WorldWideScience

Sample records for corrugator muscle responses

  1. Anatomy of the Corrugator Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Lee, Jung Hun; Lim, Hee Joong

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this article is to systematically review the anatomy and action of the corrugator muscle. PubMed and Scopus were searched using the terms "corrugator" AND "anatomy." Among the 60 full texts from the 145 relevant abstracts, 34 articles without sufficient content were excluded and 4 articles drawn from the reference lists were added. Among the 30 articles analyzed (721 hemifaces), 28% classified by oblique head and transverse head, and 72% did not. Corrugator originated mostly from the medial supraorbital rim (45%), followed by the medial frontal bone (31%), the medial infraorbital rim (17%), and the upper nasal process (7%). Corrugator extended through the frontalis and orbicularis oculi (41%), only the frontalis (41%), or only the orbicularis oculi (18%). Corrugator ran superolaterally (59%), or laterally (41%). Corrugators inserted mostly to the middle of the eyebrow (57%), or the medial half of the eyebrow (36%), but also to the glabella region (7%). The length of the corrugator ranged 38 to 53 mm. The transverse head (23.38 mm) was longer than the oblique head (19.75 mm). Corrugator was thicker at the medial canthus than at the midpupillary line. Corrugator was innervated by the temporal branch of the facial nerve (66%), the zygomatic branch (17%), or the angular nerve (zygomatic branch and buccal branch, 17%). Supraorbital nerve (60%) or supratrochlear nerve (40%) penetrated the corrugator. The action was depressing, pulling the eyebrow medially (91%), or with medial eyebrow elevation and lateral eyebrow depression (9%). Surgeons must keep this anatomy in mind during surgical procedures.

  2. Modeling of a corrugated dielectric elastomer actuator for artificial muscle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadooka, Kevin; Taya, Minoru; Naito, Keishi; Saito, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators have many advantages, including light weight, simplicity, high energy density, and silent operation. These features make them suitable to replace conventional actuators and transducers, especially in artificial muscle applications where large contractile strains are necessary for lifelike motions. This paper will introduce the concept of a corrugated dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), which consists of dielectric elastomer (DE) laminated to a thin elastic layer to induce bending motion at each of the corrugations, resulting in large axial deformation. The location of the DE and elastic layers can be configured to provide tensile or compressive axial strain. Such corrugated DE actuators are also highly scalable: linking multiple actuators in series results in greater deformation, whereas multiple actuators in parallel results in larger force output. Analytical closed-form solutions based on linear elasticity were derived for the displacement and force output of curved unimorph and corrugated DEA, both consisting of an arbitrary number of lamina. A total strain energy analysis and Castigiliano's theorem were used to predict the nonlinear force-displacement behavior of the corrugated actuator. Curved unimorph and corrugated DEA were fabricated using VHB F9469PC as the DE material. Displacement of the actuators observed during testing agreed well with the modeling results. Large contractile strain (25.5%) was achieved by the corrugated DEA. Future work includes investigating higher performance DE materials such as plasticized PVDF terpolymers, processed by thin film deposition methods.

  3. In Your Face: Risk of Punishment Enhances Cognitive Control and Error-Related Activity in the Corrugator Supercilii Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn R Lindström

    Full Text Available Cognitive control is needed when mistakes have consequences, especially when such consequences are potentially harmful. However, little is known about how the aversive consequences of deficient control affect behavior. To address this issue, participants performed a two-choice response time task where error commissions were expected to be punished by electric shocks during certain blocks. By manipulating (1 the perceived punishment risk (no, low, high associated with error commissions, and (2 response conflict (low, high, we showed that motivation to avoid punishment enhanced performance during high response conflict. As a novel index of the processes enabling successful cognitive control under threat, we explored electromyographic activity in the corrugator supercilii (cEMG muscle of the upper face. The corrugator supercilii is partially controlled by the anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC which is sensitive to negative affect, pain and cognitive control. As hypothesized, the cEMG exhibited several key similarities with the core temporal and functional characteristics of the Error-Related Negativity (ERN ERP component, the hallmark index of cognitive control elicited by performance errors, and which has been linked to the aMCC. The cEMG was amplified within 100 ms of error commissions (the same time-window as the ERN, particularly during the high punishment risk condition where errors would be most aversive. Furthermore, similar to the ERN, the magnitude of error cEMG predicted post-error response time slowing. Our results suggest that cEMG activity can serve as an index of avoidance motivated control, which is instrumental to adaptive cognitive control when consequences are potentially harmful.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Structural Response of Corrugated Blast Wall Depending on Blast Load Pulse Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Min Sohn

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydrocarbon explosions are one of most hazardous events for workers on offshore platforms. To protect structures against explosion loads, corrugated blast walls are typically installed. However, the profiles of real explosion loads are quite different depending on the congestion and confinement of Topside structures. As the level of congestion and confinement increases, the explosion load increases by up to 8 bar, and the rising time of the load decreases. This study primarily aims to investigate the structural behavior characteristics of corrugated blast walls under different types of explosion loadings. Four loading shapes were applied in the structural response analysis, which utilized a dynamic nonlinear finite element method.

