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Sample records for cortex plasticity evokes

  1. Visual cortex plasticity evokes excitatory alterations in the hippocampus

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    Marian Tsanov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The integration of episodic sequences in the hippocampus is believed to occur during theta rhythm episodes, when cortico-hippocampal dialog results in reconfiguration of neuronal assemblies. As the visual cortex (VC is a major source of sensory information to the hippocampus, information processing in the cortex may affect hippocampal network oscillations, facilitating the induction of synaptic modifications. We investigated to what degree the field activity in the primary VC, elicited by sensory or electrical stimulation, correlates with hippocampal oscillatory and synaptic responsiveness, in freely behaving adult rats. We found that the spectral power of theta rhythm (4-10Hz in the dentate gyrus (DG, increases in parallel with high-frequency oscillations in layer 2/3 of the VC and that this correlation depends on the degree of exploratory activity. When we mimic robust thalamocortical activity by theta-burst application to dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, a hippocampal theta increase occurs, followed by a persistent potentiation of the DG granule field population spike. Furthermore, the potentiation of DG neuronal excitability tightly correlates with the concurrently occurring VC plasticity. The concurrent enhancement of VC and DG activity is also combined with a highly negative synchronization between hippocampal and cortical low frequency oscillations. Exploration of familiar environment decreases the degree of this synchrony. Our data propose that novel visual information can induce high-power fluctuations in intrinsic excitability for both VC and hippocampus, potent enough to induce experience-dependent modulation of cortico-hippocampal connections. This interaction may comprise one of the endogenous triggers for long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  2. Visual attentional load influences plasticity in the human motor cortex.

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    Kamke, Marc R; Hall, Michelle G; Lye, Hayley F; Sale, Martin V; Fenlon, Laura R; Carroll, Timothy J; Riek, Stephan; Mattingley, Jason B

    2012-05-16

    Neural plasticity plays a critical role in learning, memory, and recovery from injury to the nervous system. Although much is known about the physical and physiological determinants of plasticity, little is known about the influence of cognitive factors. In this study, we investigated whether selective attention plays a role in modifying changes in neural excitability reflecting long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity. We induced LTP-like effects in the hand area of the human motor cortex using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). During the induction of plasticity, participants engaged in a visual detection task with either low or high attentional demands. Changes in neural excitability were assessed by measuring motor-evoked potentials in a small hand muscle before and after the TMS procedures. In separate experiments plasticity was induced either by paired associative stimulation (PAS) or intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS). Because these procedures induce different forms of LTP-like effects, they allowed us to investigate the generality of any attentional influence on plasticity. In both experiments reliable changes in motor cortex excitability were evident under low-load conditions, but this effect was eliminated under high-attentional load. In a third experiment we investigated whether the attentional task was associated with ongoing changes in the excitability of motor cortex, but found no difference in evoked potentials across the levels of attentional load. Our findings indicate that in addition to their role in modifying sensory processing, mechanisms of attention can also be a potent modulator of cortical plasticity.

  3. Augmenting Plasticity Induction in Human Motor Cortex by Disinhibition Stimulation.

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    Cash, Robin F H; Murakami, Takenobu; Chen, Robert; Thickbroom, Gary W; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Cellular studies showed that disinhibition, evoked pharmacologically or by a suitably timed priming stimulus, can augment long-term plasticity (LTP) induction. We demonstrated previously that transcranial magnetic stimulation evokes a period of presumably GABA(B)ergic late cortical disinhibition (LCD) in human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we hypothesized that, in keeping with cellular studies, LCD can augment LTP-like plasticity in humans. In Experiment 1, patterned repetitive TMS was applied to left M1, consisting of 6 trains (intertrain interval, 8 s) of 4 doublets (interpulse interval equal to individual peak I-wave facilitation, 1.3-1.5 ms) spaced by the individual peak LCD (interdoublet interval (IDI), 200-250 ms). This intervention (total of 48 pulses applied over ∼45 s) increased motor-evoked potential amplitude, a marker of corticospinal excitability, in a right hand muscle by 147% ± 4%. Control experiments showed that IDIs shorter or longer than LCD did not result in LTP-like plasticity. Experiment 2 indicated topographic specificity to the M1 hand region stimulated by TMS and duration of the LTP-like plasticity of 60 min. In conclusion, GABA(B)ergic LCD offers a powerful new approach for augmenting LTP-like plasticity induction in human cortex. We refer to this protocol as disinhibition stimulation (DIS).

  4. Plasticity resembling spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity: the evidence in human cortex

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    Florian Müller-Dahlhaus

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP has been studied extensively in a variety of animal models during the past decade but whether it can be studied at the systems level of the human cortex has been a matter of debate. Only recently newly developed non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS have made it possible to induce and assess timing dependent plasticity in conscious human subjects. This review will present a critical synopsis of these experiments, which suggest that several of the principal characteristics and molecular mechanisms of TMS-induced plasticity correspond to those of STDP as studied at a cellular level. TMS combined with a second phasic stimulation modality can induce bidirectional long-lasting changes in the excitability of the stimulated cortex, whose polarity depends on the order of the associated stimulus-evoked events within a critical time window of tens of milliseconds. Pharmacological evidence suggests an NMDA receptor mediated form of synaptic plasticity. Studies in human motor cortex demonstrated that motor learning significantly modulates TMS-induced timing dependent plasticity, and, conversely, may be modulated bidirectionally by prior TMS-induced plasticity, providing circumstantial evidence that long-term potentiation-like mechanisms may be involved in motor learning. In summary, convergent evidence is being accumulated for the contention that it is now possible to induce STDP-like changes in the intact human central nervous system by means of TMS to study and interfere with synaptic plasticity in neural circuits in the context of behaviour such as learning and memory.

  5. Drug-evoked synaptic plasticity in addiction: from molecular changes to circuit remodeling

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    Lüscher, Christian; Malenka, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Addictive drugs have in common that they target the mesocoticolimbic dopamine (DA) system. This system originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and projects mainly to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we review the effects that such drugs leave on glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission in these three brain areas. We refer to these changes as drug-evoked synaptic plasticity, which outlasts the presence of the drug in the brain and contributes to the reorganization of neural circuits. While in most cases these early changes are not sufficient to induce the disease, with repetitive drug exposure, they may add up and cause addictive behavior. PMID:21338877

  6. Functional Plasticity in Somatosensory Cortex Supports Motor Learning by Observing.

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    McGregor, Heather R; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Gribble, Paul L

    2016-04-04

    An influential idea in neuroscience is that the sensory-motor system is activated when observing the actions of others [1, 2]. This idea has recently been extended to motor learning, in which observation results in sensory-motor plasticity and behavioral changes in both motor and somatosensory domains [3-9]. However, it is unclear how the brain maps visual information onto motor circuits for learning. Here we test the idea that the somatosensory system, and specifically primary somatosensory cortex (S1), plays a role in motor learning by observing. In experiment 1, we applied stimulation to the median nerve to occupy the somatosensory system with unrelated inputs while participants observed a tutor learning to reach in a force field. Stimulation disrupted motor learning by observing in a limb-specific manner. Stimulation delivered to the right arm (the same arm used by the tutor) disrupted learning, whereas left arm stimulation did not. This is consistent with the idea that a somatosensory representation of the observed effector must be available during observation for learning to occur. In experiment 2, we assessed S1 cortical processing before and after observation by measuring somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) associated with median nerve stimulation. SEP amplitudes increased only for participants who observed learning. Moreover, SEPs increased more for participants who exhibited greater motor learning following observation. Taken together, these findings support the idea that motor learning by observing relies on functional plasticity in S1. We propose that visual signals about the movements of others are mapped onto motor circuits for learning via the somatosensory system.

  7. Visual spatial attention has opposite effects on bidirectional plasticity in the human motor cortex.

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    Kamke, Marc R; Ryan, Alexander E; Sale, Martin V; Campbell, Megan E J; Riek, Stephan; Carroll, Timothy J; Mattingley, Jason B

    2014-01-22

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are key mechanisms of synaptic plasticity that are thought to act in concert to shape neural connections. Here we investigated the influence of visual spatial attention on LTP-like and LTD-like plasticity in the human motor cortex. Plasticity was induced using paired associative stimulation (PAS), which involves repeated pairing of peripheral nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation to alter functional responses in the thumb area of the primary motor cortex. PAS-induced changes in cortical excitability were assessed using motor-evoked potentials. During plasticity induction, participants directed their attention to one of two visual stimulus streams located adjacent to each hand. When participants attended to visual stimuli located near the left thumb, which was targeted by PAS, LTP-like increases in excitability were significantly enhanced, and LTD-like decreases in excitability reduced, relative to when they attended instead to stimuli located near the right thumb. These differential effects on (bidirectional) LTP-like and LTD-like plasticity suggest that voluntary visual attention can exert an important influence on the functional organization of the motor cortex. Specifically, attention acts to both enhance the strengthening and suppress the weakening of neural connections representing events that fall within the focus of attention.

  8. Low Doses of Ethanol Enhance LTD-like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex.

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    Fuhl, Anna; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Lücke, Caroline; Toennes, Stefan W; Ziemann, Ulf

    2015-12-01

    Humans liberally use ethanol for its facilitating effects on social interactions but its effects on central nervous system function remain underexplored. We have recently described that very low doses of ethanol abolish long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in human cortex, most likely through enhancement of tonic inhibition [Lücke et al, 2014, Neuropsychopharmacology 39:1508-18]. Here, we studied the effects of low-dose ethanol on long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity. LTD-like plasticity was induced in human motor cortex by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PASLTD), and measured as decreases of motor evoked potential input-output curve (IO-curve). In addition, sedation was measured by decreases in saccade peak velocity (SPV). Ethanol in two low doses (EtOHethanol, easily reached during social drinking, enhance LTD-like plasticity in human cortex. This effect is most likely explained by the activation of extrasynaptic α4-subunit containing gamma-aminobutyric type A receptors by low-dose EtOH, resulting in increased tonic inhibition. Findings may stimulate cellular research on the role of tonic inhibition in regulating excitability and plasticity of cortical neuronal networks.

  9. Homeostatic modulation of stimulation-dependent plasticity in human motor cortex.

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    Ilić, N V; Milanović, S; Krstić, J; Bajec, D D; Grajić, M; Ilić, T V

    2011-01-01

    Since recently, it is possible, using noninvasive cortical stimulation, such as the protocol of paired associative stimulation (PAS), to induce the plastic changes in the motor cortex, in humans that mimic Hebb's model of learning. Application of TMS conjugated with peripheral electrical stimulation at strictly coherent temporal manner lead to convergence of inputs in the sensory-motor cortex, with the consequent synaptic potentiation or weakening, if applied repetitively. However, when optimal interstimulus interval (ISI) for induction of LTP-like effects is applied as a single pair, Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude inhibition is observed, the paradigm known as short-latency afferent inhibition (SLAI). Aiming to resolve this paradox, PAS protocols were applied, with 200 repetitions of TMS pulses paired with median nerve electrical stimulation, at ISI equal to individual latencies of evoked response of somatosensory cortex (N(20)) (PAS(LTP)), and at ISI of N(20) shortened for 5 msec (PAS(LTD)) - protocols that mimic LTP-like changes in the human motor cortex. MEP amplitudes before, during and after interventions were measured as an indicator based on output signals originating from the motor system. Post-intervention MEP amplitudes following the TMS protocols of PAS(LTP) and PAS(LTD) were facilitated and depressed, respectively, contrary to MEP amplitudes during intervention. During PAS(LTP) MEP amplitudes were significantly decreased in case of PAS(LTP), while in the case of PAS(LTD) an upward trend was observed. In conclusions, a possible explanation for the seemingly paradoxical effect of PAS can be found in the mechanism of homeostatic modulation of plasticity. Those findings indicate the existence of complex relationships in the development of plasticity induced by stimulation, depending on the level of the previous motor cortex excitability.

  10. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

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    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood.

  11. Stimulus uncertainty enhances long-term potentiation-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

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    Sale, Martin V; Nydam, Abbey S; Mattingley, Jason B

    2017-03-01

    Plasticity can be induced in human cortex using paired associative stimulation (PAS), which repeatedly and predictably pairs a peripheral electrical stimulus with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the contralateral motor region. Many studies have reported small or inconsistent effects of PAS. Given that uncertain stimuli can promote learning, the predictable nature of the stimulation in conventional PAS paradigms might serve to attenuate plasticity induction. Here, we introduced stimulus uncertainty into the PAS paradigm to investigate if it can boost plasticity induction. Across two experimental sessions, participants (n = 28) received a modified PAS paradigm consisting of a random combination of 90 paired stimuli and 90 unpaired (TMS-only) stimuli. Prior to each of these stimuli, participants also received an auditory cue which either reliably predicted whether the upcoming stimulus was paired or unpaired (no uncertainty condition) or did not predict the upcoming stimulus (maximum uncertainty condition). Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) evoked from abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle quantified cortical excitability before and after PAS. MEP amplitude increased significantly 15 min following PAS in the maximum uncertainty condition. There was no reliable change in MEP amplitude in the no uncertainty condition, nor between post-PAS MEP amplitudes across the two conditions. These results suggest that stimulus uncertainty may provide a novel means to enhance plasticity induction with the PAS paradigm in human motor cortex. To provide further support to the notion that stimulus uncertainty and prediction error promote plasticity, future studies should further explore the time course of these changes, and investigate what aspects of stimulus uncertainty are critical in boosting plasticity.

  12. Dosage-dependent effect of dopamine D2 receptor activation on motor cortex plasticity in humans.

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    Fresnoza, Shane; Stiksrud, Elisabeth; Klinker, Florian; Liebetanz, David; Paulus, Walter; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2014-08-06

    The neuromodulator dopamine plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. The effects depend on receptor subtypes, affinity, concentration level, and the kind of neuroplasticity induced. In animal experiments, dopamine D2-like receptor stimulation revealed partially antagonistic effects on plasticity, which might be explained by dosage dependency. In humans, D2 receptor block abolishes plasticity, and the D2/D3, but predominantly D3, receptor agonist ropinirol has a dosage-dependent nonlinear affect on plasticity. Here we aimed to determine the specific affect of D2 receptor activation on neuroplasticity in humans, because physiological effects of D2 and D3 receptors might differ. Therefore, we combined application of the selective D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine (2.5, 10, and 20 mg or placebo medication) with anodal and cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), which induces nonfocal plasticity, and with paired associative stimulation (PAS) generating a more focal kind of plasticity in the motor cortex of healthy humans. Plasticity was monitored by transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor-evoked potential amplitudes. For facilitatory tDCS, bromocriptine prevented plasticity induction independent from drug dosage. However, its application resulted in an inverted U-shaped dose-response curve on inhibitory tDCS, excitability-diminishing PAS, and to a minor degree on excitability-enhancing PAS. These data support the assumption that modulation of D2-like receptor activity exerts a nonlinear dose-dependent effect on neuroplasticity in the human motor cortex that differs from predominantly D3 receptor activation and that the kind of plasticity-induction procedure is relevant for its specific impact.

  13. Motor Cortex Stimulation Reverses Maladaptive Plasticity Following Spinal Cord Injury

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    2011-09-01

    etic neuralgia [5], brachial plexus, and phantom limb pain [53]. Stimulation of other brain structures has also been used for the treatment of...Verdie JC, Mascott C, Lazorthes Y. Chronic motor cortex stimulation for phantom limb pain: correlations between pain relief and functional imaging...G, Thompson, SM (2008) Maladaptive homeostatic plasticity in a rodent model of central pain syndrome : thalamic hyperexcitability after

  14. Cerebellum to motor cortex paired associative stimulation induces bidirectional STDP-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

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    Lu, Ming-Kuei; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is crucially important for motor control and adaptation. Recent non-invasive brain stimulation studies have indicated the possibility to alter the excitability of the cerebellum and its projections to the contralateral motor cortex, with behavioral consequences on motor control and adaptation. Here we sought to induce bidirectional spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP)-like modifications of motor cortex (M1) excitability by application of paired associative stimulation (PAS) in healthy subjects. Conditioning stimulation over the right lateral cerebellum (CB) preceded focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left M1 hand area at an interstimulus interval of 2 ms (CB→M1 PAS(2 ms)), 6 ms (CB→M1 PAS(6 ms)) or 10 ms (CB→M1 PAS(10 ms)) or randomly alternating intervals of 2 and 10 ms (CB→M1 PAS(Control)). Effects of PAS on M1 excitability were assessed by the motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cerebellar-motor cortex inhibition (CBI) in the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the right hand. CB→M1 PAS(2 ms) resulted in MEP potentiation, CB→M1 PAS(6 ms) and CB→M1 PAS(10 ms) in MEP depression, and CB→M1 PAS(Control) in no change. The MEP changes lasted for 30-60 min after PAS. SICI and CBI decreased non-specifically after all PAS protocols, while ICF remained unaltered. The physiological mechanisms underlying these MEP changes are carefully discussed. Findings support the notion of bidirectional STDP-like plasticity in M1 mediated by associative stimulation of the cerebello-dentato-thalamo-cortical pathway and M1. Future studies may investigate the behavioral significance of this plasticity.

  15. Enhancement of visual cortex plasticity by dark exposure

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    Erchova, Irina; Vasalauskaite, Asta; Longo, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Dark rearing is known to delay the time course of the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity in the visual cortex. Recent evidence suggests that a period of dark exposure (DE) may enhance or reinstate plasticity even after closure of the critical period, mediated through modification of the excitatory–inhibitory balance and/or removal of structural brakes on plasticity. Here, we investigated the effects of a week of DE on the recovery from a month of monocular deprivation (MD) in the primary visual cortex (V1) of juvenile mice. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals revealed that ocular dominance in V1 of mice that had received DE recovered slightly more quickly than of mice that had not, but the level of recovery after three weeks was similar in both groups. Two-photon calcium imaging showed no significant difference in the recovery of orientation selectivity of excitatory neurons between the two groups. Parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons exhibited a smaller ocular dominance shift during MD but again no differences in subsequent recovery. The percentage of PV+ cells surrounded by perineuronal nets, a structural brake on plasticity, was lower in mice with than those without DE. Overall, DE causes a modest enhancement of mouse visual cortex plasticity. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity’. PMID:28093553

  16. Plasticity of the visual cortex and treatment of amblyopia.

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    Sengpiel, Frank

    2014-09-22

    Over the last 50 years, research into the developmental plasticity of the visual cortex has led to a growing understanding of first the causes and then of the underlying cellular mechanisms of amblyopia or 'lazy eye', the commonest childhood disorder of vision. While it is widely believed that amblyopia cannot be treated successfully after the age of about 7, recent animal studies have demonstrated that visual cortex plasticity can be restored or enhanced later in life, paving the way for new strategies for the treatment of amblyopia that attempt to remove molecular brakes on plasticity. In addition, both animal and human work has established that amblyopia is not simply a monocular deficit, and therefore the most promising new non-invasive approaches force the two eyes to cooperate as opposed to conventional procedures that severely penalise the good eye. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physiology, anatomy, and plasticity of the cerebral cortex in relation to musical instrument performance

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    Tramo, Mark Jude

    2004-05-01

    The acquisition and maintenance of fine-motor skills underlying musical instrument performance rely on the development, integration, and plasticity of neural systems localized within specific subregions of the cerebral cortex. Cortical representations of a motor sequence, such as a sequence of finger movements along the keys of a saxophone, take shape before the figure sequence occurs. The temporal pattern and spatial coordinates are computed by networks of neurons before and during the movements. When a finger sequence is practiced over and over, performance gets faster and more accurate, probably because cortical neurons generating the sequence increase in spatial extent, their electrical discharges become more synchronous, or both. By combining experimental methods such as single- and multi-neuron recordings, focal stimulation, microanatomical tracers, gross morphometry, evoked potentials, and functional imaging in humans and nonhuman primates, neuroscientists are gaining insights into the cortical physiology, anatomy, and plasticity of musical instrument performance.

  18. Characterization of electrically evoked field potentials in the medial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex of the rat: modulation by monoamines.

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    Wallace, Joanne; Jackson, Rosanna K; Shotton, Tanya L; Munjal, Ishaana; McQuade, Richard; Gartside, Sarah E

    2014-02-01

    Medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) play critical roles in cognition and behavioural control. Glutamatergic, GABAergic, and monoaminergic dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex has been hypothesised to underlie symptoms in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we characterised electrically-evoked field potentials in the mPFC and OFC. Electrical stimulation evoked field potentials in layer V/VI of the mPFC and layer V of the OFC. The earliest component (approximately 2 ms latency) was insensitive to glutamate receptor blockade and was presumed to be presynaptic. Later components were blocked by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX (20 µM)) and were assumed to reflect monosynaptic (latency 4-6 ms) and polysynaptic activity (latency 6-40 ms) mediated by glutamate via AMPA/kainate receptor. In the mPFC, but not the OFC, the monosynaptic component was also partly blocked by 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5 (50-100µM)) indicating the involvement of NMDA receptors. Bicuculline (3-10 µM) enhanced the monosynaptic component suggesting electrically-evoked and/or glutamate induced GABA release inhibits the monosynaptic component via GABAA receptor activation. There were complex effects of bicuculline on polysynaptic components. In the mPFC both the mono- and polysynaptic components were attenuated by 5-HT (10-100 µM) and NA (30 and 60 µM) and the monosynaptic component was attenuated by DA (100 µM). In the OFC the mono- and polysynaptic components were also attenuated by 5-HT (100 µM), NA (10-100 µM) but DA (10-100 µM) had no effect. We propose that these pharmacologically characterised electrically-evoked field potentials in the mPFC and OFC are useful models for the study of prefrontal cortical physiology and pathophysiology.

  19. Different Effects of Implicit and Explicit Motor Sequence Learning on Latency of Motor Evoked Potential Evoked by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on the Primary Motor Cortex

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    Hirano, Masato; Kubota, Shinji; Koizume, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Shinya; Funase, Kozo

    2017-01-01

    Motor training induces plastic changes in the primary motor cortex (M1). However, it is unclear whether and how the latency of motor-evoked potentials (MEP) and MEP amplitude are affected by implicit and/or explicit motor learning. Here, we investigated the changes in M1 excitability and MEP latency induced by implicit and explicit motor learning. The subjects performed a serial reaction time task (SRTT) with their five fingers. In this task, visual cues were lit up sequentially along with a predetermined order. Through training, the subjects learned the order of sequence implicitly and explicitly. Before and after the SRTT, we recorded MEP at 25 stimulation points around the hot spot for the flexor pollicis brevis (FPB) muscle. Although no changes in MEP amplitude were observed in either session, we found increases in MEP latency and changes in histogram of MEP latency after implicit learning. Our results suggest that reorganization across the motor cortices occurs during the acquisition of implicit knowledge. In contrast, acquisition of explicit knowledge does not appear to induce the reorganization based on the measures we recorded. The fact that the above mentioned increases in MEP latency occurred without any alterations in MEP amplitude suggests that learning has different effects on different physiological signals. In conclusion, our results propose that analyzing a combination of some indices of M1 excitability, such as MEP amplitude and MEP latency, is encouraged in order to understand plasticity across motor cortices. PMID:28101014

  20. Background sounds contribute to spectrotemporal plasticity in primary auditory cortex.

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    Moucha, Raluca; Pandya, Pritesh K; Engineer, Navzer D; Rathbun, Daniel L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2005-05-01

    The mammalian auditory system evolved to extract meaningful information from complex acoustic environments. Spectrotemporal selectivity of auditory neurons provides a potential mechanism to represent natural sounds. Experience-dependent plasticity mechanisms can remodel the spectrotemporal selectivity of neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1). Electrical stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis (NB) enables plasticity in A1 that parallels natural learning and is specific to acoustic features associated with NB activity. In this study, we used NB stimulation to explore how cortical networks reorganize after experience with frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps, and how background stimuli contribute to spectrotemporal plasticity in rat auditory cortex. Pairing an 8-4 kHz FM sweep with NB stimulation 300 times per day for 20 days decreased tone thresholds, frequency selectivity, and response latency of A1 neurons in the region of the tonotopic map activated by the sound. In an attempt to modify neuronal response properties across all of A1 the same NB activation was paired in a second group of rats with five downward FM sweeps, each spanning a different octave. No changes in FM selectivity or receptive field (RF) structure were observed when the neural activation was distributed across the cortical surface. However, the addition of unpaired background sweeps of different rates or direction was sufficient to alter RF characteristics across the tonotopic map in a third group of rats. These results extend earlier observations that cortical neurons can develop stimulus specific plasticity and indicate that background conditions can strongly influence cortical plasticity.

  1. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on associative LTP-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

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    Heidegger, Tonio; Krakow, Karsten; Ziemann, Ulf

    2010-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively in clinical practice but relatively little is known on their specific effects at the systems level of human cortex. Here we tested, using a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in healthy subjects, the effects of a single therapeutic oral dose of seven AEDs with different modes of action (tiagabine, diazepam, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam and piracetam) on long-term potentiation (LTP)-like motor cortical plasticity induced by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PAS). PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity was assessed from the increase in motor evoked potential amplitude in a hand muscle contralateral to the stimulated motor cortex. Levetiracetam significantly reduced LTP-like plasticity when compared to the placebo condition. Tiagabine, diazepam, lamotrigine and piracetam resulted in nonsignificant trends towards reduction of LTP-like plasticity while gabapentin and topiramate had no effect. The particularly depressant effect of levetiracetam is probably explained by its unique mode of action through binding at the vesicle membrane protein SV2A. Enhancement of gamma-amino butyric acid-dependent cortical inhibition by tiagabine, diazepam and possibly levetiracetam, and blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels by lamotrigine, may also depress PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity but these mechanisms appear to be less relevant. Findings may inform about AED-related adverse effects on important LTP-dependent central nervous systems processes such as learning or memory formation. The particular depressant effect of levetiracetam on LTP-like plasticity may also relate to the unique properties of this drug to inhibit epileptogenesis, a potentially LTP-associated process.

  2. Cholecystokinin from the entorhinal cortex enables neural plasticity in the auditory cortex.

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    Li, Xiao; Yu, Kai; Zhang, Zicong; Sun, Wenjian; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Jingyu; Chen, Xi; Liu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Haitao; Guo, Yi Ping; He, Jufang

    2014-03-01

    Patients with damage to the medial temporal lobe show deficits in forming new declarative memories but can still recall older memories, suggesting that the medial temporal lobe is necessary for encoding memories in the neocortex. Here, we found that cortical projection neurons in the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices were mostly immunopositive for cholecystokinin (CCK). Local infusion of CCK in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats induced plastic changes that enabled cortical neurons to potentiate their responses or to start responding to an auditory stimulus that was paired with a tone that robustly triggered action potentials. CCK infusion also enabled auditory neurons to start responding to a light stimulus that was paired with a noise burst. In vivo intracellular recordings in the auditory cortex showed that synaptic strength was potentiated after two pairings of presynaptic and postsynaptic activity in the presence of CCK. Infusion of a CCKB antagonist in the auditory cortex prevented the formation of a visuo-auditory association in awake rats. Finally, activation of the entorhinal cortex potentiated neuronal responses in the auditory cortex, which was suppressed by infusion of a CCKB antagonist. Together, these findings suggest that the medial temporal lobe influences neocortical plasticity via CCK-positive cortical projection neurons in the entorhinal cortex.

  3. Long-term evolution of brainstem electrical evoked responses to sound after restricted ablation of the auditory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Lamas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to assess the top-down control of sound processing in the auditory brainstem of rats. Short latency evoked responses were analyzed after unilateral or bilateral ablation of auditory cortex. This experimental paradigm was also used towards analyzing the long-term evolution of post-lesion plasticity in the auditory system and its ability to self-repair. METHOD: Auditory cortex lesions were performed in rats by stereotactically guided fine-needle aspiration of the cerebrocortical surface. Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR were recorded at post-surgery day (PSD 1, 7, 15 and 30. Recordings were performed under closed-field conditions, using click trains at different sound intensity levels, followed by statistical analysis of threshold values and ABR amplitude and latency variables. Subsequently, brains were sectioned and immunostained for GAD and parvalbumin to assess the location and extent of lesions accurately. RESULTS: Alterations in ABR variables depended on the type of lesion and post-surgery time of ABR recordings. Accordingly, bilateral ablations caused a statistically significant increase in thresholds at PSD1 and 7 and a decrease in waves amplitudes at PSD1 that recover at PSD7. No effects on latency were noted at PSD1 and 7, whilst recordings at PSD15 and 30 showed statistically significant decreases in latency. Conversely, unilateral ablations had no effect on auditory thresholds or latencies, while wave amplitudes only decreased at PSD1 strictly in the ipsilateral ear. CONCLUSION: Post-lesion plasticity in the auditory system acts in two time periods: short-term period of decreased sound sensitivity (until PSD7, most likely resulting from axonal degeneration; and a long-term period (up to PSD7, with changes in latency responses and recovery of thresholds and amplitudes values. The cerebral cortex may have a net positive gain on the auditory pathway response to sound.

  4. Resting State Functional Connectivity within the Cingulate Cortex Jointly Predicts Agreeableness and Stressor-Evoked Cardiovascular Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, John P.; Sheu, Lei K.; Peter J Gianaros

    2010-01-01

    Exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to stress confers risk for cardiovascular disease. Further, individual differences in stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity covary with the functionality of cortical and limbic brain areas, particularly within the cingulate cortex. What remains unclear, however, is how individual differences in personality traits interact with cingulate functionality in the prediction of stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity. Accordingly, we tested the association...

  5. The Role of NMDA Receptor Subtypes in Short-Term Plasticity in the Rat Entorhinal Cortex

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    Sophie E. L. Chamberlain

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that spontaneous release of glutamate in the entorhinal cortex (EC is tonically facilitated via activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDAr containing the NR2B subunit. Here we show that the same receptors mediate short-term plasticity manifested by frequency-dependent facilitation of evoked glutamate release at these synapses. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from layer V pyramidal neurones in rat EC slices. Evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents showed strong facilitation at relatively low frequencies (3 Hz of activation. Facilitation was abolished by an NR2B-selective blocker (Ro 25-6981, but unaffected by NR2A-selective antagonists (Zn2+, NVP-AAM077. In contrast, postsynaptic NMDAr-mediated responses could be reduced by subunit-selective concentrations of all three antagonists. The data suggest that NMDAr involved in presynaptic plasticity in layer V are exclusively NR1/NR2B diheteromers, whilst postsynaptically they are probably a mixture of NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B diheteromers and NR1/NR2A/NR2B triheteromeric receptors.

  6. Receptive field plasticity of neurons in rat auditory cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wenwei; GAO Lixia; SUN Xinde

    2004-01-01

    Using conventional electrophysiological technique, we investigated the plasticity of the frequency receptive fields (RF) of auditory cortex (AC) neurons in rats. In the AC, when the frequency difference between conditioning stimulus frequency (CSF) and the best frequency (BF) was in the range of 1-4 kHz, the frequency RF of AC neurons shifted. The smaller the differences between CSF and BF, the higher the probability of the RF shift and the greater the degree of the RF shift. To some extent, the plasticity of RF was dependent on the duration of the session of conditioning stimulus (CS). When the frequency difference between CSF and BF was bigger, the duration of the CS session needed to induce the plasticity was longer. The recovery time course of the frequency RF showed opposite changes after CS cessation.The RF shift could be induced by the frequency that was either higher or lower than the control BF, demonstrating no clear directional preference. The frequency RF of some neurons showed bidirectional shift, and the RF of other neurons showed single directional shift. The results suggest that the frequency RF plasticity of AC neurons could be considered as an ideal model for studying plasticity mechanism. The present study also provides important evidence for further study of learning and memory in auditory system.

  7. Neural field theory of plasticity in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, P K; Haber, A L; Robinson, P A

    2013-02-07

    A generalized timing-dependent plasticity rule is incorporated into a recent neural field theory to explore synaptic plasticity in the cerebral cortex, with both excitatory and inhibitory populations included. Analysis in the time and frequency domains reveals that cortical network behavior gives rise to a saddle-node bifurcation and resonant frequencies, including a gamma-band resonance. These system resonances constrain cortical synaptic dynamics and divide it into four classes, which depend on the type of synaptic plasticity window. Depending on the dynamical class, synaptic strengths can either have a stable fixed point, or can diverge in the absence of a separate saturation mechanism. Parameter exploration shows that time-asymmetric plasticity windows, which are signatures of spike-timing dependent plasticity, enable the richest variety of synaptic dynamics to occur. In particular, we predict a zone in parameter space which may allow brains to attain the marginal stability phenomena observed experimentally, although additional regulatory mechanisms may be required to maintain these parameters.

  8. Proteolytic regulation of synaptic plasticity in the mouse primary visual cortex: analysis of matrix metalloproteinase 9 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Emily A; Russo, Amanda S; Jackson, Cory D; Lamantia, Cassandra E; Majewska, Ania K

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to play important roles in regulating neuronal recovery from injury. The ECM can also impact physiological synaptic plasticity, although this process is less well understood. To understand the impact of the ECM on synaptic function and remodeling in vivo, we examined ECM composition and proteolysis in a well-established model of experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. We describe a rapid change in ECM protein composition during Ocular Dominance Plasticity (ODP) in adolescent mice, and a loss of ECM remodeling in mice that lack the extracellular protease, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9). Loss of MMP9 also attenuated functional ODP following monocular deprivation (MD) and reduced excitatory synapse density and spine density in sensory cortex. While we observed no change in the morphology of existing dendritic spines, spine dynamics were altered, and MMP9 knock-out (KO) mice showed increased turnover of dendritic spines over a period of 2 days. We also analyzed the effects of MMP9 loss on microglia, as these cells are involved in extracellular remodeling and have been recently shown to be important for synaptic plasticity. MMP9 KO mice exhibited very limited changes in microglial morphology. Ultrastructural analysis, however, showed that the extracellular space surrounding microglia was increased, with concomitant increases in microglial inclusions, suggesting possible changes in microglial function in the absence of MMP9. Taken together, our results show that MMP9 contributes to ECM degradation, synaptic dynamics and sensory-evoked plasticity in the mouse visual cortex.

  9. A Semi-Persistent Adult Ocular Dominance Plasticity in Visual Cortex Is Stabilized by Activated CREB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Angel; Kandel, Eric R.; Gordon, Barbara; Lickey, Marvin E.; Suzuki, Seigo; Pham, Tony A.; Graham, Sarah J.

    2004-01-01

    The adult cerebral cortex can adapt to environmental change. Using monocular deprivation as a paradigm, we find that rapid experience-dependent plasticity exists even in the mature primary visual cortex. However, adult cortical plasticity differs from developmental plasticity in two important ways. First, the effect of adult, but not juvenile…

  10. Spectral features control temporal plasticity in auditory cortex.

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    Kilgard, M P; Pandya, P K; Vazquez, J L; Rathbun, D L; Engineer, N D; Moucha, R

    2001-01-01

    Cortical responses are adjusted and optimized throughout life to meet changing behavioral demands and to compensate for peripheral damage. The cholinergic nucleus basalis (NB) gates cortical plasticity and focuses learning on behaviorally meaningful stimuli. By systematically varying the acoustic parameters of the sound paired with NB activation, we have previously shown that tone frequency and amplitude modulation rate alter the topography and selectivity of frequency tuning in primary auditory cortex. This result suggests that network-level rules operate in the cortex to guide reorganization based on specific features of the sensory input associated with NB activity. This report summarizes recent evidence that temporal response properties of cortical neurons are influenced by the spectral characteristics of sounds associated with cholinergic modulation. For example, repeated pairing of a spectrally complex (ripple) stimulus decreased the minimum response latency for the ripple, but lengthened the minimum latency for tones. Pairing a rapid train of tones with NB activation only increased the maximum following rate of cortical neurons when the carrier frequency of each train was randomly varied. These results suggest that spectral and temporal parameters of acoustic experiences interact to shape spectrotemporal selectivity in the cortex. Additional experiments with more complex stimuli are needed to clarify how the cortex learns natural sounds such as speech.

  11. Cortisol reduces plasticity in the kitten visual cortex.

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    Daw, N W; Sato, H; Fox, K; Carmichael, T; Gingerich, R

    1991-03-01

    We investigated the effect of elevated levels of cortisol on plasticity in the visual cortex of the cat. Animals were given daily injections of cortisol i.m. for 20 days starting around 35 days of age. After 10 days they were monocularly deprived, and after an additional 10 days recordings were made from the visual cortex to construct an ocular dominance histogram. The results were compared with those from normal animals of the same age, and with animals monocularly deprived for the same period but not treated with cortisol. Cortisol reduced the ocular dominance shift in a dose-dependent manner, but did not totally abolish it even at the highest doses used. Two other series of animals were recorded, one slightly later in the critical period and one slightly earlier, with care taken to give cortisol before the animals were exposed to light in the morning. In both cases, cortisol reduced the ocular dominance shift but did not abolish it. To interpret these results, we measured levels of plasma cortisol in normal cats of various ages. Average levels were fairly constant between birth and 12 months of age (0.5-1 microgram/dl), and increased slightly after that, but there was a large variation between animals. Thus elevated levels of cortisol can have a substantial effect on plasticity in the visual cortex of the cat, but the decline of the critical period for plasticity between 6 weeks and 3-5 months of age does not seem to be due to a rise in cortisol levels during this time.

  12. Environmental enrichment potentiates thalamocortical transmission and plasticity in the adult rat visual cortex.

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    Mainardi, Marco; Landi, Silvia; Gianfranceschi, Laura; Baldini, Sara; De Pasquale, Roberto; Berardi, Nicoletta; Maffei, Lamberto; Caleo, Matteo

    2010-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that the complex sensorimotor and social stimulation achieved by rearing animals in an enriched environment (EE) can reinstate juvenile-like plasticity in the adult cortex. However, it is not known whether EE can affect thalamocortical transmission. Here, we recorded in vivo field potentials from the visual cortex evoked by electrical stimulation of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) in anesthetized rats. We found that a period of EE during adulthood shifted the input-output curves and increased paired-pulse depression, suggesting an enhanced synaptic strength at thalamocortical terminals. Accordingly, EE animals showed an increased expression of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT-2) in geniculocortical afferents to layer IV. Rats reared in EE also showed an enhancement of thalamocortical long-term potentiation (LTP) triggered by theta-burst stimulation (TBS) of the dLGN. To monitor the functional consequences of increased LTP in EE rats, we recorded visual evoked potentials (VEPs) before and after application of TBS to the geniculocortical pathway. We found that responses to visual stimulation were enhanced across a range of contrasts in EE animals. This was accompanied by an up-regulation of the intracortical excitatory synaptic marker vGluT-1 and a decrease in the expression of the vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT), indicating a shift in the excitation/inhibition ratio. Thus, in the adult rat, EE enhances synaptic strength and plasticity of the thalamocortical pathway associated with specific changes in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. These data provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which EE shapes the adult brain.

  13. Influence of body temperature on the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Kalatsky, Valery A

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signals and conventional electrophysiological methods were used to investigate the correlation between the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex and core body temperature. The results show that hypothermia (25-36 °C) decreases the intensity of optical imaging in the visual cortex and the imaging signal reversibly disappears at 25 °C. Hyperthermia (39-41 °C) increases the intensity but decreases the quality of cortical imaging when body temperature is above 40 °C. The change of optical imaging was in line with that of neuronal activities and local field potentials (LFPs) directly recorded from the visual cortex at 25-39 °C. Hypothermia decreases neuron firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Most of the recorded neurons ceased firing to visual stimulation at 25 °C. Hyperthermia increases neuronal firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Both are reduced when body temperature is above 40 °C, though neither change was statistically significant. These results suggest: (1) Body temperature has an important impact on the visual cortical evoked activities and optical imaging generally reflects these effects when body temperature is between 25 and 39 °C; (2) Optical imaging may not properly reflect the neuronal activity when body temperature is over 40 °C. It is important to maintain core body temperature within 3 °C of the normal body temperature to obtain verifiable results.

  14. The stimulus-evoked population response in visual cortex of awake monkey is a propagating wave.

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    Muller, Lyle; Reynaud, Alexandre; Chavane, Frédéric; Destexhe, Alain

    2014-04-28

    Propagating waves occur in many excitable media and were recently found in neural systems from retina to neocortex. While propagating waves are clearly present under anaesthesia, whether they also appear during awake and conscious states remains unclear. One possibility is that these waves are systematically missed in trial-averaged data, due to variability. Here we present a method for detecting propagating waves in noisy multichannel recordings. Applying this method to single-trial voltage-sensitive dye imaging data, we show that the stimulus-evoked population response in primary visual cortex of the awake monkey propagates as a travelling wave, with consistent dynamics across trials. A network model suggests that this reliability is the hallmark of the horizontal fibre network of superficial cortical layers. Propagating waves with similar properties occur independently in secondary visual cortex, but maintain precise phase relations with the waves in primary visual cortex. These results show that, in response to a visual stimulus, propagating waves are systematically evoked in several visual areas, generating a consistent spatiotemporal frame for further neuronal interactions.

  15. [Correlation of evoked potentials in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of cats in emotional stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanetsian, G L; Pavlova, I V

    2002-01-01

    Averaged auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded in symmetric points of the frontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of cats performing acquired conditioned food-procuring reaction reinforced in 100% cases, urgent transition to 30%-reinforcement, and return to 100%-reinforcement. Emotional stress estimated by a heart rate rise developed during increased food motivation of a cat as well as during change in ordinary food-procuring stereotype. The emotional stress was accompanied by a high positive correlation of cortical and hippocampal AEPs. Decrease in the stress level led to a drop between AEP correlations and appearance of their negative values. In emotional stress, the interactions between the frontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus were asymmetric: right-side correlations were higher.

  16. Priming theta burst stimulation enhances motor cortex plasticity in young but not old adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, George M; Vosnakis, Eleni; Ridding, Michael C; Ziemann, Ulf; Semmler, John G

    Primary motor cortex neuroplasticity is reduced in old adults, which may contribute to the motor deficits commonly observed in the elderly. Previous research in young subjects suggests that the neuroplastic response can be enhanced using non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS), with a larger plastic response observed following priming with both long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD)-like protocols. However, it is not known if priming stimulation can also modulate plasticity in older adults. To investigate if priming NIBS can be used to modulate motor cortical plasticity in old subjects. In 16 young (22.3 ± 1.0 years) and 16 old (70.2 ± 1.7 years) subjects, we investigated the response to intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS; LTP-like) when applied 10 min after sham stimulation, continuous TBS (cTBS; LTD-like) or an identical block of iTBS. Corticospinal plasticity was assessed by recording changes in motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. In young subjects, priming with cTBS (cTBS + iTBS) resulted in larger MEPs than priming with either iTBS (iTBS + iTBS; P = 0.001) or sham (sham + iTBS; P  0.9), whereas the response to cTBS + iTBS was reduced relative to iTBS + iTBS (P = 0.02) and sham + iTBS (P = 0.04). Priming TBS is ineffective for modifying M1 plasticity in older adults, which may limit the therapeutic use of priming stimulation in neurological conditions common in the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  18. Category expectation modulates baseline and stimulus-evoked activity in human inferotemporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Amrita M; Wojciulik, Ewa; Ranganath, Charan

    2009-12-08

    Expectation of locations and low-level features increases activity in extrastriate visual areas even in the absence of a stimulus, but it is unclear whether or how expectation of higher-level stimulus properties affects visual responses. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test whether category expectation affects baseline and stimulus-evoked activity in higher-level, category-selective inferotemporal (IT) visual areas. Word cues indicating an image category (FACE or HOUSE) were followed by a delay, then a briefly presented image of a face or a house. On most trials, the cue correctly predicted the upcoming stimulus. Baseline activity in regions within the fusiform face area (FFA) and parahippocampal place area (PPA) was modulated such that activity was higher during expectation of the preferred (e.g., FACE for FFA) vs. non-preferred category. Stimulus-evoked responses reflected an initial bias (higher overall activity) followed by increased selectivity (greater difference between activity to a preferred vs. non-preferred stimulus) after expectation of the preferred vs. non-preferred category. Consistent with the putative role of a frontoparietal network in top-down modulation of activity in sensory cortex, expectation-related activity in several frontal and parietal areas correlated with the magnitude of baseline shifts in the FFA and PPA across subjects. Furthermore, expectation-related activity in lateral prefrontal cortex also correlated with the magnitude of expectation-based increases in stimulus selectivity in IT areas. These findings demonstrate that category expectation influences both baseline and stimulus-evoked activity in category-selective inferotemporal visual areas, and that these modulations may be driven by a frontoparietal attentional control network.

  19. Enhancement of extinction learning attenuates ethanol-seeking behavior and alters plasticity in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Justin T; Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Kassab, Amanda S; Glen, William B; Olive, M Foster; Chandler, L Judson

    2014-05-28

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder in which relapse is often initiated by exposure to drug-related cues. The present study examined the effects of mGluR5 activation on extinction of ethanol-cue-maintained responding, relapse-like behavior, and neuronal plasticity. Rats were trained to self-administer ethanol and then exposed to extinction training during which they were administered either vehicle or the mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl) or CDPPB. CDPPB treatment reduced active lever responding during extinction, decreased the total number of extinction sessions required to meet criteria, and attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of ethanol seeking. CDPPB facilitation of extinction was blocked by the local infusion of the mGluR5 antagonist 3-((2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl) pyridine into the infralimbic (IfL) cortex, but had no effect when infused into the prelimbic (PrL) cortex. Analysis of dendritic spines revealed alterations in structural plasticity, whereas electrophysiological recordings demonstrated differential alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the PrL and IfL cortex. Extinction was associated with increased amplitude of evoked synaptic PrL and IfL NMDA currents but reduced amplitude of PrL AMPA currents. Treatment with CDPPB prevented the extinction-induced enhancement of NMDA currents in PrL without affecting NMDA currents in the IfL. Whereas CDPPB treatment did not alter the amplitude of PrL or IfL AMPA currents, it did promote the expression of IfL calcium-permeable GluR2-lacking receptors in both abstinence- and extinction-trained rats, but had no effect in ethanol-naive rats. These results confirm changes in the PrL and IfL cortex in glutamatergic neurotransmission during extinction learning and demonstrate that manipulation of mGluR5 facilitates extinction of ethanol cues in association with neuronal plasticity.

  20. Increased occlusal vertical dimension induces cortical plasticity in the rat face primary motor cortex.

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    Kato, C; Fujita, K; Kokai, S; Ishida, T; Shibata, M; Naito, S; Yabushita, T; Ono, T

    2012-03-17

    Previous studies have demonstrated that functional plasticity in the primary motor cortex (M1) is related to motor-skill learning and changes in the environment. Increased occlusal vertical dimension (iOVD) may modulate mastication, such as in the masticatory cycle, and the firing properties of jaw-muscle spindles. However, little is known about the changes in motor representation within the face primary motor cortex (face-M1) after iOVD. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of iOVD on the face-M1 using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). In an iOVD group, the maxillary molars were built-up by 2mm with acrylic. The electromyographic (EMG) activities from the left (LAD) and right (RAD) anterior digastric (AD), masseter and genioglossus (GG) muscles elicited by ICMS within the right face-M1 were recorded 1, 2 and 8 weeks after iOVD. IOVD was associated with a significant increase in the number of sites within the face-M1 from which ICMS evoked LAD and/or GG EMG activities, as well as a lateral shift in the center of gravity of the RAD and LAD muscles at 1 and 2 weeks, but not at 8 weeks. These findings suggest that a time-dependent neuroplastic change within the rat face-M1 occurs in association with iOVD. This may be related to the animal's ability to adapt to a change in the oral environment.

  1. Proteolytic Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity in the Mouse Primary Visual Cortex: Analysis of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A Kelly

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM is known to play important roles in regulating neuronal recovery from injury. The ECM can also impact physiological synaptic plasticity, although this process is less well understood. To understand the impact of the ECM on synaptic function and remodeling in vivo, we examined ECM composition and proteolysis in a well-established model of experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. We describe a rapid change in ECM protein composition during ocular dominance plasticity in adolescent mice, and a loss of ECM remodeling in mice that lack the extracellular protease, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9. Loss of MMP9 also attenuated functional ocular dominance plasticity following monocular deprivation and reduced excitatory synapse density and spine density in sensory cortex. While we observed no change in the morphology of existing dendritic spines, spine dynamics were altered, and MMP9 knock-out (KO mice showed increased turnover of dendritic spines over a period of 2 days. We also analyzed the effects of MMP9 loss on microglia, as these cells are involved in extracellular remodeling and have been recently shown to be important for synaptic plasticity. MMP9 KO mice exhibited very limited changes in microglial morphology. Ultrastructural analysis, however, showed that the extracellular space surrounding microglia was increased, with concomitant increases in microglial inclusions, suggesting possible changes in microglial function in the absence of MMP9. Taken together, our results show that MMP9 contributes to ECM degradation, synaptic dynamics and sensory-evoked plasticity in the mouse visual cortex.

  2. Skilled Bimanual Training Drives Motor Cortex Plasticity in Children With Unilateral Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Kathleen M; Kuo, Hsing-Ching; Fuller, Jason; Ferre, Claudio L; Brandão, Marina; Carmel, Jason B; Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Gowatsky, Jaimie L; Stanford, Arielle D; Rowny, Stefan B; Luber, Bruce; Bassi, Bruce; Murphy, David L K; Lisanby, Sarah H; Gordon, Andrew M

    2016-10-01

    Background Intensive bimanual therapy can improve hand function in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP). We compared the effects of structured bimanual skill training versus unstructured bimanual practice on motor outcomes and motor map plasticity in children with USCP. Objective We hypothesized that structured skill training would produce greater motor map plasticity than unstructured practice. Methods Twenty children with USCP (average age 9.5; 12 males) received therapy in a day camp setting, 6 h/day, 5 days/week, for 3 weeks. In structured skill training (n = 10), children performed progressively more difficult movements and practiced functional goals. In unstructured practice (n = 10), children engaged in bimanual activities but did not practice skillful movements or functional goals. We used the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA), Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function (JTTHF), and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) to measure hand function. We used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to map the representation of first dorsal interosseous and flexor carpi radialis muscles bilaterally. Results Both groups showed significant improvements in bimanual hand use (AHA; P < .05) and hand dexterity (JTTHF; P < .001). However, only the structured skill group showed increases in the size of the affected hand motor map and amplitudes of motor evoked potentials (P < .01). Most children who showed the most functional improvements (COPM) had the largest changes in map size. Conclusions These findings uncover a dichotomy of plasticity: the unstructured practice group improved hand function but did not show changes in motor maps. Skill training is important for driving motor cortex plasticity in children with USCP.

  3. Speaking modifies voice-evoked activity in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curio, G; Neuloh, G; Numminen, J; Jousmäki, V; Hari, R

    2000-04-01

    The voice we most often hear is our own, and proper interaction between speaking and hearing is essential for both acquisition and performance of spoken language. Disturbed audiovocal interactions have been implicated in aphasia, stuttering, and schizophrenic voice hallucinations, but paradigms for a noninvasive assessment of auditory self-monitoring of speaking and its possible dysfunctions are rare. Using magnetoencephalograpy we show here that self-uttered syllables transiently activate the speaker's auditory cortex around 100 ms after voice onset. These phasic responses were delayed by 11 ms in the speech-dominant left hemisphere relative to the right, whereas during listening to a replay of the same utterances the response latencies were symmetric. Moreover, the auditory cortices did not react to rare vowel changes interspersed randomly within a series of repetitively spoken vowels, in contrast to regular change-related responses evoked 100-200 ms after replayed rare vowels. Thus, speaking primes the human auditory cortex at a millisecond time scale, dampening and delaying reactions to self-produced "expected" sounds, more prominently in the speech-dominant hemisphere. Such motor-to-sensory priming of early auditory cortex responses during voicing constitutes one element of speech self-monitoring that could be compromised in central speech disorders.

  4. Homeostatic plasticity in human motor cortex demonstrated by two consecutive sessions of paired associative stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J Florian M; Orekhov, Yuriy; Liu, Yali; Ziemann, Ulf

    2007-06-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) underlie most models of learning and memory, but neural activity would grow or shrink in an uncontrolled manner, if not guarded by stabilizing mechanisms. The Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM) rule proposes a sliding threshold for LTP/LTD induction: LTP induction becomes more difficult if neural activity was high previously. Here we tested if this form of homeostatic plasticity applies to the human motor cortex (M1) in vivo by examining the interactions between two consecutive sessions of paired associative stimulation (PAS). PAS consisted of repeated pairs of electrical stimulation of the right median nerve followed by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left M1. The first PAS session employed an interstimulus interval equalling the individual N20-latency of the median nerve somatosensory-evoked cortical potential plus 2 ms, N20-latency minus 5 ms, or a random alternation between these intervals, to induce an LTP-like increase in motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes in the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle (PAS(LTP)), an LTD-like decrease (PAS(LTD)), or no change (PAS(Control)), respectively. The second PAS session 30 min later was always PAS(LTP). It induced an moderate LTP-like effect if conditioned by PAS(Control), which increased if conditioned by PAS(LTD), but decreased if conditioned by PAS(LTP). Effects on MEP amplitude induced by the second PAS session exhibited a negative linear correlation with those in the first PAS session. Because the two PAS sessions activate identical neuronal circuits, we conclude that 'homosynaptic-like' homeostatic mechanisms in accord with the BCM rule contribute to regulating plasticity in human M1.

  5. Temporal and spatial dynamics of thalamus-evoked activity in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Chih; Lee, Chia-Ming; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2012-10-11

    In the present study, multielectrode array (MEA) recording was used to illustrate the spatial-temporal progression of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activity following stimulation of the thalamus in a thalamocingulate pathway-preserved slice. The MEA was placed under the slice that contained the ACC, and 60 channels of extracellular local field potentials evoked by bipolar electrical stimulation within the thalamus were analyzed. Several distinct thalamic-evoked responses were identified. The early negative component (N1; amplitude, -35.7 ± 5.9 μV) emerged in layer VI near the cingulum 8.4 ± 0.5 ms after stimulation. N1 progressed upward to layers V and II/III in a lateral-to-medial direction. Subsequently, a positive component (P; amplitude, 27.0 ± 3.2 μV) appeared 12.0 ± 0.6 ms after stimulation in layer VI. At 26.8 ± 1.1 ms, a second negative component (N2; amplitude, -20.9 ± 2.7 μV) became apparent in layers II/III and V, followed by a more ventrolateral component (N3; amplitude, -18.9 ± 2.9 μV) at 42.8 ± 2.6 ms. These two late components spread downward to layer VI in a medial-to-lateral direction. The trajectory paths of the evoked components were consistently represented with varied medial thalamic stimulation intensities and sites. Both AMPA/kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors involved in monosynaptic and polysynaptic transmission participated in this thalamocortical pathway. Morphine mainly diminished the two negative synaptic components, and this suppressive effect was reversed by naloxone. The present study confirmed that functional thalamocingulate activity was preserved in the brain-slice preparation. The thalamus-evoked responses were activated and progressed along a deep surface-deep trajectory loop across the ACC layers. Glutamatergic neurotransmitters were crucially involved in information processing. Opioid interneurons may play a modulatory role in regulating the signal flows in the cingulate cortex.

  6. Direct-current-dependent shift of theta-burst-induced plasticity in the human motor cortex.

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    Hasan, Alkomiet; Hamada, Masashi; Nitsche, Michael A; Ruge, Diane; Galea, Joseph M; Wobrock, Thomas; Rothwell, John C

    2012-03-01

    Animal studies using polarising currents have shown that induction of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) by bursts of patterned stimulation is affected by the membrane potential of the postsynaptic neurone. The aim of the present experiments was to test whether it is possible to observe similar phenomena in humans with the aim of improving present protocols of inducing synaptic plasticity for therapeutic purposes. We tested whether the LTP/LTD-like after effects of transcranial theta-burst stimulation (TBS) of human motor cortex, an analogue of patterned electrical stimulation in animals, were affected by simultaneous transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive method of polarising cortical neurones in humans. Nine healthy volunteers were investigated in a single-blind, balanced cross-over study; continuous TBS (cTBS) was used to introduce LTD-like after effects, whereas intermittent TBS (iTBS) produced LTP-like effects. Each pattern was coupled with concurrent application of tDCS (motor thresholds and intracortical inhibitory/facilitatory networks were not altered by any of the stimulation protocols. We conclude that the after effects of TBS can be modulated by concurrent tDCS. We hypothesise that tDCS changes the membrane potential of the apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurones and that this changes the response to patterned synaptic input evoked by TBS. The data show that it may be possible to enhance LTP-like plasticity after TBS in the human cortex.

  7. Measurement of motor evoked potentials following repetitive magnetic motor cortex stimulation during isoflurane or propofol anaesthesia.

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    Rohde, V; Krombach, G A; Baumert, J H; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, I; Weinzierl, M; Gilsbach, J M

    2003-10-01

    Isoflurane and propofol reduce the recordability of compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) following single transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex (sTCMS). Repetition of the magnetic stimulus (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, rTCMS) might allow the inhibition caused by anaesthesia with isoflurane or propofol to be overcome. We applied rTCMS (four stimuli; inter-stimulus intervals of 3, 4, 5 ms (333, 250, 200 Hz), output 2.5 Tesla) in 27 patients and recorded CMAP from the hypothenar and anterior tibial muscle. Anaesthesia was maintained with fentanyl 0.5-1 microg kg(-1) x h(-1) and either isoflurane 1.2% (10 patients) or propofol 5 mg kg(-1) x h(-1) with nitrous oxide 60% in oxygen (17 patients). No CMAP were detected during isoflurane anaesthesia. During propofol anaesthesia 333 Hz, four-pulse magnetic stimulation evoked CMAP in the hypothenar muscle in 75%, and in the anterior tibial muscle in 65% of the patients. Less response was obtained with 250 and 200 Hz stimulation. In most patients, rTCMS can overcome suppression of CMAP during propofol/nitrous oxide anaesthesia, but not during isoflurane anaesthesia. A train of four magnetic stimuli at a frequency of 333 Hz is most effective in evoking potentials from the upper and lower limb muscles. The authors conclude that rTCMS can be used for evaluation of the descending motor pathways during anaesthesia.

  8. Effects of decreased inhibition on synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology in the juvenile prefrontal cortex

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    Xanthippi Konstantoudaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-inhibition balance is critical for maintaining proper functioning of the cerebral cortex, as evident from electrophysiological and modeling studies, and it is also important for animal behavior (Yizhar et al., 2011. In the cerebral cortex, excitation is provided by glutamate release from pyramidal neurons, while inhibition is provided by GABA release from several types of interneurons. Many neuropsychiatric disorders, such as epilepsy, anxiety, schizophrenia and autism exhibit an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms of cortical circuits within key brain regions as prefrontal cortex or hippocampus, primarily through dysfunctions in the inhibitory system (Lewis, Volk, & Hashimoto, 2003; Marín, 2012 Given the significant role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping proper function of the cerebral cortex, we used a mouse model of developmentally decreased GABAergic inhibition in order to examine its effects in network properties, namely basal synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons. For our study, we used mice (postnatal day 20-30 in which the Rac1 protein was deleted from Nkx2.1-expressing neurons (Vidaki et al., 2012, (Rac1fl/flNkx2.1 +/cre referred as Rac1 KO mice, and heterozygous (Rac1+/flNkx2.1 +/cre or control (Rac1+/flNkx2.1 +/+ mice. The specific ablation of Rac1 protein from NKx2.1-expressing MGE-derived progenitors leads to a perturbation of their cell cycle exit resulting in decreased number of interneurons in the cortex(Vidaki et al, 2012. We prepared brain slices from the prefrontal cortex and recorded field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs from layer II neurons while stimulating axons in layer II. We find that the evoked fEPSPs are decreased in Rac1 KO mice compared to Rac1 heterozygous or control mice. This could suggest that the decreased GABAergic inhibition causes network alterations that result in reduced glutamatergic function. Furthermore

  9. Differences in motor evoked potentials induced in rats by transcranial magnetic stimulation under two separate anesthetics: implications for plasticity studies

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    Matthew Sykes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is primarily used in humans to change the state of corticospinal excitability. To assess the efficacy of different rTMS stimulation protocols, motor evoked potentials (MEPs are used as a readout due to their non-invasive nature. Stimulation of the motor cortex produces a response in a targeted muscle, and the amplitude of this twitch provides an indirect measure of the current state of the cortex. When applied to the motor cortex, rTMS can alter MEP amplitude, however results are variable between participants and across studies. In addition, the mechanisms underlying any change and its locus are poorly understood. In order to better understand these effects, MEPs have been investigated in vivo in animal models, primarily in rats. One major difference in protocols between rats and humans is the use of general anesthesia in animal experiments. Anesthetics are known to affect plasticity-like mechanisms and so may contaminate the effects of an rTMS protocol. In the present study, we explored the effect of anesthetic on MEP amplitude, recorded before and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS, a patterned rTMS protocol with reported facilitatory effects. MEPs were assessed in the brachioradialis muscle of the upper forelimb under two anesthetics: a xylazine/zoletil combination and urethane. We found MEPs could be induced under both anesthetics, with no differences in the resting motor threshold or the average baseline amplitudes. However, MEPs were highly variable between animals under both anesthetics, with the xylazine/zoletil combination showing higher variability and most prominently a rise in amplitude across the baseline recording period. Interestingly, application of iTBS did not facilitate MEP amplitude under either anesthetic condition. Although it is important to underpin human application of TMS with mechanistic examination of effects in animals, caution must be taken when

  10. Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation to identify epileptogenic cortex: Clinical information obtained from early evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthaan, B E; van 't Klooster, M A; Keizer, D; Hebbink, G J; Leijten, F S S; Ferrier, C H; van Putten, M J A M; Zijlmans, M; Huiskamp, G J M

    2016-02-01

    Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation (SPES) probes epileptogenic cortex during electrocorticography. Two SPES responses are described: pathological delayed responses (DR, >100 ms) associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) and physiological early responses (ER, 80 Hz, in the SOZ and seizure propagation areas. We used data from 12 refractory epilepsy patients. SPES consisted of 10 pulses of 1 ms, 4-8 mA and 5s interval on adjacent electrodes pairs. Data were available at 2048 samples/s for six and 512 samples/s (22 bits) for eight patients and analyzed in the time-frequency (TF) and time-domain (TD). Electrodes with ERs were stronger associated with SOZ than non-SOZ electrodes. ERs with frequency content >80 Hz exist and are specific for SOZ channels. ERs evoked by stimulation of seizure onset electrodes were associated with electrodes involved in seizure propagation. Analysis of ERs can reveal aspects of pathology, manifested by association with seizure propagation and areas with high ER numbers that coincide with the SOZ. Not only DRs, but also ERs could have clinical value for mapping epileptogenic cortex and help to unravel aspects of the epileptic network. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

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    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination.

  12. Plasticity of neuronal response properties in adult cat striate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, J; Palmer, L A

    1998-01-01

    demonstrate the ability of mature visual cortical neurons to alter their integrative properties. Our results lend further support to models of synaptic plasticity where temporal correlations between presynaptic and postsynaptic activity levels control the efficiency of transmission at existing synapses, and to the idea that the mature visual cortex is, in some sense, dynamically organized.

