by using yeast two-hybrid assays, glutathione S-transferase (GST precipitation assays and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP experiments, we demonstrate that Dok6 selectively binds to the NPQY motif of TrkC through its phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB domain in a kinase activity-dependent manner. We further confirmed their interaction by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalisation in E18.5 mouse cortex neurons, which provided more in vivo evidence. Next, we demonstrated that Dok6 is involved in neurite outgrowth in mouse cortex neurons via the RNAi method. Knockdown of Dok6 decreased neurite outgrowth in cortical neurons upon neurotrophin 3 (NT-3 stimulation. Conclusions We conclude that Dok6 interacts with the NPQY motif of the TrkC receptor through its PTB domain in a kinase activity-dependent manner, and works as a novel substrate of the TrkC receptor involved in NT-3-mediated neurite outgrowth in mouse cortex neurons.

  19. Controlled release of 6-aminonicotinamide from aligned, electrospun fibers alters astrocyte metabolism and dorsal root ganglia neurite outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2011-08-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form a glial scar that inhibits the migration of axons ultimately leading to regeneration failure. Biomaterials developed for CNS repair can provide local delivery of therapeutics and/or guidance mechanisms to encourage cell migration into damaged regions of the brain or spinal cord. Electrospun fibers are a promising type of biomaterial for CNS injury since these fibers can direct cellular and axonal migration while slowly delivering therapy to the injury site. In this study, it was hypothesized that inclusion of an anti-metabolite, 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN), within poly-l-lactic acid electrospun fibers could attenuate astrocyte metabolic activity while still directing axonal outgrowth. Electrospinning parameters were varied to produce highly aligned electrospun fibers that contained 10% or 20% (w/w) 6AN. 6AN release from the fiber substrates occurred continuously over 2 weeks. Astrocytes placed onto drug-releasing fibers were less active than those cultured on scaffolds without 6AN. Dorsal root ganglia placed onto control and drug-releasing scaffolds were able to direct neurites along the aligned fibers. However, neurite outgrowth was stunted by fibers that contained 20% 6AN. These results show that 6AN release from aligned, electrospun fibers can decrease astrocyte activity while still directing axonal outgrowth.

  20. Collagen containing neurotrophin 3 (NT 3) attracts regrowing injured corticospinal axons in the adult rat spinal cord and promotes partial functional recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Houweling, D.A.; Lankhorst, A.J.; Bär, P.R; Joosten, E.A.J.

    1998-01-01

    During development, neurotrophic factors play an important role in the guidance and outgrowth of axons. Our working hypothesis is that neurotrophic factors involved in the development of axons of a particular CNS tract are among the most promising candidates for stimulating and directing the regrowt

  1. Local erythropoietin signaling enhances regeneration in peripheral axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, C; Martinez, J A; Liu, W Q; Diggle, J; Guo, G F; Ramji, N; Mi, R; Hoke, A; Zochodne, D W

    2008-06-23

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor (EPO-R), mediate neuroprotection from axonopathy and apoptosis in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We examined the impact and potential mechanisms of local EPO signaling on regenerating PNS axons in vivo and in vitro. As a consequence of injury, peripheral nerve axons and DRG neurons have a marked increase in the expression of EPO and EPO-R. Local delivery of EPO via conduit over 2 weeks to rat sciatic nerve following crush injury increased the density and maturity of regenerating myelinated axons growing distally from the crush site. In addition, EPO also rescued retrograde degeneration and atrophy of axons. EPO substantially increased the density and intensity of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression within outgrowing axons. Behavioral improvements in sensorimotor function also occurred in rats exposed to near nerve EPO delivery. EPO delivery led to decreased nuclear factor kappaB (NFkB) activation but increased phosphorylation of Akt and STAT3 within nerve and dorsal root ganglia neurons indicating rescue from an injury phenotype. Spinal cord explant studies also demonstrated a similar dose-dependent effect of EPO upon motor axonal outgrowth. Local EPO signaling enhances regenerating peripheral nervous system axons in addition to its known neuroprotection. Exogenous EPO may have a therapeutic role in a large number of peripheral nerve diseases through its impact on regeneration.

  2. Ndel1 promotes axon regeneration via intermediate filaments.

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    Cory Toth

    Full Text Available Failure of axons to regenerate following acute or chronic neuronal injury is attributed to both the inhibitory glial environment and deficient intrinsic ability to re-grow. However, the underlying mechanisms of the latter remain unclear. In this study, we have investigated the role of the mammalian homologue of aspergillus nidulans NudE, Ndel1, emergently viewed as an integrator of the cytoskeleton, in axon regeneration. Ndel1 was synthesized de novo and upregulated in crushed and transected sciatic nerve axons, and, upon injury, was strongly associated with neuronal form of the intermediate filament (IF Vimentin while dissociating from the mature neuronal IF (Neurofilament light chain NF-L. Consistent with a role for Ndel1 in the conditioning lesion-induced neurite outgrowth of Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG neurons, the long lasting in vivo formation of the neuronal Ndel1/Vimentin complex was associated with robust axon regeneration. Furthermore, local silencing of Ndel1 in transected axons by siRNA severely reduced the extent of regeneration in vivo. Thus, Ndel1 promotes axonal regeneration; activating this endogenous repair mechanism may enhance neuroregeneration during acute and chronic axonal degeneration.

  3. Berberine regulates neurite outgrowth through AMPK-dependent pathways by lowering energy status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cao, Yuanzhao; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Xu, Bo; Wang, Tianchang; Yang, Qi; Yang, Qin [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Feng, Xudong, E-mail: xudong.feng@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Xia, Qing, E-mail: xqing@hsc.pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-10

    As a widely used anti-bacterial agent and a metabolic inhibitor as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, berberine (BBR) has been shown to cross the blood–brain barrier. Its efficacy has been investigated in various disease models of the central nervous system. Neurite outgrowth is critical for nervous system development and is a highly energy-dependent process regulated by AMPK-related pathways. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on AMPK activation and neurite outgrowth in neurons. The neurite outgrowth of primary rat cortical neurons at different stages of polarization was monitored after exposure of BBR. Intracellular energy level, AMPK activation and polarity-related pathways were also inspected. The results showed that BBR suppressed neurite outgrowth and affected cytoskeleton stability in the early stages of neuronal polarization, which was mediated by lowered energy status and AMPK activation. Liver kinase B1 and PI3K–Akt–GSK3β signaling pathways were also involved. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to the lowered energy status induced by BBR. This study highlighted the knowledge of the complex activities of BBR in neurons and corroborated the significance of energy status during the neuronal polarization. - Highlights: • BBR inhibited neurite outgrowth in early stages of neuronal development. • Lowered neuronal energy status was induced by BBR treatment. • Neuronal energy stress induced by BBR activated AMPK-related pathways. • BBR induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  4. Mitochondrial localized STAT3 is involved in NGF induced neurite outgrowth.

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    Lihan Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 plays critical roles in neural development and is increasingly recognized as a major mediator of injury response in the nervous system. Cytokines and growth factors are known to phosphorylate STAT3 at tyrosine(705 with or without the concomitant phosphorylation at serine(727, resulting in the nuclear localization of STAT3 and subsequent transcriptional activation of genes. Recent evidence suggests that STAT3 may control cell function via alternative mechanisms independent of its transcriptional activity. Currently, the involvement of STAT3 mono-phosphorylated at residue serine(727 (P-Ser-STAT3 in neurite outgrowth and the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the role of nerve growth factor (NGF induced P-Ser-STAT3 in mediating neurite outgrowth. NGF induced the phosphorylation of residue serine(727 but not tyrosine(705 of STAT3 in PC12 and primary cortical neuronal cells. In PC12 cells, serine but not tyrosine dominant negative mutant of STAT3 was found to impair NGF induced neurite outgrowth. Unexpectedly, NGF induced P-Ser-STAT3 was localized to the mitochondria but not in the nucleus. Mitochondrial STAT3 was further found to be intimately involved in NGF induced neurite outgrowth and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. CONCLUSION: Taken together, the findings herein demonstrated a hitherto unrecognized novel transcription independent mechanism whereby the mitochondria localized P-Ser-STAT3 is involved in NGF induced neurite outgrowth.

  5. RA-RAR-β counteracts myelin-dependent inhibition of neurite outgrowth via Lingo-1 repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttagunta, Radhika; Schmandke, André; Floriddia, Elisa; Gaub, Perrine; Fomin, Natalie; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2011-06-27

    After an acute central nervous system injury, axonal regeneration is limited as the result of a lack of neuronal intrinsic competence and the presence of extrinsic inhibitory signals. The injury fragments the myelin neuronal insulating layer, releasing extrinsic inhibitory molecules to signal through the neuronal membrane-bound Nogo receptor (NgR) complex. In this paper, we show that a neuronal transcriptional pathway can interfere with extrinsic inhibitory myelin-dependent signaling, thereby promoting neurite outgrowth. Specifically, retinoic acid (RA), acting through the RA receptor β (RAR-β), inhibited myelin-activated NgR signaling through the transcriptional repression of the NgR complex member Lingo-1. We show that suppression of Lingo-1 was required for RA-RAR-β to counteract extrinsic inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we confirm in vivo that RA treatment after a dorsal column overhemisection injury inhibited Lingo-1 expression, specifically through RAR-β. Our findings identify a novel link between RA-RAR-β-dependent proaxonal outgrowth and inhibitory NgR complex-dependent signaling, potentially allowing for the development of molecular strategies to enhance axonal regeneration after a central nervous system injury.

  6. Computing along the axon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Haiming; Tseren-Onolt Ishdorj; Gheorghe Pǎun

    2007-01-01

    A special form of spiking neural P systems, called axon P systems, corresponding to the activity of Ranvier nodes of neuron axon, is considered and a class of SN-like P systems where the computation is done along the axon is introduced and their language generative power is investigated.

  7. Metallothionein-I/II Promotes Axonal Regeneration in the Central Nervous System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Hannila, Sari S.; Carmel, Jason B.; Bryson, John B.; Hou, Jianwei; Nikulina, Elena; Willis, Matthew R.; Mellado, Wilfredo; Richman, Erica L.; Hilaire, Melissa; Hart, Ronald P.; Filbin, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    The adult CNS does not spontaneously regenerate after injury, due in large part to myelin-associated inhibitors such as myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Nogo-A, and oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein. All three inhibitors can interact with either the Nogo receptor complex or paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B. A conditioning lesion of the sciatic nerve allows the central processes of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to spontaneously regenerate in vivo after a dorsal column lesion. After a conditioning lesion, DRG neurons are no longer inhibited by myelin, and this effect is cyclic AMP (cAMP)- and transcription-dependent. Using a microarray analysis, we identified several genes that are up-regulated both in adult DRGs after a conditioning lesion and in DRG neurons treated with cAMP analogues. One gene that was up-regulated under both conditions is metallothionein (MT)-I. We show here that treatment with two closely related isoforms of MT (MT-I/II) can overcome the inhibitory effects of both myelin and MAG for cortical, hippocampal, and DRG neurons. Intrathecal delivery of MT-I/II to adult DRGs also promotes neurite outgrowth in the presence of MAG. Adult DRGs from MT-I/II-deficient mice extend significantly shorter processes on MAG compared with wild-type DRG neurons, and regeneration of dorsal column axons does not occur after a conditioning lesion in MT-I/II-deficient mice. Furthermore, a single intravitreal injection of MT-I/II after optic nerve crush promotes axonal regeneration. Mechanistically, MT-I/II ability to overcome MAG-mediated inhibition is transcription-dependent, and MT-I/II can block the proteolytic activity of α-secretase and the activation of PKC and Rho in response to soluble MAG. PMID:25947372

  8. Spatial gradients of chemotropic factors from immobilized patterns to guide axonal growth and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joddar, Binata; Guy, Adam T; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of varying localized concentration gradients of NGF and Sema3A on the axonal outgrowth of embryonic chick DRG explants and primary neurons in vitro. Immobilized 2D NGF or Sema3A micropatterns were produced using photolithography on tissue culture cover slips. Two distinct regions were identified: slow, with little or no change in concentration of chemotropic factor; and steep, with a transition from low to high. The direction of axonal outgrowth was defined as proximal or distal, with proximal growing towards the higher concentration of immobilized NGF/Sema3A and vice versa for distal. Axons grew preferentially in the proximal direction when explants were seeded onto steep NGF, and distally in response to steep Sema3A. On slow NGF, or on slow Sema3A there was no difference in the directional specificity of axonal outgrowth. DRG primary neurons seeded onto steep NGF migrated proximally, whereas neurons seeded onto slow NGF migrated in all directions. Conversely, neurons seeded onto steep or slow Sema3A did not extend any axons. Our 2D immobilized micropatterns of chemotropic factors show promise for further development of in vitro nerve tissue engineering studies.

  9. Neurite outgrowth on electrospun PLLA fibers is enhanced by exogenous electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, A. N.; Zaccor, N. W.; Rivet, C. J.; Williams, L. A.; Piselli, J. M.; Gilbert, R. J.; Thompson, D. M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Both electrical stimuli (endogenous and exogenous) and topographical cues are instructive to axonal extension. This report, for the first time, investigated the relative dominance of directional topographical guidance cues and directional electrical cues to enhance and/or direct primary neurite extension. We hypothesized the combination of electrical stimulation with electrospun fiber topography would induce longer neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia neurons than the presence of electrical stimulation or aligned topography alone. Approach. To test the hypothesis, neurite outgrowth was examined on laminin-coated poly-L-lactide films or electrospun fibers (2 µm in diameter) in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation. Immunostained neurons were semi-automatically traced using Neurolucida software and morphology was evaluated. Main Results. Neurite extension increased 74% on the aligned fibers compared to film controls. Stimulation alone increased outgrowth by 32% on films or fibers relative to unstimulated film controls. The co-presentation of topographical (fibers) with biophysical (electrical stimulation) cues resulted in a synergistic 126% increase in outgrowth relative to unstimulated film controls. Field polarity had no influence on the directionality of neurites, indicating topographical cues are responsible for guiding neurite extension. Significance. Both cues (electrical stimulation and fiber geometry) are modular in nature and can be synergistically applied in conjunction with other common methods in regenerative medicine such as controlled release of growth factors to further influence axonal growth in vivo. The combined application of electrical and aligned fiber topographical guidance cues described herein, if translated in vivo, could provide a more supportive environment for directed and robust axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury.

  10. Chronic excitotoxin-induced axon degeneration in a compartmented neuronal culture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Hosie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate excitotoxicity is a major pathogenic process implicated in many neurodegenerative conditions, including AD (Alzheimer's disease and following traumatic brain injury. Occurring predominantly from over-stimulation of ionotropic glutamate receptors located along dendrites, excitotoxic axonal degeneration may also occur in white matter tracts. Recent identification of axonal glutamate receptor subunits within axonal nanocomplexes raises the possibility of direct excitotoxic effects on axons. Individual neuronal responses to excitotoxicity are highly dependent on the complement of glutamate receptors expressed by the cell, and the localization of the functional receptors. To enable isolation of distal axons and targeted excitotoxicity, murine cortical neuron cultures were prepared in compartmented microfluidic devices, such that distal axons were isolated from neuronal cell bodies. Within the compartmented culture system, cortical neurons developed to relative maturity at 11 DIV (days in vitro as demonstrated by the formation of dendritic spines and clustering of the presynaptic protein synaptophysin. The isolated distal axons retained growth cone structures in the absence of synaptic targets, and expressed glutamate receptor subunits. Glutamate treatment (100 μM to the cell body chamber resulted in widespread degeneration within this chamber and degeneration of distal axons in the other chamber. Glutamate application to the distal axon chamber triggered a lesser degree of axonal degeneration without degenerative changes in the untreated somal chamber. These data indicate that in addition to current mechanisms of indirect axonal excitotoxicity, the distal axon may be a primary target for excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative conditions.

  11. RGMa regulates cortical interneuron migration and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor O'Leary

    Full Text Available The etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, has been linked to a failure to establish the intricate neural network comprising excitatory pyramidal and inhibitory interneurons during neocortex development. A large proportion of cortical inhibitory interneurons originate in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE of the ventral telencephalon and then migrate through the ventral subventricular zone, across the corticostriatal junction, into the embryonic cortex. Successful navigation of newborn interneurons through the complex environment of the ventral telencephalon is governed by spatiotemporally restricted deployment of both chemorepulsive and chemoattractive guidance cues which work in concert to create a migratory corridor. Despite the expanding list of interneuron guidance cues, cues responsible for preventing interneurons from re-entering the ventricular zone of the ganglionic eminences have not been well characterized. Here we provide evidence that the chemorepulsive axon guidance cue, RGMa (Repulsive Guidance Molecule a, may fulfill this function. The ventricular zone restricted expression of RGMa in the ganglionic eminences and the presence of its receptor, Neogenin, in the ventricular zone and on newborn and maturing MGE-derived interneurons implicates RGMa-Neogenin interactions in interneuron differentiation and migration. Using an in vitro approach, we show that RGMa promotes interneuron differentiation by potentiating neurite outgrowth. In addition, using in vitro explant and migration assays, we provide evidence that RGMa is a repulsive guidance cue for newborn interneurons migrating out of the ganglionic eminence ventricular zone. Intriguingly, the alternative Neogenin ligand, Netrin-1, had no effect on migration. However, we observed complete abrogation of RGMa-induced chemorepulsion when newborn interneurons were simultaneously exposed to RGMa and Netrin-1 gradients, suggesting a novel mechanism for

  12. Npn-1 contributes to axon-axon interactions that differentially control sensory and motor innervation of the limb.

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    Rosa-Eva Huettl

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1 in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs.

  13. Npn-1 contributes to axon-axon interactions that differentially control sensory and motor innervation of the limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Soellner, Heidi; Bianchi, Elisa; Novitch, Bennett G; Huber, Andrea B

    2011-02-01

    The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1) in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs.

  14. Progranulin regulates neuronal outgrowth independent of Sortilin

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    Gass Jennifer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin (PGRN, a widely secreted growth factor, is involved in multiple biological functions, and mutations located within the PGRN gene (GRN are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FLTD-TDP. In light of recent reports suggesting PGRN functions as a protective neurotrophic factor and that sortilin (SORT1 is a neuronal receptor for PGRN, we used a Sort1-deficient (Sort1−/− murine primary hippocampal neuron model to investigate whether PGRN’s neurotrophic effects are dependent on SORT1. We sought to elucidate this relationship to determine what role SORT1, as a regulator of PGRN levels, plays in modulating PGRN’s neurotrophic effects. Results As the first group to evaluate the effect of PGRN loss in Grn knockout primary neuronal cultures, we show neurite outgrowth and branching are significantly decreased in Grn−/− neurons compared to wild-type (WT neurons. More importantly, we also demonstrate that PGRN overexpression can rescue this phenotype. However, the recovery in outgrowth is not observed following treatment with recombinant PGRN harboring missense mutations p.C139R, p.P248L or p.R432C, indicating that these mutations adversely affect the neurotrophic properties of PGRN. In addition, we also present evidence that cleavage of full-length PGRN into granulin peptides is required for increased neuronal outgrowth, suggesting that the neurotrophic functions of PGRN are contained within certain granulins. To further characterize the mechanism by which PGRN impacts neuronal morphology, we assessed the involvement of SORT1. We demonstrate that PGRN induced-outgrowth occurs in the absence of SORT1 in Sort1−/− cultures. Conclusion We demonstrate that loss of PGRN impairs proper neurite outgrowth and branching, and that exogenous PGRN alleviates this impairment. Furthermore, we determined that exogenous PGRN induces outgrowth independent of SORT1, suggesting another

  15. Corticostriatal combinatorics: the implications of corticostriatal axonal arborizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, T; Wilson, C J

    2002-02-01

    The complete striatal axonal arborizations of 16 juxtacellularly stained cortical pyramidal cells were analyzed. Corticostriatal neurons were located in the medial agranular or anterior cingulate cortex of rats. All axons were of the extended type and formed synaptic contacts in both the striosomal and matrix compartments as determined by counterstaining for the mu-opiate receptor. Six axonal arborizations were from collaterals of brain stem-projecting cells and the other 10 from bilaterally projecting cells with no brain stem projections. The distribution of synaptic boutons along the axons were convolved with the average dendritic tree volume of spiny projection neurons to obtain an axonal innervation volume and innervation density map for each axon. Innervation volumes varied widely, with single axons occupying between 0.4 and 14.2% of the striatum (average = 4%). The total number of boutons formed by individual axons ranged from 25 to 2,900 (average = 879). Within the innervation volume, the density of innervation was extremely sparse but inhomogeneous. The pattern of innervation resembled matrisomes, as defined by bulk labeling and functional mapping experiments, superimposed on a low background innervation. Using this sample as representative of all corticostriatal axons, the total number of corticostriatal neurons was estimated to be 17 million, about 10 times the number of striatal projection neurons.

  16. Role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) interactions in induction of neurite outgrowth and identification of a binding site for NCAM in the heel region of GDNF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Gotfryd, Kamil; Li, Shizhong

    2009-01-01

    The formation of appropriate neuronal circuits is an essential part of nervous system development and relies heavily on the outgrowth of axons and dendrites and their guidance to their respective targets. This process is governed by a large array of molecules, including glial cell line......-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), the interaction of which induce neurite outgrowth. In the present study the requirements for NCAM-mediated GDNF-induced neurite outgrowth were investigated in cultures of hippocampal neurons, which do not express Ret. We demonstrate...

  17. Novel DLK-independent neuronal regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans shares links with activity-dependent ectopic outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awal, Mehraj R.; Shay, James; McLoed, Melissa M.; Mazur, Eric; Gabel, Christopher V.

    2016-01-01

    During development, a neuron transitions from a state of rapid growth to a stable morphology, and neurons within the adult mammalian CNS lose their ability to effectively regenerate in response to injury. Here, we identify a novel form of neuronal regeneration, which is remarkably independent of DLK-1/DLK, KGB-1/JNK, and other MAPK signaling factors known to mediate regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mammals. This DLK-independent regeneration in C. elegans has direct genetic and molecular links to a well-studied form of endogenous activity-dependent ectopic axon outgrowth in the same neuron type. Both neuron outgrowth types are triggered by physical lesion of the sensory dendrite or mutations disrupting sensory activity, calcium signaling, or genes that restrict outgrowth during neuronal maturation, such as SAX-1/NDR kinase or UNC-43/CaMKII. These connections suggest that ectopic outgrowth represents a powerful platform for gene discovery in neuronal regeneration. Moreover, we note numerous similarities between C. elegans DLK-independent regeneration and lesion conditioning, a phenomenon producing robust regeneration in the mammalian CNS. Both regeneration types are triggered by lesion of a sensory neurite via reduction of neuronal activity and enhanced by disrupting L-type calcium channels or elevating cAMP. Taken as a whole, our study unites disparate forms of neuronal outgrowth to uncover fresh molecular insights into activity-dependent control of the adult nervous system’s intrinsic regenerative capacity. PMID:27078101

  18. Myelin Lipids Inhibit Axon Regeneration Following Spinal Cord Injury: a Novel Perspective for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; da Silva, Tiago F; Morgado, Marlene M; Rodrigues, Lorena G; Rodrigues, Daniel; Pereira, Marta I L; Marques, Ana; Sousa, Vera F; Coentro, João; Sá-Miranda, Clara; Sousa, Mónica M; Brites, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Lack of axon regeneration following spinal cord injury has been mainly ascribed to the inhibitory environment of the injury site, i.e., to chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs). Here, we used shiverer (shi) mice to assess axon regeneration following spinal cord injury in the presence of MAIs and CSPG but in the absence of compact myelin. Although in vitro shi neurons displayed a similar intrinsic neurite outgrowth to wild-type neurons, in vivo, shi fibers had increased regenerative capacity, suggesting that the wild-type spinal cord contains additional inhibitors besides MAIs and CSPG. Our data show that besides myelin protein, myelin lipids are highly inhibitory for neurite outgrowth and suggest that this inhibitory effect is released in the shi spinal cord given its decreased lipid content. Specifically, we identified cholesterol and sphingomyelin as novel myelin-associated inhibitors that operate through a Rho-dependent mechanism and have inhibitory activity in multiple neuron types. We further demonstrated the inhibitory action of myelin lipids in vivo, by showing that delivery of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, a drug that reduces the levels of lipids specifically in the injury site, leads to increased axon regeneration of wild-type (WT) dorsal column axons following spinal cord injury. In summary, our work shows that myelin lipids are important modulators of axon regeneration that should be considered together with protein MAIs as critical targets in strategies aiming at improving axonal growth following injury.

  19. N-Propionylmannosamine stimulates axonal elongation in a murine model of sciatic nerve injury

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    Christian Witzel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that sialic acid plays an important role during nerve regeneration. Sialic acids can be modified in vitro as well as in vivo using metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of the N-acyl side chain. N-Propionylmannosamine (ManNProp increases neurite outgrowth and accelerates the reestablishment of functional synapses in vitro. We investigated the influence of systemic ManNProp application using a specific in vivo mouse model. Using mice expressing axonal fluorescent proteins, we quantified the extension of regenerating axons, the number of regenerating axons, the number of arborising axons and the number of branches per axon 5 days after injury. Sciatic nerves from non-expressing mice were grafted into those expressing yellow fluorescent protein. We began a twice-daily intraperitoneal application of either peracetylated ManNProp (200 mg/kg or saline solution 5 days before injury, and continued it until nerve harvest (5 days after transection. ManNProp significantly increased the mean distance of axonal regeneration (2.49 mm vs. 1.53 mm; P < 0.005 and the number of arborizing axons (21% vs. 16% P = 0.008 5 days after sciatic nerve grafting. ManNProp did not affect the number of regenerating axons or the number of branches per arborizing axon. The biochemical glycoengineering of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid might be a promising approach for improving peripheral nerve regeneration.

  20. Histone acetylation inhibitors promote axon growth in adult dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shen; Nazif, Kutaiba; Smith, Alexander; Baas, Peter W; Smith, George M

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic mechanisms that guide damaged axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury remain poorly understood. Manipulation of posttranslational modifications of key proteins in mature neurons could reinvigorate growth machinery after injury. One such modification is acetylation, a reversible process controlled by two enzyme families, the histone deacetylases (HDACs) and the histone acetyl transferases (HATs), acting in opposition. Whereas acetylated histones in the nucleus are associated with upregulation of growth-promoting genes, deacetylated tubulin in the axoplasm is associated with more labile microtubules, conducive to axon growth. This study investigates the effects of HAT and HDAC inhibitors on cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and shows that inhibition of HATs by anacardic acid or CPTH2 improves axon outgrowth, whereas inhibition of HDACs by TSA or tubacin inhibits axon growth. Anacardic acid increased the number of axons able to cross an inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan border. Histone acetylation but not tubulin acetylation level was affected by HAT inhibitors, whereas tubulin acetylation levels were increased in the presence of the HDAC inhibitor tubacin. Although the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol did not have an effect on the lengths of DRG axons, nocodazole decreased axon lengths. Determining the mechanistic basis will require future studies, but this study shows that inhibitors of HAT can augment axon growth in adult DRG neurons, with the potential of aiding axon growth over inhibitory substrates produced by the glial scar. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Insulin and IGF-II, but not IGF-I, stimulate the in vitro regeneration of adult frog sciatic sensory axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edbladh, M; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Ekström, P A

    1994-01-01

    We used the in vitro regenerating frog sciatic nerve to look for effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II) on regeneration of sensory axons and on injury induced support cell proliferation in the outgrowth region. In nerves cultured for 11 days, a physiological...... dose (10 ng/ml, approximately 2 nM) of insulin or IGF-II increased ganglionic protein synthesis (by 20% and 50%, respectively) as well as the level of newly formed, radiolabelled axonal material distal to a crush injury (both by 80%), compared to untreated, paired controls. In addition, insulin...... increased the outgrowth distance of the furthest regenerating sensory axons by 10%. The preparation was particularly sensitive to insulin during the first 5 days of culturing. Furthermore, both insulin and IGF-II were found to inhibit proliferation of support cells in the outgrowth region in a manner...

  2. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Alexandra B; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Sekine, Yuichi; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Miller, David M; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured C. elegans GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both C. elegans GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12734.001

  3. Two Drosophila model neurons can regenerate axons from the stump or from a converted dendrite, with feedback between the two sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kavitha S; Rolls, Melissa M

    2017-08-17

    After axon severing, neurons recover function by reinitiating axon outgrowth. New outgrowth often originates from the remaining axon stump. However, in many mammalian neurons, new axons initiate from a dendritic site when the axon is injured close to the cell body. Drosophila sensory neurons are ideal for studying neuronal injury responses because they can be injured reproducibly in a variety of genetic backgrounds. In Drosophila, it has been shown that a complex sensory neuron, ddaC, can regenerate an axon from a stump, and a simple sensory neuron, ddaE, can regenerate an axon from a dendrite. To provide a more complete picture of axon regeneration in these cell types, we performed additional injury types. We found that ddaE neurons can initiate regeneration from an axon stump when a stump remains. We also showed that ddaC neurons regenerate from the dendrite when the axon is severed close to the cell body. We next demonstrated if a stump remains, new axons can originate from this site and a dendrite at the same time. Because cutting the axon close to the cell body results in growth of the new axon from a dendrite, and cutting further out may not, we asked whether the initial response in the cell body was similar after both types of injury. A transcriptional reporter for axon injury signaling, puc-GFP, increased with similar timing and levels after proximal and distal axotomy. However, changes in dendritic microtubule polarity differed in response to the two types of injury, and were influenced by the presence of a scar at the distal axotomy site. We conclude that both ddaE and ddaC can regenerate axons either from the stump or a dendrite, and that there is some feedback between the two sites that modulates dendritic microtubule polarity.

  4. Antibody to collapsin response mediator protein 1 promotes neurite outgrowth from rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongsheng Lin; Jing Chen; Wenbin Zhang; Xiaobing Gong; Biao Chen; Guoqing Guo

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of collapsin response mediator protein 1 (CRMP-1) on neurite outgrowth from rat hippocampal neurons by blocking its function using an antibody. Hippocampal neurons, cultured in vitro, were treated (blocked) using a polyclonal antibody to CRMP-1, and neurite outgrowth and cytoskeletal changes w ere captured using atomic force microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. Control cells, treated with normal rabbit IgG, established their characteristic morphology and had a large number of processes emerging from the soma, including numerous branches. Microtubules were clearly visible in the soma, formed an elaborate network, and were aligned in parallel arrays to form bundles which projected into neurites. After blocking with CRMP-1 antibody, the number of branches emerging from axons and dendrites significantly increased and were substantially longer, compared with control cells. However, the microtubule network nearly disappeared and only a few remnants were visible. When CRMP-1 antibody-blocked neurons were treated with the Rho inhibitor, Y27632, numerous neurites emerged from the soma, and branches were more abundant than in control neurons. Although the microtubules were not as clearly visible compared with neurons cultured in control medium, the microtubule network recovered in cells treated with Y27632, when compared with cells that were blocked by CRMP-1 antibody (but not treated with Y27632). These results demonstrate that neurite outgrowth from hippocampal neurons can be promoted by blocking CRMP-1 with a polyclonal antibody.

  5. Role of laminin bioavailability in the astroglial permissivity for neuritic outgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TARDY MARCIENNE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms involved in the failure of an adult brain to regenerate post-lesion remain poorly understood. The reactive gliosis which occurs after an injury to the CNS and leads to the glial scar has been considered as one of the major impediments to neurite outgrowth and axonal regeneration. A glial scar consists mainly of reactive, hypertrophic astrocytes. These reactive cells acquire new properties, leading to A non-permissive support for neurons. Astrogial reactivity is mainly characteriized by a high overexpression of the major component of the gliofilaments, the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. This GFAP overexpression is related to the astroglial morphological response to injury. We hypothesized that modulation of GFAP synthesis, reversing the hypertrophic phenotype, might also reverse the blockage of neuritic outgrowth observed after a lesion. In this article, we review findings of our group, confirming our hypothesis in a model of lesioned neuron-astrocyte cocultures. We demonstrate that permissivity for neuritic outgrowth is related to phenotypic changes induced in reactive astrocytes transfected by antisense GFAP-mRNA. We also found that this permissivity was related to a neuron-regulated extracellular laminin bioavailability.

  6. Axonal GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Federico F; Marty, Alain; Stell, Brandon M

    2008-09-01

    Type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are well established as the main inhibitory receptors in the mature mammalian forebrain. In recent years, evidence has accumulated showing that GABA(A)Rs are prevalent not only in the somatodendritic compartment of CNS neurons, but also in their axonal compartment. Evidence for axonal GABA(A)Rs includes new immunohistochemical and immunogold data: direct recording from single axonal terminals; and effects of local applications of GABA(A)R modulators on action potential generation, on axonal calcium signalling, and on neurotransmitter release. Strikingly, whereas presynaptic GABA(A)Rs have long been considered inhibitory, the new studies in the mammalian brain mostly indicate an excitatory action. Depending on the neuron that is under study, axonal GABA(A)Rs can be activated by ambient GABA, by GABA spillover, or by an autocrine action, to increase either action potential firing and/or transmitter release. In certain neurons, the excitatory effects of axonal GABA(A)Rs persist into adulthood. Altogether, axonal GABA(A)Rs appear as potent neuronal modulators of the mammalian CNS.

  7. Proteoglycans:Road Signs for Neurite Outgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Justin A. Beller; Diane M. Snow

    2014-01-01

    Proteoglycans in the central nervous system play integral roles as“trafifc signals”for the direc-tion of neurite outgrowth. This attribute of proteoglycans is a major factor in regeneration of the injured central nervous system. In this review, the structures of proteoglycans and the evi-dence suggesting their involvement in the response following spinal cord injury are presented. The review further describes the methods routinely used to determine the effect proteoglycans have on neurite outgrowth. The effects of proteoglycans on neurite outgrowth are not com-pletely understood as there is disagreement on what component of the molecule is interacting with growing neurites and this ambiguity is chronicled in an historical context. Finally, the most recent findings suggesting possible receptors, interactions, and sulfation patterns that may be important in eliciting the effect of proteoglycans on neurite outgrowth are discussed. A greater understanding of the proteoglycan-neurite interaction is necessary for successfully promoting regeneration in the injured central nervous system.

  8. Characterization of BASP1-mediated neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshunova, Irina; Caroni, Pico; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    The brain acid-soluble protein BASP1 (CAP-23, NAP-22) belongs to the family of growth-associated proteins, which also includes GAP-43, a protein recently shown to regulate neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated neurite outgrowth. Here, the effects of BASP1 overexpression were investigated ...

  9. Neurite outgrowth on a fibronectin isoform expressed during peripheral nerve regeneration is mediated by the interaction of paxillin with α4β1 integrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginsberg Mark H

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regeneration of peripheral nerve is associated with a change in the alternative splicing of the fibronectin primary gene transcript to re-express embryonic isoforms containing a binding site for α4β1 integrins that promote neurite outgrowth. Here we use PC12 cells to examine the role of the interaction between paxillin and the α4 integrin cytoplasmic domain in neurite outgrowth. Results Expression of α4 with mutations in the paxillin-binding domain reduced neurite outgrowth on recombinant embryonic fibronectin fragments relative to wild type α4. Over-expression of paxillin promoted neurite outgrowth while a mutant isoform lacking the LD4 domain implicated in the regulation of ARF and Rac GTPases was less effective. Optimal α4-mediated migration in leucocytes requires spatial regulation of α4 phosphorylation at Ser988, a post-translational modification that blocks paxillin binding to the integrin cytoplasmic domain. In keeping with this α4(S988D, which mimics phosphorylated α4, did not promote neurite outgrowth. However, α4 was not phosphorylated in the PC12 cells, and a non-phosphorylatable α4(S988A mutant promoted neurite outgrowth indistinguishably from the wild type integrin. Conclusion We establish the importance of the α4 integrin-paxillin interaction in a model of axonal regeneration and highlight differing dependence on phosphorylation of α4 for extension of neuronal growth cones and migration of non-neural cells.

  10. Slit2 inactivates GSK3β to signal neurite outgrowth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Justin; Kim, Bo Taek; Kim, Yun Tai; Jiao, Zhongxian; Hur, Eun-Mi; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Slit molecules comprise one of the four canonical families of axon guidance cues that steer the growth cone in the developing nervous system. Apart from their role in axon pathfinding, emerging lines of evidence suggest that a wide range of cellular processes are regulated by Slit, ranging from branch formation and fasciculation during neurite outgrowth to tumor progression and to angiogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms downstream of Slit remain largely unknown, in part, because of a lack of a readily manipulatable system that produces easily identifiable traits in response to Slit. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using the cell line CAD as an assay system to dissect the signaling pathways triggered by Slit. Here, we show that CAD cells express receptors for Slit (Robo1 and Robo2) and that CAD cells respond to nanomolar concentrations of Slit2 by markedly decelerating the rate of process extension. Using this system, we reveal that Slit2 inactivates GSK3β and that inhibition of GSK3β is required for Slit2 to inhibit process outgrowth. Furthermore, we show that Slit2 induces GSK3β phosphorylation and inhibits neurite outgrowth in adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, validating Slit2 signaling in primary neurons. Given that CAD cells can be conveniently manipulated using standard molecular biological methods and that the process extension phenotype regulated by Slit2 can be readily traced and quantified, the use of a cell line CAD will facilitate the identification of downstream effectors and elucidation of signaling cascade triggered by Slit.

  11. Slit2 inactivates GSK3β to signal neurite outgrowth inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Byun

    Full Text Available Slit molecules comprise one of the four canonical families of axon guidance cues that steer the growth cone in the developing nervous system. Apart from their role in axon pathfinding, emerging lines of evidence suggest that a wide range of cellular processes are regulated by Slit, ranging from branch formation and fasciculation during neurite outgrowth to tumor progression and to angiogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms downstream of Slit remain largely unknown, in part, because of a lack of a readily manipulatable system that produces easily identifiable traits in response to Slit. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using the cell line CAD as an assay system to dissect the signaling pathways triggered by Slit. Here, we show that CAD cells express receptors for Slit (Robo1 and Robo2 and that CAD cells respond to nanomolar concentrations of Slit2 by markedly decelerating the rate of process extension. Using this system, we reveal that Slit2 inactivates GSK3β and that inhibition of GSK3β is required for Slit2 to inhibit process outgrowth. Furthermore, we show that Slit2 induces GSK3β phosphorylation and inhibits neurite outgrowth in adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, validating Slit2 signaling in primary neurons. Given that CAD cells can be conveniently manipulated using standard molecular biological methods and that the process extension phenotype regulated by Slit2 can be readily traced and quantified, the use of a cell line CAD will facilitate the identification of downstream effectors and elucidation of signaling cascade triggered by Slit.

  12. Neurite outgrowth is significantly increased by the simultaneous presentation of Schwann cells and moderate exogenous electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, Abigail N; Seggio, Angela M; Thompson, Deanna M

    2011-08-01

    Axonal extension is influenced by a variety of external guidance cues; therefore, the development and optimization of a multi-faceted approach is probably necessary to address the intricacy of functional regeneration following nerve injury. In this study, primary dissociated neonatal rat dorsal root ganglia neurons and Schwann cells were examined in response to an 8 h dc electrical stimulation (0-100 mV mm(-1)). Stimulated samples were then fixed immediately, immunostained, imaged and analyzed to determine Schwann cell orientation and characterize neurite outgrowth relative to electric field strength and direction. Results indicate that Schwann cells are viable following electrical stimulation with 10-100 mV mm(-1), and retain a normal morphology relative to unstimulated cells; however, no directional bias is observed. Neurite outgrowth was significantly enhanced by twofold following exposure to either a 50 mV mm(-1) electric field (EF) or co-culture with unstimulated Schwann cells by comparison to neurons cultured alone. Neurite outgrowth was further increased in the presence of simultaneously applied cues (Schwann cells + 50 mV mm(-1) dc EF), exhibiting a 3.2-fold increase over unstimulated control neurons, and a 1.2-fold increase over either neurons cultured with unstimulated Schwann cells or the electrical stimulus alone. These results indicate that dc electric stimulation in combination with Schwann cells may provide synergistic guidance cues for improved axonal growth relevant to nerve injuries in the peripheral nervous system.

  13. Axons take a dive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Paredes, Mercedes F; Huang, Eric J; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) and ependymal (E1) cells share the apical surface of the ventricular–subventricular zone (V–SVZ). In a recent article, we show that supraependymal serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from the raphe nuclei in mice form an extensive plexus on the walls of the lateral ventricles where they contact E1 cells and NSCs. Here we further characterize the contacts between 5HT supraependymal axons and E1 cells in mice, and show that suprependymal axons tightly associated to E1 cells are also present in the walls of the human lateral ventricles. These observations raise interesting questions about the function of supraependymal axons in the regulation of E1 cells. PMID:26413556

  14. Polarized targeting of L1-CAM regulates axonal and dendritic bundling in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Yuanzheng; Gu, Chen

    2010-11-01

    Proper axonal and dendritic bundling is essential for the establishment of neuronal connections and the synchronization of synaptic inputs, respectively. Cell adhesion molecules of the L1-CAM (L1-cell adhesion molecule) family regulate axon guidance and fasciculation, neuron migration, dendrite morphology, and synaptic plasticity. It remains unclear how these molecules play so many different roles. Here we show that polarized axon-dendrite targeting of an avian L1-CAM protein, NgCAM (neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule), can regulate the switch of bundling of the two major compartments of rat hippocampal neurons. Using a new in-vitro model for studying neurite-neurite interactions, we found that expressed axonal NgCAM induced robust axonal bundling via the trans-homophilic interaction of immunoglobulin domains. Interestingly, dendritic bundling was induced by the dendritic targeting of NgCAM, caused by either deleting its fibronectin repeats or blocking activities of protein kinases. Consistent with the NgCAM results, expression of mouse L1-CAM also induced axonal bundling and blocking kinase activities disrupted its axonal targeting. Furthermore, the trans-homophilic interaction stabilized the bundle formation, probably through recruiting NgCAM proteins to contact sites and promoting guided axon outgrowth. Taken together, our results suggest that precise localization of L1-CAM is important for establishing proper cell-cell contacts in neural circuits.

  15. Dopaminergic axon guidance: which makes what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia ePrestoz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesotelencephalic pathways in the adult central nervous system have been studied in great detail because of their implication in major physiological functions as well as in psychiatric, neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the ontogeny of these pathways and the molecular mechanisms that guide dopaminergic axons during embryogenesis have been only recently studied. This line of research is of crucial interest for the repair of lesioned circuits in adulthood following neurodegenerative diseases or common traumatic injuries. For instance, in the adult, the anatomic and functional repair of the nigrostriatal pathway following dopaminergic embryonic neuron transplantation suggests that specific guidance cues exist which govern embryonic fibers outgrowth, and suggests that axons from transplanted embryonic cells are able to respond to theses cues, which then guide them to their final targets. In this review, we first synthesize the work that has been performed in the last few years on developing mesotelencephalic pathways, and summarize the current knowledge on the identity of cellular and molecular signals thought to be involved in establishing mesotelencephalic dopaminergic neuronal connectivity during embryogenesis in the central nervous system of rodents. Then, we review the modulation of expression of these molecular signals in the lesioned adult brain and discuss their potential role in remodeling the mesotelencephalic dopaminergic circuitry, with a particular focus on Parkinson’s disease. Identifying guidance molecules involved in the connection of grafted cells may be useful for cellular therapy in Parkinsonian patients, as these molecules may help direct axons from grafted cells along the long distance they have to travel from the substantia nigra to the striatum.