  5. Experimental investigation on the dynamic response of clamped corrugated sandwich plates subjected to underwater impulsive loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Dacheng; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Corrugated sandwich plates are widely used in marine industry because such plates have high strength-to-weight ratios and blast resistance. The laboratory-scaled fluid-structure interaction experiments are performed to demonstrate the shock resistance of solid monolithic plates and corrugated sandwich plates by quantifying the permanent transverse deflection at mid-span of the plates as a function of impulsive loadings per areal mass. Sandwich structures with 6mm-thick and 10mm-thick 3003 aluminum corrugated core and 5A06 face sheets are compared with the 5A06 solid monolithic plates in this paper. The dynamic deformation of plates are captured with the the 3D digital speckle correlation method (DIC). The results affirm that sandwich structures show a 30% reduction in the maximum plate deflection compare with a monolithic plate of identical mass per unit area, and the peak value of deflection effectively reduced by increasing the thickness core. The failure modes of sandwich plates consists of core crushing, imprinting, stretch tearing of face sheets, bending and permanent deformation of entire structure with the increasing impulsive loads, and the failure mechanisms are analyzed with the postmortem panels and dynamic deflection history captured by cameras. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.: 11372088).

  6. Impact response of ductile self-reinforced composite corrugated sandwich beams

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Christof; Kazemahvazi, Sohrab; Russell, B. P.; Zenkert, Dan; V. S. Deshpande

    2016-01-01

    Corrugated sandwich beams made entirely from self-reinforced poly (ethylene terephthalate) SrPET are manufactured and tested dynamically. The beams are subjected to impact loading at the mid-span using a metal foam projectile and the beam deflection is measured. For sandwich beams with a constant areal mass, beams with a high mass portion in the core webs outperform configurations with a high mass portion in the face sheets (given that the face sheets are thick enough to carry the transversal...

  7. Numerical Analysis of Dynamic Response of Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels Subjected to Near-Field Air Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional fully coupled simulation is conducted to analyze the dynamic response of sandwich panels comprising equal thicknesses face sheets sandwiching a corrugated core when subjected to localized impulse created by the detonation of cylindrical explosive. A large number of computational cases have been calculated to comprehensively investigate the performance of sandwich panels under near-field air blast loading. Results show that the deformation/failure modes of panels depend strongly on stand-off distance. The beneficial FSI effect can be enhanced by decreasing the thickness of front face sheet. The core configuration has a negligible influence on the peak reflected pressure, but it has an effect on the deflection of a panel. It is found that the benefits of a sandwich panel over an equivalent weight solid plate to withstand near-field air blast loading are more evident at lower stand-off distance.

  8. Compact wideband plasmonic filter with flat-top transmission response based on corrugated metal-insulator-metal ring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Zhou, Yong Jin; Zhang, Chao; Xiao, Qian Xun

    2017-10-27

    We demonstrate a novel route to control the filtering of spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) on the corrugated metal-insulator-metal (MIM) ring resonator. The spoof LSPs resonance modes can be effectively tuned to achieve broad passband (covering the quadrupole mode and the hexapole mode) by selecting proper lengths in the input and output coupling area. The mutual coupling between the input and output lines produces the flat-top transmission response and sharp out-of-band rejection. Compared with the wideband bandpass filters based on spoof plasmonic waveguides, the proposed filter is ultra-compact and only 0.35λ*0.35λ. In order to further improve the property of the bandpass plasmonic filter, all the out-of-band frequencies (the dipole mode and the octopole mode) have been rejected by introducing a shunt stepped-impedance resonator and double C-shaped rings on the back of the substrate of the filter. Simulated results are confirmed via experiment, showing good rejection and wideband filtering performance with low insertion loss, flat-top transmission response and sharp out-of-band suppression. The proposed filter can find more applications in the highly integrated plasmonic circuits and systems in both terahertz and microwave regimes.