  13. Cerebellum to motor cortex paired associative stimulation induces bidirectional STDP-like plasticity in human motor cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Ming-Kuei; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is crucially important for motor control and adaptation. Recent non-invasive brain stimulation studies have indicated the possibility to alter the excitability of the cerebellum and its projections to the contralateral motor cortex, with behavioral consequences on motor control and adaptation. Here we sought to induce bidirectional spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP)-like modifications of motor cortex (M1) excitability by application of paired associative stimulation (PAS)...

  14. Cocaine-evoked synaptic plasticity of excitatory transmission in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüscher, Christian

    2013-05-01

    Cocaine leads to a strong euphoria, which is at the origin of its recreational use. Past the acute effects, the drug leaves traces in the brain that persist long after it has been cleared from the body. These traces eventually shape behavior such that drug use may become compulsive and addiction develops. Here we discuss cocaine-evoked synaptic plasticity of glutamatergic transmission onto dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) as one of the earliest traces after a first injection of cocaine. We review the literature that has examined the induction requirements as well as the expression mechanism of this form of plasticity and ask the question about its functional significance.

  15. Effects of lamotrigine on PCP-evoked elevations in monoamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Davide; Large, Charles H

    2011-12-01

    Lamotrigine is suggested to have potential as an add-on treatment for patients with schizophrenia. Supporting evidence comes from the efficacy of the drug in models of psychotic-like behaviour induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as phencyclidine (PCP). These drugs enhance levels of the monoamines in the cortex, which may contribute to their psychotomimetic effects. The ability of lamotrigine to prevent these neurochemical changes has not been examined. We studied PCP-evoked overflow of noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin in the medial prefrontal cortex of awake rats using microdialysis. Rats were administered lamotrigine or vehicle, followed by PCP. Locomotor activity was also recorded before and after drug treatment. Lamotrigine did not have an influence on basal levels of the monoamines, but significantly reduced PCP-evoked overflow of dopamine and serotonin; PCP-evoked overflow of noradrenaline was also reduced by lamotrigine, but not to a significant degree. In contrast, PCP-induced hyperactivity was unaffected by lamotrigine. It is concluded that lamotrigine can modify PCP-evoked monoamine overflow in the cortex, consistent with an ability to prevent the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA receptor antagonists in rodents and humans. The dissociation between monoamine overflow and locomotor activity suggests the involvement of different brain circuits; relevance to the treatment of schizophrenia is also discussed.

  16. Nocifensive behavior-related laser heat-evoked component in the rostral agranular insular cortex revealed using morphine analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Yi; Liu, Chan-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Li; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2016-02-01

    The rostral agranular insular cortex (RAIC), an opioid-responsive site, is essential for modulating nociception in rats. Our previous studies have shown that morphine suppressed long latency laser heat-evoked nociceptive responses in the primary somatosensory cortex (SmI). By contrast, morphine significantly attenuated both short and long latency responses in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The present study assessed the effect of morphine on laser heat-evoked responses in the RAIC. Laser heat irradiation applied to the rat forepaws at graded levels was used as a specific noxious stimulus. In the RAIC, the first part of the long latency component (140-250ms) of the laser heat-evoked response was enhanced by intraperitoneal morphine (5mg/kg). When the laser heat-evoked cortical responses were examined for trials showing strong nocifensive movement (paw licking), moderate nocifensive movement (paw lifting), and no nocifensive movement, a 140-250ms period enhancement was observed in the RAIC only for the paw lifting movement. This enhancement was absent in the SmI. Thus, our data suggest that the RAIC has a pain-related behavior-dependent neuronal component. Furthermore, the RAIC, ACC, and SmI are differentially modulated by morphine analgesia.

  17. Resting state functional connectivity within the cingulate cortex jointly predicts agreeableness and stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity.

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    Ryan, John P; Sheu, Lei K; Gianaros, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    Exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to stress is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Further, individual differences in stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity covary with the functionality of corticolimbic brain systems, particularly areas of the cingulate cortex. What remains unclear, however, is how individual differences in personality traits interact with cingulate functionality in the prediction of stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity. Accordingly, we tested the associations between (i) a particular personality trait, Agreeableness, which is associated with emotional reactions to conflict, (ii) resting state functional connectivity within the cingulate cortex, and (iii) stressor-evoked blood pressure (BP) reactivity. Participants (N=39, 19 men, aged 20-37 years) completed a resting functional connectivity MRI protocol, followed by two standardized stressor tasks that engaged conflict processing and evoked BP reactivity. Agreeableness covaried positively with BP reactivity across individuals. Moreover, connectivity analyses demonstrated that a more positive functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate (BA31) and the perigenual anterior cingulate (BA32) covaried positively with Agreeableness and with BP reactivity. Finally, statistical mediation analyses demonstrated that BA31-BA32 connectivity mediated the covariation between Agreeableness and BP reactivity. Functional connectivity within the cingulate appears to link Agreeableness and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stressor-evoked BP reactivity.

  18. Low-frequency rTMS inhibitory effects in the primary motor cortex: Insights from TMS-evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casula, Elias P; Tarantino, Vincenza; Basso, Demis; Arcara, Giorgio; Marino, Giuliana; Toffolo, Gianna Maria; Rothwell, John C; Bisiacchi, Patrizia S

    2014-09-01

    The neuromodulatory effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have been mostly investigated by peripheral motor-evoked potentials (MEPs). New TMS-compatible EEG systems allow a direct investigation of the stimulation effects through the analysis of TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs). We investigated the effects of 1-Hz rTMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) of 15 healthy volunteers on TEP evoked by single pulse TMS over the same area. A second experiment in which rTMS was delivered over the primary visual cortex (V1) of 15 healthy volunteers was conducted to examine the spatial specificity of the effects. Single-pulse TMS evoked four main components: P30, N45, P60 and N100. M1-rTMS resulted in a significant decrease of MEP amplitude and in a significant increase of P60 and N100 amplitude. There was no effect after V1-rTMS. 1-Hz rTMS appears to increase the amount of inhibition following a TMS pulse, as demonstrated by the higher N100 and P60, which are thought to originate from GABAb-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic potentials. Our results confirm the reliability of the TMS-evoked N100 as a marker of cortical inhibition and provide insight into the neuromodulatory effects of 1-Hz rTMS. The present finding could be of relevance for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

  19. Occlusion of LTP-like plasticity in human primary motor cortex by action observation.

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    Jean-François Lepage

    Full Text Available Passive observation of motor actions induces cortical activity in the primary motor cortex (M1 of the onlooker, which could potentially contribute to motor learning. While recent studies report modulation of motor performance following action observation, the neurophysiological mechanism supporting these behavioral changes remains to be specifically defined. Here, we assessed whether the observation of a repetitive thumb movement--similarly to active motor practice--would inhibit subsequent long-term potentiation-like (LTP plasticity induced by paired-associative stimulation (PAS. Before undergoing PAS, participants were asked to either 1 perform abductions of the right thumb as fast as possible; 2 passively observe someone else perform thumb abductions; or 3 passively observe a moving dot mimicking thumb movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEP were used to assess cortical excitability before and after motor practice (or observation and at two time points following PAS. Results show that, similarly to participants in the motor practice group, individuals observing repeated motor actions showed marked inhibition of PAS-induced LTP, while the "moving dot" group displayed the expected increase in MEP amplitude, despite differences in baseline excitability. Interestingly, LTP occlusion in the action-observation group was present even if no increase in cortical excitability or movement speed was observed following observation. These results suggest that mere observation of repeated hand actions is sufficient to induce LTP, despite the absence of motor learning.

  20. Comparison of descending volleys evoked by transcranial and epidural motor cortex stimulation in a conscious patient with bulbar pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Meglio, M; Cioni, B; Papacci, F; Tonali, P A; Rothwell, J C

    2004-04-01

    To compare the pattern of activation of motor cortex produced by transcranial magnetic stimulation and epidural electrical stimulation. The spinal volleys evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation and epidural electrical stimulation over the cerebral motor cortex were recorded from an electrode inserted into the cervical epidural space of one conscious subject who also had a cortical epidural electrode over the motor area. The volleys were termed D- and I-waves according to their latency. Magnetic stimulation was performed with a figure-of-eight coil and the induced current flowed either in a postero-anterior (PA) or in latero-medial (LM) direction. At active motor threshold intensity LM magnetic stimulation evoked a D wave whereas PA stimulation evoked an I(1) wave with later I waves being recruited at increasing stimulus intensities. Electrical epidural stimulation evoked both a D wave and I waves. However, the D wave evoked by electrical epidural stimulation had a longer latency than the LM D wave, suggesting either a more proximal site of activation of the pyramidal axon or activation of slightly faster conducting set of corticospinal fibres by LM stimulation. The I3 wave evoked by electrical epidural stimulation also had a longer latency than the PA I3-wave Epidural stimulation of the motor cortex can produce repetitive excitation of corticospinal neurones. The order of recruitment of the volleys, and the latency of the D and I3 waves may be slightly different to that seen after transcranial magnetic stimulation. Our findings suggest that there may be subtle differences in the populations of neurones activated by the two forms of stimulation.

  1. The Role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in Activity-Dependent Neuronal Plasticity in the Visual Cortex.

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    Pulimood, Nisha S; Rodrigues, Wandilson Dos Santos; Atkinson, Devon A; Mooney, Sandra M; Medina, Alexandre E

    2017-07-12

    The transcription factors CREB (cAMP response element binding factor), SRF (serum response factor), and MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2) play critical roles in the mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity. However, the role of the activation of these transcription factors in the different components of plasticity in vivo is not well known. In this study, we tested the role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in ocular dominance plasticity (ODP), a paradigm of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in the visual cortex. These three proteins bind to the synaptic activity response element (SARE), an enhancer sequence found upstream of many plasticity-related genes (Kawashima et al., 2009; Rodríguez-Tornos et al., 2013), and can act cooperatively to express Arc, a gene required for ODP (McCurry et al., 2010). We used viral-mediated gene transfer to block the transcription function of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in the visual cortex, and measured visually evoked potentials in awake male and female mice before and after a 7 d monocular deprivation, which allowed us to examine both the depression component (Dc-ODP) and potentiation component (Pc-ODP) of plasticity independently. We found that CREB, SRF, and MEF2 are all required for ODP, but have differential effects on Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP. CREB is necessary for both Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP, whereas SRF and MEF2 are only needed for Dc-ODP. This finding supports previous reports implicating SRF and MEF2 in long-term depression (required for Dc-ODP), and CREB in long-term potentiation (required for Pc-ODP).SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is the cellular basis for learning and memory, and it is crucial for the refinement of neuronal circuits during development. Identifying the mechanisms of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is crucial to finding therapeutic interventions in the myriad of disorders where it is disrupted, such as Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, epilepsy, major depressive disorder, and autism

  2. Bimodal stimulus timing-dependent plasticity in primary auditory cortex is altered after noise exposure with and without tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Koehler, Seth D; Shore, Susan E

    2015-12-01

    Central auditory circuits are influenced by the somatosensory system, a relationship that may underlie tinnitus generation. In the guinea pig dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), pairing spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5) stimulation with tones at specific intervals and orders facilitated or suppressed subsequent tone-evoked neural responses, reflecting spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Furthermore, after noise-induced tinnitus, bimodal responses in DCN were shifted from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian timing rules with less discrete temporal windows, suggesting a role for bimodal plasticity in tinnitus. Here, we aimed to determine if multisensory STDP principles like those in DCN also exist in primary auditory cortex (A1), and whether they change following noise-induced tinnitus. Tone-evoked and spontaneous neural responses were recorded before and 15 min after bimodal stimulation in which the intervals and orders of auditory-somatosensory stimuli were randomized. Tone-evoked and spontaneous firing rates were influenced by the interval and order of the bimodal stimuli, and in sham-controls Hebbian-like timing rules predominated as was seen in DCN. In noise-exposed animals with and without tinnitus, timing rules shifted away from those found in sham-controls to more anti-Hebbian rules. Only those animals with evidence of tinnitus showed increased spontaneous firing rates, a purported neurophysiological correlate of tinnitus in A1. Together, these findings suggest that bimodal plasticity is also evident in A1 following noise damage and may have implications for tinnitus generation and therapeutic intervention across the central auditory circuit.

  3. Induction of plasticity in the human motor cortex by pairing an auditory stimulus with TMS

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Fredrick Sowman; Jesper eRasmussen; Søren eDueholm; Natalie eMrachacz-Kersting

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic stimuli can cause a transient increase in the excitability of the motor cortex. The current study leverages this phenomenon to develop a method for testing the integrity of auditorimotor integration and the capacity for auditorimotor plasticity. We demonstrate that appropriately timed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the hand area, paired with auditorily mediated excitation of the motor cortex, induces an enhancement of motor cortex excitability that lasts beyond the time o...

  4. Evidence for high-fidelity timing-dependent synaptic plasticity of human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, R F H; Mastaglia, F L; Thickbroom, G W

    2013-01-01

    A single transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse typically evokes a short series of spikes in corticospinal neurons [known as indirect (I)-waves] which are thought to arise from transynaptic input. Delivering a second pulse at inter-pulse intervals (IPIs) corresponding to the timing of these I-waves leads to a facilitation of the response, and if stimulus pairs are delivered repeatedly, a persistent LTP-like increase in excitability can occur. This has been demonstrated at an IPI of 1.5 ms, which corresponds to the first I-wave interval, in an intervention referred to as ITMS (I-wave TMS), and it has been argued that this may have similarities with timing-dependent plasticity models. Consequently, we hypothesized that if the second stimulus is delivered so as not to coincide with I-wave timing, it should lead to LTD. We performed a crossover study in 10 subjects in which TMS doublets were timed to coincide (1.5-ms IPI, ITMS(1.5)) or not coincide (2-ms IPI, ITMS(2)) with I-wave firing. Single pulse motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, resting motor threshold (RMT), and short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI) were measured from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. After ITMS(1.5) corticomotor excitability was increased by ~60% for 15 min (P < 0.05) and returned to baseline by 20 min. Increasing the IPI by just 500 μs to 2 ms reversed the aftereffect, and MEP amplitude was significantly reduced (~35%, P < 0.05) for 15 min before returning to baseline. This reduction was not associated with an increase in SICI, suggesting a reduction in excitatory transmission rather than an increase in inhibitory efficacy. RMT also remained unchanged, suggesting that these changes were not due to changes in membrane excitability. Amplitude-matching ITMS(2) did not modulate excitability. The results are consistent with timing-dependent synaptic LTP/D-like effects and suggest that there are plasticity mechanisms operating in the human motor cortex with a temporal

  5. Visual Cortex Plasticity Following Peripheral Damage To The Visual System: fMRI Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, João; Pereira, Daniela; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Over the last two decades, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful research method to investigate cortical visual plasticity. Abnormal fMRI response patterns have been occasionally detected in the visually deprived cortex of patients with bilateral retinal diseases. Controversy remains whether these observations indicate structural reorganization of the visual cortex or unmasking of previously silent cortico-cortical connections. In optic nerve diseases, there is weak evidence showing that early visual cortex seems to lack reorganization, while higher-order visual areas undergo plastic changes which may contribute to optimise visual function. There is however accumulating imaging evidence demonstrating trans-synaptic degeneration of the visual cortex in patients with disease of the anterior visual pathways. This may preclude the use of restorative treatments in these patients. Here, we review and update the body of fMRI evidence on visual cortical plasticity.

  6. Early and late activity in somatosensory cortex reflects changes in bodily self-consciousness: an evoked potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspell, J E; Palluel, E; Blanke, O

    2012-08-02

    How can we investigate the brain mechanisms underlying self-consciousness? Recent behavioural studies on multisensory bodily perception have shown that multisensory conflicts can alter bodily self-consciousness such as in the "full body illusion" (FBI) in which changes in self-identification with a virtual body and tactile perception are induced. Here we investigated whether experimental changes in self-identification during the FBI are accompanied by activity changes in somatosensory cortex by recording somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs). To modulate self-identification, participants were filmed by a video camera from behind while their backs were stroked, either synchronously (illusion condition) or asynchronously (control condition) with respect to the stroking seen on their virtual body. Tibial nerve SEPs were recorded during the FBI and analysed using evoked potential (EP) mapping. Tactile mislocalisation was measured using the crossmodal congruency task. SEP mapping revealed five sequential periods of brain activation during the FBI, of which two differed between the illusion condition and the control condition. Activation at 30-50 ms (corresponding to the P40 component) in primary somatosensory cortex was stronger in the illusion condition. A later activation at ∼110-200 ms, likely originating in higher-tier somatosensory regions in parietal cortex, was stronger and lasted longer in the control condition. These data show that changes in bodily self-consciousness modulate activity in primary and higher-tier somatosensory cortex at two distinct processing steps. We argue that early modulations of primary somatosensory cortex may be a consequence of (1) multisensory integration of synchronous vs. asynchronous visuo-tactile stimuli and/or (2) differences in spatial attention (to near or far space) between the conditions. The later activation in higher-tier parietal cortex (and potentially other regions in temporo-parietal and frontal cortex) likely

  7. Long-range neural activity evoked by premotor cortex stimulation: a TMS/EEG co-registration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eZanon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The premotor cortex is one of the fundamental structures composing the neural networks of the human brain. It is implicated in many behaviors and cognitive tasks, ranging from movement to attention and eye-related activity. Therefore, neural circuits that are related to premotor cortex have been studied to clarify their connectivity and/or role in different tasks. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the propagation of the neural activity evoked in the dorsal premotor cortex using transcranial magnetic stimulation/electroencephalography (TMS/EEG. Towards this end, interest was focused on the neural dynamics elicited in long-ranging temporal and spatial networks. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent a single-pulse TMS protocol in a resting condition with eyes closed, and the evoked activity, measured by EEG, was compared to a sham condition in a time window ranging from 45 msec to about 200 msec after TMS. Spatial and temporal investigations were carried out with sLORETA. TMS was found to induce propagation of neural activity mainly in the contralateral sensorimotor and frontal cortices, at about 130 msec after delivery of the stimulus. Different types of analyses showed propagated activity also in posterior, mainly visual, regions, in a time window between 70 and 130 msec. Finally, a likely rebounding activation of the sensorimotor and frontal regions, was observed in various time ranges. Taken together, the present findings further characterize the neural circuits that are driven by dorsal premotor cortex activation in healthy humans.

  8. THE EFFECTS OF SALICYLATE ON AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIAL AMPLITWDE FROM THE AUDITORY CORTEX AND AUDITORY BRAINSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Sawka; SUN Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus has often been studied using salicylate in animal models as they are capable of inducing tempo-rary hearing loss and tinnitus. Studies have recently observed enhancement of auditory evoked responses of the auditory cortex (AC) post salicylate treatment which is also shown to be related to tinnitus like behavior in rats. The aim of this study was to observe if enhancements of the AC post salicylate treatment are also present at structures in the brainstem. Four male Sprague Dawley rats with AC implanted electrodes were tested for both AC and auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings pre and post 250 mg/kg intraperitone-al injections of salicylate. The responses were recorded as the peak to trough amplitudes of P1-N1 (AC), ABR wave V, and ABR waveⅡ. AC responses resulted in statistically significant enhancement of ampli-tude at 2 hours post salicylate with 90 dB stimuli tone bursts of 4, 8, 12, and 20 kHz. Wave V of ABR re-sponses at 90 dB resulted in a statistically significant reduction of amplitude 2 hours post salicylate and a mean decrease of amplitude of 31%for 16 kHz. WaveⅡamplitudes at 2 hours post treatment were signifi-cantly reduced for 4, 12, and 20 kHz stimuli at 90 dB SPL. Our results suggest that the enhancement chang-es of the AC related to salicylate induced tinnitus are generated superior to the level of the inferior colliculus and may originate in the AC.

  9. Prandial states modify the reactivity of the gustatory cortex using gustatory evoked potentials in humans

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    Agnès eJACQUIN-PIQUES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies evaluated the role of satiety on cortical taste area activity and highlighted decreased activation in the orbito-frontal cortex when food was eaten until satiation. The modulation of orbito-frontal neurons (secondary taste area by ad libitum food intake has been associated with the pleasantness of the food’s flavor. The insula and frontal operculum (primary taste area are also involved in reward processing. The aim was to compare human gustatory evoked potentials (GEP recorded in the primary and secondary gustatory cortices in a fasted state with those after food intake. Fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled in this observational study. In each of two sessions, two GEP recordings were performed (at 11:00 am and 1:30 pm in response to sucrose gustatory stimulation, and a sucrose-gustatory threshold was determined. During one session, a standard lunch was provided between the two GEP recordings. During the other session, subjects had nothing to eat. Hunger sensation, wanting, liking and the perception of the solution’s intensity were evaluated with visual analogue scales. GEP latencies measured in the Pz (p<0.001, Cz (p<0.01, Fz (p<0.001 recordings (primary taste area were longer after lunch than in the pre-prandial condition. Fp1 and Fp2 latencies (secondary taste area tended to be longer after lunch, but the difference was not significant. No difference was observed for the sucrose-gustatory threshold regardless of the session and time. Modifications in the primary taste area activity during the post-prandial period occurred regardless of the nature of the food eaten and could represent the activity of the frontal operculum and insula, which was recently shown to be modulated by gut signals (GLP-1, CCK, ghrelin, or insulin through vagal afferent neurons or metabolic changes of the internal milieu after nutrient absorption. This trial was registered at clinicalstrials.gov as NCT

  10. Bidirectional Hebbian Plasticity Induced by Low-Frequency Stimulation in Basal Dendrites of Rat Barrel Cortex Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-García, Andrea; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Núñez, Ángel; Buño, Washington; Fernández de Sevilla, David

    2017-01-01

    According to Hebb's original hypothesis (Hebb, 1949), synapses are reinforced when presynaptic activity triggers postsynaptic firing, resulting in long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic efficacy. Long-term depression (LTD) is a use-dependent decrease in synaptic strength that is thought to be due to synaptic input causing a weak postsynaptic effect. Although the mechanisms that mediate long-term synaptic plasticity have been investigated for at least three decades not all question have as yet been answered. Therefore, we aimed at determining the mechanisms that generate LTP or LTD with the simplest possible protocol. Low-frequency stimulation of basal dendrite inputs in Layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat barrel cortex induces LTP. This stimulation triggered an EPSP, an action potential (AP) burst, and a Ca2+ spike. The same stimulation induced LTD following manipulations that reduced the Ca2+ spike and Ca2+ signal or the AP burst. Low-frequency whisker deflections induced similar bidirectional plasticity of action potential evoked responses in anesthetized rats. These results suggest that both in vitro and in vivo similar mechanisms regulate the balance between LTP and LTD. This simple induction form of bidirectional hebbian plasticity could be present in the natural conditions to regulate the detection, flow, and storage of sensorimotor information. PMID:28203145

  11. Sleep recalibrates homeostatic and associative synaptic plasticity in the human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Marion; Wolf, Elias; Maier, Jonathan G; Mainberger, Florian; Feige, Bernd; Schmid, Hanna; Bürklin, Jan; Maywald, Sarah; Mall, Volker; Jung, Nikolai H; Reis, Janine; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Klöppel, Stefan; Sterr, Annette; Eckert, Anne; Riemann, Dieter; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph

    2016-08-23

    Sleep is ubiquitous in animals and humans, but its function remains to be further determined. The synaptic homeostasis hypothesis of sleep-wake regulation proposes a homeostatic increase in net synaptic strength and cortical excitability along with decreased inducibility of associative synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) due to saturation after sleep deprivation. Here we use electrophysiological, behavioural and molecular indices to non-invasively study net synaptic strength and LTP-like plasticity in humans after sleep and sleep deprivation. We demonstrate indices of increased net synaptic strength (TMS intensity to elicit a predefined amplitude of motor-evoked potential and EEG theta activity) and decreased LTP-like plasticity (paired associative stimulation induced change in motor-evoked potential and memory formation) after sleep deprivation. Changes in plasma BDNF are identified as a potential mechanism. Our study indicates that sleep recalibrates homeostatic and associative synaptic plasticity, believed to be the neural basis for adaptive behaviour, in humans.

  12. Sleep recalibrates homeostatic and associative synaptic plasticity in the human cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Marion; Wolf, Elias; Maier, Jonathan G.; Mainberger, Florian; Feige, Bernd; Schmid, Hanna; Bürklin, Jan; Maywald, Sarah; Mall, Volker; Jung, Nikolai H.; Reis, Janine; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Klöppel, Stefan; Sterr, Annette; Eckert, Anne; Riemann, Dieter; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is ubiquitous in animals and humans, but its function remains to be further determined. The synaptic homeostasis hypothesis of sleep–wake regulation proposes a homeostatic increase in net synaptic strength and cortical excitability along with decreased inducibility of associative synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) due to saturation after sleep deprivation. Here we use electrophysiological, behavioural and molecular indices to non-invasively study net synaptic strength and LTP-like plasticity in humans after sleep and sleep deprivation. We demonstrate indices of increased net synaptic strength (TMS intensity to elicit a predefined amplitude of motor-evoked potential and EEG theta activity) and decreased LTP-like plasticity (paired associative stimulation induced change in motor-evoked potential and memory formation) after sleep deprivation. Changes in plasma BDNF are identified as a potential mechanism. Our study indicates that sleep recalibrates homeostatic and associative synaptic plasticity, believed to be the neural basis for adaptive behaviour, in humans. PMID:27551934

  13. Induction of plasticity in the human motor cortex by pairing an auditory stimulus with TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowman, Paul F; Dueholm, Søren S; Rasmussen, Jesper H; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic stimuli can cause a transient increase in the excitability of the motor cortex. The current study leverages this phenomenon to develop a method for testing the integrity of auditorimotor integration and the capacity for auditorimotor plasticity. We demonstrate that appropriately timed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the hand area, paired with auditorily mediated excitation of the motor cortex, induces an enhancement of motor cortex excitability that lasts beyond the time of stimulation. This result demonstrates for the first time that paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity within the motor cortex is applicable with auditory stimuli. We propose that the method developed here might provide a useful tool for future studies that measure auditory-motor connectivity in communication disorders.

  14. Synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimuli in Purkinje cells in mouse cerebellar cortex Crus II in vivo.

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    Chun-Ping Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sensory stimuli evoke responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway. However, the properties of synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimulation in cerebellar PCs are unknown. The present study investigated the synaptic responses of PCs in response to an air-puff stimulation on the ipsilateral whisker pad in urethane-anesthetized mice. METHODS AND MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-three PCs were recorded from 48 urethane-anesthetized adult (6-8-week-old HA/ICR mice by somatic or dendritic patch-clamp recording and pharmacological methods. Tactile stimulation to the ipsilateral whisker pad was delivered by an air-puff through a 12-gauge stainless steel tube connected with a pressurized injection system. Under current-clamp conditions (I = 0, the air-puff stimulation evoked strong inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs in the somata of PCs. Application of SR95531, a specific GABA(A receptor antagonist, blocked IPSPs and revealed stimulation-evoked simple spike firing. Under voltage-clamp conditions, tactile stimulation evoked a sequence of transient inward currents followed by strong outward currents in the somata and dendrites in PCs. Application of SR95531 blocked outward currents and revealed excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in somata and a temporal summation of parallel fiber EPSCs in PC dendrites. We also demonstrated that PCs respond to both the onset and offset of the air-puff stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that tactile stimulation induced asynchronous parallel fiber excitatory inputs onto the dendrites of PCs, and failed to evoke strong EPSCs and spike firing in PCs, but induced the rapid activation of strong GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the somata and dendrites of PCs in the cerebellar cortex Crus II in urethane-anesthetized mice.

  15. The Corpus Callosum and the Visual Cortex: Plasticity Is a Game for Two

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    Marta Pietrasanta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, experience shapes and selects the most appropriate brain functional connectivity to adapt to a changing environment. An ideal system to study experience-dependent plasticity is the visual cortex, because visual experience can be easily manipulated. In this paper, we focus on the role of interhemispheric, transcallosal projections in experience-dependent plasticity of the visual cortex. We review data showing that deprivation of sensory experience can modify the morphology of callosal fibres, thus altering the communication between the two hemispheres. More importantly, manipulation of callosal input activity during an early critical period alters developmental maturation of functional properties in visual cortex and modifies its ability to remodel in response to experience. We also discuss recent data in rat visual cortex, demonstrating that the corpus callosum plays a role in binocularity of cortical neurons and is involved in the plastic shift of eye preference that follows a period of monocular eyelid suture (monocular deprivation in early age. Thus, experience can modify the fine connectivity of the corpus callosum, and callosal connections represent a major pathway through which experience can mediate functional maturation and plastic rearrangements in the visual cortex.

  16. Music-induced cortical plasticity and lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex as foundations for tonal tinnitus treatment

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    Christo ePantev

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years, we have studied plasticity in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. Two main topics nurtured our curiosity: the effects of musical training on plasticity in the auditory system, and the effects of lateral inhibition. One of our plasticity studies found that listening to notched music for three hours inhibited the neuronal activity in the auditory cortex that corresponded to the center-frequency of the notch, suggesting suppression of neural activity by lateral inhibition. Crucially, the overall effects of lateral inhibition on human auditory cortical activity were stronger than the habituation effects. Based on these results we developed a novel treatment strategy for tonal tinnitus - tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT. By notching the music energy spectrum around the individual tinnitus frequency, we intended to attract lateral inhibition to auditory neurons involved in tinnitus perception. So far, the training strategy has been evaluated in two studies. The results of the initial long-term controlled study (12 months supported the validity of the treatment concept: subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance were significantly reduced after TMNMT but not when notching spared the tinnitus frequencies. Correspondingly, tinnitus-related auditory evoked fields (AEFs were significantly reduced after training. The subsequent short-term (5 days training study indicated that training was more effective in the case of tinnitus frequencies ≤ 8 kHz compared to tinnitus frequencies > 8 kHz, and that training should be employed over a long-term in order to induce more persistent effects. Further development and evaluation of TMNMT therapy are planned. A goal is to transfer this novel, completely non-invasive, and low-cost treatment approach for tonal tinnitus into routine clinical practice.

  17. The disorganized visual cortex in reelin-deficient mice is functional and allows for enhanced plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Wagener, Robin Jan; Martens, Ann-Kristin; Goetze, Bianka; Schmidt, Karl-Friedrich; Staiger, Jochen F; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-11-01

    A hallmark of neocortical circuits is the segregation of processing streams into six distinct layers. The importance of this layered organization for cortical processing and plasticity is little understood. We investigated the structure, function and plasticity of primary visual cortex (V1) of adult mice deficient for the glycoprotein reelin and their wild-type littermates. In V1 of rl-/- mice, cells with different laminar fates are present at all cortical depths. Surprisingly, the (vertically) disorganized cortex maintains a precise retinotopic (horizontal) organization. Rl-/- mice have normal basic visual capabilities, but are compromised in more challenging perceptual tasks, such as orientation discrimination. Additionally, rl-/- animals learn and memorize a visual task as well as their wild-type littermates. Interestingly, reelin deficiency enhances visual cortical plasticity: juvenile-like ocular dominance plasticity is preserved into late adulthood. The present data offer an important insight into the capabilities of a disorganized cortical system to maintain basic functional properties.

  18. Cocaine-induced Modification of Synaptic Plasticity in Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in relapse after withdrawal for cocaine exposure, but changes in synaptic function and plasticity in the mPFC during the period of withdrawal remain largely unknown. After the termination of repeated cocaine treatments in rats, I observed a gradual enhancement in the susceptibility of excitatory synapses on layer V mPFC pyramidal neurons to activity-induced long-term potentiation (LTP). This enhanced synaptic plasticity could be attributed to a grad...

  19. Cortico-fugal output from visual cortex promotes plasticity of innate motor behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao-Hua; Huberman, Andrew D; Scanziani, Massimo

    2016-10-20

    The mammalian visual cortex massively innervates the brainstem, a phylogenetically older structure, via cortico-fugal axonal projections. Many cortico-fugal projections target brainstem nuclei that mediate innate motor behaviours, but the function of these projections remains poorly understood. A prime example of such behaviours is the optokinetic reflex (OKR), an innate eye movement mediated by the brainstem accessory optic system, that stabilizes images on the retina as the animal moves through the environment and is thus crucial for vision. The OKR is plastic, allowing the amplitude of this reflex to be adaptively adjusted relative to other oculomotor reflexes and thereby ensuring image stability throughout life. Although the plasticity of the OKR is thought to involve subcortical structures such as the cerebellum and vestibular nuclei, cortical lesions have suggested that the visual cortex might also be involved. Here we show that projections from the mouse visual cortex to the accessory optic system promote the adaptive plasticity of the OKR. OKR potentiation, a compensatory plastic increase in the amplitude of the OKR in response to vestibular impairment, is diminished by silencing visual cortex. Furthermore, targeted ablation of a sparse population of cortico-fugal neurons that specifically project to the accessory optic system severely impairs OKR potentiation. Finally, OKR potentiation results from an enhanced drive exerted by the visual cortex onto the accessory optic system. Thus, cortico-fugal projections to the brainstem enable the visual cortex, an area that has been principally studied for its sensory processing function, to plastically adapt the execution of innate motor behaviours.

  20. Altered neuronal architecture and plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Jeroen; Nys, Julie; Moons, Lieve; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidases considered to be essential for normal brain development and neuroplasticity by modulating extracellular matrix proteins, receptors, adhesion molecules, growth factors and cytoskeletal proteins. Specifically, MMP-3 has recently been implicated in synaptic plasticity, hippocampus-dependent learning and neuronal development and migration in the cerebellum. However, the function(s) of this enzyme in the neocortex is understudied. Therefore, we explored the phenotypical characteristics of the neuronal architecture and the capacity for experience-dependent cortical plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient (MMP-3(-/-)) mice. Golgi-Cox stainings revealed a significant reduction in apical dendritic length and an increased number of apical obliques for layer V pyramidal neurons in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) animals. In addition, a significant upregulation of both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (NF)-high, phosphorylated NF-medium, NF-low and α-internexin was detected in the visual cortex of MMP-3(-/-) mice. To assess the effect of MMP-3 deficiency on cortical plasticity, we monocularly enucleated adult MMP-3(-/-) mice and analyzed the reactivation of the contralateral visual cortex 7 weeks post-enucleation. In contrast to previous results in C57Bl/6J adult mice, activity remained confined to the binocular zone and did not expand into the monocular regions indicative for an aberrant open-eye potentiation. Permanent hypoactivity in the monocular cortex lateral and medial to V1 also indicated a lack of cross-modal plasticity. These observations demonstrate that genetic inactivation of MMP-3 has profound effects on the structural integrity and plasticity response of the visual cortex of adult mice.

  1. Synchrony between orientation-selective neurons is modulated during adaptation-induced plasticity in cat visual cortex

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    Shumikhina Svetlana

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual neurons respond essentially to luminance variations occurring within their receptive fields. In primary visual cortex, each neuron is a filter for stimulus features such as orientation, motion direction and velocity, with the appropriate combination of features eliciting maximal firing rate. Temporal correlation of spike trains was proposed as a potential code for linking the neuronal responses evoked by various features of a same object. In the present study, synchrony strength was measured between cells following an adaptation protocol (prolonged exposure to a non-preferred stimulus which induce plasticity of neurons' orientation preference. Results Multi-unit activity from area 17 of anesthetized adult cats was recorded. Single cells were sorted out and (1 orientation tuning curves were measured before and following 12 min adaptation and 60 min after adaptation (2 pairwise synchrony was measured by an index that was normalized in relation to the cells' firing rate. We first observed that the prolonged presentation of a non-preferred stimulus produces attractive (58% and repulsive (42% shifts of cell's tuning curves. It follows that the adaptation-induced plasticity leads to changes in preferred orientation difference, i.e. increase or decrease in tuning properties between neurons. We report here that, after adaptation, the neuron pairs that shared closer tuning properties display a significant increase of synchronization. Recovery from adaptation was accompanied by a return to the initial synchrony level. Conclusion We conclude that synchrony reflects the similarity in neurons' response properties, and varies accordingly when these properties change.

  2. Language plasticity in aphasics after recovery: evidence from slow evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spironelli, Chiara; Angrilli, Alessandro; Pertile, Marco

    2008-04-01

    With the present experiment we sought to investigate brain plasticity underlying language recovery in a group of seventeen patients with non-fluent aphasia mainly caused by stroke. Patients were screened along three domains of measures: analysis of linguistic components by the Aachener Aphasie Test, combined mapping of their lesion from CT/MRI scans, and functional measure of the reorganized linguistic processes by means of mapping of slow evoked potentials. The spatial dimension and temporal dynamics of word processing were measured in three tasks, Phonological, Semantic and Orthographic. Compared with the matched control group, patients showed relative inhibition (decreased negativity) of left central regions in perisylvian areas, which were damaged in most subjects. In addition, reorganization of linguistic functions occurred within the left hemisphere both at frontal and posterior sites corresponding to spared brain regions. Correlations between linguistic lateralization in the three tasks and AAT subtests point to functional reorganization of phonological processes over left frontal sites and dysfunctional reorganization of semantic processing over left posterior regions.

  3. The strychnine-like action of curare and related compounds on the somatosensory evoked response of the rat cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, V. K.; Meldrum, B. S.

    1969-01-01

    1. Drugs were applied to the cerebral cortex of rats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone and changes measured in the somatosensory primary evoked response. 2. Computer-derived averages of thirty-two consecutive responses yielded stable and consistent measurements of the potential changes comprising the evoked response, and comparable records from the opposite (non-drug treated) cortex provided an essential control for systemic actions of the drug. 3. The modifications produced by curare and strychnine were indistinguishable. The first positive wave (peak latency 7 msec) was unaltered; the second positive wave (peak latency 11·5 msec) was variably enhanced, and the first and second negative waves (peak latencies 16 and 40 msec) were replaced by a much larger negative wave (peak latency 22 msec). 4. The time of onset of the effect on the negative waves and the maximal amplitude attained by the abnormal negative wave were related to the log concentration of the drug used. Curare is approximately 10 times more potent than strychnine. 5. Toxiferine I, di-allylnortoxiferine and atropine also produced this effect but were less potent than strychnine. 6. Succinylcholine, dihydro-β-erythroidine and gallamine triethiodide did not produce this effect (in concentrations up to 10-3M). 7. The observations are consistent with an action of curare and strychnine on an intracortical cholinergic inhibitory system, but other possibilities including a “non-specific excitatory action” cannot be excluded. PMID:5824927

  4. Cochlear injury and adaptive plasticity of the auditory cortex

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    ANNA R. eFETONI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that cochlear stressors as noise exposure and aging can induce homeostatic/maladaptive changes in the central auditory system from the brainstem to the cortex. Studies centered on such changes have revealed several mechanisms that operate in the context of sensory disruption after insult (noise trauma, drug- or age-related injury. The oxidative stress is central to current theories of induced sensory neural hearing loss and aging, and interventions to attenuate the hearing loss are based on antioxidant agent. The present review addresses the recent literature on the alterations in hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons due to noise-induced oxidative stress in the cochlea, as well on the impact of cochlear damage on the auditory cortex neurons. The emerging image emphasizes that noise-induced deafferentation and upward spread of cochlear damage is associated with the altered dendritic architecture of auditory pyramidal neurons. The cortical modifications may be reversed by treatment with antioxidants counteracting the cochlear redox imbalance. These findings open new therapeutic approaches to treat the functional consequences of the cortical reorganization following cochlear damage.

  5. Associative plasticity in the human motor cortex is enhanced by concurrently targeting separate muscle representations with excitatory and inhibitory protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Marc R; Nydam, Abbey S; Sale, Martin V; Mattingley, Jason B

    2016-04-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) induces changes in the excitability of human sensorimotor cortex that outlast the procedure. PAS typically involves repeatedly pairing stimulation of a peripheral nerve that innervates an intrinsic hand muscle with transcranial magnetic stimulation over the representation of that muscle in the primary motor cortex. Depending on the timing of the stimuli (interstimulus interval of 25 or 10 ms), PAS leads to either an increase (PAS25) or a decrease (PAS10) in excitability. Both protocols, however, have been associated with an increase in excitability of nearby muscle representations not specifically targeted by PAS. Based on these spillover effects, we hypothesized that an additive, excitability-enhancing effect of PAS25 applied to one muscle representation may be produced by simultaneously applying PAS25 or PAS10 to a nearby representation. In different experiments prototypical PAS25 targeting the left thumb representation [abductor pollicis brevis (APB)] was combined with either PAS25 or PAS10 applied to the left little finger representation [abductor digiti minimi (ADM)] or, in a control experiment, with PAS10 also targeting the APB. In an additional control experiment PAS10 targeted both representations. The plasticity effects were quantified by measuring the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded before and after PAS. As expected, prototypical PAS25 was associated with an increase in MEP amplitude in the APB muscle. This effect was enhanced when PAS also targeted the ADM representation but only when a different interstimulus timing (PAS10) was used. These results suggest that PAS-induced plasticity is modified by concurrently targeting separate motor cortical representations with excitatory and inhibitory protocols.

  6. Plasticity of the human auditory cortex related to musical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantev, Christo; Herholz, Sibylle C

    2011-11-01

    During the last decades music neuroscience has become a rapidly growing field within the area of neuroscience. Music is particularly well suited for studying neuronal plasticity in the human brain because musical training is more complex and multimodal than most other daily life activities, and because prospective and professional musicians usually pursue the training with high and long-lasting commitment. Therefore, music has increasingly been used as a tool for the investigation of human cognition and its underlying brain mechanisms. Music relates to many brain functions like perception, action, cognition, emotion, learning and memory and therefore music is an ideal tool to investigate how the human brain is working and how different brain functions interact. Novel findings have been obtained in the field of induced cortical plasticity by musical training. The positive effects, which music in its various forms has in the healthy human brain are not only important in the framework of basic neuroscience, but they also will strongly affect the practices in neuro-rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

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    Laura Musazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated, and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486. On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats. Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes

  8. Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation to identify epileptogenic cortex: Clinical information obtained from early evoked responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouthaan, B.E.; van 't Klooster, M.A.; Keizer, D.; Hebbink, Gerrit Jan; Leijten, F.S.; Ferrier, C.H.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Zijlmans, M.; Huiskamp, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation (SPES) probes epileptogenic cortex during electrocorticography. Two SPES responses are described: pathological delayed responses (DR, >100 ms) associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) and physiological early responses (ER, <100 ms) that map cortical

  9. Single pulse electrical stimulation to identify epileptogenic cortex: Clinical information obtained from early evoked responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouthaan, B.E.; van 't Klooster, M.A.; Keizer, D.; Hebbink, Gerrit Jan; Leijten, F.S.S.; Ferrier, C.H.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Zijlmans, M.; Huiskamp, G.J.M.

    Objective: Single Pulse Electrical Stimulation (SPES) probes epileptogenic cortex during electrocorticography. Two SPES responses are described: pathological delayed responses (DR, >100 ms) associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) and physiological early responses (ER, <100 ms) that map cortical

  10. HDAC2 expression in parvalbumin interneurons regulates synaptic plasticity in the mouse visual cortex

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    Alexi Nott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experience-dependent postnatal increase in GABAergic inhibition in the visual cortex is important for the closure of a critical period of enhanced synaptic plasticity. Although maturation of the subclass of parvalbumin (Pv–expressing GABAergic interneurons is known to contribute to critical period closure, the role of epigenetics on cortical inhibition and synaptic plasticity has not been explored. The transcription regulator, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2, has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity and learning processes in hippocampal excitatory neurons. We found that genetic deletion of HDAC2 specifically from Pv interneurons reduces inhibitory input in the visual cortex of adult mice and coincides with enhanced long-term depression that is more typical of young mice. These findings show that HDAC2 loss in Pv interneurons leads to a delayed closure of the critical period in the visual cortex and supports the hypothesis that HDAC2 is a key negative regulator of synaptic plasticity in the adult brain.

  11. Novel experience induces persistent sleep-dependent plasticity in the cortex but not in the hippocampus

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    Sidarta Ribeiro

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Episodic and spatial memories engage the hippocampus during acquisition but migrate to the cerebral cortex over time. We have recently proposed that the interplay between slow-wave (SWS and rapid eye movement (REM sleep propagates recent synaptic changes from the hippocampus to the cortex. To test this theory, we jointly assessed extracellular neuronal activity, local field potentials (LFP, and expression levels of plasticity-related immediate-early genes (IEG arc and zif-268 in rats exposed to novel spatio-tactile experience. Post-experience firing rate increases were strongest in SWS and lasted much longer in the cortex (hours than in the hippocampus (minutes. During REM sleep, firing rates showed strong temporal dependence across brain areas: cortical activation during experience predicted hippocampal activity in the first post-experience hour, while hippocampal activation during experience predicted cortical activity in the third post-experience hour. Four hours after experience, IEG expression was specifically upregulated during REM sleep in the cortex, but not in the hippocampus. Arc gene expression in the cortex was proportional to LFP amplitude in the spindle-range (10-14 Hz but not to firing rates, as expected from signals more related to dendritic input than to somatic output. The results indicate that hippocampo-cortical activation during waking is followed by multiple waves of cortical plasticity as full sleep cycles recur. The absence of equivalent changes in the hippocampus may explain its mnemonic disengagement over time.

  12. Auditory evoked fields elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal changes in human cerebral cortex

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    Hidehiko eOkamoto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral-temporal change were very similar to those elicited by the spectral change, but those elicited by the temporal change were delayed by 30 – 50 ms and differed from the others in morphology. The results suggest that human brain responses corresponding to spectral sound changes precede those corresponding to temporal sound changes, even when the spectral and temporal changes occur simultaneously.

  13. Two Coincidence Detectors for Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity in Somatosensory Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Many cortical synapses exhibit spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) in which the precise timing of presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes induces synaptic strengthening [long-term potentiation (LTP)] or weakening [long-term depression (LTD)]. Standard models posit a single, postsynaptic, NMDA receptor-based coincidence detector for LTP and LTD components of STDP. We show instead that STDP at layer 4 to layer 2/3 synapses in somatosensory (S1) cortex involves separate calcium sources and coin...

  14. Dopamine Promotes Motor Cortex Plasticity and Motor Skill Learning via PLC Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioult-Pedotti, Mengia-Seraina; Pekanovic, Ana; Atiemo, Clement Osei; Marshall, John; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, the major midbrain nucleus projecting to the motor cortex, play a key role in motor skill learning and motor cortex synaptic plasticity. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists exert parallel effects in the motor system: they impair motor skill learning and reduce long-term potentiation. Traditionally, D1 and D2 receptor modulate adenylyl cyclase activity and cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation in opposite directions via different G-proteins and bidirectionally modulate protein kinase A (PKA), leading to distinct physiological and behavioral effects. Here we show that D1 and D2 receptor activity influences motor skill acquisition and long term synaptic potentiation via phospholipase C (PLC) activation in rat primary motor cortex. Learning a new forelimb reaching task is severely impaired in the presence of PLC, but not PKA-inhibitor. Similarly, long term potentiation in motor cortex, a mechanism involved in motor skill learning, is reduced when PLC is inhibited but remains unaffected by the PKA inhibitor. Skill learning deficits and reduced synaptic plasticity caused by dopamine antagonists are prevented by co-administration of a PLC agonist. These results provide evidence for a role of intracellular PLC signaling in motor skill learning and associated cortical synaptic plasticity, challenging the traditional view of bidirectional modulation of PKA by D1 and D2 receptors. These findings reveal a novel and important action of dopamine in motor cortex that might be a future target for selective therapeutic interventions to support learning and recovery of movement resulting from injury and disease.

  15. Dopamine Promotes Motor Cortex Plasticity and Motor Skill Learning via PLC Activation.

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    Mengia-Seraina Rioult-Pedotti

    Full Text Available Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, the major midbrain nucleus projecting to the motor cortex, play a key role in motor skill learning and motor cortex synaptic plasticity. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists exert parallel effects in the motor system: they impair motor skill learning and reduce long-term potentiation. Traditionally, D1 and D2 receptor modulate adenylyl cyclase activity and cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation in opposite directions via different G-proteins and bidirectionally modulate protein kinase A (PKA, leading to distinct physiological and behavioral effects. Here we show that D1 and D2 receptor activity influences motor skill acquisition and long term synaptic potentiation via phospholipase C (PLC activation in rat primary motor cortex. Learning a new forelimb reaching task is severely impaired in the presence of PLC, but not PKA-inhibitor. Similarly, long term potentiation in motor cortex, a mechanism involved in motor skill learning, is reduced when PLC is inhibited but remains unaffected by the PKA inhibitor. Skill learning deficits and reduced synaptic plasticity caused by dopamine antagonists are prevented by co-administration of a PLC agonist. These results provide evidence for a role of intracellular PLC signaling in motor skill learning and associated cortical synaptic plasticity, challenging the traditional view of bidirectional modulation of PKA by D1 and D2 receptors. These findings reveal a novel and important action of dopamine in motor cortex that might be a future target for selective therapeutic interventions to support learning and recovery of movement resulting from injury and disease.

  16. Stability and Plasticity of Contextual Modulation in the Mouse Visual Cortex

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    Adam Ranson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity of neurons in primary visual cortex is shaped by sensory and behavioral context. However, the long-term stability of the influence of contextual factors in the mature cortex remains poorly understood. To investigate this, we used two-photon calcium imaging to track the influence of surround suppression and locomotion on individual neurons over 14 days. We found that highly active excitatory neurons and parvalbumin-positive (PV+ interneurons exhibited relatively stable modulation by visual context. Similarly, most neurons exhibited a stable yet distinct degree of modulation by locomotion. In contrast, less active excitatory neurons exhibited plasticity in visual context influence, resulting in increased suppression. These findings suggest that the mature visual cortex possesses stable subnetworks of neurons, differentiated by cell type and activity level, which have distinctive and stable interactions with sensory and behavioral contexts, as well as other less active and more labile neurons, which are sensitive to visual experience.

  17. Quantification of mid and late evoked sinks in laminar current source density profiles of columns in the primary auditory cortex.

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    Schaefer, Markus K; Hechavarría, Julio C; Kössl, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Current source density (CSD) analysis assesses spatiotemporal synaptic activations at somatic and/or dendritic levels in the form of depolarizing current sinks. Whereas many studies have focused on the short (primary auditory cortex of Mongolian gerbils. By applying an algorithm for contour calculation, three distinct mid and four late evoked sinks were identified in layers I, III, Va, VIa, and VIb. Our results further showed that the patterns of intracortical information-flow remained qualitatively similar for low and for high sound pressure level stimuli at the characteristic frequency (CF) as well as for stimuli ± 1 octave from CF. There were, however, differences associated with the strength, vertical extent, onset latency, and duration of the sinks for the four stimulation paradigms used. Stimuli one octave above the most sensitive frequency evoked a new, and quite reliable, sink in layer Va whereas low level stimulation led to the disappearance of the layer VIb sink. These data indicate the presence of input sources specifically activated in response to level and/or frequency parameters. Furthermore, spectral integration above vs. below the CF of neurons is asymmetric as illustrated by CSD profiles. These results are important because synaptic feedback associated with mid and late sinks-beginning at 50 ms post stimulus latency-is likely crucial for response modulation resulting from higher order processes like memory, learning or cognitive control.

  18. A systematic review of non-motor rTMS induced motor cortex plasticity

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    Gregory eNordmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Motor cortex excitability can be measured by single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS can induce neuroplastic effects in stimulated and in functionally connected cortical regions. Due to its ability to non-invasively modulate cortical activity, rTMS has been investigated for the treatment of various neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, such studies revealed a high variability of both clinical and neuronal effects induced by rTMS. In order to better elucidate this meta-plasticity, rTMS-induced changes in motor cortex excitability have been monitored in various studies in a pre-post stimulation design. Here, we give a systematic literature review (April 2014 of 29 studies investigating motor cortex excitability changes as a neuronal marker for rTMS effects over non-motor cortical areas. The majority of the studies focused on the stimulation of one of three separate cortical areas: the prefrontal area (17 studies, the cerebellum (8 studies, or the temporal cortex (3 studies. One study assessed the effects of multi-site rTMS. Most studies investigated healthy controls but some also stimulated patients with neuropsychiatric conditions (e.g., affective disorders, tinnitus. Methods and findings of the identified studies were highly variable showing no clear systematic pattern of interaction of non-motor rTMS with measures of motor cortex excitability. Based on the available literature, the measurement of motor cortex excitability changes before and after non-motor rTMS has only limited value in the investigation of rTMS related meta-plasticity as a neuronal state or as a trait marker for neuropsychiatric diseases. Our results do not suggest that there are systematic alterations of cortical excitability changes during rTMS treatment, which calls into question the practice of re-adjusting the stimulation intensity according to the motor threshold over the course of the

  19. Music-induced cortical plasticity and lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex as foundations for tonal tinnitus treatment

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    Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Teismann, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, we have studied plasticity in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). Two main topics nurtured our curiosity: the effects of musical training on plasticity in the auditory system, and the effects of lateral inhibition. One of our plasticity studies found that listening to notched music for 3 h inhibited the neuronal activity in the auditory cortex that corresponded to the center-frequency of the notch, suggesting suppression of neural activity by lateral inhibition. Subsequent research on this topic found that suppression was notably dependent upon the notch width employed, that the lower notch-edge induced stronger attenuation of neural activity than the higher notch-edge, and that auditory focused attention strengthened the inhibitory networks. Crucially, the overall effects of lateral inhibition on human auditory cortical activity were stronger than the habituation effects. Based on these results we developed a novel treatment strategy for tonal tinnitus—tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT). By notching the music energy spectrum around the individual tinnitus frequency, we intended to attract lateral inhibition to auditory neurons involved in tinnitus perception. So far, the training strategy has been evaluated in two studies. The results of the initial long-term controlled study (12 months) supported the validity of the treatment concept: subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance were significantly reduced after TMNMT but not when notching spared the tinnitus frequencies. Correspondingly, tinnitus-related auditory evoked fields (AEFs) were significantly reduced after training. The subsequent short-term (5 days) training study indicated that training was more effective in the case of tinnitus frequencies ≤ 8 kHz compared to tinnitus frequencies >8 kHz, and that training should be employed over a long-term in order to induce more persistent effects. Further development and evaluation of TMNMT therapy

  20. IGF-1 Restores Visual Cortex Plasticity in Adult Life by Reducing Local GABA Levels

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    José Fernando Maya-Vetencourt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system architecture is markedly modified by sensory experience during early life, but a decline of plasticity occurs with age. Recent studies have challenged this dogma providing evidence that both pharmacological treatments and paradigms based on the manipulation of environmental stimulation levels can be successfully employed as strategies for enhancing plasticity in the adult nervous system. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 is a peptide implicated in prenatal and postnatal phases of brain development such as neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation, synaptogenesis, and experience-dependent plasticity. Here, using the visual system as a paradigmatic model, we report that IGF-1 reactivates neural plasticity in the adult brain. Exogenous administration of IGF-1 in the adult visual cortex, indeed, restores the susceptibility of cortical neurons to monocular deprivation and promotes the recovery of normal visual functions in adult amblyopic animals. These effects were accompanied by a marked reduction of intracortical GABA levels. Moreover, we show that a transitory increase of IGF-1 expression is associated to the plasticity reinstatement induced by environmental enrichment (EE and that blocking IGF-1 action by means of the IGF-1 receptor antagonist JB1 prevents EE effects on plasticity processes.

  1. Basal forebrain cholinergic input is not essential for lesion-induced plasticity in mature auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Marc R; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2005-11-23

    The putative role of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mediating lesion-induced plasticity in topographic cortical representations was investigated. Cholinergic immunolesions were combined with unilateral restricted cochlear lesions in adult cats, demonstrating the consequence of cholinergic depletion on lesion-induced plasticity in primary auditory cortex (AI). Immunolesions almost eliminated the cholinergic input to AI, while cochlear lesions produced broad high-frequency hearing losses. The results demonstrate that the near elimination of cholinergic input does not disrupt reorganization of the tonotopic representation of the lesioned (contralateral) cochlea in AI and does not affect the normal representation of the unlesioned (ipsilateral) cochlea. It is concluded that cholinergic basal forebrain input to AI is not essential for the occurrence of lesion-induced plasticity in AI.

  2. Paired-pulse plasticity in the strength and latency of light-evoked lateral inhibition to retinal bipolar cell terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Evan; Kim, Mean-Hwan; Vigh, Jozsef; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2012-08-22

    Synapses in the inner plexiform layer of the retina undergo short-term plasticity that may mediate different forms of adaptation to regularities in light stimuli. Using patch-clamp recordings from axotomized goldfish Mb bipolar cell (BC) terminals with paired-pulse light stimulation, we isolated and quantified the short-term plasticity of GABAergic lateral IPSCs (L-IPSCs). Bright light stimulation evoked ON and OFF L-IPSCs in axotomized BCs, which had distinct onset latencies (∼50-80 and ∼70-150 ms, respectively) that depended on background light adaptation. We observed plasticity in both the synaptic strength and latency of the L-IPSCs. With paired light stimulation, latencies of ON L-IPSCs increased at paired-pulse intervals (PPIs) of 50 and 300 ms, whereas OFF L-IPSC latencies decreased at the 300 ms PPI. ON L-IPSCs showed paired-pulse depression at intervals <1 s, whereas OFF L-IPSCs showed depression at intervals ≤1 s and amplitude facilitation at longer intervals (1-2 s). This biphasic form of L-IPSC plasticity may underlie adaptation and sensitization to surround temporal contrast over multiple timescales. Block of retinal signaling at GABA(A)Rs and AMPARs differentially affected ON and OFF L-IPSCs, confirming that these two types of feedback inhibition are mediated by distinct and convergent retinal pathways with different mechanisms of plasticity. We propose that these plastic changes in the strength and timing of L-IPSCs help to dynamically shape the time course of glutamate release from ON-type BC terminals. Short-term plasticity of L-IPSCs may thus influence the strength, timing, and spatial extent of amacrine and ganglion cell inhibitory surrounds.

  3. Corticospinal activity evoked and modulated by non-invasive stimulation of the intact human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John C

    2014-10-01

    A number of methods have been developed recently that stimulate the human brain non-invasively through the intact scalp. The most common are transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial electric stimulation (TES) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS). They are widely used to probe function and connectivity of brain areas as well as therapeutically in a variety of conditions such as depression or stroke. They are much less focal than conventional invasive methods which use small electrodes placed on or in the brain and are often thought to activate all classes of neurones in the stimulated area. However, this is not true. A large body of evidence from experiments on the motor cortex shows that non-invasive methods of brain stimulation can be surprisingly selective and that adjusting the intensity and direction of stimulation can activate different classes of inhibitory and excitatory inputs to the corticospinal output cells. Here we review data that have elucidated the action of TMS and TES, concentrating mainly on the most direct evidence available from spinal epidural recordings of the descending corticospinal volleys. The results show that it is potentially possible to test and condition specific neural circuits in motor cortex that could be affected differentially by disease, or be used in different forms of natural behaviour. However, there is substantial interindividual variability in the specificity of these protocols. Perhaps in the future it will be possible, with the advances currently being made to model the electrical fields induced in individual brains, to develop forms of stimulation that can reliably target more specific populations of neurones, and open up the internal circuitry of the motor cortex for study in behaving humans.

  4. Pairing tone trains with vagus nerve stimulation induces temporal plasticity in auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetake, Jai A; Engineer, Navzer D; Vrana, Will A; Wolf, Jordan T; Kilgard, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    The selectivity of neurons in sensory cortex can be modified by pairing neuromodulator release with sensory stimulation. Repeated pairing of electrical stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis, for example, induces input specific plasticity in primary auditory cortex (A1). Pairing nucleus basalis stimulation (NBS) with a tone increases the number of A1 neurons that respond to the paired tone frequency. Pairing NBS with fast or slow tone trains can respectively increase or decrease the ability of A1 neurons to respond to rapidly presented tones. Pairing vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) with a single tone alters spectral tuning in the same way as NBS-tone pairing without the need for brain surgery. In this study, we tested whether pairing VNS with tone trains can change the temporal response properties of A1 neurons. In naïve rats, A1 neurons respond strongly to tones repeated at rates up to 10 pulses per second (pps). Repeatedly pairing VNS with 15 pps tone trains increased the temporal following capacity of A1 neurons and repeatedly pairing VNS with 5 pps tone trains decreased the temporal following capacity of A1 neurons. Pairing VNS with tone trains did not alter the frequency selectivity or tonotopic organization of auditory cortex neurons. Since VNS is well tolerated by patients, VNS-tone train pairing represents a viable method to direct temporal plasticity in a variety of human conditions associated with temporal processing deficits.

  5. Inhibitory and Excitatory Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity in the Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'amour, James A.; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Synapses are plastic and can be modified by changes of spike timing. While most studies of long-term synaptic plasticity focus on excitation, inhibitory plasticity may be critical for controlling information processing, memory storage, and overall excitability in neural circuits. Here we examine spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) of inhibitory synapses onto layer 5 neurons in slices of mouse auditory cortex, together with concomitant STDP of excitatory synapses. Pairing pre- and postsynaptic spikes potentiated inhibitory inputs irrespective of precise temporal order within ~10 msec. This was in contrast to excitatory inputs, which displayed an asymmetrical STDP time window. These combined synaptic modifications both required NMDA receptor activation, and adjusted the excitatory-inhibitory ratio of events paired together with postsynaptic spiking. Finally, subthreshold events became suprathreshold, and the time window between excitation and inhibition became more precise. These findings demonstrate that cortical inhibitory plasticity requires interactions with co-activated excitatory synapses to properly regulate excitatory-inhibitory balance. PMID:25843405

  6. Summation of connectivity strengths in the visual cortex reveals stability of neuronal microcircuits after plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachatene, Lyes; Bharmauria, Vishal; Cattan, Sarah; Chanauria, Nayan; Rouat, Jean; Molotchnikoff, Stéphane

    2015-10-09

    Within sensory systems, neurons are continuously affected by environmental stimulation. Recently, we showed that, on cell-pair basis, visual adaptation modulates the connectivity strength between similarly tuned neurons to orientation and we suggested that, on a larger scale, the connectivity strength between neurons forming sub-networks could be maintained after adaptation-induced-plasticity. In the present paper, based on the summation of the connectivity strengths, we sought to examine how, within cell-assemblies, functional connectivity is regulated during an exposure-based adaptation. Using intrinsic optical imaging combined with electrophysiological recordings following the reconfiguration of the maps of the primary visual cortex by long stimulus exposure, we found that within functionally connected cells, the summed connectivity strengths remain almost equal although connections among individual pairs are modified. Neuronal selectivity appears to be strongly associated with neuronal connectivity in a "homeodynamic" manner which maintains the stability of cortical functional relationships after experience-dependent plasticity. Our results support the "homeostatic plasticity concept" giving new perspectives on how the summation in visual cortex leads to the stability within labile neuronal ensembles, depending on the newly acquired properties by neurons.