  16. A Systems-Level Analysis of the Peripheral Nerve Intrinsic Axonal Growth Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Vijayendran; Coppola, Giovanni; Nawabi, Homaira; Omura, Takao; Versano, Revital; Huebner, Eric A.; Zhang, Alice; Costigan, Michael; Yekkirala, Ajay; Barrett, Lee; Blesch, Armin; Michaelevski, Izhak; Davis-Turak, Jeremy; Gao, Fuying; Langfelder, Peter; Horvath, Steve; He, Zhigang; Benowitz, Larry; Fainzilber, Mike; Tuszynski, Mark; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The regenerative capacity of the injured CNS in adult mammals is severely limited, yet axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) regrow, albeit to a limited extent, after injury. We reasoned that coordinate regulation of gene expression in injured neurons involving multiple pathways was central to PNS regenerative capacity. To provide a framework for revealing pathways involved in PNS axon regrowth after injury, we applied a comprehensive systems biology approach, starting with gene expression profiling of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) combined with multi-level bioinformatic analyses and experimental validation of network predictions. We used this rubric to identify a drug that accelerates DRG neurite outgrowth in vitro and optic nerve outgrowth in vivo by inducing elements of the identified network. The work provides a functional genomics foundation for understanding neural repair and proof of the power of such approaches in tackling complex problems in nervous system biology. PMID:26898779

  17. EGFR Activation Mediates Inhibition of Axon Regeneration by Myelin and Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprivica, Vuk; Cho, Kin-Sang; Park, Jong Bae; Yiu, Glenn; Atwal, Jasvinder; Gore, Bryan; Kim, Jieun A.; Lin, Estelle; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Chen, Dong Feng; He, Zhigang

    2005-10-01

    Inhibitory molecules associated with myelin and the glial scar limit axon regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS), but the underlying signaling mechanisms of regeneration inhibition are not fully understood. Here, we show that suppressing the kinase function of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blocks the activities of both myelin inhibitors and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in inhibiting neurite outgrowth. In addition, regeneration inhibitors trigger the phosphorylation of EGFR in a calcium-dependent manner. Local administration of EGFR inhibitors promotes significant regeneration of injured optic nerve fibers, pointing to a promising therapeutic avenue for enhancing axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  18. ATP7A (Menkes protein) functions in axonal targeting and synaptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Meskini, Rajaâ; Crabtree, Kelli L; Cline, Laura B; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A; Ronnett, Gabriele V

    2007-03-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the copper transporter, ATP7A, a P-type ATPase. We previously used the olfactory system to demonstrate that ATP7A expression is developmentally, not constitutive, regulated, peaking during synaptogenesis when it is highly expressed in extending axons in a copper-independent manner. Although not known to be associated with axonal functions, we explored the possibility that the inability of mutant ATP7A to support axon outgrowth contributes to the neurodegeneration seen in MD. In vivo analysis of the olfactory system in mottled brindled (Atp7aMobr) mice, a rodent model for MD, demonstrates that ATP7A deficiency affects olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) maturation. Disrupted OSN axonal projections and mitral/tufted cell dendritic growth lead to altered synapse integrity and glomerular disorganization in the olfactory bulbs of Atp7aMobr mice. Our data indicate that the neuronal abnormalities observed in MD are a result of specific age-dependent developmental defects. This study demonstrates a role for ATP7A and/or copper in axon outgrowth and synaptogenesis, and will further help identify the cause of the neuropathology that characterizes MD.

  19. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaskos, J., E-mail: flaskos@vet.auth.gr [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Nikolaidis, E. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Harris, W. [School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS (United Kingdom); Sachana, M. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Hargreaves, A.J., E-mail: alan.hargreaves@ntu.ac.uk [School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-lethal levels of chlorpyrifos oxon inhibit neurite outgrowth in N2a cells Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylcholinesterase exhibits sustained inhibition throughout exposure Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The levels of neurofilament heavy chain and GAP-43

  20. Distinct roles for Sema3A, Sema3F, and an unidentified trophic factor in controlling the advance of geniculate axons to gustatory lingual epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilbig, Ryan; Cosmano, Jason; Giger, Roman; Rochlin, M William

    2004-12-01

    Geniculate ganglion axons arrive in the lingual mesenchyme on embryonic day 13 (E13), 3-4 days before penetrating fungiform papilla epithelium (E17). This latency may result from chemorepulsion by epithelial Sema3A (Dillon et al. (2004) Journal of Comparative Neurology 470, 13-24), or Sema3F, which we report is also expressed in this epithelium. Sema3A and Sema3F repelled or suppressed geniculate neurite outgrowth, respectively, and these effects were stage and neurotrophic factor dependent. BDNF-stimulated outgrowth is repelled by Sema3A until E17, but insensitive to Sema3F from E16. NT-4-stimulated neurite outgrowth is sensitive to Sema3A and Sema3F through E18, but NT-4 has not been detected in E15-18 tongue. E15-18 tongue explants did not exhibit net chemorepulsion of geniculate neurites, but the ability of tongue explants to support geniculate neurite outgrowth fluctuates: E12-13 (Rochlin et al. (2000), Journal of Comparative Neurology, 422, 579-593) and E17-18 explants promote and may attract geniculate neurites, but stages corresponding to intralingual arborization do not. The E18 trophic and tropic effects were evident even in the presence of BDNF or NT-4, suggesting that some other factor is responsible. Intrinsic neurite outgrowth capability (without exogenous neurotrophic factors) fluctuated similarly: ganglia deteriorated at E15, but exhibited moderate outgrowth at E18. The chemorepulsion studies are consistent with a role for Sema3A, not Sema3F, in restricting geniculate axons from the epithelium until E17, when axons penetrate the epithelium. The transient inability of tongue explants to promote geniculate neurite outgrowth may signify an alternative mechanism for restricting geniculate axons from the epithelium: limiting trophic factor access.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase modulates neurite outgrowth on fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, C; Poiana, G; Augusti-Tocco, G; Biagioni, S

    2007-05-04

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been reported to be involved in the modulation of neurite outgrowth. To understand the role played by different domains, we transfected neuroblastoma cells with three constructs containing the invariant region of AChE, differing in the exon encoding the C-terminus and therefore in AChE cellular fate and localization. All isoforms increased neurite extension, suggesting the involvement of the invariant domain [A. De Jaco, G. Augusti-Tocco, S. Biagioni, Alternative AChE molecular forms exhibit similar ability to induce neurite outgrowth, J. Neurosci. Res. 70 (2002) 756-765]. The peripheral anionic site (PAS) is encoded by invariant exons and represents the domain involved in non-cholinergic functions of AChE. Masking of PAS with fasciculin results in a significant decrease of neurite outgrowth in all clones overexpressing AChE. A strong reduction was also observed when clones were cultured on fibronectin. Treatment of clones with fasciculin, therefore masking PAS, abolished the fibronectin-induced reduction. The inhibition of the catalytic site cannot revert the fibronectin effect. Finally, when clones were cultured on fibronectin in the presence of heparin, a ligand of fibronectin, the inhibitory effect was completely reversed. Our results indicate that PAS could directly or indirectly mediate AChE/fibronectin interactions.

  2. Identification of Arx targets unveils new candidates for controlling cortical interneuron migration and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle M Friocourt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the homeobox transcription factor ARX have been found to be responsible for a wide spectrum of disorders extending from phenotypes with severe neuronal migration defects, such as lissencephaly, to mild forms of intellectual disabilities without apparent brain abnormalities, but with associated features of dystonia and epilepsy. Arx expression is mainly restricted to populations of GABA-containing neurons. Studies of the effects of ARX loss of function, either in humans or mutant mice, revealed varying defects, suggesting multiple roles of this gene in brain patterning, neuronal proliferation and migration, cell maturation and differentiation, as well as axonal outgrowth and connectivity. However, to date, little is known about how Arx functions as a transcription factor or which genes it binds and regulates. Recently, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation and mRNA expression with microarray analysis and identified approximately 1000 gene promoters bound by Arx in transfected neuroblastoma N2a cells and mouse embryonic brain. To narrow the analysis of Arx targets to those most likely to control cortical interneuron migration and/or differentiation, we compare here our data to previously published studies searching for genes enriched or down-regulated in cortical interneurons between E13.5 and E15.5. We thus identified 14 Arx-target genes enriched (Cxcr7, Meis1, Ppap2a, Slc12a5, Ets2, Phlda1, Zif268, Igf1, Lmo3, Sema6, Lgi1, Alk, Tgfb3, Napb and 5 genes specifically down-regulated (Hmgn3, Lmo1, Ebf3, Rasgef1b and Slit2 in cortical migrating neurons. In this review, we present these genes and discuss how their possible regulation by Arx may lead to the dysfunction of GABAergic neurons, resulting in mental retardation and epilepsy.

  3. Neurite outgrowth of mature retinal ganglion cells and PC12 cells requires activity of CK1δ and CK1ε.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Bischof

    Full Text Available Mature retinal ganglion cells (RGCs do not normally regenerate severed axons after optic nerve injury and show only little neurite outgrowth in culture. However, RGCs can be transformed into an active regenerative state after lens injury (LI enabling these neurons to regrow axons in vitro and in vivo. In the current study we investigated the role of CK1δ and CK1ε activity in neurite outgrowth of LI stimulated RGCs and nerve growth factor (NGF stimulated PC12 cells, respectively. In both cell types CK1δ and ε were localized in granular particles aligned at microtubules in neurites and growth cones. Although LI treatment did not measurably affect the expression of CK1δ and ε, it significantly elevated the specific kinase activity in the retina. Similarly, CK1δ/ε specific kinase activity was also elevated in NGF treated PC12 cells compared with untreated controls. Neurite extension in PC12 cells was associated with a change in the activity of CK1δ C-terminal targeting kinases, suggesting that activity of these kinases might be necessary for neurite outgrowth. Pharmacological inactivation of CK1δ and ε markedly compromised neurite outgrowth of both, PC12 cells and LI stimulated RGCs in a concentration dependent manner. These data provide evidence for a so far unknown, but essential role of CK1 isoforms in neurite growth.

  4. Depending on Its Nano-Spacing, ALCAM Promotes Cell Attachment and Axon Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Karsten; Jaehrling, Steffen; Spatz, Joachim P.; Pollerberg, G. Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    ALCAM is a member of the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) family which plays an important role during nervous system formation. We here show that the two neuron populations of developing dorsal root ganglia (DRG) display ALCAM transiently on centrally and peripherally projecting axons during the two phases of axon outgrowth. To analyze the impact of ALCAM on cell adhesion and axon growth, DRG single cells were cultured on ALCAM-coated coverslips or on nanopatterns where ALCAM is presented in physiological amino-carboxyl terminal orientation at highly defined distances (29, 54, 70, 86, and 137 nm) and where the interspaces are passivated to prevent unspecific protein deposition. Some axonal features (branching, lateral deviation) showed density dependence whereas others (number of axons per neuron, various axon growth parameters) turned out to be an all-or-nothing reaction. Time-lapse analyses revealed that ALCAM density has an impact on axon velocity and advance efficiency. The behavior of the sensory axon tip, the growth cone, partially depended on ALCAM density in a dose-response fashion (shape, dynamics, detachment) while other features did not (size, complexity). Whereas axon growth was equally promoted whether ALCAM was presented at high (29 nm) or low densities (86 nm), the attachment of non-neuronal cells depended on high ALCAM densities. The attachment of non-neuronal cells to the rather unspecific standard proteins presented by conventional implants designed to enhance axonal regeneration is a severe problem. Our findings point to ALCAM, presented as 86 nm pattern, for a promising candidate for the improvement of such implants since this pattern drives axon growth to its full extent while at the same time non-neuronal cell attachment is clearly reduced. PMID:23251325

  5. A role for myosin VI in the localization of axonal proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy L Lewis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In neurons polarized trafficking of vesicle-bound membrane proteins gives rise to the distinct molecular composition and functional properties of axons and dendrites. Despite their central role in shaping neuronal form and function, surprisingly little is known about the molecular processes that mediate polarized targeting of neuronal proteins. Recently, the plus-end-directed motor Myosin Va was shown to play a critical role in targeting of transmembrane proteins to dendrites; however, the role of myosin motors in axonal targeting is unknown. Here we show that Myosin VI, a minus-end-directed motor, plays a vital role in the enrichment of proteins on the surface of axons. Engineering non-neuronal proteins to interact with Myosin VI causes them to become highly concentrated at the axonal surface in dissociated rat cortical neurons. Furthermore, disruption of either Myosin VI function or expression leads to aberrant dendritic localization of axonal proteins. Myosin VI mediates the enrichment of proteins on the axonal surface at least in part by stimulating dendrite-specific endocytosis, a mechanism that has been shown to underlie the localization of many axonal proteins. In addition, a version of Channelrhodopsin 2 that was engineered to bind to Myosin VI is concentrated at the surface of the axon of cortical neurons in mice in vivo, suggesting that it could be a useful tool for probing circuit structure and function. Together, our results indicate that myosins help shape the polarized distributions of both axonal and dendritic proteins.

  6. Axonal dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in somatosensory cortex.

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    Sally A Marik

    Full Text Available Cortical topography can be remapped as a consequence of sensory deprivation, suggesting that cortical circuits are continually modified by experience. To see the effect of altered sensory experience on specific components of cortical circuits, we imaged neurons, labeled with a genetically modified adeno-associated virus, in the intact mouse somatosensory cortex before and after whisker plucking. Following whisker plucking we observed massive and rapid reorganization of the axons of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, accompanied by a transient increase in bouton density. For horizontally projecting axons of excitatory neurons there was a net increase in axonal projections from the non-deprived whisker barrel columns into the deprived barrel columns. The axon collaterals of inhibitory neurons located in the deprived whisker barrel columns retracted in the vicinity of their somata and sprouted long-range projections beyond their normal reach towards the non-deprived whisker barrel columns. These results suggest that alterations in the balance of excitation and inhibition in deprived and non-deprived barrel columns underlie the topographic remapping associated with sensory deprivation.

  7. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

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    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  8. MARK2 Rescues Nogo-66-Induced Inhibition of Neurite Outgrowth via Regulating Microtubule-Associated Proteins in Neurons In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yu-Chao; Xiong, Nan-Xiang; Shen, Jian-Ying; Yu, Hua; Huang, Yi-Zhi; Zhao, Hong-Yang

    2016-11-01

    The ability of neurons in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) to regenerate after injury is limited by inhibitors in CNS myelin. Nogo-66 is the most important myelin inhibitor but the mechanisms of Nogo-66 inhibition of neurite outgrowth remain poorly understood. Particularly, the relationship between Nogo-66 and microtubule-affinity regulating kinase 2 (MARK2) has not been examined. This study investigated the role of MARK2 in Nogo-66 inhibition and the function of MARK2 in neurite elongation in neurons in vitro. MARK2 and phosphorylated MARK2 at Ser212 (p-Ser212) alterations in Neuro 2a cells were assessed at different Nogo-66 exposure times; the relationships between MARK2 and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were determined via the overexpression or interference of MARK2. Our study reports that Nogo-66 inhibited the expression of total MARK2 but also reduced Ser212 phosphorylation of MARK2, whereas levels of MAP1-b and tau varied depending on MARK2 overexpression or reduced expression. Furthermore, MARK2 increased the proportion of tyrosinated α-tubulin, thereby disrupting the stability of tubulin, most likely affecting axonal growth. In line with these results, overexpression of MARK2 promoted neurite elongation and therefore is able to rescue the inhibitory effect of Nogo-66 on neurite growth. In conclusion, the intracellular PKB/MARK2/MAPs/α-tubulin pathway appears to be essential for neurite elongation in neurons in vitro. These results suggest a critical role for MARK2 in overcoming Nogo-66-induced inhibition of axon outgrowth in neurons. Pharmacological activators of MARK2 may be applicable to promote successful axonal outgrowth following many types of CNS injuries.

  9. Coculture of elongated neuron axon with poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) biomembrane in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程飚; 陈峥嵘

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To elongate human nerve axon in culture and search for suitable support matrices for peripheral nervous system transplantation.Methods: Human embryo cortical neuronal cells,seeded on poly ( D, L-lactide-co-glycolide ) ( PLGA )membrane scaffolds, were elongated with a self-made neuro-axon extending device. The growth and morphological changes of neuron axons were observed to measure axolemmal permeability after elongation.Neurofilament protein was stained by immunohistochemical technique.Results: Human embryo neuron axon could be elongated and cultured on the PLGA membrane and retain their normal form and function.Conclusions: Three dimensional scaffolds with elongated neuron axon have the basic characteristics of artificial nerves, indicating a fundemental theory of nerve repair with elongated neuron axon.

  10. Aquaporin-1 water permeability as a novel determinant of axonal regeneration in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Verkman, A S

    2015-03-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons transduce peripheral pain signals through small-diameter, non-myelinated C-fibers, which, when injured, can regenerate to restore pain sensation. Water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed at the plasma membrane of cell bodies and axons of DRG neurons, where it modulates the sensing of certain types of pain. Here, we found that AQP1 is also involved in DRG axonal growth and regeneration by a mechanism that may involve water transport-facilitated extension of axonal outgrowths. Spontaneous and nerve growth factor-stimulated axonal extension was reduced in cultures of AQP1-deficient DRG neurons and DRG explants compared to the wildtype. Axonal growth in AQP1-deficient DRG cultures was rescued by transfection with AQP1 or a different water-transporting AQP (AQP4), but not by a non-water-transporting AQP1 mutant. Following sciatic nerve compression injury AQP1 expression was increased in DRG neurons in wildtype mice, and DRG axonal growth was impaired in AQP1-deficient mice. Our results indicate AQP1 as a novel determinant of DRG axonal regeneration and hence a potential therapeutic target to accelerate neuronal regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glia to axon RNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José Roberto; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José Roberto; Calliari, Aldo; Cal, Karina; Bresque, Mariana; Dipaolo, Andrés; Farias, Joaquina; Mercer, John A

    2014-03-01

    The existence of RNA in axons has been a matter of dispute for decades. Evidence for RNA and ribosomes has now accumulated to a point at which it is difficult to question, much of the disputes turned to the origin of these axonal RNAs. In this review, we focus on studies addressing the origin of axonal RNAs and ribosomes. The neuronal soma as the source of most axonal RNAs has been demonstrated and is indisputable. However, the surrounding glial cells may be a supplemental source of axonal RNAs, a matter scarcely investigated in the literature. Here, we review the few papers that have demonstrated that glial-to-axon RNA transfer is not only feasible, but likely. We describe this process in both invertebrate axons and vertebrate axons. Schwann cell to axon ribosomes transfer was conclusively demonstrated (Court et al. [2008]: J. Neurosci 28:11024-11029; Court et al. [2011]: Glia 59:1529-1539). However, mRNA transfer still remains to be demonstrated in a conclusive way. The intercellular transport of mRNA has interesting implications, particularly with respect to the integration of glial and axonal function. This evolving field is likely to impact our understanding of the cell biology of the axon in both normal and pathological conditions. Most importantly, if the synthesis of proteins in the axon can be controlled by interacting glia, the possibilities for clinical interventions in injury and neurodegeneration are greatly increased.

  12. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics. PMID:22366651

  13. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2012-11-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics.

  14. Insulin and IGF-II, but not IGF-I, stimulate the in vitro regeneration of adult frog sciatic sensory axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edbladh, M; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Ekström, P A

    1994-01-01

    We used the in vitro regenerating frog sciatic nerve to look for effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II) on regeneration of sensory axons and on injury induced support cell proliferation in the outgrowth region. In nerves cultured for 11 days, a physiological...

  15. SAX-3 (Robo) and UNC-40 (DCC) regulate a directional bias for axon guidance in response to multiple extracellular cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xia; Wadsworth, William G

    2014-01-01

    Axons in Caenorhabditis elegans are guided by multiple extracellular cues, including UNC-6 (netrin), EGL-20 (wnt), UNC-52 (perlecan), and SLT-1 (slit). How multiple extracellular cues determine the direction of axon guidance is not well understood. We have proposed that an axon's response to guidance cues can be modeled as a random walk, i.e., a succession of randomly directed movement. Guidance cues dictate the probability of axon outgrowth activity occurring in each direction, which over time creates a directional bias. Here we provide further evidence for this model. We describe the effects that the UNC-40 (DCC) and SAX-3 (Robo) receptors and the UNC-6, EGL-20, UNC-52, and SLT-1 extracellular cues have on the directional bias of the axon outgrowth activity for the HSN and AVM neurons. We find that the directional bias created by the cues depend on UNC-40 or SAX-3. UNC-6 and EGL-20 affect the directional bias for both neurons, whereas UNC-52 and SLT-1 only affect the directional bias for HSN and AVM, respectively. The direction of the bias created by the loss of a cue can vary and the direction depends on the other cues. The random walk model predicts this combinatorial regulation. In a random walk a probability is assigned for each direction of outgrowth, thus creating a probability distribution. The probability distribution for each neuron is determined by the collective effect of all the cues. Since the sum of the probabilities must equal one, each cue affects the probability of outgrowth in multiple directions.

  16. Experience-driven axon retraction in the pharmacologically inactivated visual cortex does not require synaptic transmission.

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    Kana Watanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experience during early postnatal development plays an important role in the refinement of specific neural connections in the brain. In the mammalian visual system, altered visual experiences induce plastic adaptation of visual cortical responses and guide rearrangements of afferent axons from the lateral geniculate nucleus. Previous studies using visual deprivation demonstrated that the afferents serving an open eye significantly retract when cortical neurons are pharmacologically inhibited by applying a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor agonist, muscimol, whereas those serving a deprived eye are rescued from retraction, suggesting that presynaptic activity can lead to the retraction of geniculocortical axons in the absence of postsynaptic activity. Because muscimol application suppresses the spike activity of cortical neurons leaving transmitter release intact at geniculocortical synapses, local synaptic interaction may underlie the retraction of active axons in the inhibited cortex. METHOD AND FINDINGS: New studies reported here determined whether experience-driven axon retraction can occur in the visual cortex inactivated by blocking synaptic inputs. We inactivated the primary visual cortex of kittens by suppressing synaptic transmission with cortical injections of botulinum neurotoxin type E, which cleaves a synaptic protein, SNAP-25, and blocks transmitter release, and examined the geniculocortical axon morphology in the animals with normal vision and those deprived of vision binocularly. We found that afferent axons in the animals with normal vision showed a significant retraction in the inactivated cortex, as similarly observed in the muscimol-treated cortex, whereas the axons in the binocularly deprived animals were preserved. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, the experience-driven axon retraction in the inactivated cortex can proceed in the absence of synaptic transmission. These results suggest that presynaptic mechanisms play

  17. Loss of Saltation and Presynaptic Action Potential Failure in Demyelinated Axons

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    Hamada, Mustafa S.; Popovic, Marko A.; Kole, Maarten H. P.

    2017-01-01

    In cortical pyramidal neurons the presynaptic terminals controlling transmitter release are located along unmyelinated axon collaterals, far from the original action potential (AP) initiation site, the axon initial segment (AIS). Once initiated, APs will need to reliably propagate over long distances and regions of geometrical inhomogeneity like branch points (BPs) to rapidly depolarize the presynaptic terminals and confer temporally precise synaptic transmission. While axon pathologies such as demyelinating diseases are well established to impede the fidelity of AP propagation along internodes, to which extent myelin loss affects propagation along BPs and axon collaterals is not well understood. Here, using the cuprizone demyelination model, we performed optical voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging from control and demyelinated layer 5 pyramidal neuron axons. In the main axon, we find that myelin loss switches the modality of AP propagation from rapid saltation towards a slow continuous wave. The duration of single AP waveforms at BPs or nodes was, however, only slightly briefer. In contrast, by using two-photon microscopy-guided loose-seal patch recordings from axon collaterals we revealed a presynaptic AP broadening in combination with a reduced velocity and frequency-dependent failure. Finally, internodal myelin loss was also associated with de novo sprouting of axon collaterals starting from the primary (demyelinated) axon. Thus, the loss of oligodendrocytes and myelin sheaths bears functional consequences beyond the main axon, impeding the temporal fidelity of presynaptic APs and affecting the functional and structural organization of synaptic connectivity within the neocortex.

  18. LINGO-1 antagonist promotes functional recovery and axonal sprouting after spinal cord injury.

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    Ji, Benxiu; Li, Mingwei; Wu, Wu-Tian; Yick, Leung-Wah; Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Wang, Joy; So, Kwok-Fai; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake; Mi, Sha; Relton, Jane K

    2006-11-01

    LINGO-1 is a CNS-specific protein and a functional component of the NgR1/p75/LINGO-1 and NgR1/TAJ(TROY)/LINGO-1 signaling complexes that mediate inhibition of axonal outgrowth. These receptor complexes mediate the axonal growth inhibitory effects of Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) via RhoA activation. Soluble LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc), which acts as an antagonist of these pathways by blocking LINGO-1 binding to NgR1, was administered to rats after dorsal or lateral hemisection of the spinal cord. LINGO-1-Fc treatment significantly improved functional recovery, promoted axonal sprouting and decreased RhoA activation and increased oligodendrocyte and neuronal survival after either rubrospinal or corticospinal tract transection. These experiments demonstrate an important role for LINGO-1 in modulating axonal outgrowth in vivo and that treatment with LINGO-1-Fc can significantly enhance recovery after spinal cord injury.

  19. Preferential Enhancement of Sensory and Motor Axon Regeneration by Combining Extracellular Matrix Components with Neurotrophic Factors

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    Daniel Santos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available After peripheral nerve injury, motor and sensory axons are able to regenerate but inaccuracy of target reinnervation leads to poor functional recovery. Extracellular matrix (ECM components and neurotrophic factors (NTFs exert their effect on different neuronal populations creating a suitable environment to promote axonal growth. Here, we assessed in vitro and in vivo the selective effects of combining different ECM components with NTFs on motor and sensory axons regeneration and target reinnervation. Organotypic cultures with collagen, laminin and nerve growth factor (NGF/neurotrophin-3 (NT3 or collagen, fibronectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF selectively enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons and motor neurite outgrowth from spinal cord slices respectively. For in vivo studies, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with a collagen and laminin matrix with NGF/NT3 encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA microspheres (MP (LM + MP.NGF/NT3, or a collagen and fibronectin matrix with BDNF in PLGA MPs (FN + MP.BDNF. Retrograde labeling and functional tests showed that LM + MP.NGF/NT3 increased the number of regenerated sensory neurons and improved sensory functional recovery, whereas FN + MP.BDNF preferentially increased regenerated motoneurons and enhanced motor functional recovery. Therefore, combination of ECM molecules with NTFs may be a good approach to selectively enhance motor and sensory axons regeneration and promote appropriate target reinnervation.

  20. Atlastin regulates store-operated calcium entry for nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth

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    Li, Jing; Yan, Bing; Si, Hongjiang; Peng, Xu; Zhang, Shenyuan L.; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by a class of dynamin-like GTPases known as atlastin (ATL). Depletion of or mutations in ATL cause an unbranched ER morphology and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by axon shortening in corticospinal motor neurons and progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. How ER shaping is linked to neuronal defects is poorly understood. Here, we show that dominant-negative mutants of ATL1 in PC-12 cells inhibit nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of wild-type or mutant ATL1 or depletion of ATLs alters ER morphology and affects store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) by decreasing STIM1 puncta formation near the plasma membrane upon calcium depletion of the ER. In addition, blockage of the STIM1-Orai pathway effectively abolishes neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells stimulated by NGF. These results suggest that SOCE plays an important role in neuronal regeneration, and mutations in ATL1 may cause HSP, partly by undermining SOCE. PMID:28240257

  1. [Cortical blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokron, S

    2014-02-01

    Cortical blindness refers to a visual loss induced by a bilateral occipital lesion. The very strong cooperation between psychophysics, cognitive psychology, neurophysiology and neuropsychology these latter twenty years as well as recent progress in cerebral imagery have led to a better understanding of neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness. It thus becomes possible now to propose an earlier diagnosis of cortical blindness as well as new perspectives for rehabilitation in children as well as in adults. On the other hand, studying complex neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness is a way to infer normal functioning of the visual system.

  2. A loss-of-function screen for phosphatases that regulate neurite outgrowth identifies PTPN12 as a negative regulator of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation.

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    Malene Ambjørn

    Full Text Available Alterations in function of the neurotrophin BDNF are associated with neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. BDNF promotes axonal outgrowth and branching, regulates dendritic tree morphology and is important for axonal regeneration after injury, responses that largely result from activation of its tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB. Although intracellular neurotrophin (NT signaling presumably reflects the combined action of kinases and phosphatases, little is known about the contributions of the latter to TrkB regulation. The issue is complicated by the fact that phosphatases belong to multiple independently evolved families, which are rarely studied together. We undertook a loss-of-function RNA-interference-based screen of virtually all known (254 human phosphatases to understand their function in BDNF/TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. This approach identified phosphatases from diverse families, which either positively or negatively modulate BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth, and most of which have little or no previously established function related to NT signaling. "Classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs accounted for 13% of the candidate regulatory phosphatases. The top classical PTP identified as a negative regulator of BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth was PTPN12 (also called PTP-PEST. Validation and follow-up studies showed that endogenous PTPN12 antagonizes tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkB itself, and the downstream activation of ERK1/2. We also found PTPN12 to negatively regulate phosphorylation of p130cas and FAK, proteins with previously described functions related to cell motility and growth cone behavior. Our data provide the first comprehensive survey of phosphatase function in NT signaling and neurite outgrowth. They reveal the complexity of phosphatase control, with several evolutionarily unrelated phosphatase families cooperating to affect this biological response

  3. Axon degeneration and PGC-1α-mediated protection in a zebrafish model of α-synuclein toxicity

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    Kelley C. O’Donnell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available α-synuclein (aSyn expression is implicated in neurodegenerative processes, including Parkinson’s disease (PD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. In animal models of these diseases, axon pathology often precedes cell death, raising the question of whether aSyn has compartment-specific toxic effects that could require early and/or independent therapeutic intervention. The relevance of axonal pathology to degeneration can only be addressed through longitudinal, in vivo monitoring of different neuronal compartments. With current imaging methods, dopaminergic neurons do not readily lend themselves to such a task in any vertebrate system. We therefore expressed human wild-type aSyn in zebrafish peripheral sensory neurons, which project elaborate superficial axons that can be continuously imaged in vivo. Axonal outgrowth was normal in these neurons but, by 2 days post-fertilization (dpf, many aSyn-expressing axons became dystrophic, with focal varicosities or diffuse beading. Approximately 20% of aSyn-expressing cells died by 3 dpf. Time-lapse imaging revealed that focal axonal swelling, but not overt fragmentation, usually preceded cell death. Co-expressing aSyn with a mitochondrial reporter revealed deficits in mitochondrial transport and morphology even when axons appeared overtly normal. The axon-protective protein Wallerian degeneration slow (WldS delayed axon degeneration but not cell death caused by aSyn. By contrast, the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α, which has roles in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and reactive-oxygen-species detoxification, abrogated aSyn toxicity in both the axon and the cell body. The rapid onset of axonal pathology in this system, and the relatively moderate degree of cell death, provide a new model for the study of aSyn toxicity and protection. Moreover, the accessibility of peripheral sensory axons will allow effects of aSyn to be studied in different neuronal compartments and might have utility in

  4. Shank3 is localized in axons and presynaptic specializations of developing hippocampal neurons and involved in the modulation of NMDA receptor levels at axon terminals.

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    Halbedl, Sonja; Schoen, Michael; Feiler, Marisa S; Boeckers, Tobias M; Schmeisser, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Autism-related Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3 are major postsynaptic scaffold proteins of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. A few studies, however, have already indicated that within a neuron, the presence of Shank family members is not limited to the postsynaptic density. By separating axons from dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons in microfluidic chambers, we show that RNA of all three Shank family members is present within axons. Immunostaining confirms these findings as all three Shanks are indeed found within separated axons and further co-localize with well-known proteins of the presynaptic specialization in axon terminals. Therefore, Shank proteins might not only serve as postsynaptic scaffold proteins, but also play a crucial role during axonal outgrowth and presynaptic development and function. This is supported by our findings that shRNA-mediated knockdown of Shank3 results in up-regulation of the NMDA receptor subunit GluN1 in axon terminals. Taken together, our findings will have major implications for the future analysis of neuronal Shank biology in both health and disease. Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3 are major postsynaptic scaffold proteins of excitatory glutamatergic synapses strongly related to several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, a few studies have already implicated a functional role of the Shanks beyond the postsynaptic density (PSD). We here show that all three Shanks are localized in both axons and pre-synaptic specializiations of developing hippocampal neurons in culture. We further provide evidence that Shank3 is involved in the modulation of NMDA receptor levels at axon terminals. Taken together, our study will open up novel avenues for the future analysis of neuronal Shank biology in both health and disease.

  5. Inhibition of Rho-kinase differentially affects axon regeneration of peripheral motor and sensory nerves.

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    Joshi, Abhijeet R; Bobylev, Ilja; Zhang, Gang; Sheikh, Kazim A; Lehmann, Helmar C

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA and its down-stream effector Rho-kinase (ROCK) are important effector molecules of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Modulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway has been shown to promote axonal regeneration, however in vitro and animal studies are inconsistent regarding the extent of axonal outgrowth induced by pharmacological inhibition of ROCK. We hypothesized that injury to sensory and motor nerves result in diverse activation levels of RhoA, which may impact the response of those nerve fiber modalities to ROCK inhibition. We therefore examined the effects of Y-27632, a chemical ROCK inhibitor, on the axonal outgrowth of peripheral sensory and motor neurons grown in the presence of growth-inhibiting chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). In addition we examined the effects of three different doses of Y-27632 on nerve regeneration of motor and sensory nerves in animal models of peripheral nerve crush. In vitro, sensory neurons were less responsive to Y-27632 compared to motor neurons in a non-growth permissive environment. These differences were associated with altered expression and activation of RhoA in sensory and motor axons. In vivo, systemic treatment with high doses of Y-27632 significantly enhanced the regeneration of motor axons over short distances, while the regeneration of sensory fibers remained largely unchanged. Our results support the concept that in a growth non-permissive environment, the regenerative capacity of sensory and motor axons is differentially affected by the RhoA/ROCK pathway, with motor neurons being more responsive compared to sensory. Future treatments, that are aimed to modulate RhoA activity, should consider this functional diversity.

  6. The changing roles of neurons in the cortical subplate

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    Michael J Friedlander

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons may serve different functions over the course of an organism’s life. Recent evidence suggests that cortical subplate neurons including those that reside in the white matter may perform longitudinal multi-tasking at different stages of development. These cells play a key role in early cortical development in coordinating thalamocortical reciprocal innervation. At later stages of development, they become integrated within the cortical microcircuitry. This type of longitudinal multi-tasking can enhance the capacity for information processing by populations of cells serving different functions over the lifespan. Subplate cells are initially derived when cells from the ventricular zone underlying the cortex migrate to the cortical preplate that is subsequently split by the differentiating neurons of the cortical plate with some neurons locating in the marginal zone and others settling below in the subplate (SP. While the cortical plate neurons form most of the cortical layers (layers 2-6, the marginal zone neurons form layer 1 and the SP neurons become interstitial cells of the white matter as well as forming a compact sublayer along the bottom of layer 6. After serving as transient innervation targets for thalamocortical axons, most of these cells die and layer 4 neurons become innervated by thalamic axons. However, 10-20% survives, remaining into adulthood along the bottom of layer 6 and as a scattered population of interstitial neurons in the white matter. Surviving subplate cells’ axons project throughout the overlying laminae, reaching layer 1 and issuing axon collaterals within white matter and in lower layer 6. This suggests that they participate in local synaptic networks, as well. Moreover, they receive excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs, potentially monitoring outputs from axon collaterals of cortical efferents, from cortical afferents and/or from each other. We explore our understanding of the functional connectivity of

  7. MicroRNA function is required for neurite outgrowth of mature neurons in the mouse postnatal cerebral cortex

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    Janet eHong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the postnatal mammalian cerebral cortex is an assembly of numerous mature neurons that exhibit proper neurite outgrowth and axonal and dendritic morphology. While many protein coding genes are shown to be involved in neuronal maturation, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs in this process is also becoming evident. We here report that blocking miRNA biogenesis in differentiated neurons results in microcephaly-like phenotypes in the postnatal mouse brain. The smaller brain defect is not caused by defective neurogenesis, altered neuronal migration or significant neuronal cell death. Surprisingly, a dramatic increase in neuronal packing density within the postnatal brain is observed. Loss of miRNA function causes shorter neurite outgrowth and smaller soma size of mature neurons in vitro. Our results reveal the impact of miRNAs on normal development of neuronal morphology and brain function. Because neurite outgrowth is critical for neuroregeneration, our studies further highlight the importance of miRNAs in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Chondrolectin affects cell survival and neuronal outgrowth in in vitro and in vivo models of spinal muscular atrophy.

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    Sleigh, James N; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Oliver, Peter L; Biba, Angeliki; Becker, Thomas; Davies, Kay E; Becker, Catherina G; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-02-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by the selective loss of spinal motor neurons owing to reduced levels of survival motor neuron (Smn) protein. In addition to its well-established role in assembling constituents of the spliceosome, diverse cellular functions have been proposed for Smn, but the reason why low levels of this widely expressed protein result in selective motor neuron pathology is still debated. In longitudinal studies of exon-level changes in SMA mouse model tissues, designed to determine the contribution of splicing dysfunction to the disease, we have previously shown that a generalized defect in splicing is unlikely to play a causative role in SMA. Nevertheless, we identified a small subset of genes that were alternatively spliced in the spinal cord compared with control mice before symptom onset, indicating a possible mechanistic role in disease. Here, we have performed functional studies of one of these genes, chondrolectin (Chodl), known to be highly expressed in motor neurons and important for correct motor axon outgrowth in zebrafish. Using in vitro and in vivo models of SMA, we demonstrate altered expression of Chodl in SMA mouse spinal motor neurons, show that Chodl has distinct effects on cell survival and neurite outgrowth and that increasing the expression of chodl can rescue motor neuron outgrowth defects in Smn-depleted zebrafish. Our findings thus link the dysregulation of Chodl to the pathophysiology of motor neuron degeneration in SMA.

  9. Midbrain dopaminergic axons are guided longitudinally through the diencephalon by Slit/Robo signals.

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    Dugan, James P; Stratton, Andrea; Riley, Hilary P; Farmer, W Todd; Mastick, Grant S

    2011-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons from the ventral mesencephalon/diencephalon (mesodiencephalon) form vital pathways constituting the majority of the brain's dopamine systems. Mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons extend longitudinal projections anteriorly through the diencephalon, ascending toward forebrain targets. The mechanisms by which mdDA axons initially navigate through the diencephalon are poorly understood. Recently the Slit family of secreted axon guidance proteins, and their Robo receptors, have been identified as important guides for descending longitudinal axons. To test the potential roles of Slit/Robo guidance in ascending trajectories, we examined tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) projections from mdDA neurons in mutant mouse embryos. We found that mdDA axons grow out of and parallel to Slit-positive ventral regions within the diencephalon, and that subsets of the mdDA axons likely express Robo1 and possibly also Robo2. Slit2 was able to directly inhibit TH axon outgrowth in explant co-culture assays. The mdDA axons made significant pathfinding errors in Slit1/2 and Robo1/2 knockout mice, including spreading out in the diencephalon to form a wider tract. The wider tract resulted from a combination of invasion of the ventral midline, consistent with Slit repulsion, but also axons wandering dorsally, away from the ventral midline. Aberrant dorsal trajectories were prominent in Robo1 and Robo1/2 knockout mice, suggesting that an aspect of Robo receptor function is Slit-independent. These results indicate that Slit/Robo signaling is critical during the initial establishment of dopaminergic pathways, with roles in the dorsoventral positioning and precise pathfinding of these ascending longitudinal axons.

  10. ROCK2 is a major regulator of axonal degeneration, neuronal death and axonal regeneration in the CNS.

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    Koch, J C; Tönges, L; Barski, E; Michel, U; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2014-05-15

    The Rho/ROCK/LIMK pathway is central for the mediation of repulsive environmental signals in the central nervous system. Several studies using pharmacological Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors have shown positive effects on neurite regeneration and suggest additional pro-survival effects in neurons. However, as none of these drugs is completely target specific, it remains unclear how these effects are mediated and whether ROCK is really the most relevant target of the pathway. To answer these questions, we generated adeno-associated viral vectors to specifically downregulate ROCK2 and LIM domain kinase (LIMK)-1 in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vitro and in vivo. We show here that specific knockdown of ROCK2 and LIMK1 equally enhanced neurite outgrowth of RGCs on inhibitory substrates and both induced substantial neuronal regeneration over distances of more than 5 mm after rat optic nerve crush (ONC) in vivo. However, only knockdown of ROCK2 but not LIMK1 increased survival of RGCs after optic nerve axotomy. Moreover, knockdown of ROCK2 attenuated axonal degeneration of the proximal axon after ONC assessed by in vivo live imaging. Mechanistically, we demonstrate here that knockdown of ROCK2 resulted in decreased intraneuronal activity of calpain and caspase 3, whereas levels of pAkt and collapsin response mediator protein 2 and autophagic flux were increased. Taken together, our data characterize ROCK2 as a specific therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate new downstream effects of ROCK2 including axonal degeneration, apoptosis and autophagy.

  11. Adenomatous polyposis coli regulates axon arborization and cytoskeleton organization via its N-terminus.

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    Youjun Chen

    Full Text Available Conditional deletion of APC leads to marked disruption of cortical development and to excessive axonal branching of cortical neurons. However, little is known about the cell biological basis of this neuronal morphological regulation. Here we show that APC deficient cortical neuronal growth cones exhibit marked disruption of both microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. Functional analysis of the different APC domains revealed that axonal branches do not result from stabilized β-catenin, and that the C-terminus of APC containing microtubule regulatory domains only partially rescues the branching phenotype. Surprisingly, the N-terminus of APC containing the oligomerization domain and the armadillo repeats completely rescues the branching and cytoskeletal abnormalities. Our data indicate that APC is required for appropriate axon morphological development and that the N-terminus of APC is important for regulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton.

  12. Optimizing neurotrophic factor combinations for neurite outgrowth

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    Deister, C.; Schmidt, C. E.

    2006-06-01

    Most neurotrophic factors are members of one of three families: the neurotrophins, the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs) and the neuropoietic cytokines. Each family activates distinct but overlapping cellular pathways. Several studies have shown additive or synergistic interactions between neurotrophic factors from different families, though generally only a single combination has been studied. Because of possible interactions between the neurotrophic factors, the optimum concentration of a factor in a mixture may differ from the optimum when applied individually. Additionally, the effect of combinations of neurotrophic factors from each of the three families on neurite extension is unclear. This study examines the effects of several combinations of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), the GFL glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neuropoietic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on neurite outgrowth from young rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants. The combination of 50 ng ml-1 NGF and 10 ng ml-1 of each GDNF and CNTF induced the highest level of neurite outgrowth at a 752 ± 53% increase over untreated DRGs and increased the longest neurite length to 2031 ± 97 µm compared to 916 ± 64 µm for untreated DRGs. The optimum concentrations of the three factors applied in combination corresponded to the optimum concentration of each factor when applied individually. These results indicate that the efficacy of future therapies for nerve repair would be enhanced by the controlled release of a combination of neurotrophins, GFLs and neuropoietic cytokines at higher concentrations than used in previous conduit designs.