  9. Properties of cutoff corrugated surfaces for corrugated horn design. [corrugation shape and density effects on scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, C. A.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Corrugated horns involve a junction between the corrugated surface and a conducting ground plane. Proper horn design requires an understanding of the electromagnetic properties of the corrugated surface and this junction. An integral equation solution has been used to study the influence of corrugation density and tooth thickness on the power loss, surface current, and the scattering from a ground plane/corrugated surface junction.

  10. An Improved Method of Manufacturing Corrugated Boxes: Lateral Corrugator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank C. Murray Ph.D.; , Roman Popil Ph.D.; Michael Shaepe (formerly with IPST, now at Cargill. Inc)

    2008-12-18

    Paper physicists have known that a corrugated box constructed from outer liner sheets having a predominant fiber orientation aligned with the corrugating flute direction would have higher stiffness and crush resistance (per unit of fiber weight) than the conventional box construction. Such increased performance per unit of fiber weight could result in fiber reduction and energy savings for boxes having equivalent performance specifications. The goal of this project was to develop and demonstrate a commercially viable lateral corrugating process. This included designing and building a pilot lateral corrugator, testing and evaluating pilot machine made boxes, and developing a strategy for commercialization.

  11. Terahertz guided mode properties in an internally corrugated plasmonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Maidul; Chowdhury, Dibakar Roy; Ahmad, Amir; Kumar, Gagan

    2017-08-01

    We discuss the terahertz surface plasmon propagation properties in a waveguide comprising of subwavelength scale internally corrugated V-shaped structures. The structures are assumed to be periodically arranged in a thin sheet of metal and ensure plasmonic response of the waveguide. We comprehensively examine the effect of internal corrugations on the plasmonic properties of the guided modes supported by the waveguide. The guided mode properties are found to vary with the internal corrugations of the structures. We observe that multimode propagation can be switched to a single mode as we increase the steps of internal corrugations. The findings are supported with a semi-analytical model that we employ specifically for our geometry. We also analyze the dispersion properties of the fundamental modes under the different steps of corrugations and calculate group velocity in order to understand the slow light behavior of the modes. The results are compared with the waveguides having V-grooves without any internal corrugations. Our study could be significant to understand the role of corrugations along the waveguide as well as within the structures and accordingly their applications in the active and passive plasmonic guided wave devices.

  12. Competition and Co-operation in the Corrugated Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Carl-Henric; Axelson, Johan; Emanuelsson, Martin

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes how the five Swedish corrugated box manufacturers, while still in fierce competition, got together in 1999 to fight a new logistic system, plastic crates, which threatened to overtake a substantial part of the Swedish market for transport packaging. It explains the background of SWIF 2000, the competitive response by the five Swedish corrugated box manufacturers, how the strategy was developed, and what made the competitors work together. Many driving forces influence com...

  13. Embodied simulation of emotional valence: Facial muscle responses to abstract and concrete words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künecke, Janina; Sommer, Werner; Schacht, Annekathrin; Palazova, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Semantic knowledge is thought to be at least partially grounded in sensory, motor, and affective information, acquired through experiences in our inner and outer world. The reactivation of experience-related information during meaning access is called simulation. In the affective simulation account, it is assumed that the grounding information depends on the concepts' concreteness. Whereas abstract concepts are thought to be mainly represented through affective experiential information, concrete words rely more on sensory-motor experiential information. To test this hypothesis, we measured facial muscle activity as an indicator of affective simulation during visual word recognition. Words varied on the dimensions of concreteness and valence. Behavioral and electromyographic data were analyzed with linear mixed-effects models with maximal random effect structure to optimize generalization over participants and word samples. Contrary to this hypothesis, we found a valence effect in the m. corrugator supercilii only in response to concrete but not to abstract words. Our data show that affective simulation as measured with facial muscle activity occurs in response to concrete rather than to abstract words. More concrete words are supposed to have higher context availability and richer visual imagery, which might promote affective simulation on the expressive level of facial muscle activity. The results are in line with embodied accounts of semantic representation but speak against its predominant role for representing affective information in abstract concepts. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. Shape optimization of corrugated airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sambhav; Bhatt, Varun Dhananjay; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The effect of corrugations on the aerodynamic performance of a Mueller C4 airfoil, placed at a 5° angle of attack and Re=10{,}000, is investigated. A stabilized finite element method is employed to solve the incompressible flow equations in two dimensions. A novel parameterization scheme is proposed that enables representation of corrugations on the surface of the airfoil, and their spontaneous appearance in the shape optimization loop, if indeed they improve aerodynamic performance. Computations are carried out for different location and number of corrugations, while holding their height fixed. The first corrugation causes an increase in lift and drag. Each of the later corrugations leads to a reduction in drag. Shape optimization of the Mueller C4 airfoil is carried out using various objective functions and optimization strategies, based on controlling airfoil thickness and camber. One of the optimal shapes leads to 50 % increase in lift coefficient and 23 % increase in aerodynamic efficiency compared to the Mueller C4 airfoil.