  7. The plasticity of extinction: contribution of the prefrontal cortex in treating addiction though inhibitory learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Judson Chandler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Theories of drug addiction that incorporate various concepts from the fields of learning and memory have led to the idea that classical and operant conditioning principles underlie the compulsiveness of addictive behaviors. Relapse often results from exposure to drug-associated cues, and the ability to extinguish these conditioned behaviors through inhibitory learning could serve as a potential therapeutic mechanism for those who suffer from addiction. This review will examine the evidence that extinction learning alters neuronal plasticity in specific brain regions and pathways. In particular, subregions of the prefrontal cortex and their projections to other brain regions have been shown to differentially modulate drug-seeking and extinction behavior. Additionally, there is a growing body of research demonstrating that manipulation of neuronal plasticity can alter extinction learning. Therefore, the ability to alter plasticity within areas of the prefrontal cortex through pharmacological manipulation could facilitate the acquisition of extinction and provide a novel intervention to aid in the extinction of drug-related memories.

  8. The functional upregulation of piriform cortex is associated with cross-modal plasticity in loss of whisker tactile inputs.

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    Bing Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cross-modal plasticity is characterized as the hypersensitivity of remaining modalities after a sensory function is lost in rodents, which ensures their awareness to environmental changes. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cross-modal sensory plasticity remain unclear. We aim to study the role of different types of neurons in cross-modal plasticity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In addition to behavioral tasks in mice, whole-cell recordings at the excitatory and inhibitory neurons, and their two-photon imaging, were conducted in piriform cortex. We produced a mouse model of cross-modal sensory plasticity that olfactory function was upregulated by trimming whiskers to deprive their sensory inputs. In the meantime of olfactory hypersensitivity, pyramidal neurons and excitatory synapses were functionally upregulated, as well as GABAergic cells and inhibitory synapses were downregulated in piriform cortex from the mice of cross-modal sensory plasticity, compared with controls. A crosswire connection between barrel cortex and piriform cortex was established in cross-modal plasticity. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: An upregulation of pyramidal neurons and a downregulation of GABAergic neurons strengthen the activities of neuronal networks in piriform cortex, which may be responsible for olfactory hypersensitivity after a loss of whisker tactile input. This finding provides the clues for developing therapeutic strategies to promote sensory recovery and substitution.

  9. Augmenting LTP-Like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex by Spaced Paired Associative Stimulation.

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    Florian Müller-Dahlhaus

    Full Text Available Paired associative stimulation (PASLTP of the human primary motor cortex (M1 can induce LTP-like plasticity by increasing corticospinal excitability beyond the stimulation period. Previous studies showed that two consecutive PASLTP protocols interact by homeostatic metaplasticity, but animal experiments provided evidence that LTP can be augmented by repeated stimulation protocols spaced by ~30 min. Here we tested in twelve healthy selected PASLTP responders the possibility that LTP-like plasticity can be augmented in the human M1 by systematically varying the interval between two consecutive PASLTP protocols. The first PASLTP protocol (PAS1 induced strong LTP-like plasticity lasting for 30-60 min. The effect of a second identical PASLTP protocol (PAS2 critically depended on the time between PAS1 and PAS2. At 10 min, PAS2 prolonged the PAS1-induced LTP-like plasticity. At 30 min, PAS2 augmented the LTP-like plasticity induced by PAS1, by increasing both magnitude and duration. At 60 min and 180 min, PAS2 had no effect on corticospinal excitability. The cumulative LTP-like plasticity after PAS1 and PAS2 at 30 min exceeded significantly the effect of PAS1 alone, and the cumulative PAS1 and PAS2 effects at 60 min and 180 min. In summary, consecutive PASLTP protocols interact in human M1 in a time-dependent manner. If spaced by 30 min, two consecutive PASLTP sessions can augment LTP-like plasticity in human M1. Findings may inspire further research on optimized therapeutic applications of non-invasive brain stimulation in neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  10. Effect of serotonin on paired associative stimulation-induced plasticity in the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsikadze, Giorgi; Paulus, Walter; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2013-10-01

    Serotonin modulates diverse brain functions. Beyond its clinical antidepressant effects, it improves motor performance, learning and memory formation. These effects might at least be partially caused by the impact of serotonin on neuroplasticity, which is thought to be an important foundation of the respective functions. In principal accordance, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance long-term potentiation-like plasticity induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in humans. As other neuromodulators have discernable effects on different kinds of plasticity in humans, here we were interested to explore the impact of serotonin on paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity, which induces a more focal kind of plasticity, as compared with tDCS, shares some features with spike timing-dependent plasticity, and is thought to be relative closely related to learning processes. In this single-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, we administered a single dose of 20 mg citalopram or placebo medication and applied facilitatory- and excitability-diminishing PAS to the left motor cortex of 14 healthy subjects. Cortico-spinal excitability was explored via single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation-elicited MEP amplitudes up to the next evening after plasticity induction. After citalopram administration, inhibitory PAS-induced after-effects were abolished and excitatory PAS-induced after-effects were enhanced trendwise, as compared with the respective placebo conditions. These results show that serotonin modulates PAS-induced neuroplasticity by shifting it into the direction of facilitation, which might help to explain mechanism of positive therapeutic effects of serotonin in learning and medical conditions characterized by enhanced inhibitory or reduced facilitatory plasticity, including depression and stroke.

  11. Augmenting LTP-Like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex by Spaced Paired Associative Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Lücke, Caroline; Lu, Ming-Kuei; Arai, Noritoshi; Fuhl, Anna; Herrmann, Eva; Ziemann, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PASLTP) of the human primary motor cortex (M1) can induce LTP-like plasticity by increasing corticospinal excitability beyond the stimulation period. Previous studies showed that two consecutive PASLTP protocols interact by homeostatic metaplasticity, but animal experiments provided evidence that LTP can be augmented by repeated stimulation protocols spaced by ~30 min. Here we tested in twelve healthy selected PASLTP responders the possibility that LTP-like plasticity can be augmented in the human M1 by systematically varying the interval between two consecutive PASLTP protocols. The first PASLTP protocol (PAS1) induced strong LTP-like plasticity lasting for 30-60 min. The effect of a second identical PASLTP protocol (PAS2) critically depended on the time between PAS1 and PAS2. At 10 min, PAS2 prolonged the PAS1-induced LTP-like plasticity. At 30 min, PAS2 augmented the LTP-like plasticity induced by PAS1, by increasing both magnitude and duration. At 60 min and 180 min, PAS2 had no effect on corticospinal excitability. The cumulative LTP-like plasticity after PAS1 and PAS2 at 30 min exceeded significantly the effect of PAS1 alone, and the cumulative PAS1 and PAS2 effects at 60 min and 180 min. In summary, consecutive PASLTP protocols interact in human M1 in a time-dependent manner. If spaced by 30 min, two consecutive PASLTP sessions can augment LTP-like plasticity in human M1. Findings may inspire further research on optimized therapeutic applications of non-invasive brain stimulation in neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  12. A systematic review of non-motor rTMS induced motor cortex plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Grégory; Azorina, Valeriya; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Motor cortex excitability can be measured by single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce neuroplastic effects in stimulated and in functionally connected cortical regions. Due to its ability to non-invasively modulate cortical activity, rTMS has been investigated for the treatment of various neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, such studies revealed a high variability of both clinical and neuronal effects induced by rTMS. In order to better elucidate this meta-plasticity, rTMS-induced changes in motor cortex excitability have been monitored in various studies in a pre-post stimulation design. Here, we give a literature review of studies investigating motor cortex excitability changes as a neuronal marker for rTMS effects over non-motor cortical areas. A systematic literature review in April 2014 resulted in 29 articles in which motor cortex excitability was assessed before and after rTMS over non-motor areas. The majority of the studies focused on the stimulation of one of three separate cortical areas: the prefrontal area (17 studies), the cerebellum (8 studies), or the temporal cortex (3 studies). One study assessed the effects of multi-site rTMS. Most studies investigated healthy controls but some also stimulated patients with neuropsychiatric conditions (e.g., affective disorders, tinnitus). Methods and findings of the identified studies were highly variable showing no clear systematic pattern of interaction of non-motor rTMS with measures of motor cortex excitability. Based on the available literature, the measurement of motor cortex excitability changes before and after non-motor rTMS has only limited value in the investigation of rTMS related meta-plasticity as a neuronal state or as a trait marker for neuropsychiatric diseases. Our results do not suggest that there are systematic alterations of cortical excitability changes during rTMS treatment, which calls

  13. A systematic review of non-motor rTMS induced motor cortex plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Grégory; Azorina, Valeriya; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Motor cortex excitability can be measured by single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce neuroplastic effects in stimulated and in functionally connected cortical regions. Due to its ability to non-invasively modulate cortical activity, rTMS has been investigated for the treatment of various neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, such studies revealed a high variability of both clinical and neuronal effects induced by rTMS. In order to better elucidate this meta-plasticity, rTMS-induced changes in motor cortex excitability have been monitored in various studies in a pre-post stimulation design. Here, we give a literature review of studies investigating motor cortex excitability changes as a neuronal marker for rTMS effects over non-motor cortical areas. A systematic literature review in April 2014 resulted in 29 articles in which motor cortex excitability was assessed before and after rTMS over non-motor areas. The majority of the studies focused on the stimulation of one of three separate cortical areas: the prefrontal area (17 studies), the cerebellum (8 studies), or the temporal cortex (3 studies). One study assessed the effects of multi-site rTMS. Most studies investigated healthy controls but some also stimulated patients with neuropsychiatric conditions (e.g., affective disorders, tinnitus). Methods and findings of the identified studies were highly variable showing no clear systematic pattern of interaction of non-motor rTMS with measures of motor cortex excitability. Based on the available literature, the measurement of motor cortex excitability changes before and after non-motor rTMS has only limited value in the investigation of rTMS related meta-plasticity as a neuronal state or as a trait marker for neuropsychiatric diseases. Our results do not suggest that there are systematic alterations of cortical excitability changes during rTMS treatment, which calls

  14. Physical Exercise Preserves Adult Visual Plasticity in Mice and Restores it after a Stroke in the Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Hüppe, Janika M.; Löwel, Siegrid

    2016-01-01

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is widely used to study brain plasticity, which is not only crucial for normal brain function, such as learning and memory, but also for recovery after brain injuries such as stroke. In standard cage (SC) raised mice, experience-dependent ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in V1 declines with age and is compromised by a lesion in adjacent and distant cortical regions. In contrast, mice raised in an enriched environment (EE), exhibit lifelong OD plasticity and are protected from losing OD plasticity after a stroke-lesion in the somatosensory cortex. Since SC mice with an access to a running wheel (RW) displayed preserved OD plasticity during aging, we investigated whether physical exercise might also provide a plasticity promoting effect after a cortical stroke. To this end, we tested if adult RW-raised mice preserved OD plasticity after stroke and also if short-term running after stroke restored OD plasticity to SC mice. Indeed, unlike mice without a RW, adult RW mice continued to show OD plasticity even after stroke, and a 2 weeks RW experience after stroke already restored lost OD plasticity. Additionally, the experience-enabled increase of the spatial frequency and contrast threshold of the optomotor reflex of the open eye, normally lost after a stroke, was restored in both groups of RW mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise alone can not only preserve visual plasticity into old age, but also restore it after a cortical stroke. PMID:27708575

  15. A model of long-term memory storage in the cerebellar cortex: a possible role for plasticity at parallel fiber synapses onto stellate/basket interneurons.

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    Kenyon, G T

    1997-12-09

    By evoking changes in climbing fiber activity, movement errors are thought to modify synapses from parallel fibers onto Purkinje cells (pf*Pkj) so as to improve subsequent motor performance. Theoretical arguments suggest there is an intrinsic tradeoff, however, between motor adaptation and long-term storage. Assuming a baseline rate of motor errors is always present, then repeated performance of any learned movement will generate a series of climbing fiber-mediated corrections. By reshuffling the synaptic weights responsible for any given movement, such corrections will degrade the memories for other learned movements stored in overlapping sets of synapses. The present paper shows that long-term storage can be accomplished by a second site of plasticity at synapses from parallel fibers onto stellate/basket interneurons (pf*St/Bk). Plasticity at pf*St/Bk synapses can be insulated from ongoing fluctuations in climbing fiber activity by assuming that changes in pf*St/Bk synapses occur only after changes in pf*Pkj synapses have built up to a threshold level. Although climbing fiber-dependent plasticity at pf*Pkj synapses allows for the exploration of novel motor strategies in response to changing environmental conditions, plasticity at pf*St/Bk synapses transfers successful strategies to stable long-term storage. To quantify this hypothesis, both sites of plasticity are incorporated into a dynamical model of the cerebellar cortex and its interactions with the inferior olive. When used to simulate idealized motor conditioning trials, the model predicts that plasticity develops first at pf*Pkj synapses, but with additional training is transferred to pf*St/Bk synapses for long-term storage.

  16. Intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain alters synaptic plasticity and dopamine release in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

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    Sui, Li; Song, Xiao-Jin; Ren, Jie; Ju, Li-Hua; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of ouabain, a specific Na-K-ATPase inhibitor, in rats mimics the manic phenotypes of bipolar disorder and thus has been proposed as one of the best animal models of mania. Bipolar mania has been known to be associated with dysfunctions of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a brain area critically involved in mental functions; however, the exact mechanism underlying these dysfunctions is not yet clear. The present study investigated synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity, and dopamine release in Sprague-Dawley rat mPFC following ICV administration of ouabain (5 μl of 1 mM ouabain). The electrophysiological results demonstrated that ouabain depressed the short- and the long-term synaptic plasticity, represented by paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation, respectively, in the mPFC. These ouabain-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity can be prevented by pre-treatment with lithium (intraperitoneal injection of 47.5 mg/kg lithium, twice a day, 7 days), which acts as an effective mood stabilizer in preventing mania. The electrochemical results demonstrated that ICV administration of ouabain enhanced dopamine release in the mPFC, which did not be affected by pre-treatment with lithium. These findings suggested that alterations in synaptic plasticity and dopamine release in the mPFC might underlie the dysfunctions of mPFC accompanied with ouabain administration-induced bipolar mania.

  17. Vocal sequences suppress spiking in the bat auditory cortex while evoking concomitant steady-state local field potentials

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    Hechavarría, Julio C.; Beetz, M. Jerome; Macias, Silvio; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms by which the mammalian brain copes with information from natural vocalization streams remain poorly understood. This article shows that in highly vocal animals, such as the bat species Carollia perspicillata, the spike activity of auditory cortex neurons does not track the temporal information flow enclosed in fast time-varying vocalization streams emitted by conspecifics. For example, leading syllables of so-called distress sequences (produced by bats subjected to duress) suppress cortical spiking to lagging syllables. Local fields potentials (LFPs) recorded simultaneously to cortical spiking evoked by distress sequences carry multiplexed information, with response suppression occurring in low frequency LFPs (i.e. 2–15 Hz) and steady-state LFPs occurring at frequencies that match the rate of energy fluctuations in the incoming sound streams (i.e. >50 Hz). Such steady-state LFPs could reflect underlying synaptic activity that does not necessarily lead to cortical spiking in response to natural fast time-varying vocal sequences.

  18. Oxidative stress induced by cumene hydroperoxide evokes changes in neuronal excitability of rat motor cortex neurons.

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    Pardillo-Díaz, R; Carrascal, L; Ayala, A; Nunez-Abades, P

    2015-03-19

    Oxidative stress and the production of reactive oxygen radicals play a key role in neuronal cell damage. This paper describes an in vitro study that explores the neuronal responses to oxidative stress focusing on changes in neuronal excitability and functional membrane properties. This study was carried out in pyramidal cells of the motor cortex by applying whole-cell patch-clamp techniques on brain slices from young adult rats. Oxygen-derived free radical formation was induced by bath application of 10μM cumene hydroperoxide (CH) for 30min. CH produced marked changes in the electrophysiological properties of neurons (n=30). Resting membrane potential became progressively depolarized, as well as depolarization voltage, with no variations in voltage threshold. Membrane resistance showed a biphasic behavior, increasing after 5min of drug exposure and then it started to decrease, even under control values, after 15 and 30min. At the same time, changes in membrane resistance produced compensatory variations in the rheobase. The amplitude of the action potentials diminished and the duration increased progressively over time. Some of the neurons under study also lost their ability to discharge action potentials in a repetitive way. Most of the neurons, however, kept their repetitive discharge even though their maximum frequency and gain decreased. Furthermore, cancelation of the repetitive firing discharge took place at intensities that decreased with time of exposure to CH, which resulted in a narrower working range. We can conclude that oxidative stress compromises both neuronal excitability and the capability of generating action potentials, and so this type of neuronal functional failure could precede the neuronal death characteristics of many neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Formation of complement membrane attack complex in mammalian cerebral cortex evokes seizures and neurodegeneration.

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    Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Qian, Weihua; Suzuki, Katsuaki; McNamara, James O

    2003-02-01

    The complement system consists of >30 proteins that interact in a carefully regulated manner to destroy invading bacteria and prevent the deposition of immune complexes in normal tissue. This complex system can be activated by diverse mechanisms proceeding through distinct pathways, yet all converge on a final common pathway in which five proteins assemble into a multimolecular complex, the membrane attack complex (MAC). The MAC inserts into cell membranes to form a functional pore, resulting in ion flux and ultimately osmotic lysis. Immunohistochemical evidence of the MAC decorating neurons in cortical gray matter has been identified in multiple CNS diseases, yet the deleterious consequences, if any, of MAC deposition in the cortex of mammalian brain in vivo are unknown. Here we demonstrate that the sequential infusion of individual proteins of the membrane attack pathway (C5b6, C7, C8, and C9) into the hippocampus of awake, freely moving rats induced both behavioral and electrographic seizures as well as cytotoxicity. The onset of seizures occurred during or shortly after the infusion of C8/C9. Neither seizures nor cytotoxicity resulted from the simultaneous infusion of all five proteins premixed in vitro. The requirement for the sequential infusion of all five proteins together with the temporal relationship of seizure onset to infusions of C8/C9 implies that the MAC was formed in vivo and triggered both seizures and cytotoxicity. Deposition of the complement MAC in cortical gray matter may contribute to epileptic seizures and cell death in diverse diseases of the human brain.

  20. Experience Affects Critical Period Plasticity in the Visual Cortex through an Epigenetic Regulation of Histone Post-Translational Modifications.

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    Baroncelli, Laura; Scali, Manuela; Sansevero, Gabriele; Olimpico, Francesco; Manno, Ilaria; Costa, Mario; Sale, Alessandro

    2016-03-23

    During an early phase of enhanced sensitivity called the critical period (CP), monocular deprivation causes a shift in the response of visual cortex binocular neurons in favor of the nondeprived eye, a process named ocular dominance (OD) plasticity. While the time course of the CP for OD plasticity can be modulated by genetic/pharmacological interventions targeting GABAergic inhibition, whether an increased sensory-motor experience can affect this major plastic phenomenon is not known. We report that exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) accelerated the closure of the CP for OD plasticity in the rat visual cortex. Histone H3 acetylation was developmentally regulated in primary visual cortex, with enhanced levels being detectable early in enriched pups, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed an increase at the level of the BDNF P3 promoter. Administration of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) to animals reared in a standard cage mimicked the increase in H3 acetylation observed in the visual cortex and resulted in an accelerated decay of OD plasticity. Finally, exposure to EE in adulthood upregulated H3 acetylation and was paralleled by a reopening of the CP. These findings demonstrate a critical involvement of the epigenetic machinery as a mediator of visual cortex developmental plasticity and of the impact of EE on OD plasticity. While it is known that an epigenetic remodeling of chromatin structure controls developmental plasticity in the visual cortex, three main questions have remained open. Which is the physiological time course of histone modifications? Is it possible, by manipulating the chromatin epigenetic state, to modulate plasticity levels during the critical period? How can we regulate histone acetylation in the adult brain in a noninvasive manner? We show that the early exposure of rat pups to enriching environmental conditions accelerates the critical period for plasticity in the primary visual cortex

  1. Npas4 Expression in Two Experimental Models of the Barrel Cortex Plasticity

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    Aleksandra Kaliszewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Npas4 has recently been identified as an important factor in brain plasticity, particularly in mechanisms of inhibitory control. Little is known about Npas4 expression in terms of cortical plasticity. In the present study expressions of Npas4 and the archetypal immediate early gene (IEG c-Fos were investigated in the barrel cortex of mice after sensory deprivation (sparing one row of whiskers for 7 days or sensory conditioning (pairing stimulation of one row of whiskers with aversive stimulus. Laser microdissection of individual barrel rows allowed for analysis of IEGs expression precisely in deprived and nondeprived barrels (in deprivation study or stimulated and nonstimulated barrels (in conditioning study. Cortex activation by sensory conditioning was found to upregulate the expression of both Npas4 and c-Fos. Reorganization of cortical circuits triggered by removal of selected rows of whiskers strongly affected c-Fos but not Npas4 expression. We hypothesize that increased inhibitory synaptogenesis observed previously after conditioning may be mediated by Npas4 expression.

  2. Motor Cortex Plasticity during Unilateral Finger Movement with Mirror Visual Feedback

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    Hatice Kumru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity is one of the most important physiological mechanisms underlying motor recovery from brain lesions. Rehabilitation methods, such as mirror visual feedback therapy, which are based on multisensory integration of motor, cognitive, and perceptual processes, are considered effective methods to induce cortical reorganization. The present study investigated 3 different types of visual feedback (direct, mirrored, and blocked visual feedback: DVF, MVF, and BVF, resp. on M1 cortex excitability and intracortical inhibition/facilitation at rest and during phasic unimanual motor task in 11 healthy individuals. The excitability of the ipsilateral M1 cortex and the intracortical facilitation increased during motor task performance in the DVF and MVF but not in the BVF condition. In addition, MVF induced cortical disinhibition of the ipsilateral hemisphere to the index finger performing the motor task, which was greater when compared to the BVF and restricted to the homologue first dorsal interosseous muscle. The visual feedback is relevant to M1 cortex excitability modulation but the MVF plays a crucial role in promoting changes in intracortical inhibition in comparison to BVF. Altogether, it can be concluded that a combination of motor training with MVF therapy may induce more robust neuroplastic changes through multisensory integration that is relevant to motor rehabilitation.

  3. Physical exercise preserves adult visual plasticity in mice and restores it after a stroke in the somatosensory cortex

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    Evgenia Kalogeraki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary visual cortex is widely used to study brain plasticity, which is not only crucial for normal brain function, such as learning and memory, but also for recovery after brain injuries such as stroke. In standard cage raised mice, experience-dependent ocular dominance plasticity in the primary visual cortex declines with age and is compromised by a lesion in adjacent and distant cortical regions. In contrast, mice raised in an enriched environment exhibit lifelong ocular dominance plasticity and are protected from losing ocular dominance plasticity after a stroke-lesion in the somatosensory cortex. Since standard cage mice with an access to a running wheel displayed preserved ocular dominance plasticity during ageing, we investigated whether physical exercise might also provide a plasticity promoting effect after a cortical stroke. To this end, we tested if adult running wheel-raised mice preserved ocular dominance plasticity after stroke and also if short-term running after stroke restored ocular dominance plasticity to standard cage mice. Indeed, unlike mice without a running wheel, adult running wheel mice continued to show ocular dominance plasticity even after stroke, and a two weeks running wheel experience after stroke already restored lost ocular dominance plasticity. Additionally, the experience-enabled increase of the spatial frequency and contrast threshold of the optomotor reflex of the open eye, normally lost after stroke, was restored in both groups of running wheel mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise alone can, not only preserve visual plasticity into old age but also restore it after a cortical stroke.

  4. Long-term plasticity in the regulation of olfactory bulb activity by centrifugal fibers from piriform cortex.

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    Cauthron, Joy L; Stripling, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-16

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are activated synaptically via two main pathways. Mitral/tufted (M/T) cells form dendrodendritic synapses on granule cells that can be activated by antidromic stimulation of the lateral olfactory tract (LOT). Centrifugal fibers originating from the association fiber (AF) system in piriform cortex (PC) make axodendritic synapses on granule cells within the granule cell layer (GCL) that can be activated by orthodromic stimulation of AF axons in the PC. We explored functional plasticity in the AF pathway by recording extracellularly from individual M/T cells and presumed granule cells in male Long-Evans rats under urethane anesthesia while testing their response to LOT and AF stimulation. Presumed granule cells driven synaptically by LOT stimulation (type L cells) were concentrated in the superficial half of the GCL and were activated at short latencies, whereas those driven synaptically by AF stimulation (type A cells) were concentrated in the deep half of the GCL and were activated at longer latencies. Type A cells were readily detected only in animals in which the AF input to the GCL had been previously potentiated by repeated high-frequency stimulation. An additional bout of high-frequency stimulation administered under urethane caused an immediate increase in the number of action potentials evoked in type A cells by AF test stimulation and a concomitant increase in inhibition of M/T cells. These results underscore the importance of the role played in olfactory processing by PC regulation of OB activity and document the long-lasting potentiation of that regulation by repeated high-frequency AF activation.

  5. A postnatal critical period for orientation plasticity in the cat visual cortex.

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    Shigeru Tanaka

    Full Text Available Orientation selectivity of primary visual cortical neurons is an important requisite for shape perception. Although numerous studies have been previously devoted to a question of how orientation selectivity is established and elaborated in early life, how the susceptibility of orientation plasticity to visual experience changes in time remains unclear. In the present study, we showed a postnatal sensitive period profile for the modifiability of orientation selectivity in the visual cortex of kittens reared with head-mounted goggles for stable single-orientation exposure. When goggle rearing (GR started at P16-P30, 2 weeks of GR induced a marked over-representation of the exposed orientation, and 2 more weeks of GR consolidated the altered orientation maps. GR that started later than P50, in turn, induced the under-representation of the exposed orientation. Orientation plasticity in the most sensitive period was markedly suppressed by cortical infusion of NMDAR antagonist. The present study reveals that the plasticity and consolidation of orientation selectivity in an early life are dynamically regulated in an experience-dependent manner.

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation enhances extinction of conditioned fear and modulates plasticity in the pathway from the infralimbic prefrontal cortex to the amygdala.

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    David Frausto Peña

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fearful experiences can produce long-lasting and debilitating memories. Extinction of the fear response requires consolidation of new memories that compete with fearful associations. Subjects with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD show impaired extinction of conditioned fear, which is associated with decreased ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC control over amygdala activity. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS enhances memory consolidation in both rats and humans, and pairing VNS with exposure to conditioned cues enhances the consolidation of extinction learning in rats. Here we investigated whether pairing VNS with extinction learning facilitates plasticity between the infralimbic (IL medial prefrontal cortex and the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA. Rats were trained on an auditory fear conditioning task, which was followed by a retention test and one day of extinction training. Vagus nerve stimulation or sham-stimulation was administered concurrently with exposure to the fear-conditioned stimulus and retention of fear conditioning was tested again 24 hours later. VNS-treated rats demonstrated a significant reduction in freezing after a single extinction training session similar to animals that received 5x the number of extinction pairings. To study plasticity in the IL-BLA pathway, we recorded evoked field potentials in the BLA in anesthetized animals 24 h after retention testing. Brief burst stimulation in the IL produced LTD in the BLA field response in fear-conditioned and sham-treated animals. In contrast, the same stimulation resulted in potentiation of the IL-BLA pathway in the VNS-treated group. The present findings suggest that VNS promotes plasticity in the IL-BLA pathway to facilitate extinction of conditioned fear responses.

  7. Functional ultrasound imaging reveals different odor-evoked patterns of vascular activity in the main olfactory bulb and the anterior piriform cortex.

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    Osmanski, B F; Martin, C; Montaldo, G; Lanièce, P; Pain, F; Tanter, M; Gurden, H

    2014-07-15

    Topographic representation of the outside world is a key feature of sensory systems, but so far it has been difficult to define how the activity pattern of the olfactory information is distributed at successive stages in the olfactory system. We studied odor-evoked activation patterns in the main olfactory bulb and the anterior piriform cortex of rats using functional ultrasound (fUS) imaging. fUS imaging is based on the use of ultrafast ultrasound scanners and detects variations in the local blood volume during brain activation. It makes deep brain imaging of ventral structures, such as the piriform cortex, possible. Stimulation with two different odors (hexanal and pentylacetate) induced the activation of odor-specific zones that were spatially segregated in the main olfactory bulb. Interestingly, the same odorants triggered the activation of the entire anterior piriform cortex, in all layers, with no distinguishable odor-specific areas detected in the power Doppler images. These fUS imaging results confirm the spatial distribution of odor-evoked activity in the main olfactory bulb, and furthermore, they reveal the absence of such a distribution in the anterior piriform cortex at the macroscopic scale in vivo.

  8. The effect of synaptic plasticity on orientation selectivity in a balanced model of primary visual cortex

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    Soledad eGonzalo Cogno

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Orientation selectivity is ubiquitous in the primary visual cortex (V1 of mammals. In cats and monkeys, V1 displays spatially ordered maps of orientation preference. Instead, in mice, squirrels and rats, orientation selective neurons in V1 are not spatially organized, giving rise to a seemingly random pattern usually referred to as a salt-and-pepper layout. The fact that such different organizations can sharpen orientation tuning leads to question the structural role of the intracortical connections; specifically the influence of plasticity and the generation of functional connectivity. In this work, we analyze the effect of plasticity processes on orientation selectivity for both scenarios. We study a computational model of layer 2/3 and a reduced one-dimensional model of orientation selective neurons, both in the balanced state. We analyze two plasticity mechanisms. The first one involves spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP, while the second one considers the reconnection of the interactions according to the preferred orientations of the neurons. We find that under certain conditions STDP can indeed improve selectivity but it works in a somehow unexpected way, that is, effectively decreasing the modulated part of the intracortical connectivity as compared to the non-modulated part of it. For the reconnection mechanism we find that increasing functional connectivity leads, in fact, to a decrease in orientation selectivity if the network is in a stable balanced state. Both counterintuitive results are a consequence of the dynamics of the balanced state. We also find that selectivity can increase due to a reconnection process if the resulting connections give rise to an unstable balanced state. We compare these findings with recent experimental results.

  9. Dose-response curve of associative plasticity in human motor cortex and interactions with motor practice.

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    Elahi, Behzad; Hutchison, William D; Daskalakis, Z Jeff; Gunraj, Carolyn; Chen, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Associative plasticity is hypothesized to be an important neurophysiological correlate of memory formation and learning with potentials for applications in neurorehabilitation and for the development of new electrophysiological measures to study disorders of cortical plasticity. We hypothesized that the magnitude of the paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP)-like effect depends on the number of pairs in the PAS protocol. We also hypothesized that homeostatic interaction of PAS with subsequent motor learning is related to the magnitude of the PAS-induced LTP-like effect. We studied 10 healthy subjects. In experiment 1a, subjects received 90 (PAS90), 180 (PAS180), or 270 (PAS270) pairs of stimuli, followed by a dynamic motor practice (DMP) 1 h after the end of the PAS protocols. In experiment 1b, the DMP preceded the PAS protocol. In experiment 2, the time course of PAS270 was studied. We found that PAS270 resulted in greater increase in motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude compared with protocols with fewer pairs of stimuli. Moreover, the interaction between PAS protocols with motor learning differed depending on the number of stimulus pairs used to induce PAS. While DMP alone increased MEP amplitudes, DMP during the LTP-like effects induced by PAS270 led to a long-term depression (LTD)-like effect (homeostatic interaction). This homeostatic interaction did not occur after PAS90 and PAS180. In conclusion, we found a dose-dependent effect of the number of stimulus pairs used in the PAS protocol on cortical plasticity. Homeostatic interaction between PAS and DMP was observed only after PAS270.

  10. Combined administration of cerebrolysin and donepezil induces plastic changes in prefrontal cortex in aged mice.

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    Alcántara-González, Faviola; Mendoza-Perez, Claudia Rebeca; Zaragoza, Néstor; Juarez, Ismael; Arroyo-García, Luis Enrique; Gamboa, Citlalli; De La Cruz, Fidel; Zamudio, Sergio; Garcia-Dolores, Fernando; Flores, Gonzalo

    2012-11-01

    Cerebrolysin (Cbl) shows neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties while donepezil (Dnp) is a potent acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, both drugs are prescribed for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment. Previous studies have shown that the Dnp and Cbl administered separately, modify dendritic morphology of neurons in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in senile rodents. Since the deficit of neurotrophic factor activity is implicated in the degeneration of cholinergic neurons of basal forebrain, a combination therapy of Dnp and Cbl has been tested recently in Alzheimer's patients. However, the plastic changes that may underlie this combined treatment have not yet been explored. We present here the effect of the combined administration of Cbl and Dnp on dendritic morphology in brain regions related to learning and memory in aged mice. The Golgi-Cox staining protocol and Sholl analysis were used for studying dendritic changes. Cbl and Dnp were administrated daily for 2 months to 9-months-old mice. Locomotor activity was assessed, as well as the dendritic morphology of neurons in several limbic regions was analyzed. Results showed that Cbl and Dnp induced an increase in locomotor activity without synergistic effect. The Cbl or Dnp treatment modified the dendritic morphology of neurons from prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal hippocampus (DH), dentate gyrus (DG), and the shell of nucleus accumbens (NAcc). These changes show an increase in the total dendritic length and spine density, resulting in an improvement of dendritic arborization. Prominently, a synergistic effect of Cbl and Dnp was observed on branching order and total dendritic length of pyramidal neurons from PFC. These results suggest that Dnp and Cbl may induce plastic changes in a manner independent of each other, but could enhance their effect in target cells from PFC.

  11. Impaired synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex of mice with developmentally decreased number of interneurons.

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    Konstantoudaki, X; Chalkiadaki, K; Tivodar, S; Karagogeos, D; Sidiropoulou, K

    2016-05-13

    Interneurons are inhibitory neurons, which protect neural tissue from excessive excitation. They are interconnected with glutamatergic pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex and regulate their function. Particularly in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), interneurons have been strongly implicated in regulating pathological states which display deficits in the PFC. The aim of this study is to investigate the adaptations in the adult glutamatergic system, when defects in interneuron development do not allow adequate numbers of interneurons to reach the cerebral cortex. To this end, we used a mouse model that displays ~50% fewer cortical interneurons due to the Rac1 protein loss from Nkx2.1/Cre expressing cells (Rac1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice), to examine how the developmental loss of interneurons may affect basal synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and neuronal morphology in the adult PFC. Despite the decrease in the number of interneurons, basal synaptic transmission, as examined by recording field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) from layer II networks, is not altered in the PFC of Rac1 cKO mice. However, there is decreased paired-pulse ratio (PPR) and decreased long-term potentiation (LTP), in response to tetanic stimulation, in the layer II PFC synapses of Rac1 cKO mice. Furthermore, expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subunits is decreased and dendritic morphology is altered, changes that could underlie the decrease in LTP in the Rac1 cKO mice. Finally, we find that treating Rac1 cKO mice with diazepam in early postnatal life can reverse changes in dendritic morphology observed in non-treated Rac1 cKO mice. Therefore, our data show that disruption in GABAergic inhibition alters glutamatergic function in the adult PFC, an effect that could be reversed by enhancement of GABAergic function during an early postnatal period.

  12. Motor training and the combination of action observation and peripheral nerve stimulation reciprocally interfere with the plastic changes induced in primary motor cortex excitability.

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    Bisio, Ambra; Avanzino, Laura; Biggio, Monica; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco

    2017-02-15

    AO-PNS is a stimulation protocol combining action observation (AO) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) to induce plasticity in the primary motor cortex (M1) (increased excitability). Another method to increase M1 excitability is motor training. The combination of two protocols, which individually induce long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in overlapping neural circuits, results in a transitory occlusion or reverse of this phenomenon. This study aimed to understand the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying AO-PNS by testing whether AO-PNS and motor training induced LTP-like plasticity in, at least partially, overlapping neural networks. One group of participants practiced a motor training (finger opposition movements) followed by AO-PNS, whereas another group performed the two protocols in reverse order. Motor performance was evaluated by means of a sensor-engineered glove and transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess M1 excitability before and after each conditioning protocol. Motor training increased movement frequency, suggesting the occurrence of motor learning in both groups. When applied on first, both motor training and AO-PNS significantly increased the motor-evoked potential (MEP), but occluded the increase of cortical excitability expected after the following protocol, leading to a significant decrease of MEP amplitude. These results suggest that motor training and AO-PNS act on partially overlapping neuronal networks, which include M1, and that AO-PNS might be able to induce LTP-like plasticity in a similar way to overt movement execution. This candidates AO-PNS as methodology potentially useful when planning rehabilitative interventions on patients who cannot voluntarily move.

  13. Hyper-connectivity and hyper-plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex in the valproic acid animal model of autism

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    Tania Rinaldi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The prefrontal cortex has been extensively implicated in autism to explain deficits in executive and other higher-order functions related to cognition, language, sociability and emotion. The possible changes at the level of the neuronal microcircuit are however not known. We studied microcircuit alterations in the prefrontal cortex in the valproic acid rat model of autism and found that the layer 5 pyramidal neurons are connected to significantly more neighbouring neurons than in controls. These excitatory connections are more plastic displaying enhanced long-term potentiation of the strength of synapses. The microcircuit alterations found in the prefrontal cortex are therefore similar to the alterations previously found in the somatosensory cortex. Hyper-connectivity and hyper-plasticity in the prefrontal cortex implies hyper-functionality of one of the highest order processing regions in the brain, and stands in contrast to the hypo-functionality that is normally proposed in this region to explain some of the autistic symptoms. We propose that a number of deficits in autism such as sociability, attention, multi-tasking and repetitive behaviours, should be re-interpreted in the light of a hyper-functional prefrontal cortex.

  14. Activity-dependent structural plasticity after aversive experiences in amygdala and auditory cortex pyramidal neurons.

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    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-07-22

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc- neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc- neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity.

  15. Chronic alcohol exposure alters behavioral and synaptic plasticity of the rodent prefrontal cortex.

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    Sven Kroener

    Full Text Available In the present study, we used a mouse model of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure to examine how CIE alters the plasticity of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. In acute slices obtained either immediately or 1-week after the last episode of alcohol exposure, voltage-clamp recording of excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs in mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons revealed that CIE exposure resulted in an increase in the NMDA/AMPA current ratio. This increase appeared to result from a selective increase in the NMDA component of the EPSC. Consistent with this, Western blot analysis of the postsynaptic density fraction showed that while there was no change in expression of the AMPA GluR1 subunit, NMDA NR1 and NRB subunits were significantly increased in CIE exposed mice when examined immediately after the last episode of alcohol exposure. Unexpectedly, this increase in NR1 and NR2B was no longer observed after 1-week of withdrawal in spite of a persistent increase in synaptic NMDA currents. Analysis of spines on the basal dendrites of layer V neurons revealed that while the total density of spines was not altered, there was a selective increase in the density of mushroom-type spines following CIE exposure. Examination of NMDA-receptor mediated spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP showed that CIE exposure was associated with altered expression of long-term potentiation (LTP. Lastly, behavioral studies using an attentional set-shifting task that depends upon the mPFC for optimal performance revealed deficits in cognitive flexibility in CIE exposed mice when tested up to 1-week after the last episode of alcohol exposure. Taken together, these observations are consistent with those in human alcoholics showing protracted deficits in executive function, and suggest these deficits may be associated with alterations in synaptic plasticity in the mPFC.

  16. Dose-dependent effect of donepezil administration on long-term enhancement of visually evoked potentials and cholinergic receptor overexpression in rat visual cortex.

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    Chamoun, Mira; Groleau, Marianne; Bhat, Menakshi; Vaucher, Elvire

    2016-09-01

    Stimulation of the cholinergic system tightly coupled with periods of visual stimulation boosts the processing of specific visual stimuli via muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in terms of intensity, priority and long-term effect. However, it is not known whether more diffuse pharmacological stimulation with donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is an efficient tool for enhancing visual processing and perception. The goal of the present study was to potentiate cholinergic transmission with donepezil treatment (0.5 and 1mg/kg) during a 2-week visual training to examine the effect on visually evoked potentials and to profile the expression of cholinergic receptor subtypes. The visual training was performed daily, 10min a day, for 2weeks. One week after the last training session, visual evoked potentials were recorded, or the mRNA expression level of muscarinic (M1-5) and nicotinic (α/β) receptors subunits was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The visual stimulation coupled with any of the two doses of donepezil produced significant amplitude enhancement of cortical evoked potentials compared to pre-training values. The enhancement induced by the 1mg/kg dose of donepezil was spread to neighboring spatial frequencies, suggesting a better sensitivity near the visual detection threshold. The M3, M4, M5 and α7 receptors mRNA were upregulated in the visual cortex for the higher dose of donepezil but not the lower one, and the receptors expression was stable in the somatosensory (non-visual control) cortex. Therefore, higher levels of acetylcholine within the cortex sustain the increased intensity of the cortical response and trigger the upregulation of cholinergic receptors.

  17. Plasticity in the rat prefrontal cortex: linking gene expression and an operant learning with a computational theory.

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    Maximiliano Rapanelli

    Full Text Available The plasticity in the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC of rodents or lateral prefrontal cortex in non human primates (lPFC, plays a key role neural circuits involved in learning and memory. Several genes, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, cAMP response element binding (CREB, Synapsin I, Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII, activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc, c-jun and c-fos have been related to plasticity processes. We analysed differential expression of related plasticity genes and immediate early genes in the mPFC of rats during learning an operant conditioning task. Incompletely and completely trained animals were studied because of the distinct events predicted by our computational model at different learning stages. During learning an operant conditioning task, we measured changes in the mRNA levels by Real-Time RT-PCR during learning; expression of these markers associated to plasticity was incremented while learning and such increments began to decline when the task was learned. The plasticity changes in the lPFC during learning predicted by the model matched up with those of the representative gene BDNF. Herein, we showed for the first time that plasticity in the mPFC in rats during learning of an operant conditioning is higher while learning than when the task is learned, using an integrative approach of a computational model and gene expression.

  18. Cross-modal plasticity in Cuban visually-impaired child cochlear implant candidates: topography of somatosensory evoked potentials.

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    Charroó-Ruíz, Lidia E; Pérez-Abalo, María C; Hernández, María C; Alvarez, Beatriz; Bermejo, Beatriz; Bermejo, Sandra; Galán, Lídice; Díaz-Comas, Lourdes

    2012-04-01

    Studies of neuroplasticity have shown that the brain's neural networks change in the absence of sensory input such as hearing or vision. However, little is known about what happens when both sensory modalities are lost (deaf-blindness). Hence, this study of cortical reorganization in visually-impaired child cochlear implant (CI) candidates. Assess cross-modal plasticity, specifically cortical reorganization for tactile representation in visually-impaired child CI candidates, through study of topography of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP). From April through September 2005, SEP from median and tibial nerve electrical stimulation were studied in 12 visually-impaired child CI candidates aged 3-15 years and 23 healthy controls. Following placement of 19 recording electrodes using the International 10-20 System , SEP were recorded and then processed. Topographic maps were obtained for SEP N20 (median nerve) and SEP P40 (tibial nerve), permitting assessment of cortical reorganization by comparing visually-impaired, deaf children's maps with those of healthy children by means of visual inspection and statistical comparison using a permutation test. SEP N20 topography was significantly more extensive in visually-impaired child CI candidates than in healthy children. An asymmetrical pattern occurred from the expansion of hand tactile activation into the temporal and occipital regions in the left hemisphere on right median nerve stimulation. This did not occur for SEP P40 on tibial nerve stimulation (right and left). Magnitude of expanded SEP N20 response was related to severity of visual impairment and longer duration of dual sensory loss. Changes in SEP N20 topography are evidence of cross-modal plasticity in visually-impaired child CI candidates, appearing to result from a complex interaction between severity of visual impairment and duration of multisensory deprivation.

  19. Cerebral cortex plasticity after 90 days of bed rest: data from TMS and fMRI.

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    Roberts, Donna R; Ramsey, David; Johnson, Kevin; Kola, Jejo; Ricci, Raffaella; Hicks, Christian; Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Epstein, Charles; George, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    Microgravity animal models have demonstrated corticospinal plasticity; however, little is understood of its functional significance. In this pilot study, we explored corticospinal plasticity in a bed rest model. We hypothesized that the lack of weight bearing would induce cortical reorganization correlating with performance. Four subjects underwent functional MRI (fMRI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and functional mobility testing (FMT) before and after 90 d of bed rest. Recruitment curves (RC) were created by measuring motor evoked potentials over a range of TMS intensities with changes in the slope of the RC reflecting changes in corticospinal excitability. Significant leg RC slope decreases were observed on post-bed rest day 1 (P1) (t(2805) = -4.14, P < 0.0001), P2 (t(2805) = -6.59, P < 0.0001), P3 (t(2805) = -6.15, P < 0.0001), P5 (t(2805) = -7.93, P <0.0001), P8 (t(2805) = -3.30, P = 0.001), and P12 (t(2805)= -3.33, P = 0.0009), suggesting a group decrease in corticospinal excitability in the immediate post-bed rest period with recovery approaching baseline over the following 2 wk. Significant effects were observed for hand RC slopes only for P2 (t(2916) = 1.97, P = 0.049), P3 (t(2916) = -2.12, P = 0.034), and P12 (t(2916) = -2.19, P = 0.029); no significant effects were observed for days P0 (t(2916) = -1.32, ns), P1 (t(2916) = 1.00, ns), P5 (t(2916) = -0.21, ns), or P8 (t(2916) = -0.27, ns). fMRI showed no change in activation for the hand but an increase in activation post-bed rest for the leg. On an individual basis, a more heterogeneous response was found which showed a potential association with performance on FMT. Results of this research include a better understanding of the cortical plasticity associated with leg disuse and may lead to applications in patient and astronaut rehabilitation.

  20. A Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements.

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    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold ("visual acuity") nor of the contrast threshold ("contrast sensitivity") of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain regions.

  1. A Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements

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    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Kalogeraki, Evgenia; Greifzu, Franziska; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold (“visual acuity”) nor of the contrast threshold (“contrast sensitivity”) of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain

  2. Plasticity of urinary bladder reflexes evoked by stimulation of pudendal afferent nerves after chronic spinal cord injury in cats.

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    Tai, Changfeng; Chen, Mang; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Liu, Hailong; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C

    2011-03-01

    Bladder reflexes evoked by stimulation of pudendal afferent nerves (PudA-to-Bladder reflex) were studied in normal and chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) adult cats to examine the reflex plasticity. Physiological activation of pudendal afferent nerves by tactile stimulation of the perigenital skin elicits an inhibitory PudA-to-Bladder reflex in normal cats, but activates an excitatory reflex in chronic SCI cats. However, in both normal and chronic SCI cats electrical stimulation applied to the perigenital skin or directly to the pudendal nerve induces either inhibitory or excitatory PudA-to-Bladder reflexes depending on stimulation frequency. An inhibitory response occurs at 3-10 Hz stimulation, but becomes excitatory at 20-30 Hz. The inhibitory reflex activated by electrical stimulation significantly (Preflex significantly (Preflex in normal cats; however, in chronic SCI cats a volume less than 20% of bladder capacity was sufficient to unmask an excitatory response. This study revealed the co-existence of both inhibitory and excitatory PudA-to-Bladder reflex pathways in cats before and after chronic SCI. However our data combined with published electrophysiological data strongly indicates that the spinal circuitry for both the excitatory and inhibitory PudA-to-Bladder reflexes undergoes a marked reorganization after SCI. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transformations in oscillatory activity and evoked responses in primary somatosensory cortex in middle age: a combined computational neural modeling and MEG study.

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    Ziegler, David A; Pritchett, Dominique L; Hosseini-Varnamkhasti, Paymon; Corkin, Suzanne; Hämäläinen, Matti; Moore, Christopher I; Jones, Stephanie R

    2010-09-01

    Oscillatory brain rhythms and evoked responses are widely believed to impact cognition, but relatively little is known about how these measures are affected by healthy aging. The present study used MEG to examine age-related changes in spontaneous oscillations and tactile evoked responses in primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in healthy young (YA) and middle-aged (MA) adults. To make specific predictions about neurophysiological changes that mediate age-related MEG changes, we applied a biophysically realistic model of SI that accurately reproduces SI MEG mu rhythms, containing alpha (7-14 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) components, and evoked responses. Analyses of MEG data revealed a significant increase in prestimulus mu power in SI, driven predominately by greater mu-beta dominance, and a larger and delayed M70 peak in the SI evoked response in MA. Previous analysis with our computational model showed that the SI mu rhythm could be reproduced with a stochastic sequence of rhythmic approximately 10 Hz feedforward (FF) input to the granular layers of SI (representative of lemniscal thalamic input) followed nearly simultaneously by approximately 10 Hz feedback (FB) input to the supragranular layers (representative of input from high order cortical or non-specific thalamic sources) (Jones et al., 2009). In the present study, the model further predicted that the rhythmic FF and FB inputs become stronger with age. Further, the FB input is predicted to arrive more synchronously to SI on each cycle of the 10 Hz input in MA. The simulated neurophysiological changes are sufficient to account for the age-related differences in both prestimulus mu rhythms and evoked responses. Thus, the model predicts that a single set of neurophysiological changes intimately links these age-related changes in neural dynamics. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscarinic and nicotinic modulation of thalamo-prefrontal cortex synaptic plasticity [corrected] in vivo.

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    Lezio Soares Bueno-Junior

    Full Text Available The mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD is a rich source of afferents to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. Dysfunctions in the thalamo-prefrontal connections can impair networks implicated in working memory, some of which are affected in Alzheimer disease and schizophrenia. Considering the importance of the cholinergic system to cortical functioning, our study aimed to investigate the effects of global cholinergic activation of the brain on MD-mPFC synaptic plasticity by measuring the dynamics of long-term potentiation (LTP and depression (LTD in vivo. Therefore, rats received intraventricular injections either of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (PILO; 40 nmol/µL, the nicotinic agonist nicotine (NIC; 320 nmol/µL, or vehicle. The injections were administered prior to either thalamic high-frequency (HFS or low-frequency stimulation (LFS. Test pulses were applied to MD for 30 min during baseline and 240 min after HFS or LFS, while field postsynaptic potentials were recorded in the mPFC. The transient oscillatory effects of PILO and NIC were monitored through recording of thalamic and cortical local field potentials. Our results show that HFS did not affect mPFC responses in vehicle-injected rats, but induced a delayed-onset LTP with distinct effects when applied following PILO or NIC. Conversely, LFS induced a stable LTD in control subjects, but was unable to induce LTD when applied after PILO or NIC. Taken together, our findings show distinct modulatory effects of each cholinergic brain activation on MD-mPFC plasticity following HFS and LFS. The LTP-inducing action and long-lasting suppression of cortical LTD induced by PILO and NIC might implicate differential modulation of thalamo-prefrontal functions under low and high input drive.

  5. A period of structural plasticity at the axon initial segment in developing visual cortex

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    Annika eGutzmann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical networks are shaped by sensory experience and are most susceptible to modifications during critical periods characterized by enhanced plasticity at the structural and functional level. A system particularly well-studied in this context is the mammalian visual system. Plasticity has been documented for the somatodendritic compartment of neurons in detail. A neuronal microdomain not yet studied in this context is the axon initial segment (AIS located at the proximal axon segment. It is a specific electrogenic axonal domain and the site of action potential generation. Recent studies showed that structure and function of the AIS can be dynamically regulated. Here we hypothesize that the AIS shows a dynamic regulation during maturation of the visual cortex. We therefore analyzed AIS length development from embryonic day (E 12.5 to adulthood in mice. A tri-phasic time course of AIS length remodeling during development was observed. AIS first appeared at E14.5 and increased in length throughout the postnatal period to a peak between postnatal day (P 10 to P15 (eyes open P13-14. Then, AIS length was reduced significantly around the beginning of the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity (CP, P21. Shortest AIS were observed at the peak of the CP (P28, followed by a moderate elongation towards the end of the CP (P35. To test if the dynamic maturation of the AIS is influenced by eye opening (onset of activity, animals were deprived of visual input before and during the CP. Deprivation for 1 week prior to eye opening did not affect AIS length development. However, deprivation from P0-P28 and P14-P28 resulted in AIS length distribution similar to the peak at P15. In other words, deprivation from birth prevents the transient shortening of the AIS and maintains an immature AIS length. These results are the first to suggest a dynamic maturation of the AIS in cortical neurons and point to novel mechanisms in the development of neuronal

  6. BACE1 Is Necessary for Experience-Dependent Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity in Visual Cortex

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    Emily Petrus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of age-related dementia, which is thought to result from overproduction and/or reduced clearance of amyloid-beta (Aβ peptides. Studies over the past few decades suggest that Aβ is produced in an activity-dependent manner and has physiological relevance to normal brain functions. Similarly, physiological functions for β- and γ-secretases, the two key enzymes that produce Aβ by sequentially processing the amyloid precursor protein (APP, have been discovered over recent years. In particular, activity-dependent production of Aβ has been suggested to play a role in homeostatic regulation of excitatory synaptic function. There is accumulating evidence that activity-dependent immediate early gene Arc is an activity “sensor,” which acts upstream of Aβ production and triggers AMPA receptor endocytosis to homeostatically downregulate the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. We previously reported that Arc is critical for sensory experience-dependent homeostatic reduction of excitatory synaptic transmission in the superficial layers of visual cortex. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking the major neuronal β-secretase, BACE1, exhibit a similar phenotype: stronger basal excitatory synaptic transmission and failure to adapt to changes in visual experience. Our results indicate that BACE1 plays an essential role in sensory experience-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity in the neocortex.

  7. Study on Long-term Potentiation in Developing Rat Visual Cortex during the Critical Period of Plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfen Gao; Zhengqin Yin; Yingbing Liu; Shijun Wang; Huimin Fan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the property of LTP in layers Ⅱ~Ⅳof the rats visual cortex at different postnatal days induced by pairing low-frequency stimulation at layer Ⅳ with post synaptic depolarization in order to explore the synaptic and cellular mechanism of experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex.Methods: Postsynaptic currents (PSCs) of layers Ⅱ~Ⅳ in visual cortex slices of Wistar rats aged P0-29 d were recorded by patch-clamp whole cell recording method. Long-term potentiation (LTP) was induced by low-frequency stimulation (LFS) at 1Hz for 60~90 s.Each pulse of the LFS paired with depolarization of post-synaptic neurons to -20 mV.100μM APV, a kind of competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, was both applied to some slices to test the property of LTP.Results: 1. The LTP incidence was very low before P10d (5/34), and increased rapidly to the top at P15-24 d (17/28), then decreased sharply to 1/5 at P25-29 d, coinciding well with the critical period of plasticity of rat visual cortex. The LTP incidence of P15-29d (after eye opening, 18/33) was significantly higher than that of P0-14 d (before eye opening, 12/43, P < 0.05). 2. Compared with non-APV applied group (30/76), LTP incidence of APV applied group (4/33) was significantly decreased (P < 0.01 ). There were 4 Ⅳ-Ⅳ horizontal synapses. APV application could not block the LTP induction.Conclusions: 1. LTP was a reflection of naturally occurring, experience-dependent plasticity in rat visual cortex. The patterned visual stimuli received after eye opening might be an activation factor of the synaptic plasticity. 2. LTP of visual cortex induced by LFS in layer Ⅳ paired with postsynaptic depolarization was NMDA receptor dependent during the critical period of visual plasticity. However, there were LTP existed in Ⅳ-Ⅳ horizontal synapses which could not be blocked by 100μM APV.

  8. Characterization of the time course of changes of the evoked electrical activity in a model of a chemically-induced neuronal plasticity

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    Ruaro Maria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal plasticity is initiated by transient elevations of neuronal networks activity leading to changes of synaptic properties and providing the basis for memory and learning 1. An increase of electrical activity can be caused by electrical stimulation 2 or by pharmacological manipulations: elevation of extracellular K+ 3, blockage of inhibitory pathways 4 or by an increase of second messengers intracellular concentrations 5. Neuronal plasticity is mediated by several biochemical pathways leading to the modulation of synaptic strength, density of ionic channels and morphological changes of neuronal arborisation 6. On a time scale of a few minutes, neuronal plasticity is mediated by local protein trafficking 7 while, in order to sustain modifications beyond 2–3 h, changes of gene expression are required 8. Findings In the present manuscript we analysed the time course of changes of the evoked electrical activity during neuronal plasticity and we correlated it with a transcriptional analysis of the underlying changes of gene expression. Our investigation shows that treatment for 30 min. with the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine (GabT causes a potentiation of the evoked electrical activity occurring 2–4 hours after GabT and the concomitant up-regulation of 342 genes. Inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway reduced but did not abolish the potentiation of the evoked response caused by GabT. In fact not all the genes analysed were blocked by ERK1/2 inhibitors. Conclusion These results are in agreement with the notion that neuronal plasticity is mediated by several distinct pathways working in unison.

  9. Not an Aspirin: No Evidence for Acute Anti-Nociception to Laser-Evoked Pain After Motor Cortex rTMS in Healthy Humans.

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    Bradley, Claire; Perchet, Caroline; Lelekov-Boissard, Taïssia; Magnin, Michel; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) has shown efficacy in relieving neuropathic pain. Whether its analgesic effect also applies to acute physiological nociception remains unclear due to previous contradictory findings. To provide an in-depth investigation of the effects of motor cortex HF-rTMS on acute laser-evoked pain and excitability of nociceptive networks in healthy subjects. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study in 20 healthy participants. Laser heat stimuli at nociceptive threshold were delivered to the right hand, allowing assessment of: (a) subjective pain intensity and unpleasantness; (b) laser-evoked potentials (LEPs, 128 electrodes) and their source model; (c) sympathetic skin responses, and (d) spino-thalamic pathway excitability. Data were collected before and 20 minutes after a session of neuro-navigated 20 Hz rTMS to the contralateral motor cortex. Subjective pain reports to thermal laser pulses, amplitude of late cortical potentials and sympathetic skin responses were decreased after cortical stimulation, to a similar extent whether it was active or placebo. Early cortical potentials and nociceptive network excitability remained identical before and after rTMS, as did anatomical sources of LEPs. Our results do not provide evidence for a genuine anti-nociceptive effect of rTMS on acute physiological pain. We suggest that motor cortex rTMS may act upon high-order networks linked to the emotional and cognitive appraisal of chronic pain, and/or modulate pathologically sensitized networks, rather than change the physiological transmission within an intact nervous system. Such dichotomy is reminiscent of that observed with most drugs used for neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of diazepam and levodopa single doses on motor cortex plasticity modulation in healthy human subjects: A TMS study

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    Ilić Nela V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Administration of pharmacological agents with specific actions on neurotransmitter systems is a powerful driver of functional cortical reorganization. Plastic reorganization of the motor cortex in humans studies by the use of non-invasive stimulation protocols, which mimic the Hebbian model of associative plasticity. Objective. Aiming to explore pharmacological modulation on human motor cortex plasticity, we tested healthy subjects after each dosage of diazepam, levodopa i placebo administration, using paired associative stimulation protocol (PAS that induce fenomena similar to a long-term potentiation and depression, as defined on the synaptic level. Methods. We analyzed effects of benzodiazepines (10 mg, levodopa (200 mg and placebo on PAS protocol in 14 healthy volunteers, using a double-blind placebo-controlled study design. PAS consisted of electrical stimuli pairs at n.medianus and magnetic pulses over the scalp (transcranial magnetic stimulation in precisely defined intervals (ISI was 10 and 25 ms for a total of about 15 minutes (200 pairs. MEP amplitudes before and after (0, 10, 20 and 30 minutes later interventional protocols were compared. Results. When protocols were applied with placebo depending on ISI (10 ms - inhibitory, 25 ms - facilitatory effects, MEP amplitudes decreased or increased, while values in the postinterventional period (0, 10, 20 and 30 min were compared with initial values before the use of SAS. The use of benzodiazepines caused the occlusion of LTP-like effect, in contrast to amplification effects recorded after the administration of levodopa. With respect to the LTD-like protocol, the reverse was true (ANOVA for repeat measurements p<0.001. Conclusion. Administration of GABA-ergic agonist diazepam interferes with the induction of associative plasticity in the motor cortex of healthy individuals, as opposed to the use of levodopa, which stimulates these processes. The observed effects point at a

  11. AT1 and AT2 Receptors in the Prelimbic Cortex Modulate the Cardiovascular Response Evoked by Acute Exposure to Restraint Stress in Rats.

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    Brasil, Taíz F S; Fassini, Aline; Corrêa, Fernando M

    2017-07-10

    The prelimbic cortex (PL) is an important structure in the neural pathway integrating stress responses. Brain angiotensin is involved in cardiovascular control and modulation of stress responses. Blockade of angiotensin receptors has been reported to reduce stress responses. Acute restraint stress (ARS) is a stress model, which evokes sustained blood pressure increase, tachycardia, and reduction in tail temperature. We therefore hypothesized that PL locally generated angiotensin and angiotensin receptors modulate stress autonomic responses. To test this hypothesis, we microinjected an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin antagonists into the PL, prior to ARS. Male Wistar rats were used; guide cannulas were bilaterally implanted in the PL for microinjection of vehicle or drugs. A polyethylene catheter was introduced into the femoral artery to record cardiovascular parameters. Tail temperature was measured using a thermal camera. ARS was started 10 min after PL treatment with drugs. Pretreatment with ACE inhibitor lisinopril (0.5 nmol/100 nL) reduced the pressor response, but did not affect ARS-evoked tachycardia. At a dose of 1 nmol/100 nL, it reduced both ARS pressor and tachycardic responses. Pretreatment with candesartan, AT1 receptor antagonist reduced ARS-evoked pressor response, but not tachycardia. Pretreatment with PD123177, AT2 receptor antagonist, reduced tachycardia, but did not affect ARS pressor response. No treatment affected ARS fall in tail temperature. Results suggest involvement of PL angiotensin in the mediation of ARS cardiovascular responses, with participation of both AT1 and AT2 receptors. In conclusion, results indicate that PL AT1-receptors modulate the ARS-evoked pressor response, while AT2-receptors modulate the tachycardic component of the autonomic response.