  13. Microfluidic control of axonal guidance

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    Gu, Ling; Black, Bryan; Ordonez, Simon; Mondal, Argha; Jain, Ankur; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2014-10-01

    The precision of axonal pathfinding and the accurate formation of functional neural circuitry are crucial for an organism during development as well as during adult central and peripheral nerve regeneration. While chemical cues are believed to be primarily responsible for axonal pathfinding, we hypothesize that forces due to localized fluid flow may directly affect neuronal guidance during early organ development. Here, we report direct evidence of fluid flow influencing axonal migration, producing turning angles of up to 90°. Microfluidic flow simulations indicate that an axon may experience significant bending force due to cross-flow, which may contribute to the observed axonal turning. This method of flow-based guidance was successfully used to fasciculate one advancing axon onto another, showcasing the potential of this technique to be used for the formation of in vitro neuronal circuits.

  14. Depletion of Inositol Polyphosphate 4-Phosphatase II Suppresses Callosal Axon Formation in the Developing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liting; Kim, Nam-Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh; Rhee, Hae Jin

    2016-06-30

    The corpus callosum is a bundle of nerve fibers that connects the two cerebral hemispheres and is essential for coordinated transmission of information between them. Disruption of early stages of callosal development can cause agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC), including both complete and partial callosal absence, causing mild to severe cognitive impairment. Despite extensive studies, the etiology of AgCC remains to be clarified due to the complicated mechanism involved in generating AgCC. The biological function of PI3K signaling including phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is well established in diverse biochemical processes including axon and dendrite morphogenesis, but the function of the closely related phosphatidylinositol-3,4,-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P2) signaling, particularly in the nervous system, is largely unknown. Here, we provide the first report on the role of inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase II (INPP4B), a PI(3,4)P2 metabolizing 4-phosphatase in the regulation of callosal axon formation. Depleting INPP4B by in utero electroporation suppressed medially directed callosal axon formation. Moreover, depletion of INPP4B significantly attenuated formation of Satb2-positive pyramidal neurons and axon polarization in cortical neurons during cortical development. Taken together, these data suggest that INPP4B plays a role in the regulating callosal axon formation by controlling axon polarization and the Satb2-positive pyramidal neuron population. Dysregulation of INPP4B during cortical development may be implicated in the generation of partial AgCC.

  15. Mesoscale infraslow spontaneous membrane potential fluctuations recapitulate high-frequency activity cortical motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Allen W; Mohajerani, Majid H; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Wang, Yu Tian; Murphy, Timothy H

    2015-07-20

    Neuroimaging of spontaneous, resting-state infraslow (regional connectivity that are analogous to cortical motifs observed from higher-frequency spontaneous activity and reflect the underlying framework of intracortical axonal projections.

  16. Collateral branching of long-distance cortical projections in monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockland, Kathleen S

    2013-12-15

    Collateralization of individual cortical axons is well documented for rodents but less so for monkeys, where double retrograde tracer experiments have tended to find only small numbers of neurons projecting to two different injection sites. Evidence from both double label and single axon studies, however, suggests that in specific projection systems the number of neurons with collateralized axons can be 10% or greater. These include feedback projections from temporal areas (but less so those from V4 and MT/V5). Single-axon analyses show that many parietal neurons branch to multiple targets. Except for giant Meynert cells in area V1, feedforward projections from early visual areas have only a small number of neurons with branching axons. Why only some neurons collateralize, what determines branch points and projection foci, and how this impacts network organization are largely unknown. Deciphering the branching code might offer new perspectives on space-time organization at the network level.

  17. The NAV2 homolog Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth in Drosophila mushroom body neurons via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Satoshi; Hiroi, Makoto; Nitta, Yohei; Maeyama, Yuko; Tabata, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    The Rac-Cofilin pathway is essential for cytoskeletal remodeling to control axonal development. Rac signals through the canonical Rac-Pak-LIMK pathway to suppress Cofilin-dependent axonal growth and through a Pak-independent non-canonical pathway to promote outgrowth. Whether this non-canonical pathway converges to promote Cofilin-dependent F-actin reorganization in axonal growth remains elusive. We demonstrate that Sickie, a homolog of the human microtubule-associated protein neuron navigator 2, cell-autonomously regulates axonal growth of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons via the non-canonical pathway. Sickie was prominently expressed in the newborn F-actin-rich axons of MB neurons. A sickie mutant exhibited axonal growth defects, and its phenotypes were rescued by exogenous expression of Sickie. We observed phenotypic similarities and genetic interactions among sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling components. Using the MARCM technique, distinct F-actin and phospho-Cofilin patterns were detected in developing axons mutant for sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling regulators. The upregulation of Cofilin function alleviated the axonal defect of the sickie mutant. Epistasis analyses revealed that Sickie suppresses the LIMK overexpression phenotype and is required for Pak-independent Rac1 and Slingshot phosphatase to counteract LIMK. We propose that Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway in a Slingshot-dependent manner.

  18. The Microtubule Minus-End-Binding Protein Patronin/PTRN-1 Is Required for Axon Regeneration in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Chuang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Precise regulation of microtubule (MT dynamics is increasingly recognized as a critical determinant of axon regeneration. In contrast to developing neurons, mature axons exhibit noncentrosomal microtubule nucleation. The factors regulating noncentrosomal MT architecture in axon regeneration remain poorly understood. We report that PTRN-1, the C. elegans member of the Patronin/Nezha/calmodulin- and spectrin-associated protein (CAMSAP family of microtubule minus-end-binding proteins, is critical for efficient axon regeneration in vivo. ptrn-1-null mutants display generally normal developmental axon outgrowth but significantly impaired regenerative regrowth after laser axotomy. Unexpectedly, mature axons in ptrn-1 mutants display elevated numbers of dynamic axonal MTs before and after injury, suggesting that PTRN-1 inhibits MT dynamics. The CKK domain of PTRN-1 is necessary and sufficient for its functions in axon regeneration and MT dynamics and appears to stabilize MTs independent of minus-end localization. Whereas in developing neurons, PTRN-1 inhibits activity of the DLK-1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascade, we find that, in regeneration, PTRN-1 and DLK-1 function together to promote axonal regrowth.

  19. NRC-interacting factor directs neurite outgrowth in an activity-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X-S; Fu, W-Y; Hung, K-W; Chien, W W Y; Li, Z; Fu, A K; Ip, N Y

    2015-03-19

    Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) is a zinc finger nuclear protein that was initially identified to enhance nuclear hormone receptor transcription via its interaction with nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC). NIF-1 may regulate gene transcription either by modulating general transcriptional machinery or remodeling chromatin structure through interactions with specific protein partners. We previously reported that the cytoplasmic/nuclear localization of NIF-1 is regulated by the neuronal Cdk5 activator p35, suggesting potential neuronal functions for NIF-1. The present study reveals that NIF-1 plays critical roles in regulating neuronal morphogenesis at early stages. NIF-1 was prominently expressed in the nuclei of developing rat cortical neurons. Knockdown of NIF-1 expression attenuated both neurite outgrowth in cultured cortical neurons and retinoic acid (RA)-treated Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, activity-induced Ca(2+) influx, which is critical for neuronal morphogenesis, stimulated the nuclear localization of NIF-1 in cortical neurons. Suppression of NIF-1 expression reduced the up-regulation of neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. These findings collectively suggest that NIF-1 directs neuronal morphogenesis during early developmental stages through modulating activity-dependent gene transcription.

  20. Photosynthetic leaf area modulates tiller bud outgrowth in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebrom, Tesfamichael H; Mullet, John E

    2015-08-01

    Shoot branches or tillers develop from axillary buds. The dormancy versus outgrowth fates of buds depends on genetic, environmental and hormonal signals. Defoliation inhibits bud outgrowth indicating the role of leaf-derived metabolic factors such as sucrose in bud outgrowth. In this study, the sensitivity of bud outgrowth to selective defoliation was investigated. At 6 d after planting (6 DAP), the first two leaves of sorghum were fully expanded and the third was partially emerged. Therefore, the leaves were selectively defoliated at 6 DAP and the length of the bud in the first leaf axil was measured at 8 DAP. Bud outgrowth was inhibited by defoliation of only 2 cm from the tip of the second leaf blade. The expression of dormancy and sucrose-starvation marker genes was up-regulated and cell cycle and sucrose-inducible genes was down-regulated during the first 24 h post-defoliation of the second leaf. At 48 h, the expression of these genes was similar to controls as the defoliated plant recovers. Our results demonstrate that small changes in photosynthetic leaf area affect the propensity of tiller buds for outgrowth. Therefore, variation in leaf area and photosynthetic activity should be included when integrating sucrose into models of shoot branching.

  1. Characterization of Axo-Axonic Synapses in the Piriform Cortex of Mus musculus

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xinjun; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Previous anatomical and physiological studies have established major glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal subtypes within the piriform cortical circuits. However, quantitative information regarding axo-axonic inhibitory synapses mediated by chandelier cells across major cortical subdivisions of piriform cortex is lacking. Therefore, we examined the properties of these synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Our results show the following. 1) γ-Aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1-posi...

  2. The genetics of axonal transport and axonal transport disorders.

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    Jason E Duncan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are specialized cells with a complex architecture that includes elaborate dendritic branches and a long, narrow axon that extends from the cell body to the synaptic terminal. The organized transport of essential biological materials throughout the neuron is required to support its growth, function, and viability. In this review, we focus on insights that have emerged from the genetic analysis of long-distance axonal transport between the cell body and the synaptic terminal. We also discuss recent genetic evidence that supports the hypothesis that disruptions in axonal transport may cause or dramatically contribute to neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

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    Yoshiyuki eKubota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their IPSP size is not uniform. Thus cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit.

  4. Analysis of gene expression during neurite outgrowth and regeneration

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    Tai Yu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of a neuron to regenerate functional connections after injury is influenced by both its intrinsic state and also by extrinsic cues in its surroundings. Investigations of the transcriptional changes undergone by neurons during in vivo models of injury and regeneration have revealed many transcripts associated with these processes. Because of the complex milieu of interactions in vivo, these results include not only expression changes directly related to regenerative outgrowth and but also unrelated responses to surrounding cells and signals. In vitro models of neurite outgrowth provide a means to study the intrinsic transcriptional patterns of neurite outgrowth in the absence of extensive extrinsic cues from nearby cells and tissues. Results We have undertaken a genome-wide study of transcriptional activity in embryonic superior cervical ganglia (SCG and dorsal root ganglia (DRG during a time course of neurite outgrowth in vitro. Gene expression observed in these models likely includes both developmental gene expression patterns and regenerative responses to axotomy, which occurs as the result of tissue dissection. Comparison across both models revealed many genes with similar gene expression patterns during neurite outgrowth. These patterns were minimally affected by exposure to the potent inhibitory cue Semaphorin3A, indicating that this extrinsic cue does not exert major effects at the level of nuclear transcription. We also compared our data to several published studies of DRG and SCG gene expression in animal models of regeneration, and found the expression of a large number of genes in common between neurite outgrowth in vitro and regeneration in vivo. Conclusion Many gene expression changes undergone by SCG and DRG during in vitro outgrowth are shared between these two tissue types and in common with in vivo regeneration models. This suggests that the genes identified in this in vitro study may represent new

  5. BDNF production by olfactory ensheathing cells contributes to axonal regeneration of cultured adult CNS neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrana, Erika; Moreno-Flores, Maria Teresa; Avila, Jesus; Wandosell, Francisco; Minichiello, Liliana; Diaz-Nido, Javier

    2007-02-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are the main glial cell type that populates mammalian olfactory nerves. These cells have a great capacity to promote the regeneration of axons when transplanted into the injured adult mammalian CNS. However, little is still known about the molecular mechanisms they employ in mediating such a task. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was identified as a candidate molecule in a genomic study that compared three functionally different OEC populations: Early passage OECs (OEC Ep), Late passage OECs (OEC Lp) and the OEC cell line TEG3 [Pastrana, E., Moreno-Flores, M.T., Gurzov, E.N., Avila, J., Wandosell, F., Diaz-Nido, J., 2006. Genes associated with adult axon regeneration promoted by olfactory ensheathing cells: a new role for matrix metalloproteinase 2. J. Neurosci. 26, 5347-5359]. We have here set out to determine the role played by BDNF in the stimulation of axon outgrowth by OECs. We compared the extracellular BDNF levels in the three OEC populations and show that it is produced in significant amounts by the OECs that can stimulate axon regeneration in adult retinal neurons (OEC Ep and TEG3) but it is absent from the extracellular medium of OEC Lp cells which lack this capacity. Blocking BDNF signalling impaired axonal regeneration of adult retinal neurons co-cultured with TEG3 cells and adding BDNF increased the proportion of adult neurons that regenerate their axons on OEC Lp monolayers. Combining BDNF with other extracellular proteins such as Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) further augmented this effect. This study shows that BDNF production by OECs plays a direct role in the promotion of axon regeneration of adult CNS neurons.

  6. Munc18 and Munc13 regulate early neurite outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeke, Jurjen H.P.; Roelandse, Martijn; Luteijn, Maartje J.; Boiko, Tatiana; Matus, Andrew; Toonen, Ruud F.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    Background information. During development, growth cones of outgrowing neurons express proteins involved in vesicular secretion, such as SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor) proteins, Munc13 and Munc18. Vesicles are known to fuse in growth cones prior to synapse formation, which may contribute to outgrowth. Results. We tested this possibility in dissociated cell cultures and organotypic slice cultures of two release-deficient mice (Munc18-1 null and Munc13-1/2 double null). Both types of release-deficient neurons have a decreased outgrowth speed and therefore have a smaller total neurite length during early development [DIV1–4 (day in vitro 1–4)]. In addition, more filopodia per growth cone were observed in Munc18-1 null, but not WT (wild-type) or Munc13-1/2 double null neurons. The smaller total neurite length during early development was no longer observed after synaptogenesis (DIV14–23). Conclusion. These data suggest that the inability of vesicle fusion in the growth cone affects outgrowth during the initial phases when outgrowth speed is high, but not during/after synaptogenesis. Overall, the outgrowth speed is probably not rate-limiting during neuronal network formation, at least in vitro. In addition, Munc18, but not Munc13, regulates growth cone filopodia, potentially via its previously observed effect on filamentous actin. PMID:20497124

  7. The L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian is necessary for maintenance of sensory axon advance in the Drosophila embryo

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    Martin Veronica

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion molecules have long been implicated in the regulation of axon growth, but the precise cellular roles played by individual cell adhesion molecules and the molecular basis for their action are still not well understood. We have used the sensory system of the Drosophila embryo to shed light on the mechanism by which the L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian regulates axon growth. Results We have found a highly penetrant sensory axon stalling phenotype in neuroglian mutant embryos. Axons stalled at a variety of positions along their normal trajectory, but most commonly in the periphery some distance along the peripheral nerve. All lateral and dorsal cluster sensory neurons examined, except for the dorsal cluster neuron dbd, showed stalling. Sensory axons were never seen to project along inappropriate pathways in neuroglian mutants and stalled axons showed normal patterns of fasciculation within nerves. The growth cones of stalled axons possessed a simple morphology, similar to their appearance in wild-type embryos when advancing along nerves. Driving expression of the wild-type form of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone rescued the neuroglian mutant phenotype of both pioneering and follower neurons. A partial rescue was achieved by expressing the Neuroglian extracellular domain. Over/mis-expression of Neuroglian in all neurons, oenocytes or trachea had no apparent effect on sensory axon growth. Conclusion We conclude that Neuroglian is necessary to maintain axon advance along axonal substrates, but is not required for initiation of axon outgrowth, axon fasciculation or recognition of correct growth substrates. Expression of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone is sufficient to promote axon advance and the intracellular region of the molecule is largely dispensable for this function. It is unlikely, therefore, that Nrg acts as a molecular 'clutch' to couple adhesion of F-actin within the growth cone to the

  8. LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) interacts with tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and Mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced axonal elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing; Ji, Yun-Song; Cai, Chang; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2012-12-07

    BDNF/TrkB signaling plays critical roles in axonal outgrowth of neurons, the process of which requires the remodeling of the cytoskeleton structure, including microtubules and filamentous actin. However, the mechanism by which BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates cytoskeleton reorganization is still unclear. Here, we identified a novel interaction between LIMK1 and TrkB, which is required for the BDNF-induced axonal elongation. We demonstrated that BDNF-induced TrkB dimerization led to LIMK1 dimerization and transphosphorylation independent of TrkB kinase activity, which could further enhance the activation and stabilization of LIMK1. Moreover, activated LIMK1 translocated to the membrane fraction and phosphorylated its substrate cofilin, thus promoting actin polymerization and axonal elongation. Our findings provided evidence of a novel mechanism for the BDNF-mediated signal transduction leading to axonal elongation.

  9. Multichannel activity propagation across an engineered axon network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. Isaac; Wolf, John A.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Although substantial progress has been made in mapping the connections of the brain, less is known about how this organization translates into brain function. In particular, the massive interconnectivity of the brain has made it difficult to specifically examine data transmission between two nodes of the connectome, a central component of the ‘neural code.’ Here, we investigated the propagation of multiple streams of asynchronous neuronal activity across an isolated in vitro ‘connectome unit.’ Approach. We used the novel technique of axon stretch growth to create a model of a long-range cortico-cortical network, a modular system consisting of paired nodes of cortical neurons connected by axon tracts. Using optical stimulation and multi-electrode array recording techniques, we explored how input patterns are represented by cortical networks, how these representations shift as they are transmitted between cortical nodes and perturbed by external conditions, and how well the downstream node distinguishes different patterns. Main results. Stimulus representations included direct, synaptic, and multiplexed responses that grew in complexity as the distance between the stimulation source and recorded neuron increased. These representations collapsed into patterns with lower information content at higher stimulation frequencies. With internodal activity propagation, a hierarchy of network pathways, including latent circuits, was revealed using glutamatergic blockade. As stimulus channels were added, divergent, non-linear effects were observed in local versus distant network layers. Pairwise difference analysis of neuronal responses suggested that neuronal ensembles generally outperformed individual cells in discriminating input patterns. Significance. Our data illuminate the complexity of spiking activity propagation in cortical networks in vitro, which is characterized by the transformation of an input into myriad outputs over several network layers

  10. Studies in the development of a bridging device for guiding regenerating axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xuejun

    At present there is no clinically effective treatment for injuries or pathological processes that disrupt the continuity of axons in the mature central nervous system. However, a number of studies suggest that a tremendous potential exists for developing therapies. In particular biomaterials in the form of bridging substrates been shown to support at least some level of axonal regeneration across the lesion site, but display a limited capacity for directing axons toward their targets. To influence the directionality of the regeneration process filaments and tubes appear promising but the technology is far from optimized. As a step toward optimization, we investigated various components of a tissue-engineered bridging device consisting of numerous filaments surrounded by a semipermeable biodegradable hollow fiber membrane (HFM). In the first part of the thesis, we studied the influence of filament diameter and various extracellular matrix coatings on neuron regeneration suing a dorsal root ganglion explant model. We found that laminin surface treated filaments that approached the size of spinal axons support significantly longer regenerative outgrowth than similarly treated filaments of larger diameter, and exceed outgrowth distance on similarly sized filaments treated with fibronectin. Such substrates also consistently supported the attachment and alignment of glial cells and directed the outgrowth of regenerating axons along the long axis of the filaments. In the last part of the thesis, biodegradable hollow fiber membranes were fabricated and their physical, chemical and degradation properties were analyzed. We found that it is possible to use phase inversion methods to fabricate hollow fiber membranes of widely varying properties that degrade of the course of several months. We then evaluated the biocompatibility of the new materials after implantation in the CNS using an adult rat model. We found that the implants were well tolerated and elicited a reaction

  11. Calpain-mediated cleavage of collapsin response mediator protein-2 drives acute axonal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Michel, Uwe; Lenz, Christof; Friedel, Caroline C.; Köster, Sarah; d’Hedouville, Zara; Tönges, Lars; Urlaub, Henning; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul; Koch, Jan C.

    2016-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a key initiating event in many neurological diseases. Focal lesions to axons result in a rapid disintegration of the perilesional axon by acute axonal degeneration (AAD) within several hours. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of AAD are only incompletely understood. Here, we studied AAD in vivo through live-imaging of the rat optic nerve and in vitro in primary rat cortical neurons in microfluidic chambers. We found that calpain is activated early during AAD of the optic nerve and that calpain inhibition completely inhibits axonal fragmentation on the proximal side of the crush while it attenuates AAD on the distal side. A screening of calpain targets revealed that collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) is a main downstream target of calpain activation in AAD. CRMP2-overexpression delayed bulb formation and rescued impairment of axonal mitochondrial transport after axotomy in vitro. In vivo, CRMP2-overexpression effectively protected the proximal axon from fragmentation within 6 hours after crush. Finally, a proteomic analysis of the optic nerve was performed at 6 hours after crush, which identified further proteins regulated during AAD, including several interactors of CRMP2. These findings reveal CRMP2 as an important mediator of AAD and define it as a putative therapeutic target. PMID:27845394

  12. Oestrogen regulates sympathetic neurite outgrowth by modulating brain derived neurotrophic factor synthesis and release by the rodent uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizsan-Agbas, D; Pedchenko, T; Hasan, W; Smith, P G

    2003-11-01

    Sympathetic innervation of the adult rodent uterus undergoes cyclic remodelling. Terminal sympathetic axons degenerate when oestrogen levels rise and regenerate when oestrogen levels decline. This study examined the role of neurotrophins in oestrogen-mediated uterine sympathetic nerve remodelling. Oestrogen injection of ovariectomized female rats did not affect uterine NT-3 levels 24 h postinjection, and increased endometrial NGF protein, indicating that reduced NGF or NT-3 is not responsible for the oestrogen-induced denervation. Oestrogen also raised BDNF protein and mRNA in myometrium and endometrium. To assess whether increased BDNF affects uterine receptivity to sympathetic outgrowth, sympathetic ganglion explants were co-cultured with myometrium. Myometrium from ovariectomized rats induced neuritogenesis in oestrogen-free conditions, and this was abolished when BDNF was added to the medium. Neuritogenesis induced by ovariectomized myometrium was suppressed by oestrogen, and restored by a BDNF function-blocking antibody. To determine if target BDNF synthesis is required for oestrogen to suppress sympathetic neurite outgrowth, uteri from wild-type mice and mice homozygous or heterozygous for recombinant mutations of the BDNF gene were cultured with rat sympathetic ganglia. Neuritogenesis induced by wild-type uteri was diminished by oestrogen. Neurite formation in the presence of homozygous BDNF mutant uteri was not affected by oestrogen, but was lower than that of wild-type mice. Uteri from mice heterozygous for the BDNF mutation, who have reduced BDNF synthesis, showed normal neuritogenic properties, but were not affected by oestrogen. These findings suggest that oestrogen alters neuritogenic properties of the rodent uterus by regulating BDNF synthesis, which inhibits sympathetic neurite outgrowth.

  13. Moringa oleifera with promising neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth promoting potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Md Abdul; Kang, Ji-Young; Mohibbullah, Md; Hong, Yong-Ki; Lee, Hyunsook; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2014-02-27

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) by virtue of its high nutritional as well as ethnomedical values has been gaining profound interest both in nutrition and medicinal research. The leaf of this plant is used in ayurvedic medicine to treat paralysis, nervous debility and other nerve disorders. In addition, research evidence also suggests the nootropic as well as neuroprotective roles of Moringa oleifera leaf in animal models. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Moringa oleifera leaf in the primary hippocampal neurons regarding its neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties. The primary culture of embryonic hippocampal neurons was incubated with the ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera leaf (MOE). After an indicated time, cultures were either stained directly with a lipophilic dye, DiO, or fixed and immunolabeled to visualize the neuronal morphology. Morphometric analyses for neurite maturation and synaptogenesis were performed using Image J software. Neuronal viability was evaluated using trypan blue exclusion and lactate dehydrogenase assays. MOE promoted neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner with an optimal concentration of 30 μg/mL. As a very initial effect, MOE significantly promoted the earlier stages of neuronal differentiation. Subsequently, MOE significantly increased the number and length of dendrites, the length of axon, and the number and length of both dendrite and axonal branches, and eventually facilitated synaptogenesis. The β-carotene, one major compound of MOE, promoted neuritogensis, but the increase was not comparable with the effect of MOE. In addition, MOE supported neuronal survival by protecting neurons from naturally occurring cell death in vitro. Our findings indicate that MOE promotes axodendritic maturation as well as provides neuroprotection suggesting a promising pharmacological importance of this nutritionally and ethnomedically important plant for the well-being of nervous system. Copyright

  14. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus spore outgrowth and multiplication by chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellegård, Hilde; From, Cecilie; Christensen, Bjørn E; Granum, Per E

    2011-10-03

    Bacillus cereus is an endospore-forming bacterium able to cause food-associated illness. Different treatment processes are used in the food industry to reduce the number of spores and thereby the potential of foodborne disease. Chitosan is a polysaccharide with well-documented antibacterial activity towards vegetative cells. The activity against bacterial spores, spore germination and subsequent outgrowth and growth (the latter two events hereafter denoted (out)growth), however, is poorly documented. By using six different chitosans with defined macromolecular properties, we evaluated the effect of chitosan on Bacillus cereus spore germination and (out)growth using optical density assays and a dipicolinic acid release assay. (Out)growth was inhibited by chitosan, but germination was not. The action of chitosan was found to be concentration-dependent and also closely related to weight average molecular weight (M(w)) and fraction of acetylation (F(A)) of the biopolymer. Chitosans of low acetylation (F(A)=0.01 or 0.16) inhibited (out)growth more effectively than higher acetylated chitosans (F(A)=0.48). For the F(A)=0.16 chitosans with medium (56.8kDa) and higher M(w) (98.3kDa), a better (out)growth inhibition was observed compared to low M(w) (10.6kDa) chitosan. The same trend was not evident with chitosans of 0.48 acetylation, where the difference in activity between the low (19.6kDa) and high M(w) (163.0kDa) chitosans was only minor. In a spore test concentration corresponding to 10(2)-10(3)CFU/ml (spore numbers relevant to food), less chitosan was needed to suppress (out)growth compared to higher spore numbers (equivalent to 10(8)CFU/ml), as expected. No major differences in chitosan susceptibility between three different strains of B. cereus were detected. Our results contribute to a better understanding of chitosan activity towards bacterial spore germination and (out)growth.

  15. Viral vector-mediated downregulation of RhoA increases survival and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells

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    Jan Christoph Koch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rho/ROCK pathway is a promising therapeutic target in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. Pharmacological inhibition of various pathway members has been shown to promote neuronal regeneration and survival. However, because pharmacological inhibitors are inherently limited in their specificity, shRNA-mediated approaches can add more information on the function of each single kinase involved. Thus, we generated adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV to specifically downregulate RhoA via shRNA. We found that specific knockdown of RhoA promoted neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGC grown on the inhibitory substrate CSPG as well as neurite regeneration of primary midbrain neurons after scratch lesion. In the rat optic nerve crush model in vivo, downregulation of RhoA significantly enhanced axonal regeneration compared to control. Moreover, survival of RGCs transduced with AAV expressing RhoA-shRNA was substantially increased at two weeks after optic nerve axotomy.Compared to previous data using pharmacological inhibitors to target RhoA, its upstream regulator Nogo or its main downstream target ROCK2, the specific effects of RhoA downregulation shown here were more pronounced in regard to promoting RGC survival while the stimulatory effects on neurite outgrowth were rather moderate. Taken together, we show here that specific knockdown of RhoA substantially increases neuronal survival after optic nerve axotomy and modestly increases neurite outgrowth in vitro and axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush.

  16. Inhibition of Nischarin Expression Promotes Neurite Outgrowth through Regulation of PAK Activity.

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    Yuemin Ding

    Full Text Available Nischarin is a cytoplasmic protein expressed in various organs that plays an inhibitory role in cell migration and invasion and the carcinogenesis of breast cancer cells. We previously reported that Nischarin is highly expressed in neuronal cell lines and is differentially expressed in the brain tissue of adult rats. However, the physiological function of Nischarin in neural cells remains unknown. Here, we show that Nischarin is expressed in rat primary cortical neurons but not in astrocytes. Nischarin is localized around the nucleus and dendrites. Using shRNA to knockdown the expression of endogenous Nischarin significantly increases the percentage of neurite-bearing cells, remarkably increases neurite length, and accelerates neurite extension in neuronal cells. Silencing Nischarin expression also promotes dendrite elongation in rat cortical neurons where Nischarin interacts with p21-activated kinase 1/2 (PAK1/2 and negatively regulates phosphorylation of both PAK1 and PAK2. The stimulation of neurite growth observed in cells with decreased levels of Nischarin is partially abolished by IPA3-mediated inhibition of PAK1 activity. Our findings indicate that endogenous Nischarin inhibits neurite outgrowth by blocking PAK1 activation in neurons.

  17. Axon growth inhibition by RhoA/ROCK in the central nervous system

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    Toshihide eYamashita

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rho kinase (ROCK is a serine/threonine kinase and a downstream target of the small GTPase Rho. The RhoA/ROCK pathway is associated with various neuronal functions such as migration, dendrite development, and axonal extension. Evidence from animal studies reveals that RhoA/ROCK signaling is involved in various central nervous system (CNS diseases, including optic nerve and spinal cord injuries, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. Given that RhoA/ROCK plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of CNS diseases, the development of therapeutic agents targeting this pathway is expected to contribute to the treatment of CNS diseases. The RhoA/ROCK pathway mediates the effects of myelin-associated axon growth inhibitors—Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG, oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp, and repulsive guidance molecule (RGM. Blocking RhoA/ROCK signaling can reverse the inhibitory effects of these molecules on axon outgrowth, and promotes axonal sprouting and functional recovery in animal models of CNS injury. To date, several RhoA/ROCK inhibitors have been under development or in clinical trials as therapeutic agents for neurological disorders. In this review, we focus on the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in neurological disorders. We also discuss the potential therapeutic approaches of RhoA/ROCK inhibitors for various neurological disorders.

  18. Neuronal cyclic AMP controls the developmental loss in ability of axons to regenerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, D; Qiu, J; Cao, Z; McAtee, M; Bregman, B S; Filbin, M T

    2001-07-01

    Unlike neonatal axons, mammalian adult axons do not regenerate after injury. Likewise, myelin, a major factor in preventing regeneration in the adult, inhibits regeneration from older but not younger neurons. Identification of the molecular events responsible for this developmental loss of regenerative capacity is believed key to devising strategies to encourage regeneration in adults after injury. Here, we report that the endogenous levels of the cyclic nucleotide, cAMP, are dramatically higher in young neurons in which axonal growth is promoted both by myelin in general and by a specific myelin component, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), than in the same types of neurons that, when older, are inhibited by myelin-MAG. Inhibiting a downstream effector of cAMP [protein kinase A (PKA)] prevents myelin-MAG promotion from young neurons, and elevating cAMP blocks myelin-MAG inhibition of neurite outgrowth in older neurons. Importantly, developmental plasticity of spinal tract axons in neonatal rat pups in vivo is dramatically reduced by inhibition of PKA. Thus, the switch from promotion to inhibition by myelin-MAG, which marks the developmental loss of regenerative capacity, is mediated by a developmentally regulated decrease in endogenous neuronal cAMP levels.

  19. Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Chung-ha O; Kim, Keun-Young; Bushong, Eric A; Mills, Elizabeth A; Boassa, Daniela; Shih, Tiffany; Kinebuchi, Mira; Phan, Sebastien; Zhou, Yi; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A; Nguyen, Judy V; Jin, Yunju; Ellisman, Mark H; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2014-07-01

    It is generally accepted that healthy cells degrade their own mitochondria. Here, we report that retinal ganglion cell axons of WT mice shed mitochondria at the optic nerve head (ONH), and that these mitochondria are internalized and degraded by adjacent astrocytes. EM demonstrates that mitochondria are shed through formation of large protrusions that originate from otherwise healthy axons. A virally introduced tandem fluorophore protein reporter of acidified mitochondria reveals that acidified axonal mitochondria originating from the retinal ganglion cell are associated with lysosomes within columns of astrocytes in the ONH. According to this reporter, a greater proportion of retinal ganglion cell mitochondria are degraded at the ONH than in the ganglion cell soma. Consistently, analyses of degrading DNA reveal extensive mtDNA degradation within the optic nerve astrocytes, some of which comes from retinal ganglion cell axons. Together, these results demonstrate that surprisingly large proportions of retinal ganglion cell axonal mitochondria are normally degraded by the astrocytes of the ONH. This transcellular degradation of mitochondria, or transmitophagy, likely occurs elsewhere in the CNS, because structurally similar accumulations of degrading mitochondria are also found along neurites in superficial layers of the cerebral cortex. Thus, the general assumption that neurons or other cells necessarily degrade their own mitochondria should be reconsidered.

  20. Radial Glial Cell-Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-10-28

    How extracellular cues direct axon-dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)-cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC-neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia-neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases.

  1. Motor cortical organization in an adult with hemimegalencephaly and late onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Carlo; Vicentini, Roberta; Collini, Alessandra; Boccagni, Cristina; Cantello, Roberto; Monaco, Francesco

    2009-08-28

    Hemimegalencephaly is a rare brain malformation whose physiology is largely obscure. In a single patient, we studied motor cortex using several transcranial magnetic stimulation variables testing cortical excitability, and mapping motor area. The megalencephalic hemisphere showed an enlargement of cortical motor map with abnormal axonal orientation and an excess spread of corticospinal excitation, associated with multiple defects of cortical inhibition. TMS gave new information on the anatomic/functional features and epileptogenesis in this complex and physiologically obscure syndrome.

  2. Low Piconewton Towing of CNS Axons against Diffusing and Surface-Bound Repellents Requires the Inhibition of Motor Protein-Associated Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Devrim; Blasiak, Agata; O'Mahony, James J.; Lee, Gil U.

    2014-11-01

    Growth cones, dynamic structures at axon tips, integrate chemical and physical stimuli and translate them into coordinated axon behaviour, e.g., elongation or turning. External force application to growth cones directs and enhances axon elongation in vitro; however, direct mechanical stimulation is rarely combined with chemotactic stimulation. We describe a microfluidic device that exposes isolated cortical axons to gradients of diffusing and substrate-bound molecules, and permits the simultaneous application of piconewton (pN) forces to multiple individual growth cones via magnetic tweezers. Axons treated with Y-27632, a RhoA kinase inhibitor, were successfully towed against Semaphorin 3A gradients, which repel untreated axons, with less than 12 pN acting on a small number of neural cell adhesion molecules. Treatment with Y-27632 or monastrol, a kinesin-5 inhibitor, promoted axon towing on substrates coated with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, potent axon repellents. Thus, modulating key molecular pathways that regulate contractile stress generation in axons counteracts the effects of repellent molecules and promotes tension-induced growth. The demonstration of parallel towing of axons towards inhibitory environments with minute forces suggests that mechanochemical stimulation may be a promising therapeutic approach for the repair of the damaged central nervous system, where regenerating axons face repellent factors over-expressed in the glial scar.

  3. Zebrafish foxP2 zinc finger nuclease mutant has normal axon pathfinding.

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    Lingyan Xing

    Full Text Available foxP2, a forkhead-domain transcription factor, is critical for speech and language development in humans, but its role in the establishment of CNS connectivity is unclear. While in vitro studies have identified axon guidance molecules as targets of foxP2 regulation, and cell culture assays suggest a role for foxP2 in neurite outgrowth, in vivo studies have been lacking regarding a role for foxP2 in axon pathfinding. We used a modified zinc finger nuclease methodology to generate mutations in the zebrafish foxP2 gene. Using PCR-based high resolution melt curve analysis (HRMA of G0 founder animals, we screened and identified three mutants carrying nonsense mutations in the 2(nd coding exon: a 17 base-pair (bp deletion, an 8bp deletion, and a 4bp insertion. Sequence analysis of cDNA confirmed that these were frameshift mutations with predicted early protein truncations. Homozygous mutant fish were viable and fertile, with unchanged body morphology, and no apparent differences in CNS apoptosis, proliferation, or patterning at embryonic stages. There was a reduction in expression of the known foxP2 target gene cntnap2 that was rescued by injection of wild-type foxP2 transcript. When we examined axon pathfinding using a pan-axonal marker or transgenic lines, including a foxP2-neuron-specific enhancer, we did not observe any axon guidance errors. Our findings suggest that foxP2 is not necessary for axon pathfinding during development.

  4. TIPsy tour guides: How microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs facilitate axon guidance

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    Elizabeth A Bearce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth cone is a dynamic cytoskeletal vehicle, which drives the end of a developing axon. It serves to interpret and navigate through the complex landscape and guidance cues of the early nervous system. The growth cone’s distinctive cytoskeletal organization offers a fascinating platform to study how extracellular cues can be translated into mechanical outgrowth and turning behaviors. While many studies of cell motility highlight the importance of actin networks in signaling, adhesion, and propulsion, both seminal and emerging works in the field have highlighted a unique and necessary role for microtubules in growth cone navigation. Here, we focus on the role of singular pioneer microtubules, which extend into the growth cone periphery and are regulated by a diverse family of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs. These +TIPs accumulate at the dynamic ends of microtubules, where they are well-positioned to encounter and respond to key signaling events downstream of guidance receptors, catalyzing immediate changes in microtubule stability and actin cross-talk, that facilitate both axonal outgrowth and turning events.

  5. Reduced sympathetic neurite outgrowth on uterine tissue sections from rats treated with estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richeri, Analía; Bianchimano, Paola; Crutcher, Keith A; Brauer, M Mónica

    2010-05-01

    In order to evaluate the contribution of substrate-bound factors to the extent and patterning of the sympathetic innervation of rat uterus following estrogen treatment, superior cervical ganglion explants from neonatal and adult ovariectomized rats were cultured on tissue sections of fresh frozen uterus from adult ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen or a vehicle. The main findings were: (1) neurite growth was greatly influenced by histological features of the underlying section; (2) on myometrial sections, neurites followed the orientation of the main axis of the longitudinally sectioned muscle cells; (3) neurites showed limited growth on transversally sectioned smooth muscle; (4) neuritic patterning was unaffected by a reduction in migrating ganglionic non-neuronal cells; (5) neurite outgrowth, but not non-neural cell migration, was markedly reduced on myometrial sections from rats treated with estrogen. These results suggest that adult myometrium continues to provide signals allowing the organotypic patterning and growth of sympathetic axons, that estrogen treatment modifies myometrial substrate properties so that it is less supportive for sympathetic neurite growth, and that adult sympathetic neurons retain their ability to recognize substrate-bound cues present in the myometrium. On endometrial sections, neurites formed radially symmetric halos, which were reduced in size on estrogen-treated endometrial substrates. Thus, changes in the neuritogenic capacity of the uterus underlie plasticity in uterine sympathetic nerves, and alterations in substrate-bound factors contribute to the diminished receptivity of the estrogenized uterus to its sympathetic innervation.

  6. Live-imaging of Bacillus subtilis spore germination and outgrowth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandey, R.

    2014-01-01

    Spores of Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus and Clostridium cause huge economic losses to the food industry. In food products, spores survive under food preservation conditions and subsequent germination and outgrowth eventually causes food spoilage. Therefore efforts are being made to elimina

  7. Discovery of pyrroloimidazoles as agents stimulating neurite outgrowth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, Barbara; Leppert, Christian A.; Mueller, Bernhard K.; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A diverse library of substituted pyrroloimidazoles was assembled by a multicomponent reaction (MCR) of tosylmethyl isocyanides (TOSMIC), indole carbaldehydes and primary amines in a van Leusen reaction. A library of this scaffold was screened in a phenotypic assay for neurite outgrowth. Several memb

  8. Discovery of pyrroloimidazoles as agents stimulating neurite outgrowth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, Barbara; Leppert, Christian A.; Mueller, Bernhard K.; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A diverse library of substituted pyrroloimidazoles was assembled by a multicomponent reaction (MCR) of tosylmethyl isocyanides (TOSMIC), indole carbaldehydes and primary amines in a van Leusen reaction. A library of this scaffold was screened in a phenotypic assay for neurite outgrowth. Several

  9. Laminin/β1 integrin signal triggers axon formation by promoting microtubule assembly and stabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Liang Lei; Shi-Ge Xing; Cai-Yun Deng; Xiang-Chun Ju; Xing-Yu Jiang; Zhen-Ge Luo

    2012-01-01

    Axon specification during neuronal polarization is closely associated with increased microtubule stabilization in one of the neurites of unpolarized neuron,but how this increased microtubule stability is achieved is unclear.Here,we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) component laminin promotes neuronal polarization via regulating directional microtubule assembly through β1 integrin (Itgb1).Contact with laminin coated on culture substrate or polystyrene beads was sufficient for axon specification of undifferentiated neurites in cultured hippocampal neurons and cortical slices.Active Itgb1 was found to be concentrated in laminin-contacting neurites.Axon formation was promoted and abolished by enhancing and attenuating Itgbl signaling,respectively.Interestingly,laminin contact promoted plus-end microtubule assembly in a manner that required Itgbl.Moreover,stabilizing microtubules partially prevented polarization defects caused by ltgbl downregulation.Finally,genetic ablation of ltgbl in dorsal telencephalic progenitors caused deficits in axon development of cortical pyramidal neurons.Thus,laminin/Itgb1 signaling plays an instructive role in axon initiation and growth,both in vitro and in vivo,through the regulation of microtubule assembly.This study has established a linkage between an extrinsic factor and intrinsic cytoskeletai dynamics during neuronal polarization.

  10. Axon density and axon orientation dispersion in children born preterm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, Claire E.; Thompson, Deanne K.; Chen, Jian; Leemans, Alexander; Adamson, Christopher L.; Inder, Terrie E.; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Doyle, Lex W.; Anderson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Very preterm birth (VPT, <32 weeks' gestation) is associated with altered white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), the biological basis of which is uncertain but may relate to changes in axon density and/or dispersion, which can be measured using Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density

  11. Intermediate Progenitors Facilitate Intracortical Progression of Thalamocortical Axons and Interneurons through CXCL12 Chemokine Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Philipp; Molnár, Zoltán; Tzeng, Yi-Shiuan; Lai, Dar-Ming; Arnold, Sebastian J; Stumm, Ralf

    2015-09-23

    Glutamatergic principal neurons, GABAergic interneurons and thalamocortical axons (TCAs) are essential elements of the cerebrocortical network. Principal neurons originate locally from radial glia and intermediate progenitors (IPCs), whereas interneurons and TCAs are of extrinsic origin. Little is known how the assembly of these elements is coordinated. C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12), which is known to guide axons outside the neural tube and interneurons in the cortex, is expressed in the meninges and IPCs. Using mouse genetics, we dissected the influence of IPC-derived CXCL12 on TCAs and interneurons by showing that Cxcl12 ablation in IPCs, leaving meningeal Cxcl12 intact, attenuates intracortical TCA growth and disrupts tangential interneuron migration in the subventricular zone. In accordance with strong CXCR4 expression in the forming thalamus and TCAs, we identified a CXCR4-dependent growth-promoting effect of CXCL12 on TCAs in thalamus explants. Together, our findings indicate a cell-autonomous role of CXCR4 in promoting TCA growth. We propose that CXCL12 signals from IPCs link cortical neurogenesis to the progression of TCAs and interneurons spatially and temporally. Significance statement: The cerebral cortex exerts higher brain functions including perceptual and emotional processing. Evolutionary expansion of the mammalian cortex is mediated by intermediate progenitors, transient amplifying cells generating cortical excitatory neurons. During the peak period of cortical neurogenesis, migrating precursors of inhibitory interneurons originating in subcortical areas and thalamic axons invade the cortex. Although defects in the assembly of cortical network elements cause neurological and mental disorders, little is known how neurogenesis, interneuron recruitment, and axonal ingrowth are coordinated. We demonstrate that intermediate progenitors release the chemotactic cytokine CXCL12 to promote intracortical interneuron migration and growth of thalamic axons

  12. Action-potential modulation during axonal conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takuya; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2011-02-04

    Once initiated near the soma, an action potential (AP) is thought to propagate autoregeneratively and distribute uniformly over axonal arbors. We challenge this classic view by showing that APs are subject to waveform modulation while they travel down axons. Using fluorescent patch-clamp pipettes, we recorded APs from axon branches of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons ex vivo. The waveforms of axonal APs increased in width in response to the local application of glutamate and an adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist to the axon shafts, but not to other unrelated axon branches. Uncaging of calcium in periaxonal astrocytes caused AP broadening through ionotropic glutamate receptor activation. The broadened APs triggered larger calcium elevations in presynaptic boutons and facilitated synaptic transmission to postsynaptic neurons. This local AP modification may enable axonal computation through the geometry of axon wiring.