  15. Dynamic epigenetic responses to muscle contraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Zierath, Juleen R; Barrès, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a malleable organ that responds to a single acute exercise bout by inducing the expression of genes involved in structural, metabolic and functional adaptations. Several epigenetic mechanisms including histone H4 deacetylation and loss of promoter methylation have been implicated...... in modifying exercise-responsive gene expression. These transient changes suggest that epigenetic mechanisms are not restricted to early stages of human development but are broad dynamic controllers of genomic plasticity in response to environmental factors....

  16. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

    2013-09-30

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  17. Experimental studies of Steel Corrugated Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarev Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this particular article is to assess existing calculations of steel corrugated constructions. Steel Corrugated Construction is a perspective type of constructions, which is exhibiting numerous advantages in comparison with one that currently applied in automobile and railroad networks (reinforced concrete water-throughput pipes, reinforced concrete frame bridges. The evaluation of experimental data on models of constructions of this particular type has been carried out in order to improve calculations of Steel Corrugated Constructions.

  18. Large Deflection Performance of Surface Micromachined Corrugated Diaphragms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mullem, C.J.; van Mullem, C.J.; Gabriel, K.J.; Fujita, H.

    1991-01-01

    The large deflection performance was measured and modeled for its dependence on diaphragm geometries and corrugation parameters. Corrugated polyimide diaphragms of various diameters, corrugation frequencies, and thicknesses were fabricated using a surface micromachining technique. Current models

  19. Transpalpebral Corrugator Resection: 25-Year Experience, Refinements and Additional Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyuron, Bahman; Son, Ji H

    2017-04-01

    The senior author introduced the transpalpebral approach for the first time during the ASPS meeting in 1993. He has made some refinements in the technique and has developed newer indications for this procedure. These refinements, indications and the related new video are the subject of this report. The modifications in the technique are as follows: After elevation of the skin and the orbicularis muscle and dissection under the muscle, a thin layer of the depressor supercilii muscle overlying the darker and more friable corrugator supercilii muscle is removed. A fairly constant branch of the supraorbital nerve piercing this muscle medially is first identified on the surface and followed deep in the muscle using a mosquito hemostat. The muscle is then lifted, and then, the same nerve branch is identified above the periosteum. The segment of the muscle lateral to this nerve is then isolated and removed by first transecting it medially and then lateral to the nerve. A cephalic segment is isolated and removed using the coagulation power of the cautery to minimize the postoperative bleeding. The rest of the muscle is then removed in a piecemeal fashion as thoroughly as possible, including a lateral segment of the procerus muscle, the end point being visualization of the subcutaneous fat. If the intention of the surgery is to treat frontal migraine headaches, the supratrochlear and supraorbital arteries are also removed. If the nerve and vessel pass through a foramen, a foraminotomy is carried out on patients with migraine headaches. Two to three cc of fat is injected in the glabellar and corrugator sites in most patients to avoid any depression and to restore the lost glabellar volume. Beyond patients with male pattern baldness, those with a long forehead and those with overactive frown muscles but optimal eyebrow positions, this technique is now being used for those with proptosis, exophthalmos and those with eyelid ptosis who would not undergo ptosis correction to

  20. Corrugated megathrust revealed offshore from Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Joel H.; Kluesner, Jared; Silver, Eli A.; Brodsky, Emily E.; Brothers, Daniel; Bangs, Nathan L.; Kirkpatrick, James D.; Wood, Ruby; Okamato, Kristina

    2018-01-01

    Exhumed faults are rough, often exhibiting topographic corrugations oriented in the direction of slip; such features are fundamental to mechanical processes that drive earthquakes and fault evolution. However, our understanding of corrugation genesis remains limited due to a lack of in situ observations at depth, especially at subducting plate boundaries. Here we present three-dimensional seismic reflection data of the Costa Rica subduction zone that image a shallow megathrust fault characterized by corrugated, and chaotic and weakly corrugated topographies. The corrugated surfaces extend from near the trench to several kilometres down-dip, exhibit high reflection amplitudes (consistent with high fluid content/pressure) and trend 11–18° oblique to subduction, suggesting 15 to 25 mm yr−1 of trench-parallel slip partitioning across the plate boundary. The corrugations form along portions of the megathrust with greater cumulative slip and may act as fluid conduits. In contrast, weakly corrugated areas occur adjacent to active plate bending faults where the megathrust has migrated up-section, forming a nascent fault surface. The variations in megathrust roughness imaged here suggest that abandonment and then reestablishment of the megathrust up-section transiently increases fault roughness. Analogous corrugations may exist along significant portions of subduction megathrusts globally.