  12. Structure and plasticity potential of neural networks in the cerebral cortex

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    Fares, Tarec Edmond

    In this thesis, we first described a theoretical framework for the analysis of spine remodeling plasticity. We provided a quantitative description of two models of spine remodeling in which the presence of a bouton is either required or not for the formation of a new synapse. We derived expressions for the density of potential synapses in the neuropil, the connectivity fraction, which is the ratio of actual to potential synapses, and the number of structurally different circuits attainable with spine remodeling. We calculated these parameters in mouse occipital cortex, rat CA1, monkey V1, and human temporal cortex. We found that on average a dendritic spine can choose among 4-7 potential targets in rodents and 10-20 potential targets in primates. The neuropil's potential for structural circuit remodeling is highest in rat CA1 (7.1-8.6 bits/mum3) and lowest in monkey V1 (1.3-1.5 bits/mum 3 We next studied the role neuron morphology plays in defining synaptic connectivity. As previously stated it is clear that only pairs of neurons with closely positioned axonal and dendritic branches can be synaptically coupled. For excitatory neurons in the cerebral cortex, ). We also evaluated the lower bound of neuron selectivity in the choice of synaptic partners. Post-synaptic excitatory neurons in rodents make synaptic contacts with more than 21-30% of pre-synaptic axons encountered with new spine growth. Primate neurons appear to be more selective, making synaptic connections with more than 7-15% of encountered axons. We next studied the role neuron morphology plays in defining synaptic connectivity. As previously stated it is clear that only pairs of neurons with closely positioned axonal and dendritic branches can be synaptically coupled. For excitatory neurons in the cerebral cortex, such axo-dendritic oppositions, or potential synapses, must be bridged by dendritic spines to form synaptic connections. To explore the rules by which synaptic connections are formed within

  13. Paired-Associative Stimulation-Induced Long-term Potentiation-Like Motor Cortex Plasticity in Healthy Adolescents

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    Jonathan C. Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using paired-associative stimulation (PAS to study excitatory and inhibitory plasticity in adolescents while examining variables that may moderate plasticity (such as sex and environment.MethodsWe recruited 34 healthy adolescents (aged 13–19, 13 males, 21 females. To evaluate excitatory plasticity, we compared mean motor-evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS before and after PAS at 0, 15, and 30 min. To evaluate inhibitory plasticity, we evaluated the cortical silent period (CSP elicited by single-pulse TMS in the contracted hand before and after PAS at 0, 15, and 30 min.ResultsAll participants completed PAS procedures. No adverse events occurred. PAS was well tolerated. PAS-induced significant increases in the ratio of post-PAS MEP to pre-PAS MEP amplitudes (p < 0.01 at all post-PAS intervals. Neither socioeconomic status nor sex was associated with post-PAS MEP changes. PAS induced significant CSP lengthening in males but not females.ConclusionPAS is a feasible, safe, and well-tolerated index of adolescent motor cortical plasticity. Gender may influence PAS-induced changes in cortical inhibition. PAS is safe and well tolerated by healthy adolescents and may be a novel tool with which to study adolescent neuroplasticity.

  14. Modulation of Synaptic Plasticity in the Cortex Needs to Understand All the Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Claire N. J.; Chameau, Pascal; Fossier, Philippe M.

    2017-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in cognitive tasks such as working memory, decision making, risk assessment and regulation of attention. These functions performed by the PFC are supposed to rely on rhythmic electrical activity generated by neuronal network oscillations determined by a precise balance between excitation and inhibition balance (E/I balance) resulting from the coordinated activities of recurrent excitation and feedback and feedforward inhibition. Functional alterations in PFC functions have been associated with cognitive deficits in several pathologies such as major depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. These pathological situations are correlated with alterations of different neurotransmitter systems (i.e., serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), acetylcholine…) that result in alterations of the E/I balance. The aim of this review article is to cover the basic aspects of the regulation of the E/I balance as well as to highlight the importance of the complementarity role of several neurotransmitters in the modulation of the plasticity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We illustrate our purpose by recent findings that demonstrate that 5-HT and DA cooperate to regulate the plasticity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses targeting layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PyNs) of the PFC and to fine tune the E/I balance. Using a method based on the decomposition of the synaptic conductance into its excitatory and inhibitory components, we show that concomitant activation of D1-like receptors (D1Rs) and 5-HT1ARs, through a modulation of NMDA receptors, favors long term potentiation (LTP) of both excitation and inhibition and consequently does not modify the E/I balance. We also demonstrate that activation of D2-receptors requires functional 5-HT1ARs to shift the E-I balance towards more inhibition and to favor long term depression (LTD) of excitatory synapses through the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). This cooperation between different

  15. The Role of Neural Plasticity in Depression: From Hippocampus to Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Neural plasticity, a fundamental mechanism of neuronal adaptation, is disrupted in depression. The changes in neural plasticity induced by stress and other negative stimuli play a significant role in the onset and development of depression. Antidepressant treatments have also been found to exert their antidepressant effects through regulatory effects on neural plasticity. However, the detailed mechanisms of neural plasticity in depression still remain unclear. Therefore, in this review, we summarize the recent literature to elaborate the possible mechanistic role of neural plasticity in depression. Taken together, these findings may pave the way for future progress in neural plasticity studies.

  16. Diverse action of repeated corticosterone treatment on synaptic transmission, neuronal plasticity, and morphology in superficial and deep layers of the rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Joanna; Gugula, Anna; Blasiak, Anna; Bobula, Bartosz; Danielewicz, Joanna; Kania, Alan; Tylko, Grzegorz; Hess, Grzegorz

    2017-07-27

    One of the adverse effects of prolonged stress in rats is impaired performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks. The mechanisms that lead to these abnormalities are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared the effects of twice daily repeated corticosterone injections for 7 days on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), as well as on synaptic plasticity and morphology of layers II/III and V pyramidal neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1) of male Wistar rats. Corticosterone treatment resulted in increased frequency, but not amplitude, of mEPSCs in layer II/III neurons accompanied by increased complexity of the apical part of their dendritic tree, with no changes in the density of dendritic spines. The frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs as well as the parameters characterizing the complexity of the dendritic tree were not changed in layer V cells; however, their dendritic spine density was increased. While corticosterone treatment resulted in an increase in the amplitude of field potentials evoked in intralaminar connections within layer II/III, it did not influence field responses in layer V intralaminar connections, as well as the extent of chemically induced layer V long-term potentiation (chemLTP) by the application of tetraethylammonium (TEA, 25 mM). However, chemLTP induction in layer II/III was impaired in slices prepared from corticosterone-treated animals. These data indicate that repeated 7-day administration of exogenous corticosterone induces structural and functional plasticity in the M1, which occurs mainly in layer II/III pyramidal neurons. These findings shed light on potential sites of action and mechanisms underlying stress-induced impairment of motor functions.

  17. Perception of hand movement by mirror reflection evokes brain activation in the motor cortex contralateral to a non-moving hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Ranjan; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    We investigated whether perception of hand movement via mirror reflection evokes activation in the motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the non-moving hand (the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand). Continuous electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from 14 participants while they performed unimanual extension-flexion hand movements in direct view and mirror view conditions. We measured the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) as a marker of M1 activation in both conditions. Both the direct and mirror view conditions produced LRPs, with the mirror view conditions revealing clear activation in M1 contralateral to the non-moving hand (ipsilateral to the moving hand) during both flexion and extension phases. This unambiguous demonstration of M1 activation in association with a non-moving hand (which is visually-perceived as moving), suggests that perception of movement can directly lead to M1 activation.

  18. Inactivation of BRD7 results in impaired cognitive behavior and reduced synaptic plasticity of the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Cao, Wenyu; Zhou, Ming; Li, Changqi; Luo, Yanwei; Wang, Heran; Zhao, Ran; Jiang, Shihe; Yang, Jing; Liu, Yukun; Wang, Xinye; Li, Xiayu; Xiong, Wei; Ma, Jian; Peng, Shuping; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Li, Xiaoling; Tan, Ming; Li, Guiyuan

    2015-06-01

    BRD7 is a bromodomain-containing protein (BCP), and recent evidence implicates the role of BCPs in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, few studies have investigated the biological functions of BRD7 in the central nervous system. In our study, BRD7 was found to be widely expressed in various regions of the mouse brain, including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), caudate putamen (CPu), hippocampus (Hip), midbrain (Mb), cerebellum (Cb), and mainly co-localized with neuron but not with glia. Using a BRD7 knockout mouse model and a battery of behavioral tests, we report that disruption of BRD7 results in impaired cognitive behavior leaving the emotional behavior unaffected. Moreover, a series of proteins involved in synaptic plasticity were decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex and there was a concomitant decrease in neuronal spine density and dendritic branching in the medial prefrontal cortex. However, no significant difference was found in the hippocampus compared to the wild-type mice. Thus, BRD7 might play a critical role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity and affect cognitive behavior.

  19. Time course of the induction of homeostatic plasticity generated by repeated transcranial direct current stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, K; Seeber, A A; Thirugnanasambandam, N; Paulus, W; Nitsche, M A; Rothwell, J C

    2011-03-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed that control the amount of plasticity in neuronal circuits and guarantee dynamic stability of neuronal networks. Homeostatic plasticity suggests that the ease with which a synaptic connection is facilitated/suppressed depends on the previous amount of network activity. We describe how such homeostatic-like interactions depend on the time interval between two conditioning protocols and on the duration of the preconditioning protocol. We used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to produce short-lasting plasticity in the motor cortex of healthy humans. In the main experiment, we compared the aftereffect of a single 5-min session of anodal or cathodal tDCS with the effect of a 5-min tDCS session preceded by an identical 5-min conditioning session administered 30, 3, or 0 min beforehand. Five-minute anodal tDCS increases excitability for about 5 min. The same duration of cathodal tDCS reduces excitability. Increasing the duration of tDCS to 10 min prolongs the duration of the effects. If two 5-min periods of tDCS are applied with a 30-min break between them, the effect of the second period of tDCS is identical to that of 5-min stimulation alone. If the break is only 3 min, then the second session has the opposite effect to 5-min tDCS given alone. Control experiments show that these shifts in the direction of plasticity evolve during the 10 min after the first tDCS session and depend on the duration of the first tDCS but not on intracortical inhibition and facilitation. The results are compatible with a time-dependent "homeostatic-like" rule governing the response of the human motor cortex to plasticity probing protocols.

  20. [Visual evoked potentials produced by monocular flash stimuli in the cerebral cortex of the rabbit. I. Typography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cobo, J C; Ruiz-Beramendi, M; Pérez-Arroyo, M

    1990-12-01

    The visually evoked potentials in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulated eye in rabbit, can be described topographically as follows. While a positive wave (P1) begins forming in the anterior zones and in the V I binocular zone, the N0 wave, at times very large, is produced in a more occipital zone, which corresponds to the visual streak. Immediately afterwards, the positivity, P1, practically invades the whole of the hemisphere. After this, the N1 wave which is produced in the most posterior parts of the V I, begins forming. The whole phenomenon comes to an end when the P2 wave is generated in the most occipital zones.

  1. Juvenile methylphenidate reduces prefrontal cortex plasticity via D3 receptor and BDNF in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L Andersen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early drug intervention in childhood disorders aims to maximize individual potential in the short- and long-term. Consistently, juvenile exposure to psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (MPH, reduces risk for substance use in animals and sub-populations of individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. We investigated the effects of MPH on brain plasticity via dopamine receptor D3 (D3R and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression in developing rats. Methods: Between postnatal days 20-35, rat pups were administered saline vehicle (Veh or MPH (2 mg/kg, the D3R-preferring agonist ± 7-OHDPAT, or the antagonist nafadotride (0.05 mg/kg alone, or in combination with MPH twice a day. In adulthood, subjects were challenged to Veh or cocaine (10 mg/kg for two days. The prefrontal cortex was analyzed for protein and mRNA levels of total BDNF, its splice variants I, IIc, III/IV, and IV/VI, and D3 receptors. A separate group of subjects was assessed for splice variants at 20, 35, 40 and 60 days. Results: Across age strong correlations were evident between Drd3 and Bdnf mRNA levels (r=0.65 and a negative relationship between Drd3 and exon IIc after MPH exposure (r=-0.73. BDNF protein levels did not differ between Veh- and MPH subjects at baseline, but were significantly lower in MPH-treated and cocaine challenged subjects (30.3 ± 9.7%. Bdnf mRNA was significantly higher in MPH subjects, and reversed upon exposure to cocaine. This effect was blocked by nafadotride. Furthermore, Bdnftotal and Bdnf splice variants I, IIc, III/IV, and IV/VI changed across the transitions between juvenility and late adolescence. Conclusions: These data suggest a sensitive window of vulnerability to modulations of BDNF expression around adolescence, and that compared to normal animals, juvenile exposure to MPH permanently reduces prefrontal BDNF transcription and translation upon cocaine exposure in adulthood by a D3R

  2. Induction of motor associative plasticity in the posterior parietal cortex-primary motor network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chao, Chi-Chao; Karabanov, Anke Ninija; Paine, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    There is anatomical and functional connectivity between the primary motor cortex (M1) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that plays a role in sensorimotor integration. In this study, we applied corticocortical paired-associative stimuli to ipsilateral PPC and M1 (parietal ccPAS) in healthy right...

  3. A role for the insular cortex in long-term memory for context-evoked drug craving in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Marco; Billeke, Pablo; Vicencio, Sergio; Madrid, Carlos; Perdomo, Guetón; González, Marcela; Torrealba, Fernando

    2012-08-01

    Drug craving critically depends on the function of the interoceptive insular cortex, and may be triggered by contextual cues. However, the role of the insula in the long-term memory linking context with drug craving remains unknown. Such a memory trace probably resides in some neocortical region, much like other declarative memories. Studies in humans and rats suggest that the insula may include such a region. Rats chronically implanted with bilateral injection cannulae into the high-order rostral agranular insular cortex (RAIC) or the primary interoceptive posterior insula (pIC) were conditioned to prefer the initially aversive compartment of a 2-compartment place preference apparatus by repeatedly pairing it to amphetamine. We found a reversible but long-lasting loss (ca. 24 days) of amphetamine-conditioned place preference (CPP) and a decreased expression in the insula of zif268, a crucial protein in memory reconsolidation, when anisomycin (ANI) was microinjected into the RAIC immediately after the reactivation of the conditioned amphetamine/context memory. ANI infusion into the RAIC without reactivation did not change CPP, whereas ANI infusion into pIC plus caused a 15 days loss of CPP. We also found a 24 days loss of CPP when we reversibly inactivated pIC during extinction trials. We interpret these findings as evidence that the insular cortex, including the RAIC, is involved in a context/drug effect association. These results add a drug-related memory function to the insular cortex to the previously found role of the pIC in the perception of craving or malaise.

  4. Recognition of Mother's voice evokes metabolic activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and lateral thalamus of Octodon degus pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, K; Poeggel, G

    2001-01-01

    In a variety of animal species, including primates, vocal communication is an essential part to establish and maintain social interactions, including the emotional bond between the newborn, its parents and siblings. The aim of this study in pups of the trumpet-tailed rat, Octodon degus, was to identify cortical and subcortical brain regions, which are involved in the perception of vocalizations uttered by the mother. In this species, which is characterized by an elaborated vocal repertoire, the (14C)-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose autoradiography was applied to measure region-specific metabolic activation in response to the presentation of a learned emotionally relevant acoustic stimulus, the maternal calls. Already at the age of eight days the precentral medial cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the lateral thalamus could be identified by their enhanced metabolic activation in response to the presentation of the emotionally relevant maternal nursing calls, whereas other brain areas, such as the hippocampus and amygdala did not show stimulus-induced activation. Since in humans changes of activity patterns in relation to the emotional content of spoken language have been observed in similar brain regions, e.g. in the anterior cingulate cortex, Octodon degus may provide a suitable animal model to study the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying perception, production and processing of conspecific vocalizations.

  5. Plasticity in bilateral superior temporal cortex: Effects of deafness and cochlear implantation on auditory and visual speech processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carly A; Lazard, Diane S; Hartley, Douglas E H

    2017-01-01

    While many individuals can benefit substantially from cochlear implantation, the ability to perceive and understand auditory speech with a cochlear implant (CI) remains highly variable amongst adult recipients. Importantly, auditory performance with a CI cannot be reliably predicted based solely on routinely obtained information regarding clinical characteristics of the CI candidate. This review argues that central factors, notably cortical function and plasticity, should also be considered as important contributors to the observed individual variability in CI outcome. Superior temporal cortex (STC), including auditory association areas, plays a crucial role in the processing of auditory and visual speech information. The current review considers evidence of cortical plasticity within bilateral STC, and how these effects may explain variability in CI outcome. Furthermore, evidence of audio-visual interactions in temporal and occipital cortices is examined, and relation to CI outcome is discussed. To date, longitudinal examination of changes in cortical function and plasticity over the period of rehabilitation with a CI has been restricted by methodological challenges. The application of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in studying cortical function in CI users is becoming increasingly recognised as a potential solution to these problems. Here we suggest that fNIRS offers a powerful neuroimaging tool to elucidate the relationship between audio-visual interactions, cortical plasticity during deafness and following cochlear implantation, and individual variability in auditory performance with a CI. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of motor cortex NMDA receptors in learning-dependent synaptic plasticity of behaving mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mazahir T Hasan; Hernández-González, Samuel; Dogbevia, Godwin; Treviño, Mario; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary motor cortex has an important role in the precise execution of learned motor responses. During motor learning, synaptic efficacy between sensory and primary motor cortical neurons is enhanced, possibly involving long-term potentiation and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-specific glutamate receptor function. To investigate whether NMDA receptor in the primary motor cortex can act as a coincidence detector for activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength and associative learning, her...

  7. Efficacy and interindividual variability in motor-cortex plasticity following anodal tDCS and paired-associative stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strube, Wolfgang; Bunse, Tilmann; Malchow, Berend; Hasan, Alkomiet

    2015-01-01

    Interindividual response variability to various motor-cortex stimulation protocols has been recently reported. Comparative data of stimulation protocols with different modes of action is lacking. We aimed to compare the efficacy and response variability of two LTP-inducing stimulation protocols in the human motor cortex: anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) and paired-associative stimulation (PAS25). In two experiments 30 subjects received 1mA a-tDCS and PAS25. Data analysis focused on motor-cortex excitability change and response defined as increase in MEP applying different cut-offs. Furthermore, the predictive pattern of baseline characteristics was explored. Both protocols induced a significant increase in motor-cortical excitability. In the PAS25 experiments the likelihood to develop a MEP response was higher compared to a-tDCS, whereas for intracortical facilitation (ICF) the likelihood for a response was higher in the a-tDCS experiments. Baseline ICF (12 ms) correlated positively with an increase in MEPs only following a-tDCS and responders had significantly higher ICF baseline values. Contrary to recent studies, we showed significant group-level efficacy following both stimulation protocols confirming older studies. However, we also observed a remarkable amount of nonresponders. Our findings highlight the need to define sufficient physiological read-outs for a given plasticity protocol and to develop predictive markers for targeted stimulation.

  8. Abnormal plasticity of the sensorimotor cortex to slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with writer's cramp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumer, Tobias; Demiralay, Cüneyt; Hidding, Ute; Bikmullina, Rosalia; Helmich, Rick C; Wunderlich, Silke; Rothwell, John; Liepert, Joachim; Siebner, Hartwig R; Münchau, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated functional abnormalities in the somatosensory system, including a distorted functional organization of the somatosensory cortex (S1) in patients with writer's cramp. We tested the hypothesis that these functional alterations render S1 of these patients more susceptible to the "inhibitory" effects of subthreshold 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) given to S1. Seven patients with writer's cramp and eight healthy subjects were studied. Patients also received rTMS to the motor cortex hand area (M1). As an outcome measure, short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was tested. SAI was studied in the relaxed first dorsal interosseous muscle using conditioning electrical stimulation of the index finger and TMS pulses over the contralateral M1. Baseline SAI did not differ between groups. S1 but not M1 rTMS reduced SAI in patients. rTMS had no effects on SAI in healthy subjects. Because SAI is mediated predominantly at a cortical level in the sensorimotor cortex, we conclude that there is an abnormal responsiveness of this area to 1 Hz rTMS in writer's cramp, which may represent a trait toward maladaptive plasticity in the sensorimotor system in these patients.

  9. Motor learning in animal models of Parkinson's disease: Aberrant synaptic plasticity in the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tonghui; Wang, Shaofang; Lalchandani, Rupa R; Ding, Jun B

    2017-04-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), dopamine depletion causes major changes in the brain, resulting in the typical cardinal motor features of the disease. PD neuropathology has been restricted to postmortem examinations, which are limited to only a single time of PD progression. Models of PD in which dopamine tone in the brain is chemically or physically disrupted are valuable tools in understanding the mechanisms of the disease. The basal ganglia have been well studied in the context of PD, and circuit changes in response to dopamine loss have been linked to the motor dysfunctions in PD. However, the etiology of the cognitive dysfunctions that are comorbid in PD patients has remained unclear until now. In this article, we review recent studies exploring how dopamine depletion affects the motor cortex at the synaptic level. In particular, we highlight our recent findings on abnormal spine dynamics in the motor cortex of PD mouse models through in vivo time-lapse imaging and motor skill behavior assays. In combination with previous studies, a role of the motor cortex in skill learning and the impairment of this ability with the loss of dopamine are becoming more apparent. Taken together, we conclude with a discussion on the potential role for the motor cortex in PD, with the possibility of targeting the motor cortex for future PD therapeutics. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Stimulus dependency of object-evoked responses in human visual cortex: an inverse problem for category specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Graewe

    Full Text Available Many studies have linked the processing of different object categories to specific event-related potentials (ERPs such as the face-specific N170. Despite reports showing that object-related ERPs are influenced by visual stimulus features, there is consensus that these components primarily reflect categorical aspects of the stimuli. Here, we re-investigated this idea by systematically measuring the effects of visual feature manipulations on ERP responses elicited by both structure-from-motion (SFM-defined and luminance-defined object stimuli. SFM objects elicited a novel component at 200-250 ms (N250 over parietal and posterior temporal sites. We found, however, that the N250 amplitude was unaffected by restructuring SFM stimuli into meaningless objects based on identical visual cues. This suggests that this N250 peak was not uniquely linked to categorical aspects of the objects, but is strongly determined by visual stimulus features. We provide strong support for this hypothesis by parametrically manipulating the depth range of both SFM- and luminance-defined object stimuli and showing that the N250 evoked by SFM stimuli as well as the well-known N170 to static faces were sensitive to this manipulation. Importantly, this effect could not be attributed to compromised object categorization in low depth stimuli, confirming a strong impact of visual stimulus features on object-related ERP signals. As ERP components linked with visual categorical object perception are likely determined by multiple stimulus features, this creates an interesting inverse problem when deriving specific perceptual processes from variations in ERP components.

  11. Plasticity-Related PKMζ Signaling in the Insular Cortex Is Involved in the Modulation of Neuropathic Pain after Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongsoo Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The insular cortex (IC is associated with important functions linked with pain and emotions. According to recent reports, neural plasticity in the brain including the IC can be induced by nerve injury and may contribute to chronic pain. Continuous active kinase, protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ, has been known to maintain the long-term potentiation. This study was conducted to determine the role of PKMζ in the IC, which may be involved in the modulation of neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia test and immunohistochemistry (IHC of zif268, an activity-dependent transcription factor required for neuronal plasticity, were performed after nerve injury. After ζ-pseudosubstrate inhibitory peptide (ZIP, a selective inhibitor of PKMζ injection, mechanical allodynia test and immunoblotting of PKMζ, phospho-PKMζ (p-PKMζ, and GluR1 and GluR2 were observed. IHC demonstrated that zif268 expression significantly increased in the IC after nerve injury. Mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by ZIP microinjection into the IC. The analgesic effect lasted for 12 hours. Moreover, the levels of GluR1, GluR2, and p-PKMζ were decreased after ZIP microinjection. These results suggest that peripheral nerve injury induces neural plasticity related to PKMζ and that ZIP has potential applications for relieving chronic pain.

  12. TMS and TMS-EEG techniques in the study of the excitability, connectivity, and plasticity of the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Florinda; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the notion that brain plasticity involves distinct functional and structural components, each entailing a number of cellular mechanisms operating at different time scales, synaptic loci, and developmental phases within an extremely complex framework. However, the exact relationship between functional and structural components of brain plasticity/connectivity phenomena is still unclear and its explanation is a major challenge within modern neuroscience. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with or without electroencephalography (EEG), is a sensitive and objective measure of the effect of different kinds of noninvasive manipulation of the brain's activity, particularly of the motor cortex. Moreover, the key feature of TMS and TMS-EEG coregistration is their crucial role in tracking temporal dynamics and inner hierarchies of brain functional and effective connectivities, possibly clarifying some essential issues underlying brain plasticity. All together, the findings presented here are significant for the adoption of the TMS and TMS-EEG coregistration techniques as a tool for basic neurophysiologic research and, in the future, even for clinical diagnostics purposes.

  13. Hidden prenatal malnutrition in the rat: role of β₁-adrenoceptors on synaptic plasticity in the frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Osvaldo; Pérez, Hernán; Valladares, Luis; Morgan, Carlos; Gatica, Arnaldo; Burgos, Héctor; Olivares, Ricardo; Hernández, Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    Moderate reduction in the protein content of the mother's diet (hidden malnutrition) does not alter body and brain weights of rat pups at birth, but leads to dysfunction of neocortical noradrenaline systems together with impaired long-term potentiation and visuo-spatial memory performance. As β₁-adrenoceptors and downstream protein kinase signaling are critically involved in synaptic long-term potentiation and memory formation, we evaluated the β₁-adrenoceptor density and the expression of cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase Fyn, in the frontal cortex of prenatally malnourished adult rats. In addition, we also studied if β₁-adrenoceptor activation with the selective β₁ agonist dobutamine could improve deficits of prefrontal cortex long-term potentiation presenting these animals. Prenatally malnourished rats exhibited half of β₁-adrenoceptor binding, together with a 51% and 65% reduction of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase α and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase α expression, respectively, as compared with eutrophic animals. Administration of the selective β₁ agonist dobutamine prior to tetanization completely rescued the ability of the prefrontal cortex to develop and maintain long-term potentiation in the malnourished rats. Results suggest that under-expression of neocortical β₁-adrenoceptors and protein kinase signaling in hidden malnourished rats functionally affects the synaptic networks subserving prefrontal cortex long-term potentiation. β₁-adrenoceptor activation was sufficient to fully recover neocortical plasticity in the PKA- and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-deficient undernourished rats, possibly by producing extra amounts of cAMP and/or by recruiting alternative signaling cascades. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala plasticity in a rat model of autism spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Díaz, Nuvia; Bringas, Maria Elena; Atzori, Marco; Flores, Gonzalo

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of prenatal administration of valproic acid (VPA) (500 mg/kg) at embryonic day 12.5 on the anatomical properties of the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala, at three different ages: immediately after weaning (postnatal day 21 [PD21]), prepubertal (PD35), and postpubertal (PD70) ages in a rat model of autistic spectrum disorder. Quantitative analysis of the thickness of the prefrontal cortex revealed a reduced size at all study ages in the cingulate 1 area of the prefrontal cortex and CA1 of the dorsal hippocampus in prenatally exposed animals compared to controls. At the level of the basolateral amygdala, a reduction in the size was observed at PD35 and PD70 in the VPA group. In addition, a reduced thickness was observed in the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex in VPA animals at PD35. Interestingly, no differences in cortical thickness were observed between control and VPA animals in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal at any age. Our results suggest that prenatal exposure to VPA differentially alters cortical limbic regions anatomical parameters, with implication in the autistic spectrum disorder.

  15. Determining auditory-evoked activities from multiple cells in layer 1 of the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus of mice by in vivo calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsufumi; Hirose, Junichi; Murase, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-24

    Layer 1 of the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus (DCIC) is distinguished from other layers by its cytoarchitecture and fiber connections. However, the information of the sound types represented in layer 1 of the DCIC remains unclear because placing electrodes on such thin structures is challenging. In this study, we utilized in vivo calcium imaging to assess auditory-evoked activities in multiple cells in layer 1 of DCIC and to characterize sound stimuli producing strong activity. Most cells examined showed strong responses to broad-band noise and low-frequency tone bursts of high sound intensity. In some cases, we successfully obtained frequency response areas, which are receptive fields to tone frequencies and intensities, and ~30% of these showed V-shape tunings. This is the first systematic study to record auditory responses of cells in layer 1 of DCIC. These results indicate that cells in this area are selective to tones with low frequency, implying the importance of such auditory information in the neural circuitry of layer 1 of DCIC.

  16. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Collins, Adam PR; Müller, Nicole; Stegmann-Woessner, Gaby; Jankowski, Jacob; Gieseke, Jürgen; Born, Mark; Seitz, Hermann; Bartmann, Peter; Schild, Hans H.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Boecker, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC). Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level. Patients / methods Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL). Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR) was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an ‘adult’ 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p lateralization of SMC activation, as found in children and adults, is already present in the newborn period. PMID:28076368

  17. Anodal tDCS over the Primary Motor Cortex Facilitates Long-Term Memory Formation Reflecting Use-Dependent Plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orjon Rroji

    Full Text Available Previous research suggests that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the primary motor cortex (M1 modulates NMDA receptor dependent processes that mediate synaptic plasticity. Here we test this proposal by applying anodal versus sham tDCS while subjects practiced to flex the thumb as fast as possible (ballistic movements. Repetitive practice of this task has been shown to result in performance improvements that reflect use-dependent plasticity resulting from NMDA receptor mediated, long-term potentiation (LTP-like processes. Using a double-blind within-subject cross-over design, subjects (n=14 participated either in an anodal or a sham tDCS session which were at least 3 months apart. Sham or anodal tDCS (1 mA was applied for 20 min during motor practice and retention was tested 30 min, 24 hours and one week later. All subjects improved performance during each of the two sessions (p < 0.001 and learning gains were similar. Our main result is that long term retention performance (i.e. 1 week after practice was significantly better when practice was performed with anodal tDCS than with sham tDCS (p < 0.001. This effect was large (Cohen's d=1.01 and all but one subject followed the group trend. Our data strongly suggest that anodal tDCS facilitates long-term memory formation reflecting use-dependent plasticity. Our results support the notion that anodal tDCS facilitates synaptic plasticity mediated by an LTP-like mechanism, which is in accordance with previous research.

  18. Dopaminergic modulation of short-term synaptic plasticity in fast-spiking interneurons of primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Burgos, G; Kroener, S; Seamans, J K; Lewis, D A; Barrionuevo, G

    2005-12-01

    Dopaminergic regulation of primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity is essential for cognitive functions such as working memory. However, the cellular mechanisms of dopamine neuromodulation in PFC are not well understood. We have studied the effects of dopamine receptor activation during persistent stimulation of excitatory inputs onto fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons in monkey PFC. Stimulation at 20 Hz induced short-term excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) depression. The D1 receptor agonist SKF81297 (5 microM) significantly reduced the amplitude of the first EPSP but not of subsequent responses in EPSP trains, which still displayed significant depression. Dopamine (DA; 10 microM) effects were similar to those of SKF81297 and were abolished by the D1 antagonist SCH23390 (5 microM), indicating a D1 receptor-mediated effect. DA did not alter miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, suggesting that its effects were activity dependent and presynaptic action potential dependent. In contrast to previous findings in pyramidal neurons, in fast-spiking cells, contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors to EPSPs at subthreshold potentials was not significant and fast-spiking cell depolarization decreased EPSP duration. In addition, DA had no significant effects on temporal summation. The selective decrease in the amplitude of the first EPSP in trains delivered every 10 s suggests that in fast-spiking neurons, DA reduces the amplitude of EPSPs evoked at low frequency but not of EPSPs evoked by repetitive stimulation. DA may therefore improve detection of EPSP bursts above background synaptic activity. EPSP bursts displaying short-term depression may transmit spike-timing-dependent temporal codes contained in presynaptic spike trains. Thus DA neuromodulation may increase the signal-to-noise ratio at fast-spiking cell inputs.

  19. Ocular dominance plasticity disrupts binocular inhibition-excitation matching in visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saiepour, M Hadi; Rajendran, Rajeev; Omrani, Azar; Ma, Wen-Pei; Tao, Huizhong W; Heimel, J Alexander; Levelt, Christiaan N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To ensure that neuronal networks function in a stable fashion, neurons receive balanced inhibitory and excitatory inputs. In various brain regions, this balance has been found to change temporarily during plasticity. Whether changes in inhibition have an instructive or permissive role in

  20. Two distinct interneuron circuits in human motor cortex are linked to different subsets of physiological and behavioral plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Masashi; Galea, Joseph M; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Mazzone, Paolo; Ziemann, Ulf; Rothwell, John C

    2014-09-17

    How does a single brain region participate in multiple behaviors? Here we argue that two separate interneuron circuits in the primary motor cortex (M1) contribute differently to two varieties of physiological and behavioral plasticity. To test this in human brain noninvasively, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of M1 hand area to activate two independent sets of synaptic inputs to corticospinal neurons by changing the direction of current induced in the brain: posterior-to-anterior current (PA inputs) and anterior-to-posterior current (AP inputs). We demonstrate that excitability changes produced by repetitive activation of AP inputs depend on cerebellar activity and selectively alter model-based motor learning. In contrast, the changes observed with repetitive stimulation of PA inputs are independent of cerebellar activity and specifically modulate model-free motor learning. The findings are highly suggestive that separate circuits in M1 subserve different forms of motor learning.

  1. Extracellular matrix plasticity and GABAergic inhibition of prefrontal cortex pyramidal cells facilitates relapse to heroin seeking

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Successful treatment of drug addiction is hampered by high relapse rates during periods of abstinence. Neuroadaptation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is thought to play a crucial role in vulnerability to relapse to drug seeking, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To identify protein changes that contribute to relapse susceptibility, we investigated synaptic membrane fractions from the mPFC of rats that underwent 21 days of forced abst...

  2. Requirement of keratan sulfate proteoglycan phosphacan with a specific sulfation pattern for critical period plasticity in the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda-Uchimura, Yoshiko; Uchimura, Kenji; Sugimura, Taketoshi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Komatsu, Yukio; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating the development and functions of the brain. They consist of a core protein and glycosaminoglycans, which are long sugar chains of repeating disaccharide units with sulfation. A recent study demonstrated that the sulfation pattern of chondroitin sulfate on proteoglycans contributes to regulation of the critical period of experience-dependent plasticity in the mouse visual cortex. In the present study, we investigated the role of keratan sulfate (KS), another glycosaminoglycan, in critical period plasticity in the mouse visual cortex. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated the presence of KS containing disaccharide units of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-6-sulfate and nonsulfated galactose during the critical period, although KS containing disaccharide units of GlcNAc-6-sulfate and galactose-6-sulfate was already known to disappear before that period. The KS chains were distributed diffusely in the extracellular space and densely around the soma of a large population of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the KS was localized within the perisynaptic spaces and dendrites but not in presynaptic sites. KS was mainly located on phosphacan. In mice deficient in GlcNAc-6-O-sulfotransferase 1, which is one of the enzymes necessary for the synthesis of KS chains, the expression of KS was one half that in wild-type mice. In the knockout mice, monocular deprivation during the critical period resulted in a depression of deprived-eye responses but failed to produce potentiation of nondeprived-eye responses. In addition, T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP), which occurs only during the critical period, was not observed. These results suggest that regulation by KS-phosphacan with a specific sulfation pattern is necessary for the generation of LTP and hence the potentiation of nondeprived-eye responses after monocular deprivation.

  3. Correlation-based model of artificially induced plasticity in motor cortex by a bidirectional brain-computer interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lajoie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments show that spike-triggered stimulation performed with Bidirectional Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BBCI can artificially strengthen connections between separate neural sites in motor cortex (MC. When spikes from a neuron recorded at one MC site trigger stimuli at a second target site after a fixed delay, the connections between sites eventually strengthen. It was also found that effective spike-stimulus delays are consistent with experimentally derived spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP rules, suggesting that STDP is key to drive these changes. However, the impact of STDP at the level of circuits, and the mechanisms governing its modification with neural implants remain poorly understood. The present work describes a recurrent neural network model with probabilistic spiking mechanisms and plastic synapses capable of capturing both neural and synaptic activity statistics relevant to BBCI conditioning protocols. Our model successfully reproduces key experimental results, both established and new, and offers mechanistic insights into spike-triggered conditioning. Using analytical calculations and numerical simulations, we derive optimal operational regimes for BBCIs, and formulate predictions concerning the efficacy of spike-triggered conditioning in different regimes of cortical activity.

  4. Correlation-based model of artificially induced plasticity in motor cortex by a bidirectional brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Guillaume; Kalaska, John F.; Fairhall, Adrienne L.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    2017-01-01

    Experiments show that spike-triggered stimulation performed with Bidirectional Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BBCI) can artificially strengthen connections between separate neural sites in motor cortex (MC). When spikes from a neuron recorded at one MC site trigger stimuli at a second target site after a fixed delay, the connections between sites eventually strengthen. It was also found that effective spike-stimulus delays are consistent with experimentally derived spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) rules, suggesting that STDP is key to drive these changes. However, the impact of STDP at the level of circuits, and the mechanisms governing its modification with neural implants remain poorly understood. The present work describes a recurrent neural network model with probabilistic spiking mechanisms and plastic synapses capable of capturing both neural and synaptic activity statistics relevant to BBCI conditioning protocols. Our model successfully reproduces key experimental results, both established and new, and offers mechanistic insights into spike-triggered conditioning. Using analytical calculations and numerical simulations, we derive optimal operational regimes for BBCIs, and formulate predictions concerning the efficacy of spike-triggered conditioning in different regimes of cortical activity. PMID:28151957

  5. [Noradrenaline and plasticity of the visual cortex of the kitten: a reexamination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrien, J; Buisseret, P; Fregnac, Y; Gary-Bobo, E; Imbert, M; Tassin, J P; Trotter, Y

    1982-12-06

    We have undertaken a study of the role of the noradrenergic system in the functional modifications, observed in the primary visual cortex of the Kitten, following monocular deprivation. The lids of one eye were sutured in 5 week old Kittens for a period of 1 or 2 weeks. Noradrenergic depletion was obtained by 6-OHDA injection, either intraventricular or localized in the coeruleus complex. Our results indicate that disappearance of noradrenaline in area 17 does not prevent the loss of binocularity of cortical cells, but appears to limit ocular dominance shifts at a stage equivalent to that observed in the intact Kitten after 6 days of monocular deprivation.

  6. Plasticity of astrocytic coverage and glutamate transporter expression in adult mouse cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Genoud

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes play a major role in the removal of glutamate from the extracellular compartment. This clearance limits the glutamate receptor activation and affects the synaptic response. This function of the astrocyte is dependent on its positioning around the synapse, as well as on the level of expression of its high-affinity glutamate transporters, GLT1 and GLAST. Using Western blot analysis and serial section electron microscopy, we studied how a change in sensory activity affected these parameters in the adult cortex. Using mice, we found that 24 h of whisker stimulation elicited a 2-fold increase in the expression of GLT1 and GLAST in the corresponding cortical column of the barrel cortex. This returns to basal levels 4 d after the stimulation was stopped, whereas the expression of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 remained unaltered throughout. Ultrastructural analysis from the same region showed that sensory stimulation also causes a significant increase in the astrocytic envelopment of excitatory synapses on dendritic spines. We conclude that a period of modified neuronal activity and synaptic release of glutamate leads to an increased astrocytic coverage of the bouton-spine interface and an increase in glutamate transporter expression in astrocytic processes.

  7. Plasticity of the mate choice mind: courtship evokes choice-like brain responses in females from a coercive mating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S M T; Ramsey, M E; Cummings, M E

    2014-04-01

    Female mate choice is fundamental to sexual selection, and determining molecular underpinnings of female preference variation is important for understanding mating character evolution. Previously it was shown that whole-brain expression of a synaptic plasticity marker, neuroserpin, positively correlates with mating bias in the female choice poeciliid, Xiphophorus nigrensis, when exposed to conspecific courting males, whereas this relationship is reversed in Gambusia affinis, a mate coercive poeciliid with no courting males. Here we explore whether species-level differences in female behavioral and brain molecular responses represent 'canalized' or 'plastic' traits. We expose female G. affinis to conspecific males and females, as well as coercive and courting male Poecilia latipinna, for preference assays followed by whole-brain gene expression analyses of neuroserpin, egr-1 and early B. We find positive correlations between gene expression and female preference strength during exposure to courting heterospecific males, but a reversed pattern following exposure to coercive heterospecific males. This suggests that the neuromolecular processes associated with female preference behavior are plastic and responsive to different male phenotypes (courting or coercive) rather than a canalized response linked to mating system. Further, we propose that female behavioral plasticity may involve learning because female association patterns shifted with experience. Compared to younger females, we found larger, more experienced females spend less time near coercive males but associate more with males in the presence of courters. We thus suggest a conserved learning-based neuromolecular process underlying the diversity of female mate preference across the mate choice and coercion-driven mating systems.

  8. Investigations of motor-cortex cortical plasticity following facilitatory and inhibitory transcranial theta-burst stimulation in schizophrenia: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Brinkmann, Caroline; Strube, Wolfgang; Palm, Ulrich; Malchow, Berend; Rothwell, John C; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Impaired neural plasticity has been proposed as an important pathophysiological feature underlying the neurobiology and symptomatology of schizophrenia. In this proof-of-concept study, we aimed to explore cortical plasticity in schizophrenia patients with two different transcranial theta-burst (TBS) paradigms. TBS induces Ca(2+)-dependent long-term-potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term-depression (LTP)-like plasticity in the human motor cortex. A total of 10 schizophrenia patients and 10 healthy controls were included in this study. Cortical excitability was investigated using transcranial magnetic stimulation in each study participant before and after TBS applied to the left primary motor-cortex on two different days. cTBS600 was used to induce LTD-like and cTBS300 was used to induce LTP-like plasticity in the absence of any prior motor-cortex activation. Repeated measures ANOVAs showed a significant interaction between the timecourse, the study group and the stimulation paradigm (cTBS600 vs. cTBS300) for the left, but not for the right hemisphere. Healthy controls showed an MEP amplitude decrease at a trend level following cTBS600 and a numeric, but not significant, increase in MEP amplitudes following cTBS300. Schizophrenia patients did not show an MEP amplitude decrease following cTBS600, but surprisingly a significant MEP decrease following cTBS300. The proportion of subjects showing the expected changes in motor-cortex excitability following both cTBS paradigms was higher in healthy controls. These preliminary results indicate differences in cortical plasticity following two different cTBS protocols in schizophrenia patients compared to healthy controls. However, the incomplete plasticity response in the healthy controls and the proof-of-concept nature of this study need to be considered as important limitations.

  9. The role of plastic changes in the motor cortex and spinal cord for motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive changes of the efficacy of neural circuitries at different sites of the central nervous system is the basis of acquisition of new motor skills. Non-invasive human imaging and electrophysiological experiments have demonstrated that the primary motor cortex and spinal cord circuitries...... are key players in the early stages of skill acquisition and consolidation of motor learning. Expansion of the cortical representation of the trained muscles, changes in corticomuscular coupling and changes in stretch reflex activity are thus all markers of neuroplastic changes accompanying early skill...... acquisition. We have shown in recent experiments that sensory feedback from the active muscles play a surprisingly specific role at this stage of learning. Following motor skill training, repeated activation of sensory afferents from the muscle that has been involved in a previous training session, interfered...

  10. The role of plastic changes in the motor cortex and spinal cord for motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    acquisition. We have shown in recent experiments that sensory feedback from the active muscles play a surprisingly specific role at this stage of learning. Following motor skill training, repeated activation of sensory afferents from the muscle that has been involved in a previous training session, interfered...... the consolidation of increased performance of a different previously trained task involving the same movement direction and muscle group, whereas training of other muscles had no effect. This emphasizes the role of specific sensory error signals in the acquisition of new motor skills and illustrates the functional......Adaptive changes of the efficacy of neural circuitries at different sites of the central nervous system is the basis of acquisition of new motor skills. Non-invasive human imaging and electrophysiological experiments have demonstrated that the primary motor cortex and spinal cord circuitries...

  11. Diversity of thalamorecipient spine morphology in cat visual cortex and its implication for synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Nuno Maçarico

    2013-06-15

    A feature of spine synapses is the existence of a neck connecting the synapse on the spine head to the dendritic shaft. As with a cable, spine neck resistance (R(neck)) increases with increasing neck length and is inversely proportional to the cross-sectional area of the neck. A synaptic current entering a spine with a high R(neck) will lead to greater local depolarization in the spine head than would a similar input applied to a spine with a lower R(neck). This could make spines with high R(neck) more sensitive to plastic changes since voltage sensitive conductances, such as N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) channels can be more easily activated. This hypothesis was tested using serial section electron microscopic reconstructions of thalamocortical spine synapses and spine necks located on spiny stellate cells and corticothalamic cells from area 17 of cats. Thalamic axons and corticothalamic neurons were labeled by injections of the tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) of anesthetized cats and spiny stellates were filled intracellularly in vivo with horseradish peroxidase. Twenty-eight labeled spines that formed synapses with dLGN boutons were collected from three spiny stellate and four corticothalamic cells and reconstructed in 3D from serial electron micrographs. Spine length, spine diameter, and the area of the postsynaptic density were measured from the 3D reconstructions and R(neck) of the spine was estimated. No correlation was found between the postsynaptic density size and the estimated spine R(neck). This suggests that forms of plasticity that lead to larger synapses are independent of spine neck resistance.

  12. Task-concurrent anodal tDCS modulates bilateral plasticity in the human suprahyoid motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaofeng eZhao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a non-invasive method to modulate cortical excitability in humans. Here, we examined the effects of anodal tDCS on suprahyoid motor evoked potentials (MEP when applied over the hemisphere with stronger and weaker suprahyoid/submental projections, respectively, while study participants performed a swallowing task. 30 healthy volunteers were invited to two experimental sessions and randomly assigned to one of two different groups. While in the first group stimulation was targeted over the hemisphere with stronger suprahyoid projections, the second group received stimulation over the weaker suprahyoid projections. tDCS was applied either as anodal or sham stimulation in a random cross-over design. Suprahyoid MEPs were assessed immediately before intervention, as well as 5, 30, 60, and 90 min after discontinuation of stimulation from both the stimulated and non-stimulated contralateral hemisphere. We found that anodal tDCS (a-tDCS had long-lasting effects on suprahyoid MEPs on the stimulated side in both groups (tDCS targeting the stronger projections: F(1,14 = 96.2, p < 0.001; tDCS targeting the weaker projections: F(1,14 = 37.45, p < 0.001. While MEPs did not increase when elicited from the non-targeted hemisphere after stimulation of the stronger projections (F(1,14 = 0.69, p = 0.42, we found increased MEPs elicited from the non-targeted hemisphere after stimulating the weaker projections (at time points 30 to 90 min (F(1,14 = 18.26, p = 0.001. We conclude that anodal tDCS has differential effects on suprahyoid MEPs elicited from the targeted and non-targeted hemisphere depending on the site of stimulation. This finding may be important for the application of a-tDCS in patients with dysphagia, for example after stroke.

  13. Color opponent receptive fields self-organize in a biophysical model of visual cortex via spike-timing dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Akihiro; Neymotin, Samuel A; Stringer, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    Although many computational models have been proposed to explain orientation maps in primary visual cortex (V1), it is not yet known how similar clusters of color-selective neurons in macaque V1/V2 are connected and develop. In this work, we address the problem of understanding the cortical processing of color information with a possible mechanism of the development of the patchy distribution of color selectivity via computational modeling. Each color input is decomposed into a red, green, and blue representation and transmitted to the visual cortex via a simulated optic nerve in a luminance channel and red-green and blue-yellow opponent color channels. Our model of the early visual system consists of multiple topographically-arranged layers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, with sparse intra-layer connectivity and feed-forward connectivity between layers. Layers are arranged based on anatomy of early visual pathways, and include a retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and layered neocortex. Each neuron in the V1 output layer makes synaptic connections to neighboring neurons and receives the three types of signals in the different channels from the corresponding photoreceptor position. Synaptic weights are randomized and learned using spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). After training with natural images, the neurons display heightened sensitivity to specific colors. Information-theoretic analysis reveals mutual information between particular stimuli and responses, and that the information reaches a maximum with fewer neurons in the higher layers, indicating that estimations of the input colors can be done using the output of fewer cells in the later stages of cortical processing. In addition, cells with similar color receptive fields form clusters. Analysis of spiking activity reveals increased firing synchrony between neurons when particular color inputs are presented or removed (ON-cell/OFF-cell).

  14. Different current intensities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation do not differentially modulate motor cortex plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidgell, Dawson J; Daly, Robin M; Young, Kayleigh; Lum, Jarrod; Tooley, Gregory; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Zoghi, Maryam; Pearce, Alan J

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive technique that modulates the excitability of neurons within the motor cortex (M1). Although the aftereffects of anodal tDCS on modulating cortical excitability have been described, there is limited data describing the outcomes of different tDCS intensities on intracortical circuits. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying the aftereffects of M1 excitability following anodal tDCS, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the effect of different intensities on cortical excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Using a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover design, with a one-week wash-out period, 14 participants (6 females and 8 males, 22-45 years) were exposed to 10 minutes of anodal tDCS at 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 mA. TMS was used to measure M1 excitability and SICI of the contralateral wrist extensor muscle at baseline, immediately after and 15 and 30 minutes following cessation of anodal tDCS. Cortical excitability increased, whilst SICI was reduced at all time points following anodal tDCS. Interestingly, there were no differences between the three intensities of anodal tDCS on modulating cortical excitability or SICI. These results suggest that the aftereffect of anodal tDCS on facilitating cortical excitability is due to the modulation of synaptic mechanisms associated with long-term potentiation and is not influenced by different tDCS intensities.

  15. Different Current Intensities of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Do Not Differentially Modulate Motor Cortex Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawson J. Kidgell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a noninvasive technique that modulates the excitability of neurons within the motor cortex (M1. Although the aftereffects of anodal tDCS on modulating cortical excitability have been described, there is limited data describing the outcomes of different tDCS intensities on intracortical circuits. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying the aftereffects of M1 excitability following anodal tDCS, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to examine the effect of different intensities on cortical excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI. Using a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover design, with a one-week wash-out period, 14 participants (6 females and 8 males, 22–45 years were exposed to 10 minutes of anodal tDCS at 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 mA. TMS was used to measure M1 excitability and SICI of the contralateral wrist extensor muscle at baseline, immediately after and 15 and 30 minutes following cessation of anodal tDCS. Cortical excitability increased, whilst SICI was reduced at all time points following anodal tDCS. Interestingly, there were no differences between the three intensities of anodal tDCS on modulating cortical excitability or SICI. These results suggest that the aftereffect of anodal tDCS on facilitating cortical excitability is due to the modulation of synaptic mechanisms associated with long-term potentiation and is not influenced by different tDCS intensities.

  16. Decreased synaptic plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex underlies short-term memory deficits in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus, Filipe C; Rial, Daniel; Real, Joana I; Lemos, Cristina; Ben, Juliana; Guaita, Gisele O; Pita, Inês R; Sequeira, Ana C; Pereira, Frederico C; Walz, Roger; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor dysfunction associated with dopaminergic degeneration in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). However, motor symptoms in PD are often preceded by short-term memory deficits, which have been argued to involve deregulation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We now used a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat PD model to explore if alterations of synaptic plasticity in DLS and mPFC underlie short-term memory impairments in PD prodrome. The bilateral injection of 6-OHDA (20μg/hemisphere) in the DLS caused a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (>80%) and decreased monoamine levels in the striatum and PFC, accompanied by motor deficits evaluated after 21 days in the open field and accelerated rotarod. A lower dose of 6-OHDA (10μg/hemisphere) only induced a partial degeneration (about 60%) of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra with no gross motor impairments, thus mimicking an early premotor stage of PD. Notably, 6-OHDA (10μg)-lesioned rats displayed decreased monoamine levels in the PFC as well as short-term memory deficits evaluated in the novel object discrimination and in the modified Y-maze tasks; this was accompanied by a selective decrease in the amplitude of long-term potentiation in the mPFC, but not in DLS, without changes of synaptic transmission in either brain regions. These results indicate that the short-term memory dysfunction predating the motor alterations in the 6-OHDA model of PD is associated with selective changes of information processing in PFC circuits, typified by persistent changes of synaptic plasticity.

  17. Monocular Visual Deprivation Suppresses Excitability in Adult Human Visual Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Astrid Rosenstand; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The adult visual cortex maintains a substantial potential for plasticity in response to a change in visual input. For instance, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have shown that binocular deprivation (BD) increases the cortical excitability for inducing phosphenes with TMS. Here, we...... employed TMS to trace plastic changes in adult visual cortex before, during, and after 48 h of monocular deprivation (MD) of the right dominant eye. In healthy adult volunteers, MD-induced changes in visual cortex excitability were probed with paired-pulse TMS applied to the left and right occipital cortex....... Stimulus–response curves were constructed by recording the intensity of the reported phosphenes evoked in the contralateral visual field at range of TMS intensities. Phosphene measurements revealed that MD produced a rapid and robust decrease in cortical excitability relative to a control condition without...

  18. Combination of blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential recordings for abnormal visual cortex in two types of amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinmei; Cui, Dongmei; Zheng, Ling; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the different neuromechanisms of subjects with strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia compared with normal vision subjects using blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP). Methods Fifty-three subjects, age range seven to 12 years, diagnosed with strabismic amblyopia (17 cases), anisometropic amblyopia (20 cases), and normal vision (16 cases), were examined using the BOLD-fMRI and PR-VEP of UTAS-E3000 techniques. Cortical activation by binocular viewing of reversal checkerboard patterns was examined in terms of the calcarine region of interest (ROI)-based and spatial frequency–dependent analysis. The correlation of cortical activation in fMRI and the P100 amplitude in VEP were analyzed using the SPSS 12.0 software package. Results In the BOLD-fMRI procedure, reduced areas and decreased activation levels were found in Brodmann area (BA) 17 and other extrastriate areas in subjects with amblyopia compared with the normal vision group. In general, the reduced areas mainly resided in the striate visual cortex in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. In subjects with strabismic amblyopia, a more significant cortical impairment was found in bilateral BA 18 and BA 19 than that in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. The activation by high-spatial-frequency stimuli was reduced in bilateral BA 18 and 19 as well as BA 17 in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia, whereas the activation was mainly reduced in BA 18 and BA 19 in subjects with strabismic amblyopia. These findings were further confirmed by the ROI-based analysis of BA 17. During spatial frequency–dependent VEP detection, subjects with anisometropic amblyopia had reduced sensitivity for high spatial frequency compared to subjects with strabismic amblyopia. The cortical activation in fMRI with the calcarine ROI-based analysis of BA 17 was significantly correlated with the P100 amplitude in VEP

  19. The chronic administration of cerebrolysin induces plastic changes in the prefrontal cortex and dentate gyrus in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Ismael; González, Deniss Janeth; Mena, Raúl; Flores, Gonzalo

    2011-11-01

    Cerebrolysin (Cbl) is a mixture of neuropeptides with effects similar to the endogenous neurotrophic factors and is considered one of the best drugs used in the treatment of dementias such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In brains with AD, morphological changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been reported. These changes are reflected particularly in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine density. Here we evaluated the effect of this drug on the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC and CA1 dorsal hippocampus and granule cells from the dentate gyrus (DG) and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of aged mice. Cbl (5 ml kg(-1) , i.p.) was administered daily for 60 days to 6-month-old mice. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by Sholl analysis at 8 months ages. In all Cbl-treated mice a significant increase in dendritic spine density and dendritic length in pyramidal neurons of the PFC and granule cells of the DG was observed. Interestingly, the enhancement in dendritic length was close to the soma in pyramidal neurons of the PFC whereas in granule neurons of the DG the increase in dendritic length was further from the soma. Our results suggest that Cbl induces plastic modifications of dendritic morphology in the PFC and DG. These changes may explain the therapeutic effect seen in AD patients treated with Cbl.

  20. Medial prefrontal cortex inversely regulates toluene-induced changes in markers of synaptic plasticity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Jacob T.; Evins, Caitlin E.; Fedarovich, Hleb; Gilstrap, Meghin J.; Woodward, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Toluene is a volatile solvent that is intentionally inhaled by children, adolescents and adults for its intoxicating effects. While voluntary use of toluene suggests that it possesses rewarding properties and abuse potential, it is unknown whether toluene alters excitatory synaptic transmission in reward sensitive dopamine neurons like other drugs of abuse. Here, using a combination of retrograde labeling and slice electrophysiology, we show that a brief in vivo exposure of rats to a behaviorally relevant concentration of toluene vapor enhances glutamatergic synaptic strength of dopamine (DA) neurons projecting to nucleus accumbens core and medial shell neurons. This effect persisted for up to 3 days in mesoaccumbens core DA neurons and for at least 21 days in those projecting to the medial shell. In contrast, toluene vapor exposure had no effect on synaptic strength of DA neurons that project to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Furthermore, infusion of GABAergic modulators into the mPFC prior to vapor exposure to pharmacologically manipulate output, inhibited or potentiated toluene's action on mesoaccumbens DA neurons. Taken together, the results of these studies indicate that toluene induces a target-selective increase in mesolimbic DA neuron synaptic transmission and strongly implicates the mPFC as an important regulator of drug-induced plasticity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons. PMID:23303956

  1. Plastic changes to dendritic spines on layer V pyramidal neurons are involved in the rectifying role of the prefrontal cortex during the fast period of motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tapia, David; Martínez-Torres, Nestor I; Hernández-González, Marisela; Guevara, Miguel Angel; González-Burgos, Ignacio

    2016-02-01

    The prefrontal cortex participates in the rectification of information related to motor activity that favors motor learning. Dendritic spine plasticity is involved in the modifications of motor patterns that underlie both motor activity and motor learning. To study this association in more detail, adult male rats were trained over six days in an acrobatic motor learning paradigm and they were subjected to a behavioral evaluation on each day of training. Also, a Golgi-based morphological study was carried out to determine the spine density and the proportion of the different spine types. In the learning paradigm, the number of errors diminished as motor training progressed. Concomitantly, spine density increased on days 1 and 3 of training, particularly reflecting an increase in the proportion of thin (day 1), stubby (day 1) and branched (days 1, 2 and 5) spines. Conversely, mushroom spines were less prevalent than in the control rats on days 5 and 6, as were stubby spines on day 6, together suggesting that this plasticity might enhance motor learning. The increase in stubby spines on day 1 suggests a regulation of excitability related to the changes in synaptic input to the prefrontal cortex. The plasticity to thin spines observed during the first 3 days of training could be related to the active rectification induced by the information relayed to the prefrontal cortex -as the behavioral findings indeed showed-, which in turn could be linked to the lower proportion of mushroom and stubby spines seen in the last days of training.

  2. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation revives a form of developmentally regulated synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex of post-critical period rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffery, James P; Lopez, Jorge; Bissette, Garth; Roffwarg, Howard P

    2006-01-01

    The critical period for observing a developmentally regulated form of synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex of young rats normally ends at about postnatal day 30. This developmentally regulated form of in vitro long-term potentiation (LTP) can be reliably induced in layers II-III by aiming high frequency, theta burst stimulation (TBS) at the white matter situated directly below visual cortex (LTPWM-III). Previous work has demonstrated that suppression of sensory activation of visual cortex, achieved by rearing young rats in total darkness from birth, delays termination of the critical period for inducing LTPWM-III. Subsequent data also demonstrated that when rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is suppressed, thereby reducing REMS cortical activation, just prior to the end of the critical period, termination of this developmental phase is delayed, and LTPWM-III can still be reliably produced in the usual post-critical period. Here, we report that for approximately 3 weeks immediately following the usual end of the critical period, suppression of REMS disrupts the maturational processes that close the critical period, and LTPWM-III is readily induced in brain slices taken from these somewhat older animals. Insofar as in vitro LTP is a model for the cellular and molecular changes that underlie developmental synaptic plasticity, these results suggest that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, which participate in brain development and perhaps also in learning and memory processes, remain susceptible to the effects of REMS deprivation during the general period of adolescence in the rat.

  3. Sound-Making Actions Lead to Immediate Plastic Changes of Neuromagnetic Evoked Responses and Induced β-Band Oscillations during Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Bernhard; Barat, Masihullah; Fujioka, Takako

    2017-06-14

    Auditory and sensorimotor brain areas interact during the action-perception cycle of sound making. Neurophysiological evidence of a feedforward model of the action and its outcome has been associated with attenuation of the N1 wave of auditory evoked responses elicited by self-generated sounds, such as talking and singing or playing a musical instrument. Moreover, neural oscillations at β-band frequencies have been related to predicting the sound outcome after action initiation. We hypothesized that a newly learned action-perception association would immediately modify interpretation of the sound during subsequent listening. Nineteen healthy young adults (7 female, 12 male) participated in three magnetoencephalographic recordings while first passively listening to recorded sounds of a bell ringing, then actively striking the bell with a mallet, and then again listening to recorded sounds. Auditory cortex activity showed characteristic P1-N1-P2 waves. The N1 was attenuated during sound making, while P2 responses were unchanged. In contrast, P2 became larger when listening after sound making compared with the initial naive listening. The P2 increase occurred immediately, while in previous learning-by-listening studies P2 increases occurred on a later day. Also, reactivity of β-band oscillations, as well as θ coherence between auditory and sensorimotor cortices, was stronger in the second listening block. These changes were significantly larger than those observed in control participants (eight female, five male), who triggered recorded sounds by a key press. We propose that P2 characterizes familiarity with sound objects, whereas β-band oscillation signifies involvement of the action-perception cycle, and both measures objectively indicate functional neuroplasticity in auditory perceptual learning.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT While suppression of auditory responses to self-generated sounds is well known, it is not clear whether the learned action-sound association

  4. Plasticity-related binding of GABA and muscarinic receptor sites in piriform cortex of rat: An autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.P.; Westrum, L.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-09-01

    This study has used the recently developed in vitro quantitative autoradiographic technique to examine the effects of olfactory bulb (OB) removal on receptor-binding sites in the deafferented piriform cortex (PC) of the rat. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine receptor (GABA-BZR)- and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MChR)-binding sites in layer I of PC were localized using (3H)flunitrazepam and (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate as ligands, respectively. From the resultant autoradiograms the optical densities were measured using a Drexel-DUMAS image analysis system. The densities of BZR and MChR-binding sites were markedly increased in the PC ipsilateral to the lesion as compared to the contralateral side in those subjects that were operated in adulthood (Postnatal Day 100, PN 100). Comparisons between the unoperated and PN 100 operated animals also showed significant increases in the deafferented PC. In the animals operated on the day of birth (PN 0) no significant differences were seen between the operated and the contralateral PC. The difference between the PN 0 deafferented PC and the unoperated controls shows a slight decrease in BZR density in the former group; however, in case of the MChR there is a slight increase on the side of the lesion. These results demonstrate that deafferentation of PC by OB removal appears to modulate both the BZR-binding sites that are coupled with the GABA-A receptor complex and the MChR-binding sites. The results also suggest that possibility of a role for these neurotransmitter receptor-binding sites in plasticity following deafferentation.