  13. Exogenous BDNF enhances the integration of chronically injured axons that regenerate through a peripheral nerve grafted into a chondroitinase-treated spinal cord injury site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Veronica J; Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R; Miller, Kassi; Domitrovich, Cheryl; Bouyer, Julien; Zhukareva, Victoria; Klaw, Michelle C; Lemay, Michel A; Houlé, John D

    2013-01-01

    Although axons lose some of their intrinsic capacity for growth after their developmental period, some axons retain the potential for regrowth after injury. When provided with a growth-promoting substrate such as a peripheral nerve graft (PNG), severed axons regenerate into and through the graft; however, they stop when they reach the glial scar at the distal graft-host interface that is rich with inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. We previously showed that treatment of a spinal cord injury site with chondroitinase (ChABC) allows axons within the graft to traverse the scar and reinnervate spinal cord, where they form functional synapses. While this improvement in outgrowth was significant, it still represented only a small percentage (regenerated into the PNG. Here we tested whether providing exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via lentivirus in tissue distal to the PNG would augment regeneration beyond a ChABC-treated glial interface. We found that ChABC treatment alone promoted axonal regeneration but combining ChABC with BDNF-lentivirus did not increase the number of axons that regenerated back into spinal cord. Combining BDNF with ChABC did increase the number of spinal cord neurons that were trans-synaptically activated during electrical stimulation of the graft, as indicated by c-Fos expression, suggesting that BDNF overexpression improved the functional significance of axons that did reinnervate distal spinal cord tissue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Reducing Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling-3 (SOCS3 Expression on Dendritic Outgrowth and Demyelination after Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Keun Woo Park

    Full Text Available Suppressors of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3 is associated with limitations of nerve growth capacity after injury to the central nervous system. Although genetic manipulations of SOCS3 can enhance axonal regeneration after optic injury, the role of SOCS3 in dendritic outgrowth after spinal cord injury (SCI is still unclear. The present study investigated the endogenous expression of SOCS3 and its role in regulating neurite outgrowth in vitro. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 induces SOCS3 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in neuroscreen-1 (NS-1 cells. In parallel to SOCS3 expression, IL-6 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 in NS-1 cells. Lentiviral delivery of short hairpin RNA (shSOCS3 (Lenti-shSOCS3 to decrease SOCS3 expression into NS-1 cells enhanced IL-6-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 (P-STAT3 Tyr705 and promoted neurite outgrowth. In addition, we determined if reduction of SOCS3 expression by microinjection of Lenti-shSOCS3 into spinal cord enhances dendrite outgrowth in spinal cord neurons after SCI. Knocking down of SOCS3 in spinal cord neurons with Lenti-shSOCS3 increased complete SCI-induced P-STAT3 Tyr705. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that complete SCI induced a significant reduction of microtubule association protein 2-positive (MAP-2+ dendrites in the gray and white matter at 1 and 4 weeks after injury. The SCI-induced reduction of MAP-2+ dendrites was inhibited by infection with Lenti-shSOCS3 in areas both rostral and caudal to the lesion at 1 and 4 weeks after complete SCI. Furthermore, shSOCS3 treatment enhanced up-regulation of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43 expression, which co-localized with MAP-2+ dendrites in white matter and with MAP-2+ cell bodies in gray matter, indicating Lenti-shSOCS3 may induce dendritic regeneration after SCI. Moreover, we demonstrated that Lenti-shSOCS3 decreased SCI-induced demyelination in white matter of spinal cord both

  15. Characterization of axo-axonic synapses in the piriform cortex of Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinjun; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2012-03-01

    Previous anatomical and physiological studies have established major glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal subtypes within the piriform cortical circuits. However, quantitative information regarding axo-axonic inhibitory synapses mediated by chandelier cells across major cortical subdivisions of piriform cortex is lacking. Therefore, we examined the properties of these synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Our results show the following. 1) γ-Aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1-positive varicosities, whose appearance resembles chandelier cartridges, are found around the initial segments of axons of glutamatergic cells across layers II and III. 2) Both the density of axo-axonic cartridges and the degree of γ-aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1 innervation in each axo-axonic synapse are significantly higher in the piriform cortex than in the neocortex. 3) Glutamate decarboxylase 67, vesicular GABA transporter, and parvalbumin, but not calbindin, are colocalized with the presynaptic varicosities, whereas gephyrin, Na-K-2Cl cotransporter 1, and GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit, but not K-Cl cotransporter 2, are colocalized at the presumed postsynaptic sites. 4) The axo-axonic cartridges innervate the majority of excitatory neurons and are distributed more frequently in putative centrifugal cells and posterior piriform cortex. We further describe the morphology of chandelier cells by using parvalbumin-immunoreactivity and single-cell labeling. In summary, our results demonstrate that a small population of chandelier cells mediates abundant axo-axonic synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Because of the critical location of these inhibitory synapses in relation to action potential regulation, our results highlight a critical role of axo-axonic synapses in regulating information flow and olfactory-related oscillations within the piriform cortex in vivo.

  16. Optofluidic control of axonal guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Ordonez, Simon; Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Significant efforts are being made for control on axonal guidance due to its importance in nerve regeneration and in the formation of functional neuronal circuitry in-vitro. These include several physical (topographic modification, optical force, and electric field), chemical (surface functionalization cues) and hybrid (electro-chemical, photochemical etc) methods. Here, we report comparison of the effect of linear flow versus microfluidic flow produced by an opticallydriven micromotor in guiding retinal ganglion axons. A circularly polarized laser tweezers was used to hold, position and spin birefringent calcite particle near growth cone, which in turn resulted in microfluidic flow. The flow rate and resulting shear-force on axons could be controlled by a varying the power of the laser tweezers beam. The calcite particles were placed separately in one chamber and single particle was transported through microfluidic channel to another chamber containing the retina explant. In presence of flow, the turning of axons was found to strongly correlate with the direction of flow. Turning angle as high as 90° was achieved. Optofluidic-manipulation can be applied to other types of mammalian neurons and also can be extended to stimulate mechano-sensing neurons.

  17. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  18. The origin of cortical neurons

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    J.G. Parnavelas

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex comprise two broad classes: pyramidal neurons, which project to distant targets, and the inhibitory nonpyramidal cells, the cortical interneurons. Pyramidal neurons are generated in the germinal ventricular zone, which lines the lateral ventricles, and migrate along the processes of radial glial cells to their positions in the developing cortex in an `inside-out' sequence. The GABA-containing nonpyramidal cells originate for the most part in the ganglionic eminence, the primordium of the basal ganglia in the ventral telencephalon. These cells follow tangential migratory routes to enter the cortex and are in close association with the corticofugal axonal system. Once they enter the cortex, they move towards the ventricular zone, possibly to obtain positional information, before they migrate radially in the direction of the pial surface to take up their positions in the developing cortex. The mechanisms that guide interneurons throughout these long and complex migratory routes are currently under investigation.

  19. Peripheral nerve regeneration and NGF-dependent neurite outgrowth of adult sensory neurons converge on STAT3 phosphorylation downstream of neuropoietic cytokine receptor gp130.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Serena; Baeumer, Bastian E; Scherbakov, Nadja; Andratsch, Manfred; Rose-John, Stefan; Dechant, Georg; Bandtlow, Christine E; Kress, Michaela

    2014-09-24

    After nerve injury, adult sensory neurons can regenerate peripheral axons and reconnect with their target tissue. Initiation of outgrowth, as well as elongation of neurites over long distances, depends on the signaling of receptors for neurotrophic growth factors. Here, we investigated the importance of gp130, the signaling subunit of neuropoietic cytokine receptors in peripheral nerve regeneration. After sciatic nerve crush, functional recovery in vivo was retarded in SNS-gp130(-/-) mice, which specifically lack gp130 in sensory neurons. Correspondingly, a significantly reduced number of free nerve endings was detected in glabrous skin from SNS-gp130(-/-) compared with control mice after nerve crush. Neurite outgrowth and STAT3 activation in vitro were severely reduced in cultures in gp130-deficient cultured neurons. Surprisingly, in neurons obtained from SNS-gp130(-/-) mice the increase in neurite length was reduced not only in response to neuropoietic cytokine ligands of gp130 but also to nerve growth factor (NGF), which does not bind to gp130-containing receptors. Neurite outgrowth in the absence of neurotrophic factors was partially rescued in gp130-deficient neurons by leptin, which activates STAT3 downstream of leptic receptor and independent of gp130. The neurite outgrowth response of gp130-deficient neurons to NGF was fully restored in the presence of leptin. Based on these findings, gp130 signaling via STAT3 activation is suggested not only to be an important regulator of peripheral nerve regeneration in vitro and in vivo, but as determining factor for the growth promoting action of NGF in adult sensory neurons. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413222-12$15.00/0.

  20. Quantification of the impact of single and multiple mild stresses on outgrowth heterogeneity of Bacillus cereus spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, van C.C.J.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2014-01-01

    Outgrowth heterogeneity of bacterial spore populations complicates both prediction and efficient control of spore outgrowth. In this study, the impact of mild preservation stresses on outgrowth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was quantified during the first stages of outgrowth. Heterogeneity in

  1. IgCAMs redundantly control axon navigation in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Voltmer-Irsch Susanne

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgCAMs form one of the largest and most diverse families of adhesion molecules and receptors in the nervous system. Many members of this family mediate contact and communication among neurons during development. The Caenorhabditis elegans genome contains a comparatively small number of IgCAMs, most of which are evolutionarily conserved and found across all animal phyla. Only some of these have been functionally characterized so far. Results We systematically analyzed previously uncharacterized IgCAMs in C. elegans. Green fluorescent protein reporter constructs of 12 IgCAMs revealed that expression generally is not confined to a single tissue and that all tissues express at least one of the IgCAMs. Most IgCAMs were expressed in neurons. Within the nervous system significant overlap in expression was found in central components of the motor circuit, in particular the command interneurons, ventral cord motoneurons as well as motoneurons innervating head muscles. Sensory neurons are underrepresented among the cells expressing these IgCAMs. We isolated mutations for eight of the genes showing neuronal expression. Phenotypic analysis of single mutants revealed limited neuronal defects, in particular axon navigation defects in some of the mutants. Systematic genetic interaction studies uncovered two cases of functional overlap among three and four genes, respectively. A strain combining mutations in all eight genes is viable and shows no additional defects in the neurons that were analyzed, suggesting that genetic interactions among those genes are limited. Conclusion Genetic interactions involving multiple IgCAMs affecting axon outgrowth demonstrate functional overlap among IgCAMs during nervous system development.

  2. Shoc2/Sur8 protein regulates neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Gonzalo; Sanchez-Ruiloba, Lucia; Perez-Rodriguez, Andrea; Gragera, Teresa; Martinez, Natalia; Hernandez, Silvia; Anta, Berta; Calero, Olga; Garcia-Dominguez, Carlota A; Dura, Lara M; Peña-Jimenez, Daniel; Castro, Judit; Zarich, Natasha; Sanchez-Gomez, Pilar; Calero, Miguel; Iglesias, Teresa; Oliva, Jose L; Rojas, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    The Shoc2 protein has been implicated in the positive regulation of the Ras-ERK pathway by increasing the functional binding interaction between Ras and Raf, leading to increased ERK activity. Here we found that Shoc2 overexpression induced sustained ERK phosphorylation, notably in the case of EGF stimulation, and Shoc2 knockdown inhibited ERK activation. We demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of human Shoc2 in PC12 cells significantly promotes neurite extension in the presence of EGF, a stimulus that induces proliferation rather than differentiation in these cells. Finally, Shoc2 depletion reduces both NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and ERK activation in PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Shoc2 is essential to modulate the Ras-ERK signaling outcome in cell differentiation processes involved in neurite outgrowth.

  3. Shoc2/Sur8 protein regulates neurite outgrowth.

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    Gonzalo Leon

    Full Text Available The Shoc2 protein has been implicated in the positive regulation of the Ras-ERK pathway by increasing the functional binding interaction between Ras and Raf, leading to increased ERK activity. Here we found that Shoc2 overexpression induced sustained ERK phosphorylation, notably in the case of EGF stimulation, and Shoc2 knockdown inhibited ERK activation. We demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of human Shoc2 in PC12 cells significantly promotes neurite extension in the presence of EGF, a stimulus that induces proliferation rather than differentiation in these cells. Finally, Shoc2 depletion reduces both NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and ERK activation in PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Shoc2 is essential to modulate the Ras-ERK signaling outcome in cell differentiation processes involved in neurite outgrowth.

  4. Human intraretinal myelination: Axon diameters and axon/myelin thickness ratios

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    Thomas FitzGibbon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human intraretinal myelination of ganglion cell axons occurs in about 1% of the population. We examined myelin thickness and axon diameter in human retinal specimens containing myelinated retinal ganglion cell axons. Materials and Methods: Two eyes containing myelinated patches were prepared for electron microscopy. Two areas were examined in one retina and five in the second retina. Measurements were compared to normal retinal and optic nerve samples and the rabbit retina, which normally contains myelinated axons. Measurements were made using a graphics tablet. Results: Mean axon diameter of myelinated axons at all locations were significantly larger than unmyelinated axons (P ≤ 0.01. Myelinated axons within the patches were significantly larger than axons within the optic nerve (P < 0.01. The relationship between axon diameter/fiber diameter (the G-ratio seen in the retinal sites differed from that in the nerve. G-ratios were higher and myelin thickness was positively correlated to axon diameter (P < 0.01 in the retina but negatively correlated to axon diameter in the nerve (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Intraretinally myelinated axons are larger than non-myelinated axons from the same population and suggests that glial cells can induce diameter changes in retinal axons that are not normally myelinated. This effect is more dramatic on intraretinal axons compared with the normal transition zone as axons enter the optic nerve and these changes are abnormal. Whether intraretinal myelin alters axonal conduction velocity or blocks axonal conduction remains to be clarified and these issues may have different clinical outcomes.

  5. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor is essential for axonal regeneration in adult central nervous system neurons.

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    Sebastián Dupraz

    Full Text Available Axonal regeneration is an essential condition to re-establish functional neuronal connections in the injured adult central nervous system (CNS, but efficient regrowth of severed axons has proven to be very difficult to achieve. Although significant progress has been made in identifying the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms involved, many aspects remain unresolved. Axonal development in embryonic CNS (hippocampus requires the obligate activation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R. Based on known similarities between axonal growth in fetal compared to mature CNS, we decided to examine the expression of the IGF-1R, using an antibody to the βgc subunit or a polyclonal anti-peptide antibody directed to the IGF-R (C20, in an in vitro model of adult CNS axonal regeneration, namely retinal ganglion cells (RGC derived from adult rat retinas. Expression of both βgc and the β subunit recognized by C20 antibody were low in freshly isolated adult RGC, but increased significantly after 4 days in vitro. As in embryonic axons, βgc was localised to distal regions and leading growth cones in RGC. IGF-1R-βgc co-localised with activated p85 involved in the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K signaling pathway, upon stimulation with IGF-1. Blocking experiments using either an antibody which neutralises IGF-1R activation, shRNA designed against the IGF-1R sequence, or the PI3K pathway inhibitor LY294002, all significantly reduced axon regeneration from adult RGC in vitro (∼40% RGC possessed axons in controls vs 2-8% in the different blocking studies. Finally, co-transfection of RGC with shRNA to silence IGF-1R together with a vector containing a constitutively active form of downstream PI3K (p110, fully restored axonal outgrowth in vitro. Hence these data demonstrate that axonal regeneration in adult CNS neurons requires re-expression and activation of IGF-1R, and targeting this system may offer new therapeutic approaches to enhancing axonal

  6. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sato, C.; Naka, Y.; Whitby, R.; Shimizu, N.

    2010-03-01

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 µg ml - 1) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 µg ml - 1 CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  7. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K; Sato, C; Shimizu, N [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Toyo University, 1-1-1 Izumino, Itakura-machi, Ora-gun, Gunma 374-0193 (Japan); Naka, Y [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Center, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Whitby, R, E-mail: shimizu@toyonet.toyo.ac.jp [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Cockroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-19

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 {mu}g ml{sup -1} CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  8. Neurite outgrowth on fluorinated polyimide film micropatterned by ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, Y.; Sato, M.; Nagaoka, S.; Kawakami, H. E-mail: kawakami-hiroyoshi@c.metro-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Y.; Iwaki, M

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we investigated neurite outgrowth on a fluorinated polyimide film micropatterned by ion irradiation. We used the fluorinated polyimide because of its excellent thermal and mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Rattus norvegicus chromaphin (PC12) cells were used for in vitro studies. The polyimide films were irradiated with He{sup +}, Ne{sup +} or Kr{sup +} at 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} using an ion-beam mask. The lines in the mask were 120 and 160 {mu}m wide and 120-160 {mu}m apart. PC12 cells were selectively adhered on the polyimide film micropatterned by Kr{sup +}-irradiation. However, the neurite length on the film irradiated by Kr{sup +} was shorter than that determined in the film irradiated by He{sup +}. On the other hand, neurite outgrowth on the polyimide film micropatterned by He{sup +}-irradiation was at least 100 {mu}m in length. This initial study indicated the enhanced outgrowth of PC12 cells on the fluorinated polyimide film micropatterned by ion irradiation.

  9. Notch Signaling Inhibits Axon Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Bejjani, Rachid El; Hammarlund, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Many neurons have limited capacity to regenerate their axons after injury. Neurons in the mammalian CNS do not regenerate, and even neurons in the PNS often fail to regenerate to their former targets. This failure is likely due in part to pathways that actively restrict regeneration; however, only a few factors that limit regeneration are known. Here, using single-neuron analysis of regeneration in vivo, we show that Notch/lin-12 signaling inhibits the regeneration of mature C. elegans neuron...

  10. Molecular mechanisms of the suppression of axon regeneration by KLF transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akintomide Apara; Jeffrey L.Goldberg

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the Kr̈uppel-like family of transcription factors (KLFs) have been studied more in proliferating cells than in post-mitotic cells such as neurons. We recently found that KLFs regulate intrinsic axon growth ability in central nervous system (CNS) neurons in-cluding retinal ganglion cells, and hippocampal and cortical neurons. With at least 15 of 17 KLF family members expressed in neurons and at least 5 structurally unique subfamilies, it is import-ant to determine how this complex family functions in neurons to regulate the intricate genetic programs of axon growth and regeneration. By characterizing the molecular mechanisms of the KLF family in the nervous system, including binding partners and gene targets, and comparing them to deifned mechanisms deifned outside the nervous system, we may better understand how KLFs regulate neurite growth and axon regeneration.

  11. Quantitative analysis of axonal fiber activation evoked by deep brain stimulation via activation density heat maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J. Hartmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cortical modulation is likely to be involved in the various therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS. However, it is currently difficult to predict the changes of cortical modulation during clinical adjustment of DBS. Therefore, we present a novel quantitative approach to estimate anatomical regions of DBS-evoked cortical modulation. Methods: Four different models of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS were created to represent variable electrode placements (model I: dorsal border of the posterolateral STN; model II: central posterolateral STN; model III: central anteromedial STN; model IV: dorsal border of the anteromedial STN. Axonal fibers of passage near each electrode location were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography and modeled using multi-compartment cable models. Stimulation-evoked activation of local axon fibers and corresponding cortical projections were modeled and quantified. Results: Stimulation at the border of the STN (models I and IV led to a higher degree of fiber activation and associated cortical modulation than stimulation deeply inside the STN (models II and III. A posterolateral target (models I and II was highly connected to cortical areas representing motor function. Additionally, model I was also associated with strong activation of fibers projecting to the cerebellum. Finally, models III and IV showed a dorsoventral difference of preferentially targeted prefrontal areas (models III: middle frontal gyrus; model IV: inferior frontal gyrus.Discussion: The method described herein allows characterization of cortical modulation across different electrode placements and stimulation parameters. Furthermore, knowledge of anatomical distribution of stimulation-evoked activation targeting cortical regions may help predict efficacy and potential side effects, and therefore can be used to improve the therapeutic effectiveness of individual adjustments in DBS patients.

  12. Developmental Expression of Kv Potassium Channels at the Axon Initial Segment of Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ponce, Diana; DeFelipe, Javier; Garrido, Juan José; Muñoz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth and the formation of the axon initial segment (AIS) are early events in the acquisition of neuronal polarity. The AIS is characterized by a high concentration of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels. However, the specific ion channel subunits present and their precise localization in this axonal subdomain vary both during development and among the types of neurons, probably determining their firing characteristics in response to stimulation. Here, we characterize the developmental expression of different subfamilies of voltage-gated potassium channels in the AISs of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, including subunits Kv1.2, Kv2.2 and Kv7.2. In contrast to the early appearance of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Kv7.2 subunit at the AIS, Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits were tethered at the AIS only after 10 days in vitro. Interestingly, we observed different patterns of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunit expression, with each confined to distinct neuronal populations. The accumulation of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits at the AIS was dependent on ankyrin G tethering, it was not affected by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and it was resistant to detergent extraction, as described previously for other AIS proteins. This distribution of potassium channels in the AIS further emphasizes the heterogeneity of this structure in different neuronal populations, as proposed previously, and suggests corresponding differences in action potential regulation. PMID:23119056

  13. MAP1B Regulates Axonal Development by Modulating Rho-GTPase Rac1 Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Tortosa, Elena; Rosso, Silvana; Peretti, Diego; Bollati, Flavia; Bisbal, Mariano; Jausoro, Ignacio; Avila, Jesus; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Cultured neurons obtained from MAP1B-deficient mice have a delay in axon outgrowth and a reduced rate of axonal elongation compared with neurons from wild-type mice. Here we show that MAP1B deficiency results in a significant decrease in Rac1 and cdc42 activity and a significant increase in Rho activity. We found that MAP1B interacted with Tiam1, a guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1. The decrease in Rac1/cdc42 activity was paralleled by decreases in the phosphorylation of the downstream effectors of these proteins, such as LIMK-1 and cofilin. The expression of a constitutively active form of Rac1, cdc42, or Tiam1 rescued the axon growth defect of MAP1B-deficient neurons. Taken together, these observations define a new and crucial function of MAP1B that we show to be required for efficient cross-talk between microtubules and the actin cytoskeleton during neuronal polarization. PMID:20719958

  14. Drosophila as a genetic and cellular model for studies on axonal growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitington Paul

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the most fascinating processes during nervous system development is the establishment of stereotypic neuronal networks. An essential step in this process is the outgrowth and precise navigation (pathfinding of axons and dendrites towards their synaptic partner cells. This phenomenon was first described more than a century ago and, over the past decades, increasing insights have been gained into the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating neuronal growth and navigation. Progress in this area has been greatly assisted by the use of simple and genetically tractable invertebrate model systems, such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This review is dedicated to Drosophila as a genetic and cellular model to study axonal growth and demonstrates how it can and has been used for this research. We describe the various cellular systems of Drosophila used for such studies, insights into axonal growth cones and their cytoskeletal dynamics, and summarise identified molecular signalling pathways required for growth cone navigation, with particular focus on pathfinding decisions in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila embryos. These Drosophila-specific aspects are viewed in the general context of our current knowledge about neuronal growth.

  15. Axon guidance of sympathetic neurons to cardiomyocytes by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Miwa

    Full Text Available Molecular signaling of cardiac autonomic innervation is an unresolved issue. Here, we show that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF promotes cardiac sympathetic innervation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ventricular myocytes (VMs and sympathetic neurons (SNs isolated from neonatal rat ventricles and superior cervical ganglia were cultured at a close distance. Then, morphological and functional coupling between SNs and VMs was assessed in response to GDNF (10 ng/ml or nerve growth factor (50 ng/ml. As a result, fractions of neurofilament-M-positive axons and synapsin-I-positive area over the surface of VMs were markedly increased with GDNF by 9-fold and 25-fold, respectively, compared to control without neurotrophic factors. Pre- and post-synaptic stimulation of β1-adrenergic receptors (BAR with nicotine and noradrenaline, respectively, resulted in an increase of the spontaneous beating rate of VMs co-cultured with SNs in the presence of GDNF. GDNF overexpressing VMs by adenovirus vector (AdGDNF-VMs attracted more axons from SNs compared with mock-transfected VMs. In vivo, axon outgrowth toward the denervated myocardium in adult rat hearts after cryoinjury was also enhanced significantly by adenovirus-mediated GDNF overexpression. GDNF acts as a potent chemoattractant for sympathetic innervation of ventricular myocytes, and is a promising molecular target for regulation of cardiac function in diseased hearts.

  16. Axon guidance of sympathetic neurons to cardiomyocytes by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Itsuo; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular signaling of cardiac autonomic innervation is an unresolved issue. Here, we show that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes cardiac sympathetic innervation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ventricular myocytes (VMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) isolated from neonatal rat ventricles and superior cervical ganglia were cultured at a close distance. Then, morphological and functional coupling between SNs and VMs was assessed in response to GDNF (10 ng/ml) or nerve growth factor (50 ng/ml). As a result, fractions of neurofilament-M-positive axons and synapsin-I-positive area over the surface of VMs were markedly increased with GDNF by 9-fold and 25-fold, respectively, compared to control without neurotrophic factors. Pre- and post-synaptic stimulation of β1-adrenergic receptors (BAR) with nicotine and noradrenaline, respectively, resulted in an increase of the spontaneous beating rate of VMs co-cultured with SNs in the presence of GDNF. GDNF overexpressing VMs by adenovirus vector (AdGDNF-VMs) attracted more axons from SNs compared with mock-transfected VMs. In vivo, axon outgrowth toward the denervated myocardium in adult rat hearts after cryoinjury was also enhanced significantly by adenovirus-mediated GDNF overexpression. GDNF acts as a potent chemoattractant for sympathetic innervation of ventricular myocytes, and is a promising molecular target for regulation of cardiac function in diseased hearts.

  17. Estrogen induces axonal outgrowth in the nucleus retroambiguus-lumbosacral motoneuronal pathway in the adult female cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM; Holstege, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, we discovered a new pathway in the cat, which originates from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) and terminates in a distinct set of lumbosacral hindlimb, axial, and pelvic floor motoneuronal cell groups [VanderHorst VG.JM, Holstege G (1995) Caudal medullary pathways to lumbosacral

  18. In vivo induction of glial cell proliferation and axonal outgrowth and myelination by brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, D.M. de; Coenen, A.J.M.; Verhofstad, A.A.J.; Herp, F. van; Martens, G.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) belongs to the neurotrophin family of neuronal cell survival and differentiation factors but is thought to be involved in neuronal cell proliferation and myelination as well. To explore the role of BDNF in vivo, we employed the intermediate pituitary melanotr

  19. Estrogen induces axonal outgrowth in the nucleus retroambiguus-lumbosacral motoneuronal pathway in the adult female cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM; Holstege, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, we discovered a new pathway in the cat, which originates from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) and terminates in a distinct set of lumbosacral hindlimb, axial, and pelvic floor motoneuronal cell groups [VanderHorst VG.JM, Holstege G (1995) Caudal medullary pathways to lumbosacral motoneurona

  20. Axonal and dendritic density field estimation from incomplete single-slice neuronal reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap evan Pelt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal information processing in cortical networks critically depends on the organization of synaptic connectivity. Synaptic connections can form when axons and dendrites come in close proximity of each other. The spatial innervation of neuronal arborizations can be described by their axonal and dendritic density fields. Recently we showed that potential locations of synapses between neurons can be estimated from their overlapping axonal and dendritic density fields. However, deriving density fields from single-slice neuronal reconstructions is hampered by incompleteness because of cut branches.Here, we describe a method for recovering the lost axonal and dendritic mass. This so-called completion method is based on an estimation of the mass inside the slice and an extrapolation to the space outside the slice, assuming axial symmetry in the mass distribution. We validated the method using a set of neurons generated with our NETMORPH simulator. The model-generated neurons were artificially sliced and subsequently recovered by the completion method. Depending on slice thickness and arbor extent, branches that have lost their outside parents (orphan branches may occur inside the slice. Not connected anymore to the contiguous structure of the sliced neuron, orphan branches result in an underestimation of neurite mass. For 300 m thick slices, however, the validation showed a full recovery of dendritic and an almost full recovery of axonal mass.The completion method was applied to three experimental data sets of reconstructed rat cortical L2/3 pyramidal neurons. The results showed that in 300 m thick slices intracortical axons lost about 50% and dendrites about 16% of their mass. The completion method can be applied to single-slice reconstructions as long as axial symmetry can be assumed in the mass distribution. This opens up the possibility of using incomplete neuronal reconstructions from open-access data bases to determine population mean

  1. Ameliorative Effects of p75NTR-ED-Fc on Axonal Regeneration and Functional Recovery in Spinal Cord-Injured Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Zhu, Feng; Huang, Peng; Yu, Ying; Long, Zai-Yun; Wu, Ya-Min

    2015-12-01

    As a co-receptor of Nogo-66 receptor (NgR) and a critical receptor for paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PirB), p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) mediates the inhibitory effects of myelin-associated inhibitors on axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. Therefore, the p75NTR antagonist, such as recombinant p75NTR protein or its homogenates may block the inhibitory effects of myelin and promote the axonal regeneration and functional recovery. The purposes of this study are to subclone and express the extracellular domain gene of human p75NTR with IgG-Fc (hp75NTR-ED-Fc) in prokaryotic expression system and investigate the effects of the recombinant protein on axonal regeneration and functional recovery in spinal cord-injured rats. The hp75NTR-ED-Fc coding sequence was amplified from pcDNA-hp75NTR-ED-Fc by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subcloned into vector pET32a (+), then the effects of the purified recombinant protein on neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons cultured with myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) were determined, and the effects of the fusion protein on axonal regeneration, functional recovery, and its possible mechanisms in spinal cord-injured rats were further investigated. The results indicated that the purified infusion protein could promote neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons, promote axonal regeneration and functional recovery, and decrease RhoA activation in spinal cord-injured rats. Taken together, the findings revealed that p75NTR still may be a potential and novel target for therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury and that the hp75NTR-ED-Fc fusion protein treatment enhances functional recovery by limiting tissue loss and stimulating axonal growth in spinal cord-injured rats, which may result from decreasing the activation of RhoA.

  2. Co-effects of matrix low elasticity and aligned topography on stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Xi; Yu, Shukui; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Shuming; Wu, Qiong; Sun, Xiaodan; Mao, Haiquan

    2016-05-01

    The development of novel biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to direct stem cell fate for nerve regeneration is the focus of current intensive research efforts. In this study, a hierarchically aligned fibrillar fibrin hydrogel (AFG) that was fabricated through electrospinning and the concurrent molecular self-assembly process mimics both the soft and oriented features of nerve tissue, thus providing hybrid biophysical cues to instruct cell behavior in vitro and in vivo. The electrospun hydrogels were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing a hierarchically linear-ordered structure from the nanoscale to the macroscale with a soft elastic character (elasticity ~1 kPa). We found that this low elasticity and aligned topography of AFG exhibit co-effects on promoting the neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUMSCs) in comparison to random fibrin hydrogel (RFG) and tissue culture plate (TCP) control after two week cell culture in growth medium lacking supplementation with soluble neurogenic induction factors. In addition, AFG also induces dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to rapidly project numerous long neurite outgrowths longitudinally along the AFG fibers for a total neurite extension distance of 1.96 mm in three days in the absence of neurotrophic factor supplementation. Moreover, the AFG implanted in a rat T9 dorsal hemisection spinal cord injury model was found to promote endogenous neural cell fast migration and axonal invasion along AFG fibers, resulting in aligned tissue cables in vivo. Our results suggest that matrix stiffness and aligned topography may instruct stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth, providing great promise for biomaterial design for applications in nerve regeneration.The development of novel biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to

  3. A noise-reduction GWAS analysis implicates altered regulation of neurite outgrowth and guidance in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussman John P

    2011-01-01

    them cooperate in a coherent pathway that regulates the directional protrusion of axons and dendrites to their appropriate synaptic targets. Conclusions As statistical noise is likely to particularly affect studies of complex disorders, where genetic heterogeneity or interaction between genes may confound the ability to detect association, GWAS-NR offers a powerful method for prioritizing regions for follow-up studies. Applying this method to autism datasets, GWAS-NR analysis indicates that a large subset of genes involved in the outgrowth and guidance of axons and dendrites is implicated in the aetiology of autism.

  4. Human Genetic Disorders of Axon Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews symptoms and signs of aberrant axon connectivity in humans, and summarizes major human genetic disorders that result, or have been proposed to result, from defective axon guidance. These include corpus callosum agenesis, L1 syndrome, Joubert syndrome and related disorders, horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, Kallmann syndrome, albinism, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1, Duane retraction syndrome, and pontine tegmental cap dysplasia. Genes mutated in these disorders can encode axon growth cone ligands and receptors, downstream signaling molecules, and axon transport motors, as well as proteins without currently recognized roles in axon guidance. Advances in neuroimaging and genetic techniques have the potential to rapidly expand this field, and it is feasible that axon guidance disorders will soon be recognized as a new and significant category of human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:20300212

  5. Co-culture of oligodendrocytes and neurons can be used to assess drugs for axon regeneration in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Lin; Yao, Yu-Chen; Liu, Ying-Fu; Li, Yi-Peng; Yang, Kai; Lu, Lei; Cheng, Yuan-Chi; Chen, Xu-Yi; Tu, Yue

    2015-10-01

    We present a novel in vitro model in which to investigate the efficacy of experimental drugs for the promotion of axon regeneration in the central nervous system. We co-cultured rat hippocampal neurons and cerebral cortical oligodendrocytes, and tested the co-culture system using a Nogo-66 receptor antagonist peptide (NEP1-40), which promotes axonal growth. Primary cultured oligodendrocytes suppressed axonal growth in the rat hippocampus, but NEP1-40 stimulated axonal growth in the co-culture system. Our results confirm the validity of the neuron-oligodendrocyte co-culture system as an assay for the evaluation of drugs for axon regeneration in the central nervous system.

  6. Co-culture of oligodendrocytes and neurons can be used to assess drugs for axon regeneration in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Gang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel in vitro model in which to investigate the efficacy of experimental drugs for the promotion of axon regeneration in the central nervous system. We co-cultured rat hippocampal neurons and cerebral cortical oligodendrocytes, and tested the co-culture system using a Nogo-66 receptor antagonist peptide (NEP1-40, which promotes axonal growth. Primary cultured oligodendrocytes suppressed axonal growth in the rat hippocampus, but NEP1-40 stimulated axonal growth in the co-culture system. Our results confirm the validity of the neuron-oligodendrocyte co-culture system as an assay for the evaluation of drugs for axon regeneration in the central nervous system.

  7. Removing dysfunctional mitochondria from axons independent of mitophagy under pathophysiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei-Yao; Cheng, Xiu-Tang; Xie, Yuxiang; Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2017-10-03

    Chronic mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in major neurodegenerative diseases. Long-term cumulative pathological stress leads to axonal accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Therefore, the early removal of defective mitochondria from axons constitutes a critical step of mitochondrial quality control. We recently investigated the axonal mitochondrial response to mild stress in wild-type neurons and chronic mitochondrial defects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)- and Alzheimer disease (AD)-linked neurons. We demonstrated that remobilizing stressed mitochondria is critical for maintaining axonal mitochondrial integrity. The selective release of the mitochondrial anchoring protein SNPH (syntaphilin) from stressed mitochondria enhances their retrograde transport toward the soma before PARK2/Parkin-mediated mitophagy is activated. This SNPH-mediated response is robustly activated during the early disease stages of ALS-linked motor neurons and AD-related cortical neurons. Our study thus reveals a new mechanism for the maintenance of axonal mitochondrial integrity through SNPH-mediated coordination of mitochondrial stress and motility that is independent of mitophagy.

  8. Activity-Dependent Callosal Axon Projections in Neonatal Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Tagawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Callosal axon projections are among the major long-range axonal projections in the mammalian brain. They are formed during the prenatal and early postnatal periods in the mouse, and their development relies on both activity-independent and -dependent mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent findings about the roles of neuronal activity in callosal axon projections. In addition to the well-documented role of sensory-driven neuronal activity, recent studies using in utero electroporation demonstrated an essential role of spontaneous neuronal activity generated in neonatal cortical circuits. Both presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal activities are critically involved in the axon development. Studies have begun to reveal intracellular signaling pathway which works downstream of neuronal activity. We also review several distinct patterns of neuronal activity observed in the developing cerebral cortex, which might play roles in activity-dependent circuit construction. Such neuronal activity during the neonatal period can be disrupted by genetic factors, such as mutations in ion channels. It has been speculated that abnormal activity caused by such factors may affect activity-dependent circuit construction, leading to some developmental disorders. We discuss a possibility that genetic mutation in ion channels may impair callosal axon projections through an activity-dependent mechanism.

  9. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg.

  10. AxonSeg: open source software for axon and myelin segmentation and morphometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Zaimi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy only. Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i image pre-processing, (ii pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information, (iii automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image and (iv atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg.

  11. Epitransverse process: A rare outgrowth from atlas vertebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal P

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute injuries of the upper cervical spine as a cause of severe disability and death following trauma has at all times been an interesting phase of anatomical study. The present case study describes a rare outgrowth from the left transverse process of the atlas vertebra. This process referred to as epitransverse process can be of high importance to many specialties and especially to surgeons performing radical neck dissections, radiologists for accurate diagnosis of bony malformations and manipulative therapists, as it may markedly influence the posture, stability and mobility at the atlanto-occipital joint.

  12. How the cortex gets its folds: an inside-out, connectivity-driven model for the scaling of mammalian cortical folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eMota

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Larger mammalian cerebral cortices tend to have increasingly folded surfaces, often considered to result from the lateral expansion of the grey matter (GM, which, in a volume constrained by the cranium, causes mechanical compression that is relieved by inward folding of the white matter (WM, or to result from differential expansion of cortical layers. Across species, thinner cortices, presumably more pliable, would offer less resistance and hence become more folded than thicker cortices of a same size. However, such models do not acknowledge evidence in favor of a tension-based pull onto the GM from the inside, holding it in place even when the constraint imposed by the cranium is removed. Here we propose a testable, quantitative model of cortical folding driven by tension along the length of axons in the WM that assumes that connections through the WM are formed early in development, at the same time as the GM becomes folded, and considers that axonal connections through the WM generate tension that leads to inward folding of the WM surface, which pulls the GM surface inwards. Cortical folding is thus driven by WM connectivity, and is a function of the fraction of cortical neurons connected through the WM, the average length and the average cross-sectional area of the axons in the WM. Our model predicts that the different scaling of cortical folding across mammalian orders corresponds to different combinations of scaling of connectivity, axonal cross-sectional area and tension along WM axons, instead of being a simple function of the number of GM neurons. Our model also explains variations in cortical thickness as a result of the factors that lead to cortical folding, rather than as a determinant of folding; predicts that for a same tension, folding increases with connectivity through the WM and increased axonal cross-section; and that, for a same number of neurons, higher connectivity through the WM leads to a higher degree of folding as well

  13. Variable laterality of corticospinal tract axons that regenerate after spinal cord injury as a result of PTEN deletion or knock-down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Rafer; Zukor, Katherine; Liu, Kai; He, Zhigang; Steward, Oswald

    2016-09-01

    Corticospinal tract (CST) axons from one hemisphere normally extend and terminate predominantly in the contralateral spinal cord. We previously showed that deleting the gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in the sensorimotor cortex enables CST axons to regenerate after spinal cord injury and that some regenerating axons extend along the "wrong" side. Here, we characterize the degree of specificity of regrowth in terms of laterality. PTEN was selectively deleted via cortical adeno-associated virus (AAV)-Cre injections in neonatal PTEN-floxed mice. As adults, mice received dorsal hemisection injuries at T12 or complete crush injuries at T9. CST axons from one hemisphere were traced by unilateral biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) injections in PTEN-deleted mice with spinal cord injury and in noninjured PTEN-floxed mice that had not received AAV-Cre. In noninjured mice, 97.9 ± 0.7% of BDA-labeled axons in white matter and 88.5 ± 1.0% of BDA-labeled axons in gray matter were contralateral to the cortex of origin. In contrast, laterality of CST axons that extended past a lesion due to PTEN deletion varied across animals. In some cases, regenerated axons extended predominantly on the ipsilateral side; in other cases, axons extended predominantly contralaterally, and in others, axons were similar in numbers on both sides. Similar results were seen in analyses of cases from previous studies using short hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated PTEN knock-down. These results indicate that CST axons that extend past a lesion due to PTEN deletion or knock-down do not maintain the contralateral rule of the noninjured CST, highlighting one aspect of how the resultant circuitry from regenerating axons may differ from that of the uninjured CST. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2654-2676, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Waves of actin and microtubule polymerization drive microtubule-based transport and neurite growth before single axon formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans, Amy M; Collins, Sean R; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Many developing neurons transition through a multi-polar state with many competing neurites before assuming a unipolar state with one axon and multiple dendrites. Hallmarks of the multi-polar state are large fluctuations in microtubule-based transport into and outgrowth of different neurites, although what drives these fluctuations remains elusive. We show that actin waves, which stochastically migrate from the cell body towards neurite tips, direct microtubule-based transport during the multi-polar state. Our data argue for a mechanical control system whereby actin waves transiently widen the neurite shaft to allow increased microtubule polymerization to direct Kinesin-based transport and create bursts of neurite extension. Actin waves also require microtubule polymerization, arguing that positive feedback links these two components. We propose that actin waves create large stochastic fluctuations in microtubule-based transport and neurite outgrowth, promoting competition between neurites as they explore the environment until sufficient external cues can direct one to become the axon. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12387.001 PMID:26836307

  15. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  16. Transient developmental Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in healthy and ataxic mouse cerebellum

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    Lovisa Ljungberg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Information is carried out of the cerebellar cortical microcircuit via action potentials propagated along Purkinje cell axons. In several human neurodegenerative diseases, focal axonal swellings on Purkinje cells – known as torpedoes – have been associated with Purkinje cell loss. Interestingly, torpedoes are also reported to appear transiently during development in rat cerebellum. The function of Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in health as well as in disease is poorly understood. We investigated the properties of developmental torpedoes in the postnatal mouse cerebellum of wildtype and transgenic mice. We found that Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes transiently appeared on axons of Purkinje neurons, with the largest number of torpedoes observed at postnatal day 11 (P11. This was after peak developmental apoptosis had occurred, when Purkinje cell counts in a lobule were static, suggesting that most developmental torpedoes appear on axons of neurons that persist into adulthood. We found that developmental torpedoes were not associated with a presynaptic GABAergic marker, indicating that they are not synapses. They were seldom found at axonal collateral branch points, and lacked microglia enrichment, suggesting that they are unlikely to be involved in axonal refinement. Interestingly, we found several differences between developmental torpedoes and disease-related torpedoes: developmental torpedoes occured largely on myelinated axons, and were not associated with changes in basket cell innervation on their parent soma. Disease-related torpedoes are typically reported to contain neurofilament; while the majority of developmental torpedoes did as well, a fraction of smaller developmental torpedoes did not. These differences indicate that developmental torpedoes may not be functionally identical to disease-related torpedoes. To study this further, we used a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6, and found elevated disease

  17. A possible role for integrin signaling in diffuse axonal injury.

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    Matthew A Hemphill

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, investigators have attempted to establish the pathophysiological mechanisms by which non-penetrating injuries damage the brain. Several studies have implicated either membrane poration or ion channel dysfunction pursuant to neuronal cell death as the primary mechanism of injury. We hypothesized that traumatic stimulation of integrins may be an important etiological contributor to mild Traumatic Brain Injury. In order to study the effects of forces at the cellular level, we utilized two hierarchical, in vitro systems to mimic traumatic injury to rat cortical neurons: a high velocity stretcher and a magnetic tweezer system. In one system, we controlled focal adhesion formation in neurons cultured on a stretchable substrate loaded with an abrupt, one dimensional strain. With the second system, we used magnetic tweezers to directly simulate the abrupt injury forces endured by a focal adhesion on the neurite. Both systems revealed variations in the rate and nature of neuronal injury as a function of focal adhesion density and direct integrin stimulation without membrane poration. Pharmacological inhibition of calpains did not mitigate the injury yet the inhibition of Rho-kinase immediately after injury reduced axonal injury. These data suggest that integrin-mediated activation of Rho may be a contributor to the diffuse axonal injury reported in mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

  18. Satellite glial cells can promote the extension of neuronal axons in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-Hong Zhao; Yi-Di Huang; Xi-Nan Yi; Quan-Peng Zhang; Xian-Fang Zhang; Xu Dong; Gang Luo; Hai-Ying Zhang; Kun-Ju Wang; Mei-Li Lao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of satellite glial cells (SGCs) on the outgrowth of neuronal neurite and the role of Slit1 protein and the contact with neurons in this process, in vitro. Methods: Neurons culture and SGC-neuron co-culture were used as the cell models. The length of axons and dendrites were measured via immunofluorescence to observe the influence of SGCs on the outgrowth of neuronal neurite. The Slit1 protein was added into SGC-neuron co-culture model. The length of dendrites was measured via immunofluorescence at different point times. Result: The anatomical relationship between neurons and SGCs changed as culture period expand. At 12 h after culture, SGCs all surrounded neurons; by 72 h after culture, SGCs were all off neurons. SGCs can promote the growth of neuronal axos, but inhibit the growth of its dendrites; when SGCs closely contact with neurons, the effect of Slit1 on promoting the dendritic growth is not obvious, but when SGCs were off neurons, the effect of Slit1 on promoting the dendritic growth is significant. Conclusion: SGCs can promote the growth of neuronal axos, but inhibit the growth of its dendrites; Slit- Robo signaling pathways and contact with neurons play a role in this process.