  1. Flow induced pulsations generated in corrugated tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Swindell, R.; Tummers, R.

    2008-01-01

    Corrugated tubes can produce a tonal noise when used for gas transport, for instance in the case of flexible risers. The whistling sound is generated by shear layer instability due to the boundary layer separation at each corrugation. This whistling is examined by investigating the frequency,

  2. Corrugated Pipe as a Beam Dechirper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2012-04-20

    We have studied the use of a metallic pipe with small corrugations for the purpose of passively dechirping, through its wakefield, a short, intense electron bunch. The corrugated pipe is attractive for this purpose because its wake: (i) has near maximal possible amplitude for a given aperture and (ii) has a relatively large oscillation wave length, even when the aperture is small. We showed how the corrugated structure can satisfy dechirping requirements encountered in the NGLS project at LBNL. We found that a linear chirp of -40 MeV/mm can be induced by an NGLS-like beam, by having it pass through a corrugated, metallic pipe of radius 3 mm, length 8.2 m, and corrugation parameters full depth 450 {mu}m and period 1000 {mu}m. This structure is about 15 times as effective in the role of dechirper as an S-band accelerator structure used passively.

  3. Using skin temperature and muscle thickness to assess muscle response to strength training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Borba Neves

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Several studies already reported the response of many biomarkers after strength training, but studies using low cost diagnostic imaging tools are rare.Objective:To evaluate the usage of skin temperature and muscle thickness (MT to monitor muscle response (until 96 hours after to high-intensity strength training.Methods:This is a short-term longitudinal study with 13 trained, healthy male volunteers. Volunteers performed five sets of biceps bi-set exercise with their dominant arm with dumbbells, with load of 70% of one-repetition maximum (1RM. The ultrasound (US and thermal images were acquired before and immediately after the last set, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after exercise.Results:The analysis was divided in two stages: acute muscle response (until 24 hours after training and delayed muscle response (from 24 to 96 hours after training. The elbow flexors thickness showed the peak value immediately after the last set of training. Skin temperature (on elbow flexors and the elbow flexors thickness grew continuously from 24 to 96 hours after strength training. There is a high correlation (r=0.941, p=0.017 between skin temperature and muscle thickness from the end of exercise until 96 hours after strength training.Conclusions:The US images showed high sensibility for muscle physiological changes on the first 24 hours after exercise. On the other hand, the thermal images had higher sensibility for muscle physiological changes than US images from 24 to 96 hours after training.

  4. Hybrid modes in a square corrugated waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, K.

    2001-06-01

    By using two scalar eigenfunctions, electric and magnetic fields in the rectangular (or square) corrugated waveguide are analyzed. In a rectangular corrugated waveguide, the boundary conditions on two corrugated and two smooth walls can be satisfied to excite the hybrid mode. In a highly oversized waveguide where the wavelength of dominant mode is close to that in vacuum, two smooth walls can be exchanged with the corrugated walls because the boundary condition at this walls is satisfied approximately. The replacement is possible due to almost no penetration of the electromagnetic fields into the gap of the replaced walls when the direction of main electric field is parallel to the gap of replaced walls. This characteristic enables us to rotate the polarization of the hybrid mode in the oversized square waveguide with all four corrugated walls and is applicable to the remote steering antenna for electron cyclotron heating in the ITER. For a beam injection larger than the critical angle in this antenna, excited higher modes are at a considerably different wavelength from that in vacuum and result in the dissatisfaction of boundary conditions due to millimeter-wave penetration into corrugation gaps in replaced walls. (author)

  5. Response of the respiratory muscles to rehabilitation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decramer, Marc