  5. Role of GABAA-Mediated Inhibition and Functional Assortment of Synapses onto Individual Layer 4 Neurons in Regulating Plasticity Expression in Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Ignacio; Friedlander, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Layer 4 (L4) of primary visual cortex (V1) is the main recipient of thalamocortical fibers from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGNd). Thus, it is considered the main entry point of visual information into the neocortex and the first anatomical opportunity for intracortical visual processing before information leaves L4 and reaches supra- and infragranular cortical layers. The strength of monosynaptic connections from individual L4 excitatory cells onto adjacent L4 cells (unitary connections) is highly malleable, demonstrating that the initial stage of intracortical synaptic transmission of thalamocortical information can be altered by previous activity. However, the inhibitory network within L4 of V1 may act as an internal gate for induction of excitatory synaptic plasticity, thus providing either high fidelity throughput to supragranular layers or transmittal of a modified signal subject to recent activity-dependent plasticity. To evaluate this possibility, we compared the induction of synaptic plasticity using classical extracellular stimulation protocols that recruit a combination of excitatory and inhibitory synapses with stimulation of a single excitatory neuron onto a L4 cell. In order to induce plasticity, we paired pre- and postsynaptic activity (with the onset of postsynaptic spiking leading the presynaptic activation by 10ms) using extracellular stimulation (ECS) in acute slices of primary visual cortex and comparing the outcomes with our previously published results in which an identical protocol was used to induce synaptic plasticity between individual pre- and postsynaptic L4 excitatory neurons. Our results indicate that pairing of ECS with spiking in a L4 neuron fails to induce plasticity in L4-L4 connections if synaptic inhibition is intact. However, application of a similar pairing protocol under GABAARs inhibition by bath application of 2μM bicuculline does induce robust synaptic plasticity, long term potentiation (LTP) or long term

  6. Formation and maintenance of neuronal assemblies through synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent

    2014-11-14

    The architecture of cortex is flexible, permitting neuronal networks to store recent sensory experiences as specific synaptic connectivity patterns. However, it is unclear how these patterns are maintained in the face of the high spike time variability associated with cortex. Here we demonstrate, using a large-scale cortical network model, that realistic synaptic plasticity rules coupled with homeostatic mechanisms lead to the formation of neuronal assemblies that reflect previously experienced stimuli. Further, reverberation of past evoked states in spontaneous spiking activity stabilizes, rather than erases, this learned architecture. Spontaneous and evoked spiking activity contains a signature of learned assembly structures, leading to testable predictions about the effect of recent sensory experience on spike train statistics. Our work outlines requirements for synaptic plasticity rules capable of modifying spontaneous dynamics and shows that this modification is beneficial for stability of learned network architectures.

  7. Metabolic demand stimulates CREB signaling in the limbic cortex: implication for the induction of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by intrinsic stimulus for survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly M Estrada

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction by fasting has been implicated to facilitate synaptic plasticity and promote contextual learning. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of fasting on memory consolidation are not completely understood. We hypothesized that fasting-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity was mediated by the increased signaling mediated by CREB (c-AMP response element binding protein, an important nuclear protein and the transcription factor that is involved in the consolidation of memories in the hippocampus. In the in vivo rat model of 18 h fasting, the expression of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB was examined using anti-phospho-CREB (Ser133 in cardially-perfused and cryo-sectioned rat brain specimens. When compared with control animals, the hippocampus exhibited up to a two-fold of increase in pCREB expression in fasted animals. The piriform cortex, the entorhinal cortex, and the cortico-amygdala transitional zone also significantly increased immunoreactivities to pCREB. In contrast, the amygdala did not show any change in the magnitude of pCREB expression in response to fasting. The arcuate nucleus in the medial hypothalamus, which was previously reported to up-regulate CREB phosphorylation during fasting of up to 48 h, was also strongly immunoreactive and provided a positive control in the present study. Our findings demonstrate a metabolic demand not only stimulates cAMP-dependent signaling cascades in the hypothalamus, but also signals to various limbic brain regions including the hippocampus by activating the CREB signaling mechanism. The hippocampus is a primary brain structure for learning and memory. It receives hypothalamic and arcuate projections directly from the fornix. The hippocampus is also situated centrally for functional interactions with other limbic cortexes by establishing reciprocal synaptic connections. We suggest that hippocampal neurons and those in the surrounding limbic cortexes are

  8. The Functional Upregulation of Piriform Cortex Is Associated with Cross-Modal Plasticity in Loss of Whisker Tactile Inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Ye; Li Huang; Zilong. Gao; Ping Chen; Hong Ni; Sudong Guan; Yan Zhu; Jin-Hui Wang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cross-modal plasticity is characterized as the hypersensitivity of remaining modalities after a sensory function is lost in rodents, which ensures their awareness to environmental changes. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cross-modal sensory plasticity remain unclear. We aim to study the role of different types of neurons in cross-modal plasticity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In addition to behavioral tasks in mice, whole-cell recordings at the excitatory and inhib...

  9. Short-latency afferent inhibition is a poor predictor of individual susceptibility to rTMS-induced plasticity in the motor cortex of young and older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielle eYoung-Bernier

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortical plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP-like plasticity, can be assessed non-invasively with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS protocols. In this study, we examined age differences in responses to intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS in a group of 20 young and 18 healthy older adults. Because the cholinergic system plays a role in the neural processes underlying learning and memory, including LTP, we also investigated whether short latency afferent inhibition (SAI, a neurophysiological marker of central cholinergic activity, would be associated with age-related differences in LTP-like plasticity induced by iTBS. Methods: SAI was first assessed by examining the modulation of motor evoked potentials (MEPs in response to median nerve conditioning 20 ms prior to TMS. Participants then underwent iTBS (3 pulses at 50 HZ every 200 ms for 2 s with 8 s between trains, repeated 20 times. MEP responses (120% RMT were assessed immediately after iTBS and 5, 10, and 20 min post-application. Results: Responses to iTBS were quite variable in both age groups, with only approximately 60% of the participants (n=13 young and 10 older adults showing the expected facilitation of MEP responses. There were no significant age group differences in MEP facilitation following iTBS. Although older adults exhibited reduced SAI, individual variations were not associated with susceptibility to express LTP-like induced plasticity after iTBS. Conclusion: Overall, these results are consistent with reports of high inter-individual variability in responses to iTBS. Although SAI was reduced in older adults, consistent with a deterioration of the cholinergic system with age, SAI levels were not associated with LTP-like plasticity as assessed with iTBS.

  10. Efficacy and Interindividual Variability in Motor-Cortex Plasticity following Anodal tDCS and Paired-Associative Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Strube; Tilmann Bunse; Berend Malchow; Alkomiet Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Interindividual response variability to various motor-cortex stimulation protocols has been recently reported. Comparative data of stimulation protocols with different modes of action is lacking. We aimed to compare the efficacy and response variability of two LTP-inducing stimulation protocols in the human motor cortex: anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) and paired-associative stimulation (PAS25). In two experiments 30 subjects received 1mA a-tDCS and PAS25. Data analysi...

  11. A Possible Role of Prolonged Whirling Episodes on Structural Plasticity of the Cortical Networks and Altered Vertigo Perception: The Cortex of Sufi Whirling Dervishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Yusuf O.; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Heinecke, Armin; Çavdar, Safiye

    2017-01-01

    Although minutes of a spinning episode may induce vertigo in the healthy human, as a result of a possible perceptional plasticity, Sufi Whirling Dervishes (SWDs) can spin continuously for an hour without a vertigo perception.This unique long term vestibular system stimulation presents a potential human model to clarify the cortical networks underlying the resistance against vertigo. This study, therefore, aimed to investigate the potential structural cortical plasticity in SWDs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 10 SWDs and 10 controls were obtained, using a 3T scanner. Cortical thickness in the whole cortex was calculated. Results demonstrated significantly thinner cortical areas for SWD subjects compared with the control group in the hubs of the default mode network (DMN), as well as in the motion perception and discrimination areas including the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the right lingual gyrus and the left visual area 5 (V5)/middle temporal (MT) and the left fusiform gyrus. In conclusion, this is the first report that warrants the potential relationship of the motion/body perception related cortical networks and the prolonged term of whirling ability without vertigo or dizziness. PMID:28167905

  12. Speech-evoked activation in adult temporal cortex measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS): Are the measurements reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Ian M; Anderson, Carly A; Kitterick, Pádraig T; Hartley, Douglas E H

    2016-09-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a silent, non-invasive neuroimaging technique that is potentially well suited to auditory research. However, the reliability of auditory-evoked activation measured using fNIRS is largely unknown. The present study investigated the test-retest reliability of speech-evoked fNIRS responses in normally-hearing adults. Seventeen participants underwent fNIRS imaging in two sessions separated by three months. In a block design, participants were presented with auditory speech, visual speech (silent speechreading), and audiovisual speech conditions. Optode arrays were placed bilaterally over the temporal lobes, targeting auditory brain regions. A range of established metrics was used to quantify the reproducibility of cortical activation patterns, as well as the amplitude and time course of the haemodynamic response within predefined regions of interest. The use of a signal processing algorithm designed to reduce the influence of systemic physiological signals was found to be crucial to achieving reliable detection of significant activation at the group level. For auditory speech (with or without visual cues), reliability was good to excellent at the group level, but highly variable among individuals. Temporal-lobe activation in response to visual speech was less reliable, especially in the right hemisphere. Consistent with previous reports, fNIRS reliability was improved by averaging across a small number of channels overlying a cortical region of interest. Overall, the present results confirm that fNIRS can measure speech-evoked auditory responses in adults that are highly reliable at the group level, and indicate that signal processing to reduce physiological noise may substantially improve the reliability of fNIRS measurements.

  13. A single dose of vortioxetine, but not ketamine or fluoxetine, increases plasticity-related gene expression in the rat frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers; Elfving, Betina

    2016-09-05

    Ketamine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that has been shown to induce a rapid antidepressant effect in treatment-resistant patients. Vortioxetine is a multimodal-acting antidepressant that exert its therapeutic activity through serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibition and modulation of several 5-HT receptors. In clinical trials, vortioxetine improves depression symptoms and cognitive dysfunction. Neuroplasticity as well as serotonergic and glutamatergic signaling attain significant roles in depression pathophysiology and antidepressant responses. Here, we investigate the effects of ketamine and vortioxetine on gene expression related to serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission as well as neuroplasticity and compare them to those of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Rats were injected with fluoxetine (10mg/kg), ketamine (15mg/kg), or vortioxetine (10mg/kg) at 2, 8, 12, or 27h prior to harvesting of the frontal cortex and hippocampus. mRNA levels were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The main finding was that vortioxetine enhanced plasticity-related gene expression (Mtor, Mglur1, Pkcα, Homer3, Spinophilin, and Synapsin3) in the frontal cortex at 8h after a single dose. Ingenuity pathway analysis of this subset of data identified a biological network that was engaged by vortioxetine and is plausibly associated with neuroplasticity. Transcript levels had returned to baseline levels 12h after injection. Only minor effects on gene expression were found for ketamine or fluoxetine. In conclusion, acute vortioxetine, but not fluoxetine or ketamine, transiently increased plasticity-related gene expression in the frontal cortex. These effects may be ascribed to the direct 5-HT receptor activities of vortioxetine.

  14. A re-examination of Hebbian-covariance rules and spike timing-dependent plasticity in cat visual cortex in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Frégnac

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP is considered as an ubiquitous rule for associative plasticity in cortical networks in vitro. However, limited supporting evidence for its functional role has been provided in vivo. In particular, there are very few studies demonstrating the co-occurence of synaptic efficiency changes and alteration of sensory responses in adult cortex during Hebbian or STDP protocols. We addressed this issue by reviewing and comparing the functional effects of two types of cellular conditioning in cat visual cortex. The first one, referred to as the covariance protocol, obeys a generalized Hebbian framework, by imposing, for different stimuli, supervised positive and negative changes in covariance between postsynaptic and presynaptic activity rates. The second protocol, based on intracellular recordings, replicated in vivo variants of the theta-burst paradigm (TBS, proven successful in inducing long-term potentiation (LTP in vitro. Since it was shown to impose a precise correlation delay between the electrically activated thalamic input and the TBS-induced postsynaptic spike, this protocol can be seen as a probe of causal (pre-before-post STDP. By choosing a thalamic region where the visual field representation was in retinotopic overlap with the intracellularly recorded cortical receptive field as the afferent site for supervised electrical stimulation, this protocol allowed to look for possible correlates between STDP and functional reorganization of the conditioned cortical receptive field. The rate-based covariance protocol induced significant and large amplitude changes in receptive field properties, in both kitten and adult V1 cortex. The TBS STDP-like protocol produced in the adult significant changes in the synaptic gain of the electrically activated thalamic pathway, but the statistical significance of the functional correlates was detectable mostly at the population level. Comparison of our observations with the

  15. Signed words in the congenitally deaf evoke typical late lexicosemantic responses with no early visual responses in left superior temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Matthew K; Ferjan Ramirez, Naja; Torres, Christina; Travis, Katherine E; Hatrak, Marla; Mayberry, Rachel I; Halgren, Eric

    2012-07-11

    Congenitally deaf individuals receive little or no auditory input, and when raised by deaf parents, they acquire sign as their native and primary language. We asked two questions regarding how the deaf brain in humans adapts to sensory deprivation: (1) is meaning extracted and integrated from signs using the same classical left hemisphere frontotemporal network used for speech in hearing individuals, and (2) in deafness, is superior temporal cortex encompassing primary and secondary auditory regions reorganized to receive and process visual sensory information at short latencies? Using MEG constrained by individual cortical anatomy obtained with MRI, we examined an early time window associated with sensory processing and a late time window associated with lexicosemantic integration. We found that sign in deaf individuals and speech in hearing individuals activate a highly similar left frontotemporal network (including superior temporal regions surrounding auditory cortex) during lexicosemantic processing, but only speech in hearing individuals activates auditory regions during sensory processing. Thus, neural systems dedicated to processing high-level linguistic information are used for processing language regardless of modality or hearing status, and we do not find evidence for rewiring of afferent connections from visual systems to auditory cortex.

  16. Synaptic Basis for Cross-modal Plasticity: Enhanced Supragranular Dendritic Spine Density in Anterior Ectosylvian Auditory Cortex of the Early Deaf Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemo, H Ruth; Lomber, Stephen G; Meredith, M Alex

    2016-04-01

    In the cat, the auditory field of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (FAES) is sensitive to auditory cues and its deactivation leads to orienting deficits toward acoustic, but not visual, stimuli. However, in early deaf cats, FAES activity shifts to the visual modality and its deactivation blocks orienting toward visual stimuli. Thus, as in other auditory cortices, hearing loss leads to cross-modal plasticity in the FAES. However, the synaptic basis for cross-modal plasticity is unknown. Therefore, the present study examined the effect of early deafness on the density, distribution, and size of dendritic spines in the FAES. Young cats were ototoxically deafened and raised until adulthood when they (and hearing controls) were euthanized, the cortex stained using Golgi-Cox, and FAES neurons examined using light microscopy. FAES dendritic spine density averaged 0.85 spines/μm in hearing animals, but was significantly higher (0.95 spines/μm) in the early deaf. Size distributions and increased spine density were evident specifically on apical dendrites of supragranular neurons. In separate tracer experiments, cross-modal cortical projections were shown to terminate predominantly within the supragranular layers of the FAES. This distributional correspondence between projection terminals and dendritic spine changes indicates that cross-modal plasticity is synaptically based within the supragranular layers of the early deaf FAES. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Hyper-connectivity and hyper-plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex in the valproic Acid animal model of autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinaldi, Tania; Perrodin, Catherine; Markram, Henry

    2008-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex has been extensively implicated in autism to explain deficits in executive and other higher-order functions related to cognition, language, sociability and emotion. The possible changes at the level of the neuronal microcircuit are however not known. We studied microcircuit...

  18. Alteration of Neuronal Excitability and Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity in the Prefrontal Cortex of a Mouse Model of Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Gregg W; Sun, Ziyi; Kvajo, Mirna; Broek, Jantine A C; Fénelon, Karine; McKellar, Heather; Xiao, Lan; Xu, Bin; Bahn, Sabine; O'Donnell, James M; Gogos, Joseph A

    2017-04-12

    Using a genetic mouse model that faithfully recapitulates a DISC1 genetic alteration strongly associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, we examined the impact of this mutation within the prefrontal cortex. Although cortical layering, cytoarchitecture, and proteome were found to be largely unaffected, electrophysiological examination of the mPFC revealed both neuronal hyperexcitability and alterations in short-term synaptic plasticity consistent with enhanced neurotransmitter release. Increased excitability of layer II/III pyramidal neurons was accompanied by consistent reductions in voltage-activated potassium currents near the action potential threshold as well as by enhanced recruitment of inputs arising from superficial layers to layer V. We further observed reductions in both the paired-pulse ratios and the enhanced short-term depression of layer V synapses arising from superficial layers consistent with enhanced neurotransmitter release at these synapses. Recordings from layer II/III pyramidal neurons revealed action potential widening that could account for enhanced neurotransmitter release. Significantly, we found that reduced functional expression of the voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv1.1 substantially contributes to both the excitability and short-term plasticity alterations that we observed. The underlying dysregulation of Kv1.1 expression was attributable to cAMP elevations in the PFC secondary to reduced phosphodiesterase 4 activity present in Disc1 deficiency and was rescued by pharmacological blockade of adenylate cyclase. Our results demonstrate a potentially devastating impact of Disc1 deficiency on neural circuit function, partly due to Kv1.1 dysregulation that leads to a dual dysfunction consisting of enhanced neuronal excitability and altered short-term synaptic plasticity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Schizophrenia is a profoundly disabling psychiatric illness with a devastating impact not only upon the afflicted but

  19. A Sensitive Period for Language in the Visual Cortex: Distinct Patterns of Plasticity in Congenitally versus Late Blind Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedny, Marina; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Dravida, Swethasri; Saxe, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that blindness enables visual circuits to contribute to language processing. We examined whether this dramatic functional plasticity has a sensitive period. BOLD fMRI signal was measured in congenitally blind, late blind (blindness onset 9-years-old or later) and sighted participants while they performed a sentence…

  20. Plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex induced by Music-supported therapy in stroke patients: A TMS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eGrau-Sánchez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Playing a musical instrument demands the engagement of different neural systems. Recent studies about the musician’s brain and musical training highlight that this activity requires the close interaction between motor and somatosensory systems. Moreover, neuroplastic changes have been reported in motor-related areas after short and long-term musical training. Because of its capacity to promote neuroplastic changes, music has been used in the context of stroke neurorehabilitation. The majority of patients suffering from a stroke have motor impairments, preventing them to live independently. Thus, there is an increasing demand for effective restorative interventions for neurological deficits. Music-supported Therapy (MST has been recently developed to restore motor deficits. We report data of a selected sample of stroke patients who have been enrolled in a MST program (1 month intense music learning. Prior to and after the therapy, patients were evaluated with different behavioral motor tests. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS was applied to evaluate changes in the sensorimotor representations underlying the motor gains observed. Several parameters of excitability of the motor cortex were assessed as well as the cortical somatotopic representation of a muscle in the affected hand. Our results revealed that participants obtained significant motor improvements in the paretic hand and those changes were accompanied by changes in the excitability of the motor cortex. Thus, MST leads to neuroplastic changes in the motor cortex of stroke patients which may explain its efficacy.

  1. Plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex induced by Music-supported therapy in stroke patients: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Amengual, Julià L; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Montero, Jordi; Rubio, Francisco; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument demands the engagement of different neural systems. Recent studies about the musician's brain and musical training highlight that this activity requires the close interaction between motor and somatosensory systems. Moreover, neuroplastic changes have been reported in motor-related areas after short and long-term musical training. Because of its capacity to promote neuroplastic changes, music has been used in the context of stroke neurorehabilitation. The majority of patients suffering from a stroke have motor impairments, preventing them to live independently. Thus, there is an increasing demand for effective restorative interventions for neurological deficits. Music-supported Therapy (MST) has been recently developed to restore motor deficits. We report data of a selected sample of stroke patients who have been enrolled in a MST program (1 month intense music learning). Prior to and after the therapy, patients were evaluated with different behavioral motor tests. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was applied to evaluate changes in the sensorimotor representations underlying the motor gains observed. Several parameters of excitability of the motor cortex were assessed as well as the cortical somatotopic representation of a muscle in the affected hand. Our results revealed that participants obtained significant motor improvements in the paretic hand and those changes were accompanied by changes in the excitability of the motor cortex. Thus, MST leads to neuroplastic changes in the motor cortex of stroke patients which may explain its efficacy.

  2. Do Studies on Cortical Plasticity Provide a Rationale for Using Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation as a Treatment for Parkinson’s Disease Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) have shown that key mechanisms of cortical plasticity such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) can be impaired by the PD pathology. In humans protocols of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as paired associative stimulation (PAS) and theta-burst stimulation (TBS), can be used to investigate cortical plasticity of the primary motor cortex. Through the amplitude of the motor evoked potential these transcranial magnetic stimu...

  3. Dynamic movement of N100m current sources in auditory evoked fields: comparison of ipsilateral versus contralateral responses in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chun Yu; Ozaki, Isamu; Suzuki, Yasumi; Baba, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Isao

    2008-04-01

    We recorded auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs) to monaural 400Hz tone bursts and investigated spatio-temporal features of the N100m current sources in the both hemispheres during the time before the N100m reaches at the peak strength and 5ms after the peak. A hemispheric asymmetry was evaluated as the asymmetry index based on the ratio of N100m peak dipole strength between right and left hemispheres for either ear stimulation. The results of asymmetry indices showed right-hemispheric dominance for left ear stimulation but no hemispheric dominance for right ear stimulation. The current sources for N100m in both hemispheres in response to monaural 400Hz stimulation moved toward anterolateral direction along the long axis of the Heschl gyri during the time before it reaches the peak strength; the ipsilateral N100m sources were located slightly posterior to the contralateral N100m ones. The onset and peak latencies of the right hemispheric N100m in response to right ear stimulation are shorter than those of the left hemispheric N100m to left ear stimulation. The traveling distance of the right hemispheric N100m sources following right ear stimulation was longer than that for the left hemispheric ones following left ear stimulation. These results suggest the right-dominant hemispheric asymmetry in pure tone processing.

  4. β2-adrenoceptor stimulation restores frontal cortex plasticity and improves visuospatial performance in hidden-prenatally-malnourished young-adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Briones, Patricio; Soto-Moyano, Rubén; Burgos, Héctor; Castillo, Amparo; Valladares, Luis; Morgan, Carlos; Pérez, Hernán; Barra, Rafael; Constandil, Luis; Laurido, Claudio; Hernández, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Moderate reduction in dietary protein composition of pregnant rats from 25% to 8% casein, calorically compensated by carbohydrates, has been described as a "hidden malnutrition" because it does not alter body and brain weights of pups at birth. However, this dietary treatment leads to altered central noradrenergic systems, impaired cortical long-term potentiation (LTP) and worsened visuo-spatial memory performance. Given the increasing interest on the role played by β2-adrenoceptors (β2-ARs) on brain plasticity, the present study aimed to address the following in hidden-malnourished and eutrophic control rats: (i) the expression levels of β2-ARs in the frontal cortex determined by immunohistochemistry, and (ii) the effect of the β2 selective agonist clenbuterol on both LTP elicited in vivo in the prefrontal cortex and visuospatial performance measured in an eight-arm radial maze. Our results showed that, prenatally malnourished rats exhibited a significant reduction of neocortical β2-AR expression in adulthood. Concomitantly, they were unable to elicit and maintain prefrontal cortex LTP and exhibited lower visuospatial learning performance. Administration of clenbuterol (0.019, 0.038 and 0.075 mg/kg i.p.) enhanced LTP in malnourished and control animals and restored visuospatial learning performance in malnourished but not in normal rats, in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that decreased density of neocortical β2-ARs during postnatal life, subsequent to hidden prenatal malnutrition might affect some synaptic networks required to elicit neocortical LTP and form visuospatial memory, since those neuroplastic deficits were counteracted by β2-AR stimulation.

  5. No evidence for early modulation of evoked responses in primary visual cortex to irrelevant probe stimuli presented during the attentional blink.

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    Oscar Jacoby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP, observers often miss the second of two targets if it appears within 500 ms of the first. This phenomenon, called the attentional blink (AB, is widely held to reflect a bottleneck in the processing of rapidly sequential stimuli that arises after initial sensory registration is complete (i.e., at a relatively late, post-perceptual stage of processing. Contrary to this view, recent fMRI studies have found that activity in the primary visual area (V1, which represents the earliest cortical stage of visual processing, is attenuated during the AB. Here we asked whether such changes in V1 activity during the AB arise in the initial feedforward sweep of stimulus input, or instead reflect the influence of feedback signals from higher cortical areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: EEG signals were recorded while participants monitored a sequential stream of distractor letters for two target digits (T1 and T2. Neural responses associated with an irrelevant probe stimulus presented simultaneously with T2 were measured using an ERP marker--the C1 component--that reflects initial perceptual processing of visual information in V1. As expected, T2 accuracy was compromised when the inter-target interval was brief, reflecting an AB deficit. Critically, however, the magnitude of the early C1 component evoked by the probe was not reduced during the AB. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding that early sensory processing of irrelevant probe stimuli is not suppressed during the AB is consistent with theoretical models that assume that the bottleneck underlying the AB arises at a post-perceptual stage of processing. This suggests that reduced neural activity in V1 during the AB is driven by re-entrant signals from extrastriate areas that regulate early cortical activity via feedback connections with V1.

  6. Polysialic acid is required for dopamine D2 receptor-mediated plasticity involving inhibitory circuits of the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

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    Esther Castillo-Gómez

    Full Text Available Decreased expression of dopamine D2 receptors (D2R, dysfunction of inhibitory neurotransmission and impairments in the structure and connectivity of neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and major depression, but the relationship between these changes remains unclear. The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM, a plasticity-related molecule, may serve as a link. This molecule is expressed in cortical interneurons and dopamine, via D2R, modulates its expression in parallel to that of proteins related to synapses and inhibitory neurotransmission, suggesting that D2R-targeted antipsychotics/antidepressants may act by affecting the plasticity of mPFC inhibitory circuits. To understand the role of PSA-NCAM in this plasticity, rats were chronically treated with a D2R agonist (PPHT after cortical PSA depletion. PPHT-induced increases in GAD67 and synaptophysin (SYN neuropil expression were blocked when PSA was previously removed, indicating a role for PSA-NCAM in this plasticity. The number of PSA-NCAM expressing interneuron somata also increased after PPHT treatment, but the percentages of these cells belonging to different interneuronal subpopulations did not change. Cortical pyramidal neurons did not express PSA-NCAM, but puncta co-expressing this molecule and parvalbumin could be found surrounding their somata. PPHT treatment increased the number of PSA-NCAM and parvalbumin expressing perisomatic puncta, but decreased the percentage of parvalbumin puncta that co-expressed SYN. PSA depletion did not block these effects on the perisomatic region, but increased further the number of parvalbumin expressing puncta and increased the percentage of puncta co-expressing SYN and parvalbumin, suggesting that the polysialylation of NCAM may regulate perisomatic inhibition of mPFC principal neurons. Summarizing, the present results indicate that dopamine acting on D2R

  7. [Synergy of vision and extraocular proprioception in the mechanisms of functional plasticity of the primary visual cortex in the kitten].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Y; Fregnac, Y; Buisseret, P

    1983-01-01

    In 6 week old dark reared kittens, a visual monocular exposure for 6 hrs. elicits major functional modifications in the primary visual cortex. Most cells become orientation selective and are activated through the open eye only. However, if a unilateral section of the ophthalmic branch of the fifth nerve is performed 1 week before the monocular exposure, these modifications are less pronounced, particularly when carried out on the same side as the open eye. Moreover, if the ophthalmic branch has been cut bilaterally, visual monocular exposure has almost no effect: cortical cells remain non selective to orientation and binocularly activated.

  8. Line scanning fMRI reveals earlier onset of optogenetically evoked BOLD response in rat somatosensory cortex as compared to sensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Franziska; Schmid, Florian; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Faber, Cornelius

    2016-12-21

    The combination of optogenetic control and fMRI readout in the brain is increasingly used to assess neuronal networks and underlying signal processing. However, how exactly optogenetic activation or inhibition reproduces normal physiological input has not been fully unraveled. To assess details of temporal dynamics of the hemodynamic response, temporal resolution in rodent fMRI is often not sufficient. Recent advances in human fMRI using faster acquisition schemes cannot be easily translated to small animals due to smaller dimensions, fast physiological motion, and higher sensitivity to artefacts. Here, we applied a one dimensional line scanning acquisition with 50ms temporal resolution in rat somatosensory cortex. We observed that optogenetic activation reproduces the hemodynamic response upon sensory stimulation, but shows a 160 to 340ms earlier onset of the response. This difference is explained by direct activation of all opsin-expressing and illuminated cortical layers, while hemodynamic response to sensory stimulation is delayed during intracortical transmission between cortical layers. Our results confirm that optogenetic activation is a valid model for physiological neuronal input, and that differences in temporal behavior of only a few hundred milliseconds can be resolved in rodent fMRI.

  9. What does neural plasticity tell us about role of primary visual cortex (V1 in visual awareness?

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    Juha eSilvanto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete loss of visual awareness resulting from a lesion to the primary visual cortex (V1 suggests that this region is indispensable for conscious visual perception. There are however a number cases of conscious perception in the absence of V1 which appear to challenge this conclusion. These include reports of patients with bilateral V1 lesions sustained at an early age whose conscious vision has spontaneously recovered, as well as stroke patients who have recovered some conscious vision with the help of rehabilitation programs. In addition, the phenomenon of hemianopic completion and percepts induced by brain stimulation suggest that V1 may not be necessary for conscious perception in all circumstances. Furthermore, that the visual abilities in the cat are associated with the recovery of normal extrastriate tuning properties rather than emulation of V1 functions suggests that there is nothing unique about the functional properties of this region in visual awareness. Rather, the dramatic effect of a V1 lesion on visual awareness may be due to its role in providing the majority of extrastriate visual input, the loss of which abolishes normal neural responsiveness throughout the visual cortex.

  10. Quantifying network properties in multi-electrode recordings: Spatiotemporal characterization and inter-trial variation of evoked gamma oscillations in mouse somatosensory cortex in vitro

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    Cristian eCarmeli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Linking the structural connectivity of brain circuits to their cooperative dynamics and emergent functions is a central aim of neuroscience research. Graph theory has recently been applied to study the structure-function relationship of networks, where dynamical similarity of different nodes has been turned into a static functional connection. However, the capability of the brain to adapt, learn and process external stimuli requires a constant dynamical functional rewiring between circuitries and cell assemblies. Hence, we must capture the changes of network functional connectivity over time. Multi-electrode array data present a unique challenge within this framework. We study the dynamics of gamma oscillations in acute slices of the somatosensory cortex from juvenile mice recorded by planar multi-electrode arrays. Bursts of gamma oscillatory activity lasting a few hundred milliseconds could be initiated only by brief trains of electrical stimulations applied at the deepest cortical layers and simultaneously delivered at multiple locations. Local field potentials were used to study the spatio-temporal properties and the instantaneous synchronization profile of the gamma oscillatory activity, combined with current source density analysis. Pair-wise differences in the oscillation phase were used to determine the presence of instantaneous synchronization between the different sites of the circuitry during the oscillatory period. Despite variation in the duration of the oscillatory response over successive trials, they showed a constant average power, suggesting that the rate of expenditure of energy during the oscillation represents an invariant of gamma bursts. Within each gamma burst, the functional connectivity map reflected the columnar organization of the neocortex. Over successive trials, an apparently random rearrangement of the functional connectivity was observed, with a more stable columnar than horizontal organization.

  11. Environmental enrichment improves response strength, threshold, selectivity, and latency of auditory cortex neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Navzer D; Percaccio, Cherie R; Pandya, Pritesh K; Moucha, Raluca; Rathbun, Daniel L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2004-07-01

    Over the last 50 yr, environmental enrichment has been shown to generate more than a dozen changes in brain anatomy. The consequences of these physical changes on information processing have not been well studied. In this study, rats were housed in enriched or standard conditions either prior to or after reaching sexual maturity. Evoked potentials from awake rats and extracellular recordings from anesthetized rats were used to document responses of auditory cortex neurons. This report details several significant, new findings about the influence of housing conditions on the responses of rat auditory cortex neurons. First, enrichment dramatically increases the strength of auditory cortex responses. Tone-evoked potentials of enriched rats, for example, were more than twice the amplitude of rats raised in standard laboratory conditions. Second, cortical responses of both young and adult animals benefit from exposure to an enriched environment and are degraded by exposure to an impoverished environment. Third, housing condition resulted in rapid remodeling of cortical responses in <2 wk. Fourth, recordings made under anesthesia indicate that enrichment increases the number of neurons activated by any sound. This finding shows that the evoked potential plasticity documented in awake rats was not due to differences in behavioral state. Finally, enrichment made primary auditory cortex (A1) neurons more sensitive to quiet sounds, more selective for tone frequency, and altered their response latencies. These experiments provide the first evidence of physiologic changes in auditory cortex processing resulting from generalized environmental enrichment.

  12. Phase-specific plasticity of synaptic structures in the somatosensory cortex of living mice during neuropathic pain

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    Kim Sun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postsynaptic dendritic spines in the cortex are highly dynamic, showing rapid morphological changes including elongation/retraction and formation/elimination in response to altered sensory input or neuronal activity, which achieves experience/activity-dependent cortical circuit rewiring. Our previous long-term in vivo two-photon imaging study revealed that spine turnover in the mouse primary somatosensory (S1 cortex markedly increased in an early development phase of neuropathic pain, but was restored in a late maintenance phase of neuropathic pain. However, it remains unknown how spine morphology is altered preceding turnover change and whether gain and loss of presynaptic boutons are changed during neuropathic pain. Findings Here we used short-term (2-hour and long-term (2-week time-lapse in vivo two-photon imaging of individual spines and boutons in the S1 cortical layer 1 of the transgenic mice expressing GFP in pyramidal neurons following partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL. We found in the short-term imaging that spine motility (Δ length per 30 min significantly increased in the development phase of neuropathic pain, but returned to the baseline in the maintenance phase. Moreover, the proportion of immature (thin and mature (mushroom spines increased and decreased, respectively, only in the development phase. Long-term imaging data showed that formation and elimination of boutons moderately increased and decreased, respectively, during the first 3 days following PSL and was subsequently restored. Conclusions Our results indicate that the S1 synaptic structures are rapidly destabilized and rearranged following PSL and subsequently stabilized in the maintenance phase of neuropathic pain, suggesting a novel therapeutic target in intractable chronic pain.

  13. A case study of the changes in the speech-evoked auditory brainstem response associated with auditory training in children with auditory processing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Sridhar; Forrester, Jennifer; Rutledge, Casey; Holmes, Georgia W

    2013-04-01

    Studies related to plasticity and learning-related phenomena have primarily focused on higher-order processes of the auditory system, such as those in the auditory cortex and limited information is available on learning- and plasticity-related processes in the auditory brainstem. A clinical electrophysiological test of speech-evoked ABR known as BioMARK has been developed to evaluate brainstem responses to speech sounds in children with language learning disorders. Fast ForWord (FFW) was used as an auditory intervention program in the current study and pre- intervention and post-intervention speech-evoked ABR (BioMARK) measures were compared in 2 school-aged children with auditory processing disorders (APD). Significant changes were noted from pre-intervention to post-intervention and reflect plasticity in the auditory brainstem's neural activity to speech stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Formation and reverberation of sequential neural activity patterns evoked by sensory stimulation are enhanced during cortical desynchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez Contreras, Edgar J; Schjetnan, Andrea Gomez Palacio; Muhammad, Arif; Bartho, Peter; McNaughton, Bruce L; Kolb, Bryan; Gruber, Aaron J; Luczak, Artur

    2013-08-07

    Memory formation is hypothesized to involve the generation of event-specific neural activity patterns during learning and the subsequent spontaneous reactivation of these patterns. Here, we present evidence that these processes can also be observed in urethane-anesthetized rats and are enhanced by desynchronized brain state evoked by tail pinch, subcortical carbachol infusion, or systemic amphetamine administration. During desynchronization, we found that repeated tactile or auditory stimulation evoked unique sequential patterns of neural firing in somatosensory and auditory cortex and that these patterns then reoccurred during subsequent spontaneous activity, similar to what we have observed in awake animals. Furthermore, the formation of these patterns was blocked by an NMDA receptor antagonist, suggesting that the phenomenon depends on synaptic plasticity. These results suggest that anesthetized animals with a desynchronized brain state could serve as a convenient model for studying stimulus-induced plasticity to improve our understanding of memory formation and replay in the brain.

  15. Critical role of promoter IV-driven BDNF transcription in GABAergic transmission and synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Kazuko; Woo, Newton H; Martinowich, Keri; Greene, Joshua S; Schloesser, Robert J; Shen, Liya; Lu, Bai

    2009-04-07

    Transcription of Bdnf is controlled by multiple promoters, which drive expression of multiple transcripts encoding for the same protein. Promoter IV contributes significantly to activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcription. We have generated promoter IV mutant mice (BDNF-KIV) by inserting a GFP-STOP cassette within the Bdnf exon IV locus. This genetic manipulation results in disruption of promoter IV-mediated Bdnf expression. BDNF-KIV animals exhibited significant deficits in GABAergic interneurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), particularly those expressing parvalbumin, a subtype implicated in executive function and schizophrenia. Moreover, disruption of promoter IV-driven Bdnf transcription impaired inhibitory but not excitatory synaptic transmission recorded from layer V pyramidal neurons in the PFC. The attenuation of GABAergic inputs resulted in an aberrant appearance of spike-timing-dependent synaptic potentiation (STDP) in PFC slices derived from BDNF-KIV, but not wild-type littermates. These results demonstrate the importance of promoter IV-dependent Bdnf transcription in GABAergic function and reveal an unexpected regulation of STDP in the PFC by BDNF.

  16. Streptozotocin diabetic mice display depressive-like behavior and alterations in the structure, neurotransmission and plasticity of medial prefrontal cortex interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Gómez, Esther; Coviello, Simona; Perez-Rando, Marta; Curto, Yasmina; Carceller, Héctor; Salvador, Alicia; Nacher, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus patients are at increased risk of developing depression, although the neurobiological bases of this comorbidity are not yet fully understood. These patients show CNS alterations, similar to those found in major depression, including changes in the structure and neurotransmission of excitatory neurons. However, although depressive patients and animal models also display alterations in inhibitory networks, little is known about the effects of diabetes on interneurons. Our main objective was to study the impact of diabetes on interneurons of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), one of the regions most affected by major depression. For this purpose we have induced diabetes with high-dose streptozotozin in transgenic mice displaying fluorescent interneurons. These animals showed a depressive-like behavior (increased immobility time in tail suspension test) in parallel with reductions in interneuronal dendritic arborization and in the expression of GAD67, the enzyme that synthetizes the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. However, the levels of PSA-NCAM, a plasticity-related molecule exclusively expressed by interneurons in the mPFC, were unaltered in the different regions and layers of this cortical area. Interestingly, diabetic mice also showed increased levels of synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle protein. These results indicate that the structure and neurotransmission of interneurons is altered in the mPFC of diabetic mice and suggest that these changes may play a key role in the depressive symptoms associated to diabetes.

  17. A realistic neural mass model of the cortex with laminar-specific connections and synaptic plasticity - evaluation with auditory habituation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    Full Text Available In this work we propose a biologically realistic local cortical circuit model (LCCM, based on neural masses, that incorporates important aspects of the functional organization of the brain that have not been covered by previous models: (1 activity dependent plasticity of excitatory synaptic couplings via depleting and recycling of neurotransmitters and (2 realistic inter-laminar dynamics via laminar-specific distribution of and connections between neural populations. The potential of the LCCM was demonstrated by accounting for the process of auditory habituation. The model parameters were specified using Bayesian inference. It was found that: (1 besides the major serial excitatory information pathway (layer 4 to layer 2/3 to layer 5/6, there exists a parallel "short-cut" pathway (layer 4 to layer 5/6, (2 the excitatory signal flow from the pyramidal cells to the inhibitory interneurons seems to be more intra-laminar while, in contrast, the inhibitory signal flow from inhibitory interneurons to the pyramidal cells seems to be both intra- and inter-laminar, and (3 the habituation rates of the connections are unsymmetrical: forward connections (from layer 4 to layer 2/3 are more strongly habituated than backward connections (from Layer 5/6 to layer 4. Our evaluation demonstrates that the novel features of the LCCM are of crucial importance for mechanistic explanations of brain function. The incorporation of these features into a mass model makes them applicable to modeling based on macroscopic data (like EEG or MEG, which are usually available in human experiments. Our LCCM is therefore a valuable building block for future realistic models of human cognitive function.

  18. Motor cortical plasticity induced by motor learning through mental practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAvanzino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several investigations suggest that actual and mental actions trigger similar neural substrates. Motor learning via physical practice results in long-term potentiation (LTP-like plasticity processes, namely potentiation of M1 and a temporary occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. However, whether this neuroplasticity process contributes to improve motor performance through mental practice remains to be determined. Here, we tested skill learning-dependent changes in primary motor cortex (M1 excitability and plasticity by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation in subjects trained to physically execute or mentally perform a sequence of finger opposition movements. Before and after physical practice and motor-imagery practice, M1 excitability was evaluated by measuring the input-output (IO curve of motor evoked potentials. M1 long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD-like plasticity was assessed with paired-associative stimulation (PAS of the median nerve and motor cortex using an interstimulus interval of 25 ms (PAS25 or 10 ms (PAS10, respectively. We found that even if after both practice sessions subjects significantly improved their movement speed, M1 excitability and plasticity were differentially influenced by the two practice sessions. First, we observed an increase in the slope of IO curve after physical but not after motor-imagery practice. Second, there was a reversal of the PAS25 effect from LTP-like plasticity to LTD-like plasticity following physical and motor-imagery practice. Third, LTD-like plasticity (PAS10 protocol increased after physical practice, whilst it was occluded after motor-imagery practice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that motor-imagery practice lead to the development of neuroplasticity, as it affected the PAS25- and PAS10- induced plasticity in M1. These results, expanding the current knowledge on how motor-imagery training shapes M1 plasticity, might have a potential impact in

  19. Brain correlates of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies, partly owing to its power to evoke strong emotions and influence moods. During the past decade, the investigation of the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions has been invaluable for the understanding of human emotion. Functional neuroimaging studies on music and emotion show that music can modulate activity in brain structures that are known to be crucially involved in emotion, such as the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, insula, cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. The potential of music to modulate activity in these structures has important implications for the use of music in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  20. Structural and Functional Plasticity within the Nucleus Accumbens and Prefrontal Cortex Associated with Time-Dependent Increases in Food Cue Seeking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingess, Paige M; Darling, Rebecca A; Derman, Rifka C; Wulff, Shaun S; Hunter, Melissa L; Ferrario, Carrie R; Brown, Travis E

    2017-03-15

    Urges to consume food can be driven by stimuli in the environment that are associated with previous food experience. Identifying adaptations within brain reward circuits that facilitate cue-induced food seeking is critical for understanding and preventing the overconsumption of food and subsequent weight gain. Utilizing electrophysiological, biochemical, and DiI labeling we examined functional and structural changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) associated with time-dependent increases in food craving ('incubation of craving'). Rats self-administered 60% high-fat or chow 45 mg pellets and were then tested for incubation of craving either 1 or 30 days after training (1d, 30d). High-fat was chosen for comparison to determine if palatability differentially affected incubation and/or plasticity. Rats showed robust incubation of craving for both food rewards, although responding for cues previously associated with high-fat was greater than chow at both 1d and 30d. In addition, previous experience with high-fat consumption reduced dendritic spine density in the PFC at both time points. In contrast, incubation was associated with an increase in NAc spine density and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)-mediated transmission at 30d in both groups. Finally, incubation of craving for chow and high-fat was accompanied by an increase in calcium-permeable and calcium-impermeable AMPARs, respectively. Our results suggest that incubation of food craving alters brain reward circuitry and macronutrient composition specifically induces cortical changes in a way that may facilitate maladaptive food seeking behaviors.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 15 March 2017. doi:10.1038/npp.2017.57.

  1. Steady-state dynamics and experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer 4/5a pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Miquelajauregui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The steady state dynamics and experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer (L 2/3 and L5B cortical pyramidal neurons have recently been assessed using in vivo two-photon microscopy (Trachtenberg et al., 2002; Zuo et al., 2005; Holtmaat et al., 2006. In contrast, not much is known about spine dynamics in L4/5a neurons, regarded as direct recipients of thalamocortical input (Constantinople and Bruno, 2013. In the adult mouse somatosensory cortex (SCx, the transcription factor Ebf2 is enriched in excitatory neurons of L4/5a, including pyramidal neurons. We assessed the molecular and electrophysiological properties of these neurons as well as the morphology of their apical tufts (Scholl analysis and cortical outputs (optogenetics within the SCx. To test the hypothesis that L4/5a pyramidal neurons play an important role in sensory processing (given their key laminar position; soma depth ~450-480 µm, we successfully labeled them in Ebf2-Cre mice with EGFP by expressing recombinant rAAV vectors in utero. Using longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy through a craniotomy (Mostany and Portera-Cailliau, 2008, we repeatedly imaged spines in apical dendritic tufts of L4/5a neurons under basal conditions and after sensory deprivation. Under steady-state conditions in adults, the morphology of the apical tufts and the mean spine density were stable at 0.39 ± 0.05 spines/μm (comparable to L5B, Mostany et al., 2011. Interestingly, spine elimination increases 4-8 days after sensory deprivation, probably due to input loss. This suggests that Ebf2+ L4/5a neurons could be involved in early steps of processing of thalamocortical information.

  2. 小鼠海马CAl区高频刺激诱发的突触可塑性分析%Analysis of high-frequency stimulation-evoked synaptic plasticity in mouse hippocampal CA1 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘喜娟; 黄汾生; 黄辰; 杨章民; 冯新正

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) is one of the most common ways for studies ofsynaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse plasticity (PPP). The measurement of the changes in thedifferent components of fEPSP waveform, such as the initial slope, initial area, peak amplitude and whole area, were commonly usedas criteria for the judgement of potentiation or depression of synaptic plasticity. However, the differences in the conclusions drawnfrom measuring different components of fEPSP waveform at the same recording have still been largely ignored. Here we compared high-frequency stimulation (HFS)-evoked synaptic plasticity, both LTP and PPP, by measuring different components of fEPSP waveform,including the initial slope, initial area, peak amplitude, whole area and time course. The results not only indicated the acceleration of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor kinetics underlies LTP in hippocampal CAI region of mice,but also showed that different measurements of fEPSP waveform at the same recording'result in different magnitudes of LTP anddifferent forms of PPP in hippocampal CAl region of mice. After HFS, the paired-pulse ratio was slightly decreased by measurementof the initial area, but obviously increased by measurement of the initial slope of the pair fEPSPs. These results might draw apparentlycontradictory conclusions. Therefore, careful and complete analysis of the data from different parts of fEPSP waveforms is importantfor reflection of the faithful changes in synaptic plasticity.%通过细胞外记录方法记录场兴奋性突触后电位(field excitatory postsynaptic potential,fEPSP)的变化是研究突触可塑性,诸如长时程增强(long-term potentiation,LTP)和双脉冲可塑性(paired.pulse plasticity,PPP)的最常见方法之一.fEPSP波形的起始斜率、起始面积、峰值及总面积等的变化常用作判断突触可塑性增强

  3. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low ( 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant.

  4. Cortical and brainstem plasticity in Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppa, Antonio; Marsili, Luca; Di Stasio, Flavio; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Pasquini, Massimo; Cardona, Francesco; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2014-10-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is characterized by motor/vocal tics commonly associated with psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. We investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in Tourette patients, exposed and unexposed to chronic drug treatment, with and without psychiatric disturbances. We also investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We studied 20 Tourette patients with and without psychiatric disturbances, 15 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 20 healthy subjects. All groups included drug-naïve patients. We conditioned the left primary motor cortex with intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation and recorded motor evoked potentials. We conditioned the supraorbital nerve with facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation and recorded the blink reflex late response area. In healthy subjects, intermittent theta-burst increased and continuous theta-burst stimulation decreased motor evoked potentials. Differently, intermittent theta-burst failed to increase and continuous theta-burst stimulation failed to decrease motor evoked potentials in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances. In obsessive-compulsive disorder, intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation elicited normal responses. In healthy subjects and in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder, the blink reflex late response area increased after facilitatory high-frequency and decreased after inhibitory high-frequency stimulation. Conversely, in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances, facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation left the blink reflex late response area unchanged. Theta-burst and high-frequency stimulation elicited similar responses in drug-naïve and chronically treated patients. Tourette patients have reduced plasticity regardless of psychiatric disturbances. These findings suggest that abnormal plasticity contributes to the

  5. Mechanisms of Gravity-Evoked Neuronal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The grant focuses on a gene we identified called, serum and glucocorticoid- induced kinase (SGK), during a previously funded NASA project. The abundance of SGK messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein is increased in CNS tissues from animals reared in microgravity in comparison with 1G reared animals. In the funded proposal we had three aims: 1) characterize the distribution of SGK mRNA in the developing and adult rat CNS, 2) determine if expression of enzymatically active or inactive forms of SGK in cells influenced cell morphology (neurite growth), and 2) determine if SGK is a CREB kinase - that is, a protein kinase that adds phosphate groups to the transcription factor CREB. Over the past year we have made strong progress in the two most difficult parts of the project, namely specific aims 2 and 3. In specific aim #2 we planned to express a dominant negative or a constitutively active form of SGK in PC12 cells and assay the effects on neurite growth. Several methods are available for examining the effects of a transgene on PC12 neurite growth. Relevant variables include the performance of the assay +/- serum, +/- NGF, substratum for growth, timing between transfection and assay. Over the past 8 months we have customized the assay to enable us to most readily determine the effects of transgene expression on neurite growth. We have also compared the relative utility of transfecting DNA as opposed to protein itself. We are now well positioned to study the effects of SGK on neurite growth. We have also made progress in parallel studies in primary neurons. We have made constructs which will lead to transgene expression in cultures of spinal cord neurons. Co-transfection of a reporter and the SGK constructs can now be performed.

  6. Synaptic Basis for Cross-modal Plasticity: Enhanced Supragranular Dendritic Spine Density in Anterior Ectosylvian Auditory Cortex of the Early Deaf Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Clemo, H. Ruth; Lomber, Stephen G.; Meredith, M. Alex

    2014-01-01

    In the cat, the auditory field of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (FAES) is sensitive to auditory cues and its deactivation leads to orienting deficits toward acoustic, but not visual, stimuli. However, in early deaf cats, FAES activity shifts to the visual modality and its deactivation blocks orienting toward visual stimuli. Thus, as in other auditory cortices, hearing loss leads to cross-modal plasticity in the FAES. However, the synaptic basis for cross-modal plasticity is unknown. Therefo...

  7. 大脑皮层内活动依赖的神经环路结构可塑性研究进展%Progress in activity-dependent structural plasticity of neural circuits in cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶小平; 许智祥; 徐富强

    2012-01-01

    哺乳动物大脑皮层内的神经环路在神经发育、学习记忆、神经和精神疾病过程中表现出令人惊异的结构和功能可塑性.随着新的成像技术及分子生物学方法的应用,在细胞和突触水平上观察活体皮层内神经环路的动态结构变化成为可能,因此近十年来有关活动依赖的神经环路结构可塑性方面的研究进展迅速.该文综述了该方面的部分实验结果,重点阐述个体生长发育、丰富环境、感觉剥夺、病理状态以及学习和记忆等过程和条件下树突的结构可塑性特点,尤其是树突棘的形态和数量变化特征;并简单介绍轴突的结构可塑性,以及结构可塑性相关的分子和细胞机制,最后提出未来该领域内亟待解决的问题.%Neural circuits of mammalian cerebral cortex have exhibited amazing abilities of structural and functional plasticity in development, learning and memory, neurological and psychiatric diseases. With the new imaging techniques and the application of molecular biology methods, observation neural circuits' structural dynamics within the cortex in vivo at the cellular and synaptic level was possible, so there were many great progresses in the field of the activity-dependent structural plasticity over the past decade. This paper reviewed some of the aspects of the experimental results, focused on the characteristics of dendritic structural plasticity in individual growth and development, rich environment, sensory deprivation, and pathological conditions, as well as learning and memory, especially the dynamics of dendritic spines on morphology and quantity; after that, we introduced axonal structural plasticity, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of structural plasticity, and proposed some future problems to be solved at last.

  8. A model of long-term memory storage in the cerebellar cortex: A possible role for plasticity at parallel fiber synapses onto stellate/basket interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kenyon, Garrett T.

    1997-01-01

    By evoking changes in climbing fiber activity, movement errors are thought to modify synapses from parallel fibers onto Purkinje cells (pf*Pkj) so as to improve subsequent motor performance. Theoretical arguments suggest there is an intrinsic tradeoff, however, between motor adaptation and long-term storage. Assuming a baseline rate of motor errors is always present, then repeated performance of any learned movement will generate a series of climbing fiber-mediated corrections. By reshuffling...

  9. Environmental enrichment and working memory tasks decrease hippocampal cell proliferation after wheel running--A role for the prefrontal cortex in hippocampal plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefers, Andrea T U

    2015-10-22

    Despite an increasing amount of evidence about the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis on the local level, less attention has been paid to its systemic embedding in wider brain circuits. The aim of the present study was to obtain evidence for a potential role of the prefrontal cortex in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We hypothesised that activation of the prefrontal cortex by environmental enrichment or a working-memory task would decrease previously enhanced cell proliferation rates. Wheel running was applied as a common stimulator of cell proliferation in CD1 mice reared under deprivation of natural environmental stimulation. Next, the animals were assigned to four groups for different treatments in the following three days: housing under continued deprivation, environmental enrichment, a spatial-delayed alternation task in an automated T-maze that activates the prefrontal cortex by working-memory requirements or a control task in the automated T-maze differing only in the single parameter working-memory-associated delay. Both the environmental enrichment and spatial-delayed alternation tasks decreased cell proliferation rates in the dentate gyrus compared to deprived housing and the control task in the T-maze. As the control animals underwent the same procedures and stressors and differed only in the single parameter working-memory-associated delay, the working-memory requirement seems to be the crucial factor for decreasing cell proliferation rates. Taken together, these results suggest that the prefrontal cortex may play a role in the regulation of hippocampal cell proliferation.

  10. Auditory evoked potentials and multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Gentile Matas; Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas; Caroline Rondina Salzano de Oliveira; Isabela Crivellaro Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease that can affect several areas of the central nervous system. Damage along the auditory pathway can alter its integrity significantly. Therefore, it is important to investigate the auditory pathway, from the brainstem to the cortex, in individuals with MS. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize auditory evoked potentials in adults with MS of the remittent-recurrent type. METHOD: The study comprised 25 individuals w...

  11. Changes in cortical plasticity across the lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina eFreitas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deterioration of motor and cognitive performance with advancing age is well documented, but its cause remains unknown. Animal studies dating back to the late 1970’s reveal that age-associated neurocognitive changes are linked to age-dependent changes in synaptic plasticity, including alterations of long-term potentiation and depression (LTP and LTD. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques enable measurement of LTP- and LTD-like mechanisms of plasticity, in vivo, in humans, and may thus provide valuable insights. We examined the effects of a 40-second train of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS to the motor cortex (600 stimuli, 3 pulses at 50 Hz applied at a frequency of 5 Hz on cortico-spinal excitability as measured by the motor evoked potentials (MEPs induced by single-pulse TMS before and after cTBS in the contralateral first dorsal interosseus muscle. Thirty-six healthy individuals aged 19 to 81 years old were studied in two sites (Boston, USA and Barcelona, Spain. The findings did not differ across study sites. We found that advancing age is negatively correlated with the duration of the effect of cTBS (r = -0.367; p = 0.028 and the overall amount of corticomotor suppression induced by cTBS (r = -0.478; p = 0.003, and positively correlated with the maximal suppression of amplitude on motor evoked responses in the target muscle (r = 0.420; p = 0.011. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based individual morphometric analysis in a subset of subjects to demonstrate that these findings are not explained by age-related brain atrophy or differences in scalp-to-brain distance that could have affected the TBS effects. Our findings provide empirical evidence that the mechanisms of cortical plasticity area are altered with aging and their efficiency decreases across the human lifespan. This may critically contribute to motor and possibly cognitive decline.

  12. Occipital cortex activation studied with simultaneous recordings of functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) and visual evoked potential (VEP) in cognitively normal human subjects: effect of healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, M Akif; Aydin, Hulya; Saka, Esen

    2009-03-06

    We evaluated effect of aging, gender and eye (sighting) dominance on relationship between visual evoked flow response (VEFR) and visual evoked potential (VEP), which refers to neurovascular coupling. The VEFR was defined as a percentage increase of the ratio of mean blood flow velocity in the contralateral (according to the side of dominant eye processing) posterior cerebral artery P2 segment to those in ipsilateral middle cerebral artery from the baseline during half-field stimulation. Vasoneural coupling index (CI) was defined as "100 x VEFR/VEP P100 amplitude". Compared to the healthy elderly subjects (n: 19; female/male: 6/13, mean age: 69.7 +/- 7), younger participants (n: 28; female/male: 16/12; mean age: 31.1 +/- 4.7) had significantly higher VEFR for both sides: 18.9 +/- 6.7% versus 11.2 +/- 6.7%, p VEP and VEFR amplitudes were well correlated. However, this was significant only for younger subjects and more evident in D side. The CI was higher in young subjects compared to those in old ones (6.49 +/- 2.79 versus 4.75 +/- 2.35, respectively, p = 0.007). But, this age-related trend remained as borderline when sides were analyzed individually: In the young subjects CI was 5.99 +/- 2.21 and 6.96 +/- 3.22 for D and ND sides, while those were 4.27 +/- 2.60 and 5.19 +/- 2.07 in old ones. This study confirmed diminished visual evoked flow in relation with advancing age, and suggested that "weakened" neurovascular coupling (as evidenced by a decreased VEP and VEFR correlation along with decreased CI) as one of the underlying mechanisms.

  13. Loss of Arc renders the visual cortex impervious to the effects of sensory experience or deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Cortina L; Shepherd, Jason D; Tropea, Daniela; Wang, Kuan H; Bear, Mark F; Sur, Mriganka

    2010-04-01

    A myriad of mechanisms have been suggested to account for the full richness of visual cortical plasticity. We found that visual cortex lacking Arc is impervious to the effects of deprivation or experience. Using intrinsic signal imaging and chronic visually evoked potential recordings, we found that Arc(-/-) mice did not exhibit depression of deprived-eye responses or a shift in ocular dominance after brief monocular deprivation. Extended deprivation also failed to elicit a shift in ocular dominance or open-eye potentiation. Moreover, Arc(-/-) mice lacked stimulus-selective response potentiation. Although Arc(-/-) mice exhibited normal visual acuity, baseline ocular dominance was abnormal and resembled that observed after dark-rearing. These data suggest that Arc is required for the experience-dependent processes that normally establish and modify synaptic connections in visual cortex.

  14. Speech training alters consonant and vowel responses in multiple auditory cortex fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Buell, Elizabeth P; Fink, Melyssa K; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Speech sounds evoke unique neural activity patterns in primary auditory cortex (A1). Extensive speech sound discrimination training alters A1 responses. While the neighboring auditory cortical fields each contain information about speech sound identity, each field processes speech sounds differently. We hypothesized that while all fields would exhibit training-induced plasticity following speech training, there would be unique differences in how each field changes. In this study, rats were trained to discriminate speech sounds by consonant or vowel in quiet and in varying levels of background speech-shaped noise. Local field potential and multiunit responses were recorded from four auditory cortex fields in rats that had received 10 weeks of speech discrimination training. Our results reveal that training alters speech evoked responses in each of the auditory fields tested. The neural response to consonants was significantly stronger in anterior auditory field (AAF) and A1 following speech training. The neural response to vowels following speech training was significantly weaker in ventral auditory field (VAF) and posterior auditory field (PAF). This differential plasticity of consonant and vowel sound responses may result from the greater paired pulse depression, expanded low frequency tuning, reduced frequency selectivity, and lower tone thresholds, which occurred across the four auditory fields. These findings suggest that alterations in the distributed processing of behaviorally relevant sounds may contribute to robust speech discrimination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple Color Stimulus Induced Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    evoked potentials, multiple color, FFT, bispectrum I. INTRODUCTION Visual evoked potential ( VEP ) is the electrical response of...brain under visual stimulation, which can be recorded from the scalp over the visual cortex of the brain. A distinction is made between transient VEP ...and steady-state VEP (SSVEP) based on the stimulation frequencies. The former arises when the stimulation frequencies are less than 2 Hz. However

  16. Characterization of postsynaptic calcium signals in the pyramidal neurons of anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu-Hui; Song, Qian; Chen, Tao; Zhuo, Min

    2017-01-01

    Calcium signaling is critical for synaptic transmission and plasticity. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors play a key role in synaptic potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex. Most previous studies of calcium signaling focus on hippocampal neurons, little is known about the activity-induced calcium signals in the anterior cingulate cortex. In the present study, we show that NMDA receptor-mediated postsynaptic calcium signals induced by different synaptic stimulation in anterior cingulate cortex pyramidal neurons. Single and multi-action potentials evoked significant suprathreshold Ca(2+) increases in somas and spines. Both NMDA receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels contributed to this increase. Postsynaptic Ca(2+)signals were induced by puff-application of glutamate, and a NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 blocked these signals in both somas and spines. Finally, long-term potentiation inducing protocols triggered postsynaptic Ca(2+) influx, and these influx were NMDA receptor dependent. Our results provide the first study of calcium signals in the anterior cingulate cortex and demonstrate that NMDA receptors play important roles in postsynaptic calcium signals in anterior cingulate cortex pyramidal neurons.

  17. Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials during Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Shirley; Deepeshwar, Singh; Naveen, Kalkuni Visweswaraiah; Pailoor, Subramanya

    2015-10-01

    The auditory sensory pathway has been studied in meditators, using midlatency and short latency auditory evoked potentials. The present study evaluated long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEPs) during meditation. Sixty male participants, aged between 18 and 31 years (group mean±SD, 20.5±3.8 years), were assessed in 4 mental states based on descriptions in the traditional texts. They were (a) random thinking, (b) nonmeditative focusing, (c) meditative focusing, and (d) meditation. The order of the sessions was randomly assigned. The LLAEP components studied were P1 (40-60 ms), N1 (75-115 ms), P2 (120-180 ms), and N2 (180-280 ms). For each component, the peak amplitude and peak latency were measured from the prestimulus baseline. There was significant decrease in the peak latency of the P2 component during and after meditation (Pmeditation facilitates the processing of information in the auditory association cortex, whereas the number of neurons recruited was smaller in random thinking and non-meditative focused thinking, at the level of the secondary auditory cortex, auditory association cortex and anterior cingulate cortex.