  19. Motor axon excitability during Wallerian degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    , action potential propagation and structural integrity of the distal segment are maintained. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the changes in membrane function of motor axons during the 'latent' phase of Wallerian degeneration. Multiple indices of axonal excitability of the tibial nerve...

  20. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course.

  1. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in

  2. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  3. Laser fabricated discontinuous anisotropic microconical substrates as a new model scaffold to control the directionality of neuronal network outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simitzi, C; Efstathopoulos, P; Kourgiantaki, A; Ranella, A; Charalampopoulos, I; Fotakis, C; Athanassakis, I; Stratakis, E; Gravanis, A

    2015-10-01

    Patterning of neuronal outgrowth in vitro is important in tissue engineering as well as for the development of neuronal interfaces with desirable characteristics. To date, this has been achieved with the aid of micro- and nanofabrication techniques giving rise to various anisotropic topographies, either in the form of continuous or discontinuous structures. In this study we propose a currently unexplored geometry of a 3D culture substrate for neuronal cell growth comprising discontinuous subcellular microstructures with anisotropic geometrical cross-section. Specifically, using laser precision 3D micro/nano fabrication techniques, silicon substrates comprising arrays of parallel oriented elliptical microcones (MCs) were fabricated to investigate whether a discontinuous geometry comprising anisotropic features at the subcellular level could influence the alignment of peripheral nervous system cell populations. It was shown that both Schwann cells and axons of sympathetic neurons were parallel oriented onto the MCs of elliptical shape, while they exhibited a random orientation onto the MCs of arbitrary shape. Notably, this topography-induced guidance effect was also observed in more complex cell culture systems, such as the organotypic culture whole dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants. Our results suggest that a discontinuous topographical pattern could promote Schwann cell and axonal alignment, provided that it hosts anisotropic geometrical features, even though the sizes of those range at the subcellular lengthscale. The laser-patterned arrays of MCs presented here could potentially be a useful platform for patterning neurons into artificial networks, allowing the study of neuronal cells interactions under 3D ex-vivo conditions.

  4. Downregulation of the microtubule associated protein tau impairs process outgrowth and myelin basic protein mRNA transport in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiberlich, Veronika; Bauer, Nina G; Schwarz, Lisa; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Goldbaum, Olaf; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin forming cells of the CNS, are characterized by their numerous membranous extensions, which enwrap neuronal axons and form myelin sheaths. During differentiation oligodendrocytes pass different morphological stages, downregulate the expression of the proteoglycan NG2, and acquire major myelin specific proteins, such as myelin basic proteins (MBP) and proteolipid protein. MBP mRNA is transported in RNA granules along the microtubules (MTs) to the periphery and translated locally. MTs participate in the elaboration and stabilization of the myelin forming extensions and are essential for cellular sorting processes. Their dynamic properties are regulated by microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). The MAP tau is present in oligodendrocytes and involved in the regulation and stabilization of the MT network. To further elucidate the functional significance of tau in oligodendrocytes, we have downregulated tau by siRNA technology and studied the effects on cell differentiation and neuron-glia contact formation. The data show that tau knockdown impairs process outgrowth and leads to a decrease in MBP expression. Furthermore, MBP mRNA transport to distant cellular extensions is impaired and cells remain in the NG2 stage. In myelinating cocultures with dorsal root ganglion neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells after tau miR RNA lentiviral knockdown develop into NG2 positive cells with very long and thin processes, contacting axons loosely, but fail to form internodes. This demonstrates that tau is important for MBP mRNA transport and involved in process formation. The disturbance of the balance of tau leads to abnormalities in oligodendrocyte differentiation, neuron-glia contact formation and the early myelination process.

  5. Ascending Midbrain Dopaminergic Axons Require Descending GAD65 Axon Fascicles for Normal Pathfinding

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    Claudia Marcela Garcia-Peña

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nigrostriatal pathway (NSP is formed by dopaminergic axons that project from the ventral midbrain to the dorsolateral striatum as part of the medial forebrain bundle. Previous studies have implicated chemotropic proteins in the formation of the NSP during development but little is known of the role of substrate-anchored signals in this process. We observed in mouse and rat embryos that midbrain dopaminergic axons ascend in close apposition to descending GAD65-positive axon bundles throughout their trajectory to the striatum. To test whether such interaction is important for dopaminergic axon pathfinding, we analyzed transgenic mouse embryos in which the GAD65 axon bundle was reduced by the conditional expression of the diphtheria toxin. In these embryos we observed dopaminergic misprojection into the hypothalamic region and abnormal projection in the striatum. In addition, analysis of Robo1/2 and Slit1/2 knockout embryos revealed that the previously described dopaminergic misprojection in these embryos is accompanied by severe alterations in the GAD65 axon scaffold. Additional studies with cultured dopaminergic neurons and whole embryos suggest that NCAM and Robo proteins are involved in the interaction of GAD65 and dopaminergic axons. These results indicate that the fasciculation between descending GAD65 axon bundles and ascending dopaminergic axons is required for the stereotypical NSP formation during brain development and that known guidance cues may determine this projection indirectly by instructing the pathfinding of the axons that are part of the GAD65 axon scaffold.

  6. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

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    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  7. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure.

  8. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M; Lau, Dawn H W; Mórotz, Gábor M; De Vos, Kurt J; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. ProNGF derived from rat sciatic nerves downregulates neurite elongation and axon specification in PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sofia Trigos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have shown that a sciatic nerve conditioned media (CM causes neuronal-like differentiation in PC12 cells. This differentiation is featured by neurite outgrowth, which are exclusively dendrites, without axon or sodium current induction. In previous studies, our group reported that the CM supplemented with a generic inhibitor for tyrosine kinase receptors (k252a enhanced the CM-induced morphological differentiation upregulating neurite outgrowth, axonal formation and sodium current elicitation. Sodium currents were also induced by depletion of endogenous proNGF from the CM (pNGFd-CM. Given that sodium currents, neurite outgrowth and axon specification are important features of neuronal differentiation, in the current manuscript, first we investigated if proNGF was hindering the full PC12 cell neuronal-like differentiation. Second, we studied the effects of exogenous wild type (pNGFwt and mutated (pNGFmut proNGF isoforms over sodium currents and, whether or not their addition to the pNGFd-CM would prevent sodium current elicitation. Third, we investigated if proNGF was exerting its negative regulation through the sortilin receptor, and for this, the proNGF action was blocked with neurotensin (NT, a factor known to compete with proNGF for sortilin. Thereby, here we show that pNGFd-CM enhanced cell differentiation, cell proportion with long neurites, total neurite length, induced axonal formation and sodium current elicitation. Interestingly, treatment of PC12 cells with wild type or mutated proNGF isoforms elicited sodium currents. Supplementing pNGFd-CM with pNGFmut reduced 35% the sodium currents. On the other hand, pNGFd-CM+pNGFwt induced larger sodium currents than pNGFd-CM. Finally, treatments with CM supplemented with NT showed that sortilin was mediating proNGF negative regulation, since its blocking induced similar effects than the pNGFd-CM treatment. Altogether, our results suggest that proNGF within the CM, is one of the

  10. Pαx6 expression in postmitotic neurons mediates the growth of axons in response to SFRP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sebastián-Serrano

    Full Text Available During development, the mechanisms that specify neuronal subclasses are coupled to those that determine their axonal response to guidance cues. Pax6 is a homedomain transcription factor required for the specification of a variety of neural precursors. After cell cycle exit, Pax6 expression is often shut down in the precursor progeny and most postmitotic neurons no longer express detectable levels of the protein. There are however exceptions and high Pax6 protein levels are found, for example, in postmitotic retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, dopaminergic neurons of the olfactory bulb and the limbic system in the telencephalon. The function of Pax6 in these differentiating neurons remains mostly elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Pax6 mediates the response of growing axons to SFRP1, a secreted molecule expressed in several Pax6-positive forebrain territories. Forced expression of Pax6 in cultured postmitotic cortical neurons, which do not normally express Pax6, was sufficient to increment axonal length. Growth was blocked by the addition of anti-SFRP1 antibodies, whereas exogenously added SFRP1 increased axonal growth of Pax6-transfected neurons but not that of control or untransfected cortical neurons. In the reverse scenario, shRNA-mediated knock-down of Pax6 in mouse retinal explants specifically abolished RGCs axonal growth induced by SFRP1, but had no effect on RGCs differentiation and it did not modify the effect of Shh or Netrin on axon growth. Taken together these results demonstrate that expression of Pax6 is necessary and sufficient to render postmitotic neurons competent to respond to SFRP1. These results reveal a novel and unexpected function of Pax6 in postmitotic neurons and situate Pax6 and SFRP1 as pair regulators of axonal connectivity.

  11. Pαx6 Expression in Postmitotic Neurons Mediates the Growth of Axons in Response to SFRP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián-Serrano, Alvaro; Sandonis, Africa; Cardozo, Marcos; Rodríguez-Tornos, Fernanda M.; Bovolenta, Paola; Nieto, Marta

    2012-01-01

    During development, the mechanisms that specify neuronal subclasses are coupled to those that determine their axonal response to guidance cues. Pax6 is a homedomain transcription factor required for the specification of a variety of neural precursors. After cell cycle exit, Pax6 expression is often shut down in the precursor progeny and most postmitotic neurons no longer express detectable levels of the protein. There are however exceptions and high Pax6 protein levels are found, for example, in postmitotic retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), dopaminergic neurons of the olfactory bulb and the limbic system in the telencephalon. The function of Pax6 in these differentiating neurons remains mostly elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Pax6 mediates the response of growing axons to SFRP1, a secreted molecule expressed in several Pax6-positive forebrain territories. Forced expression of Pax6 in cultured postmitotic cortical neurons, which do not normally express Pax6, was sufficient to increment axonal length. Growth was blocked by the addition of anti-SFRP1 antibodies, whereas exogenously added SFRP1 increased axonal growth of Pax6-transfected neurons but not that of control or untransfected cortical neurons. In the reverse scenario, shRNA-mediated knock-down of Pax6 in mouse retinal explants specifically abolished RGCs axonal growth induced by SFRP1, but had no effect on RGCs differentiation and it did not modify the effect of Shh or Netrin on axon growth. Taken together these results demonstrate that expression of Pax6 is necessary and sufficient to render postmitotic neurons competent to respond to SFRP1. These results reveal a novel and unexpected function of Pax6 in postmitotic neurons and situate Pax6 and SFRP1 as pair regulators of axonal connectivity. PMID:22359602

  12. Impact of sorbic acid on germination and outgrowth heterogeneity of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, den H.M.W.; Melis, van C.C.J.; Sanders, J.W.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2012-01-01

    Population heterogeneity complicates the predictability of the outgrowth kinetics of individual spores. Flow cytometry sorting and monitoring of the germination and outgrowth of single dormant spores allowed the quantification of acid-induced spore population heterogeneity at pH 5.5 and in the prese

  13. The Caenorhabditis elegans Eph receptor activates NCK and N-WASP, and inhibits Ena/VASP to regulate growth cone dynamics during axon guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed M; Boudreau, Jeffrey R; Yu, Fabian P S; Liu, Jun; Chin-Sang, Ian D

    2012-01-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are regulators of cell migration and axon guidance. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which Eph RTKs regulate these processes is still incomplete. To understand how Eph receptors regulate axon guidance in Caenorhabditis elegans, we screened for suppressors of axon guidance defects caused by a hyperactive VAB-1/Eph RTK. We identified NCK-1 and WSP-1/N-WASP as downstream effectors of VAB-1. Furthermore, VAB-1, NCK-1, and WSP-1 can form a complex in vitro. We also report that NCK-1 can physically bind UNC-34/Enabled (Ena), and suggest that VAB-1 inhibits the NCK-1/UNC-34 complex and negatively regulates UNC-34. Our results provide a model of the molecular events that allow the VAB-1 RTK to regulate actin dynamics for axon guidance. We suggest that VAB-1/Eph RTK can stop axonal outgrowth by inhibiting filopodia formation at the growth cone by activating Arp2/3 through a VAB-1/NCK-1/WSP-1 complex and by inhibiting UNC-34/Ena activity.

  14. T-cell- and macrophage-mediated axon damage in the absence of a CNS-specific immune response: involvement of metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, T A; Woolley, S T; Hughes, P M; Sibson, N R; Anthony, D C; Perry, V H

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the fact that axon injury is an important component of multiple sclerosis pathology. The issue of whether a CNS antigen-specific immune response is required to produce axon injury remains unresolved. We investigated the extent and time course of axon injury in a rodent model of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction directed against the mycobacterium bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Using MRI, we determined whether the ongoing axon injury is restricted to the period during which the blood-brain barrier is compromised. DTH lesions were initiated in adult rats by intracerebral injection of heat-killed BCG followed by a peripheral challenge with BCG. Our findings demonstrate that a DTH reaction to a non-CNS antigen within a CNS white matter tract leads to axon injury. Ongoing axon injury persisted throughout the 3-month period studied and was not restricted to the period of blood-brain barrier breakdown, as detected by MRI enhancing lesions. We have previously demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are upregulated in multiple sclerosis plaques and DTH lesions. In this study we demonstrated that microinjection of activated MMPs into the cortical white matter results in axon injury. Our results show that axon injury, possibly mediated by MMPs, is immunologically non-specific and may continue behind an intact blood-brain barrier.

  15. The Extract of Roots of Sophora flavescens Enhances the Recovery of Motor Function by Axonal Growth in Mice with a Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Norio; Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Kazuma, Kohei; Konno, Katsuhiro; Tohda, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Although axonal extension to reconstruct spinal tracts should be effective for restoring function after spinal cord injury (SCI), chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) levels increase at spinal cord lesion sites, and inhibit axonal regrowth. In this study, we found that the water extract of roots of Sophora flavescens extended the axons of mouse cortical neurons, even on a CSPG-coated surface. Consecutive oral administrations of S. flavescens extract to SCI mice for 31 days increased the density of 5-HT-positive axons at the lesion site and improved the motor function. Further, the active constituents in the S. flavescens extract were identified. The water and alkaloid fractions of the S. flavescens extract each exhibited axonal extension activity in vitro. LC/MS analysis revealed that these fractions mainly contain matrine and/or oxymatrine, which are well-known major compounds in S. flavescens. Matrine and oxymatrine promoted axonal extension on the CSPG-coated surface. This study is the first to demonstrate that S. flavescens extract, matrine, and oxymatrine enhance axonal growth in vitro, even on a CSPG-coated surface, and that S. flavescens extract improves motor function and increases axonal density in SCI mice. PMID:26834638

  16. The extract of roots of Sophora flavescens enhances the recovery of motor function by axonal growth in mice with a spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio eTanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although axonal extension to reconstruct spinal tracts should be effective for restoring function after spinal cord injury (SCI, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG levels increase at spinal cord lesion sites and inhibit axonal regrowth. In this study, we found that the water extract of roots of Sophora flavescens extended the axons of mouse cortical neurons, even on a CSPG-coated surface. Consecutive oral administrations of S. flavescens extract to SCI mice for 31 days increased the density of 5-HT-positive axons at the lesion site and improved the motor function. Further, the active constituents in the S. flavescens extract were identified. The water and alkaloid fractions of the S. flavescens extract each exhibited axonal extension activity in vitro. LC/MS analysis revealed that these fractions mainly contain matrine and/or oxymatrine, which are well-known major compounds in S. flavescens. Matrine and oxymatrine promoted axonal extension on the CSPG-coated surface. This study is the first to demonstrate that S. flavescens extract, matrine and oxymatrine enhance axonal growth in vitro, even on a CSPG-coated surface, and that S. flavescens extract improves motor function and increases axonal density in SCI mice.

  17. New Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease, Kamikihito, Reverses Amyloid-β-Induced Progression of Tau Phosphorylation and Axonal Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Watari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. We previously reported that kamikihito (KKT, a traditional Japanese medicine, improved memory impairment and reversed the degeneration of axons in the 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, the mechanism underlying the effects of KKT remained unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism by which KKT reverses the progression of axonal degeneration. Methods. Primary cultured cortical neurons were treated with amyloid beta (Aβ fragment comprising amino acid residues (25–35 (10 μM in an in vitro AD model. KKT (10 μg/mL was administered to the cells before or after Aβ treatment. The effects of KKT on Aβ-induced tau phosphorylation, axonal atrophy, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A activity were investigated. We also performed an in vivo assay in which KKT (500 mg/kg/day was administered to 5XFAD mice once a day for 15 days. Cerebral cortex homogenates were used to measure PP2A activity. Results. KKT improved Aβ-induced tau phosphorylation and axonal atrophy after they had already progressed. In addition, KKT increased PP2A activity in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions. KKT reversed the progression of Aβ-induced axonal degeneration. KKT reversed axonal degeneration at least in part through its role as an exogenous PP2A stimulator.

  18. New Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease, Kamikihito, Reverses Amyloid-β-Induced Progression of Tau Phosphorylation and Axonal Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Hidetoshi; Shimada, Yutaka; Tohda, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We previously reported that kamikihito (KKT), a traditional Japanese medicine, improved memory impairment and reversed the degeneration of axons in the 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism underlying the effects of KKT remained unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism by which KKT reverses the progression of axonal degeneration. Methods. Primary cultured cortical neurons were treated with amyloid beta (A β ) fragment comprising amino acid residues (25-35) (10  μ M) in an in vitro AD model. KKT (10  μ g/mL) was administered to the cells before or after A β treatment. The effects of KKT on A β -induced tau phosphorylation, axonal atrophy, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity were investigated. We also performed an in vivo assay in which KKT (500 mg/kg/day) was administered to 5XFAD mice once a day for 15 days. Cerebral cortex homogenates were used to measure PP2A activity. Results. KKT improved A β -induced tau phosphorylation and axonal atrophy after they had already progressed. In addition, KKT increased PP2A activity in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions. KKT reversed the progression of A β -induced axonal degeneration. KKT reversed axonal degeneration at least in part through its role as an exogenous PP2A stimulator.

  19. A novel Netrin-1–sensitive mechanism promotes local SNARE-mediated exocytosis during axon branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, Cortney C.; McClain, Leslie M.; Valtschanoff, Juli G.; Park, Charles S.; Maglione, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Developmental axon branching dramatically increases synaptic capacity and neuronal surface area. Netrin-1 promotes branching and synaptogenesis, but the mechanism by which Netrin-1 stimulates plasma membrane expansion is unknown. We demonstrate that SNARE-mediated exocytosis is a prerequisite for axon branching and identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 as a critical catalytic link between Netrin-1 and exocytic SNARE machinery in murine cortical neurons. TRIM9 ligase activity promotes SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion and axon branching in a Netrin-dependent manner. We identified a direct interaction between TRIM9 and the Netrin-1 receptor DCC as well as a Netrin-1–sensitive interaction between TRIM9 and the SNARE component SNAP25. The interaction with SNAP25 negatively regulates SNARE-mediated exocytosis and axon branching in the absence of Netrin-1. Deletion of TRIM9 elevated exocytosis in vitro and increased axon branching in vitro and in vivo. Our data provide a novel model for the spatial regulation of axon branching by Netrin-1, in which localized plasma membrane expansion occurs via TRIM9-dependent regulation of SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion. PMID:24778312

  20. Developmental downregulation of LIS1 expression limits axonal extension and allows axon pruning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Kumamoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The robust axonal growth and regenerative capacities of young neurons decrease substantially with age. This developmental downregulation of axonal growth may facilitate axonal pruning and neural circuit formation but limits functional recovery following nerve damage. While external factors influencing axonal growth have been extensively investigated, relatively little is known about the intrinsic molecular changes underlying the age-dependent reduction in regeneration capacity. We report that developmental downregulation of LIS1 is responsible for the decreased axonal extension capacity of mature dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. In contrast, exogenous LIS1 expression or endogenous LIS1 augmentation by calpain inhibition restored axonal extension capacity in mature DRG neurons and facilitated regeneration of the damaged sciatic nerve. The insulator protein CTCF suppressed LIS1 expression in mature DRG neurons, and this reduction resulted in excessive accumulation of phosphoactivated GSK-3β at the axon tip, causing failure of the axonal extension. Conversely, sustained LIS1 expression inhibited developmental axon pruning in the mammillary body. Thus, LIS1 regulation may coordinate the balance between axonal growth and pruning during maturation of neuronal circuits.

  1. Laser-based single-axon transection for high-content axon injury and regeneration studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Kunik

    Full Text Available The investigation of the regenerative response of the neurons to axonal injury is essential to the development of new axoprotective therapies. Here we study the retinal neuronal RGC-5 cell line after laser transection, demonstrating that the ability of these cells to initiate a regenerative response correlates with axon length and cell motility after injury. We show that low energy picosecond laser pulses can achieve transection of unlabeled single axons in vitro and precisely induce damage with micron precision. We established the conditions to achieve axon transection, and characterized RGC-5 axon regeneration and cell body response using time-lapse microscopy. We developed an algorithm to analyze cell trajectories and established correlations between cell motility after injury, axon length, and the initiation of the regeneration response. The characterization of the motile response of axotomized RGC-5 cells showed that cells that were capable of repair or regrowth of damaged axons migrated more slowly than cells that could not. Moreover, we established that RGC-5 cells with long axons could not recover their injured axons, and such cells were much more motile. The platform we describe allows highly controlled axonal damage with subcellular resolution and the performance of high-content screening in cell cultures.

  2. Axon Death Pathways Converge on Axundead to Promote Functional and Structural Axon Disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukomm, Lukas J; Burdett, Thomas C; Seeds, Andrew M; Hampel, Stefanie; Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda C; Farley, Jonathan E; Wong, Jack; Karadeniz, Yonca B; Osterloh, Jeannette M; Sheehan, Amy E; Freeman, Marc R

    2017-07-05

    Axon degeneration is a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease and neural injury. Axotomy activates an intrinsic pro-degenerative axon death signaling cascade involving loss of the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme Nmnat/Nmnat2 in axons, activation of dSarm/Sarm1, and subsequent Sarm-dependent depletion of NAD(+). Here we identify Axundead (Axed) as a mediator of axon death. axed mutants suppress axon death in several types of axons for the lifespan of the fly and block the pro-degenerative effects of activated dSarm in vivo. Neurodegeneration induced by loss of the sole fly Nmnat ortholog is also fully blocked by axed, but not dsarm, mutants. Thus, pro-degenerative pathways activated by dSarm signaling or Nmnat elimination ultimately converge on Axed. Remarkably, severed axons morphologically preserved by axon death pathway mutations remain integrated in circuits and able to elicit complex behaviors after stimulation, indicating that blockade of axon death signaling results in long-term functional preservation of axons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nuclear kinesis, neurite sprouting and abnormal axonal projections of cone photoreceptors in the aged and AMD-afflicted human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pow, David V; Sullivan, Robert K P

    2007-05-01

    Tissues often respond to damage by recapitulating developmental programs. We have investigated whether anatomical signs of developmental recapitulation are evident in cone photoreceptors of the aged and AMD-afflicted human retina. Radial migration of cell nuclei mediated by microtubules is a characteristic feature of cells in the developing retina. Similarly, neurite outgrowth is a feature of developing neurons. We have examined whether nuclear kinesis and neurite outgrowth from cone photoreceptors is evident. Calbindin-positive cone photoreceptor nuclei are normally positioned as a single layer of somata at the outer border of the outer nuclear layer. In AMD-afflicted retinae, many nuclei are translocated, with some somata abutting the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and others outside the outer limiting membrane whilst many nuclei are present at intermediate levels. The axonal processes of many cones were also aberrant, displaying tortuous pathways as they projected to the OPL, with occasional evidence for bifurcation at points where the axon changed direction. We suggest that tangential extension of collateral neurites and the rapid retraction of the original process may give rise to the tortuous axonal projections observed. Since microtubules are key mediators of both neurite extension and nuclear kinesis we examined expression of microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) which is an important regulator of neurite extension. The strong expression of MAP2 observed in those cells with aberrant morphologies supports the notion that abnormal microtubule-mediated remodelling events are present in the AMD retina and to a lesser extent in normal aged retinas, allowing cone photoreceptors to recapitulate two key features of development.

  4. Tendon cell outgrowth rates and morphology associated with kevlar-49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M; Gordon, K E

    1988-12-01

    A rat tendon cell model was used to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility of kevlar-49. The cell response to kevlar was compared to carbon AS-4 and nylon sutures. Three trials were run and cell growth rates were statistically similar for all the materials tested. A separate experiment was conducted in which the same fiber materials were placed in the same Petri dish. Again, the rates were similar for each material. Finally, the cells were observed with a scanning electron microscope, and the three classic cell morphologies associated with this tendon cell model were observed. Also, cellular attachment to the fiber and cellular encapsulation of the fiber were identical for the three materials tested. Kevlar-49 proved to be comparable to carbon AS4 and nylon sutures in terms of cellular response and cell outgrowth rates.

  5. Typical gray matter axons in mammalian brain fail to conduct action potentials faithfully at fever-like temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekala, Dobromila; Szkudlarek, Hanna; Raastad, Morten

    2016-10-01

    We studied the ability of typical unmyelinated cortical axons to conduct action potentials at fever-like temperatures because fever often gives CNS symptoms. We investigated such axons in cerebellar and hippocampal slices from 10 to 25 days old rats at temperatures between 30 and 43°C. By recording with two electrodes along axonal pathways, we confirmed that the axons were able to initiate action potentials, but at temperatures >39°C, the propagation of the action potentials to a more distal recording site was reduced. This temperature-sensitive conduction may be specific for the very thin unmyelinated axons because similar recordings from myelinated CNS axons did not show conduction failures. We found that the conduction fidelity improved with 1 mmol/L TEA in the bath, probably due to block of voltage-sensitive potassium channels responsible for the fast repolarization of action potentials. Furthermore, by recording electrically activated antidromic action potentials from the soma of cerebellar granule cells, we showed that the axons failed less if they were triggered 10-30 msec after another action potential. This was because individual action potentials were followed by a depolarizing after-potential, of constant amplitude and shape, which facilitated conduction of the following action potentials. The temperature-sensitive conduction failures above, but not below, normal body temperature, and the failure-reducing effect of the spike's depolarizing after-potential, are two intrinsic mechanisms in normal gray matter axons that may help us understand how the hyperthermic brain functions. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  6. Role of sensory-motor cortex activity in postnatal development of corticospinal axon terminals in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Kathleen M; Martin, John H

    2005-04-25

    The initial pattern of corticospinal (CS) terminations, as axons grow into the spinal gray matter, bears little resemblance to the pattern later in development and in maturity. This is because of extensive axon pruning and local axon terminal growth during early postnatal development. Pruning is driven by activity-dependent competition between the CS systems on each side during postnatal weeks (PW) 3-7. It is not known whether CS axon terminal growth and final topography are activity dependent. We examined the activity dependence of CS axon terminal growth and topography at different postnatal times. We inactivated sensory-motor cortex by infusion of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) agonist muscimol and traced CS axons from the inactivated side. Inactivation between PW5 and PW7 produced permanent changes in projection topography, reduced local axon branching, and prevented development of dense clusters of presynaptic sites, which are normally characteristic of CS terminals. Inactivation at younger (PW3-5) and older (PW8-12) ages did not affect projection topography but impeded development of local axon branching and presynaptic site clusters. These effects were not due to increased cortical cell death during inactivation. Neural activity plays an important role in determining the morphology of CS terminals during the entire period of development, but, for the projection topography, the role of activity is exercised during a very brief period. This points to a complex, and possibly independent, regulation of termination topography and terminal morphology. Surprisingly, when a CS neuron's activity is blocked during early development, it does not recover lost connections later in development once activity resumes.

  7. Inosine enhances axon sprouting and motor recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kim

    Full Text Available Although corticospinal tract axons cannot regenerate long distances after spinal cord injury, they are able to sprout collateral branches rostral to an injury site that can help form compensatory circuits in cases of incomplete lesions. We show here that inosine enhances the formation of compensatory circuits after a dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord in mature rats and improves coordinated limb use. Inosine is a naturally occurring metabolite of adenosine that crosses the cell membrane and, in neurons, activates Mst3b, a protein kinase that is part of a signal transduction pathway that regulates axon outgrowth. Compared to saline-treated controls, rats with dorsal hemisections that were treated with inosine showed three times as many synaptic contacts between corticospinal tract collaterals and long propriospinal interneurons that project from the cervical cord to the lumbar level. Inosine-treated rats also showed stronger serotonergic reinnervation of the lumbar cord than saline-treated controls, and performed well above controls in both open-field testing and a horizontal ladder rung-walking test. Inosine was equally effective whether delivered intracranially or intravenously, and has been shown to be safe for other indications in humans. Thus, inosine might be a useful therapeutic for improving outcome after spinal cord injury.

  8. Sucrose is an early modulator of the key hormonal mechanisms controlling bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Lecerf, Marion; Perez-Garcia, Maria-Dolores; Barrière, Quentin; Rolčík, Jakub; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Lemoine, Remi; Porcheron, Benoît; Roman, Hanaé; Leduc, Nathalie; Le Gourrierec, José; Bertheloot, Jessica; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-05-01

    Sugar has only recently been identified as a key player in triggering bud outgrowth, while hormonal control of bud outgrowth is already well established. To get a better understanding of sugar control, the present study investigated how sugar availability modulates the hormonal network during bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida. Other plant models, for which mutants are available, were used when necessary. Buds were grown in vitro to manipulate available sugars. The temporal patterns of the hormonal regulatory network were assessed in parallel with bud outgrowth dynamics. Sucrose determined bud entrance into sustained growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Sustained growth was accompanied by sustained auxin production in buds, and sustained auxin export in a DR5::GUS-expressing pea line. Several events occurred ahead of sucrose-stimulated bud outgrowth. Sucrose upregulated early auxin synthesis genes (RhTAR1, RhYUC1) and the auxin efflux carrier gene RhPIN1, and promoted PIN1 abundance at the plasma membrane in a pPIN1::PIN1-GFP-expressing tomato line. Sucrose downregulated both RwMAX2, involved in the strigolactone-transduction pathway, and RhBRC1, a repressor of branching, at an early stage. The presence of sucrose also increased stem cytokinin content, but sucrose-promoted bud outgrowth was not related to that pathway. In these processes, several non-metabolizable sucrose analogues induced sustained bud outgrowth in R. hybrida, Pisum sativum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that sucrose was involved in a signalling pathway. In conclusion, we identified potential hormonal candidates for bud outgrowth control by sugar. They are central to future investigations aimed at disentangling the processes that underlie regulation of bud outgrowth by sugar.

  9. Axon tension regulates fasciculation/defasciculation through the control of axon shaft zippering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmít, Daniel; Fouquet, Coralie; Pincet, Frédéric; Zapotocky, Martin; Trembleau, Alain

    2017-01-01

    While axon fasciculation plays a key role in the development of neural networks, very little is known about its dynamics and the underlying biophysical mechanisms. In a model system composed of neurons grown ex vivo from explants of embryonic mouse olfactory epithelia, we observed that axons dynamically interact with each other through their shafts, leading to zippering and unzippering behavior that regulates their fasciculation. Taking advantage of this new preparation suitable for studying such interactions, we carried out a detailed biophysical analysis of zippering, occurring either spontaneously or induced by micromanipulations and pharmacological treatments. We show that zippering arises from the competition of axon-axon adhesion and mechanical tension in the axons, and provide the first quantification of the force of axon-axon adhesion. Furthermore, we introduce a biophysical model of the zippering dynamics, and we quantitatively relate the individual zipper properties to global characteristics of the developing axon network. Our study uncovers a new role of mechanical tension in neural development: the regulation of axon fasciculation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19907.001 PMID:28422009

  10. Genetic dissection of myelinated axons in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the vertebrate nervous system, the myelin sheath allows for rapid and efficient conduction of action potentials along axons. Despite the essential function of myelin, many questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms that govern the development of myelinated axons. The fundamental properties of myelin are widely shared among vertebrates, and the zebrafish has emerged as a powerful system to study myelination in vivo. This review will highlight recent advances from genetic screens in ze...

  11. Human Genetic Disorders of Axon Guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Engle, Elizabeth C

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews symptoms and signs of aberrant axon connectivity in humans, and summarizes major human genetic disorders that result, or have been proposed to result, from defective axon guidance. These include corpus callosum agenesis, L1 syndrome, Joubert syndrome and related disorders, horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, Kallmann syndrome, albinism, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1, Duane retraction syndrome, and pontine tegmental cap dysplasia. Gene...

  12. Somatostatin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in cortical circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Yavorska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons.

  13. In vitroembryo outgrowth is a bioassay ofin vivo embryo implantation and development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalie K. Binder; Natalie J. Hannan; David K. Gardner

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine the efficacy of embryo outgrowth on fibronectin as a low cost, high throughput alternative to embryo transfer to model embryo attachment and the initial stages of implantation.Methods:Following in vitro embryo culture, embryo quality was assessedviaembryo transfer or embryo outgrowth with metabolic assessment.Results:This study shows that blastocysts attach to fibronectin at the same rate that they implantin vivo, and that the carbohydrate utilisation of embryos that successfully outgrow is comparable to those that are able to develop into a fetus.Conclusions:Embryo outgrowth is a suitable alternative endpoint to embryo transfer.

  14. Crossing axons in the third nerve nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfang, D C

    1975-12-01

    The research presented in this paper studied the pathway taken by the crossed fibers of the third nerve nucleus in an animal whose nucleus has been well mapped and found to correlate well with higher mammals and man. Autoradiography using tritiated amino acid labeled the cell bodies an axons of the left side of the oculomotor nucleus of the cat. Axons so labeled could be seen emerging from the ventral portion of the left nucleus through the median longitudinal fasciculus (mlf) to join the left oculomotor nerve. Labeled axons were also seen to emerge from the medial border of the caudal left nucleus, cross the midline, and pass through the right nucleus and the right mlf to join the right oculomotor nerve. These latter axons must be the crossed axons of the superior rectus and levator palpebrae subnuclei. Since the path of these crossed axons is through the caudal portion of the nucleus of the opposite side, the destruction of one lateral half of the oculomotor nucleus would result in a bilateral palsy of the crossed subnuclei. Bilateral palsy of the superior rectus and bilateral assymetrical palsy of the levator palpebrae muscles would result.

  15. Delayed feedback model of axonal length sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamched, Bhargav R; Bressloff, Paul C

    2015-05-05

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how the sizes of cells and organelles are regulated at various stages of development. Size homeostasis is particularly challenging for neurons, whose axons can extend from hundreds of microns to meters (in humans). Recently, a molecular-motor-based mechanism for axonal length sensing has been proposed, in which axonal length is encoded by the frequency of an oscillating retrograde signal. In this article, we develop a mathematical model of this length-sensing mechanism in which advection-diffusion equations for bidirectional motor transport are coupled to a chemical signaling network. We show that chemical oscillations emerge due to delayed negative feedback via a Hopf bifurcation, resulting in a frequency that is a monotonically decreasing function of axonal length. Knockdown of either kinesin or dynein causes an increase in the oscillation frequency, suggesting that the length-sensing mechanism would produce longer axons, which is consistent with experimental findings. One major prediction of the model is that fluctuations in the transport of molecular motors lead to a reduction in the reliability of the frequency-encoding mechanism for long axons. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between cortical regions carrying out higher level cognitive functions. Myelination can be altered by impulse activity in axons and by environmental experience. Psychiatric illness is treated by psychotherapy, behavioral modification, and drugs affecting neurotransmission, raising the possibility that myelinating glia may not only contribute to such disorders, but that activity-dependent effects on myelinating glia could provide one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effects of these treatments. This review examines evidence showing that genes and gene networks important for myelination can be regulated by functional activity in axons.

  17. Immunocytochemical demonstration of axonal and perikaryal acetylcholinesterase in human cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesulam, M M; Geula, C; Cosgrove, R; Mash, D; Brimijoin, S

    1991-01-25

    The adult human neocortex contains a dense net of axons and perikarya which yield an acetylcholinesterase-rich enzymatic reaction pattern in histochemical experiments. We employed a monoclonal antibody to human acetylcholinesterase and a method for the concurrent visualization of histochemical and immunohistochemical reaction-products to explore the relationship between immunological and enzymatic markers of acetylcholinesterase. We observed that the cortical axons and perikarya with a histochemically determined acetylcholinesterase-rich enzymatic activity also contain acetylcholinesterase-like immunoreactivity. This was especially informative for the intracortical acetylcholinesterase-rich perikarya of layers III and V since these neurons require prolonged incubations for histochemical detection and since they are not conspicuous in other animal species. The availability of a reliable immunohistochemical method makes it possible to investigate the distribution of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme molecule independent of its enzymatic activity.

  18. SARM1 activation triggers axon degeneration locally via NAD+ destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Gerdts, Josiah; Brace, E. J.; Sasaki, Yo; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Axon degeneration is an intrinsic self-destruction program that underlies axon loss during injury and disease. Sterile alpha and TIR motif containing 1 (SARM1) protein is an essential mediator of axon degeneration. We report that SARM1 initiates a local destruction program involving rapid breakdown of NAD+ after injury. We used an engineered protease-sensitized SARM1 to demonstrate that SARM1 activity is required after axon injury to induce axon degeneration. Dimerization of the Toll-Interleu...

  19. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated mutant SOD1 inhibits anterograde axonal transport of mitochondria by reducing Miro1 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Annekathrin; Bauer, Claudia S; Cohen, Rebecca N; Webster, Christopher P; De Vos, Kurt J

    2017-09-14

    Defective axonal transport is an early neuropathological feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We have previously shown that ALS-associated mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) impair axonal transport of mitochondria in motor neurons isolated from SOD1 G93A transgenic mice and in ALS mutant SOD1 transfected cortical neurons, but the underlying mechanisms remained unresolved.The outer mitochondrial membrane protein mitochondrial Rho GTPase 1 (Miro1) is a master regulator of mitochondrial axonal transport in response to cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) levels ([Ca2+]c) and mitochondrial damage. Ca2+ binding to Miro1 halts mitochondrial transport by modifying its interaction with kinesin-1 whereas mitochondrial damage induces Phosphatase and Tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin-dependent degradation of Miro1 and consequently stops transport.To identify the mechanism underlying impaired axonal transport of mitochondria in SOD1-related ALS we investigated [Ca2+]c and Miro1 levels in ALS mutant SOD1 expressing neurons. We found that expression of ALS mutant SOD1 reduced the level of endogenous Miro1 but did not affect [Ca2+]c. ALS mutant SOD1 induced reductions in Miro1 levels were Parkin dependent. Moreover, both overexpression of Miro1 and ablation of PINK1 rescued the mitochondrial axonal transport deficit in ALS mutant SOD1-expressing cortical and motor neurons.Together these results provide evidence that ALS mutant SOD1 inhibits axonal transport of mitochondria by inducing PINK1/Parkin-dependent Miro1 degradation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Activin A secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells induces neuronal development and neurite outgrowth in an in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease: neurogenesis induced by MSCs via activin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Kim, Jong Hwa; Sung, Ji-Hee; Na, Duk L; Chang, Jong Wook

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of memory in addition to cortical atrophy. Cortical atrophy in AD brains begins in the parietal and temporal lobes, which are near the subventricular zone (SVZ). The aim of this study was to activate the neurogenesis in the SVZ of AD brains by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Neural stem cells (NSCs) were isolated from SVZ of 4-month-old 5XFAD mice. Co-culture of hMSCs with SVZ-derived NSCs from 5XFAD mice induced neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. To examine the inducing factor of neurogenesis, human cytokine array was performed with co-cultured media, and revealed elevated release of activin A from hMSCs. Also, we confirmed that the mRNA levels of activin A and activin receptor in the SVZ of 5XFAD mice were significantly lower than normal mice. Treatment of human recombinant activin A in SVZ-derived NSCs from 5XFAD mice induced neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. These data suggest that use of hMSCs and activin A to recover neurogenesis in future studies of cortical regeneration to treat AD.