  18. Simultaneously-evoked auditory potentials (SEAP): A new method for concurrent measurement of cortical and subcortical auditory-evoked activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slugocki, Christopher; Bosnyak, Daniel; Trainor, Laurel J

    2017-03-01

    Recent electrophysiological work has evinced a capacity for plasticity in subcortical auditory nuclei in human listeners. Similar plastic effects have been measured in cortically-generated auditory potentials but it is unclear how the two interact. Here we present Simultaneously-Evoked Auditory Potentials (SEAP), a method designed to concurrently elicit electrophysiological brain potentials from inferior colliculus, thalamus, and primary and secondary auditory cortices. Twenty-six normal-hearing adult subjects (mean 19.26 years, 9 male) were exposed to 2400 monaural (right-ear) presentations of a specially-designed stimulus which consisted of a pure-tone carrier (500 or 600 Hz) that had been amplitude-modulated at the sum of 37 and 81 Hz (depth 100%). Presentation followed an oddball paradigm wherein the pure-tone carrier was set to 500 Hz for 85% of presentations and pseudo-randomly changed to 600 Hz for the remaining 15% of presentations. Single-channel electroencephalographic data were recorded from each subject using a vertical montage referenced to the right earlobe. We show that SEAP elicits a 500 Hz frequency-following response (FFR; generated in inferior colliculus), 80 (subcortical) and 40 (primary auditory cortex) Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a (when there is an occasional change in carrier frequency; secondary auditory cortex) in addition to the obligatory N1-P2 complex (secondary auditory cortex). Analyses showed that subcortical and cortical processes are linked as (i) the latency of the FFR predicts the phase delay of the 40 Hz steady-state response, (ii) the phase delays of the 40 and 80 Hz steady-state responses are correlated, and (iii) the fidelity of the FFR predicts the latency of the N1 component. The SEAP method offers a new approach for measuring the dynamic encoding of acoustic features at multiple levels of the auditory pathway. As such, SEAP is a promising tool with which to study how

  19. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef;

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...

  20. Cortical evoked potentials recorded from the guinea pig without averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walloch, R A

    1975-01-01

    Potentials evoked by tonal pulses and recorded with a monopolar electrode on the pial surface over the auditory cortex of the guinea pig are presented. These potentials are compared with average potentials recorded in previous studies with an electrode on the dura. The potentials recorded by these two techniques have similar waveforms, peak latencies and thresholds. They appear to be generated within the same region of the cerebral cortex. As can be expected, the amplitude of the evoked potentials recorded from the pial surface is larger than that recorded from the dura. Consequently, averaging is not needed to extract the evoked potential once the dura is removed. The thresholds for the evoked cortical potential are similar to behavioral thresholds for the guinea pig at high frequencies; however, evoked potential thresholds are eleveate over behavioral thresholds at low frequencies. The removal of the dura and the direct recording of the evoked potential appears most appropriate for acute experiments. The recording of an evoked potential with dura electrodes empploying averaging procedures appears most appropriate for chronic studies.

  1. Selective 5-HT7 Receptor Activation May Enhance Synaptic Plasticity Through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Activity in the Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Kangjian; Zhao, Xuefei; Li, Youjun; Zheng, Liang; Wang, Jue; Li, Yan-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter that modulates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity by binding to several different 5-HT receptor subtypes. In the present study, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in transverse slice preparations to test the role of 5-HT receptors in modulating the NMDA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the rat visual cortex. We found that the NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs could be potentiated by exogenously applied 5-HT. Similar results were obtained by exogenously applied 5-CT or 8-OH-DPAT (the 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor agonist). A specific antagonist for the 5-HT7 receptor, SB-269970, completely blocked the increase in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-CT or 8- OH-DPAT. Moreover, the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, displayed no influence on the enhancement in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-CT or 8-OHDPAT. These results indicated that the increase in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-HT in layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the young rat visual cortex requires activation of 5-HT7 receptors, but not 5-HT1A receptors. These observations might be clinically relevant to schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), where enhancing NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission is considered to be a promising strategy for treatment of these diseases.

  2. Role of dopamine in the plasticity of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA in the rat frontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rétaux, S; Trovero, F; Besson, M J

    1994-12-01

    The modulatory role of dopamine (DA) on the expression of mRNA encoding the large isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), the biosynthesis enzyme of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), was examined in GABA neurons of two structures innervated by DA neurons originating from the ventral tegmental area (VTA): the medial frontal cortex (MFC) and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). A bilateral electrolytic lesion of VTA was performed in rats to produce a DA denervation of both the MFC and NAcc. The efficacy of VTA lesions was verified by measurement of locomotor activity and by immunohistochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase in the mesencephalon. GAD67 mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization histochemistry using a 35S-labelled cDNA probe. Densitometric analysis of GAD67 mRNA hybridization signals revealed in VTA-lesioned rats a significant decrease (-24%) in GAD67 mRNA levels in the prelimbic area of the MFC and no significant effect in the anterior cingulate area or the frontoparietal cortex. Single cell analyses by computer-assisted grain counting showed that the decrease in GAD67 mRNA levels in prelimbic MFC was due to a change in GAD67 mRNA expression in a subpopulation of GABA interneurons located in the deep cortical layers (V-VI). By contrast, in the NAcc of VTA-lesioned rats, GAD67 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the anterior part and in the core but were unchanged in the shell part. These results suggest that in two target structures of VTA DA neurons, GAD67 mRNA expression is, in normal conditions, under a tonic stimulatory and a tonic inhibitory DA control in the MFC and the NAcc respectively. A schematic diagram is proposed for functional interactions between these structures.

  3. Evaluation of Evoked Potentials to Dyadic Tones after Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Pascale; Eichele, Tom; Buechler, Michael; Debener, Stefan; Jancke, Lutz; Dillier, Norbert; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Meyer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Auditory evoked potentials are tools widely used to assess auditory cortex functions in clinical context. However, in cochlear implant users, electrophysiological measures are challenging due to implant-created artefacts in the EEG. Here, we used independent component analysis to reduce cochlear implant-related artefacts in event-related EEGs of…

  4. Cognitive correlates of visual neural plasticity in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahshan, Carol; Wynn, Jonathan K; Mathalon, Daniel H; Green, Michael F

    2017-03-20

    Neuroplasticity may be an important treatment target to improve the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia (SZ). Yet, it is poorly understood and difficult to assess. Recently, a visual high-frequency stimulation (HFS) paradigm that potentiates electroencephalography (EEG)-based visual evoked potentials (VEP) has been developed to assess neural plasticity in the visual cortex. Using this paradigm, we examined visual plasticity in SZ patients (N=64) and its correlations with clinical symptoms, neurocognition, functional capacity, and community functioning. VEPs were assessed prior to (baseline), and 2-, 4-, and 20-min after (Post-1, Post-2, and Post-3, respectively) 2min of visual HFS. Cluster-based permutation tests were conducted to identify time points and electrodes at which VEP amplitudes were significantly different after HFS. Compared to baseline, there was increased negativity between 140 and 227ms for the early post-HFS block (average of Post-1 and Post-2), and increased positivity between 180 and 281ms for the late post-HFS block (Post-3), at parieto-occipital and occipital electrodes. The increased negativity in the early post-HFS block did not correlate with any of the measures, whereas increased positivity in the late post-HFS block correlated with better neurocognitive performance. Results suggest that SZ patients exhibit both short- and long-term plasticity. The long-term plasticity effect, which was present 22min after HFS, was evident relatively late in the VEP, suggesting that neuroplastic changes in higher-order visual association areas, rather than earlier short-term changes in primary and secondary visual cortex, may be particularly important for the maintenance of neurocognitive function in SZ.

  5. Somatosensory evoked response: application in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available One technique used for short-latency somatosensory evoked response (SER is described. SER following nerve stimulation is a unique non-invasive, clinical test used to evaluate the somatosensory pathways. It tests the physiological function of the median nerve, the brachial plexus, the C6-7 cervical roots, cervical spinal cord, the cuneate nuclei, the medial lemniscus, the thalamus, and the contralateral sensory cortex. It has been shown to be a reliable and useful clinical test partiicularly in multiple sclerosis and comatose patients. The promising technique of SER following peroneal nerve stimulation is mentioned.

  6. Cholinergic pairing with visual activation results in long-term enhancement of visual evoked potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Il Kang

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh contributes to learning processes by modulating cortical plasticity in terms of intensity of neuronal activity and selectivity properties of cortical neurons. However, it is not known if ACh induces long term effects within the primary visual cortex (V1 that could sustain visual learning mechanisms. In the present study we analyzed visual evoked potentials (VEPs in V1 of rats during a 4-8 h period after coupling visual stimulation to an intracortical injection of ACh analog carbachol or stimulation of basal forebrain. To clarify the action of ACh on VEP activity in V1, we individually pre-injected muscarinic (scopolamine, nicotinic (mecamylamine, alpha7 (methyllycaconitine, and NMDA (CPP receptor antagonists before carbachol infusion. Stimulation of the cholinergic system paired with visual stimulation significantly increased VEP amplitude (56% during a 6 h period. Pre-treatment with scopolamine, mecamylamine and CPP completely abolished this long-term enhancement, while alpha7 inhibition induced an instant increase of VEP amplitude. This suggests a role of ACh in facilitating visual stimuli responsiveness through mechanisms comparable to LTP which involve nicotinic and muscarinic receptors with an interaction of NMDA transmission in the visual cortex.

  7. Effects of light deprivation on visual evoked potentials in migraine without aura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierelli Francesco

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms underlying the interictal habituation deficit of cortical visual evoked potentials (VEP in migraine are not well understood. Abnormal long-term functional plasticity of the visual cortex may play a role and it can be assessed experimentally by light deprivation (LD. Methods We have compared the effects of LD on VEP in migraine patients without aura between attacks (MO, n = 17 and in healthy volunteers (HV, n = 17. Six sequential blocks of 100 averaged VEP at 3.1 Hz were recorded before and after 1 hour of LD. We measured VEP P100 amplitude of the 1st block of 100 sweeps and its change over 5 sequential blocks of 100 responses. Results In HV, the consequence of LD was a reduction of 1st block VEP amplitude and of the normal habituation pattern. By contrast, in MO patients, the interictal habituation deficit was not significantly modified, although 1st block VEP amplitude, already lower than in HV before LD, further decreased after LD. Conclusions Light deprivation is thought to decrease both excitatory and subsequent inhibitory processes in visual cortex, which is in line with our findings in healthy volunteers. The VEP results in migraine patients suggest that early excitation was adequately suppressed, but not the inhibitory mechanisms occurring during long term stimulation and habituation. Accordingly, deficient intracortical inhibition is unlikely to be a primary factor in migraine pathophysiology and the habituation deficit.

  8. Primary Auditory Cortex Regulates Threat Memory Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigestrand, Mattis B.; Schiff, Hillary C.; Fyhn, Marianne; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Sears, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing threatening from nonthreatening stimuli is essential for survival and stimulus generalization is a hallmark of anxiety disorders. While auditory threat learning produces long-lasting plasticity in primary auditory cortex (Au1), it is not clear whether such Au1 plasticity regulates memory specificity or generalization. We used…

  9. Primary Auditory Cortex Regulates Threat Memory Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigestrand, Mattis B.; Schiff, Hillary C.; Fyhn, Marianne; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Sears, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing threatening from nonthreatening stimuli is essential for survival and stimulus generalization is a hallmark of anxiety disorders. While auditory threat learning produces long-lasting plasticity in primary auditory cortex (Au1), it is not clear whether such Au1 plasticity regulates memory specificity or generalization. We used…

  10. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A A ... forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word "plastic" ...

  11. Brain-immune interaction accompanying odor-evoked autobiographic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Bai, Yu; Yamakawa, Kaori; Toyama, Asako; Kashiwagi, Mitsuyoshi; Fukuda, Kazuyuki; Oshida, Akiko; Sanada, Kazue; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon in which a certain smell evokes a specific memory is known as the Proust phenomenon. Odor-evoked autobiographic memories are more emotional than those elicited by other sensory stimuli. The results of our previous study indicated that odor-evoked autobiographic memory accompanied by positive emotions has remarkable effects on various psychological and physiological activities, including the secretion of cytokines, which are immune-signaling molecules that modulate systemic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to clarify the neural substrates associated with the interaction between odor-evoked autobiographic memory and peripheral circulating cytokines. We recruited healthy male and female volunteers and investigated the association between brain responses and the concentration of several cytokines in the plasma by using positron emission tomography (PET) recordings when an autographic memory was evoked in participants by asking them to smell an odor that was nostalgic to them. Participants experienced positive emotions and autobiographic memories when nostalgic odors were presented to them. The levels of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), were significantly reduced after experiencing odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Subtraction analysis of PET images indicated that the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) were significantly activated during experiences of odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Furthermore, a correlation analysis indicated that activities of the mOFC and precuneus/PCC were negatively correlated with IFN-γ concentration. These results indicate that the neural networks including the precuneus/PCC and mOFC might regulate the secretion of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines during the experience of odor-evoked autobiographic memories accompanied with positive emotions.

  12. Modulation of excitability in human primary somatosensory and motor cortex by paired associative stimulation targeting the primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriváneková, Lucia; Lu, Ming-Kuei; Bliem, Barbara; Ziemann, Ulf

    2011-10-01

    Input from primary somatosensory cortex (S1) to primary motor cortex (M1) is important for high-level motor performance, motor skill learning and motor recovery after brain lesion. This study tested the effects of manipulating S1 excitability with paired associative transcranial stimulation (S1-PAS) on M1 excitability. Given the important role of S1 in sensorimotor integration, we hypothesized that changes in S1 excitability would be directly paralleled by changes in M1 excitability. We applied two established protocols (S1-PAS(LTP) and S1-PAS(LTD) ) to the left S1 to induce long-term potentiation (LTP)-like or long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity. S1 excitability was assessed by the early cortical components (N20-P25) of the median nerve somatosensory-evoked potential. M1 excitability was assessed by motor-evoked potential amplitude and short-interval intracortical inhibition. Effects of S1-PAS(LTP) were compared with those of a PAS(LTP) protocol targeting the left M1 (M1-PAS(LTP) ). S1-PAS(LTP) and S1-PAS(LTD) did not result in significant modifications of S1 or M1 excitability at the group level due to substantial interindividual variability. The individual S1-PAS-induced changes in S1 and M1 excitability showed no correlation. Furthermore, the individual changes in S1 and M1 excitability induced by S1-PAS(LTP) did not correlate with changes in M1 excitability induced by M1-PAS(LTP) . This demonstrates that the effects of S1-PAS in S1 are variable across individuals and, within a given individual, unrelated to those induced by S1-PAS or M1-PAS in M1. Potentially, this extends the opportunities of therapeutic PAS applications because M1-PAS 'non-responders' may well respond to S1-PAS.

  13. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...

  14. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  15. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.;

    2007-01-01

    to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  16. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin.

  17. Thalamic activation modulates the responses of neurons in rat primary auditory cortex: an in vivo intracellular recording study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Han

    Full Text Available Auditory cortical plasticity can be induced through various approaches. The medial geniculate body (MGB of the auditory thalamus gates the ascending auditory inputs to the cortex. The thalamocortical system has been proposed to play a critical role in the responses of the auditory cortex (AC. In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanism of the cortical activity, adopting an in vivo intracellular recording technique, recording from the primary auditory cortex (AI while presenting an acoustic stimulus to the rat and electrically stimulating its MGB. We found that low-frequency stimuli enhanced the amplitudes of sound-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs in AI neurons, whereas high-frequency stimuli depressed these auditory responses. The degree of this modulation depended on the intensities of the train stimuli as well as the intervals between the electrical stimulations and their paired sound stimulations. These findings may have implications regarding the basic mechanisms of MGB activation of auditory cortical plasticity and cortical signal processing.

  18. Projection from the perirhinal cortex to the frontal motor cortex in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyuhou, Shin ichi; Gemba, Hisae

    2002-03-01

    Stimulation of the anterior perirhinal cortex (PERa) induced marked surface-negative and depth-positive field potentials in the rat frontal motor cortex (MC) including the rostral and caudal forelimb areas. Injection of biotinylated dextran into the PERa densely labeled axon terminals in the superficial layers of the MC, where vigorous unit responses were evoked after PERa stimulation, indicated that the perirhinal-frontal projection preferentially activates the superficial layer neurons of the MC.

  19. Somatosensory evoked magnetic fields in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclin, E L; Rose, D F; Knight, J E; Orrison, W W; Davis, L E

    1994-12-01

    We used magnetoencephalography to evaluate areas of sensory cortex in patients with ischemic strokes involving the somatomotor system. We measured somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using a 7-channel neuromagnetometer and estimated the location of cortical responses to median nerve stimulation in 5 patients with cortical or subcortical strokes involving the somatomotor system. All patients underwent quantitative neurological examinations and a high resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. The estimated current dipoles were localized onto the patient's own MRI scan in all patients with measurable responses. The location of the estimated dipole was always in non-infarcted tissue in the anatomical region of the somatosensory cortex. In 1 patient the somatosensory dipole localized to a peninsula of cortex flanked by infarcted tissue. Single photon emission computed tomography found the localized area of cortex to have significant blood flow. The estimated current dipole strengths of somatosensory evoked fields from median nerve stimulation correlated significantly (r = 0.95, P graphesthesia). The combination of evoked magnetic field recording and magnetic resonance imaging is a promising non-invasive technology for studying brain function in patients with cerebrovascular disease.

  20. Synaptic plasticity in medial vestibular nucleus neurons: comparison with computational requirements of VOR adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R W Menzies

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR gain adaptation, a longstanding experimental model of cerebellar learning, utilizes sites of plasticity in both cerebellar cortex and brainstem. However, the mechanisms by which the activity of cortical Purkinje cells may guide synaptic plasticity in brainstem vestibular neurons are unclear. Theoretical analyses indicate that vestibular plasticity should depend upon the correlation between Purkinje cell and vestibular afferent inputs, so that, in gain-down learning for example, increased cortical activity should induce long-term depression (LTD at vestibular synapses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we expressed this correlational learning rule in its simplest form, as an anti-Hebbian, heterosynaptic spike-timing dependent plasticity interaction between excitatory (vestibular and inhibitory (floccular inputs converging on medial vestibular nucleus (MVN neurons (input-spike-timing dependent plasticity, iSTDP. To test this rule, we stimulated vestibular afferents to evoke EPSCs in rat MVN neurons in vitro. Control EPSC recordings were followed by an induction protocol where membrane hyperpolarizing pulses, mimicking IPSPs evoked by flocculus inputs, were paired with single vestibular nerve stimuli. A robust LTD developed at vestibular synapses when the afferent EPSPs coincided with membrane hyperpolarization, while EPSPs occurring before or after the simulated IPSPs induced no lasting change. Furthermore, the iSTDP rule also successfully predicted the effects of a complex protocol using EPSP trains designed to mimic classical conditioning. CONCLUSIONS: These results, in strong support of theoretical predictions, suggest that the cerebellum alters the strength of vestibular synapses on MVN neurons through hetero-synaptic, anti-Hebbian iSTDP. Since the iSTDP rule does not depend on post-synaptic firing, it suggests a possible mechanism for VOR adaptation without compromising gaze-holding and VOR

  1. Do studies on cortical plasticity provide a rationale for using non-invasive brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson's disease patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Giacomo

    2013-11-06

    Animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) have shown that key mechanisms of cortical plasticity such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) can be impaired by the PD pathology. In humans protocols of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as paired associative stimulation (PAS) and theta-burst stimulation (TBS), can be used to investigate cortical plasticity of the primary motor cortex. Through the amplitude of the motor evoked potential these transcranial magnetic stimulation methods allow to measure both LTP-like and LTD-like mechanisms of cortical plasticity. So far these protocols have reported some controversial findings when tested in PD patients. While various studies described evidence for reduced LTP- and LTD-like plasticity, others showed different results, demonstrating increased LTP-like and normal LTD-like plasticity. Recent evidence provided support to the hypothesis that these different patterns of cortical plasticity likely depend on the stage of the disease and on the concomitant administration of l-DOPA. However, it is still unclear how and if these altered mechanisms of cortical plasticity can be taken as a reliable model to build appropriate protocols aimed at treating PD symptoms by applying repetitive sessions of repetitive TMS (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The current article will provide an up-to-date overview of these issues together with some reflections on future studies in the field.

  2. Do studies on cortical plasticity provide a rationale for using non invasive brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eKoch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD have shown that key mechanisms of cortical plasticity such as long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD can be impaired by the PD pathology. In humans protocols of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as paired associative stimulation (PAS and theta burst stimulation (TBS, can be used to investigate cortical plasticity of the primary motor cortex. Through the amplitude of the motor evoked potential (MEP these transcranial magnetic stimulation methods allow to measure both LTP-like and LTD-like mechanisms of cortical plasticity. So far these protocols have reported some controversial findings when tested in PD patients. While various studies described evidence for reduced LTP- and LTD-like plasticity, others showed different results, demonstrating increased LTP-like and normal LTD-like plasticity. Recent evidence provided support to the hypothesis that these different patterns of cortical plasticity likely depend on the stage of the disease and on the concomitant administration of levo-dopa. However, it still unclear how and if these altered mechanisms of cortical plasticity can be taken as a reliable model to build appropriate protocols aimed at treating PD symptoms b

  3. Selecting and evoking innovators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The practical undertaking of selecting users to work as innovators and of evoking their creative potential is crucial, but underexposed in the literature on user involvement in design. This paper reports findings from a recent case of user-driven innovation, the FEEDBACK-project, where the authors...... prepared for and conducted selection of and collaboration with innovators. The outcome was successful in the sense that the innovators produced excellent foundation for conceptual interaction design by creating mock-ups and explanations incarnating their preferences, attitudes and habits. By referring...... to theories of learning we try to explain how our way of working with selection and evoking of innovators has contributed to this positive result and how our approach to user-driven innovation can be regarded as a way to combine democracy and creativity in design....

  4. Effect of the Nicotinic α4β2-receptor Partial Agonist Varenicline on Non-invasive Brain Stimulation-Induced Neuroplasticity in the Human Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsikadze, Giorgi; Paulus, Walter; Grundey, Jessica; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Nicotine alters cognitive functions in animals and humans most likely by modification of brain plasticity. In the human brain, it alters plasticity induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and paired associative stimulation (PAS), probably by interference with calcium-dependent modulation of the glutamatergic system. We aimed to test this hypothesis further by exploring the impact of the α4β2-nicotinic receptor partial agonist varenicline on focal and non-focal plasticity, induced by PAS and tDCS, respectively. We administered low (0.1 mg), medium (0.3 mg), and high (1.0 mg) single doses of varenicline or placebo medication before PAS or tDCS on the left motor cortex of 25 healthy non-smokers. Corticospinal excitability was monitored by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor evoked potential amplitudes up to 36 h after plasticity induction. Whereas low-dose varenicline had no impact on stimulation-induced neuroplasticity, medium-dose abolished tDCS-induced facilitatory after-effects, favoring focal excitatory plasticity. High-dose application preserved cathodal tDCS-induced excitability diminution and focal excitatory PAS-induced facilitatory plasticity. These results are comparable to the impact of nicotine receptor activation and might help to further explain the involvement of specific receptor subtypes in the nicotinic impact on neuroplasticity and cognitive functions in healthy subjects and patients with neuropsychiatric diseases.

  5. Cross-Modal Functional Reorganization of Visual and Auditory Cortex in Adult Cochlear Implant Users Identified with fNIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Chia; Sandmann, Pascale; Thorne, Jeremy D; Bleichner, Martin G; Debener, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users show higher auditory-evoked activations in visual cortex and higher visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex compared to normal hearing (NH) controls, reflecting functional reorganization of both visual and auditory modalities. Visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex is a maladaptive functional reorganization whereas auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex is beneficial for speech recognition in CI users. We investigated their joint influence on CI users' speech recognition, by testing 20 postlingually deafened CI users and 20 NH controls with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Optodes were placed over occipital and temporal areas to measure visual and auditory responses when presenting visual checkerboard and auditory word stimuli. Higher cross-modal activations were confirmed in both auditory and visual cortex for CI users compared to NH controls, demonstrating that functional reorganization of both auditory and visual cortex can be identified with fNIRS. Additionally, the combined reorganization of auditory and visual cortex was found to be associated with speech recognition performance. Speech performance was good as long as the beneficial auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex was higher than the visual-evoked activation in the auditory cortex. These results indicate the importance of considering cross-modal activations in both visual and auditory cortex for potential clinical outcome estimation.

  6. Cross-Modal Functional Reorganization of Visual and Auditory Cortex in Adult Cochlear Implant Users Identified with fNIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Chia Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant (CI users show higher auditory-evoked activations in visual cortex and higher visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex compared to normal hearing (NH controls, reflecting functional reorganization of both visual and auditory modalities. Visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex is a maladaptive functional reorganization whereas auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex is beneficial for speech recognition in CI users. We investigated their joint influence on CI users’ speech recognition, by testing 20 postlingually deafened CI users and 20 NH controls with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS. Optodes were placed over occipital and temporal areas to measure visual and auditory responses when presenting visual checkerboard and auditory word stimuli. Higher cross-modal activations were confirmed in both auditory and visual cortex for CI users compared to NH controls, demonstrating that functional reorganization of both auditory and visual cortex can be identified with fNIRS. Additionally, the combined reorganization of auditory and visual cortex was found to be associated with speech recognition performance. Speech performance was good as long as the beneficial auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex was higher than the visual-evoked activation in the auditory cortex. These results indicate the importance of considering cross-modal activations in both visual and auditory cortex for potential clinical outcome estimation.

  7. Sleep deprivation affects somatosensory cortex excitability as tested through median nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoni, Maurizio; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Moroni, Fabio; D'Atri, Aurora; Donarelli, Stefania; Fanelli, Stefania; Gizzi Torriglia, Isabella; Lauri, Giulia; Ferrara, Michele; Marzano, Cristina; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Bramanti, Placido; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Changes of cortical excitability after sleep deprivation (SD) in humans have been investigated mostly in motor cortex, while there is little empirical evidence concerning somatosensory cortex, and its plastic changes across SD. To assess excitability of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and EEG voltage topographical characteristics associated with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) during SD. Across 41 h of SD, 16 healthy subjects participated in 4 experimental sessions (11.00 a.m. and 11.00 p.m. of the 1st and 2nd day) with: a) subjective sleepiness ratings; b) EEG recordings; c) SEPs recordings; d) behavioral vigilance responses. A clear enhancement of cortical excitability after SD was indexed by: (a) an amplitude increase of different SEPs component in S1; (b) higher voltage in occipital (around 35-43 ms) and fronto-central areas (around 47-62 ms). Circadian fluctuations did not affect cortical excitability. Voltage changes in S1 were strongly related with post-SD fluctuations of subjective and behavioral sleepiness. Sleep may have a role in keeping cortical excitability at optimal (namely below potentially dangerous) levels for the human brain, rebalancing progressive changes in cortical responsiveness to incoming inputs occurred during time spent awake. On the other hand, higher level of cortical responsiveness after sleep loss may be one of the mechanisms accounting for post-SD alterations in vigilance and behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Shaping motor cortex plasticity through proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzino, Laura; Pelosin, Elisa; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bassolino, Michela; Pozzo, Thierry; Bove, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Short-term upper limb disuse induces a hemispheric unbalance between the primary motor cortices (M1s). However, it is still unclear whether these changes are mainly attributable to the absence of voluntary movements or to the reduction of proprioceptive information. The goal of this work was to investigate the role of proprioception in modulating hemispheric balance during a short-term right arm immobilization. We evaluated the 2 M1s excitability and the interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) between M1s in 3 groups of healthy subjects. Two groups received during the immobilization a proprioceptive (P-VIB, 80 Hz) and tactile (T-VIB, 30 Hz) vibration to the right hand, respectively. Another group did not receive any conditioning sensory inputs (No-VIB). We found that in the No-VIB and in the T-VIB groups immobilization induced a decrease of left M1 excitability and IHI from left to right hemisphere and an increase of right M1 excitability and IHI from right to left hemisphere. Differently, only a partial decrease in left M1 excitability, no change in right M1 excitability and in IHI was observed in the P-VIB group. Our findings demonstrate that the maintenance of dynamic proprioceptive inputs in an immobilized arm through muscle vibration can prevent the hemispheric unbalance induced by short-term limb disuse.

  9. Theory of Synaptic Plasticity in Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-23

    1977), found, using intracellular recording, that geniculo- cortical synapses on inhibitory interneurons are more resistant to monocular deprivation...the CAI population EPSP that persisted without signs of recovery for > 1 hour following cessation of the conditioning stimulation. This long-term

  10. Precision mapping of the vibrissa representation within murine primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Per M; Mateo, Celine; Kleinfeld, David

    2016-10-05

    The ability to form an accurate map of sensory input to the brain is an essential aspect of interpreting functional brain signals. Here, we consider the somatotopic map of vibrissa-based touch in the primary somatosensory (vS1) cortex of mice. The vibrissae are represented by a Manhattan-like grid of columnar structures that are separated by inter-digitating septa. The development, dynamics and plasticity of this organization is widely used as a model system. Yet, the exact anatomical position of this organization within the vS1 cortex varies between individual mice. Targeting of a particular column in vivo therefore requires prior mapping of the activated cortical region, for instance by imaging the evoked intrinsic optical signal (eIOS) during vibrissa stimulation. Here, we describe a procedure for constructing a complete somatotopic map of the vibrissa representation in the vS1 cortex using eIOS. This enables precise targeting of individual cortical columns. We found, using C57BL/6 mice, that although the precise location of the columnar field varies between animals, the relative spatial arrangement of the columns is highly preserved. This finding enables us to construct a canonical somatotopic map of the vibrissae in the vS1 cortex. In particular, the position of any column, in absolute anatomical coordinates, can be established with near certainty when the functional representations in the vS1 cortex for as few as two vibrissae have been mapped with eIOS.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Diffusion barriers evoked in the rat cortex by reactive astrogliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roitbak, T; Syková, E

    1999-10-01

    Changes in extracellular space (ECS) diffusion parameters in astrogliotic tissue around a unilateral cortical stab wound were determined from concentration-time profiles of tetramethylammonium (TMA(+)) using TMA(+)-selective microelectrodes. Three diffusion parameters-ECS volume fraction alpha (alpha = ECS volume/ total tissue volume), tortuosity lambda (lambda(2) = D/ADC; where D is the free and ADC is the apparent diffusion coefficient of TMA(+) in the brain), and nonspecific TMA(+)uptake k'-were determined at 3, 7, 21, and 35 days postwounding (dpw), in the hemispheres ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion. Following diffusion experiments, tissue sections were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and chondroitin-sulphate proteoglycans (CSPG). In the area 300-1000 micron around the wound, alpha was increased at 3, 7, and 21 dpw by about 20% but returned to control values at 35 dpw; lambda was increased at all four intervals, reaching a maximum at 7 dpw. k' was lower than in the contralateral hemisphere at 7, 21, and 35 dpw. Measurements 1,500-2,000 micron from the wound revealed only an increase in lambda at 7 dpw. The time course of changes in ECS diffusion parameters closely correlated with increased staining for GFAP and CSPG. Our results show that astrogliosis significantly changes the diffusion properties of nervous tissue, making it less permissive. Both hypertrophied astrocytic processes and an enhanced formation of some extracellular matrix molecules could affect, through changes in the diffusion of molecules in the ECS, neuron-glia communication, "cross-talk" between synapses, extrasynaptic transmission, and regenerative processes.

  12. Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation over the primary somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon Tsang

    Full Text Available Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation (rPAS involves repeat pairing of peripheral nerve stimulation and Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS pulses at a 5 Hz frequency. RPAS over primary motor cortex (M1 operates with spike-timing dependent plasticity such that increases in corticospinal excitability occur when the nerve and TMS pulse temporally coincide in cortex. The present study investigates the effects of rPAS over primary somatosensory cortex (SI which has not been performed to date. In a series of experiments, rPAS was delivered over SI and M1 at varying timing intervals between the nerve and TMS pulse based on the latency of the N20 somatosensory evoked potential (SEP component within each participant (intervals for SI-rPAS: N20, N20-2.5 ms, N20 + 2.5 ms, intervals for M1-rPAS: N20, N20+5 ms. Changes in SI physiology were measured via SEPs (N20, P25, N20-P25 and SEP paired-pulse inhibition, and changes in M1 physiology were measured with motor evoked potentials and short-latency afferent inhibition. Measures were obtained before rPAS and at 5, 25 and 45 minutes following stimulation. Results indicate that paired-pulse inhibition and short-latency afferent inhibition were reduced only when the SI-rPAS nerve-TMS timing interval was set to N20-2.5 ms. SI-rPAS over SI also led to remote effects on motor physiology over a wider range of nerve-TMS intervals (N20-2.5 ms - N20+2.5 ms during which motor evoked potentials were increased. M1-rPAS increased motor evoked potentials and reduced short-latency afferent inhibition as previously reported. These data provide evidence that, similar to M1, rPAS over SI is spike-timing dependent and is capable of exerting changes in SI and M1 physiology.

  13. Parietal transcranial direct current stimulation modulates primary motor cortex excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Urbina, Guadalupe Nathzidy; Batsikadze, Giorgi; Molero-Chamizo, Andrés; Paulus, Walter; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    The posterior parietal cortex is part of the cortical network involved in motor learning and is structurally and functionally connected with the primary motor cortex (M1). Neuroplastic alterations of neuronal connectivity might be an important basis for learning processes. These have however not been explored for parieto-motor connections in humans by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Exploring tDCS effects on parieto-motor cortical connectivity might be functionally relevant, because tDCS has been shown to improve motor learning. We aimed to explore plastic alterations of parieto-motor cortical connections by tDCS in healthy humans. We measured neuroplastic changes of corticospinal excitability via motor evoked potentials (MEP) elicited by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after tDCS over the left posterior parietal cortex (P3), and 3 cm posterior or lateral to P3, to explore the spatial specificity of the effects. Furthermore, short-interval intracortical inhibition/intracortical facilitation (SICI/ICF) over M1, and parieto-motor cortical connectivity were obtained before and after P3 tDCS. The results show polarity-dependent M1 excitability alterations primarily after P3 tDCS. Single-pulse TMS-elicited MEPs, M1 SICI/ICF at 5 and 7 ms and 10 and 15 ms interstimulus intervals (ISIs), and parieto-motor connectivity at 10 and 15 ms ISIs were all enhanced by anodal stimulation. Single pulse-TMS-elicited MEPs, and parieto-motor connectivity at 10 and 15 ms ISIs were reduced by cathodal tDCS. The respective corticospinal excitability alterations lasted for at least 120 min after stimulation. These results show an effect of remote stimulation of parietal areas on M1 excitability. The spatial specificity of the effects and the impact on parietal cortex-motor cortex connections suggest a relevant connectivity-driven effect.

  14. Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M Goodwill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration accompanies the process of natural ageing, reducing the ability to perform functional daily activities. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS alters neuronal excitability and motor performance; however its beneficial effect on the induction of primary motor cortex (M1 plasticity in older adults is unclear. Moreover, little is known as to whether the tDCS electrode arrangement differentially affects M1 plasticity and motor performance in this population. In a double-blinded, cross-over trial, we compared unilateral, bilateral and sham tDCS combined with visuomotor tracking, on M1 plasticity and motor performance of the non-dominant upper limb, immediately post and 30 minutes following stimulation. We found (a unilateral and bilateral tDCS decreased tracking error by 12-22% at both time points; with sham decreasing tracking error by 10% at 30 minutes only, (b at both time points, motor evoked potentials (MEPs were facilitated (38-54% and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI was released (21-36% for unilateral and bilateral conditions relative to sham, (c there were no differences between unilateral and bilateral conditions for any measure. These findings suggest that tDCS modulated elements of M1 plasticity, which improved motor performance irrespective of the electrode arrangement. The results provide preliminary evidence indicating that tDCS is a safe non-invasive tool to preserve or improve neurological function and motor control in older adults.

  15. Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Alicia M; Reynolds, John; Daly, Robin M; Kidgell, Dawson J

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration accompanies the process of natural aging, reducing the ability to perform functional daily activities. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) alters neuronal excitability and motor performance; however its beneficial effect on the induction of primary motor cortex (M1) plasticity in older adults is unclear. Moreover, little is known as to whether the tDCS electrode arrangement differentially affects M1 plasticity and motor performance in this population. In a double-blinded, cross-over trial, we compared unilateral, bilateral and sham tDCS combined with visuomotor tracking, on M1 plasticity and motor performance of the non-dominant upper limb, immediately post and 30 min following stimulation. We found (a) unilateral and bilateral tDCS decreased tracking error by 12-22% at both time points; with sham decreasing tracking error by 10% at 30 min only, (b) at both time points, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were facilitated (38-54%) and short-interval intracortical inhibition was released (21-36%) for unilateral and bilateral conditions relative to sham, (c) there were no differences between unilateral and bilateral conditions for any measure. These findings suggest that tDCS modulated elements of M1 plasticity, which improved motor performance irrespective of the electrode arrangement. The results provide preliminary evidence indicating that tDCS is a safe non-invasive tool to preserve or improve neurological function and motor control in older adults.

  16. The involvement of primary motor cortex in mental rotation revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenegger, Christoph; Herwig, Uwe; Jäncke, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    We used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left primary hand motor cortex and motor evoked potentials of the contralateral right abductor pollicis brevis to probe motor cortex excitability during a standard mental rotation task. Based on previous findings we tested the following hypotheses. (i) Is the hand motor cortex activated more strongly during mental rotation than during reading aloud or reading silently? The latter tasks have been shown to increase motor cortex excit...

  17. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickins, Daina S E; Sale, Martin V; Kamke, Marc R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years) underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  18. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daina S. E. Dickins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  19. Cholinergic modulation of local pyramid-interneuron synapses exhibiting divergent short-term dynamics in rat sensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Robert B; Reyes, Alex D; Aoki, Chiye

    2008-06-18

    Acetylcholine (ACh) influences attention, short-term memory, and sleep/waking transitions, through its modulatory influence on cortical neurons. It has been proposed that behavioral state changes mediated by ACh result from its selective effects on the intrinsic membrane properties of diverse cortical inhibitory interneuron classes. ACh has been widely shown to reduce the strength of excitatory (glutamatergic) synapses. But past studies using extracellular stimulation have not been able to examine the effects of ACh on local cortical connections important for shaping sensory processing. Here, using dual intracellular recording in slices of rat somatosensory cortex, we show that reduction of local excitatory input to inhibitory neurons by ACh is coupled to differences in the underlying short-term synaptic plasticity (STP). In synapses with short-term depression, where successive evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs; >5 Hz) usually diminish in strength (short-term depression), cholinergic agonist (5-10 microM carbachol (CCh)) reduced the amplitude of the first EPSP in an evoked train, but CCh's net effect on subsequent EPSPs rapidly diminished. In synapses where successive EPSPs increased in strength (facilitation), the effect of CCh on later EPSPs in an evoked train became progressively greater. The effect of CCh on both depressing and facilitating synapses was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, 1-5 microM atropine. It is suggested that selective influence on STP contributes fundamentally to cholinergic "switching" between cortical rhythms that underlie different behavioral states.

  20. Plasticity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lubliner, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The aim of Plasticity Theory is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the contemporary state of knowledge in basic plasticity theory and to its applications. It treats several areas not commonly found between the covers of a single book: the physics of plasticity, constitutive theory, dynamic plasticity, large-deformation plasticity, and numerical methods, in addition to a representative survey of problems treated by classical methods, such as elastic-plastic problems, plane plastic flow, and limit analysis; the problem discussed come from areas of interest to mechanical, structural, and

  1. International Evoked Potentials Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The past decade has seen great progress in the measurement of evoked potentials in man; a steady increase in our understanding of their charac­ teristics, their origins and their usefulness; and a growing application in the field of clinical diagnosis. The topic is a truly multidisciplinary one. Important research contributions have been made by workers of many different backgrounds and clinical applications span the specialities. This book represents a revised and updated version of the work originally presented at the international evoked potential symposium held in Nottingham 4-6 1978. The Nottingham Symposium provided a forum for a state-of-the-art discussion amongst workers from many different disciplines and from many different countries. For each major topic in the field an expert review set the scene for discussion of current research presentations. This format is retained in the book: the chapters in Part A provide the context in which the research presented in Part B is set. The task of selecting m...

  2. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...... reveals presence of a true emission from all ears tested. It is concluded that the cochlear echo can be recorded in normal-hearing newborns with an extremely low rate of type I errors.......Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar...

  3. Tonotopic organization of human auditory association cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, S; Williamson, S J; Karron, D

    1994-11-07

    Neuromagnetic studies of responses in human auditory association cortex for tone burst stimuli provide evidence for a tonotopic organization. The magnetic source image for the 100 ms component evoked by the onset of a tone is qualitatively similar to that of primary cortex, with responses lying deeper beneath the scalp for progressively higher tone frequencies. However, the tonotopic sequence of association cortex in three subjects is found largely within the superior temporal sulcus, although in the right hemisphere of one subject some sources may be closer to the inferior temporal sulcus. The locus of responses for individual subjects suggests a progression across the cortical surface that is approximately proportional to the logarithm of the tone frequency, as observed previously for primary cortex, with the span of 10 mm for each decade in frequency being comparable for the two areas.

  4. Biomaterial-engineering and neurobiological approaches for regenerating the injured cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsuki Ajioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex is responsible for higher functions of the central nervous system (CNS, such as movement, sensation, and cognition. When the cerebral cortex is severely injured, these functions are irreversibly impaired. Although recent neurobiological studies reveal that the cortex has the potential for regeneration, therapies for functional recovery face some technological obstacles. Biomaterials have been used to evoke regenerative potential and promote regeneration in several tissues, including the CNS. This review presents a brief overview of new therapeutic strategies for cortical regeneration from the perspectives of neurobiology and biomaterial engineering, and discusses a promising technology for evoking the regenerative potential of the cerebral cortex.

  5. Evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, George H

    2013-11-01

    Before the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evoked potentials (EPs)-visual evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brain stem auditory evoked responses-were commonly used to determine a second site of disease in patients being evaluated for possible multiple sclerosis (MS). The identification of an area of the central nervous system showing abnormal conduction was used to supplement the abnormal signs identified on the physical examination-thus identifying the "multiple" in MS. This article is a brief overview of additional ways in which central nervous system (CNS) physiology-as measured by EPs-can still contribute value in the management of MS in the era of MRIs.

  6. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Rietman; J.-P. Sommeijer; C.N. Levelt; J.A. Heimel; A.B. Brussaard; J.G.G. Borst; Y. Elgersma; N. Galjart; G.T. van der Horst; C.M. Pennartz; A.B. Smit; B.M. Spruijt; M. Verhage; C.I. de Zeeuw

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been devoted to the identification of genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. To discover new candidate genes, we have reexamined data from one such study on ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in recombinant inbred BXD mouse strains. We have correlated

  7. Visual evoked potentials in rubber factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, O P; Kumar, V

    1997-01-01

    Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (pVEP) were studied in 39 male rubber factory workers in the age range of 18-55 years and 20 control subjects (aged 18-46 years) not exposed to the rubber factory environment. Results revealed that 20 (51%) rubber factory workers had abnormal latencies of wave P1 (dominant component of pVEP) as per accepted criteria of 99% tolerance limit set for the control group (i.e. any value above mean +3 SD of control was considered abnormal). The section-wise per cent distribution of abnormalities was vulcanization (83%), tubing (75%), calendering (60%), loading (38%) and mixing (14%). This study provides electrophysiological evidence that rubber factory environments affect the conduction processes in optical pathways from their origin in the retina to striate cortex. However, this study has its limitations in not identifying the specific chemical(s) causing these changes in VEP.

  8. Bayesian analysis of MEG visual evoked responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-04-01

    The authors developed a method for analyzing neural electromagnetic data that allows probabilistic inferences to be drawn about regions of activation. The method involves the generation of a large number of possible solutions which both fir the data and prior expectations about the nature of probable solutions made explicit by a Bayesian formalism. In addition, they have introduced a model for the current distributions that produce MEG and (EEG) data that allows extended regions of activity, and can easily incorporate prior information such as anatomical constraints from MRI. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of the Bayesian approach with actual data, they analyzed MEG data from a visual evoked response experiment. They compared Bayesian analyses of MEG responses to visual stimuli in the left and right visual fields, in order to examine the sensitivity of the method to detect known features of human visual cortex organization. They also examined the changing pattern of cortical activation as a function of time.

  9. Neuronal Rac1 is required for learning-evoked neurogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haditsch, Ursula; Anderson, Matthew P; Freewoman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    neurons for normal synaptic plasticity in vivo, and here we show that selective loss of neuronal Rac1 also impairs the learning-evoked increase in neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus. Earlier work has indicated that experience elevates the abundance of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus...... primarily by enhancing the survival of neurons produced just before the learning event. Loss of Rac1 in mature projection neurons did reduce learning-evoked neurogenesis but, contrary to our expectations, these effects were not mediated by altering the survival of young neurons in the hippocampus. Instead......, loss of neuronal Rac1 activation selectively impaired a learning-evoked increase in the proliferation and accumulation of neural precursors generated during the learning event itself. This indicates that experience-induced alterations in neurogenesis can be mechanistically resolved into two effects: (1...

  10. Multi-sensory integration in brainstem and auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Koehler, Seth D; Shore, Susan E

    2012-11-16

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of a physical sound stimulus. It is thought to arise from aberrant neural activity within central auditory pathways that may be influenced by multiple brain centers, including the somatosensory system. Auditory-somatosensory (bimodal) integration occurs in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), where electrical activation of somatosensory regions alters pyramidal cell spike timing and rates of sound stimuli. Moreover, in conditions of tinnitus, bimodal integration in DCN is enhanced, producing greater spontaneous and sound-driven neural activity, which are neural correlates of tinnitus. In primary auditory cortex (A1), a similar auditory-somatosensory integration has been described in the normal system (Lakatos et al., 2007), where sub-threshold multisensory modulation may be a direct reflection of subcortical multisensory responses (Tyll et al., 2011). The present work utilized simultaneous recordings from both DCN and A1 to directly compare bimodal integration across these separate brain stations of the intact auditory pathway. Four-shank, 32-channel electrodes were placed in DCN and A1 to simultaneously record tone-evoked unit activity in the presence and absence of spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5) electrical activation. Bimodal stimulation led to long-lasting facilitation or suppression of single and multi-unit responses to subsequent sound in both DCN and A1. Immediate (bimodal response) and long-lasting (bimodal plasticity) effects of Sp5-tone stimulation were facilitation or suppression of tone-evoked firing rates in DCN and A1 at all Sp5-tone pairing intervals (10, 20, and 40 ms), and greater suppression at 20 ms pairing-intervals for single unit responses. Understanding the complex relationships between DCN and A1 bimodal processing in the normal animal provides the basis for studying its disruption in hearing loss and tinnitus models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tinnitus Neuroscience.

  11. A Comprehensive Review on Methodologies Employed for Visual Evoked Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Ruchi; Bokariya, Pradeep; Singh, Smita; Singh, Ramji

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is fundamental to how we appreciate our environment and interact with others. The visual evoked potential (VEP) is among those evoked potentials that are the bioelectric signals generated in the striate and extrastriate cortex when the retina is stimulated with light which can be recorded from the scalp electrodes. In the current paper, we provide an overview of the various modalities, techniques, and methodologies which have been employed for visual evoked potentials over the years. In the first part of the paper, we cast a cursory glance on the historical aspect of evoked potentials. Then the growing clinical significance and advantages of VEPs in clinical disorders have been briefly described, followed by the discussion on the earlier and currently available methods for VEPs based on the studies in the past and recent times. Next, we mention the standards and protocols laid down by the authorized agencies. We then summarize the recently developed techniques for VEP. In the concluding section, we lay down prospective research directives related to fundamental and applied aspects of VEPs as well as offering perspectives for further research to stimulate inquiry into the role of visual evoked potentials in visual processing impairment related disorders.

  12. Postictal inhibition of the somatosensory cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Jovanovic, Marina; Atkins, Mary Doreen

    2011-01-01

    Transient suppression of the motor cortex and of the speech areas cause well-described postictal phenomena following seizures involving the respective cortical areas. Pain is a rare symptom in epileptic seizures. We present a patient with painful tonic seizures in the left leg. The amplitude...... of the cortical component of the somatosensory evoked potential following stimulation of the left tibial nerve was reduced immediately after the seizure. Our findings suggest that the excitability of the sensory cortex is transiently reduced following a seizure involving the somatosensory area....

  13. Layer-specific endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission onto principal neurons in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjuan; Wang, Laijian; Li, Shuo; Tie, Xiaoxiu; Jiang, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Visually induced endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission (iLTD) mediates the maturation of GABAergic release in layer 2/3 of visual cortex. Here we examined whether the maturation of GABAergic transmission in other layers of visual cortex also requires endocannabinoids. The developmental plasticity of GABAergic neurotransmission onto the principal neurons in different layers of mouse visual cortex was examined in cortical slices by whole-cell recordings of inhibitory postsynaptic currents evoked by presynaptic inhibitory inputs. Theta burst stimulation of GABAergic inputs induced an endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission onto pyramidal cells in layer 2/3 from postnatal day (P)10 to 30 and in layer 5 from P10 to 40, whereas that of GABAergic inputs did not induce iLTD onto star pyramidal neurons in layer 4 at any time postnatally, indicating that this plasticity is laminar-specific. The developmental loss of iLTD paralleled the maturation of GABAergic inhibition in both layer 2/3 and layer 5. Visual deprivation delayed the developmental loss of iLTD in layers 3 and 5 during a critical period, while 2 days of light exposure eliminated iLTD in both layers. Furthermore, the GABAergic synapses in layers 2/3 and 5 did not normally mature in the type 1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice, whereas those in layer 4 did not require endocannabinoid receptor for maturation. These results suggest that visually induced endocannabinoid-dependent iLTD mediates the maturation of GABAergic release in extragranular layer rather than in granular layer of mouse visual cortex.

  14. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces.

  15. Adjective metaphors evoke negative meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Maki; Utsumi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Previous metaphor studies have paid much attention to nominal metaphors and predicative metaphors, but little attention has been given to adjective metaphors. Although some studies have focused on adjective metaphors, they only examined differences in the acceptability of various types of adjective metaphors. This paper explores the cognitive effects evoked by adjective metaphors. Three psychological experiments revealed that (1) adjective metaphors, especially those modified by color adjectives, tend to evoke negative effect; (2) although the meanings of metaphors are basically affected by the meanings of their vehicles, when a vehicle has a neutral meaning, negative meanings are evoked most frequently for adjective metaphors compared to nominal and predicative metaphors; (3) negative meanings evoked by adjective metaphors are related to poeticness, and poetic metaphors evoke negative meanings more easily than less poetic metaphors. Our research sheds new light on studies of the use of metaphor, which is one of the most basic human cognitive abilities.

  16. Achieving Presence through Evoked Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh S. ePillai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sense of ‘Presence’ (evolving from ‘telepresence’ has always been associated with virtual reality research and is still an exceptionally mystifying constituent. Now the study of presence clearly spans over various disciplines associated with cognition. This paper attempts to put forth a concept that argues that it’s an experience of an 'Evoked Reality’ (illusion of reality that triggers an ‘Evoked Presence’ (sense of presence in our minds. A Three Pole Reality Model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. The poles range from Dream Reality to Simulated Reality with Primary (Physical Reality at the center. To demonstrate the relationship between Evoked Reality and Evoked Presence, a Reality-Presence Map is developed. We believe that this concept of Evoked Reality and the proposed model may have significant applications in the study of presence, and in exploring the possibilities of not just virtual reality but also what we call ‘reality’.

  17. Fast-spiking GABA circuit dynamics in the auditory cortex predict recovery of sensory processing following peripheral nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Jennifer; Polley, Daniel B

    2017-03-21

    Cortical neurons remap their receptive fields and rescale sensitivity to spared peripheral inputs following sensory nerve damage. To address how these plasticity processes are coordinated over the course of functional recovery, we tracked receptive field reorganization, spontaneous activity, and response gain from individual principal neurons in the adult mouse auditory cortex over a 50-day period surrounding either moderate or massive auditory nerve damage. We related the day-by-day recovery of sound processing to dynamic changes in the strength of intracortical inhibition from parvalbumin-expressing (PV) inhibitory neurons. Whereas the status of brainstem-evoked potentials did not predict the recovery of sensory responses to surviving nerve fibers, homeostatic adjustments in PV-mediated inhibition during the first days following injury could predict the eventual recovery of cortical sound processing weeks later. These findings underscore the potential importance of self-regulated inhibitory dynamics for the restoration of sensory processing in excitatory neurons following peripheral nerve injuries.

  18. Arm movement maps evoked by cortical magnetic stimulation in a robotic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Lush, L M; Judkins, T N; Wittenberg, G F

    2010-02-03

    Many neurological diseases result in a severe inability to reach for which there is no proven therapy. Promising new interventions to address reaching rehabilitation using robotic training devices are currently under investigation in clinical trials but the neural mechanisms that underlie these interventions are not understood. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may be used to probe such mechanisms quickly and non-invasively, by mapping muscle and movement representations in the primary motor cortex (M1). Here we investigate movement maps in healthy young subjects at rest using TMS in the robotic environment, with the goal of determining the range of TMS accessible movements, as a starting point for the study of cortical plasticity in combination with robotic therapy. We systematically stimulated the left motor cortex of 14 normal volunteers while the right hand and forearm rested in the cradle of a two degree-of-freedom planar rehabilitation robot (IMT). Maps were created by applying 10 stimuli at each of nine locations (3x3 cm(2) grid) centered on the M1 movement hotspot for each subject, defined as the stimulation location that elicited robot cradle movements of the greatest distance. TMS-evoked movement kinematics were measured by the robotic encoders and ranged in magnitude from 0 to 3 cm. Movement maps varied by subject and by location within a subject. However, movements were very consistent within a single stimulation location for a given subject. Movement vectors remained relatively constant (limited to arm movements in the robotic reaching trainer, and thus may provide a real-time, non-invasive platform for neurophysiology based evaluation and therapy in motor rehabilitation settings. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Plastic Jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  20. Changes in auditory perceptions and cortex resulting from hearing recovery after extended congenital unilateral hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill B Firszt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monaural hearing induces auditory system reorganization. Imbalanced input also degrades time-intensity cues for sound localization and signal segregation for listening in noise. While there have been studies of bilateral auditory deprivation and later hearing restoration (e.g. cochlear implants, less is known about unilateral auditory deprivation and subsequent hearing improvement. We investigated effects of long-term congenital unilateral hearing loss on localization, speech understanding, and cortical organization following hearing recovery. Hearing in the congenitally affected ear of a 41 year old female improved significantly after stapedotomy and reconstruction. Pre-operative hearing threshold levels showed unilateral, mixed, moderately-severe to profound hearing loss. The contralateral ear had hearing threshold levels within normal limits. Testing was completed prior to, and three and nine months after surgery. Measurements were of sound localization with intensity-roved stimuli and speech recognition in various noise conditions. We also evoked magnetic resonance signals with monaural stimulation to the unaffected ear. Activation magnitudes were determined in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex regions via an interrupted single event design. Hearing improvement following 40 years of congenital unilateral hearing loss resulted in substantially improved sound localization and speech recognition in noise. Auditory cortex also reorganized. Contralateral auditory cortex responses were increased after hearing recovery and the extent of activated cortex was bilateral, including a greater portion of the posterior superior temporal plane. Thus, prolonged predominant monaural stimulation did not prevent auditory system changes consequent to restored binaural hearing. Results support future research of unilateral auditory deprivation effects and plasticity, with consideration for length of deprivation, age at hearing correction, degree and type

  1. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of serotonin release in the rat brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Betz, R; Göthert, M

    1988-05-01

    Rat brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-serotonin were superfused with physiological salt solution (containing citalopram, an inhibitor of serotonin uptake) and the effect of histamine on the electrically (3 Hz) evoked 3H overflow was studied. Histamine decreased the evoked overflow in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of histamine was antagonized by impromidine and burimamide, but was not affected by pheniramine, ranitidine, metitepine and phentolamine. Given alone, impromidine facilitated the evoked overflow, whereas burimamide, pheniramine and ranitidine had no effect. The results suggest that histamine inhibits serotonin release in the rat brain cortex via histamine H3 receptors, which may be located presynaptically.

  2. Metaplasticity in human primary somatosensory cortex: effects on physiology and tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christina B; Lulic, Tea; Bailey, Aaron Z; Mackenzie, Tanner N; Mi, Yi Qun; Tommerdahl, Mark; Nelson, Aimee J

    2016-05-01

    Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) over human primary motor cortex evokes plasticity and metaplasticity, the latter contributing to the homeostatic balance of excitation and inhibition. Our knowledge of TBS-induced effects on primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is limited, and it is unknown whether TBS induces metaplasticity within human SI. Sixteen right-handed participants (6 females, mean age 23 yr) received two TBS protocols [continuous TBS (cTBS) and intermittent TBS (iTBS)] delivered in six different combinations over SI in separate sessions. TBS protocols were delivered at 30 Hz and were as follows: a single cTBS protocol, a single iTBS protocol, cTBS followed by cTBS, iTBS followed by iTBS, cTBS followed by iTBS, and iTBS followed by cTBS. Measures included the amplitudes of the first and second somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) via median nerve stimulation, their paired-pulse ratio (PPR), and temporal order judgment (TOJ). Dependent measures were obtained before TBS and at 5, 25, 50, and 90 min following stimulation. Results indicate similar effects following cTBS and iTBS; increased amplitudes of the second SEP and PPR without amplitude changes to SEP 1, and impairments in TOJ. Metaplasticity was observed such that TOJ impairments following a single cTBS protocol were abolished following consecutive cTBS protocols. Additionally, consecutive iTBS protocols altered the time course of effects when compared with a single iTBS protocol. In conclusion, 30-Hz cTBS and iTBS protocols delivered in isolation induce effects consistent with a TBS-induced reduction in intracortical inhibition within SI. Furthermore, cTBS- and iTBS-induced metaplasticity appear to follow homeostatic and nonhomeostatic rules, respectively.

  3. Metaplasticity in human primary somatosensory cortex: effects on physiology and tactile perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christina B.; Lulic, Tea; Bailey, Aaron Z.; Mackenzie, Tanner N.; Mi, Yi Qun; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) over human primary motor cortex evokes plasticity and metaplasticity, the latter contributing to the homeostatic balance of excitation and inhibition. Our knowledge of TBS-induced effects on primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is limited, and it is unknown whether TBS induces metaplasticity within human SI. Sixteen right-handed participants (6 females, mean age 23 yr) received two TBS protocols [continuous TBS (cTBS) and intermittent TBS (iTBS)] delivered in six different combinations over SI in separate sessions. TBS protocols were delivered at 30 Hz and were as follows: a single cTBS protocol, a single iTBS protocol, cTBS followed by cTBS, iTBS followed by iTBS, cTBS followed by iTBS, and iTBS followed by cTBS. Measures included the amplitudes of the first and second somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) via median nerve stimulation, their paired-pulse ratio (PPR), and temporal order judgment (TOJ). Dependent measures were obtained before TBS and at 5, 25, 50, and 90 min following stimulation. Results indicate similar effects following cTBS and iTBS; increased amplitudes of the second SEP and PPR without amplitude changes to SEP 1, and impairments in TOJ. Metaplasticity was observed such that TOJ impairments following a single cTBS protocol were abolished following consecutive cTBS protocols. Additionally, consecutive iTBS protocols altered the time course of effects when compared with a single iTBS protocol. In conclusion, 30-Hz cTBS and iTBS protocols delivered in isolation induce effects consistent with a TBS-induced reduction in intracortical inhibition within SI. Furthermore, cTBS- and iTBS-induced metaplasticity appear to follow homeostatic and nonhomeostatic rules, respectively. PMID:26984422

  4. Mechanisms of human motor cortex facilitation induced by subthreshold 5-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Martin; Rummel, Milena; Norden, Christoph; Rothkegel, Holger; Lang, Nicolas; Paulus, Walter

    2013-06-01

    Our knowledge about the mechanisms of human motor cortex facilitation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is still incomplete. Here we used pharmacological conditioning with carbamazepine, dextrometorphan, lorazepam, and placebo to elucidate the type of plasticity underlying this facilitation, and to probe if mechanisms reminiscent of long-term potentiation are involved. Over the primary motor cortex of 10 healthy subjects, we applied biphasic rTMS pulses of effective posterior current direction in the brain. We used six blocks of 200 pulses at 5-Hz frequency and 90% active motor threshold intensity and controlled for corticospinal excitability changes using motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes and latencies elicited by suprathreshold pulses before, in between, and after rTMS. Target muscle was the dominant abductor digiti minimi muscle; we coregistered the dominant extensor carpi radialis muscle. We found a lasting facilitation induced by this type of rTMS. The GABAergic medication lorazepam and to a lesser extent the ion channel blocker carbamazepine reduced the MEP facilitation after biphasic effective posteriorly oriented rTMS, whereas the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antagonist dextrometorphan had no effect. Our main conclusion is that the mechanism of the facilitation induced by biphasic effective posterior rTMS is more likely posttetanic potentiation than long-term potentiation. Additional findings were prolonged MEP latency under carbamazepine, consistent with sodium channel blockade, and larger MEP amplitudes from extensor carpi radialis under lorazepam, suggesting GABAergic involvement in the center-surround balance of excitability.

  5. Topography of synchronization of somatosensory evoked potentials elicited by stimulation of the sciatic nerve in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng eQu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Traditionally, the topography of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs is generated based on amplitude and latency. However, this operation focuses on the physical morphology and field potential-power, so it suffers from difficulties in performing identification in an objective manner. In this study, measurement of the synchronization of SEPs is proposed as a method to explore brain functional networks as well as the plasticity after peripheral nerve injury. Method: SEPs elicited by unilateral sciatic nerve stimulation in twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats in the normal group were compared with SEPs evoked after unilateral sciatic nerve hemisection in four peripheral nerve injured SD rats. The characterization of synchronized networks from SEPs was conducted using equal-time correlation, correlation matrix analysis, and comparison to randomized surrogate data. Eigenvalues of the correlation matrix were used to identify the clusters of functionally synchronized neuronal activity, and the participation index (PI was calculated to indicate the involvement of each channel in the cluster. The PI value at the knee point of the PI histogram was used as a threshold to demarcate the cortical boundary. Results: Ten out of the twelve normal rats showed only one synchronized brain network. The remaining two normal rats showed one strong and one weak network. In the peripheral nerve injured group, only one synchronized brain network was found in each rat. In the normal group, all network shapes appear regular and the network is largely contained in the posterior cortex. In the injured group, the network shapes appear irregular, the network extends anteriorly and posteriorly, and the network area is significantly larger. There are considerable individual variations in the shape and location of the network after peripheral nerve injury. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect functional brain networks. Compared to the results of the

  6. A PET activation study of brush-evoked allodynia in patients with nerve injury pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kupers, Ron; Svensson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    allodynia. Nine patients with peripheral nerve injury were scanned during rest, brush-evoked allodynia, and brushing of normal contralateral skin. PET data were analyzed for the whole group and for single subjects. Allodynic stimulation activated the contralateral orbitofrontal cortex (BA 11) in every...... computational demands of processing a mixed sensation of brush and pain....

  7. The cortical and sub-cortical network of sensory evoked response in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraman, M; Hellriegel, H; Groppa, S; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find the cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence in healthy subjects during electrical stimulation of right median nerve at wrist. The multitaper method was used to estimate the power and coherence spectrum followed by the source analysis method dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) to find the highest coherent source for the basic frequency 3 Hz and the complete cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence in healthy subjects. The highest coherent source for the basic frequency was in the posterior parietal cortex for all the subjects. The cortical and sub-cortical network comprised of the primary sensory motor cortex (SI), secondary sensory motor cortex (SII), frontal cortex and medial pulvinar nucleus in the thalamus. The cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence was found successfully with a 64-channel EEG system. The sensory evoked coherence is involved with a thalamo-cortical network in healthy subjects.

  8. Recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 at 9.4T static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrubla, Jorge; Neuner, Irene; Hahn, David; Boers, Frank; Shah, N Jon

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4 T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4 T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4 T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP). Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4 T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4 T were not different from those recorded at 0 T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4 T when compared to recordings at 0 T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses.

  9. Recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 at 9.4T static magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Arrubla

    Full Text Available Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4 T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4 T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4 T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP. Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4 T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4 T were not different from those recorded at 0 T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4 T when compared to recordings at 0 T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses.

  10. Short-term monocular patching boosts the patched eye’s response in visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiawei; Baker, Daniel H.; Simard, Mathieu; Saint-Amour, Dave; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Several recent studies have demonstrated that following short-term monocular deprivation in normal adults, the patched eye, rather than the unpatched eye, becomes stronger in subsequent binocular viewing. However, little is known about the site and nature of the underlying processes. In this study, we examine the underlying mechanisms by measuring steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) as an index of the neural contrast response in early visual areas. Methods: The experiment consisted of three consecutive stages: a pre-patching EEG recording (14 minutes), a monocular patching stage (2.5 hours) and a post-patching EEG recording (14 minutes; started immediately after the removal of the patch). During the patching stage, a diffuser (transmits light but not pattern) was placed in front of one randomly selected eye. During the EEG recording stage, contrast response functions for each eye were measured. Results: The neural responses from the patched eye increased after the removal of the patch, whilst the responses from the unpatched eye remained the same. Such phenomena occurred under both monocular and dichoptic viewing conditions. Conclusions: We interpret this eye dominance plasticity in adult human visual cortex as homeostatic intrinsic plasticity regulated by an increase of contrast-gain in the patched eye. PMID:26410580

  11. Loss of long-term depression in the insular cortex after tail amputation in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The insular cortex (IC) is an important forebrain structure involved in pain perception and taste memory formation. Using a 64-channel multi-electrode array system, we recently identified and characterized two major forms of synaptic plasticity in the adult mouse IC: long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In this study, we investigate injury-related metaplastic changes in insular synaptic plasticity after distal tail amputation. We found that tail amputation in adult mice produced a selective loss of low frequency stimulation-induced LTD in the IC, without affecting (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-evoked LTD. The impaired insular LTD could be pharmacologically rescued by priming the IC slices with a lower dose of DHPG application, a form of metaplasticity which involves activation of protein kinase C but not protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. These findings provide important insights into the synaptic mechanisms of cortical changes after peripheral amputation and suggest that restoration of insular LTD may represent a novel therapeutic strategy against the synaptic dysfunctions underlying the pathophysiology of phantom pain. PMID:24398034

  12. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Gutjar, Swetlana; Ter Horst, Gert J; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  13. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle R Dalenberg

    Full Text Available In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively. After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  14. Cortical modulation of short-latency TMS-evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica eVeniero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation - electroencephalogram (TMS-EEG co-registration offers the opportunity to test reactivity of brain areas across distinct conditions through TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs. Several TEPs have been described, their functional meaning being largely unknown. In particular, short-latency potentials peaking at 5 (P5 and 8 (N8 ms after the TMS pulse have been recently described, but because of their huge amplitude, the problem of whether their origin is cortical or not has been opened. To gain information about these components, we employed a protocol that modulates primary motor cortex excitability (MI through an exclusively cortical phenomena: low frequency stimulation of premotor area (PMC. TMS was applied simultaneously with EEG recording from 70 electrodes. Amplitude of TEPs evoked by 200 single-pulses TMS delivered over MI at 110% of resting motor threshold was measured before and after applying 900 TMS conditioning stimuli to left premotor cortex with 1 Hz repetition rate. Single subject analyses showed reduction in TEPs amplitude after PMC conditioning in a sample of participants and increase in TEPs amplitude in two subjects. No effects were found on corticospinal excitability as recorded by motor evoked potentials (MEPs. Furthermore, correlation analysis showed an inverse relation between the effects of the conditioning protocol on P5-N8 complex amplitude and MEPs amplitude. Because the effects of the used protocol have been ascribed to a cortical interaction between premotor area and MI, we suggest that despite the sign of P5-N8 amplitude modulation is not consistent across participant, this modulation could indicate, at least in part, their cortical origin. We conclude that with an accurate experimental procedure early-latency components can be used to evaluate the reactivity of the stimulated cortex.

  15. [Evoked potentials and inhalation anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, A; Russ, W; Hempelmann, G

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of evoked potentials can be affected by various factors including volatile anaesthetics. These effects have to be considered in order to give correct interpretations of the obtained data. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) and auditory evoked potentials (AEP) will show strong alterations under general anaesthesia whereas brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) are slightly affected. The effects of nitrous oxide, halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane on somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) after median nerve stimulation were studied in 35 healthy adult patients. pCO2 and tympanic membrane temperature were held constant. Simultaneous cervical and cortical SEP recording was performed using surface electrodes. After induction of anaesthesia SEP were recorded during normoventilation with 100% oxygen and after inhalation of 66.6% nitrous oxide. 10 patients received halothane at inspired concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0%. After nitrous oxide had been replaced by oxygen, halothane was reduced in steps of 0.5%. SEP were recorded at the end of each period (15 min). Equipotent doses of enflurane or isoflurane were administered to 15 and 10 patients, respectively. Nitrous oxide depressed early cortical SEP amplitude. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane caused dose dependent increases of latencies. Reduction of amplitude was most pronounced with isoflurane. Using high doses of enflurane in oxygen cortical SEP showed unusual high amplitudes associated with marked increases of latencies. Even under high concentrations of volatile anaesthetics cervical SEP were minimally affected. The effects of anaesthetic gases have to be considered when SEP are recorded intraoperatively.

  16. Plastics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  17. Humans with Type-2 Diabetes Show Abnormal Long-Term Potentiation-Like Cortical Plasticity Associated with Verbal Learning Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Peter J.; Schilberg, Lukas; Brem, Anna-Katharine; Saxena, Sadhvi; Wong, Bonnie; Cypess, Aaron M.; Horton, Edward S.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Background Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) accelerates cognitive aging and increases risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Rodent models of T2DM show altered synaptic plasticity associated with reduced learning and memory. Humans with T2DM also show cognitive deficits, including reduced learning and memory, but the relationship of these impairments to the efficacy of neuroplastic mechanisms has never been assessed. Objective Our primary objective was to compare mechanisms of cortical plasticity in humans with and without T2DM. Our secondary objective was to relate plasticity measures to standard measures of cognition. Methods A prospective cross-sectional cohort study was conducted on 21 adults with T2DM and 15 demographically-similar non-diabetic controls. Long-term potentiation-like plasticity was assessed in primary motor cortex by comparing the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation before and after intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS). Plasticity measures were compared between groups and related to neuropsychological scores. Results In T2DM, iTBS-induced modulation of MEPs was significantly less than controls, even after controlling for potential confounds. Furthermore, in T2DM, modulation of MEPs 10-min post-iTBS was significantly correlated with Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Task (RAVLT) performance. Conclusion Humans with T2DM show abnormal cortico-motor plasticity that is correlated with reduced verbal learning. Since iTBS after-effects and the RAVLT are both NMDA receptor-dependent measures, their relationship in T2DM may reflect brain-wide alterations in the efficacy of NMDA receptors. These findings offer novel mechanistic insights into the brain consequences of T2DM and provide a reliable means to monitor brain health and evaluate the efficacy of clinical interventions. PMID:27636847

  18. Disruption of the Perineuronal Net in the Hippocampus or Medial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylin, Michael J.; Orsi, Sara A.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2013-01-01

    The perineuronal net (PNN) surrounds neurons in the central nervous system and is thought to regulate developmental plasticity. A few studies have shown an involvement of the PNN in hippocampal plasticity and memory storage in adult animals. In addition to the hippocampus, plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been demonstrated to…

  19. St. John's wort may relieve negative effects of stress on spatial working memory by changing synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimiuk, Emil; Holownia, Adam; Braszko, Jan J

    2011-04-01

    Beneficial effects of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) in the treatment of stress-evoked memory impairment were recently described. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that St. John's wort alleviates stress- and corticosterone-related memory impairments by restoring levels of synaptic plasticity proteins: neuromoduline (GAP-43) and synaptophysin (SYP) in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Stressed and corticosterone-treated rats displayed a decline in the acquisition of spatial working memory (p < 0.001) in the Barnes maze (BM). Chronic administration of H. perforatum (350 mg kg(-1) for 21 days), potently and significantly improved processing of spatial information in the stressed and corticosterone-injected rats (p < 0.001). Also, St Johns' wort statistically significantly (p < 0.05) increased levels of GAP-43 and SYP, respectively in the hippocampi and prefrontal cortex as measured by western immunoblotting. We found that H. perforatum prevented the deleterious effects of both chronic restraint stress and prolonged corticosterone administration on working memory measured in the BM test. The herb significantly (p < 0.01) improved hippocampus-dependent spatial working memory in comparison with control and alleviated some other negative effects of stress on cognitive functions. These findings increase our understanding of the reaction of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex to stressful assaults and provide new insight into the possible actions of H. perforatum in the treatment of patients with impaired adaptation to environmental stressors and simultaneously suffering from cognitive impairment.

  20. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDimou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27 year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralised to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced phantom limb pain.

  1. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert;

    2016-01-01

    of sinusoidal TMS pulses elicited either a posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP) directed current in M1. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded before and after qTBS to probe changes in cortico-spinal excitability. PA-qTBS at 666 Hz caused a decrease in PA-MEP amplitudes, whereas AP...... in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1.......Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex (M...

  2. The Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Neuroplasticity within the Motor Cortex following Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Murdoch

    Full Text Available Aerobic exercise is associated with enhanced plasticity in the motor cortex of healthy individuals, but the effect of aerobic exercise on neuroplasticity following a stroke is unknown.The aim of this study was to compare corticomotoneuronal excitability and neuroplasticity in the upper limb cortical representation following a single session of low intensity lower limb cycling, or a rest control condition.We recruited chronic stroke survivors to take part in three experimental conditions in a randomised, cross-over design. Corticomotoneuronal excitability was examined using transcranial magnetic stimulation to elicit motor evoked potentials in the affected first dorsal interosseus muscle. Following baseline measures, participants either cycled on a stationary bike at a low exercise intensity for 30 minutes, or remained resting in a seated position for 30 minutes. Neuroplasticity within the motor cortex was then examined using an intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS paradigm. During the third experimental condition, participants cycled for the 30 minutes but did not receive any iTBS.Twelve participants completed the study. We found no significant effect of aerobic exercise on corticomotoneuronal excitability when compared to the no exercise condition (P > 0.05 for all group and time comparisons. The use of iTBS did not induce a neuroplastic-like response in the motor cortex with or without the addition of aerobic exercise.Our results suggest that following a stroke, the brain may be less responsive to non-invasive brain stimulation paradigms that aim to induce short-term reorganisation, and aerobic exercise was unable to induce or improve this response.

  3. INFLUENCE OF DANCE TRAINING ON SACCULOCOLLIC PATHWAY: VESTIBULAR EVOKED MYOGENIC POTENTIALS (VEMP) AS AN OBJECTIVE TOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Swathi; Sathish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT : Auditory system is shaped by experience and training. Training (s ensory experience) induces neurophysiologic changes & plasticity in normal hearing individuals, hearing loss patients, hearing aid users and cochlear implanted subjects. Not only speech stimulus, but music also brings about functional and structural organi zation of the brain in musician compared to non - musicians. The Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are a biphasic in...

  4. Inhibition in the Human Auditory Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Inui

    Full Text Available Despite their indispensable roles in sensory processing, little is known about inhibitory interneurons in humans. Inhibitory postsynaptic potentials cannot be recorded non-invasively, at least in a pure form, in humans. We herein sought to clarify whether prepulse inhibition (PPI in the auditory cortex reflected inhibition via interneurons using magnetoencephalography. An abrupt increase in sound pressure by 10 dB in a continuous sound was used to evoke the test response, and PPI was observed by inserting a weak (5 dB increase for 1 ms prepulse. The time course of the inhibition evaluated by prepulses presented at 10-800 ms before the test stimulus showed at least two temporally distinct inhibitions peaking at approximately 20-60 and 600 ms that presumably reflected IPSPs by fast spiking, parvalbumin-positive cells and somatostatin-positive, Martinotti cells, respectively. In another experiment, we confirmed that the degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of the prepulse, but not on the amplitude of the prepulse-evoked cortical response, indicating that the prepulse-evoked excitatory response and prepulse-evoked inhibition reflected activation in two different pathways. Although many diseases such as schizophrenia may involve deficits in the inhibitory system, we do not have appropriate methods to evaluate them; therefore, the easy and non-invasive method described herein may be clinically useful.

  5. Evoked Potentials and Human Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, John P.; Schafer, Edward W. P.

    Evidence of a relationship between the electrical responses of the human brain and psychometric measure of intelligence is presented. These involuntary cortical responses, known as average evoked potentials are considered to be the electrical signs of information processing by the brain. The time delays of these responses from presentation of a…

  6. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments.

  7. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, J.R.; Gutjar, S.; Horst, ter G.J.; Graaf, de C.; Renken, R.; Jager, G.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Th

  8. Sex, beauty and the orbitofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishai, Alumit

    2007-02-01

    Face perception is mediated by a distributed neural system in the human brain. Attention, memory and emotion modulate the neural activation evoked by faces, however the effects of gender and sexual orientation are currently unknown. To test whether subjects would respond more to their sexually-preferred faces, we scanned 40 hetero- and homosexual men and women whilst they assessed facial attractiveness. Behaviorally, regardless of their gender and sexual orientation, all subjects similarly rated the attractiveness of both male and female faces. Consistent with our hypothesis, a three-way interaction between stimulus gender, beauty and the sexual preference of the subject was found in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In heterosexual women and homosexual men, attractive male faces elicited stronger activation than attractive female faces, whereas in heterosexual men and homosexual women, attractive female faces evoked stronger activation than attractive male faces. These findings suggest that the OFC represents the value of salient sexually-relevant faces, irrespective of their reproductive fitness.

  9. Plastic bronchitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Vinoth, Bharathi; Kuruvilla, Sarah; Sivakumar, Kothandam

    2015-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis, a rare but serious clinical condition, commonly seen after Fontan surgeries in children, may be a manifestation of suboptimal adaptation to the cavopulmonary circulation with unfavorable hemodynamics...

  10. Saturation thresholds of evoked neural and hemodynamic responses in awake and asleep rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schei, Jennifer L.; Van Nortwick, Amy S.; Meighan, Peter C.; Rector, David M.

    2011-03-01

    Neural activation generates a hemodynamic response to the localized region replenishing nutrients to the area. Changes in vigilance state have been shown to alter the vascular response where the vascular response is muted during wake compared to quiet sleep. We tested the saturation thresholds of the neurovascular response in the auditory cortex during wake and sleep by chronically implanting rats with an EEG electrode, a light emitting diode (LED, 600 nm), and photodiode to simultaneously measure evoked response potentials (ERPs) and evoked hemodynamic responses. We stimulated the cortex with a single speaker click delivered at random intervals 2-13 s at varied stimulus intensities ranging from 45-80 dB. To further test the potential for activity related saturation, we sleep deprived animals for 2, 4, or 6 hours and recorded evoked responses during the first hour recovery period. With increasing stimulus intensity, integrated ERPs and evoked hemodynamic responses increased; however the hemodynamic response approached saturation limits at a lower stimulus intensity than the ERP. With longer periods of sleep deprivation, the integrated ERPs did not change but evoked hemodynamic responses decreased. There may be physical limits in cortical blood delivery and vascular compliance, and with extended periods of neural activity during wake, vessels may approach these limits.

  11. Plastic Fishes

    CERN Multimedia

    Trettnak, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In terms of weight, the plastic pollution in the world’s oceans is estimated to be around 300,000 tonnes. This plastic comes from both land-based and ocean-based sources. A lecture at CERN by chemist Wolfgang Trettnak addressed this issue and highlighted the role of art in raising people’s awareness. The slideshow below gives you a taste of the artworks by Wolfgang Trettnak and Margarita Cimadevila.

  12. Plastic Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    履之

    1994-01-01

    Already ubiquitous in homes and cars, plastic is now appearing inbridges. An academic-industrial consortium based at the University ofCalifornia in San Diego is launching a three-year research program aimed atdeveloping the world’s first plastic highway bridge, a 450-foot span madeentirely from glass-,carbon,and polymer-fiber-reinforced composite mate-rials, the stuff of military aircraft. It will cross Interstate 5 to connect thetwo sides of the school’s campus.

  13. Abnormal sensorimotor plasticity in migraine without aura patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierelli, Francesco; Iacovelli, Elisa; Bracaglia, Martina; Serrao, Mariano; Coppola, Gianluca

    2013-09-01

    The period between migraine attacks is characterized by paradoxical responses to repetitive sensory and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Abnormal long-term cortical functional plasticity may play a role and can be assessed experimentally by paired associative stimulation (PAS), in which somatosensory peripheral nerve stimuli are followed by TMS of the motor cortex. Changes in motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes were recorded in 16 migraine without aura patients (MO) and 15 healthy volunteers (HV) before and after PAS, which consisted of 90 peripheral electrical right ulnar nerve stimulations and subsequent TMS pulses over the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle activation site with a delay of 10 ms (excitability depressing) or 25 ms (excitability enhancing). As a control experiment of the 31 subjects studied, 8 (4 MO and 4 HV) also underwent PAS10 earlier, the recording of somatosensory high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) reflecting thalamocortical activation (early HFOs). Although PAS10 reduced MEP amplitudes in HV (-17.7%), it significantly increased amplitudes in MO (+35.9%). Although in HV MEP amplitudes were significantly potentiated (+55.1) after PAS25, only a slight, nonsignificant increase was observed in MO (+18.8%). In the control experiment, performed on 8 subjects pooled together, Pearson's correlation showed an inverse relationship between the percentage of MEP amplitude changes after PAS10 and early HFO amplitudes (r=-0.81; P=.01). Because we observed that the more deficient the long-term PAS-induced change, the more the thalamocortical activation decreased, we hypothesize that the abnormalities in long-term cortical plasticity observed in the interictal period between migraine episodes could be due to altered thalamic control.

  14. Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity after activation of subcortical pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M Schulz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicuculline (BIC was ejected into the superior colliculus (SC to disinhibit visual pathways to the dopamine cells and striatum. Repetitive cortical stimulation (~60; 0.2 Hz was then paired with postsynaptic spike discharge induced by an intracellular current pulse, with each pairing followed 250 ms later by a light flash to the contralateral eye (n=13. Changes in PSPs, measured as the maximal slope normalised to 5 min pre, ranged from potentiation (~120% to depression (~80%. The determining factor was the relative timing between PSP components and spike: PSP components coinciding or closely following the spike tended towards potentiation, whereas PSP components preceding the spike were depressed. Importantly, STDP was only seen in experiments with successful BIC-mediated disinhibition (n=10. Cortico-striatal high-frequency stimulation (50 pulses at 100 Hz followed 100 ms later by a light flash did not induce more robust synaptic plasticity (n=9. However, an elevated post-light spike rate correlated with depression across plasticity protocols (R2=0.55, p=0.009, n=11 active neurons. These results confirm that the direction of cortico-striatal plasticity is determined by the timing of pre- and postsynaptic activity and that synaptic modification is dependent on the activation of additional subcortical inputs.

  15. Peripheral sounds rapidly activate visual cortex: evidence from electrocorticography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brang, David; Towle, Vernon L; Suzuki, Satoru; Hillyard, Steven A; Di Tusa, Senneca; Dai, Zhongtian; Tao, James; Wu, Shasha; Grabowecky, Marcia

    2015-11-01

    Neurophysiological studies with animals suggest that sounds modulate activity in primary visual cortex in the presence of concurrent visual stimulation. Noninvasive neuroimaging studies in humans have similarly shown that sounds modulate activity in visual areas even in the absence of visual stimuli or visual task demands. However, the spatial and temporal limitations of these noninvasive methods prevent the determination of how rapidly sounds activate early visual cortex and what information about the sounds is relayed there. Using spatially and temporally precise measures of local synaptic activity acquired from depth electrodes in humans, we demonstrate that peripherally presented sounds evoke activity in the anterior portion of the contralateral, but not ipsilateral, calcarine sulcus within 28 ms of sound onset. These results suggest that auditory stimuli rapidly evoke spatially specific activity in visual cortex even in the absence of concurrent visual stimulation or visual task demands. This rapid auditory-evoked activation of primary visual cortex is likely to be mediated by subcortical pathways or direct cortical projections from auditory to visual areas.

  16. Remodeling of retrotransposon elements during epigenetic induction of adult visual cortical plasticity by HDAC inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennartsson, Andreas; Arner, Erik; Fagiolini, Michela

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The capacity for plasticity in the adult brain is limited by the anatomical traces laid down during early postnatal life. Removing certain molecular brakes, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs), has proven to be effective in recapitulating juvenile plasticity in the mature visual cortex...... and reactivate plasticity in the adult cortex. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with HDAC inhibitors increases accessibility to enhancers and repetitive elements underlying brain-specific gene expression and reactivation of visual cortical plasticity....

  17. GREEN PLASTIC: A NEW PLASTIC FOR PACKAGING

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Pankaj Kumar*, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a brief idea about a new type of plastic called as bio-plastic or green plastic. Plastic is used as a packaging material for various products, but this plastic is made up of non renewable raw materials. There are various disadvantages of using conventional plastic like littering, CO2 production, non-degradable in nature etc. To overcome these problems a new type of plastic is discovered called bio-plastic or green plastic. Bio-plastic is made from renewable resources and also...

  18. Localizing evoked and induced responses to faces using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Gavin; Singh, Krish D

    2014-05-01

    A rich pattern of responses in frequency, time and space are known to be generated in the visual cortex in response to faces. Recently, a number of studies have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to try to record these responses non-invasively - in many cases using source analysis techniques based on the beamforming method. Here we sought both to characterize best practice for measuring face-specific responses using MEG beamforming, and to determine whether the results produced by the beamformer match evidence from other modalities. We measured activity to visual presentation of face stimuli and phase-scrambled control stimuli, and performed source analyses of both induced and evoked responses using Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry. We localized the gamma-band response to bilateral lateral occipital cortex, and both the gamma-band response and the M170-evoked response to the right fusiform gyrus. Differences in the gamma-band response between faces and scrambled stimuli were confined to the frequency range 50-90 Hz; gamma-band activity at higher frequencies did not differ between the two stimulus categories. We additionally identified a component of the M220-evoked response - localized to the parieto-occipital sulcus - which was enhanced for scrambled vs. unscrambled faces. These findings help to establish that MEG beamforming can localize face-specific responses in time, frequency and space with good accuracy (when validated against established findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging and intracranial recordings), as well as contributing to the establishment of best methodological practice for the use of the beamformer method to measure face-specific responses.

  19. Representation of Reward Feedback in Primate Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eBrosch

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that auditory cortex is plastic on different time scales and that this plasticity is driven by the reinforcement that is used to motivate subjects to learn or to perform an auditory task. Motivated by these findings, we study in detail properties of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that is related to reward feedback. We recorded from the auditory cortex of two monkeys while they were performing an auditory categorization task. Monkeys listened to a sequence of tones and had to signal when the frequency of adjacent tones stepped in downward direction, irrespective of the tone frequency and step size. Correct identifications were rewarded with either a large or a small amount of water. The size of reward depended on the monkeys' performance in the previous trial: it was large after a correct trial and small after an incorrect trial. The rewards served to maintain task performance. During task performance we found three successive periods of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that reflected (1 the reward expectancy for each trial, (2 the reward size received and (3 the mismatch between the expected and delivered reward. These results, together with control experiments suggest that auditory cortex receives reward feedback that could be used to adapt auditory cortex to task requirements. Additionally, the results presented here extend previous observations of non-auditory roles of auditory cortex and shows that auditory cortex is even more cognitively influenced than lately recognized.

  20. Representation of reward feedback in primate auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Michael; Selezneva, Elena; Scheich, Henning

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that auditory cortex is plastic on different time scales and that this plasticity is driven by the reinforcement that is used to motivate subjects to learn or to perform an auditory task. Motivated by these findings, we study in detail properties of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that is related to reward feedback. We recorded from the auditory cortex of two monkeys while they were performing an auditory categorization task. Monkeys listened to a sequence of tones and had to signal when the frequency of adjacent tones stepped in downward direction, irrespective of the tone frequency and step size. Correct identifications were rewarded with either a large or a small amount of water. The size of reward depended on the monkeys' performance in the previous trial: it was large after a correct trial and small after an incorrect trial. The rewards served to maintain task performance. During task performance we found three successive periods of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that reflected (1) the reward expectancy for each trial, (2) the reward-size received, and (3) the mismatch between the expected and delivered reward. These results, together with control experiments suggest that auditory cortex receives reward feedback that could be used to adapt auditory cortex to task requirements. Additionally, the results presented here extend previous observations of non-auditory roles of auditory cortex and shows that auditory cortex is even more cognitively influenced than lately recognized.

  1. Acute aerobic exercise modulates primary motor cortex inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Ronan A; Coxon, James P; Cirillo, John; Glenny, Helen; Gant, Nicholas; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-12-01

    Aerobic exercise can enhance neuroplasticity although presently the neural mechanisms underpinning these benefits remain unclear. One possible mechanism is through effects on primary motor cortex (M1) function via down-regulation of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The aim of the present study was to examine how corticomotor excitability (CME) and M1 intracortical inhibition are modulated in response to a single bout of moderate intensity aerobic exercise. Ten healthy right-handed adults were participants. Single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied over left M1 to obtain motor-evoked potentials in the right flexor pollicis brevis. We examined CME, cortical silent period (SP) duration, short- and long-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI, LICI), and late cortical disinhibition (LCD), before and after acute aerobic exercise (exercise session) or an equivalent duration without exercise (control session). Aerobic exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer for 30 min at a workload equivalent to 60 % of maximal cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 peak; heart rate reserve = 75 ± 3 %, perceived exertion = 13.5 ± 0.7). LICI was reduced at 10 (52 ± 17 %, P = 0.03) and 20 min (27 ± 8 %, P = 0.03) post-exercise compared to baseline (13 ± 4 %). No significant changes in CME, SP duration, SICI or LCD were observed. The present study shows that GABAB-mediated intracortical inhibition may be down-regulated after acute aerobic exercise. The potential effects this may have on M1 plasticity remain to be determined.

  2. Effects of aging on motor cortex excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, A; Profice, P; Tonali, P A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Ranieri, F; Di Lazzaro, V

    2006-05-01

    To determine whether aging is associated with changes in excitability of the cerebral cortex, we evaluated the excitability of the motor cortex with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We compared TMS related measures obtained in a group of young people with those of a group of old people. Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude was significantly smaller in older than in younger controls (1.3+/-0.8 mV versus 2.7+/-1.1 mV; p<0.0071). Mean cortical silent period (CSP) duration was shorter in older than in younger controls (87+/-29 ms versus 147+/-39 ms; p<0.0071). SP duration/MEP amplitude ratios were similar in both groups. Our results are consistent with an impaired efficiency of some intracortical circuits in old age.

  3. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebatch, J G; Rosengren, S M; Welgampola, M S

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a short-latency potential evoked through activation of vestibular receptors using sound or vibration. It is generated by modulated electromyographic signals either from the sternocleidomastoid muscle for the cervical VEMP (cVEMP) or the inferior oblique muscle for the ocular VEMP (oVEMP). These reflexes appear to originate from the otolith organs and thus complement existing methods of vestibular assessment, which are mainly based upon canal function. This review considers the basis, methodology, and current applications of the cVEMP and oVEMP in the assessment and diagnosis of vestibular disorders, both peripheral and central. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Achieving Presence through Evoked Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Jayesh S; Schmidt, Colin; Richir, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The sense of "Presence" (evolving from "telepresence") has always been associated with virtual reality research and is still an exceptionally mystifying constituent. Now the study of presence clearly spans over various disciplines associated with cognition. This paper attempts to put forth a concept that argues that it's an experience of an "Evoked Reality (ER)" (illusion of reality) that triggers an "Evoked Presence (EP)" (sense of presence) in our minds. A Three Pole Reality Model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. The poles range from Dream Reality to Simulated Reality with Primary (Physical) Reality at the center. To demonstrate the relationship between ER and EP, a Reality-Presence Map is developed. We believe that this concept of ER and the proposed model may have significant applications in the study of presence, and in exploring the possibilities of not just virtual reality but also what we call "reality."

  5. State-dependent and timing-dependent bidirectional associative plasticity in the human SMA-M1 network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Noritoshi; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Murakami, Takenobu; Bliem, Barbara; Lu, Ming-Kuei; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Ziemann, Ulf

    2011-10-26

    The supplementary motor area (SMA-proper) plays a key role in the preparation and execution of voluntary movements. Anatomically, SMA-proper is densely reciprocally connected to primary motor cortex (M1), but neuronal coordination within the SMA-M1 network and its modification by external perturbation are not well understood. Here we modulated the SMA-M1 network using MR-navigated multicoil associative transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects. Changes in corticospinal excitability were assessed by recording motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude bilaterally in a hand muscle. We found timing-dependent bidirectional Hebbian-like MEP changes during and for at least 30 min after paired associative SMA-M1 stimulation. MEP amplitude increased if SMA stimulation preceded M1 stimulation by 6 ms, but decreased if SMA stimulation lagged M1 stimulation by 15 ms. This associative plasticity in the SMA-M1 network was highly topographically specific because paired associative stimulation of pre-SMA and M1 did not result in any significant MEP change. Furthermore, associative plasticity in the SMA-M1 network was strongly state-dependent because it required priming by near-simultaneous M1 stimulation to occur. We conclude that timing-dependent bidirectional associative plasticity is demonstrated for the first time at the systems level of a human corticocortical neuronal network. The properties of this form of plasticity are fully compatible with spike-timing-dependent plasticity as defined at the cellular level. The necessity of priming may reflect the strong interhemispheric connectivity of the SMA-M1 network. Findings are relevant for better understanding reorganization and potentially therapeutic modification of neuronal coordination in the SMA-M1 network after cerebral lesions such as stroke.

  6. Differential modulation of motor cortical plasticity and excitability in early and late phases of human motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Karin; Kacar, Aleksandra; Rothwell, John C

    2007-10-31

    Different phases of motor skill learning appear to involve different physiological processes, with long-term potentiation (LTP) occurring at existing synapses in early and cortical reorganization involving synaptogenesis in later phases. Here, we test the evolution of skill learning-dependent changes in motor plasticity and excitability in six subjects trained to perform rapid thumb abductions over 5 d. Plasticity was examined using paired-associative stimulation (PAS) of the median nerve and motor cortex to induce LTP-like "PAS given with an interstimulus interval of 25 ms (PAS25)" or long-term depression (LTD)-like "PAS given with an interstimulus interval of 10 ms (PAS10)" plasticity. Excitability was tested by measuring recruitment of motor-evoked-potentials "input-output (IO) curve" and of short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI curve), and sensorimotor organization (SMO). Task performance improved continuously over 5 d. After practice on day 1, the PAS25 effect reversed from facilitation to inhibition whereas the slope of the IO curve increased and the level of SICI decreased. These effects on IO curve and SICI were still present or even enhanced before the last practice on day 5, and were not changed by it. The effect of proprioceptive input from the trained muscle on SMO was also strengthened before practice on day 5. In contrast, PAS-induced plasticity was not influenced by motor practice on day 5, and had returned to prepractice values. The interference with PAS-induced plasticity suggests that the initial performance improvement relies on increasing the efficacy of existing synaptic connections. However, the long-lasting changes in the IO curve, SICI curve, and SMO suggest that continued practice enhances performance by changing Motor cortical organization. We hypothesize that new synaptic connections might have formed that allow LTP/LTD-susceptibility to be restored without reducing synaptic strength and performance skill.

  7. Synaptic Impairment in Layer 1 of the Prefrontal Cortex Induced by Repeated Stress During Adolescence is Reversed in Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Dagnino-Subiabre, Alexies; Muñoz Carvajal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is a risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders, some of which involve dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). There is a higher prevalence of these chronic stress-related psychiatric disorders during adolescence, when the PFC has not yet fully matured. In the present work we studied the effect of repeated stress during adolescence on synaptic function in the PFC in adolescence and adulthood. To this end, adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to seven consecutive days of restraint stress. Afterward, both synaptic transmission and short- and long-term synaptic plasticity were evaluated in layer 1 of medial-PFC (mPFC) slices from adolescent and adult rats. We found that repeated stress significantly reduced the amplitude of evoked field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) in the mPFC. Isolation of excitatory transmission reveled that lower-amplitude fEPSPs were associated with a reduction in α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor-mediated transmission. We also found that repeated stress significantly decreased long-term depression (LTD). Interestingly, AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated transmission and LTD were recovered in adult animals that experienced a three-week stress-free recovery period. The data indicates that the changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in the mPFC induced by repeated stress during adolescence are reversed in adulthood after a stress-free period. PMID:26617490

  8. Time Perception and Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    ARI Research Note 88-69 0 MitnS.Ktohe U.0 ... Ann-r (. Time Perception and Evoked Potentials Paul FraisseDT ( Lfniversit6 Rene Descartes E LECTE...JOHNSON 00L, [N Technical Dicctojr Cmad Research accomplished under contract for the Department of the Army C. Universite Rene Descartes , Paris )r...ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Labrato-ire de Psychologie Experimental AREA• WORK UNIT NUMBERS Universite Rene Descartes

  9. Conditioning effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation evoking motor-evoked potential on V-wave response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosprêtre, Sidney; Martin, Alain

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the collision responsible for the volitional V-wave evoked by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the motor nerve during voluntary contraction. V-wave was conditioned by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex at several inter-stimuli intervals (ISI) during weak voluntary plantar flexions (n = 10) and at rest for flexor carpi radialis muscle (FCR; n = 6). Conditioning stimulations were induced by TMS with intensity eliciting maximal motor-evoked potential (MEPmax). ISIs used were ranging from -20 to +20 msec depending on muscles tested. The results showed that, for triceps surae muscles, conditioning TMS increased the V-wave amplitude (~ +250%) and the associated mechanical response (~ +30%) during weak voluntary plantar flexion (10% of the maximal voluntary contraction -MVC) for ISIs ranging from +6 to +18 msec. Similar effect was observed at rest for the FCR with ISI ranging from +6 to +12 msec. When the level of force was increased from 10 to 50% MVC or the conditioning TMS intensity was reduced to elicit responses of 50% of MEPmax, a significant decrease in the conditioned V-wave amplitude was observed for the triceps surae muscles, linearly correlated to the changes in MEP amplitude. The slope of this correlation, as well as the electro-mechanical efficiency, was closed to the identity line, indicating that V-wave impact at muscle level seems to be similar to the impact of cortical stimulation. All these results suggest that change in V-wave amplitude is a great index to reflect changes in cortical neural drive addressed to spinal motoneurons.

  10. Transient visual evoked neuromagnetic responses: Identification of multiple sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aine, C.; George, J.; Medvick, P.; Flynn, E.; Bodis-Wollner, I.; Supek, S.

    1989-01-01

    Neuromagnetic measurements and associated modeling procedures must be able to resolve multiple sources in order to localize and accurately characterize the generators of visual evoked neuromagnetic activity. Workers have identified at least 11 areas in the macaque, throughout occipital, parietal, and temporal cortex, which are primarily or entirely visual in function. The surface area of the human occipital lobe is estimated to be 150--250cm. Primary visual cortex covers approximately 26cm/sup 2/ while secondary visual areas comprise the remaining area. For evoked response amplitudes typical of human MEG data, one report estimates that a two-dipole field may be statistically distinguishable from that of a single dipole when the separation is greater than 1--2 cm. Given the estimated expanse of cortex devoted to visual processes, along with this estimate of resolution limits it is likely that MEG can resolve sources associated with activity in multiple visual areas. Researchers have noted evidence for the existence of multiple sources when presenting visual stimuli in a half field; however, they did not attempt to localize them. We have examined numerous human MEG field patterns resulting from different visual field placements of a small sinusoidal grating which suggest the existence of multiple sources. The analyses we have utilized for resolving multiple sources in these studies differ depending on whether there was evidence of (1) synchronous activation of two spatially discrete sources or (2) two discrete asynchronous sources. In some cases we have observed field patterns which appear to be adequately explained by a single source changing its orientation and location across time. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Plastic condoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Only simple equipment, simple technology and low initial capital investment are needed in their manufacture. The condoms can be made by people who were previously unskilled or only semi-skilled workers. Plastic condoms differ from those made of latex rubber in that the nature of the plastic film allows unlimited shelf-life. Also, the plastic has a higher degree of lubricity than latex rubber; if there is a demand for extra lubrication in a particular market, this can be provided. Because the plastic is inert, these condoms need not be packaged in hermetically sealed containers. All these attributes make it possible to put these condoms on the distributors' shelves in developing countries competitively with rubber condoms. The shape of the plastic condom is based on that of the lamb caecum, which has long been used as luxury-type condom. The plastic condom is made from plastic film (ethylene ethyl acrilate) of 0.001 inch (0.0254 mm.) thickness. In addition, a rubber ring is provided and sealed into the base of the condom for retention during coitus. The advantage of the plastic condom design and the equipment on which it is made is that production can be carried out either in labour-intensive economy or with varying degrees of mechanization and automation. The uniform, finished condom if made using previously untrained workers. Training of workers can be done in a matter of hours on the two machines which are needed to produce and test the condoms. The plastic film is provided on a double wound roll, and condom blanks are prepared by means of a heat-sealing die on the stamping machine. The rubber rings are united to the condom blanks on an assembly machine, which consists of a mandrel and heat-sealing equipment to seal the rubber ring to the base of the condom. Built into the assembly machine is a simple air-testing apparatus that can detect the smallest pinhole flaw in a condom. The manufacturing process is completed by unravelling the condom from the assembly

  12. Enlargement of Axo-Somatic Contacts Formed by GAD-Immunoreactive Axon Terminals onto Layer V Pyramidal Neurons in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Adolescent Female Mice Is Associated with Suppression of Food Restriction-Evoked Hyperactivity and Resilience to Activity-Based Anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wable, Gauri Satish; Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Aoki, Chiye

    2016-06-01

    Many, but not all, adolescent female mice that are exposed to a running wheel while food restricted (FR) become excessive wheel runners, choosing to run even during the hours of food availability, to the point of death. This phenomenon is called activity-based anorexia (ABA). We used electron microscopic immunocytochemistry to ask whether individual differences in ABA resilience may correlate with the lengths of axo-somatic contacts made by GABAergic axon terminals onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5P) in the prefrontal cortex. Contact lengths were, on average, 40% greater for the ABA-induced mice, relative to controls. Correspondingly, the proportion of L5P perikaryal plasma membrane contacted by GABAergic terminals was 45% greater for the ABA mice. Contact lengths in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated negatively and strongly with the overall wheel activity after FR (R = -0.87, P < 0.01), whereas those in the prelimbic cortex correlated negatively with wheel running specifically during the hours of food availability of the FR days (R = -0.84, P < 0.05). These negative correlations support the idea that increases in the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) terminal contact lengths onto L5P contribute toward ABA resilience through suppression of wheel running, a behavior that is intrinsically rewarding and helpful for foraging but maladaptive within a cage.

  13. Disrupted relationship between "resting state" connectivity and task-evoked activity during social perception in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisch, Sjoerd J H; Gallese, Vittorio; Salone, Anatolia; Martinotti, Giovanni; di Iorio, Giuseppe; Mantini, Dante; Perrucci, Mauro Gianni; Romani, Gian Luca; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Northoff, Georg

    2017-07-20

    Schizophrenia has been described as a self-disorder, whereas social deficits are key features of the illness. Changes in "resting state" activity of brain networks involved in self-related processing have been consistently reported in schizophrenia, but their meaning for social perception deficits remains poorly understood. Here, we applied a novel approach investigating the relationship between task-evoked neural activity during social perception and functional organization of self-related brain networks during a "resting state". "Resting state" functional MRI was combined with task-related functional MRI using a social perception experiment. Twenty-one healthy control participants (HC) and 21 out-patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (SCH) were included. There were no significant differences concerning age, IQ, education and gender between the groups. Results showed reduced "resting state" functional connectivity between ventromedial prefrontal cortex and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex in SCH, compared to HC. During social perception, neural activity in dorsal posterior cingulate cortex and behavioral data indicated impaired congruence coding of social stimuli in SCH. Task-evoked activity during social perception in dorsal posterior cingulate cortex co-varied with dorsal posterior cingulate cortex-ventromedial prefrontal cortex functional connectivity during a "resting state" in HC, but not in SCH. Task-evoked activity also correlated with negative symptoms in SCH. These preliminary findings, showing disrupted prediction of social perception measures by "resting state" functioning of self-related brain networks in schizophrenia, provide important insight in the hypothesized link between self and social deficits. They also shed light on the meaning of "resting state" changes for tasks such as social perception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of Motor and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in the Yucatan Micropig Using Transcranial and Epidural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Francisco D; Santamaria, Andrea J; Bodoukhin, Nikita; Guada, Luis G; Solano, Juan P; Guest, James D

    2016-11-28

    Yucatan micropigs have brain and spinal cord dimensions similar to humans and are useful for certain spinal cord injury (SCI) translational studies. Micropigs are readily trained in behavioral tasks, allowing consistent testing of locomotor loss and recovery. However, there has been little description of their motor and sensory pathway neurophysiology. We established methods to assess motor and sensory cortical evoked potentials in the anesthetized, uninjured state. We also evaluated epidurally evoked motor and sensory stimuli from the T6 and T9 levels, spanning the intended contusion injury epicenter. Response detection frequency, mean latency and amplitude values, and variability of evoked potentials were determined. Somatosensory evoked potentials were reliable and best detected during stimulation of peripheral nerve and epidural stimulation by referencing the lateral cortex to midline Fz. The most reliable hindlimb motor evoked potential (MEP) occurred in tibialis anterior. We found MEPs in forelimb muscles in response to thoracic epidural stimulation likely generated from propriospinal pathways. Cranially stimulated MEPs were easier to evoke in the upper limbs than in the hindlimbs. Autopsy studies revealed substantial variations in cortical morphology between animals. This electrophysiological study establishes that neurophysiological measures can be reliably obtained in micropigs in a time frame compatible with other experimental procedures, such as SCI and transplantation. It underscores the need to better understand the motor control pathways, including the corticospinal tract, to determine which therapeutics are suitable for testing in the pig model.

  15. Astrocyte and Neuronal Plasticity in the Somatosensory System

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, Robert E.; Butcher, John B.; Parri, H. Rheinallt; Glazewski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Changing the whisker complement on a rodent's snout can lead to two forms of experience-dependent plasticity (EDP) in the neurons of the barrel cortex, where whiskers are somatotopically represented. One form, termed coding plasticity, concerns changes in synaptic transmission and connectivity between neurons. This is thought to underlie learning and memory processes and so adaptation to a changing environment. The second, called homeostatic plasticity, serves to maintain a restricted dynamic...

  16. Perceptual learning of acoustic noise generates memory-evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrillon, Thomas; Kouider, Sid; Agus, Trevor; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Experience continuously imprints on the brain at all stages of life. The traces it leaves behind can produce perceptual learning [1], which drives adaptive behavior to previously encountered stimuli. Recently, it has been shown that even random noise, a type of sound devoid of acoustic structure, can trigger fast and robust perceptual learning after repeated exposure [2]. Here, by combining psychophysics, electroencephalography (EEG), and modeling, we show that the perceptual learning of noise is associated with evoked potentials, without any salient physical discontinuity or obvious acoustic landmark in the sound. Rather, the potentials appeared whenever a memory trace was observed behaviorally. Such memory-evoked potentials were characterized by early latencies and auditory topographies, consistent with a sensory origin. Furthermore, they were generated even on conditions of diverted attention. The EEG waveforms could be modeled as standard evoked responses to auditory events (N1-P2) [3], triggered by idiosyncratic perceptual features acquired through learning. Thus, we argue that the learning of noise is accompanied by the rapid formation of sharp neural selectivity to arbitrary and complex acoustic patterns, within sensory regions. Such a mechanism bridges the gap between the short-term and longer-term plasticity observed in the learning of noise [2, 4-6]. It could also be key to the processing of natural sounds within auditory cortices [7], suggesting that the neural code for sound source identification will be shaped by experience as well as by acoustics.

  17. Associative Encoding in Anterior Piriform Cortex versus Orbitofrontal Cortex during Odor Discrimination and Reversal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Matthew R.; Stalnaker, Thomas A.; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    Recent proposals have conceptualized piriform cortex as an association cortex, capable of integrating incoming olfactory information with descending input from higher order associative regions such as orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). If true, encoding in piriform cortex should reflect associative features prominent in these areas during associative learning involving olfactory cues. To test this hypothesis, we recorded from neurons in OFC and anatomically related parts of the anterior piriform cortex (APC) in rats, learning and reversing novel odor discriminations. Findings in OFC were similar to what we have reported previously, with nearly all the cue-selective neurons exhibiting substantial plasticity during learning and reversal. Also, many of the cue-selective neurons were originally responsive in anticipation of the outcomes early in learning, thereby providing a single-unit representation of the cue-outcome associations. Some of these features were also evident in firing activity in APC, including some plasticity across learning and reversal. However, APC neurons failed to reverse cue selectivity when the associated outcome was changed, and the cue-selective population did not include neurons that were active prior to outcome delivery. Thus, although representations in APC are substantially more associative than expected in a purely sensory region, they do appear to be somewhat more constrained by the sensory features of the odor cues than representations in downstream areas of OFC. PMID:16699083

  18. Plastic Bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2016-09-01

    Plastic bronchitis is an uncommon and probably underrecognized disorder, diagnosed by the expectoration or bronchoscopic removal of firm, cohesive, branching casts. It should not be confused with purulent mucous plugging of the airway as seen in patients with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis. Few medications have been shown to be effective and some are now recognized as potentially harmful. Current research directions in plastic bronchitis research include understanding the genetics of lymphatic development and maldevelopment, determining how abnormal lymphatic malformations contribute to cast formation, and developing new treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurofisiologia e plasticidade no córtex cerebral pela estimulação magnética transcraniana repetitiva Plasticity of the human cerebral cortex as revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Brasil Neto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Um velho dogma da biologia afirma que só existiria capacidade de reorganização cortical (neuroplasticidade em animais muito jovens; no adulto, tal capacidade seria pequena ou mesmo inexistente. Aqui, revisamos estudos realizados em animais e em humanos que demonstram uma capacidade de reorganização cortical nos sistemas sensoriais e motores em indivíduos adultos. Destacamos os estudos realizados com a técnica de estimulação magnética transcraniana. O córtex cerebral asulto é capaz de reorganização após lesões do sistema nervoso periférico ou central ou no contexto do aprendizado.An old biological dogma states that a potencial for cortical reorganization (neuroplasticity exists nly in young animals, being lost in adlt life. Here we review studies carried out both in animals and humans, whixh demonstrate cortical reorganization in sensory and motor systems in adult subjects. We particulary emphasiza human studies carried out with the aid of transcranial magnetic stimulation. The adult cortex is capable of reorganization after peripheral or central nervous system lesions and as a result of learning.

  20. Mixed plastics recycling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hegberg, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of mixed plastics recycling technology. In addition, it characterizes mixed plastics wastes and describes collection methods, costs, and markets for reprocessed plastics products.

  1. Amygdala-prefrontal pathways and the dopamine system affect nociceptive responses in the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onozawa Kitaro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated nociceptive discharges to be evoked by mechanical noxious stimulation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC. The nociceptive responses recorded in the PFC are conceivably involved in the affective rather than the sensory-discriminative dimension of pain. The PFC receives dense projection from the limbic system. Monosynaptic projections from the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA to the PFC are known to produce long-lasting synaptic plasticity. We examined effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS delivered to the BLA on nociceptive responses in the rat PFC. Results HFS induced long lasting suppression (LLS of the specific high threshold responses of nociceptive neurons in the PFC. Microinjection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor antagonists (2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, dizocilpine (MK-801 and also metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR group antagonists (α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, and 2-[(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropyl]-3-(9H-xanthen-9-yl-D-alanine (LY341495, prevented the induction of LLS of nociceptive responses. We also examined modulatory effects of dopamine (DA on the LLS of nociceptive responses. With depletion of DA in response to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA injection into the ipsilateral forebrain bundle, LLS of nociceptive responses was decreased, while nociceptive responses were normally evoked. Antagonists of DA receptor subtypes D2 (sulpiride and D4 (3-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl piperazin-1-yl] methyl}-1H-pyrrolo [2, 3-b] pyridine (L-745,870, microinjected into the PFC, inhibited LLS of nociceptive responses. Conclusions Our results indicate that BLA-PFC pathways inhibited PFC nociceptive cell activities and that the DA system modifies the BLA-PFC regulatory function.

  2. Mitochondria, synaptic plasticity, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shachar, Dorit; Laifenfeld, Daphna

    2004-01-01

    The conceptualization of schizophrenia as a disorder of connectivity, i.e., of neuronal?synaptic plasticity, suggests abnormal synaptic modeling and neuronal signaling, possibly as a consequence of flawed interactions with the environment, as at least a secondary mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. Indeed, deficits in episodic memory and malfunction of hippocampal circuitry, as well as anomalies of axonal sprouting and synapse formation, are all suggestive of diminished neuronal plasticity in schizophrenia. Evidence supports a dysfunction of mitochondria in schizophrenia, including mitochondrial hypoplasia, and a dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system, as well as altered mitochondrial-related gene expression. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to alterations in ATP production and cytoplasmatic calcium concentrations, as well as reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production. All of the latter processes have been well established as leading to altered synaptic strength or plasticity. Moreover, mitochondria have been shown to play a role in plasticity of neuronal polarity, and studies in the visual cortex show an association between mitochondria and synaptogenesis. Finally, mitochondrial gene upregulation has been observed following synaptic and neuronal activity. This review proposes that mitochondrial dysfunction in schizophrenia could cause, or arise from, anomalies in processes of plasticity in this disorder.

  3. Plastic fish

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In terms of weight, the plastic pollution in the world’s oceans is estimated to be around 300,000 tonnes. This plastic comes from both land-based and ocean-based sources. A lecture at CERN by chemist Wolfgang Trettnak addressed this issue and highlighted the role of art in raising people’s awareness.   Artwork by Wolfgang Trettnak. Packaging materials, consumer goods (shoes, kids’ toys, etc.), leftovers from fishing and aquaculture activities… our oceans and beaches are full of plastic litter. Most of the debris from beaches is plastic bottles. “PET bottles have high durability and stability,” explains Wolfgang Trettnak, a chemist by education and artist from Austria, who gave a lecture on this topic organised by the Staff Association at CERN on 26 May. “PET degrades very slowly and the estimated lifetime of a bottle is 450 years.” In addition to the beach litter accumulated from human use, rivers bring several ki...

  4. Plastic zonnecellen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roggen, Marjolein

    1998-01-01

    De zonnecel van de toekomst is in de maak. Onderzoekers van uiteenlopend pluimage werken eendrachtig aan een plastic zonnecel. De basis is technisch gelegd met een optimale, door invallend licht veroorzaakte, vorming van ladingdragers binnen een composiet van polymeren en buckyballs. Nu is het zaak

  5. Deafness: Cross-modal plasticity and cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Jeung-Whoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong Sun

    2001-01-01

    Hearing in profoundly deaf people can be helped by inserting an implant into the inner ear to stimulate the cochlear nerve. This also boosts the low metabolic activity of the auditory cortex, the region of the brain normally used for hearing. Other sensory modalities, such as sign language, can also activate the auditory cortex, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Here we show that when metabolism in the auditory cortex of prelingually deaf children (whose hearing was lost before they learned to talk) has been restored by cross-modal plasticity, the auditory cortex can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant installed afterwards. Neural substrates in the auditory cortex might therefore be routed permanently to other cognitive processes in prelingually deaf patients.

  6. INTRAOPERATIVE LOCALIZATION OF CORTICAL MOTOR EVOKED POTENTIALS IN CENTRAL SULCUS LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study direct cortical electrical stimulation technique for the recording of motor evoked potentials under general anesthesia in central sulcus lesions. Methods The largest N20-P25 response was recorded from postcentral gyrus by intraoperative monitoring of cortical motor evoked potentials in 10 patients with intracranial lesions near or in the central area. The muscles of upper extremity in all patients were activated by delivering stimulus to cortical areas continuously. Moving the cortical electrodes forward, the largest P20-N25 response, SEP phase reversal,was obtained as a motor center stimulus. In this site of cortex, a short train stimulation elicited reproducible muscle action potentials that could be observed from the oscilloscope without averaging.Results MEPs can be recorded, pre- and post-operatively, without motor deficits of upper limbs in all patients.Conclusion This technique seems to be preferable for intraoperative localization of motor evoked potentials in central sulcus lesions under total intravenous anesthesia.

  7. GluA1 Phosphorylation Alters Evoked Firing Pattern In Vivo

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    Balázs Barkóczi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AMPA and NMDA receptors convey fast synaptic transmission in the CNS. Their relative contribution to synaptic output and phosphorylation state regulate synaptic plasticity. The AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is central in synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of GluA1 regulates channel properties and trafficking. The firing rate averaged over several hundred ms is used to monitor cellular input. However, plasticity requires the timing of spiking within a few ms; therefore, it is important to understand how phosphorylation governs these events. Here, we investigate whether the GluA1 phosphorylation (p-GluA1 alters the spiking patterns of CA1 cells in vivo. The antidepressant Tianeptine was used for inducing p-GluA1, which resulted in enhanced AMPA-evoked spiking. By comparing the spiking patterns of AMPA-evoked activity with matched firing rates, we show that the spike-trains after Tianeptine application show characteristic features, distinguishing from spike-trains triggered by strong AMPA stimulation. The interspike-interval distributions are different between the two groups, suggesting that neuronal output may differ when new inputs are activated compared to increasing the gain of previously activated receptors. Furthermore, we also show that NMDA evokes spiking with different patterns to AMPA spike-trains. These results support the role of the modulation of NMDAR/AMPAR ratio and p-GluA1 in plasticity and temporal coding.

  8. Enhancement of the amplitude of somatosensory evoked potentials following magnetic pulse stimulation of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyal, M; Browne, J K; Masuoka, L K; Gabor, A J

    1993-01-01

    In this study we have demonstrated an enhancement of cortically generated wave forms of the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) following magnetic pulse stimulation of the human brain. Subcortically generated activity was unaltered. The enhancement of SEP amplitude was greatest when the median nerve was stimulated 30-70 msec following magnetic pulse stimulation over the contralateral parietal scalp. We posit that the enhancement of the SEP is the result of synchronization of pyramidal cells in the sensorimotor cortex resulting from the magnetic pulse.

  9. Plastic Surgery Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Statistics by Year Print 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2015 ...

  10. Interactions between Pain and the Motor Cortex: Insights from Research on Phantom Limb Pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier, Catherine; Léonard, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Pain is a significantly disabling problem that often interacts with other deficits during the rehabilitation process. The aim of this paper is to review evidence of interactions between pain and the motor cortex in order to attempt to answer the following questions: (1) Does acute pain interfere with motor-cortex activity? (2) Does chronic pain interfere with motor-cortex activity, and, conversely, does motor-cortex plasticity contribute to chronic pain? (3) Can the induction of moto...

  11. The auditory representation of speech sounds in human motor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Connie; Hamilton, Liberty S; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    In humans, listening to speech evokes neural responses in the motor cortex. This has been controversially interpreted as evidence that speech sounds are processed as articulatory gestures. However, it is unclear what information is actually encoded by such neural activity. We used high-density direct human cortical recordings while participants spoke and listened to speech sounds. Motor cortex neural patterns during listening were substantially different than during articulation of the same sounds. During listening, we observed neural activity in the superior and inferior regions of ventral motor cortex. During speaking, responses were distributed throughout somatotopic representations of speech articulators in motor cortex. The structure of responses in motor cortex during listening was organized along acoustic features similar to auditory cortex, rather than along articulatory features as during speaking. Motor cortex does not contain articulatory representations of perceived actions in speech, but rather, represents auditory vocal information. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12577.001 PMID:26943778

  12. Plastic bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Singhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic bronchitis, a rare but serious clinical condition, commonly seen after Fontan surgeries in children, may be a manifestation of suboptimal adaptation to the cavopulmonary circulation with unfavorable hemodynamics. They are ominous with poor prognosis. Sometimes, infection or airway reactivity may provoke cast bronchitis as a two-step insult on a vulnerable vascular bed. In such instances, aggressive management leads to longer survival. This report of cast bronchitis discusses its current understanding.

  13. Functionally Specific Oscillatory Activity Correlates between Visual and Auditory Cortex in the Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Inga M.; Hipp, Joerg F.; Schneider, Till R.; Roder, Brigitte; Engel, Andreas K.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the visual cortex of blind humans is activated in non-visual tasks. However, the electrophysiological signals underlying this cross-modal plasticity are largely unknown. Here, we characterize the neuronal population activity in the visual and auditory cortex of congenitally blind humans and sighted controls in a…

  14. Functionally Specific Oscillatory Activity Correlates between Visual and Auditory Cortex in the Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Inga M.; Hipp, Joerg F.; Schneider, Till R.; Roder, Brigitte; Engel, Andreas K.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the visual cortex of blind humans is activated in non-visual tasks. However, the electrophysiological signals underlying this cross-modal plasticity are largely unknown. Here, we characterize the neuronal population activity in the visual and auditory cortex of congenitally blind humans and sighted controls in a…

  15. Preparatory attention in visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistoni, Elisa; Stein, Timo; Peelen, Marius V

    2017-05-01

    Top-down attention is the mechanism that allows us to selectively process goal-relevant aspects of a scene while ignoring irrelevant aspects. A large body of research has characterized the effects of attention on neural activity evoked by a visual stimulus. However, attention also includes a preparatory phase before stimulus onset in which the attended dimension is internally represented. Here, we review neurophysiological, functional magnetic resonance imaging, magnetoencephalography, electroencephalography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies investigating the neural basis of preparatory attention, both when attention is directed to a location in space and when it is directed to nonspatial stimulus attributes (content-based attention) ranging from low-level features to object categories. Results show that both spatial and content-based attention lead to increased baseline activity in neural populations that selectively code for the attended attribute. TMS studies provide evidence that this preparatory activity is causally related to subsequent attentional selection and behavioral performance. Attention thus acts by preactivating selective neurons in the visual cortex before stimulus onset. This appears to be a general mechanism that can operate on multiple levels of representation. We discuss the functional relevance of this mechanism, its limitations, and its relation to working memory, imagery, and expectation. We conclude by outlining open questions and future directions. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Molecular components and functions of the endocannabinoid system in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Lafourcade

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cannabinoids have deleterious effects on prefrontal cortex (PFC-mediated functions and multiple evidences link the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid system, cannabis use and schizophrenia, a disease in which PFC functions are altered. Nonetheless, the molecular composition and the physiological functions of the endocannabinoid system in the PFC are unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, using electron microscopy we found that key proteins involved in endocannabinoid signaling are expressed in layers v/vi of the mouse prelimbic area of the PFC: presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R faced postsynaptic mGluR5 while diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DGL-alpha, the enzyme generating the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG was expressed in the same dendritic processes as mGluR5. Activation of presynaptic CB1R strongly inhibited evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents. Prolonged synaptic stimulation at 10Hz induced a profound long-term depression (LTD of layers V/VI excitatory inputs. The endocannabinoid -LTD was presynaptically expressed and depended on the activation of postsynaptic mGluR5, phospholipase C and a rise in postsynaptic Ca(2+ as predicted from the localization of the different components of the endocannabinoid system. Blocking the degradation of 2-AG (with URB 602 but not of anandamide (with URB 597 converted subthreshold tetanus to LTD-inducing ones. Moreover, inhibiting the synthesis of 2-AG with Tetrahydrolipstatin, blocked endocannabinoid-mediated LTD. All together, our data show that 2-AG mediates LTD at these synapses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the endocannabinoid -retrograde signaling plays a prominent role in long-term synaptic plasticity at the excitatory synapses of the PFC. Alterations of endocannabinoid -mediated synaptic plasticity may participate to the etiology of PFC-related pathologies.

  17. Investigation of Motor Cortical Plasticity and Corticospinal Tract Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Patients with Parkinsons Disease and Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Ming; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Ziemann, Ulf; Chen, Jui-Cheng; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Tsai, Chon-Haw

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET) are characterized with motor dysfunctions. Motor circuit dysfunctions can be complementarily investigated by paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the corticospinal tract (CST). Three groups of twelve subjects with moderate severity PD, ET with intention tremor and healthy controls (HC) were studied. The primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, measured by motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude and by short-interval and long-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI and LICI) was compared between the three groups before and after PAS. The DTI measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were acquired. PAS effects and DTI data were simultaneously examined between groups. PAS increased MEP amplitude in HC but not in PD and ET. SICI and LICI were significantly reduced after PAS irrespective of groups. No significant differences of the mean FA and MD were found between groups. There was no significant correlation between the PAS effects and the DTI measures. Findings suggest that both PD and ET with intention tremor have impairment of the associative LTP-like corticospinal excitability change in M1. The microstructure of the CST is not relevant to the deficiency of M1 associative plasticity in PD and ET. PMID:27603204

  18. Neuromodulatory influence of norepinephrine during developmental experience-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Randall M; Ward, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Critical periods represent phases of development during which neuronal circuits and their responses can be readily shaped by stimuli. Experience-dependent plasticity that occurs within these critical periods can be influenced in many ways; however, Shepard et al. (J Neurosci 35: 2432-2437, 2015) recently singled out norepinephrine as an essential driver of this plasticity within the auditory cortex. This work provides novel insight into the mechanisms of critical period plasticity and challenges previous conceptions that a functional redundancy exists between noradrenergic and cholinergic influences on cortical plasticity.