  1. Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leyan; Ryu, Jiwon; Hiel, Hakim; Menon, Adarsh; Aggarwal, Ayushi; Rha, Elizabeth; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Cummings, Brian J; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2015-05-14

    Diffuse axonal injury is an extremely common type of traumatic brain injury encountered in motor vehicle crashes, sports injuries, and in combat. Although many cases of diffuse axonal injury result in chronic disability, there are no current treatments for this condition. Its basic lesion, traumatic axonal injury, has been aggressively modeled in primate and rodent animal models. The inexorable axonal and perikaryal degeneration and dysmyelination often encountered in traumatic axonal injury calls for regenerative therapies, including therapies based on stem cells and precursors. Here we explore the proof of concept that treatments based on transplants of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells can replace or remodel myelin and, eventually, contribute to axonal regeneration in traumatic axonal injury. We derived human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from the human embryonic stem cell line H9, purified and characterized them. We then transplanted these human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the deep sensorimotor cortex next to the corpus callosum of nude rats subjected to traumatic axonal injury based on the impact acceleration model of Marmarou. We explored the time course and spatial distribution of differentiation and structural integration of these cells in rat forebrain. At the time of transplantation, over 90 % of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells expressed A2B5, PDGFR, NG2, O4, Olig2 and Sox10, a profile consistent with their progenitor or early oligodendrocyte status. After transplantation, these cells survived well and migrated massively via the corpus callosum in both injured and uninjured brains. Human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells displayed a striking preference for white matter tracts and were contained almost exclusively in the corpus callosum and external capsule, the striatopallidal striae, and cortical layer 6. Over 3 months, human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells progressively matured into myelin basic protein(+) and adenomatous

  2. Embryoid Body-Explant Outgrowth Cultivation from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in an Automated Closed Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tone, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Saeko; Akiyama, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Akira; Ichimura, Masaki; Nakatani, Masaru; Kiyono, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Automation of cell culture would facilitate stable cell expansion with consistent quality. In the present study, feasibility of an automated closed-cell culture system “P 4C S” for an embryoid body- (EB-) explant outgrowth culture was investigated as a model case for explant culture. After placing the induced pluripotent stem cell- (iPSC-) derived EBs into the system, the EBs successfully adhered to the culture surface and the cell outgrowth was clearly observed surrounding the adherent EBs. After confirming the outgrowth, we carried out subculture manipulation, in which the detached cells were simply dispersed by shaking the culture flask, leading to uniform cell distribution. This enabled continuous stable cell expansion, resulting in a cell yield of 3.1 × 107. There was no evidence of bacterial contamination throughout the cell culture experiments. We herewith developed the automated cultivation platform for EB-explant outgrowth cells. PMID:27648449

  3. Axon injury triggers EFA-6 mediated destabilization of axonal microtubules via TACC and doublecortin like kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lizhen; Chuang, Marian; Koorman, Thijs; Boxem, Mike; Jin, Yishi; Chisholm, Andrew D

    2015-09-04

    Axon injury triggers a series of changes in the axonal cytoskeleton that are prerequisites for effective axon regeneration. In Caenorhabditis elegans the signaling protein Exchange Factor for ARF-6 (EFA-6) is a potent intrinsic inhibitor of axon regrowth. Here we show that axon injury triggers rapid EFA-6-dependent inhibition of axonal microtubule (MT) dynamics, concomitant with relocalization of EFA-6. EFA-6 relocalization and axon regrowth inhibition require a conserved 18-aa motif in its otherwise intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain. The EFA-6 N-terminus binds the MT-associated proteins TAC-1/Transforming-Acidic-Coiled-Coil, and ZYG-8/Doublecortin-Like-Kinase, both of which are required for regenerative growth cone formation, and which act downstream of EFA-6. After injury TAC-1 and EFA-6 transiently relocalize to sites marked by the MT minus end binding protein PTRN-1/Patronin. We propose that EFA-6 acts as a bifunctional injury-responsive regulator of axonal MT dynamics, acting at the cell cortex in the steady state and at MT minus ends after injury.

  4. Hepassocin is required for hepatic outgrowth during zebrafish hepatogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ming [Tianjin University, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Yan, Hui [Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing 100850 (China); Yin, Rong-Hua [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing 100850 (China); Wang, Qiang [Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yu, Miao; Ge, Chang-Hui; Li, Chang-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Hui [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing 100850 (China); Ge, Zhi-Qiang [Tianjin University, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yang, Xiao-Ming, E-mail: xiaomingyang@sina.com [Tianjin University, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2015-07-31

    Background & aims: Hepassocin (HPS) is a hepatotrophic growth factor that specifically stimulates hepatocyte proliferation and promotes liver regeneration after liver damage. In this paper, zebrafish were used to investigate the role of HPS in liver development. Methods and results: During zebrafish development, HPS expression is enriched in liver throughout hepatogenesis. Knockdown of HPS using its specific morpholino leads to a smaller liver phenotype. Further results showed that the HPS knockdown has no effect on the expression of the early endoderm marker gata6 and early hepatic marker hhex. In addition, results showed that the smaller-liver phenotype in HPS morphants was caused by suppression of cell proliferation, not induction of cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Current findings indicated that HPS is essential to the later stages of development in vertebrate liver organogenesis. - Highlights: • HPS is enriched in zebrafish liver and has strong similarities with other species. • Knocking down HPS with MOs results in small liver phenotype. • HPS depletion regulates liver outgrowth but not liver specification and budding. • HPS depletion causes hepatocyte proliferation arrest but not apoptosis induction.

  5. Complement inhibition and statins prevent fetal brain cortical abnormalities in a mouse model of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroni, Silvia M A; Gonzalez, Juan M; Wade, Jean; Jansen, Maurits A; Serio, Andrea; Marshall, Ian; Lennen, Ross J; Girardi, Guillermina

    2014-01-01

    Premature babies are particularly vulnerable to brain injury. In this study we focus on cortical brain damage associated with long-term cognitive, behavioral, attentional or socialization deficits in children born preterm. Using a mouse model of preterm birth (PTB), we demonstrated that complement component C5a contributes to fetal cortical brain injury. Disruption of cortical dendritic and axonal cytoarchitecture was observed in PTB-mice. Fetuses deficient in C5aR (-/-) did not show cortical brain damage. Treatment with antibody anti-C5, that prevents generation of C5a, also prevented cortical fetal brain injury in PTB-mice. C5a also showed a detrimental effect on fetal cortical neuron development and survival in vitro. Increased glutamate release was observed in cortical neurons in culture exposed to C5a. Blockade of C5aR prevented glutamate increase and restored neurons dendritic and axonal growth and survival. Similarly, increased glutamate levels - measured by (1)HMRS - were observed in vivo in PTB-fetuses compared to age-matched controls. The blockade of glutamate receptors prevented C5a-induced abnormal growth and increased cell death in isolated fetal cortical neurons. Simvastatin and pravastatin prevented cortical fetal brain developmental and metabolic abnormalities -in vivo and in vitro. Neuroprotective effects of statins were mediated by Akt/PKB signaling pathways. This study shows that complement activation plays a crucial role in cortical fetal brain injury in PTL and suggests that complement inhibitors and statins might be good therapeutic options to improve neonatal outcomes in preterm birth. © 2013.

  6. Neurites regrowth of cortical neurons by GSK3beta inhibition independently of Nogo receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seira, Oscar; Gavín, Rosalina; Gil, Vanessa; Llorens, Franc; Rangel, Alejandra; Soriano, Eduardo; del Río, José Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Lesioned axons do not regenerate in the adult mammalian CNS, owing to the over-expression of inhibitory molecules such as myelin-derived proteins or chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. In order to overcome axon inhibition, strategies based on extrinsic and intrinsic treatments have been developed. For myelin-associated inhibition, blockage with NEP1-40, receptor bodies or IN-1 antibodies has been used. In addition, endogenous blockage of cell signalling mechanisms induced by myelin-associated proteins is a potential tool for overcoming axon inhibitory signals. We examined the participation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and extracellular-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 in axon regeneration failure in lesioned cortical neurons. We also investigated whether pharmacological blockage of GSK3beta and ERK1/2 activities facilitates regeneration after myelin-directed inhibition in two models: (i) cerebellar granule cells and (ii) lesioned entorhino-hippocampal pathway in slice cultures, and whether the regenerative effects are mediated by Nogo Receptor 1 (NgR1). We demonstrate that, in contrast to ERK1/2 inhibition, the pharmacological treatment of GSK3beta inhibition strongly facilitated regrowth of cerebellar granule neurons over myelin independently of NgR1. Finally, these regenerative effects were corroborated in the lesioned entorhino-hippocampal pathway in NgR1-/- mutant mice. These results provide new findings for the development of new assays and strategies to enhance axon regeneration in injured cortical connections.

  7. How Schwann Cells Sort Axons: New Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltri, M Laura; Poitelon, Yannick; Previtali, Stefano Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves contain large myelinated and small unmyelinated (Remak) fibers that perform different functions. The choice to myelinate or not is dictated to Schwann cells by the axon itself, based on the amount of neuregulin I-type III exposed on its membrane. Peripheral axons are more important in determining the final myelination fate than central axons, and the implications for this difference in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are discussed. Interestingly, this choice is reversible during pathology, accounting for the remarkable plasticity of Schwann cells, and contributing to the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system. Radial sorting is the process by which Schwann cells choose larger axons to myelinate during development. This crucial morphogenetic step is a prerequisite for myelination and for differentiation of Remak fibers, and is arrested in human diseases due to mutations in genes coding for extracellular matrix and linkage molecules. In this review we will summarize progresses made in the last years by a flurry of reverse genetic experiments in mice and fish. This work revealed novel molecules that control radial sorting, and contributed unexpected ideas to our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control radial sorting of axons.

  8. Epigenetic regulation of axon and dendrite growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephraim F Trakhtenberg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroregenerative therapies for central nervous system (CNS injury, neurodegenerative disease, or stroke require axons of damaged neurons to grow and reinnervate their targets. However, mature mammalian CNS neurons do not regenerate their axons, limiting recovery in these diseases (Yiu and He, 2006. CNS’ regenerative failure may be attributable to the development of an inhibitory CNS environment by glial-associated inhibitory molecules (Yiu and He, 2006, and by various cell-autonomous factors (Sun and He, 2010. Intrinsic axon growth ability also declines developmentally (Li et al., 1995; Goldberg et al., 2002; Bouslama-Oueghlani et al., 2003; Blackmore and Letourneau, 2006 and is dependent on transcription (Moore et al., 2009. Although neurons’ intrinsic capacity for axon growth may depend in part on the panoply of expressed transcription factors (Moore and Goldberg, 2011, epigenetic factors such as the accessibility of DNA and organization of chromatin are required for downstream genes to be transcribed. Thus a potential approach to overcoming regenerative failure focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms regulating regenerative gene expression in the CNS. Here we review molecular mechanisms regulating the epigenetic state of DNA through chromatin modifications, their implications for regulating axon and dendrite growth, and important new directions for this field of study.

  9. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrivee, D. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  10. Evolution of cortical neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Cheung, Amanda F P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2008-03-18

    The neurons of the mammalian neocortex are organised into six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian dorsal cortices only have three layers which are thought to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. Increased repertoire of mammalian higher cognitive functions is likely a result of an expanded cortical surface area. The majority of cortical cell proliferation in mammals occurs in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ), with a small number of scattered divisions outside the germinal zone. Comparative developmental studies suggest that the appearance of SVZ coincides with the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers, as well as the tangential expansion of the cortical sheet seen within mammals. In spite of great variation and further compartmentalisation in the mitotic compartments, the number of neurons in an arbitrary cortical column appears to be remarkably constant within mammals. The current challenge is to understand how the emergence and elaboration of the SVZ has contributed to increased cortical cell diversity, tangential expansion and gyrus formation of the mammalian neocortex. This review discusses neurogenic processes that are believed to underlie these major changes in cortical dimensions in vertebrates.

  11. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau eCelada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT, acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by 1 modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and 2 varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3 and inhibitory (5-HT1A receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the

  12. Cortical Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. G. Gibb

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In cortical Lewy body dementia the distribution of Lewy bodies in the nervous system follows that of Parkinson's disease, except for their greater profusion in the cerebral cortex. The cortical tangles and plaques of Alzheimer pathology are often present, the likely explanation being that Alzheimer pathology provokes dementia in many patients. Pure cortical Lewy body dementia without Alzheimer pathology is uncommon. The age of onset reflects that of Parkinson's disease, and clinical features, though not diagnostic, include aphasias, apraxias, agnosias, paranoid delusions and visual hallucinations. Parkinsonism may present before or after the dementia, and survival duration is approximately half that seen in Parkinson's disease without dementia.

  13. Dendritic bundles, minicolumns, columns, and cortical output units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Innocenti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for the fundamental building block of the cerebral cortex has highlighted three structures, perpendicular to the cortical surface: i columns of neurons with radially invariant response properties, e.g., receptive field position, sensory modality, stimulus orientation or direction, frequency tuning etc. ii minicolumns of radially aligned cell bodies and iii bundles, constituted by the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons with cell bodies in different layers. The latter were described in detail, and sometimes quantitatively, in several species and areas. It was recently suggested that the dendritic bundles consist of apical dendrites belonging to neurons projecting their axons to specific targets. We review the concept above and suggest that another structural and computational unit of cerebral cortex is the cortical output unit (COU, i.e. an assembly of bundles of apical dendrites and their parent cell bodies including each of the outputs to distant cortical or subcortical structures, of a given cortical locus (area or part of an area. This somato-dendritic assembly receives inputs some of which are common to the whole assembly and determine its radially invariant response properties, others are specific to one or more dendritic bundles, and determine the specific response signature of neurons in the different cortical layers and projecting to different targets.

  14. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E.; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G.; Fingert, John H.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ’s performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice.

  15. Differences in excitability between median and superficial radial sensory axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Yumi; Kanai, Kazuaki; Misawa, Sonoko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Isose, Sagiri; Nasu, Saiko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Ohmori, Shigeki; Noto, Yu-ichi; Kugio, Yumiko; Shimizu, Toshio; Matsubara, Shiro; Lin, Cindy S Y; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in excitability properties of human median and superficial radial sensory axons (e.g., axons innervating the glabrous and hairy skin in the hand). Previous studies have shown that excitability properties differ between motor and sensory axons, and even among sensory axons between median and sural sensory axons. In 21 healthy subjects, threshold tracking was used to examine excitability indices such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, supernormality, and threshold change at the 0.2 ms inter-stimulus interval in latent addition. In addition, threshold changes induced by ischemia for 10 min were compared between median and superficial radial sensory axons. Compared with radial sensory axons, median axons showed shorter strength-duration time constant, greater threshold changes in threshold electrotonus (fanning-out), greater supernormality, and smaller threshold changes in latent addition. Threshold changes in both during and after ischemia were greater for median axons. These findings suggest that membrane potential in human median sensory axons is more negative than in superficial radial axons, possibly due to greater activity of electrogenic Na(+)/K(+) pump. These results may reflect adaptation to impulses load carried by median axons that would be far greater with a higher frequency. Biophysical properties are not identical in different human sensory axons, and therefore their responses to disease may differ. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Jin, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons. PMID:28197547

  17. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merianda, Tanuja T; Jin, Ying; Kalinski, Ashley L; Sahoo, Pabitra K; Fischer, Itzhak; Twiss, Jeffery L

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons.

  18. Focal cortical dysplasia - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults.Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed - from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized.Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe.Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes.New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life.Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias.THE MOST COMMON FINDINGS ON MRI IMAGING INCLUDE: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both types

  19. Postpartum cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Shakeel Ahmed

    2008-09-01

    A 30-years-old third gravida with previous normal pregnancies and an unremarkable prenatal course had an emergency lower segment caesarean section at a periphery hospital for failure of labour to progress. She developed bilateral cortical blindness immediately after recovery from anesthesia due to cerebral angiopathy shown by CT and MR scan as cortical infarct cerebral angiopathy, which is a rare complication of a normal pregnancy.

  20. Surface microstructures on planar substrates and textile fibers guide neurite outgrowth: a scaffold solution to push limits of critical nerve defect regeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Weigel

    Full Text Available The treatment of critical size peripheral nerve defects represents one of the most serious problems in neurosurgery. If the gap size exceeds a certain limit, healing can't be achieved. Connection mismatching may further reduce the clinical success. The present study investigates how far specific surface structures support neurite outgrowth and by that may represent one possibility to push distance limits that can be bridged. For this purpose, growth cone displacement of fluorescent embryonic chicken spinal cord neurons was monitored using time-lapse video. In a first series of experiments, parallel patterns of polyimide ridges of different geometry were created on planar silicon oxide surfaces. These channel-like structures were evaluated with and without amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H coating. In a next step, structured and unstructured textile fibers were investigated. All planar surface materials (polyimide, silicon oxide and a-C:H proved to be biocompatible, i.e. had no adverse effect on nerve cultures and supported neurite outgrowth. Mean growth cone migration velocity measured on 5 minute base was marginally affected by surface structuring. However, surface structure variability, i.e. ridge height, width and inter-ridge spacing, significantly enhanced the resulting net velocity by guiding the growth cone movement. Ridge height and inter-ridge distance affected the frequency of neurites crossing over ridges. Of the evaluated dimensions ridge height, width, and inter-ridge distance of respectively 3, 10, and 10 µm maximally supported net axon growth. Comparable artificial grooves, fabricated onto the surface of PET fibers by using an excimer laser, showed similar positive effects. Our data may help to further optimize surface characteristics of artificial nerve conduits and bioelectronic interfaces.

  1. Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Neuronal Morphology and AnkyrinG Density at the Axon Initial Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Mónica; Dominguez, Ana; Zhang, Wei; del Puerto, Ana; Ciorraga, María; Benitez, María José; Guaza, Carmen; Garrido, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal polarization underlies the ability of neurons to integrate and transmit information. This process begins early in development with axon outgrowth, followed by dendritic growth and subsequent maturation. In between these two steps, the axon initial segment (AIS), a subcellular domain crucial for generating action potentials (APs) and maintaining the morphological and functional polarization, starts to develop. However, the cellular/molecular mechanisms and receptors involved in AIS initial development and maturation are mostly unknown. In this study, we have focused on the role of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), a highly abundant G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) in the nervous system largely involved in different phases of neuronal development and differentiation. Although CB1R activity modulation has been related to changes in axons or dendrites, its possible role as a modulator of AIS development has not been yet explored. Here we analyzed the potential role of CB1R on neuronal morphology and AIS development using pharmacological and RNA interference approaches in cultured hippocampal neurons. CB1R inhibition, at a very early developmental stage, has no effect on axonal growth, yet CB1R activation can promote it. By contrast, subsequent dendritic growth is impaired by CB1R inhibition, which also reduces ankyrinG density at the AIS. Moreover, our data show a significant correlation between early dendritic growth and ankyrinG density. However, CB1R inhibition in later developmental stages after dendrites are formed only reduces ankyrinG accumulation at the AIS. In conclusion, our data suggest that neuronal CB1R basal activity plays a role in initial development of dendrites and indirectly in AIS proteins accumulation. Based on the lack of CB1R expression at the AIS, we hypothesize that CB1R mediated modulation of dendritic arbor size during early development indirectly determines the accumulation of ankyrinG and AIS development. Further studies

  2. The pathophysiology of axonal transport in alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vicario Orri, Elena; Opazo, Carlos; Muñoz López, Francisco José, 1964-

    2015-01-01

    Neurons communicate in the nervous system by carrying out information along the length of their axons to finally transmit it at the synapse. Proper function of axons and axon terminals relies on the transport of proteins, organelles, vesicles, and other elements from the site of synthesis in the cell body. Conversely, neurotrophins secreted from axonal targets and other components at nerve terminals need to travel toward the cell body for clearance. Molecular motors, namely kinesins and dynei...

  3. Internodal function in normal and regenerated mammalian axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, M; Krarup, C

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Following Wallerian degeneration, peripheral myelinated axons have the ability to regenerate and, given a proper pathway, establish functional connections with targets. In spite of this capacity, the clinical outcome of nerve regeneration remains unsatisfactory. Early studies have found...... that internodes play an active role in axonal function. RESULTS: By investigating internodal contribution to axonal excitability we have found evidence that axonal function may be permanently compromised in regenerated nerves. Furthermore, we illustrate that internodal function is also abnormal in regenerated...

  4. Detection of functional homotopy in traumatic axonal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian; Gao, Lei; Xie, Kai; Zhan, Jie; Luo, Xiaoping; Wang, Huifang; Zhang, Huifang; Zhao, Jing; Zhou, Fuqing; Zeng, Xianjun; He, Laichang; He, Yulin; Gong, Honghan [Nanchang University, Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang City, Jiangxi (China)

    2017-01-15

    This study aimed to explore the interhemispheric intrinsic connectivity in traumatic axonal injury (TAI) patients. Twenty-one patients with TAI (14 males, seven females; mean age, 38.71 ± 15.25 years) and 22 well-matched healthy controls (16 males, six females; mean age, 38.50 ± 13.82 years) were recruited, and from them we obtained resting-state fMRI data. Interhemispheric coordination was examined using voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) and seed-based functional connectivity analysis was performed. We observed significantly decreased VMHC in a number of regions in TAI patients, including the prefrontal, temporal, occipital, parietal, and posterior cingulate cortices, thalami and cerebellar posterior lobes. Subsequent seed-based functional connectivity analysis revealed widely disrupted functional connectivity between the regions of local homotopic connectivity deficits and other areas of the brain, particularly the areas subserving the default, salience, integrative, and executive systems. The lower VMHC of the inferior frontal gyrus and basal ganglia, thalamus, and caudate were significant correlated with the Beck Depression Inventory score, Clinical Dementia Rating score, and Mini-Mental State Examination score, respectively. TAI is associated with regionally decreased interhemispheric interactions and extensively disrupted seed-based functional connectivity, generating further evidence of diffuse disconnection being associated with clinical symptoms in TAI patients. (orig.)

  5. Modeling molecular mechanisms in the axon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, R.; Miller, K. E.; Kuhl, E.

    2017-03-01

    Axons are living systems that display highly dynamic changes in stiffness, viscosity, and internal stress. However, the mechanistic origin of these phenomenological properties remains elusive. Here we establish a computational mechanics model that interprets cellular-level characteristics as emergent properties from molecular-level events. We create an axon model of discrete microtubules, which are connected to neighboring microtubules via discrete crosslinking mechanisms that obey a set of simple rules. We explore two types of mechanisms: passive and active crosslinking. Our passive and active simulations suggest that the stiffness and viscosity of the axon increase linearly with the crosslink density, and that both are highly sensitive to the crosslink detachment and reattachment times. Our model explains how active crosslinking with dynein motors generates internal stresses and actively drives axon elongation. We anticipate that our model will allow us to probe a wide variety of molecular phenomena—both in isolation and in interaction—to explore emergent cellular-level features under physiological and pathological conditions.

  6. A Microfluidics Approach to Investigate Axon Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-26

    coat the substrate with PLL. The cells of one dissociated embryonic spinal cord was re-suspended in 3 µl of freshly-prepared Modified Frog Ringer’s...Surround repulsion of spinal sensory axons in higher vertebrate embryos . Neuron 18, 889-897 (1997). 8. Colamarino, S. & Tessier-Lavigne, M. The

  7. Human TUBB3 mutations perturb microtubule dynamics, kinesin interactions, and axon guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischfield, Max A.; Baris, Hagit N.; Wu, Chen; Rudolph, Guenther; Van Maldergem, Lionel; He, Wei; Chan, Wai-Man; Andrews, Caroline; Demer, Joseph L.; Robertson, Richard L.; Mackey, David A.; Ruddle, Jonathan B.; Bird, Thomas D.; Gottlob, Irene; Pieh, Christina; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Hunter, David G.; Soul, Janet S.; Newlin, Anna; Sabol, Louise J.; Doherty, Edward J.; de Uzcátegui, Clara E.; de Uzcátegui, Nicolas; Collins, Mary Louise Z.; Sener, Emin C.; Wabbels, Bettina; Hellebrand, Heide; Meitinger, Thomas; de Berardinis, Teresa; Magli, Adriano; Schiavi, Costantino; Pastore-Trossello, Marco; Koc, Feray; Wong, Agnes M.; Levin, Alex V.; Geraghty, Michael T.; Descartes, Maria; Flaherty, Maree; Jamieson, Robyn V.; Møller, H. U.; Meuthen, Ingo; Callen, David F.; Kerwin, Janet; Lindsay, Susan; Meindl, Alfons; Gupta, Mohan L.; Pellman, David; Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    We report that eight heterozygous missense mutations in TUBB3, encoding the neuron-specific β-tubulin isotype III, result in a spectrum of human nervous system disorders we now call the TUBB3 syndromes. Each mutation causes the ocular motility disorder CFEOM3, whereas some also result in intellectual and behavioral impairments, facial paralysis, and/or later-onset axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Neuroimaging reveals a spectrum of abnormalities including hypoplasia of oculomotor nerves, and dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, anterior commissure, and corticospinal tracts. A knock-in disease mouse model reveals axon guidance defects without evidence of cortical cell migration abnormalities. We show the disease-associated mutations can impair tubulin heterodimer formation in vitro, although folded mutant heterodimers can still polymerize into microtubules. Modeling each mutation in yeast tubulin demonstrates that all alter dynamic instability whereas a subset disrupts the interaction of microtubules with kinesin motors. These findings demonstrate normal TUBB3 is required for axon guidance and maintenance in mammals. PMID:20074521

  8. Sensory map transfer to the neocortex relies on pretarget ordering of thalamic axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokmane, Ludmilla; Proville, Rémi; Narboux-Nême, Nicolas; Györy, Ildiko; Keita, Maryama; Mailhes, Caroline; Léna, Clément; Gaspar, Patricia; Grosschedl, Rudolf; Garel, Sonia

    2013-05-06

    Sensory maps, such as the representation of mouse facial whiskers, are conveyed throughout the nervous system by topographic axonal projections that preserve neighboring relationships between adjacent neurons. In particular, the map transfer to the neocortex is ensured by thalamocortical axons (TCAs), whose terminals are topographically organized in response to intrinsic cortical signals. However, TCAs already show a topographic order early in development, as they navigate toward their target. Here, we show that this preordering of TCAs is required for the transfer of the whisker map to the neocortex. Using Ebf1 conditional inactivation that specifically perturbs the development of an intermediate target, the basal ganglia, we scrambled TCA topography en route to the neocortex without affecting the thalamus or neocortex. Notably, embryonic somatosensory TCAs were shifted toward the visual cortex and showed a substantial intermixing along their trajectory. Somatosensory TCAs rewired postnatally to reach the somatosensory cortex but failed to form a topographic anatomical or functional map. Our study reveals that sensory map transfer relies not only on positional information in the projecting and target structures but also on preordering of axons along their trajectory, thereby opening novel perspectives on brain wiring.

  9. Mechanisms of axon degeneration: from development to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Smita; Caroni, Pico

    2007-10-01

    Axon degeneration is an active, tightly controlled and versatile process of axon segment self-destruction. Although not involving cell death, it resembles apoptosis in its logics. It involves three distinct steps: induction of competence in specific neurons, triggering of degeneration at defined axon segments of competent neurons, and rapid fragmentation and removal of the segments. The mechanisms that initiate degeneration are specific to individual settings, but the final pathway of pruning is shared; it involves microtubule disassembly, axon swellings, axon fragmentation, and removal of the remnants by locally recruited phagocytes. The tight regulatory properties of axon degeneration distinguish it from passive loss phenomena, and confer significance to processes that involve it. Axon degeneration has prominent roles in development, upon lesions and in disease. In development, it couples the progressive specification of neurons and circuits to the removal of defined axon branches. Competence might involve transcriptional switches, and local triggering can involve axon guidance molecules and synaptic activity patterns. Lesion-induced Wallerian degeneration is inhibited in the presence of Wld(S) fusion protein in neurons; it involves early local, and later, distal degeneration. It has recently become clear that like in other settings, axon degeneration in disease is a rapid and specific process, which should not be confused with a variety of disease-related pathologies. Elucidating the specific mechanisms that initiate axon degeneration should open up new avenues to investigate principles of circuit assembly and plasticity, to uncover mechanisms of disease progression, and to identify ways of protecting synapses and axons in disease.

  10. Effects of surface charges of graphene oxide on neuronal outgrowth and branching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Qin; Pang, Long; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Yanrong; Zhang, Rui; Lu, Bingzhang; Wang, Jinyi

    2014-01-07

    Graphene oxides with different surface charges were fabricated from carboxylated graphene oxide by chemical modification with amino- (-NH2), poly-m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid- (-NH2/-SO3H), or methoxyl- (-OCH3) terminated functional groups. The chemically functionalized graphene oxides and the carboxylated graphene oxide were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectrometry, ζ potential measurements, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and contact angle analyses. Subsequently, the resulting graphene oxides were used as substrates for culturing primary rat hippocampal neurons to investigate neurite outgrowth and branching. The morphological features of neurons that directly reflect their potential capability in synaptic transmission were characterized. The results demonstrate that the chemical properties of graphene oxide can be systematically modified by attaching different functional groups that confer known characteristics to the substrate. By manipulating the charge carried by the functionalized graphene oxides, the outgrowth and branching of neuronal processes can be controlled. Compared with neutral, zwitterionic, or negatively charged graphene oxides, positively charged graphene oxide was found to be more beneficial for neurite outgrowth and branching. The ability to chemically modify graphene oxide to control neurite outgrowth could be implemented clinically, especially in cases wherein long-term presence of outgrowth modulation is necessary.

  11. Trophic and tropic effects of striatal astrocytes on cografted mesencephalic dopamine neurons and their axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, P; Quenneville, N; Vandaele, S; Abbaszadeh, R; Lanctôt, C; Crine, P; Doucet, G

    1998-01-01

    Astrocytes from the ventral mesencephalon and from the striatum respectively promote the dendritic and axonal arborization of dopamine (DA) neurons in vitro. To test this response in vivo, astrocytes in primary cultures from the neonatal cerebral cortex, ventral mesencephalon, or striatum were coimplanted with fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue into the intact or DA-denervated striatum of adult rats and these cografts examined after 3-6 months by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry (intact recipients) or after 5-6 months by in vitro [3H]DA-uptake autoradiography (DA-denervated recipients). In contrast with single ventral mesencephalic grafts, all types of cograft displayed a rather uniform distribution of TH-immunoreactive perikarya. The average size of TH-immunoreactive cell bodies was not significantly different in cografts containing cortical or mesencephalic astrocytes and in single ventral mesencephalic grafts, but it was significantly larger in cografts containing striatal astrocytes. Nevertheless, the number of [3H]DA-labeled terminals in the DA-lesioned host striatum was clearly smaller with cografts of striatal astrocytes than with single mesencephalic grafts or with cografts containing cortical astrocytes. On the other hand, cografts of striatal astrocytes contained much higher numbers of [3H]DA-labeled terminals than the other types of graft or cograft. Thus, while cografted astrocytes in general influence the distribution of DA neurons within the graft, astrocytes from the neonatal striatum have a trophic effect on DA perikarya and a tropic effect on DA axons, keeping the latter within the graft.

  12. Emerging roles of Axin in cerebral cortical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eYe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proper functioning of the cerebral cortex depends on the appropriate production and positioning of neurons, establishment of axon–dendrite polarity, and formation of proper neuronal connectivity. Deficits in any of these processes greatly impair neural functions and are associated with various human neurodevelopmental disorders including microcephaly, cortical heterotopias, and autism. The application of in vivo manipulation techniques such as in utero electroporation has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie neural development in vivo. Axin is a scaffold protein that regulates neuronal differentiation and morphogenesis in vitro. Recent studies provide novel insights into the emerging roles of Axin in gene expression and cytoskeletal regulation during neurogenesis, neuronal polarization, and axon formation. This review summarizes current knowledge on Axin as a key molecular controller of cerebral cortical development.

  13. Quantitative analysis of axon bouton distribution of subthalamic nucleus neurons in the rat by single neuron visualization with a viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Yoshinori; Fujiyama, Fumino; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Furuta, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-06-15

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia plays a key role in motor control, and STN efferents are known to mainly target the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), entopeduncular nucleus (Ep), and substantia nigra (SN) with some axon collaterals to the other regions. However, it remains to be clarified how each STN neuron projects axon fibers and collaterals to those target nuclei of the STN. Here we visualized the whole axonal arborization of single STN neurons in the rat brain by using a viral vector expressing membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein, and examined the distribution of axon boutons in those target nuclei. The vast majority (8-9) of 10 reconstructed STN neurons projected to the GPe, SN, caudate-putamen (CPu), and Ep, which received, on average ± SD, 457 ± 425, 400 ± 347, 126 ± 143, and 106 ± 100 axon boutons per STN neuron, respectively. Furthermore, the density of axon boutons in the GPe was highest among these nuclei. Although these target nuclei were divided into calbindin-rich and -poor portions, STN projection showed no exclusive preference for those portions. Since STN neurons mainly projected not only to the GPe, SN, and Ep but also to the CPu, the subthalamostriatal projection might serve as a positive feedback path for the striato-GPe-subthalamic disinhibitory pathway, or work as another route of cortical inputs to the striatum through the corticosubthalamostriatal disynaptic excitatory pathway.

  14. MAPK signaling promotes axonal degeneration by speeding the turnover of the axonal maintenance factor NMNAT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lauren J; Summers, Daniel W; Sasaki, Yo; Brace, EJ; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Injury-induced (Wallerian) axonal degeneration is regulated via the opposing actions of pro-degenerative factors such as SARM1 and a MAPK signal and pro-survival factors, the most important of which is the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT2 that inhibits activation of the SARM1 pathway. Here we investigate the mechanism by which MAPK signaling facilitates axonal degeneration. We show that MAPK signaling promotes the turnover of the axonal survival factor NMNAT2 in cultured mammalian neurons as well as the Drosophila ortholog dNMNAT in motoneurons. The increased levels of NMNAT2 are required for the axonal protection caused by loss of MAPK signaling. Regulation of NMNAT2 by MAPK signaling does not require SARM1, and so cannot be downstream of SARM1. Hence, pro-degenerative MAPK signaling functions upstream of SARM1 by limiting the levels of the essential axonal survival factor NMNAT2 to promote injury-dependent SARM1 activation. These findings are consistent with a linear molecular pathway for the axonal degeneration program. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22540.001 PMID:28095293

  15. Development of a central nervous system axonal myelination assay for high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariosa-Willingham, Karen D; Rosler, Elen S; Tung, Jay S; Dugas, Jason C; Collins, Tassie L; Leonoudakis, Dmitri

    2016-04-22

    Regeneration of new myelin is impaired in persistent multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, leaving neurons unable to function properly and subject to further degeneration. Current MS therapies attempt to ameliorate autoimmune-mediated demyelination, but none directly promote the regeneration of lost and damaged myelin of the central nervous system (CNS). Development of new drugs that stimulate remyelination has been hampered by the inability to evaluate axonal myelination in a rapid CNS culture system. We established a high throughput cell-based assay to identify compounds that promote myelination. Culture methods were developed for initiating myelination in vitro using primary embryonic rat cortical cells. We developed an immunofluorescent phenotypic image analysis method to quantify the morphological alignment of myelin characteristic of the initiation of myelination. Using γ-secretase inhibitors as promoters of myelination, the optimal growth, time course and compound treatment conditions were established in a 96 well plate format. We have characterized the cortical myelination assay by evaluating the cellular composition of the cultures and expression of markers of differentiation over the time course of the assay. We have validated the assay scalability and consistency by screening the NIH clinical collection library of 727 compounds and identified ten compounds that promote myelination. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values for these compounds were determined to rank them according to potency. We have designed the first high capacity in vitro assay that assesses myelination of live axons. This assay will be ideal for screening large compound libraries to identify new drugs that stimulate myelination. Identification of agents capable of promoting the myelination of axons will likely lead to the development of new therapeutics for MS patients.

  16. AxonQuant: A Microfluidic Chamber Culture-Coupled Algorithm That Allows High-Throughput Quantification of Axonal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Published methods for imaging and quantitatively analyzing morphological changes in neuronal axons have serious limitations because of their small sample sizes, and their time-consuming and nonobjective nature. Here we present an improved microfluidic chamber design suitable for fast and high-throughput imaging of neuronal axons. We developed the AxonQuant algorithm, which is suitable for automatic processing of axonal imaging data. This microfluidic chamber-coupled algorithm allows calculation of an ‘axonal continuity index' that quantitatively measures axonal health status in a manner independent of neuronal or axonal density. This method allows quantitative analysis of axonal morphology in an automatic and nonbiased manner. Our method will facilitate large-scale high-throughput screening for genes or therapeutic compounds for neurodegenerative diseases involving axonal damage. When combined with imaging technologies utilizing different gene markers, this method will provide new insights into the mechanistic basis for axon degeneration. Our microfluidic chamber culture-coupled AxonQuant algorithm will be widely useful for studying axonal biology and neurodegenerative disorders. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Development and maturation of embryonic cortical neurons grafted into the damaged adult motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissrine Ballout

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the human central nervous system can lead to devastating consequences due to its poor ability to self-repair. Neural transplantation aimed at replacing lost neurons and restore functional circuitry has proven to be a promising therapeutical avenue. We previously reported in adult rodent animal models with cortical lesions that grafted fetal cortical neurons could effectively re-establish specific patterns of projections and synapses. The current study was designed to provide a detailed characterization of the spatio-temporal in vivo development of fetal cortical transplanted cells within the lesioned adult motor cortex and their corresponding axonal projections. We show here that as early as two weeks after grafting, cortical neuroblasts transplanted into damaged adult motor cortex developed appropriate projections to cortical and subcortical targets. Grafted cells initially exhibited characteristics of immature neurons, which then differentiated into mature neurons with appropriate cortical phenotypes where most were glutamatergic and few were GABAergic. All cortical subtypes identified with the specific markers CTIP2, Cux1, FOXP2 and Tbr1 were generated after grafting as evidenced with BrdU co-labeling.The set of data provided here is of interest as it sets biological standards for future studies aimed at replacing fetal cells with embryonic stem cells as a source of cortical neurons.

  18. Crustacean peptidergic neurons in culture show immediate outgrowth in simple medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, I; Graf, R; Grau, S; Haylett, B; Meyers, D; Ruben, P

    1989-01-01

    The survival and outgrowth of neurons in culture has usually required conditioning factors. We now report that crustacean neurons, taken from the peptidergic neurosecretory system of the eyestalk of crabs (Cardisoma carnifex) and lobsters (Panulirus marginatus), show immediate outgrowth, sustained for a week or more, in defined medium as simple as physiological saline with glucose and glutamine. The neurons show peptide hormone immunoreactivity that is prominent at growth cones, exhibit differences in form correlated with their immunoreactivity, release peptides to the medium, and have voltage-dependent currents, including a well-sustained Ca current. Cd blocks secretion, growth, and the Ca current. Peptidergic secretory neurons may be able to utilize existing membrane from their store of granules and already active synthetic, transport, and secretory mechanisms for immediate outgrowth.

  19. Role of fibroblast growth factor 8 in neurite outgrowth from spiral ganglion neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, Sofía; Potashner, Steven J; Morest, D Kent

    2013-09-05

    Many neurons degenerate after injuries resulting from overstimulation, drugs, genetic mutations, and aging. Although several growth factors and neurotrophins delay degeneration and promote regrowth of neural processes, the role of fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) in mammalian spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) neurite outgrowth has not been examined. This study develops and uses SGN cell cultures suitable for experimental analysis, it investigates whether FGF8a and FGF8b isoforms affect the neurite outgrowth from SGN cultured in vitro. We found that both FGF8a and FGF8b promoted the outgrowth of neurites from cultured SGN. This response is mediated by FGF receptors and involves the activation of IκBα-mediated NFκB signaling pathway. These findings suggest that, besides its morphogenetic role during development, FGF8 may have trophic functions in the adult which are relevant to regeneration.

  20. Two-dimensional patterning of thin coatings for the control of tissue outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thissen, H.; Johnson, G.; Hartley, P.G.

    2006-01-01

    were used to provide evidence of successful surface modifications. Adsorption of the extracellular matrix protein collagen I followed by tissue outgrowth experiments with bovine corneal epithelial tissue for up to 21 days showed that two-dimensional control over tissue outgrowth is achievable with our......Control of the precise location and extent of cellular attachment and proliferation, and of tissue outgrowth is important in a number of biomedical applications, including biomaterials and tissue engineered medical devices. Here we describe a method to control and direct the location and define...... boundaries of tissue growth on surfaces in two dimensions. The method relies on the generation of a spatially defined surface chemistry comprising protein adsorbing and non-adsorbing areas that allow control over the adsorption of cell-adhesive glycoproteins. Surface modification was carried out...

  1. Cortical projections to the human red nucleus: a diffusion tensor tractography study with a 1.5-T MRI machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe; Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Service de Neuroimagerie, Centre Hospitalier National d' Optalmologie des Quinze-Vingts, Paris (France)

    2006-10-15

    Previous studies in apes and monkeys have shown that the red nucleus receives projections from the sensorimotor and premotor cortices, whereas other experiments carried out with injured human brains have found corticorubral projections issuing from associative areas. Therefore, we reassessed in vivo the human anatomical projections from the cerebral cortex to the red nucleus using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) axonal tracking. The connectivity between the cerebral cortex and the red nuclei of seven volunteers was studied at 1.5 T using streamlined DTI axonal tracking. Trajectories were constantly tracked between the red nuclei and the ipsilateral pericentral and prefrontal cortices, as well as the temporal cortex and the striatum in two subjects. Within the cerebral trunk, trajectories also include the superior cerebellar peduncle and the central tegmental tract. The human red nucleus receives its main afferences from the sensorimotor and prefrontal cortices. (orig.)

  2. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Costa, Lucio G. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  3. Analysis of the action of euxanthone, a plant-derived compound that stimulates neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, M; Kuan, C-Y K; Lo, W-L; Raza, M; Tolkovsky, A; Mak, N-K; Wong, R N-S; Keynes, R

    2007-09-21

    We have investigated the neurite growth-stimulating properties of euxanthone, a xanthone derivative isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Polygala caudata. Euxanthone was shown to exert a marked stimulatory action on neurite outgrowth from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia explanted in collagen gels, in the absence of added neurotrophins. It was also shown to promote cell survival in explanted chick embryo ganglia, and to stimulate neurite outgrowth from isolated adult rat primary sensory neurons in vitro. The further finding that euxanthone stimulates neurite outgrowth from explants of chick embryo retina and ventral spinal cord suggests an action on signaling pathways downstream of neuronal receptors for specific neurotrophic factors. Consistent with this, euxanthone did not promote neurite outgrowth from non-transfected PC12 cells, or from PC12 cells transfected with TrkB or TrkC, under conditions in which these cells extended neurites in response to, respectively, the neurotrophins nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3. Western blot analysis of euxanthone-stimulated dorsal root ganglion explants showed that expression of phospho-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase was up-regulated after 1 h of euxanthone-treatment. Inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway using PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase, blocked all euxanthone-stimulated neurite outgrowth. However, analysis of phospho-Akt expression indicated that the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-Akt pathway, another major signaling pathway engaged by neurotrophins, is not significantly activated by euxanthone. These results suggest that euxanthone promotes neurite outgrowth by selectively activating the MAP kinase pathway.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes vesicular glutamate transporter 3 expression and neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion neurons through the activation of the transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Hao; Pan, Xinliang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2016-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical for sensory neuron survival and is necessary for vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) expression. Whether the transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5 are involved in these BDNF-induced effects remains unclear. In the present study, primary cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were used to test the link between BDNF and transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5 on VGLUT3 expression and neurite outgrowth. BDNF promoted the mRNA and protein expression of Etv4 and Etv5 in DRG neurons. These effects were blocked by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 but not phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 or phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) inhibitor U73122. Etv4 siRNA and Etv5 siRNA effectively blocked the VGLUT3 expression and neurite elongation induced by BNDF. The overexpression of Etv4 or Etv5 potentiated the effects of BNDF-induced neurite elongation and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), medium neurofilament (NF-M), and light neurofilament (NF-L) expression while these effects could be inhibited by Etv4 and Etv5 siRNA. These data imply that Etv4 and Etv5 are essential transcription factors in modulating BDNF/TrkB signaling-mediated VGLUT3 expression and neurite outgrowth. BDNF, through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, activates Etv4 and Etv5 to initiate GAP-43 expression, promote neurofilament (NF) protein expression, induce neurite outgrowth, and mediate VGLUT3 expression for neuronal function improvement. The biological effects initiated by BDNF/TrkB signaling linked to E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors are important to elucidate neuronal differentiation, axonal regeneration, and repair in various pathological states.

  5. Two Modes of the Axonal Interferon Response Limit Alphaherpesvirus Neuroinvasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV and pseudorabies virus (PRV, typically begins at epithelial surfaces and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to invasion of the PNS. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which includes the interferons (IFNs. The fundamental question is how do PNS cell bodies respond to these distant, potentially damaging events experienced by axons. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, we found that pretreating isolated axons with beta interferon (IFN-β or gamma interferon (IFN-γ significantly diminished the number of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and PRV particles moving in axons toward the cell bodies in a receptor-dependent manner. Exposing axons to IFN-β induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1 only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFN-γ induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated antiviral effects induced by IFN-γ, but not those induced by IFN-β. Proteomic analysis of IFN-β- or IFN-γ-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore, unlike treatment with IFN-γ, IFN-β induces a noncanonical, local antiviral response in axons. The activation of a local IFN response in axons represents a new paradigm for cytokine control of neuroinvasion.

  6. Mitochondria Localize to Injured Axons to Support Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Min; Baig, Huma S; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-12-21

    Axon regeneration is essential to restore the nervous system after axon injury. However, the neuronal cell biology that underlies axon regeneration is incompletely understood. Here we use in vivo, single-neuron analysis to investigate the relationship between nerve injury, mitochondrial localization, and axon regeneration. Mitochondria translocate into injured axons so that average mitochondria density increases after injury. Moreover, single-neuron analysis reveals that axons that fail to increase mitochondria have poor regeneration. Experimental alterations to axonal mitochondrial distribution or mitochondrial respiratory chain function result in corresponding changes to regeneration outcomes. Axonal mitochondria are specifically required for growth-cone migration, identifying a key energy challenge for injured neurons. Finally, mitochondrial localization to the axon after injury is regulated in part by dual-leucine zipper kinase 1 (DLK-1), a conserved regulator of axon regeneration. These data identify regulation of axonal mitochondria as a new cell-biological mechanism that helps determine the regenerative response of injured neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Motor and dorsal root ganglion axons serve as choice points for the ipsilateral turning of dI3 axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Oshri; Hadas, Yoav; Vald, Lilach; Hong, Seulgi; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Klar, Avihu

    2010-11-17

    The axons of the spinal intersegmental interneurons are projected longitudinally along various funiculi arrayed along the dorsal-ventral axis of the spinal cord. The roof plate and the floor plate have a profound role in patterning their initial axonal trajectory. However, other positional cues may guide the final architecture of interneuron tracks in the spinal cord. To gain more insight into the organization of specific axonal tracks in the spinal cord, we focused on the trajectory pattern of a genetically defined neuronal population, dI3 neurons, in the chick spinal cord. Exploitation of newly characterized enhancer elements allowed specific labeling of dI3 neurons and axons. dI3 axons are projected ipsilaterally along two longitudinal fascicules at the ventral lateral funiculus (VLF) and the dorsal funiculus (DF). dI3 axons change their trajectory plane from the transverse to the longitudinal axis at two novel checkpoints. The axons that elongate at the DF turn at the dorsal root entry zone, along the axons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and the axons that elongate at the VLF turn along the axons of motor neurons. Loss and gain of function of the Lim-HD protein Isl1 demonstrate that Isl1 is not required for dI3 cell fate. However, Isl1 is sufficient to impose ipsilateral turning along the motor axons when expressed ectopically in the commissural dI1 neurons. The axonal patterning of dI3 neurons, revealed in this study, highlights the role of established axonal cues-the DRG and motor axons-as intermediate guidepost cues for dI3 axons.

  8. Axon Membrane Skeleton Structure is Optimized for Coordinated Sodium Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yihao; Li, He; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-01-01

    Axons transmit action potentials with high fidelity and minimal jitter. This unique capability is likely the result of the spatiotemporal arrangement of sodium channels along the axon. Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under entropic tension. Sodium channels also exhibit a periodic distribution pattern, as they bind to ankyrin G, which associates with spectrin. Here, we elucidate the relationship between the axon membrane skeleton structure and the function of the axon. By combining cytoskeletal dynamics and continuum diffusion modeling, we show that spectrin filaments under tension minimize the thermal fluctuations of sodium channels and prevent overlap of neighboring channel trajectories. Importantly, this axon skeletal arrangement allows for a highly reproducible band-like activation of sodium channels leading to coordinated sodium propagation along the axon.

  9. Effects of Valproic Acid on Axonal Regeneration and Recovery of Motor Function after Peripheral Nerve Injury in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Rao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Valproic acid (VPA is used to be an effective anti-epileptic drug and mood stabilizer. It has recently been demonstrated that VPA could promote neurite outgrowth, activate the extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway, and increases bcl-2 and growth cone-associated protein 43 levels in spinal cord. In the present research we demonstrate the effect of VPA on peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery of motor function following sciatic nerve transaction in rats. Methods:   The rats in VPA group and control group were administered with valproic acid (300mg/kg and sodium chloride respectively after operation. Each animal was observed sciatic nerve index (SFI at 2-week intervals and studied electrophysiology at 4-week intervals for 12 weeks. Histological and morphometrical analyses were performed 12 weeks after operation. Using the digital image-analysis system, thickness of the myelin sheath was measured, and total numbers of regenerated axons were counted. Results:   There was a significant difference in SFI, electrophysiological index (motor-nerve conduct velocity, and morphometrical results (regenerated axon number and thickness of myelin sheath in nerve regeneration between the VPA group and controls (   P

  10. Homeostatic responses by surviving cortical pyramidal cells in neurodegenerative tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimins, Johanna L; Rocher, Anne B; Peters, Alan; Shultz, Penny; Lewis, Jada; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2011-11-01

    Cortical neuron death is prevalent by 9 months in rTg(tau(P301L))4510 tau mutant mice (TG) and surviving pyramidal cells exhibit dendritic regression and spine loss. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of these marked structural changes on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) of layer 3 pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from behaviorally characterized TG and non-transgenic (NT) mice at this age. Frontal lobe function of TG mice was intact following a short delay interval but impaired following a long delay interval in an object recognition test, and cortical atrophy and cell loss were pronounced. Surviving TG cells had significantly reduced dendritic diameters, total spine density, and mushroom spines, yet sEPSCs were increased and sIPSCs were unchanged in frequency. Thus, despite significant regressive structural changes, synaptic responses were not reduced in TG cells, indicating that homeostatic compensatory mechanisms occur during progressive tauopathy. Consistent with this idea, surviving TG cells were more intrinsically excitable than NT cells, and exhibited sprouting of filopodia and axonal boutons. Moreover, the neuropil in TG mice showed an increased density of asymmetric synapses, although their mean size was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that during progressive tauopathy, cortical pyramidal cells compensate for loss of afferent input by increased excitability and establishment of new synapses. These compensatory homeostatic mechanisms may play an important role in slowing the progression of neuronal network dysfunction during neurodegenerative tauopathies.

  11. Axon degeneration: make the Schwann cell great again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keit Men Wong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Axonal degeneration is a pivotal feature of many neurodegenerative conditions and substantially accounts for neurological morbidity. A widely used experimental model to study the mechanisms of axonal degeneration is Wallerian degeneration (WD, which occurs after acute axonal injury. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS, WD is characterized by swift dismantling and clearance of injured axons with their myelin sheaths. This is a prerequisite for successful axonal regeneration. In the central nervous system (CNS, WD is much slower, which significantly contributes to failed axonal regeneration. Although it is well-documented that Schwann cells (SCs have a critical role in the regenerative potential of the PNS, to date we have only scarce knowledge as to how SCs 'sense' axonal injury and immediately respond to it. In this regard, it remains unknown as to whether SCs play the role of a passive bystander or an active director during the execution of the highly orchestrated disintegration program of axons. Older reports, together with more recent studies, suggest that SCs mount dynamic injury responses minutes after axonal injury, long before axonal breakdown occurs. The swift SC response to axonal injury could play either a pro-degenerative role, or alternatively a supportive role, to the integrity of distressed axons that have not yet committed to degenerate. Indeed, supporting the latter concept, recent findings in a chronic PNS neurodegeneration model indicate that deactivation of a key molecule promoting SC injury responses exacerbates axonal loss. If this holds true in a broader spectrum of conditions, it may provide the grounds for the development of new glia-centric therapeutic approaches to counteract axonal loss.

  12. Schwann cells-axon interaction in myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveggia, Carla

    2016-08-01

    The remarkable interaction between glial cells and axons is crucial for nervous system development and homeostasis. Alterations in this continuous communication can cause severe pathologies that can compromise the integrity of the nervous system. The most dramatic consequence of this interaction is the generation of the myelin sheath, made by myelinating glial cells: Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. In this review I will focus on signals coming from axons in the first part and then on those from Schwann cells that promote the formation and the maintenance of peripheral myelin. I will discuss their inter-relationship together with seminal and important advances recently made.

  13. Interspecies variation in axon-myelin relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, J P; O'Sullivan, A W

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to determine the extent and nature of interspecies differences in axon calibre and myelin sheath thickness and in the various relationships between these. Morphometric analysis of the axon perimeter-myelin sheath thickness relationship was performed on an equivalent nerve fibre population in a mammal, the rat, a bird, the chicken, an amphibian, the frog, a bony fish, the trout, and a cartilaginous fish, the dogfish. The abducent nerve was studied. It is especially suitable for this purpose because its fibres are closely similar in type and in peripheral distribution across the species studied. The relationship differed substantially between species. Differences were present in its setting, as described by the positions of the scatterplots, in the g ratio and in the regression and correlation data relating the parameters. Both parameters were markedly larger in the fish species than in all of the others. In addition, in rat, chicken, frog and trout, where large and small fibre classes could be differentiated clearly, the setting of the relationship between the two parameters was different for the two classes. In the main, variation in each of the parameters was greater between than within species. The larger fibres in the fish species were closely similar in axon perimeter and sheath thickness despite their long evolutionary separation. From this study and from others in the series, it may be concluded that there is no fixed or constant relationship between axon calibre and the thickness of the surrounding myelin sheath. Each nerve tends to have its own particular relationship and this differs between species.

  14. Longitudinal quantitative MRI assessment of cortical damage in multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracien, René-Maxime; Reitz, Sarah C; Hof, Stephanie-Michelle; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Droby, Amgad; Wahl, Mathias; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Groppa, Sergiu; Deichmann, Ralf; Klein, Johannes C

    2017-02-27

    Quantitative MRI (qMRI) allows assessing cortical pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) on a microstructural level, where cortical damage has been shown to prolong T1 -relaxation time and increase proton density (PD) compared to controls. However, the evolution of these changes in MS over time has not been investigated so far. In this pilot study we used an advanced method for the longitudinal assessment of cortical tissue change in MS patients with qMRI in comparison to cortical atrophy, as derived from conventional MRI. Twelve patients with relapsing-remitting MS underwent 3T T1 /PD-mapping at two timepoints with a mean interval of 12 months. The respective cortical T1 /PD-values were extracted from the middle of the cortical layer and the cortical thickness was measured for surface-based identification of clusters with increasing/decreasing values. Statistical analysis showed clusters with increasing PD- and T1 -values over time (annualized rate for T1 /PD increase in these clusters: 3.4 ± 2.56% for T1 , P = 0.0007; 2.3 ± 2.59% for PD, P = 0.01). Changes are heterogeneous across the cortex and different patterns of longitudinal PD and T1 increase emerged. Analysis of the cortical thickness yielded only one small cluster indicating a decrease of cortical thickness. Changes of cortical tissue composition in MS seem to be reflected by a spatially inhomogeneous, multifocal increase of the PD values, indicating replacement of neural tissue by water, and of the T1 -relaxation time, a surrogate of demyelination, axonal loss, and gliosis. qMRI changes were more prominent than cortical atrophy, showing the potential of qMRI techniques to quantify microstructural alterations that remain undetected by conventional MRI. 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. 朗飞结处神经突起生长抑制因子%Neurite outgrowth inhibitors at the node of Ranvier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du-Yu Nie; Qi-Dong Hu; Quan-Hong Ma; Melitta Schachner; Zhi-Cheng Xiao

    2008-01-01

    Nodes of Ranvier and paranodes are polarized-domains along myelinated axons. Increasing evidence indicate that glia-derived neurite outgrowth inhibitory molecules which suppress axonal regeneration following injury in the central nervous system (CNS), such as tenascins, chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, MAG, Nogo and OMgp, are specifically accumulated at the regions of nodes of Ranvier. These molecules show potent inhibition of neurite outgrowth in tissue culture. In some null mutation animals, axonal sprouting was observed at the node, suggesting that these inhibitory molecules may physiologically ensure the integrity of axons and prevent random and erroneous connection between axons. However, most null mutation animal models have so far revealed no significant improvement in CNS regeneration. Are these so-called inhibitors really the culprits in the failure of regeneration? The disparities between the in vitro and in vivo behaviours of these "inhibitors" and their specific locations have led us to reassess other physiological roles and functions. Given the bi-directional properties of axo-glial interaction, in this review, we propose that not only do the inhibitory molecules signal to neuronal receptors to regulate axonal polarization, ion channel function and axonal branching, but also axonal molecules can signal back to oligodendrocytes via glia receptors to mediate oligodendroglial development at the regions of nodes of Ranview.%朗飞结以及结侧区是有鞘轴突上的一些极化区域,越来越多的证据表明胶质细胞分泌的某些抑制中枢神经系统损伤后轴突再生过程中神经突起生长的分子如粘蛋白(tenascins)、硫酸软骨素蛋白聚糖(chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans)、髓鞘相关糖蛋白(myelin-associated glycoprotein, MAG)、轴突生长抑制因子(Nogo)以及少突胶质细胞髓鞘糖蛋白(OMGP)等非常特异性的富集于朗飞结区域.这些分子在体外组织培养过程中显示出强烈的神

  16. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  17. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  18. Shh goes multidirectional in axon guidance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Bovolenta; Luisa Sanchez-Arrones

    2012-01-01

    Shh and Wnts,secreted by the floor and roof plate of the spinal cord,direct longitudinal growth of the axons from the adjacent ventral funiculus and cortico-spinal tract.Whether these midline cues influencethe directionality of axons elongating in more lateral positions of the spinal cord is unexplored.Song and colleagues investigate this possibility and demonstrate that the location of descending raphe-spinal tract in the ventrolateral spinal cord is dictated by the simultaneous repellent activity of Shh gradients in both the anteriorto-posterior (A-P) and medial-tolateral (M-L) axis. The spinal cord is the main pathway for exchange of information between the brain and the rest of the body.Sensory information collected in the body periphery is conveyed to the brain by axonal tracts that ascend along the spinal cord whereas motor information travels from the brain to the periphery in descending tracts.Precise spatial organization of these fiber tracts is thus essential for animal behavior and survival.

  19. Where does slow axonal transport go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Sumio

    2003-12-01

    Axonal transport is the specialized and well-developed intracellular transport system for regulated and/or long-distance transport based on generalized cellular machineries. Among them, slow axonal transport conveys cytoplasmic proteins. The motor molecule, the nature of transporting complex and the transport regulation mechanism for slow transport are still unclarified. There has been a dispute regarding the nature of transporting complex of cytoskeletal proteins, polymer-sliding hypothesis versus subunit-transport theory. Recent data supporting the hypothesis of polymer sliding in cultured neurons only reconfirm the previously reported structure and this inference suffers from the lack of ultrastructural evidence and the direct relevance to the physiological slow transport phenomenon in vivo. Observation of the moving cytoskeletal proteins in vivo using transgenic mice or squid giant axons revealed that subunits do move in a microtubule-dependent manner, strongly indicating the involvement of microtubule-based motor kinesin. If the slow transport rate reflects the intermittent fast transport dependent on kinesin motor, we have to investigate the molecular constituents of the transporting complex in more detail and evaluate why the motor and cargo interaction is so unstable. This kind of weak and fluctuating interaction between various molecular pairs could not be detected by conventional techniques, thus necessitating the establishment of a new experimental system before approaching the molecular regulation problem.

  20. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  1. Efferent axons in the avian auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppl, C

    2001-05-01

    The sensory hair cells of the inner ear receive both afferent and efferent innervation. The efferent supply to the auditory organ has evolved in birds and mammals into a separate complex system, with several types of neurons of largely unknown function. In this study, the efferent axons in four different species of birds (chicken, starling, barn owl and emu) were examined anatomically. Total numbers of efferents supplying the cochlear duct (auditory basilar papilla and the vestibular lagenar macula) were determined; separate estimates of the efferents to the lagenar macula only were also derived and subtracted. The numbers for auditory efferents thus varied between 120 (chicken) and 1068 (barn owl). Considering the much larger numbers of hair cells in the basilar papilla, each efferent is predicted to branch extensively. However, pronounced species-specific differences as well as regional differences along the tonotopic gradient of the basilar papilla were documented. Myelinated and unmyelinated axons were found, with mean diameters of about 1 microm and about 0.5 microm, respectively. This suggests two basic populations of efferents, however, they did not appear to be distinguished sharply. Evidence is presented that some efferents lose their myelination at the transition from central oligodendrocyte to peripheral Schwann cell myelin. Finally, a comparison of the four bird species evaluated suggests that the efferent population with smaller, unmyelinated axons is the phylogenetically more primitive one. A new population probably arose in parallel with the evolution and differentiation of the specialized hair-cell type it innervates, the short hair cell.

  2. MRI of the diffuse axonal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Yang Gu; Woo, Young Hoon; Suh, Soo Jhi [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-01-15

    CT has facilitated early recognition and treatment of focal brain injuries in patients with head trauma. However, CT shows relatively low sensitivity in identifying non hemorrhage contusion and injuries of white matter. MR is known to be superior to CT in detection of white matter injuries, such as diffuse axonal injury. MR imaging in 14 cases of diffuse axonal injury on 2.0T was studied. The corpus callosum, especially the body portion, was the most commonly involved site. The lesions ranged from 5 to 20mm in size with ovoid to elliptical shape. T2WI was the most sensitive pulse sequence in detecting lesions such as white matter degeneration, hemorrhagic and non hemorrhagic contusion. The lesions were nonspecific as high and low signal intensities on T2WI and T1WI respectively. CT showed white matter abnormality in only 1 case of 14 cases. We propose MR imaging as the primary imaging procedure for the detection of diffuse axonal injury because of its multiplanar capabilities and higher sensitivity.

  3. Axon-glial relations during regeneration of axons in the adult rat anterior medullary velum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M; Hunter, A S; Duncan, A; Lordan, J; Kirvell, S; Tsang, W L; Butt, A M

    1998-12-01

    The anterior medullary velum (AMV) of adult Wistar rats was lesioned in the midsagittal plane, transecting all decussating axons including those of the central projection of the IVth nerve. At selected times up to 200 days after transection, the degenerative and regenerative responses of axons and glia were analyzed using transmission and scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. In particular, both the capacity of oligodendrocytes to remyelinate regenerated fibers and the stability of the CNS/PNS junctional zone of the IVth nerve rootlet were documented. Transected central AMV axons exhibited four patterns of fiber regeneration in which fibers grew: rostrocaudally in the reactive paralesion neuropil (Group 1); randomly within the AMV (Group 2); into the ipsilateral IVth nerve rootlet, after turning at the lesion edge and growing recurrently through the old degenerated contralateral central trochlear nerve trajectory (Group 3); and ectopically through paralesion tears in the ependyma onto the surface of the IVth ventricle (Group 4). Group 1-3 axons regenerated unperturbed through degenerating central myelin, reactive astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and large accumulations of hematogenous macrophages. Only Group 3 axons survived long term in significant numbers, and all became myelinated by oligodendrocytes, ultimately establishing thin sheaths with relatively normal nodal gaps and intersegmental myelin sheath lengths. Schwann cells at the CNS/PNS junction of the IVth nerve rootlet did not invade the CNS, but astrocyte processes grew across the junction into the PNS portion of the IVth nerve. The basal lamina of the junctional glia limitans remained stable throughout the experimental period.

  4. Parvalbumin-producing cortical interneurons receive inhibitory inputs on proximal portions and cortical excitatory inputs on distal dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Hiroshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyo H; Tanaka, Takuma; Sohn, Jaerin; Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Fujiyama, Fumino; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2012-03-01

    To examine inputs to parvalbumin (PV)-producing interneurons, we generated transgenic mice expressing somatodendritic membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein specifically in the interneurons, and completely visualized their dendrites and somata. Using immunolabeling for vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT)1, VGluT2, and vesicular GABA transporter, we found that VGluT1-positive terminals made contacts 4- and 3.1-fold more frequently with PV-producing interneurons than VGluT2-positive and GABAergic terminals, respectively, in the primary somatosensory cortex. Even in layer 4, where VGluT2-positive terminals were most densely distributed, VGluT1-positive inputs to PV-producing interneurons were 2.4-fold more frequent than VGluT2-positive inputs. Furthermore, although GABAergic inputs to PV-producing interneurons were as numerous as VGluT2-positive inputs in most cortical layers, GABAergic inputs clearly preferred the proximal dendrites and somata of the interneurons, indicating that the sites of GABAergic inputs were more optimized than those of VGluT2-positive inputs. Simulation analysis with a PV-producing interneuron model compatible with the present morphological data revealed a plausible reason for this observation, by showing that GABAergic and glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials evoked by inputs to distal dendrites were attenuated to 60 and 87%, respectively, of those evoked by somatic inputs. As VGluT1-positive and VGluT2-positive axon terminals were presumed to be cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs, respectively, cortical excitatory inputs to PV-producing interneurons outnumbered the thalamic excitatory and intrinsic inhibitory inputs more than two-fold in any cortical layer. Although thalamic inputs are known to evoke about two-fold larger unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials than cortical ones, the present results suggest that cortical inputs control PV-producing interneurons at least as strongly as thalamic inputs.

  5. Leucine-rich repeat C4 protein is Involved in Nervous Tissue Development and Neurite Outgrowth, and Induction of Glioma Cell Differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minghua WU; Jianhong LU; Shourong SHEN; Guiyuan LI; He HUANG; Qiong CHEN; Dan LI; Zhaoyang ZENG; Wei XIONG; Yanhong ZHOU; Xiaoling LI; Ming ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    LRRC4, leucine-rich repeat C4 protein, has been identified in human (GenBank accession No.AF196976), mouse (GenBank accession No. DQ177325), rat (GenBank accession No. DQ119102) and bovine (GenBank accession No. DQ164537) with identical domains. In terms of their similarity, the genes encoding LRRC4 in these four mammalian species are orthogs and therefore correspond to the same gene entity. Based on previous research, and using in situ hybridization, we found that LRRC4 had the strongest expression in hippocampal CA1 and CA2, the granule cells of the dentate gyrus region, the mediodoral thalamic nucleus, and cerebella Purkinje cell layers. Using a P19 cell model, we also found that LRRC4 participates in the differentiation of neuron and glia cells. In addition, extracellular proteins containing both an LRR cassette and immunoglobulin domains have been shown to participate in axon guidance. Our data from neurite outgrowth assays indicated that LRRC4 promoted neurite extension of hippocampal neurons, and induced differentiation of glioblastoma U251 cells into astrocyte-like cells, confirmed by morphology observation and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression.

  6. Rab, Arf, and Arl-Regulated Membrane Traffic in Cortical Neuron Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-07-01

    The migration of projection neurons from its birthplace in the subventricular zone to their final destination in the cortical plate is a complex process that requires a series of highly coordinated cellular events. Amongst the key factors involved in the processes are modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as cellular membrane traffic. Members of the small GTPases family responsible for the latter process, the Rabs and Arfs, have been recently implicated in cortical neuron migration. Rab5 and Rab11, which are key modulators of endocytosis and endocytic recycling respectively, ensure proper surface expression and distribution of N-cadherin, a key adhesion protein that tethers migrating neurons to the radial glia fiber tracts during pia-directed migration. Rab7, which is associated with lysosomal biogenesis and function, is important for the final step of terminal translocation when N-cadherin is downregulated by lysosomal degradation. Arf6 activity, which is known to be important in neuronal processes outgrowth, may negatively impact the multipolar-bipolar transition of cortical neurons undergoing radial migration, but the downstream effector of Arf6 in this regard is not yet known. In addition to the above, members of the Arl family which have been recently shown to be important in radial glia scaffold formation, would also be important for cortical neuron migration. In this short review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the importance of membrane traffic regulated by the Rab, Arf, and Arl family members in cortical neuron migration.

  7. Synchronous changes of cortical thickness and corresponding white matter microstructure during brain development accessed by diffusion MRI tractography from parcellated cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eJeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cortical thickness (CT changes during normal brain development is associated with complicated cellular and molecular processes including synaptic pruning and apoptosis. In parallel, the microstructural enhancement of developmental white matter (WM axons with their neuronal bodies in the cerebral cortex has been widely reported with measurements of metrics derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, especially fractional anisotropy (FA. We hypothesized that the changes of CT and microstructural enhancement of corresponding axons are highly interacted during development. DTI and T1-weighted images of 50 healthy children and adolescents between the ages of 7 to 25 years were acquired. With the parcellated cortical gyri transformed from T1-weighted images to DTI space as the tractography seeds, probabilistic tracking was performed to delineate the WM fibers traced from specific parcellated cortical regions. CT was measured at certain cortical regions and FA was measured from the WM fibers traced from same cortical regions. The CT of all frontal cortical gyri, includeing Brodmann areas 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 44, 45, 46 and 47, decreased significantly and heterogeneously; concurrently, significant and heterogeneous increases of FA of WM traced from corresponding regions were found. We further revealed significant correlation between the slopes of the CT decrease and the slopes of corresponding WM FA increase in all frontal cortical gyri, suggesting coherent cortical pruning and corresponding WM microstructural enhancement. Such correlation was not found in cortical regions other than frontal cortex. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these synchronous changes may be associated with overlapping signaling pathways of axonal guidance, synaptic pruning, neuronal apoptosis and more prevalent interstitial neurons in the prefrontal cortex. Revealing the coherence of cortical and WM structural changes during development may open a new window for

  8. A growth-promoting influence from the mesonephros during limb outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geduspan, J S; Solursh, M

    1992-05-01

    It has been suggested that the mesonephros has a role in normal limb development. This hypothesis was directly tested by removing the mesonephros adjacent to the presumptive limb region of stage 12-18 chick embryos using microsurgery or laser ablation. The experimental manipulation resulted in reduced limb outgrowth on the operated side. The poor limb outgrowth was correlated with either the lack of or the presence of a rudimentary mesonephros on the operated side. Furthermore, the presence of nephric tissue in limb bud organ culture enhanced growth and morphological differentiation of cartilage formed in culture. In vivo, the influence of the mesonephros resulted in significantly higher cell proliferation in the adjoining medial half of the limb mesoderm compared with the lateral half. The removal of the mesonephros adjoining the prospective limb region reduced the number of dividing cells in the medial mesoderm. The higher proliferation in the medial limb mesoderm is significant to limb outgrowth since grafting experiments showed that most of the cells that form the limb are derived from the medial mesoderm. The results suggest that the influence from the mesonephros may provide some signal for limb outgrowth.

  9. The cell outgrowth secretory endosome (COSE): a specialized compartment involved in neuronal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Philipp; Galli, Thierry

    2003-10-01

    The role of intracellular membrane trafficking in cellular morphogenesis is still unclear. We propose here a prominent function of a recently identified compartment that we propose to call the cell outgrowth secretory endosome (COSE), the exocytosis of which is controlled by the v-SNARE TIVAMP and by cell-cell adhesion.

  10. Agonists of fibroblast growth factor receptor induce neurite outgrowth and survival of cerebellar granule neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Christensen, Claus; Køhler, Lene B

    2009-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that hexafins act as partial agonists. Hexafin2, 3, 8, 10, and 17 (but not 1 or 9) induced neurite outgrowth from cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), an effect that was abolished by two inhibitors of FGFR, SU5402 and inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) and a diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor...

  11. Neurite outgrowth resistance to rho kinase inhibitors in PC12 Adh cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua; Hou, Xiaolin; Tao, Tingrui; Lv, Xiaoman; Zhang, Luyong; Duan, Weigang

    2015-05-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor is a promising agent for neural injury disorders, which mechanism is associated with neurite outgrowth. However, neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell was treated with ROCK inhibitors for a longer time. PC12 Adh cells were treated with ROCK inhibitor Y27632 or NGF for different durations. Neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell exposed to Y27632 (33 µM) for 3 or more days, but not happen when exposed to nerve growth factor (NGF, 100 ng/mL). The gene expression in the PC12 Adh cells treated with Y27632 (33 µM) or NGF (100 ng/mL) for 2 or 4 days was assayed by gene microarray, and the reliability of the results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Cluster analysis proved that the gene expression profile of PC12 Adh cell treated with Y27632 for 4 days was different from that treated with Y27632 for 2 days and those treated with NGF for 2 and 4 days, respectively. Pathway analysis hinted that the neurite outgrowth resistance could be associated with up-regulation of inflammatory pathways, especially rno04610 (complement and coagulation cascades), and down-regulation of cell cycle pathways, especially rno04110.

  12. A new agonist of the erythropoietin receptor, Epobis, induces neurite outgrowth and promotes neuronal survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Gu, Bing; Kiryushko, Darya

    2012-01-01

    study shows that the Epobis peptide specifically binds to EPOR and induces neurite outgrowth from primary neurons in an EPOR-expression dependent manner. Furthermore, Epobis promoted the survival of hippocampal and cerebellar neuronal cultures after kainate treatment and KCl deprivation, respectively...

  13. Luteolin induces microRNA-132 expression and modulates neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Fang Lin

    Full Text Available Luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone, a food-derived flavonoid, has been reported to exert neurotrophic properties that are associated with its capacity to promote neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. In this study, we report for the first time that luteolin induces the persistent expression of microRNA-132 (miR-132 in PC12 cells. The correlation between miR-132 knockdown and a decrease in luteolin-mediated neurite outgrowth may indicate a mechanistic link by which miR-132 functions as a mediator for neuritogenesis. Furthermore, we find that luteolin led to the phosphorylation and activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, which is associated with the up-regulation of miR-132 and neurite outgrowth. Moreover, luteolin-induced CREB activation, miR-132 expression and neurite outgrowth were inhibited by adenylate cyclase, protein kinase A (PKA and MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2 inhibitors but not by protein kinase C (PKC or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II inhibitors. Consistently, we find that luteolin treatment increases ERK phosphorylation and PKA activity in PC12 cells. These results show that luteolin induces the up-regulation of miR-132, which serves as an important regulator for neurotrophic actions, mainly acting through the activation of cAMP/PKA- and ERK-dependent CREB signaling pathways in PC12 cells.

  14. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Schwieger

    Full Text Available The functionality of cochlear implants (CI depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN. The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth.Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml, alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours.The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture.The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  15. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwieger, Jana; Warnecke, Athanasia; Lenarz, Thomas; Esser, Karl-Heinz; Scheper, Verena

    2015-01-01

    The functionality of cochlear implants (CI) depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN). The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml), alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours. The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture. The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  16. Visualisation of plastid outgrowths in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers by carboxyfluorescein diacetate staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, Wojciech; Bederska, Magdalena; Sujkowska-Rybkowska, Marzena

    2015-05-01

    We describe two types of plastid outgrowths visualised in potato tubers after carboxyfluorescein diacetate staining. Probable esterase activity of the outgrowths has been demonstrated for the first time ever. Plastid outgrowths were observed in the phelloderm and storage parenchyma cells of red potato (S. tuberosum L. cv. Rosalinde) tubers after administration of carboxyfluorescein diacetate stain. Endogenous esterases cleaved off acetic groups to release membrane-unpermeable green fluorescing carboxyfluorescein which accumulated differentially in particular cell compartments. The intensive green fluorescence of carboxyfluorescein exhibited highly branched stromules (stroma-filled plastid tubular projections of the plastid envelope) and allowed distinguishing them within cytoplasmic strands of the phelloderm cells. Stromules (1) were directed towards the nucleus or (2) penetrated the whole cells through the cytoplasmic bands of highly vacuolated phelloderm cells. Those directed towards the nucleus were flattened and adhered to the nuclear envelope. Stromule-like interconnections between two parts of the same plastids (isthmuses) were also observed. We also documented the formation of another type of the stroma-filled plastid outgrowths, referred to here as protrusions, which differed from previously defined stromules in both morphology and esterase activity. Unlike stromules, the protrusions were found to be associated with developmental processes leading to starch accumulation in the storage parenchyma cells. These results strongly suggest that stromules and protrusions exhibit esterase activity. This has been demonstrated for the first time. Morphological and biochemical features as well as possible functions of stromules and protrusions are discussed below.

  17. A novel and efficient gene transfer strategy reduces glial reactivity and improves neuronal survival and axonal growth in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Desclaux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The lack of axonal regeneration in the central nervous system is attributed among other factors to the formation of a glial scar. This cellular structure is mainly composed of reactive astrocytes that overexpress two intermediate filament proteins, the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and vimentin. Indeed, in vitro, astrocytes lacking GFAP or both GFAP and vimentin were shown to be the substrate for increased neuronal plasticity. Moreover, double knockout mice lacking both GFAP and vimentin presented lower levels of glial reactivity in vivo, significant axonal regrowth and improved functional recovery in comparison with wild-type mice after spinal cord hemisection. From these results, our objective was to develop a novel therapeutic strategy for axonal regeneration, based on the targeted suppression of astroglial reactivity and scarring by lentiviral-mediated RNA-interference (RNAi. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, we constructed two lentiviral vectors, Lv-shGFAP and Lv-shVIM, which allow efficient and stable RNAi-mediated silencing of endogenous GFAP or vimentin in vitro. In cultured cortical and spinal reactive astrocytes, the use of these vectors resulted in a specific, stable and highly significant decrease in the corresponding protein levels. In a second model -- scratched primary cultured astrocytes -- Lv-shGFAP, alone or associated with Lv-shVIM, decreased astrocytic reactivity and glial scarring. Finally, in a heterotopic coculture model, cortical neurons displayed higher survival rates and increased neurite growth when cultured with astrocytes in which GFAP and vimentin had been invalidated by lentiviral-mediated RNAi. CONCLUSIONS: Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of GFAP and vimentin in astrocytes show that GFAP is a key target for modulating reactive gliosis and monitoring neuron/glia interactions. Thus, manipulation of reactive astrocytes with the Lv-shGFAP vector constitutes a promising therapeutic strategy for

  18. Stromal derived factor-1 exerts differential regulation on distinct cortical cell populations in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeef Leo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal derived factor (SDF-1, an alpha chemokine, is a widely known chemoattractant in the immune system. A growing body of evidence now suggests multiple regulatory roles for SDF-1 in the developing nervous system. Results To investigate the role of SDF-1 signaling in the growth and differentiation of cortical cells, we performed numerous in vitro experiments, including gene chip and quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Using SDF-1 medium and AMD3100, a receptor antagonist, we demonstrate that the chemokine signaling regulates key events during early cortical development. First, SDF-1 signaling maintains cortical progenitors in proliferation, possibly through a mechanism involving connexin 43 mediated intercellular coupling. Second, SDF-1 signaling upregulates the differentiation of cortical GABAergic neurons, independent of sonic signaling pathway. Third, SDF-1 enables the elongation and branching of axons of cortical glutamatergic neurons. Finally, cortical cultures derived from CXCR4-/- mutants show a close parallel to AMD3100 treatment with reduced cell proliferation and differentiation of GABAergic neurons. Conclusion Results from this study show that SDF-1 regulates distinct cortical cell populations in vitro.

  19. Neuronal and microglial regulators of cortical wiring: usual and novel guideposts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eSquarzoni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neocortex functioning relies on the formation of complex networks that begins to be assembled during embryogenesis by highly stereotyped processes of cell migration and axonal navigation. The guidance of cells and axons is driven by extracellular cues, released along by final targets or intermediate targets located along specific pathways. In particular, guidepost cells, originally described in the grasshopper, are considered discrete, specialized cell populations located at crucial decision points along axonal trajectories that regulate tract formation. These cells are usually early-born, transient and act at short-range or via cell-cell contact. The vast majority of guidepost cells initially identified were glial cells, which play a role in the formation of important axonal tracts in the forebrain, such as the corpus callosum, anterior and post-optic commissures as well as optic chiasm. In the last decades, tangential migrating neurons have also been found to participate in the guidance of principal axonal tracts in the forebrain. This is the case for several examples such as guideposts for the lateral olfactory tract (LOT, corridor cells, which open an internal path for thalamo-cortical axons and Cajal-Retzius cells that have been involved in the formation of the entorhino-hippocampal connections. More recently, microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, were specifically observed at the crossroads of important neuronal migratory routes and axonal tract pathways during forebrain development. We furthermore found that microglia participate to the shaping of prenatal forebrain circuits, thereby opening novel perspectives on forebrain development and wiring. Here we will review the last findings on already known guidepost cells populations and will discuss the role of microglia as a potentially new class of atypical guidepost cells.

  20. DA-9801 promotes neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2-CREB pathway in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Back, Moon Jung; Ha, Hae Chan; Jang, Ji Min; Kim, Ha Hyung; Choi, Sang-Zin; Son, Miwon; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effect of DA-9801 on neurite outgrowth. We found that DA-9801 elicits its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway. DA-9801, an extract from a mixture of Dioscorea japonica and Dioscorea nipponica, was reported to promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The effects of DA-9801 on cell viability and expression of neuronal markers were evaluated in PC12 cells. To investigate DA-9801 action, specific inhibitors targeting the ERK signaling cascade were used. No cytotoxicity was observed in PC12 cells at DA-9801 concentrations of less than 30 µg/mL. In the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF, 2 ng/mL), DA-9801 promoted neurite outgrowth and increased the relative mRNA levels of neurofilament-L (NF-L), a marker of neuronal differentiation. The Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 significantly attenuated DA-9801-induced neurite outgrowth. Additionally, the MEK1 and MEK2 inhibitor SL327 significantly attenuated the increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells induced by DA-9801 treatment. Conversely, the selective p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 did not attenuate the DA-9801 treatment-induced increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells. DA-9801 enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in PC12 cells incubated with and without NGF. Pretreatment with PD98059 blocked the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB. In conclusion, DA-9801 induces neurite outgrowth by affecting the ERK1/2-CREB signaling pathway. Insights into the mechanism underlying this effect of DA-9801 may suggest novel potential strategies for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

  1. Dynamics of axon fasciculation in the presence of neuronal turnover

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Debasish; Mohanty, P K; Zapotocky, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We formulate and characterize a model aiming to describe the formation of fascicles of axons mediated by contact axon-axon interactions. The growing axons are represented as interacting directed random walks in two spatial dimensions. To mimic axonal turnover in the mammalian olfactory system, the random walkers are injected and removed at specified rates. In the dynamical steady state, the position-dependent distribution of fascicle sizes obeys a scaling law. We identify several distinct time scales that emerge from the dynamics, are sensitive functions of the microscopic parameters of the model, and can exceed the average axonal lifetime by orders of magnitude. We discuss our findings in terms of an analytically tractable, effective model of fascicle dynamics.

  2. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialized glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarization followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is...

  3. Chlorpyrifos-Oxon Disrupts Zebrafish Axonal Growth and Motor Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dongren; Lauridsen, Holly; Buels, Kalmia; Chi, Lai-Har; La Du, Jane; Bruun, Donald A.; Olson, James R.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal morphology is a critical determinant of neuronal connectivity, and perturbation of the rate or extent of axonal growth during development has been linked to neurobehavioral deficits in animal models and humans. We previously demonstrated that the organophosphorus pesticide (OP) chlorpyrifos (CPF) inhibits axonal growth in cultured neurons. In this study, we used a zebrafish model to determine whether CPF, its oxon metabolite (CPFO), or the excreted metabolite trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP...

  4. A unified cell biological perspective on axon-myelin injury

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, Mikael; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Demyelination and axon loss are pathological hallmarks of the neuroinflammatory disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). Although we have an increasingly detailed understanding of how immune cells can damage axons and myelin individually, we lack a unified view of how the axon–myelin unit as a whole is affected by immune-mediated attack. In this review, we propose that as a result of the tight cell biological interconnection of axons and myelin, damage to either can spread, which might convert a loc...

  5. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ramalho Romero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  6. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group. Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful. Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives.

  7. A unified cell biological perspective on axon-myelin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mikael; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin

    2014-08-04

    Demyelination and axon loss are pathological hallmarks of the neuroinflammatory disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). Although we have an increasingly detailed understanding of how immune cells can damage axons and myelin individually, we lack a unified view of how the axon-myelin unit as a whole is affected by immune-mediated attack. In this review, we propose that as a result of the tight cell biological interconnection of axons and myelin, damage to either can spread, which might convert a local inflammatory disease process early in MS into the global progressive disorder seen during later stages. This mode of spreading could also apply to other neurological disorders.

  8. Axonal autophagy during regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangrong Lu; Zhongxian Piao; Zhenxi Liu; Weiwang Gu; Wanshan Wang; Nngjie Piao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The removal of degenerated axonal debris during Wallerian degeneration is very important for nerve regeneration. However, the mechanism by which debris is removed is not been completely understood. Considerable controversy remains as to the clearance pathway and cells that are involved. OBJECTIVE: To investigate axonal autophagy during removal of degenerated axonal debris by transecting the sciatic nerve in a rat Wallerian degeneration model.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Experimental neuropathological analysis. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory Animal Service Center of the Southern Medical University between January and June 2005. MATERIALS: Fifty-four adult, Wistar rats of either sex, weighing 180-250 g, were obtained from the Laboratory Animal Service Center of the Southern Medical University. Animals were randomly divided into nine groups of six rats. METHODS: Wallerian degeneration was induced by transecting the rat sciatic nerve, and tissue samples from the distal stump were obtained 0.2, 0.4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 15 days post-transection. Ultrathin sections were prepared for electron microscopy to study ultrastructure and enzyme cytochemistry staining. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ultrastructure (axon body, autophagic body, and cystoskeleton) of axons and myelin sheaths observed with electron microscopy; acidic phosphatase activity detected by Gomori staining using electron microscopy. RESULTS: The major changes of degenerating axons after transection were axoplasm swelling and separation of axons from their myelin sheath between five hours and two days post-transection. At four days post-transection, the axoplasm condensed and axons were completely separated from the myelin sheath, forming dissociative axon bodies. Vacuoles of different sizes formed in axons during the early phase after lesion. Larger dissociative axon bodies were formed when the axons were completely separated from the myelin sheath during a late phase. The axolemma

  9. Molecular analysis of axon repulsion by the notochord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher N G; Ohta, Kunimasa; Quick, Marie M; Fleming, Angeleen; Keynes, Roger; Tannahill, David

    2003-03-01

    During development of the amniote peripheral nervous system, the initial trajectory of primary sensory axons is determined largely by the action of axon repellents. We have shown previously that tissues flanking dorsal root ganglia, the notochord lying medially and the dermamyotomes lying laterally, are sources of secreted molecules that prevent axons from entering inappropriate territories. Although there is evidence suggesting that SEMA3A contributes to the repellent activity of the dermamyotome, the nature of the activity secreted by the notochord remains undetermined. We have employed an expression cloning strategy to search for axon repellents secreted by the notochord, and have identified SEMA3A as a candidate repellent. Moreover, using a spectrum of different axon populations to assay the notochord activity, together with neuropilin/Fc receptor reagents to block semaphorin activity in collagen gel assays, we show that SEMA3A probably contributes to notochord-mediated repulsion. Sympathetic axons that normally avoid the midline in vivo are also repelled, in part, by a semaphorin-based notochord activity. Although our results implicate semaphorin signalling in mediating repulsion by the notochord, repulsion of early dorsal root ganglion axons is only partially blocked when using neuropilin/Fc reagents. Moreover, retinal axons, which are insensitive to SEMA3A, are also repelled by the notochord. We conclude that multiple factors act in concert to guide axons in this system, and that further notochord repellents remain to be identified.