  19. Does intrinsic motivation enhance motor cortex excitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radel, Rémi; Pjevac, Dusan; Davranche, Karen; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Colson, Serge S; Lapole, Thomas; Gruet, Mathieu

    2016-11-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) is often viewed as a spontaneous tendency for action. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging evidence indicate that IM, in comparison to extrinsic motivation (EM), solicits the motor system. Accordingly, we tested whether IM leads to greater excitability of the motor cortex than EM. To test this hypothesis, we used two different tasks to induce the motivational orientation using either words representing each motivational orientation or pictures previously linked to each motivational orientation through associative learning. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex was applied when viewing the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the contracted first dorsal interosseous muscle. Two indexes of corticospinal excitability (the amplitude of motor-evoked potential and the length of cortical silent period) were obtained through unbiased automatic detection and analyzed using a mixed model that provided both statistical power and a high level of control over all important individual, task, and stimuli characteristics. Across the two tasks and the two indices of corticospinal excitability, the exposure to IM-related stimuli did not lead to a greater corticospinal excitability than EM-related stimuli or than stimuli with no motivational valence (ps > .20). While these results tend to dismiss the advantage of IM at activating the motor cortex, we suggest alternative hypotheses to explain this lack of effect, which deserves further research. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. Evoked brain potentials and disability in brain-damaged patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, M; Hall, K; Hopkins, K; Belleza, T; Berrol, S; Reynolds, G

    1977-08-01

    Various measures of evoked brain potential abnormality (EPA) were correlated with disability ratings (DR) for 35 brain-damaged patients. EPA data consisted of judgements of abnormality of ipsilateral, contralateral and bilateral responses to auditory and visual stimuli reflecting activity in the brain stem, subcortex and cortex. DR data were obtained from a scale developed for this study to quantize and categorize patients with a wide range of disabilities from coma to normal functioning. EPA scores based on visual and auditory cortical responses showed significantly positive correlations with degree of disability. Visual response correlation was .49, auditory .38 and combined visual and auditory .51. It was concluded that EPA measures can reflect disability independently of clinical information. They are useful in assessing brain function in general and, specifically, in assessing impairment of sensory function. The evoked potential technique was particularly useful in patients who were not able to participate fully in their own examination. There were indications that the technique may also be valuable in monitoring progress and in predicting clinical outcome in brain-damaged patients.

  1. Inter-ocular contrast normalization in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Farshad; Heeger, David J

    2009-03-20

    The brain combines visual information from the two eyes and forms a coherent percept, even when inputs to the eyes are different. However, it is not clear how inputs from the two eyes are combined in visual cortex. We measured fMRI responses to single gratings presented monocularly, or pairs of gratings presented monocularly or dichoptically with several combinations of contrasts. Gratings had either the same orientation or orthogonal orientations (i.e., plaids). Observers performed a demanding task at fixation to minimize top-down modulation of the stimulus-evoked responses. Dichoptic presentation of compatible gratings (same orientation) evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating only when contrast was low (presentation of orthogonal gratings evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating for all contrasts. However, activity evoked by dichoptic plaids was equal to that evoked by monocular plaids. Introducing an onset asynchrony (stimulating one eye 500 ms before the other, which under attentive vision results in flash suppression) had no impact on the results; the responses to dichoptic and monocular plaids were again equal. We conclude that when attention is diverted, inter-ocular suppression in V1 can be explained by a normalization model in which the mutual suppression between orthogonal orientations does not depend on the eye of origin, nor on the onset times, and cross-orientation suppression is weaker than inter-ocular (same orientation) suppression.

  2. Movement Initiation Signals in Mouse Whisker Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Varun; Esmaeili, Vahid; Kiritani, Taro; Galan, Katia; Crochet, Sylvain; Petersen, Carl C H

    2016-12-21

    Frontal cortex plays a central role in the control of voluntary movements, which are typically guided by sensory input. Here, we investigate the function of mouse whisker primary motor cortex (wM1), a frontal region defined by dense innervation from whisker primary somatosensory cortex (wS1). Optogenetic stimulation of wM1 evokes rhythmic whisker protraction (whisking), whereas optogenetic inactivation of wM1 suppresses initiation of whisking. Whole-cell membrane potential recordings and silicon probe recordings of action potentials reveal layer-specific neuronal activity in wM1 at movement initiation, and encoding of fast and slow parameters of movements during whisking. Interestingly, optogenetic inactivation of wS1 caused hyperpolarization and reduced firing in wM1, together with reduced whisking. Optogenetic stimulation of wS1 drove activity in wM1 with complex dynamics, as well as evoking long-latency, wM1-dependent whisking. Our results advance understanding of a well-defined frontal region and point to an important role for sensory input in controlling motor cortex. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  4. Intracortical Microstimulation Maps of Motor, Somatosensory, and Posterior Parietal Cortex in Tree Shrews (Tupaia belangeri) Reveal Complex Movement Representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Mary K L; Cooke, Dylan F; Krubitzer, Leah

    2016-01-11

    Long-train intracortical microstimulation (LT-ICMS) is a popular method for studying the organization of motor and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in mammals. In primates, LT-ICMS evokes both multijoint and multiple-body-part movements in primary motor, premotor, and PPC. In rodents, LT-ICMS evokes complex movements of a single limb in motor cortex. Unfortunately, very little is known about motor/PPC organization in other mammals. Tree shrews are closely related to both primates and rodents and could provide insights into the evolution of complex movement domains in primates. The present study investigated the extent of cortex in which movements could be evoked with ICMS and the characteristics of movements elicited using both short train (ST) and LT-ICMS in tree shrews. We demonstrate that LT-ICMS and ST-ICMS maps are similar, with the movements elicited with ST-ICMS being truncated versions of those elicited with LT-ICMS. In addition, LT-ICMS-evoked complex movements within motor cortex similar to those in rodents. More complex movements involving multiple body parts such as the hand and mouth were also elicited in motor cortex and PPC, as in primates. Our results suggest that complex movement networks present in PPC and motor cortex were present in mammals prior to the emergence of primates.

  5. Cortical stimulation and tooth pulp evoked potentials in rats: a model of direct anti-nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Robert; Barek, Stephane; Vaculin, Simon; Azérad, Jean; Rokyta, Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the effect of cortex stimulation on pain control is widely accepted, its physiological basis remains poorly understood. We chose an animal model of pain to study the influence of sensorimotor cortex stimulation on tooth pulp stimulation evoked potentials (TPEPs). Fifteen awake rats implanted with tooth pulp, cerebral cortex, and digastric muscle electrodes were divided into three groups, receiving 60 Hz, 40 Hz and no cortical stimulation, respectively. TPEPs were recorded before, one, three and five hours after continuous stimulation. We observed an inverse relationship between TPEP amplitude and latency with increasing tooth pulp stimulation. The amplitudes of the early components of TPEPs increased and their latency decreased with increasing tooth pulp stimulation intensity. Cortical stimulation decreased the amplitude of TPEPs; however, neither the latencies of TPEPs nor the jaw-opening reflex were changed after cortical stimulation. The decrease in amplitude of TPEPs after cortical stimulation may reflect its anti-nociceptive effect.

  6. Role of reuniens nucleus projections to the medial prefrontal cortex and to the hippocampal pyramidal CA1 area in associative learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndell Eleore

    Full Text Available We studied the interactions between short- and long-term plastic changes taking place during the acquisition of a classical eyeblink conditioning and following high-frequency stimulation (HFS of the reuniens nucleus in behaving mice. Synaptic changes in strength were studied at the reuniens-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and the reuniens-CA1 synapses. Input/output curves and a paired-pulse study enabled determining the functional capabilities of the two synapses and the optimal intensities to be applied at the reuniens nucleus during classical eyeblink conditioning and for HFS applied to the reuniens nucleus. Animals were conditioned using a trace paradigm, with a tone as conditioned stimulus (CS and an electric shock to the trigeminal nerve as unconditioned stimulus (US. A single pulse was presented to the reuniens nucleus to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs in mPFC and CA1 areas during the CS-US interval. No significant changes in synaptic strength were observed at the reuniens-mPFC and reuniens-CA1 synapses during the acquisition of eyelid conditioned responses (CRs. Two successive HFS sessions carried out during the first two conditioning days decreased the percentage of CRs, without evoking any long-term potentiation (LTP at the recording sites. HFS of the reuniens nucleus also prevented the proper acquisition of an object discrimination task. A subsequent study revealed that HFS of the reuniens nucleus evoked a significant decrease of paired-pulse facilitation. In conclusion, reuniens nucleus projections to prefrontal and hippocampal circuits seem to participate in the acquisition of associative learning through a mechanism that does not required the development of LTP.

  7. Regulating critical period plasticity: insight from the visual system to fear circuitry for therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabel, Elisa M; Morishita, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Early temporary windows of heightened brain plasticity called critical periods developmentally sculpt neural circuits and contribute to adult behavior. Regulatory mechanisms of visual cortex development - the preeminent model of experience-dependent critical period plasticity-actively limit adult plasticity and have proved fruitful therapeutic targets to reopen plasticity and rewire faulty visual system connections later in life. Interestingly, these molecular mechanisms have been implicated in the regulation of plasticity in other functions beyond vision. Applying mechanistic understandings of critical period plasticity in the visual cortex to fear circuitry may provide a conceptual framework for developing novel therapeutic tools to mitigate aberrant fear responses in post traumatic stress disorder. In this review, we turn to the model of experience-dependent visual plasticity to provide novel insights for the mechanisms regulating plasticity in the fear system. Fear circuitry, particularly fear memory erasure, also undergoes age-related changes in experience-dependent plasticity. We consider the contributions of molecular brakes that halt visual critical period plasticity to circuitry underlying fear memory erasure. A major molecular brake in the visual cortex, perineuronal net formation, recently has been identified in the development of fear systems that are resilient to fear memory erasure. The roles of other molecular brakes, myelin-related Nogo receptor signaling and Lynx family proteins - endogenous inhibitors for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, are explored in the context of fear memory plasticity. Such fear plasticity regulators, including epigenetic effects, provide promising targets for therapeutic interventions.

  8. Regulating Critical Period Plasticity: Insight from the Visual System to Fear Circuitry for Therapeutic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa M. Nabel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Early temporary windows of heightened brain plasticity called critical periods developmentally sculpt neural circuits and contribute to adult behavior. Regulatory mechanisms of visual cortex development –the preeminent model of experience-dependent critical period plasticity- actively limit adult plasticity and have proved fruitful therapeutic targets to reopen plasticity and rewire faulty visual system connections later in life. Interestingly, these molecular mechanisms have been implicated in the regulation of plasticity in other functions beyond vision. Applying mechanistic understandings of critical period plasticity in the visual cortex to fear circuitry may provide a conceptual framework for developing novel therapeutic tools to mitigate aberrant fear responses in post traumatic stress disorder. In this review, we turn to the model of experience-dependent visual plasticity to provide novel insights for the mechanisms regulating plasticity in the fear system. Fear circuitry, particularly fear memory erasure, also undergoes age-related changes in experience-dependent plasticity. We consider the contributions of molecular brakes that halt visual critical period plasticity to circuitry underlying fear memory erasure. A major molecular brake in the visual cortex, perineuronal net formation, recently has been identified in the development of fear systems that are resilient to fear memory erasure. The roles of other molecular brakes, myelin-related Nogo receptor signaling and Lynx family proteins– endogenous inhibitors for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, are explored in the context of fear memory plasticity. Such fear plasticity regulators, including epigenetic effects, provide promising targets for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Emergence of spatiotemporal invariance in large neuronal ensembles in rat barrel cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Nathan S.; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2015-01-01

    Invariant sensory coding is the robust coding of some sensory information (e.g., stimulus type) despite major changes in other sensory parameters (e.g., stimulus strength). The contribution of large populations of neurons (ensembles) to invariant sensory coding is not well understood, but could offer distinct advantages over invariance in single cell receptive fields. To test invariant sensory coding in neuronal ensembles evoked by single whisker stimulation as early as primary sensory cortex, we recorded detailed spatiotemporal movies of evoked ensemble activity through the depth of rat barrel cortex using microelectrode arrays. We found that an emergent property of whisker evoked ensemble activity, its spatiotemporal profile, was notably invariant across major changes in stimulus amplitude (up to >200-fold). Such ensemble-based invariance was found for single whisker stimulation as well as for the integrated profile of activity evoked by the more naturalistic stimulation of the entire whisker array. Further, the integrated profile of whisker array evoked ensemble activity and its invariance to stimulus amplitude shares striking similarities to “funneled” tactile perception in humans. We therefore suggest that ensemble-based invariance could provide a robust neurobiological substrate for invariant sensory coding and integration at an early stage of cortical sensory processing already in primary sensory cortex. PMID:26217194

  10. Emergence of spatiotemporal invariance in large neuronal ensembles in rat barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S Jacobs

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Invariant sensory coding is the robust coding of some sensory information (e.g. stimulus type despite major changes in other sensory parameters (e.g. stimulus strength. The contribution of large populations of neurons (ensembles to invariant sensory coding is not well understood, but could offer distinct advantages over invariance in single cell receptive fields. To test invariant sensory coding in neuronal ensembles evoked by single whisker stimulation as early as primary sensory cortex, we recorded detailed spatiotemporal movies of evoked ensemble activity through the depth of rat barrel cortex using microelectrode arrays. We found that an emergent property of whisker evoked ensemble activity, its spatiotemporal profile, was notably invariant across major changes in stimulus amplitude (up to >200 fold. Such ensemble-based invariance was found for single whisker stimulation as well as for the integrated profile of activity evoked by the more naturalistic stimulation of the entire whisker array. Further, the integrated profile of whisker array evoked ensemble activity and its invariance to stimulus amplitude shares striking similarities to 'funneled' tactile perception in humans. We therefore suggest that ensemble-based invariance could provide a robust neurobiological substrate for invariant sensory coding and integration at an early stage of cortical sensory processing already in primary sensory cortex.

  11. Comparison of evoked vs. spontaneous tics in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (tic doloureux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiello-Lammens Matthew

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 53-year old woman with tic doloureaux, affecting her right maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve (V2, could elicit shooting pains by slightly tapping her teeth when off medication. The pains, which she normally rated as > 6/10 on a visual analog scale (VAS, were electric shock-like in nature. She had no other spontaneous or ongoing background pain affecting the region. Based on her ability to elicit these tics, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed while she produced brief shocks every 2 minutes on cue (evoked pain over a 20 min period. In addition, she had 1–2 spontaneous shocks manifested between these evoked pains over the course of functional image acquisition. Increased fMRI activation for both evoked and spontaneous tics was observed throughout cortical and subcortical structures commonly observed in experimental pain studies with healthy subjects; including the primary somatosensory cortex, insula, anterior cingulate, and thalamus. Spontaneous tics produced more decrease in signals in a number of regions including the posterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, suggesting that regions known to be involved in expectation/anticipation may have been activated for the evoked, but not spontaneous, tics. In this patient there were large increases in activation observed in the frontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex and the basal ganglia. Spontaneous tics showed increased activation in classic aversion circuitry that may contribute to increased levels of anxiety. We believe that this is the first report of functional imaging of brain changes in tic-doloureaux.

  12. Comparison of evoked vs. spontaneous tics in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (tic doloureux).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsook, David; Moulton, Eric A; Pendse, Gautam; Morris, Susie; Cole, Sadie H; Aiello-Lammens, Matthew; Scrivani, Steven; Becerra, Lino R

    2007-11-06

    A 53-year old woman with tic doloureaux, affecting her right maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve (V2), could elicit shooting pains by slightly tapping her teeth when off medication. The pains, which she normally rated as > 6/10 on a visual analog scale (VAS), were electric shock-like in nature. She had no other spontaneous or ongoing background pain affecting the region. Based on her ability to elicit these tics, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed while she produced brief shocks every 2 minutes on cue (evoked pain) over a 20 min period. In addition, she had 1-2 spontaneous shocks manifested between these evoked pains over the course of functional image acquisition. Increased fMRI activation for both evoked and spontaneous tics was observed throughout cortical and subcortical structures commonly observed in experimental pain studies with healthy subjects; including the primary somatosensory cortex, insula, anterior cingulate, and thalamus. Spontaneous tics produced more decrease in signals in a number of regions including the posterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, suggesting that regions known to be involved in expectation/anticipation may have been activated for the evoked, but not spontaneous, tics. In this patient there were large increases in activation observed in the frontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex and the basal ganglia. Spontaneous tics showed increased activation in classic aversion circuitry that may contribute to increased levels of anxiety. We believe that this is the first report of functional imaging of brain changes in tic-doloureaux.

  13. 大脑半球切除术后患者上肢运动功能定位及神经功能重塑性研究%Upper limbs motor maps in cortex and plasticity after the anatomical hemispherectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘源; 曲金荣; 李少武; 徐宇伦

    2009-01-01

    Objective To locate motor functional area of patients who underwent modified anatomical hemisphereetomy in order to analyze the plasticity of upper limbs motor. Methods From July to December 2007 the patients who underwent modified anatomical hemispherectomy were performed BOLD sequences,to locate functional cortical areas in their residual brain. Results Six patients had performed examination of BOLl) sequences by 3.0-T MRI. Five of them obtained cuntralateral upper limb motor areas in their residual brain ,and 3 of them obtained ipsilateral and contralateral upper limb motor area map in cortex. The ipsilateral upper limb motor areas in the M1, SMA and posterior parietal cortex. Conclusions The patients who underwent modified anatomical hemispherectomy is an excellent model to investigate mechanism of plasticity in the developing brain. Functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) providing fine spatial detail of brain responses, would describle the motor functional area of cortical maps. These patients exist ipsilater motor areas in their residual monohemisphere. The study indicates that there maybe somewhat extent of correlation between the surgerical procedure and the outcome of neuroplasticity.%目的 对改良式大脑半球切除术后患者进行肢体运动在同侧大脑半球的功能定位及其神经功能重塑的研究.方法 2007年7月至12月以改良式解剖性大脑半球切除术后患者为研究对象,使用3.0 T磁共振仪行大脑运动功能磁共振(fMRI)检测.受检者分别行双侧上肢屈肘运动,使用BOLD序列,检测双侧上肢运动在健侧大脑半球的皮质投射区.结果 6例行改良式解剖性大脑半球切除术后患者有5例检测出对侧肢体运动fMRI代表区,其中3例得到双侧上肢在健侧大腑皮质的运动代表区.同侧上肢运动定位区出现在第一运动区、辅助运动区和顶后小叶皮质.结论 在人类一侧大脑半球切除后,健侧大脑半球存在支配同侧肢体运动的功

  14. Language Networks in Anophthalmia: Maintained Hierarchy of Processing in "Visual" Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Kate E.; Cowey, Alan; Alexander, Iona; Filippini, Nicola; Kennedy, James M.; Smith, Stephen M.; Ragge, Nicola; Bridge, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Imaging studies in blind subjects have consistently shown that sensory and cognitive tasks evoke activity in the occipital cortex, which is normally visual. The precise areas involved and degree of activation are dependent upon the cause and age of onset of blindness. Here, we investigated the cortical language network at rest and during an…

  15. Visual experience regulates the development of long-term synaptic modifications induced by low-frequency stimulation in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Taketoshi; Yamamoto, Mariko; Yamada, Kazumasa; Komatsu, Yukio; Yoshimura, Yumiko

    2017-03-08

    Manipulation of visual experience can considerably modify visual responses of visual cortical neurons even in adulthood in the mouse, although the modification is less profound than that observed during the critical period. Our previous studies demonstrated that low-frequency (2Hz) stimulation for 15min applied to layer 4 induces T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at excitatory synapses in layer 2/3 neurons of visual cortex during the critical period. In this study, we investigated whether low-frequency stimulation could induce synaptic plasticity in adult mice. We found that 2Hz stimulation induced LTP of extracellular field potentials evoked by stimulation of layer 4 in layer 2/3 in adulthood as during the critical period. LTP in adulthood was blocked by L-type, but not T-type, Ca(2+) channel antagonists, whereas LTP during the critical period was blocked by T-type, but not L-type, Ca(2+) channel antagonists. This developmental change in LTP was prevented by dark rearing. Under pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors, T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent LTP occurred, whereas L-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent LTP did not occur. These results suggest that different forms of synaptic plasticity can contribute separately to experience-dependent modification of visual responses during the critical period and in adulthood.

  16. Astrocyte and Neuronal Plasticity in the Somatosensory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Robert E; Butcher, John B; Parri, H Rheinallt; Glazewski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Changing the whisker complement on a rodent's snout can lead to two forms of experience-dependent plasticity (EDP) in the neurons of the barrel cortex, where whiskers are somatotopically represented. One form, termed coding plasticity, concerns changes in synaptic transmission and connectivity between neurons. This is thought to underlie learning and memory processes and so adaptation to a changing environment. The second, called homeostatic plasticity, serves to maintain a restricted dynamic range of neuronal activity thus preventing its saturation or total downregulation. Current explanatory models of cortical EDP are almost exclusively neurocentric. However, in recent years, increasing evidence has emerged on the role of astrocytes in brain function, including plasticity. Indeed, astrocytes appear as necessary partners of neurons at the core of the mechanisms of coding and homeostatic plasticity recorded in neurons. In addition to neuronal plasticity, several different forms of astrocytic plasticity have recently been discovered. They extend from changes in receptor expression and dynamic changes in morphology to alteration in gliotransmitter release. It is however unclear how astrocytic plasticity contributes to the neuronal EDP. Here, we review the known and possible roles for astrocytes in the barrel cortex, including its plasticity.

  17. The plasticity of social emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimecki, Olga M

    2015-01-01

    Social emotions such as empathy or compassion greatly facilitate our interactions with others. Despite the importance of social emotions, scientific studies have only recently revealed functional neural plasticity associated with the training of such emotions. Using the framework of two antagonistic neural systems, the threat and social disconnection system on the one hand, and the reward and social connection system on the other, this article describes how training compassion and empathy can change the functioning of these systems in a targeted manner. Whereas excessive empathic sharing of suffering can increase negative feelings and activations in the insula and anterior cingulate cortex (corresponding to the threat and social disconnection system), compassion training can strengthen positive affect and neural activations in the medial orbitofrontal cortex and striatum (corresponding to the reward and social connection system). These neuroimaging findings are complemented by results from behavioral studies showing that compassion is linked to helping and forgiveness behavior, whereas empathic distress not only decreases helping behavior, but is even associated with increased aggressive behavior. Taken together, these data provide encouraging evidence for the plasticity of adaptive social emotions with wide-ranging implications for basic science and applied settings.

  18. Correlation of Vision Loss with Tactile-Evoked V1 Responses in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Weiland, James D.; Bao, Pinglei; Lopez-Jaime, Gilberto Raul; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that the visual cortex of visually impaired humans is active during tactile tasks. We sought to determine if this cross-modal activation in the primary visual cortex is correlated with vision loss in individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease that progressively diminishes vision later in life. RP and sighted subjects completed three tactile tasks: a symmetry discrimination task, a Braille-dot counting task, and a sandpaper roughness discrimination task. We measured tactile-evoked blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). For each subject, we quantified the cortical extent of the tactile-evoked response by the proportion of modulated voxels within the primary visual cortex (V1) and its strength by the mean absolute modulation amplitude of the modulated voxels. We characterized vision loss in terms of visual acuity and the areal proportion of V1 that corresponds to the preserved visual field. Visual acuity and proportion of the preserved visual field both had a highly significant effect on the cortical extent of the V1 BOLD response to tactile stimulation, while visual acuity also had a significant effect on the strength of the V1 response. These effects of vision loss on cross-modal responses were reliable despite high inter-subject variability. Controlling for task-evoked responses in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) across subjects further strengthened the effects of vision loss on cross-model responses in V1. We propose that such cross-modal responses in V1 and other visual areas may be used as a cortically localized biomarker to account for individual differences in visual performance following sight recovery treatments. PMID:25449160

  19. Failed stabilization for long-term potentiation in the auditory cortex of FMR1 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungchil Yang

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is a developmental disorder that affects sensory systems. A null mutation of the Fragile X Mental Retardation protein 1 (Fmr1 gene in mice has varied effects on developmental plasticity in different sensory systems, including normal barrel cortical plasticity, altered ocular dominance plasticity and grossly impaired auditory frequency map plasticity. The mutation also has different effects on long-term synaptic plasticity in somatosensory and visual cortical neurons, providing insights on how it may differentially affect the sensory systems. Here we present evidence that long-term potentiation (LTP is impaired in the developing auditory cortex of the Fmr1 knockout (KO mice. This impairment of synaptic plasticity is consistent with impaired frequency map plasticity in the Fmr1 KO mouse. Together, these results suggest a potential role of LTP in sensory map plasticity during early sensory development.

  20. Overcoming maladaptive plasticity through plastic compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R.J. MORRIS, Sean M. ROGERS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Most species evolve within fluctuating environments, and have developed adaptations to meet the challenges posed by environmental heterogeneity. One such adaptation is phenotypic plasticity, or the ability of a single genotype to produce multiple environmentally-induced phenotypes. Yet, not all plasticity is adaptive. Despite the renewed interest in adaptive phenotypic plasticity and its consequences for evolution, much less is known about maladaptive plasticity. However, maladaptive plasticity is likely an important driver of phenotypic similarity among populations living in different environments. This paper traces four strategies for overcoming maladaptive plasticity that result in phenotypic similarity, two of which involve genetic changes (standing genetic variation, genetic compensation and two of which do not (standing epigenetic variation, plastic compensation. Plastic compensation is defined as adaptive plasticity overcoming maladaptive plasticity. In particular, plastic compensation may increase the likelihood of genetic compensation by facilitating population persistence. We provide key terms to disentangle these aspects of phenotypic plasticity and introduce examples to reinforce the potential importance of plastic compensation for understanding evolutionary change [Current Zoology 59 (4: 526–536, 2013].

  1. Overcoming maladaptive plasticity through plastic compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew R.J.MORRIS; Sean M.ROGERS

    2013-01-01

    Most species evolve within fluctuating environments,and have developed adaptations to meet the challenges posed by environmental heterogeneity.One such adaptation is phenotypic plasticity,or the ability of a single genotype to produce multiple environmentally-induced phenotypes.Yet,not all plasticity is adaptive.Despite the renewed interest in adaptive phenotypic plasticity and its consequences for evolution,much less is known about maladaptive plasticity.However,maladaptive plasticity is likely an important driver of phenotypic similarity among populations living in different environments.This paper traces four strategies for overcoming maladaptive plasticity that result in phenotypic similarity,two of which involve genetic changes (standing genetic variation,genetic compensation) and two of which do not (standing epigenetic variation,plastic compensation).Plastic compensation is defined as adaptive plasticity overcoming maladaptive plasticity.In particular,plastic compensation may increase the likelihood of genetic compensation by facilitating population persistence.We provide key terms to disentangle these aspects of phenotypic plasticity and introduce examples to reinforce the potential importance of plastic compensation for understanding evolutionary change.

  2. Cortical Plasticity and Olfactory Function in Early Blindness.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Araneda; Laurent A Renier; Philippe Rombaux; Isabel Cuevas; De Volder, Anne G.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, functional brain imaging has provided insight in the maturation processes and has helped elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in brain plasticity in the absence of vision. In case of congenital blindness, drastic changes occur within the deafferented visual cortex that starts receiving and processing nonvisual inputs, including olfactory stimuli. This functional reorganization of the occipital cortex gives rise to compensatory perceptual and cognitive me...

  3. 脑磁图定位皮质运动区与术中皮质电刺激运动诱发电位的对照研究%Control study of magnetoencephalography and intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation based motor evoked potential monitoring for mapping motor cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨坤; 张玉海; 杨露; 张岩松; 杨纶先; 邹元杰; 张锐; 刘宏毅

    2014-01-01

    目的评价脑磁图(MEG)术前定位初级运动皮质(M1)的准确性。方法选取顺序入院的中央区胶质瘤26例,术前均运用MEG定位皮质运动区,与MRI导航影像融合,在神经导航下定位MEG激活区。术中对MEG成功定位的病例行直接皮质电刺激(DCES),比较两种技术的吻合度。结果因病人不能配合,MEG定位失败2例,余24例均定位成功,每例激活区1~5个。DCES成功监测24例,所有选择的DCES靶点共41个,阳性靶点24个,1个/例。以所有的41个靶点分析,MEG定位M1区与DCES定位的吻合率为58.5%;而以第1组病灶侧M1区和第2组病灶侧中央区的MEG激活区中27个靶点分析,两者吻合率为88.9%;仅以第1组M1区的MEG激活区中17个靶点分析,两者吻合率为100%。结论 MEG可以灵敏而可靠地定位M1区,可用于中央区胶质瘤病人术前手术规划。%Objective To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative primary motor cortex (M1) mapping with magnetoencephalography (MEG). Methods Twenty-six consecutive patients with glioma in the central region were selected. Motor cortex was located by MEG preoperatively, and its results were overlaid on the MRI, then the activated regions located under neuronavigation. Intraoperative direct cortical electrical stimulation (DCES) was performed in patients located successfully by MEG, and the coincidence rate was calculated between MEG and DCES techniques. Results MEG mapping failed in 2 patients because of the problems of patients, and succeeded in other 24 patients with 1 to 5 activated regions in every patient. DCES was performed in 24 patients with 41 targets, including 24 positive targets, one target in every patient. For the analysis of all the 41 targets, the coincidence rate was 58.5%in mapping M1 between MEG and DCES. For the analysis of 27 targets in MEG activated regions of M1 in group 1 and central region in group 2 at the lesion side, the coincidence rate of the two techniques was 88.9%. For the

  4. Neuropsychology of prefrontal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The history of clinical frontal lobe study is long and rich which provides valuable insights into neuropsychologic determinants of functions of prefrontal cortex (PFC). PFC is often classified as multimodal association cortex as extremely processed information from various sensory modalities is integrated here in a precise fashion to form the physiologic constructs of memory, perception, and diverse cognitive processes. Human neuropsychologic studies also support the notion of different funct...

  5. Nicotinic mechanisms influencing synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andon Nicholas PLACZEK; Tao A ZHANG; John Anthony DANI

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed throughout the hippocampus, and nicotinic signaling plays an important role in neuronal function. In the context of learning and memory related behaviors associated with hippocampal function, a potentially significant feature of nAChR activity is the impact it has on synaptic plasticity. Synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons has long been considered a contributing cellular mechanism of learning and memory. These same kinds of cellular mechanisms are a factor in the development of nicotine addiction. Nicotinic signaling has been demonstrated by in vitro studies to affect synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons via multiple steps, and the signaling has also been shown to evoke synaptic plasticity in vivo. This review focuses on the nAChRs subtypes that contribute to hippocampal synaptic plasticity at the cellular and circuit level. It also considers nicotinic influences over long-term changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to addiction.

  6. EVOKED CAVERNOUS ACTIVITY: NEUROANATOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Vicars, Brenda; Yang, Claire C.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the autonomic innervation of the penis by using evoked cavernous activity (ECA). We recruited 7 males with thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) and sexual dysfunction and 6 males who were scheduled to have pelvic surgery (PS), specifically non-nerve-sparing radical cystoprostatectomy. In the PS subjects, ECA was performed both pre- and postoperatively. The left median nerve was electrically stimulated and ECA was recorded with two concentric electromyography needles placed into the right and left cavernous bodies. We simultaneously recorded hand and foot sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) as controls. In the SCI group, all but one subject had reproducible hand SSRs. None of these subjects had ECA or foot SSRs. All the PS subjects had reproducible ECA and SSRs, both preoperatively and postoperatively. There was no difference in the latency and amplitude measurements of ECA and SSRs in the postoperative compared to the preoperative period (p>0.05). In conclusion, ECA is absent in men with SCI above the sympathetic outflow to the genitalia. In men following radical pelvic surgery, ECA is preserved, indicating the preservation of sympathetic fibers. PMID:19609298

  7. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  8. [Intraoperative Visual Evoked Potential Monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hironobu; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) is recorded from the back of the head, which is elicited by retinal stimulation transmitted through optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract lateral geniculate body, optic radiation and finally cortical visual area. VEP monitoring did not prevail since 1990s because marked intra-individual difference and instability of VEP recording limited the clinical usefulness under inhalation anesthetic management and techniques of VEP monitoring at the time. However, recent advances in techniques including a new light-stimulating device consisting of high-luminosity LEDs and induction of electroretinography to ascertain the arrival of the stimulus at the retina provided better conditions for stable VEP recording under general anesthesia. In addition, the introduction of total intravenous anesthesia using propofol is important for the successful VEP recordings because inhaled anesthetics have suppressive effect on VEP waveform. Intraoperative VEP has been considered to monitor the functional integrity of visual function during neurosurgical procedures, in which the optic pathway is at a risk of injury. Intraoperative VEP monitoring may allow us to detect reversible damage to the visual pathway intraoperatively and enable us to prevent permanent impairment.

  9. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

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    Jenq-Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  10. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  11. Temporal coupling between stimulus-evoked neural activity and hemodynamic responses from individual cortical columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyns-Haylett, Michael; Zheng Ying; Berwick, Jason; Jones, Myles [The Centre for Signal Processing in Neuroimaging and Systems Neuroscience (SPINSN), Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.jones@sheffield.ac.uk

    2010-04-21

    Using previously published data from the whisker barrel cortex of anesthetized rodents (Berwick et al 2008 J. Neurophysiol. 99 787-98) we investigated whether highly spatially localized stimulus-evoked cortical hemodynamics responses displayed a linear time-invariant (LTI) relationship with neural activity. Presentation of stimuli to individual whiskers of 2 s and 16 s durations produced hemodynamics and neural activity spatially localized to individual cortical columns. Two-dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy (2D-OIS) measured hemoglobin responses, while multi-laminar electrophysiology recorded neural activity. Hemoglobin responses to 2 s stimuli were deconvolved with underlying evoked neural activity to estimate impulse response functions which were then convolved with neural activity evoked by 16 s stimuli to generate predictions of hemodynamic responses. An LTI system more adequately described the temporal neuro-hemodynamics coupling relationship for these spatially localized sensory stimuli than in previous studies that activated the entire whisker cortex. An inability to predict the magnitude of an initial 'peak' in the total and oxy- hemoglobin responses was alleviated when excluding responses influenced by overlying arterial components. However, this did not improve estimation of the hemodynamic responses return to baseline post-stimulus cessation.

  12. Recycling of Plastic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2011-01-01

    Plastic is produced from fossil oil. Plastic is used for many different products. Some plastic products like, for example, wrapping foil, bags and disposable containers for food and beverage have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of most waste. Other plastic products like......, good strength and long durability. Recycling of plastic waste from production is well-established, while recycling of postconsumer plastic waste still is in its infancy. This chapter describes briefly how plastic is produced and how waste plastic is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements...

  13. Auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear responses in chinchillas.

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    Alex León

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cochlear microphonics (CM, auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments. We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the

  14. Transient human auditory cortex activation during volitional attention shifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Christian Harm; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    While strong activation of auditory cortex is generally found for exogenous orienting of attention, endogenous, intra-modal shifting of auditory attention has not yet been demonstrated to evoke transient activation of the auditory cortex. Here, we used fMRI to test if endogenous shifting of attention is also associated with transient activation of the auditory cortex. In contrast to previous studies, attention shifts were completely self-initiated and not cued by transient auditory or visual stimuli. Stimuli were two dichotic, continuous streams of tones, whose perceptual grouping was not ambiguous. Participants were instructed to continuously focus on one of the streams and switch between the two after a while, indicating the time and direction of each attentional shift by pressing one of two response buttons. The BOLD response around the time of the button presses revealed robust activation of the auditory cortex, along with activation of a distributed task network. To test if the transient auditory cortex activation was specifically related to auditory orienting, a self-paced motor task was added, where participants were instructed to ignore the auditory stimulation while they pressed the response buttons in alternation and at a similar pace. Results showed that attentional orienting produced stronger activity in auditory cortex, but auditory cortex activation was also observed for button presses without focused attention to the auditory stimulus. The response related to attention shifting was stronger contralateral to the side where attention was shifted to. Contralateral-dominant activation was also observed in dorsal parietal cortex areas, confirming previous observations for auditory attention shifting in studies that used auditory cues.

  15. Evoked potentials in neuroinfections in children

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    V. N. Komantsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the neurophysiological study in which 95 children with viral encephalitis and 30 children with meningitis (age from 2 up to 17 years undergo evoked potentials investigation. Some specific features of evoked potentials in neuroinfections have been shown to correlate with the course of disease and the age of the patients. We give a description of a logistic model of predicting outcomes in such patients by complex diagnostic method. We have found that evoked potentials may be successfully implemented in correcting the therapeutic strategies. Study of evoked potentials in neuroinfections in children can define the severity and extent of lesions and help to identify subclinical dysfunction and monitor the recovery processes under the therapy.

  16. Visual Evoked Potentials in Rett Syndrome

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    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Boston Children's Hospital recorded pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice and in 34 girls with Rett syndrome (RTT.

  17. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Theresia Weber-Glass; Elisabeth eLingg; Eva eHeuberger

    2014-01-01

    Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman’s (Ekman et al., 1983) basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive respons...

  18. Motor Cortex Stimulation Reverses Maladaptive Plasticity Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    after the implantation of the head holder; and immediately after each MRS scan. A dynamic planter aesthesiometer (Ugo Basile , PA) was used to deter...H, Yang A, Kopell N, Buckner RL, Graybiel AM, Moore CI. Mapping brain networks in awake mice using combined optical neural control and fMRI. J

  19. Localized infusions of the partial alpha 7 nicotinic receptor agonist SSR180711 evoke rapid and transient increases in prefrontal glutamate release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Mikkelsen, J D; Bruno, J P

    2013-01-01

    The ability of local infusions of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetycholine receptor (α7 nAChR) partial agonist SSR180711 to evoke glutamate release in prefrontal cortex was determined in awake rats using a microelectrode array. Infusions of SSR180711 produced dose-dependent increases in glutamate level...

  20. Associative encoding in posterior piriform cortex during odor discrimination and reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calu, Donna J; Roesch, Matthew R; Stalnaker, Thomas A; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2007-06-01

    Recent proposals have conceptualized piriform cortex as an association cortex, capable of integrating incoming olfactory information with descending input from higher order associative regions such as orbitofrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala (ABL). If true, encoding in piriform cortex should reflect associative features prominent in these areas during associative learning involving olfactory cues. We recently reported that neurons in anterior piriform cortex (APC) in rats exhibited significant plasticity in their responses to odor cues during associative learning. Here, we have repeated this study, recording from neurons in posterior piriform cortex (PPC), a region of piriform cortex that receives much stronger input from ABL. If associative encoding in piriform cortex is driven by inputs from ABL, then we should see more plasticity in PPC neurons than we observed in APC. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that PPC neurons were highly associative and appeared to be somewhat more likely than neurons recorded in APC to alter their responses to the odor cues after reversal of the odor-outcome associations in the task. Further, odor-selective PPC populations exhibited markedly different firing patterns based on the valence of the odor cue. These results suggest associative encoding in piriform cortex is represented in a topographical fashion, reflecting the stronger and more specific input from olfactory bulb concerning the sensory features of odors in anterior regions and stronger input from ABL concerning the meaning of odors in posterior regions.

  1. Preparatory effects of distractor suppression: evidence from visual cortex.

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    Jaap Munneke

    Full Text Available Spatial selective attention is the mechanism that facilitates the selection of relevant information over irrelevant information in the visual field. The current study investigated whether foreknowledge of the presence or absence of distractors surrounding an impending target stimulus results in preparatory changes in visual cortex. We cued the location of the target and the presence or absence of distractors surrounding the target while changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signals were measured. In line with prior work, we found that top-down spatial attention resulted in an increased contralateral BOLD response, evoked by the cue throughout early visual cortex (areas V1, V2 and V3. In addition, cues indicating distractor presence evoked a substantial increase in the magnitude of the BOLD signal in visual area V3, but not in V2 or V1. This study shows that prior knowledge concerning the presence of a distractor results in enhanced attentional modulation of visual cortex, in visual areas where neuronal receptive fields are large enough to encompass both targets and distractors. We interpret these findings as evidence that top-down attentional control processes include active preparatory suppression mechanisms for irrelevant, distracting information in the visual scene.

  2. Preparatory effects of distractor suppression: evidence from visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munneke, Jaap; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Usrey, W Martin; Theeuwes, Jan; Mangun, George R

    2011-01-01

    Spatial selective attention is the mechanism that facilitates the selection of relevant information over irrelevant information in the visual field. The current study investigated whether foreknowledge of the presence or absence of distractors surrounding an impending target stimulus results in preparatory changes in visual cortex. We cued the location of the target and the presence or absence of distractors surrounding the target while changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals were measured. In line with prior work, we found that top-down spatial attention resulted in an increased contralateral BOLD response, evoked by the cue throughout early visual cortex (areas V1, V2 and V3). In addition, cues indicating distractor presence evoked a substantial increase in the magnitude of the BOLD signal in visual area V3, but not in V2 or V1. This study shows that prior knowledge concerning the presence of a distractor results in enhanced attentional modulation of visual cortex, in visual areas where neuronal receptive fields are large enough to encompass both targets and distractors. We interpret these findings as evidence that top-down attentional control processes include active preparatory suppression mechanisms for irrelevant, distracting information in the visual scene.

  3. Binocular form deprivation influences the visual cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingming Liu; Chuanhuang Weng; Hanping Xie; Wei Qin

    2012-01-01

    1a-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors are considered to play a crucial role in synaptic plasticity in the developing visual cortex. In this study, we established a rat model of binocular form deprivation by suturing the rat binocular eyelids before eye-opening at postnatal day 14. During development, the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by 1a-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors of normal rats became longer after eyeopening; however, the decay time did not change significantly in binocular form deprivation rats. The peak value in the normal group became gradually larger with age, but there was no significant change in the binocular form deprivation group. These findings indicate that binocular form deprivation influences the properties of excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by β-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors in the rat visual cortex around the end of the critical period, indicating that form stimulation is associated with the experience-dependent modification of neuronal synapses in the visual cortex.

  4. Flash visual evoked potential monitoring of optic tract function during macroelectrode-based pallidotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaroti, E A; Rose, R D; Kondziolka, D; Baser, S; Lunsford, L D

    1997-03-15

    Posteroventral pallidotomy (PVP) has received renewed interest as an ablative procedure for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. In previous reports, the proximity of the optic tract to the lesion target in the globus pallidus internus has resulted in the occurrence of visual field deficits in as much as 14% of patients. The authors have used intraoperative visual evoked potentials (VEPs) during PVP to reduce this risk. All procedures were performed in awake patients. Flash stimuli were delivered to each eye via fiberoptic sources. Baseline flash VEPs were recorded at O1/Cz (left visual cortex to vertex), Oz/Cz (midline visual cortex to vertex), and O2/Cz (right visual cortex to vertex) for OS, OU, and OD stimulation. Epochs were acquired before and after localization, after macroelectrode stimulation, after temporary thermal lesioning, and after permanent thermal lesioning. Forty-seven patients underwent a total of 59 procedures. Visual evoked potentials were recorded reproducibly in all patients. In 11 procedures, VEP changes were reported, including six amplitude changes (10-80%), six latency shifts (3-10 msec), and one report of "variability." In four procedures, VEP changes prompted a change in target coordinates. One false-positive and one false-negative VEP change were encountered. The only confirmed visual deficit was a superior quadrantanopsia, present on formal fields, but clinically asymptomatic. The authors conclude that VEPs may be useful for procedures performed in the awake patient because of the lack of anesthetic-induced variability. The 1.7% visual morbidity reported here (one in 59 patients) compares favorably with other series using microelectrodes. Visual evoked potentials may be a useful monitoring technique to reduce the incidence of clinically significant visual morbidity during pallidotomy, especially during formal lesioning of the ventral pallidum adjacent to the optic tract.

  5. A Synaptic Basis for Memory Storage in the Cerebral Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Mark F.

    1996-11-01

    A cardinal feature of neurons in the cerebral cortex is stimulus selectivity, and experience-dependent shifts in selectivity are a common correlate of memory formation. We have used a theoretical ``learning rule,'' devised to account for experience-dependent shifts in neuronal selectivity, to guide experiments on the elementary mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and neocortex. These experiments reveal that many synapses in hippocampus and neocortex are bidirectionally modifiable, that the modifications persist long enough to contribute to long-term memory storage, and that key variables governing the sign of synaptic plasticity are the amount of NMDA receptor activation and the recent history of cortical activity.

  6. Characterization of music-evoked autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, Petr; Tomic, Stefan T; Rakowski, Sonja K

    2007-11-01

    Despite music's prominence in Western society and its importance to individuals in their daily lives, very little is known about the memories and emotions that are often evoked when hearing a piece of music from one's past. We examined the content of music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) using a novel approach for selecting stimuli from a large corpus of popular music, in both laboratory and online settings. A set of questionnaires probed the cognitive and affective properties of the evoked memories. On average, 30% of the song presentations evoked autobiographical memories, and the majority of songs also evoked various emotions, primarily positive, that were felt strongly. The third most common emotion was nostalgia. Analyses of written memory reports found both general and specific levels of autobiographical knowledge to be represented, and several social and situational contexts for memory formation were common across many memories. The findings indicate that excerpts of popular music serve as potent stimuli for studying the structure of autobiographical memories.

  7. Brain state-dependent abnormal LFP activity in the auditory cortex of a schizophrenia mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito eNakao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In schizophrenia, evoked 40-Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs are impaired, which reflects the sensory deficits in this disorder, and baseline spontaneous oscillatory activity also appears to be abnormal. It has been debated whether the evoked ASSR impairments are due to the possible increase in baseline power. GABAergic interneuron-specific NMDA receptor (NMDAR hypofunction mutant mice mimic some behavioral and pathophysiological aspects of schizophrenia. To determine the presence and extent of sensory deficits in these mutant mice, we recorded spontaneous local field potential (LFP activity and its click-train evoked ASSRs from primary auditory cortex of awake, head-restrained mice. Baseline spontaneous LFP power in the pre-stimulus period before application of the first click trains was augmented at a wide range of frequencies. However, when repetitive ASSR stimuli were presented every 20 sec, averaged spontaneous LFP power amplitudes during the inter-ASSR stimulus intervals in the mutant mice became indistinguishable from the levels of control mice. Nonetheless, the evoked 40-Hz ASSR power and their phase locking to click trains were robustly impaired in the mutants, although the evoked 20-Hz ASSRs were also somewhat diminished. These results suggested that NMDAR hypofunction in cortical GABAergic neurons confers two brain state-dependent LFP abnormalities in the auditory cortex; (1 a broadband increase in spontaneous LFP power in the absence of external inputs, and (2 a robust deficit in the evoked ASSR power and its phase-locking despite of normal baseline LFP power magnitude during the repetitive auditory stimuli. The paradoxically high spontaneous LFP activity of the primary auditory cortex in the absence of external stimuli may possibly contribute to the emergence of schizophrenia-related aberrant auditory perception.

  8. Brain state-dependent abnormal LFP activity in the auditory cortex of a schizophrenia mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Kazuhito; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2014-01-01

    In schizophrenia, evoked 40-Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) are impaired, which reflects the sensory deficits in this disorder, and baseline spontaneous oscillatory activity also appears to be abnormal. It has been debated whether the evoked ASSR impairments are due to the possible increase in baseline power. GABAergic interneuron-specific NMDA receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction mutant mice mimic some behavioral and pathophysiological aspects of schizophrenia. To determine the presence and extent of sensory deficits in these mutant mice, we recorded spontaneous local field potential (LFP) activity and its click-train evoked ASSRs from primary auditory cortex of awake, head-restrained mice. Baseline spontaneous LFP power in the pre-stimulus period before application of the first click trains was augmented at a wide range of frequencies. However, when repetitive ASSR stimuli were presented every 20 s, averaged spontaneous LFP power amplitudes during the inter-ASSR stimulus intervals in the mutant mice became indistinguishable from the levels of control mice. Nonetheless, the evoked 40-Hz ASSR power and their phase locking to click trains were robustly impaired in the mutants, although the evoked 20-Hz ASSRs were also somewhat diminished. These results suggested that NMDAR hypofunction in cortical GABAergic neurons confers two brain state-dependent LFP abnormalities in the auditory cortex; (1) a broadband increase in spontaneous LFP power in the absence of external inputs, and (2) a robust deficit in the evoked ASSR power and its phase-locking despite of normal baseline LFP power magnitude during the repetitive auditory stimuli. The "paradoxically" high spontaneous LFP activity of the primary auditory cortex in the absence of external stimuli may possibly contribute to the emergence of schizophrenia-related aberrant auditory perception.

  9. Response of SI cortex to ipsilateral, contralateral and bilateral flutter stimulation in the cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favorov Oleg

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While SII cortex is considered to be the first cortical stage of the pathway that integrates tactile information arising from both sides of the body, SI cortex is generally not considered as a region in which neuronal response is modulated by simultaneous stimulation of bilateral (and mirror-image skin sites. Results Optical intrinsic signal imaging was used to evaluate the response of SI and SII in the same hemisphere to 25 Hz sinusoidal vertical skin displacement stimulation ("skin flutter" applied contralaterally, ipsilaterally, and bilaterally (simultaneously to the central pads of the forepaws. A localized increase in absorbance in both SI and SII occurred in response to both contralateral and bilateral flutter stimulation. Ipsilateral flutter stimulation evoked a localized increase in absorbance in SII, but little or no change in SI absorbance. In the forepaw representational region of SI, however, bilateral stimulation of the central pads evoked a response substantially smaller (approximately 30–35% smaller than the response to flutter stimulation of the contralateral central pad. Conclusion The finding that the response of SI cortex to bilateral central pad flutter stimulation is substantially smaller than the response evoked by a contralateral flutter stimulus, together with the recently published observation that a region located posteriorly in SII responds with a substantially larger response to a bilateral flutter stimulus than the response evoked from the contralateral central pad, lead us to propose that the SI activity evoked by contralateral skin stimulation is suppressed/inhibited (via corticocortical connections between SII and SI in the same hemisphere by the activity a simultaneous ipsilateral skin stimulus evokes in posterior SII.

  10. SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE - 2

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    Rekha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder affecting majority of population. It is estimated that over 400 million people throughout the world have diabetes. It has progressed to be a pandemic from an epidemic causing morbidity and mortality in the population. Among the many complications of diabetes, diabetic neuropathies contribute majorly to the morbidity associated with the disease. Axonal conduction is affected by elevated levels of protein kinase c causing neuronal ischemia; decreased ce llular myoinositol affecting sodium potassium ATPase pump leads to decreased nerve conduction; Somatosensory E voked P otentials (SSEPs reflect the activity of somatosensory pathways mediated through the dorsal columns of the spinal cord and the specific so matosensory cortex. Recording of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in diabetics is done to assess the sensory involvement of spinal cord. Presence of SEPs provides clear evidence for axonal continuity and by using different stimulation sites, the rate of reg eneration can be determined. Both onset and peak latencies of all SEP components are prolonged in patients with diabetes. Present study is done to compare somatosensory evoked potentials in diabetics and normal subjects. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: The present study was undertaken at the Upgraded Department of Physiology, Osmania Medical College, Koti, Hyderabad. The study was conducted on subjects, both male and female in the age group of 45 to 55 years, suffering from type II diabetes excluding other neurologi cal disorders. Non - invasive method of estimation of nerve conduction studies using SFEMG/EP — Electromyography or evoked potential system (Nicolet systems — USA using surface electrodes with automated computerized monitor attached with printer is used. RESUL TS : ANOVA showed statistically significant N9 latency (right & left sides. Latencies of all the components of SSEPs were more significant than amplitudes in Diabetic

  11. Cdk5 Kinase Activity, Caspase-3 Expression and Synaptic Structural Plasticity in Infra-limbic Cortex of Rats with Conditioned Fear%条件性恐惧大鼠边缘下区Cdk5激酶活性、caspase-3表达以及突触结构的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李培培; 张丽丽; 韦美; 李敏

    2011-01-01

    Classical fear conditioning is a behavioral paradigm that is widely used to study the neuronal mechanisms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Previous studies have clearly identified the medial prefrontal cortex as a key brain area for fear memory traces, but the molecules involving are poorly understood. Recently, the neuronal cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in both functional and structural plasticity through affecting ion channel conductance, dendritic spine formation. protein expressions and transcriptions in the postsynaptic neurons. Importantly, dysregulation of Cdk5 has been linked to cell apoptosis, which involves perturbation in synaptic function. How the kinase activity, expression of caspase-3 and synaptic structure have changed in infra-limbic cortex (IL) of conditioned fear? The present study is aimed to answer this question by two experiments.Male adult SD rats were randomly divided into fear group and naive group. Conditioned fear model of rats was established by tone paired foot shock. At the 2nd, 4th and 8th days after fear conditioning, the Cdk5 activity,and expressions of P35 or P25 and caspase-3 in IL area were studied by immunoprecipitation and kinase assay,Western blotting and immunnohistochemical assay. Then the change of synaptic structure at the 8th and 22nd days after conditioned fear was observed with electron microscopy. The results of our experiment 1 showed that Cdk5 activity and expressions of P25 and caspase-3 were all higher in fear group than naive group. In experiment 2, the postsynaptic density (PSD) was thinner in fear group than naive group at the 8th and 22nd days after fear conditioning, but the numerical densities of IL synapse was decreased in fear group at the 22nd day after fear conditioning.Our date suggested that at 8th days after conditioned fear established, the expression of P25 and Cdk5 activity in fear group were higher than naive group, which may lead to the change of synaptic structural

  12. Higher Order Spike Synchrony in Prefrontal Cortex during visual memory

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    Gordon ePipa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Precise temporal synchrony of spike firing has been postulated as an important neuronal mechanism for signal integration and the induction of plasticity in neocortex. As prefrontal cortex plays an important role in organizing memory and executive functions, the convergence of multiple visual pathways onto PFC predicts that neurons should preferentially synchronize their spiking when stimulus information is processed. Furthermore, synchronous spike firing should intensify if memory processes require the induction of neuronal plasticity, even if this is only for short-term. Here we show with multiple simultaneously recorded units in ventral prefrontal cortex that neurons participate in 3 ms precise synchronous discharges distributed across multiple sites separated by at least 500 µm. The frequency of synchronous firing is modulated by behavioral performance and is specific for the memorized visual stimuli. In particular, during the memory period in which activity is not stimulus driven, larger groups of up to 7 sites exhibit performance dependent modulation of their spike synchronization.

  13. Recycling of Plastic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2011-01-01

    Plastic is produced from fossil oil. Plastic is used for many different products. Some plastic products like, for example, wrapping foil, bags and disposable containers for food and beverage have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of most waste. Other plastic products like......, for example, gutters, window frames, car parts and transportation boxes have long lifetimes and thus appear as waste only many years after they have been introduced on the market. Plastic is constantly being used for new products because of its attractive material properties: relatively cheap, easy to form......, good strength and long durability. Recycling of plastic waste from production is well-established, while recycling of postconsumer plastic waste still is in its infancy. This chapter describes briefly how plastic is produced and how waste plastic is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements...

  14. Different forms of decision-making involve changes in the synaptic strength of the thalamic, hippocampal, and amygdalar afferents to the medial prefrontal cortex

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    Juan Carlos López-Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decision-making and other cognitive processes are assumed to take place in the prefrontal cortex. In particular, the medial prefrontal cortex is identified in rodents by its dense connectivity with the mediodorsal thalamus, and because of its inputs from other sites, such as hippocampus and amygdala. The aim of this study was to find a putative relationship between the behavior of mice during the performance of decision-making tasks that involve penalties as a consequence of induced actions, and the strength of field postsynaptic potentials evoked in the prefrontal cortex from its thalamic, hippocampal, and amygdalar afferents. Mice were chronically implanted with stimulating electrodes in the mediodorsal thalamus, the hippocampal CA1 area, or the basolateral amygdala, and with recording electrodes in the prelimbic/infralimbic area of the prefrontal cortex. Additional stimulating electrodes aimed at evoking negative reinforcements were implanted on the trigeminal nerve. Field postsynaptic potentials evoked at the medial prefrontal cortex from the three selected projecting areas during the food/shock decision-making task decreased in amplitude with shock intensity and animals’ avoidance of the reward. Field postsynaptic potentials collected during the operant task also decreased in amplitude (but that evoked by amygdalar stimulation when lever presses were associated with a trigeminal shock. Results showed a general decrease in the strength of these potentials when animals inhibited their natural or learned appetitive behaviors, suggesting an inhibition of the prefrontal cortex in these conflicting situations.

  15. Motor cortex representation of the upper-limb in individuals born without a hand.

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    Karen T Reilly

    Full Text Available The body schema is an action-related representation of the body that arises from activity in a network of multiple brain areas. While it was initially thought that the body schema developed with experience, the existence of phantom limbs in individuals born without a limb (amelics led to the suggestion that it was innate. The problem with this idea, however, is that the vast majority of amelics do not report the presence of a phantom limb. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS applied over the primary motor cortex (M1 of traumatic amputees can evoke movement sensations in the phantom, suggesting that traumatic amputation does not delete movement representations of the missing hand. Given this, we asked whether the absence of a phantom limb in the majority of amelics means that the motor cortex does not contain a cortical representation of the missing limb, or whether it is present but has been deactivated by the lack of sensorimotor experience. In four upper-limb amelic subjects we directly stimulated the arm/hand region of M1 to see 1 whether we could evoke phantom sensations, and 2 whether muscle representations in the two cortices were organised asymmetrically. TMS applied over the motor cortex contralateral to the missing limb evoked contractions in stump muscles but did not evoke phantom movement sensations. The location and extent of muscle maps varied between hemispheres but did not reveal any systematic asymmetries. In contrast, forearm muscle thresholds were always higher for the missing limb side. We suggest that phantom movement sensations reported by some upper limb amelics are mostly driven by vision and not by the persistence of motor commands to the missing limb within the sensorimotor cortex. We propose that prewired movement representations of a limb need the experience of movement to be expressed within the primary motor cortex.

  16. The Role of GABAergic Inhibition in Ocular Dominance Plasticity

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    J. Alexander Heimel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, we have gained much insight into the mechanisms that open and close a sensitive period of plasticity in the visual cortex. This brings the hope that novel treatments can be developed for brain injuries requiring renewed plasticity potential and neurodevelopmental brain disorders caused by defective synaptic plasticity. One of the central mechanisms responsible for opening the sensitive period is the maturation of inhibitory innervation. Many molecular and cellular events have been identified that drive this developmental process, including signaling through BDNF and IGF-1, transcriptional control by OTX2, maturation of the extracellular matrix, and GABA-regulated inhibitory synapse formation. The mechanisms through which the development of inhibitory innervation triggers and potentially closes the sensitive period may involve plasticity of inhibitory inputs or permissive regulation of excitatory synapse plasticity. Here, we discuss the current state of knowledge in the field and open questions to be addressed.

  17. Maladaptive synaptic plasticity in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID in patients with Parkinson disease (PD could be due to maladaptive plasticity of corticostriatal synapses in response to L-DOPA treatment. A series of recent studies has revealed that LID is associated with marked morphological plasticity of striatal dendritic spines, particularly cell type-specific structural plasticity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs in the striatum. In addition, evidence demonstrating the occurrence of plastic adaptations, including aberrant morphological and functional features, in multiple components of cortico-basal ganglionic circuitry, such as primary motor cortex (M1 and basal ganglia (BG output nuclei. These adaptations have been implicated in the pathophysiology of LID. Here, we briefly review recent studies that have addressed maladaptive plastic changes within the cortico-BG loop in dyskinetic animal models of PD and patients with PD.

  18. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Whitt, Jessica L

    2015-12-01

    Sensory loss leads to widespread adaptation of brain circuits to allow an organism to navigate its environment with its remaining senses, which is broadly referred to as cross-modal plasticity. Such adaptation can be observed even in the primary sensory cortices, and falls into two distinct categories: recruitment of the deprived sensory cortex for processing the remaining senses, which we term 'cross-modal recruitment', and experience-dependent refinement of the spared sensory cortices referred to as 'compensatory plasticity.' Here we will review recent studies demonstrating that cortical adaptation to sensory loss involves LTP/LTD and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity is observed in adults, hence cross-modal sensory deprivation may be an effective way to promote plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

  19. Extinction reveals that primary sensory cortex predicts reinforcement outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Bieszczad, Kasia M.; Weinberger, Norman M.

    2012-01-01

    Primary sensory cortices are traditionally regarded as stimulus analyzers. However, studies of associative learning-induced plasticity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) indicate involvement in learning, memory and other cognitive processes. For example, the area of representation of a tone becomes larger for stronger auditory memories and the magnitude of area gain is proportional to the degree that a tone becomes behaviorally important. Here, we used extinction to investigate whether “beha...

  20. AUGMENTATION-RELATED BRAIN PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eDi Pino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyzes the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain.Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools.Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e. primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the

  1. Colocalized structural and functional changes in the cortex of patients with trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre F DaSilva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent data suggests that in chronic pain there are changes in gray matter consistent with decreased brain volume, indicating that the disease process may produce morphological changes in the brains of those affected. However, no study has evaluated cortical thickness in relation to specific functional changes in evoked pain. In this study we sought to investigate structural (gray matter thickness and functional (blood oxygenation dependent level - BOLD changes in cortical regions of precisely matched patients with chronic trigeminal neuropathic pain (TNP affecting the right maxillary (V2 division of the trigeminal nerve. The model has a number of advantages including the evaluation of specific changes that can be mapped to known somatotopic anatomy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cortical regions were chosen based on sensory (Somatosensory cortex (SI and SII, motor (MI and posterior insula, or emotional (DLPFC, Frontal, Anterior Insula, Cingulate processing of pain. Both structural and functional (to brush-induced allodynia scans were obtained and averaged from two different imaging sessions separated by 2-6 months in all patients. Age and gender-matched healthy controls were also scanned twice for cortical thickness measurement. Changes in cortical thickness of TNP patients were frequently colocalized and correlated with functional allodynic activations, and included both cortical thickening and thinning in sensorimotor regions, and predominantly thinning in emotional regions. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, such patterns of cortical thickness suggest a dynamic functionally-driven plasticity of the brain. These structural changes, which correlated with the pain duration, age-at-onset, pain intensity and cortical activity, may be specific targets for evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  2. [Neuroanatomy of Frontal Association Cortex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    The frontal association cortex is composed of the prefrontal cortex and the motor-related areas except the primary motor cortex (i.e., the so-called higher motor areas), and is well-developed in primates, including humans. The prefrontal cortex receives and integrates large bits of diverse information from the parietal, temporal, and occipital association cortical areas (termed the posterior association cortex), and paralimbic association cortical areas. This information is then transmitted to the primary motor cortex via multiple motor-related areas. Given these facts, it is likely that the prefrontal cortex exerts executive functions for behavioral control. The functional input pathways from the posterior and paralimbic association cortical areas to the prefrontal cortex are classified primarily into six groups. Cognitive signals derived from the prefrontal cortex are conveyed to the rostral motor-related areas to transform them into motor signals, which finally enter the primary motor cortex via the caudal motor-related areas. Furthermore, it has been shown that, similar to the primary motor cortex, areas of the frontal association cortex form individual networks (known as "loop circuits") with the basal ganglia and cerebellum via the thalamus, and hence are ex