  10. Crossing the Border: Molecular Control of Motor Axon Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Bravo-Ambrosio

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms heavily rely on the function of motor circuits for their survival and for adapting to ever-changing environments. Unique among central nervous system (CNS neurons, motor neurons (MNs project their axons out of the CNS. Once in the periphery, motor axons navigate along highly stereotyped trajectories, often at considerable distances from their cell bodies, to innervate appropriate muscle targets. A key decision made by pathfinding motor axons is whether to exit the CNS through dorsal or ventral motor exit points (MEPs. In contrast to the major advances made in understanding the mechanisms that regulate the specification of MN subtypes and the innervation of limb muscles, remarkably little is known about how MN axons project out of the CNS. Nevertheless, a limited number of studies, mainly in Drosophila, have identified transcription factors, and in some cases candidate downstream effector molecules, that are required for motor axons to exit the spinal cord. Notably, specialized neural crest cell derivatives, referred to as Boundary Cap (BC cells, pre-figure and demarcate MEPs in vertebrates. Surprisingly, however, BC cells are not required for MN axon exit, but rather restrict MN cell bodies from ectopically migrating along their axons out of the CNS. Here, we describe the small set of studies that have addressed motor axon exit in Drosophila and vertebrates, and discuss our fragmentary knowledge of the mechanisms, which guide motor axons out of the CNS.

  11. Fast axonal transport in early experimental disc edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-02-01

    Previous work has documented impairment of slow axonal transport in papilledema, but the abnormalities in rapid transport were less certain. Therefore fast axonal transport was studied in 19 primate eyes subjected to ocular hypotony for 6 to 72 hr following surgical fistulization of the anterior chamber. Mild, irregular alterations in fast axonal transport were detected only after nerve head swelling was apparent. These changes in fast transport mechanisms in cases of nerve head edema occur after, and may be secondary to, impaired slow axoplasmic flow and the resultant axonal swelling. Furthermore, since prolonged complete interruption of axonal transport is theoretically inconsistent with the continued normal neuron function characteristic of papilledema and, moreover, since previous data shows a "slowdown" rather than complete blockade of axonal transport in papilledema, it is likely that in eyes with papilledema there does not exist a complete flock of axonal transport. Therefore we hypothesize that the swelling results when slow axoplasmic flow is locally slowed down but not totally stopped, with the axon distention producing secondary mild, irregular changes in fast axonal transport.

  12. Differences in excitability properties of FDI and ADM motor axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong Seok; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Kanai, Kazuaki; Isose, Sagiri; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    The first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles are innervated by the same ulnar nerve, but studies have shown that the former is much more severely affected in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, threshold tracking was used to investigate whether membrane properties differ between FDI and ADM motor axons. In 12 normal subjects, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from FDI and ADM after ulnar nerve stimulation at the wrist. The strength-duration time constant was significantly longer in the FDI axons than in the ADM axons, and latent addition studies showed greater threshold changes at the conditioning-test stimulus of 0.2 ms in FDI than in ADM axons. These findings suggest that nodal persistent sodium conductances are more prominent in FDI axons than in ADM axons, and therefore excitability is physiologically higher in FDI axons. Even in the same nerve at the same sites, membrane properties of FDI and ADM motor axons differ significantly, and thus their axonal/neuronal responses to disease may also differ.

  13. Present status of studies on diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Ma; Chonggong Zhang; Yi Li

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explain the present status of study on diffuse axonal injury,investigate its pathogenesis and pathophysiological changes ,and suggest principles for the diagnosis and treatment.DATA SOURCES: Articles about diffuse axonal injury published in English from January 1994 to October 2006 were searched in Pubmed database using the keywords of "diffuse axonal injury,pathogenesis,therapy".STUDY SELECTION: The collected articles were primarily screened to select those associated with diffuse axonal injury,the obviously irrelated articles were excluded,and the rest ones were retrieved manually,and the full-texes were searched.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 98 articles were collected,41 of them were involved.and the other 57 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: Diffuse axonal injury is mainly caused by acceleratory or deceleratory injury,and its pathophysiological change is a progressive duration,local axonal injury finally develops to axonal breakage,mainly includes inactivation of natrium channel,intracellular Ca2+ overloading,activation of calcium protease,caspase etc.,and mitochondrial injury.At present,there is still lack of effective therapeutic methods for diffuse axonal injury,so we should actively explore more effective methods to relieve the pain of patients and improve their prognosis.CONCLUSION: At present,diffuse axonal injury has not attracted enough attentions in China,the mechanisms for its diagnosis and attack are still unclear,and the treatments are mainly aiming at the symptoms.

  14. Axonal regeneration and development of de novo axons from distal dendrites of adult feline commissural interneurons after a proximal axotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenrich, Keith K; Skelton, Nicole; MacDermid, Victoria E

    2007-01-01

    at 4-5 weeks post injury. The somata of axotomized CINs were identified by the presence of immunoreactivity for the axonal growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Nearly half of the CINs had de novo axons that emerged from distal dendrites. These axons lacked immunoreactivity for the dendritic protein......Following proximal axotomy, several types of neurons sprout de novo axons from distal dendrites. These processes may represent a means of forming new circuits following spinal cord injury. However, it is not know whether mammalian spinal interneurons, axotomized as a result of a spinal cord injury......, develop de novo axons. Our goal was to determine whether spinal commissural interneurons (CINs), axotomized by 3-4-mm midsagittal transection at C3, form de novo axons from distal dendrites. All experiments were performed on adult cats. CINs in C3 were stained with extracellular injections of Neurobiotin...

  15. White-matter astrocytes, axonal energy metabolism, and axonal degeneration in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambron, Melissa; D'haeseleer, Miguel; Laureys, Guy; Clinckers, Ralph; Debruyne, Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a diffuse axonal degeneration occurring throughout the white matter of the central nervous system causes progressive neurologic disability. The underlying mechanism is unclear. This review describes a number of pathways by which dysfunctional astrocytes in M

  16. Why Are Sensory Axons More Vulnerable for Ischemia than Motor Axons?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Franssen, H.; van Schelven, L.J.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    Objective:In common peripheral neuropathies, sensory symptoms usually prevail over motor symptoms. This predominance of sensory symptoms may result from higher sensitivity of sensory axons to ischemia.Methods:We measured median nerve compound sensory action potentials (CSAPs), compound muscle action

  17. IMP2 axonal localization, RNA interactome, and function in the development of axon trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preitner, Nicolas; Quan, Jie; Li, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    RNA-based regulatory mechanisms play important roles in the development and plasticity of neural circuits and neurological disease. Developing axons provide a model well suited to the study of RNA-based regulation, and contain specific subsets of mRNAs that are locally translated and have roles i...

  18. Quantification of the impact of single and multiple mild stresses on outgrowth heterogeneity of Bacillus cereus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Melis, C C J; den Besten, H M W; Nierop Groot, M N; Abee, T

    2014-05-02

    Outgrowth heterogeneity of bacterial spore populations complicates both prediction and efficient control of spore outgrowth. In this study, the impact of mild preservation stresses on outgrowth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was quantified during the first stages of outgrowth. Heterogeneity in outgrowth of heat-treated (90°C for 10 min) and non-heat-treated germinated single spores to the maximum micro-colony stage of 256 cells was assessed by direct imaging on Anopore strips, placed on BHI plates at pH7 and pH5.5, without and with added NaCl or sorbic acid (HSA). At pH7 non-heated and heat-treated germinated spores required 6h to reach the maximum microcolony stage with limited heterogeneity, and these parameters were only slightly affected with both types of spores when incubated at pH7 with added NaCl. Notably, the most pronounced effects were observed during outgrowth of spores at pH5.5 without and with added NaCl or HSA. Non-heat-treated germinated spores showed again efficient outgrowth with limited heterogeneity reaching the maximum microcolony stage after 6h at pH5.5, which increased to 12h and 16 h with added NaCl and HSA, respectively. In contrast, heat-treated spores displayed a strong delay between initial germination and swelling and further outgrowth at pH5.5, resulting in large heterogeneity and low numbers of fastest growers reaching the maximum microcolony stage after 10, 12 and 24h, without and with added NaCl or HSA, respectively. This work shows that Anopore technology provides quantitative information on the impact of combined preservation stresses on outgrowth of single spores, showing that outgrowth of germinated heat-treated spores is significantly affected at pH5.5 with a large fraction of spores arrested in the early outgrowth stage, and with outgrowing cells showing large heterogeneity with only a small fraction committed to relatively fast outgrowth.

  19. AxonPacking: An Open-Source Software to Simulate Arrangements of Axons in White Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingasson, Tom; Duval, Tanguy; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS AxonPacking: Open-source software for simulating white matter microstructure.Validation on a theoretical disk packing problem.Reproducible and stable for various densities and diameter distributions.Can be used to study interplay between myelin/fiber density and restricted fraction. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can provide parameters that describe white matter microstructure, such as the fiber volume fraction (FVF), the myelin volume fraction (MVF) or the axon volume fraction (AVF) via the fraction of restricted water (fr). While already being used for clinical application, the complex interplay between these parameters requires thorough validation via simulations. These simulations required a realistic, controlled and adaptable model of the white matter axons with the surrounding myelin sheath. While there already exist useful algorithms to perform this task, none of them combine optimisation of axon packing, presence of myelin sheath and availability as free and open source software. Here, we introduce a novel disk packing algorithm that addresses these issues. The performance of the algorithm is tested in term of reproducibility over 50 runs, resulting density, and stability over iterations. This tool was then used to derive multiple values of FVF and to study the impact of this parameter on fr and MVF in light of the known microstructure based on histology sample. The standard deviation of the axon density over runs was lower than 10−3 and the expected hexagonal packing for monodisperse disks was obtained with a density close to the optimal density (obtained: 0.892, theoretical: 0.907). Using an FVF ranging within [0.58, 0.82] and a mean inter-axon gap ranging within [0.1, 1.1] μm, MVF ranged within [0.32, 0.44] and fr ranged within [0.39, 0.71], which is consistent with the histology. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the open-source software AxonPacking (https://github.com/neuropoly/axonpacking) and can be useful for

  20. AxonPacking: An Open-Source Software to Simulate Arrangements of Axons in White Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingasson, Tom; Duval, Tanguy; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS AxonPacking: Open-source software for simulating white matter microstructure.Validation on a theoretical disk packing problem.Reproducible and stable for various densities and diameter distributions.Can be used to study interplay between myelin/fiber density and restricted fraction. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can provide parameters that describe white matter microstructure, such as the fiber volume fraction (FVF), the myelin volume fraction (MVF) or the axon volume fraction (AVF) via the fraction of restricted water (fr). While already being used for clinical application, the complex interplay between these parameters requires thorough validation via simulations. These simulations required a realistic, controlled and adaptable model of the white matter axons with the surrounding myelin sheath. While there already exist useful algorithms to perform this task, none of them combine optimisation of axon packing, presence of myelin sheath and availability as free and open source software. Here, we introduce a novel disk packing algorithm that addresses these issues. The performance of the algorithm is tested in term of reproducibility over 50 runs, resulting density, and stability over iterations. This tool was then used to derive multiple values of FVF and to study the impact of this parameter on fr and MVF in light of the known microstructure based on histology sample. The standard deviation of the axon density over runs was lower than 10(-3) and the expected hexagonal packing for monodisperse disks was obtained with a density close to the optimal density (obtained: 0.892, theoretical: 0.907). Using an FVF ranging within [0.58, 0.82] and a mean inter-axon gap ranging within [0.1, 1.1] μm, MVF ranged within [0.32, 0.44] and fr ranged within [0.39, 0.71], which is consistent with the histology. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the open-source software AxonPacking (https://github.com/neuropoly/axonpacking) and can be useful for

  1. Human neural precursor cells express low levels of telomerase in vitro and show diminishing cell proliferation with extensive axonal outgrowth following transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostenfeld, T; Caldwell, MA; Prowse, KR; Linskens, MH; Jauniaux, E; Svendsen, CN; Prowse, Karen R.; Svendsen, Clive N.

    Worldwide attention. is presently focused on proliferating populations of neural precursor cells as an in vitro source of tissue for neural transplantation and brain repair. However, successful neuroreconstruction is contingent upon their capacity to integrate within the host CNS and the absence of

  2. Exercise dependent increase in axon regeneration into peripheral nerve grafts by propriospinal but not sensory neurons after spinal cord injury is associated with modulation of regeneration-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Rahul; Theisen, Catherine C; Ninan, Vinu; Twiss, Jeffery L; Houlé, John D

    2016-02-01

    Insufficient regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) axons contributes to persisting neurological dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI). Peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) support regeneration by thousands of injured intraspinal axons and help them bypass some of the extracellular barriers that form after SCI. However this number represents but a small portion of the total number of axons that are injured. Here we tested if rhythmic sensory stimulation during cycling exercise would boost the intrinsic regenerative state of neurons to enhance axon regeneration into PNGs after a lower thoracic (T12) spinal transection of adult rats. Using True Blue retrograde tracing, we show that 4 weeks of cycling improves regeneration into a PNG from lumbar interneurons but not by primary sensory neurons. The majority of neurons that regenerate their axon are within 5 mm of the lesion and their number increased 70% with exercise. Importantly propriospinal neurons in more distant regions (5-20 mm from the lesion) that routinely exhibit very limited regeneration responded to exercise by increasing the number of regenerating neurons by 900%. There was no exercise-associated increase in regeneration from sensory neurons. Analyses using fluorescent in situ hybridization showed that this increase in regenerative response is associated with changes in levels of mRNAs encoding the regeneration associated genes (RAGs) GAP43, β-actin and Neuritin. While propriospinal neurons showed increased mRNA levels in response to SCI alone and then to grafting and exercise, sensory neurons did not respond to SCI, but there was a response to the presence of a PNG. Thus, exercise is a non-invasive approach to modulate gene expression in injured neurons leading to an increase in regeneration. This sets the stage for future studies to test whether exercise will promote axon outgrowth beyond the PNG and reconnection with spinal cord neurons, thereby demonstrating a potential clinical application of

  3. Differential extraction of axonally transported proteoglycans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, J.S. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Axonally transported proteoglycans were differentially solubilized by a sequence of extractions designed to infer their relationship to nerve terminal membranes. Groups of goldfish were injected unilaterally with 35SO4 and contralateral optic tecta containing axonally transported molecules were removed 16 h later. Tecta were homogenized in isotonic buffer and centrifuged at 100,000 g for 60 min to create a total supernatant fraction. Subsequent homogenizations followed by recentrifugation were with hypotonic buffer (lysis extract), 1 M NaCl, Triton X-100 or alternatively Triton-1 M NaCl. Populations of proteoglycans in each extract were isolated on DEAE ion exchange columns and evaluated for content of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Results show the distribution of transported proteoglycans to be 26.3% total soluble, 13.7% lysis extract, 13.8% NaCl extract, 12.2% Triton extract, and 46.2% Triton-NaCl extract. Proteoglycans from all fractions contained heparan sulfate as the predominant GAG, with lesser amounts of chondroitin (4 or 6) sulfate. The possible localizations of transported proteoglycans suggested by the extraction results are discussed.

  4. Cerebellum tunes the excitability of the motor system: evidence from peripheral motor axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodera, Hiroyuki; Manto, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Cerebellum is highly connected with the contralateral cerebral cortex. So far, the motor deficits observed in acute focal cerebellar lesions in human have been mainly explained on the basis of a disruption of the cerebello-thalamo-cortical projections. Cerebellar circuits have also numerous anatomical and functional interactions with brainstem nuclei and projects also directly to the spinal cord. Cerebellar lesions alter the excitability of peripheral motor axons as demonstrated by peripheral motor threshold-tracking techniques in cerebellar stroke. The biophysical changes are correlated with the functional scores. Nerve excitability measurements represent an attractive tool to extract the rules underlying the tuning of excitability of the motor pathways by the cerebellum and to discover the contributions of each cerebellar nucleus in this key function, contributing to early plasticity and sensorimotor learning.

  5. Human neural stem cells promote corticospinal axons regeneration and synapse reformation in injured spinal cord of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Peng; JIN Lian-hong; LIANG Tao; LIU En-zhong; ZHAO Shi-guang

    2006-01-01

    Background Axonal regeneration in lesioned mammalian central nervous system is abortive, and this causes permanent disabilities in individuals with spinal cord injuries. This paper studied the action of neural stem cell (NSC) in promoting corticospinal axons regeneration and synapse reformation in rats with injured spinal cord.Methods NSCs were isolated from the cortical tissue of spontaneous aborted human fetuses in accordance with the ethical request. The cells were discarded from the NSC culture to acquire NSC-conditioned medium. Sixty adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=15 in each): NSC graft, NSC medium, graft control and medium control groups. Microsurgical transection of the spinal cord was performed in all the rats at the T11. The NSC graft group received stereotaxic injections of NSCs suspension into both the spinal cord stumps immediately after transection; graft control group received DMEM injection. In NSC medium group,NSC-conditioned medium was administered into the spinal cord every week; NSC culture medium was administered to the medium control group. Hindlimb motor function was assessed using the BBB Locomotor Rating Scale. Regeneration of biotin dextran amine (BDA) labeled corticospinal tract was assessed. Differentiation of NSCs and the expression of synaptophysin at the distal end of the injured spinal cord were observed under a confocal microscope. Group comparisons of behavioral data were analyzed with ANOVA.Results NSCs transplantation resulted in extensive growth of corticospinal axons and locomotor recovery in adult rats after complete spinal cord transection, the mean BBB scores reached 12.5 in NSC graft group and 2.5 in graft control group (P< 0.05). There was also significant difference in BBB score between the NSC medium (11.7) and medium control groups (3.7, P< 0.05). BDA traces regenerated fibers sprouted across the lesion site and entered the caudal part of the spinal cord. Synaptophysin expression

  6. The axon-glia unit in white matter stroke: mechanisms of damage and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Shira; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-10-14

    Approximately one quarter of all strokes in humans occur in white matter, and the progressive nature of white matter lesions often results in severe physical and mental disability. Unlike cortical grey matter stroke, the pathology of white matter stroke revolves around disrupted connectivity and injured axons and glial cells, rather than neuronal cell bodies. Consequently, the mechanisms behind ischemic damage to white matter elements, the regenerative responses of glial cells and their signaling pathways, all differ significantly from those in grey matter. Development of effective therapies for white matter stroke would require an enhanced understanding of the complex cellular and molecular interactions within the white matter, leading to the identification of new therapeutic targets. This review will address the unique properties of the axon-glia unit during white matter stroke, describe the challenging process of promoting effective white matter repair, and discuss recently-identified signaling pathways which may hold potential targets for repair in this disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke.

  7. Convergent differential regulation of SLIT-ROBO axon guidance genes in the brains of vocal learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Chun-Chun; Hara, Erina; Rivas, Miriam V; Roulhac, Petra L; Howard, Jason T; Chakraborty, Mukta; Audet, Jean-Nicolas; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-04-15

    Only a few distantly related mammals and birds have the trait of complex vocal learning, which is the ability to imitate novel sounds. This ability is critical for speech acquisition and production in humans, and is attributed to specialized forebrain vocal control circuits that have several unique connections relative to adjacent brain circuits. As a result, it has been hypothesized that there could exist convergent changes in genes involved in neural connectivity of vocal learning circuits. In support of this hypothesis, expanding on our related study (Pfenning et al. [2014] Science 346: 1256846), here we show that the forebrain part of this circuit that makes a relatively rare direct connection to brainstem vocal motor neurons in independent lineages of vocal learning birds (songbird, parrot, and hummingbird) has specialized regulation of axon guidance genes from the SLIT-ROBO molecular pathway. The SLIT1 ligand was differentially downregulated in the motor song output nucleus that makes the direct projection, whereas its receptor ROBO1 was developmentally upregulated during critical periods for vocal learning. Vocal nonlearning bird species and male mice, which have much more limited vocal plasticity and associated circuits, did not show comparable specialized regulation of SLIT-ROBO genes in their nonvocal motor cortical regions. These findings are consistent with SLIT and ROBO gene dysfunctions associated with autism, dyslexia, and speech sound language disorders and suggest that convergent evolution of vocal learning was associated with convergent changes in the SLIT-ROBO axon guidance pathway.

  8. Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    TITLE: Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Alan Plunkett, Ph.D. Martin...TYPE FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Sept 2011 - 1 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration...available that restore motor impairments resulting fromspinal cord injury (SCI). Soldiers with SCI are permanently paralyzed and in needof lifelong care

  9. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total l...

  10. Neuronal Logistics : Axonal Transport in Development and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van den Berg (Robert)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractBrain cells are uniquely shaped among the many cell types of the body. While most cells are more or less rounded or square-shaped, neurons grow one or more long axons that can reach lengths of a meter or more. To keep these axons alive and functional, neurons are dependent on an intr

  11. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J.; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38±0.06 compared to 1.91±0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  12. LYRATE is a key regulator of leaflet initiation and lamina outgrowth in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Koenig, Daniel; Sinha, Neelima R

    2009-10-01

    Development of the flattened laminar structure in plant leaves requires highly regulated cell division and expansion patterns. Although tight regulation of these processes is essential during leaf development, leaf shape is highly diverse across the plant kingdom, implying that patterning of growth must be amenable to evolutionary change. Here, we describe the molecular identification of the classical tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant lyrate, which is impaired in outgrowth of leaflet primodia and laminar tissues during compound leaf development. We found that the lyrate phenotype results from a loss-of-function mutation of the tomato JAGGED homolog, a well-described positive regulator of cell division in lateral organs. We demonstrate that LYRATE coordinates lateral outgrowth in the compound leaves of tomato by interacting with both the KNOX and auxin transcriptional networks and suggest that evolutionary changes in LYRATE expression may contribute to the fundamental difference between compound and simple leaves.

  13. Guaifenesin derivatives promote neurite outgrowth and protect diabetic mice from neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadimani, Mallinath B; Purohit, Meena K; Vanampally, Chandrashaker; Van der Ploeg, Randy; Arballo, Victor; Morrow, Dwane; Frizzi, Katie E; Calcutt, Nigel A; Fernyhough, Paul; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2013-06-27

    In diabetic patients, an early index of peripheral neuropathy is the slowing of conduction velocity in large myelinated neurons and a lack of understanding of the basic pathogenic mechanisms hindered therapeutics development. Racemic (R/S)-guaifenesin (1) was identified as a potent enhancer of neurite outgrowth using an in vitro screen. Its R-enantiomer (R)-1 carried the most biological activity, whereas the S-enantiomer (S)-1 was inactive. Focused structural variations to (R/S)-1 was conducted to identify potentially essential groups for the neurite outgrowth activity. In vivo therapeutic studies indicated that both (R/S)-1 and (R)-1 partially prevented motor nerve conduction velocity slowing in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. In vitro microsomal assays suggested that compounds (R)-1 and (S)-1 are not metabolized rapidly, and PAMPA assay indicated moderate permeability through the membrane. Findings revealed here could lead to the development of novel drugs for diabetic neuropathy.

  14. Synthetic polymers active against Clostridium difficile vegetative cell growth and spore outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Runhui; Suárez, Jose M; Weisblum, Bernard; Gellman, Samuel H; McBride, Shonna M

    2014-10-15

    Nylon-3 polymers (poly-β-peptides) have been investigated as synthetic mimics of host-defense peptides in recent years. These polymers are attractive because they are much easier to synthesize than are the peptides themselves, and the polymers resist proteolysis. Here we describe in vitro analysis of selected nylon-3 copolymers against Clostridium difficile, an important nosocomial pathogen that causes highly infectious diarrheal disease. The best polymers match the human host-defense peptide LL-37 in blocking vegetative cell growth and inhibiting spore outgrowth. The polymers and LL-37 were effective against both the epidemic 027 ribotype and the 012 ribotype. In contrast, neither vancomycin nor nisin inhibited outgrowth for the 012 ribotype. The best polymer was less hemolytic than LL-37. Overall, these findings suggest that nylon-3 copolymers may be useful for combatting C. difficle.

  15. Neurite outgrowth-promoting active constituents of the Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Masanori; Ikeda, Ryuya; Gao, Hui Yuan; Muto, Norio; Otaki, Keisuke; Sano, Toshikazu; Kawahara, Nobuo; Nakane, Takahisa

    2008-01-01

    In the screening of biologically active constituents from woody plants, the methanol extract of leaves of Chamaecyparis obtusa showed potent neurite outgrowth-promoting activity in neuronal PC12 cells. The ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of the methanol extract showed potent activity and was separated by means of various chromatographic methods to give the two new compounds 1 and 2, as well as 11 known lignan and sesquiterpene derivatives. The structures of the new compounds were determined to be 9-O-acetyldihydrosesamin (1) and 9-O-(11-hydroxyeudesman-4-yl)dihydrosesamin (2), respectively, in NMR studies including 2D-NMR experiments. Of the 13 compounds, the known compound hinokinin (5) and the new compound 2 showed potent neurite outgrowth-promoting activity in PC 12 cells.

  16. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J. E-mail: masdingj@nus.edu.sg; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y.M

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38{+-}0.06 compared to 1.91{+-}0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  17. Large enhancement in neurite outgrowth on a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo; Luo, Shyh-Chyang; Zhao, Haichao; Lin, Hsing-An; Sekine, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Chen, Chi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Yu, Hsiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Although electrically stimulated neurite outgrowth on bioelectronic devices is a promising means of nerve regeneration, immunogenic scar formation can insulate electrodes from targeted cells and tissues, thereby reducing the lifetime of the device. Ideally, an electrode material capable of electrically interfacing with neurons selectively and efficiently would be integrated without being recognized by the immune system and minimize its response. Here we develop a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer possessing several attractive features. This polymer displays high resistance towards nonspecific enzyme/cell binding and recognizes targeted cells specifically to allow intimate electrical communication over long periods of time. Its low electrical impedance relays electrical signals efficiently. This material is capable to integrate biochemical and electrical stimulation to promote neural cellular behaviour. Neurite outgrowth is enhanced greatly on this new conducting polymer; in addition, electrically stimulated secretion of proteins from primary Schwann cells can also occur on it.

  18. Terpenoids with neurite outgrowth-promoting activity from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xin-Hui; Yue, Rong-Cai; Fang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guo-Wei; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Shen, Yun-Heng

    2016-05-01

    Eighteen terpenoids (1-18) were isolated from Illicium merrillianum. Compound 1 was identified as new compound, and its structure was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All compounds were evaluated for nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated neurite outgrowth activity using rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells as a model system of neuronal differentiation. Compounds 1, 3, 18 showed significant neurite outgrowth-promoting activity in the presence of 20 ng/ml NGF in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations of 1-100 μM after 24-h treatment. Subtle difference of functional groups at C-2 position in hopane-type triterpene resulted in enormous bioactivity difference, compound 1 was neurotrophic but 2 was cytotoxic.

  19. Quantitative assessment of neurite outgrowth in human embryonic stem-cell derived neurons using automated high-content image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    During development neurons undergo a number of morphological changes including neurite outgrowth from the cell body. Exposure to neurotoxicants that interfere with this process may cause in permanent deficits in nervous system function. While many studies have used rodent primary...

  20. Increased Human Wildtype Tau Attenuates Axonal Transport Deficits Caused by Loss of APP in Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Karen D.B.; Erica Peethumnongsin; Han Lin; Hui Zheng; Pautler, Robia G.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is implicated in axonal elongation, synaptic plasticity, and axonal transport. However, the role of APP on axonal transport in conjunction with the microtubule associated protein tau continues to be debated. Here we measured in vivo axonal transport in APP knockout mice with Manganese Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to determine whether APP is necessary for maintaining normal axonal transport. We also tested how overexpression and mutations of tau affect axonal transport ...

  1. Cortical inputs innervate calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons of the rat basolateral amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Gunes; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland; Paré, Denis

    2014-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to shed light on the synaptic organization of the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA). The BLA contains multiple types of GABAergic interneurons that are differentially connected with extrinsic afferents and other BLA cells. Previously, it was reported that parvalbumin immunoreactive (PV(+) ) interneurons receive strong excitatory inputs from principal BLA cells but very few cortical inputs, implying a prevalent role in feedback inhibition. However, because prior physiological studies indicate that cortical afferents do trigger feedforward inhibition in principal cells, the present study aimed to determine whether a numerically important subtype of interneurons, expressing calbindin (CB(+) ), receives cortical inputs. Rats received injections of the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHAL) in the perirhinal cortex or adjacent temporal neocortex. Light and electron microscopic observations of the relations between cortical inputs and BLA neurons were performed in the lateral (LA) and basolateral (BL) nuclei. Irrespective of the injection site (perirhinal or temporal neocortex) and target nucleus (LA or BL), ~90% of cortical axon terminals formed asymmetric synapses with dendritic spines of principal BLA neurons, while 10% contacted the dendritic shafts of presumed interneurons, half of which were CB(+) . Given the previously reported pattern of CB coexpression among GABAergic interneurons of the BLA, these results suggest that a subset of PV-immunonegative cells that express CB, most likely the somatostatin-positive interneurons, are important mediators of cortically evoked feedforward inhibition in the BLA.

  2. Rap1GAP interacts with RET and suppresses GDNF-induced neurite outgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jiao; Yong Zhang; Chun Hu; Yong-Gang Wang; Aijun Huang; Cheng He

    2011-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor(GDNF)was originally recognized for its ability to promote survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons,but it has since been demonstrated to be crucial for the survival and differentiation of many neuronal subpopulations,including motor neurons,sympathetic neurons,sensory neurons and enteric neurons.To identify possible effectors or regulators of GDNF signaling,we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using the intracellular domain of RET,the common signaling receptor of the GDNF family,as bait.Using this approach,we identified RaplGAP,a GTPase-activating protein(GAP)for Rap1,as a novel RET-binding protein.Endogenous RaplGAP co-immunoprecipitated with RET in neural tissues,and RET and RaplGAP were co-expressed in dopaminergic neurons of the mesencephalon,in addition,overexpression of RaplGAP attenuated GDNF-induced neurite outgrowth,whereas suppressing the expression of endogenous RaplGAP by RNAi enhanced neurite outgrowth.Furthermore,using co-immunoprecipitation analyses,we found that the interaction between RET and RaplGAP was enhanced following GDNF treatment.Mutagenesis analysis revealed that Tyr981 in the intracellular domain of RET was crucial for the interaction with RapiGAP.Moreover,we found that RaplGAP negatively regulatedGNDFinduced ERK activation and neurite outgrowth.Taken together,our results suggest the involvement of a novel interaction of RET with Rap l GAP in the regulation of GDNF-mediated neurite outgrowth.

  3. Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 in neurite outgrowth from spiral ganglion neurons in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    García-Hernández, Sofía; Potashner, Steven J.; Morest, D. Kent

    2013-01-01

    Many neurons degenerate after injuries resulting from overstimulation, drugs, genetic mutations, and aging. Although several growth factors and neurotrophins delay degeneration and promote regrowth of neural processes, the role of fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) in mammalian spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) neurite outgrowth has not been examined. This study develops and uses SGN cell cultures suitable for experimental analysis, it investigates whether FGF8a and FGF8b isoforms affect the neuri...

  4. Associations of unilateral whisker and olfactory signals induce synapse formation and memory cell recruitment in bilateral barrel cortices: cellular mechanism for unilateral training toward bilateral memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilong Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveals the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory.

  5. Associations of Unilateral Whisker and Olfactory Signals Induce Synapse Formation and Memory Cell Recruitment in Bilateral Barrel Cortices: Cellular Mechanism for Unilateral Training Toward Bilateral Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zilong; Chen, Lei; Fan, Ruicheng; Lu, Wei; Wang, Dangui; Cui, Shan; Huang, Li; Zhao, Shidi; Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex (CBC) were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveal the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory. PMID:28018178

  6. Coordinate expression of IGF-I and its receptor during limb outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geduspan, J S; Padanilam, B J; Solursh, M

    1992-09-01

    The morphogenetic mechanisms involved in shaping the embyro are largely unknown. Previous studies from this laboratory suggest that the mesonephros promotes limb outgrowth in ovo in the chicken embryo and might be involved in early limb morphogenesis, since damage to the mesonephros results in truncated limbs. In limb bud organ cultures, the presence of the mesonephros promotes cartilage formation. This effect can be reproduced by exogenous IGF-I or prevented by blocking antibody to IGF-I. In order to examine the hypothesis that mesonephros-derived IGF-I is involved in the early morphogenesis of the limb, we examined the spatial and temporal expression of IGF-I and type I receptor for IGF by in situ hybridization at stages when the onset of limb development occurs. The results show that neither transcript is detected at stage 13, prior to the appearance of the limb bud; but both transcripts are detected in the mesonephros at stage 14, an early stage in limb outgrowth. The hybridization signal in the mesonephros for both transcripts increases with development and signal was codistributed as well. At stage 18 the level of receptor transcripts detected in the flank relative to the limb decreased. Thus, the temporal and spatial patterns of expression of IGF-I and its receptor are consistent with their involvement in the initiation of limb outgrowth and support the model that localized expression of a growth factor and its receptor can be involved in shaping the embryo.

  7. Spatial and molecular cues for cell outgrowth during C. elegans uterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Srimoyee; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-12-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans uterine seam cell (utse) is an H-shaped syncytium that connects the uterus to the body wall. Comprising nine nuclei that move outward in a bidirectional manner, this synctium undergoes remarkable shape change during development. Using cell ablation experiments, we show that three surrounding cell types affect utse development: the uterine toroids, the anchor cell and the sex myoblasts. The presence of the anchor cell (AC) nucleus within the utse is necessary for proper utse development and AC invasion genes fos-1, cdh-3, him-4, egl-43, zmp-1 and mig-10 promote utse cell outgrowth. Two types of uterine lumen epithelial cells, uterine toroid 1 (ut1) and uterine toroid 2 (ut2), mediate proper utse outgrowth and we show roles in utse development for two genes expressed in the uterine toroids: the RASEF ortholog rsef-1 and Trio/unc-73. The SM expressed gene unc-53/NAV regulates utse cell shape; ablation of sex myoblasts (SMs), which generate uterine and vulval muscles, cause defects in utse morphology. Our results clarify the nature of the interactions that exist between utse and surrounding tissue, identify new roles for genes involved in cell outgrowth, and present the utse as a new model system for understanding cell shape change and, putatively, diseases associated with cell shape change.

  8. Hydrogel Design for Supporting Neurite Outgrowth and Promoting Gene Delivery to Maximize Neurite Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Stevans, Alyson C.; Holland, Samantha; Wang, Christine E.; Shikanov, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels capable of gene delivery provide a combinatorial approach for nerve regeneration, with the hydrogel supporting neurite outgrowth and gene delivery inducing the expression of inductive factors. This report investigates the design of hydrogels that balance the requirements for supporting neurite growth with those requirements for promoting gene delivery. Enzymatically-degradable PEG hydrogels encapsulating dorsal root ganglia explants, fibroblasts, and lipoplexes encoding nerve growth factor were gelled within channels that can physically guide neurite outgrowth. Transfection of fibroblasts increased with increasing concentration of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion sites and decreasing PEG content. The neurite length increased with increasing RGD concentration within 10% PEG hydrogels, yet was maximal within 7.5% PEG hydrogels at intermediate RGD levels. Delivering lipoplexes within the gel produced longer neurites than culture in NGF-supplemented media or co-culture with cells exposed to DNA prior to encapsulation. Hydrogels designed to support neurite outgrowth and deliver gene therapy vectors locally may ultimately be employed to address multiple barriers that limit regeneration. PMID:22038654

  9. The Role of Bioactive Compounds on the Promotion of Neurite Outgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kug Choi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurite loss is one of the cardinal features of neuronal injury. Apart from neuroprotection, reorganization of the lost neuronal network in the injured brain is necessary for the restoration of normal physiological functions. Neuritogenic activity of endogenous molecules in the brain such as nerve growth factor is well documented and supported by scientific studies which show innumerable compounds having neurite outgrowth activity from natural sources. Since the damaged brain lacks the reconstructive capacity, more efforts in research are focused on the identification of compounds that promote the reformation of neuronal networks. An abundancy of natural resources along with the corresponding activity profiles have shown promising results in the field of neuroscience. Recently, importance has also been placed on understanding neurite formation by natural products in relation to neuronal injury. Arrays of natural herbal products having plentiful active constituents have been found to enhance neurite outgrowth. They act synergistically with neurotrophic factors to promote neuritogenesis in the diseased brain. Therefore use of natural products for neuroregeneration provides new insights in drug development for treating neuronal injury. In this study, various compounds from natural sources with potential neurite outgrowth activity are reviewed in experimental models.

  10. Hedgehog signaling patterns the outgrowth of unpaired skeletal appendages in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlberg Per

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the control of the development of vertebrate unpaired appendages such as the caudal fin, one of the key morphological specializations of fishes. Recent analysis of lamprey and dogshark median fins suggests the co-option of some molecular mechanisms between paired and median in Chondrichthyes. However, the extent to which the molecular mechanisms patterning paired and median fins are shared remains unknown. Results Here we provide molecular description of the initial ontogeny of the median fins in zebrafish and present several independent lines of evidence that Sonic hedgehog signaling emanating from the embryonic midline is essential for establishment and outgrowth of the caudal fin primordium. However, gene expression analysis shows that the primordium of the adult caudal fin does not harbor a Sonic hedgehog-expressing domain equivalent to the Shh secreting zone of polarizing activity (ZPA of paired appendages. Conclusion Our results suggest that Hedgehog proteins can regulate skeletal appendage outgrowth independent of a ZPA and demonstrates an unexpected mechanism for mediating Shh signals in a median fin primordium. The median fins evolved before paired fins in early craniates, thus the patterning of the median fins may be an ancestral mechanism that controls the outgrowth of skeletogenic appendages in vertebrates.

  11. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-07-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells.

  12. Neurite outgrowth in cultured mouse pelvic ganglia - Effects of neurotrophins and bladder tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Mari; Zhu, Baoyi; Swärd, Karl; Uvelius, Bengt

    2017-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors regulate survival and growth of neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated via both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons located in the major pelvic ganglion. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on the sprouting rate of sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites from the female mouse ganglion. The pelvic ganglion was dissected out and attached to a petri dish and cultured in vitro. All three factors (BDNF, NT-3 and NGF) stimulated neurite outgrowth of both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites although BDNF and NT-3 had a higher stimulatory effect on parasympathetic ganglion cells. The neurotrophin receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC were all expressed in neurons of the ganglia. Co-culture of ganglia with urinary bladder tissue, but not diaphragm tissue, increased the sprouting rate of neurites. Active forms of BDNF and NT-3 were detected in urinary bladder tissue using western blotting whereas tissue from the diaphragm expressed NGF. Neurite outgrowth from the pelvic ganglion was inhibited by a TrkB receptor antagonist. We therefore suggest that the urinary bladder releases trophic factors, including BDNF and NT-3, which regulate neurite outgrowth via activation of neuronal Trk-receptors. These findings could influence future strategies for developing pharmaceuticals to improve re-innervation due to bladder pathologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on hippocampal neuronal injury and neurite outgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Liu; Jing He; Liang Huang; Ling Dou; Shuang Wu; Qionglan Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 has been reported to exert anti-aging and anti-neurodegenerative effects. In the present study, we investigate whether ginsenoside Rb1 is involved in neurite outgrowth and neuroprotection against damage induced by amyloid beta (25-35) in cultured hippocampal neu-rons, and explore the underlying mechanisms. Ginsenoside Rb1 significantly increased neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons, and increased the expression of phosphorylated-Akt and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. These effects were abrogated by API-2 and PD98059, inhibitors of the signaling proteins Akt and MEK. Additionally, cultured hippo-campal neurons were exposed to amyloid beta (25-35) for 30 minutes; ginsenoside Rb1 prevented apoptosis induced by amyloid beta (25-35), and this effect was blocked by API-2 and PD98059. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rb1 significantly reversed the reduction in phosphorylated-Akt and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 levels induced by amyloid beta (25-35), and API-2 neutralized the effect of ginsenoside Rb1. The present results indicate that ginsenoside Rb1 enhances neurite outgrowth and protects against neurotoxicity induced by amyloid beta (25-35) via a mechanism involving Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling.

  14. Role of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) in vesicular transport mediating neurite outgrowth.

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    Martinez-Arca, S; Alberts, P; Zahraoui, A; Louvard, D; Galli, T

    2000-05-15

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH(2)-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH(2)-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH(2)-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process.

  15. Plasticity of the Axon Initial Segment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders Victor; Cotel, Florence; Perrier, Jean François

    2017-01-01

    of metabotropic receptors modulates the properties of ion channels expressed at the AIS within seconds and consequently produces fast adjustments of neuronal excitability. Recent results suggest that this plasticity plays important roles in physiological functions as diverse as memory formation, hearing......The axon initial segment (AIS) is a key neuronal compartment because it is responsible for action potential initiation. The local density of Na+ channels, the biophysical properties of K+ channels, as well as the length and diameter of the AIS determine the spiking of neurons. These parameters...... undergo important modifications during development. The development of the AIS is governed by intrinsic mechanisms. In addition, surrounding neuronal networks modify its maturation. As a result, neurons get tuned to particular physiological functions. Neuronal activity also influences the morphology...

  16. Clinical features of diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the mechanism of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) and study the relationship between DAI and brain concussion, brain contusion, and primary brain stem injury.Methods: The clinical data and iconographic characteristics of 56 patients with DAI were analyzed retrospectively.Results: Traffic accidents were the main cause of DAI. Among the 56 cases, 34 were injured for at least twice, and 71.43% of the patients were complicated with contusion.Conclusions: It is considered that DAI is a common pattern of primary brain injury, which is often underestimated. And DAI includes cerebral concussion and primary brain injury, and is often complicated by cerebral cortex contusion. Therefore, it is very simple and practical to divide primary brain injuries into local and diffuse injuries.

  17. Cobalt inhibits motility of axonal mitochondria and induces axonal degeneration in cultured dorsal root ganglion cells of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Tatsumi, Haruyuki

    2017-06-27

    Cobalt is a trace element that localizes in the human body as cobalamin, also known as vitamin B12. Excessive cobalt exposure induces a peripheral neuropathy, the mechanisms of which are yet to be elucidated. We investigated how cobalt may affect mitochondrial motility in primary cultures of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We observed mitochondrial motility by time-lapse imaging after DsRed2 tagging via lentivirus, mitochondrial structure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and axonal swelling using immunocytochemical staining. The concentration of cobaltous ion (Co(2+)) required to significantly suppress mitochondrial motility is lower than that required to induce axonal swelling following a 24-h treatment. Exposure to relatively low concentrations of Co(2+) for 48 h suppressed mitochondrial motility without leading to axonal swelling. TEM images indicated that Co(2+) induces mitochondrial destruction. Our results show that destruction of the axonal mitochondria precedes the axonal degeneration induced by Co(2+) exposure.

  18. A period of structural plasticity at the axon initial segment in developing visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eGutzmann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical networks are shaped by sensory experience and are most susceptible to modifications during critical periods characterized by enhanced plasticity at the structural and functional level. A system particularly well-studied in this context is the mammalian visual system. Plasticity has been documented for the somatodendritic compartment of neurons in detail. A neuronal microdomain not yet studied in this context is the axon initial segment (AIS located at the proximal axon segment. It is a specific electrogenic axonal domain and the site of action potential generation. Recent studies showed that structure and function of the AIS can be dynamically regulated. Here we hypothesize that the AIS shows a dynamic regulation during maturation of the visual cortex. We therefore analyzed AIS length development from embryonic day (E 12.5 to adult