    2009-09-01

    Respiratory rehabilitation is known to improve outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The question addressed in the present review is whether these beneficial effects are related to improvements in inspiratory muscle function. Respiratory muscle fatigue often did not occur during exercise in patients with COPD, since exercise limitation usually occurred when significant force reserve in the inspiratory muscles was still present. Notwithstanding, a number of observations may provide indirect evidence that respiratory muscle fatigue may occur during exercise. Some evidence is present that, in normal humans, whole body exercise training improved inspiratory muscle endurance, but no studies are available in patients with COPD. Animal studies invariably demonstrated that exercise training increased the number of oxidative fibers and oxidative enzyme activity in inspiratory muscles. These effects, however, were considerably smaller than the effects found on peripheral muscles with similar fiber composition. Clear evidence indicated that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improved inspiratory muscle function. Two large meta-analyses indicated that, if the training load was properly controlled, IMT alone or combined with general exercise reconditioning improved inspiratory muscle strength and endurance and dyspnea. The combination did not result in greater improvements in functional exercise capacity. Animal studies and one patient study confirmed the occurrence of structural remodeling of the inspiratory muscles in response to IMT. The final question is whether improvements in inspiratory muscle function produced by IMT lead to improved outcomes in COPD. In all five studies in which training load was adequately controlled, a significant reduction of dyspnea during activities of daily living was found. Eight randomized studies examined the effects of the combination. Greater improvements in exercise capacity were only found in three studies

  6. Effects of corrugation parameters on fluid mixing characteristics in corrugated passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiser, Gerd; Kottke, Volker

    1991-05-01

    Static mixers are well established in process engineering. Their particular advantages are in-line mixing, no moving parts, low power consumption, and simultaneous homogenization of residence time behavior. Several species of static mixers are well known. An example of their arrangement is based on corrugated passages formed by layers of single plates with opposing orientation. Until now, the corrugation parameters of this species have mainly been designed according to few experimental studies. However, flow phenomena, implied by the geometry of the corrugated structure, are of significant influence on the mixing behavior, the pressure drop, and the residence time characteristics in corrugated passages. In new investigations, the effects of a variety of corrugation parameters on flow phenomena, mixing characteristics/and pressure drop have been systematically determined. The results prove that there are quite different kinds of flow phenomena depending on the geometrical parameters of the structure. Some parameter combinations lead to no mixing at all, others lead to a homogeneous mixing within a small length. Examples are shown of flow behavior in corrugated passages; here the flow has been traced locally making the flow direction evident. The effects of corrugation parameters on the fundamental flow phenomena will be discussed. In order to describe and predict the flow behavior in these corrugated passages, a model has been set up based on the fundamental flow phenomena. This model allows the simulation of flow behavior in corrugated passages, thereby allowing, also, the simulation of the mixing characteristics and the residence time behavior of the fluid in these structures. Examples of the simulation, where the local addition of a tracer and its mixing across the structure has been simulated, are shown. Further results of flow simulation on mixing characteristics and dynamic aspects will be compared to experiments. Combined with the pressure drop in corrugated

  7. Response and function of skeletal muscle heat shock protein 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuefei; Gampert, Larissa; Nething, Katja; Steinacker, Jürgen M

    2006-09-01

    In response to stress, cells produce a series of heat shock proteins (Hsps). One of the most prominent Hsps, is the 70 kDa Hsp (Hsp70). Hsp70 is a highly conserved and essential protein against stress. The skeletal muscle responds to a diverse group of stress signals namely, muscle contraction linked energy and milieu challenges, ischemia and exercise by producing Hsp70. The extent of this Hsp70 response in skeletal muscle depends on the type and intensity of the signal, and is characterized in a muscle fiber specific manner by a special time course. Hsp70 in the skeletal muscle is regulated at transcriptional, translational and posttranslational levels. Hsp70 serves as an indicator for cellular stress as a molecular chaperone, plays pivotal role in maintaining cellular homeostasis by preventing apoptosis, influences energy metabolism, facilitates cellular processes in terms of muscular adaptation and interacts with other signalling pathways. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the skeletal muscle Hsp70 response.

  8. Wheal and flare responses to muscle relaxants in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J H; Adelson, D; Walker, B

    1991-11-01

    Chemically and pharmacologically unrelated molecules release histamine in humans to produce both cutaneous and systemic responses. It has been suggested that molecular changes in the new benzylisoquinoline-derived muscle relaxant, atracurium, make it less likely to cause histamine release. We therefore injected volunteers intradermally with equimolar concentrations of various muscle relaxants, morphine, papaverine (a benzylisoquinoline), and histamine, to evaluate the relative ability of these drugs to cause wheal and flare responses, and mast-cell degranulation. There were no significant differences in wheal and flare responses among the three benzylisoquinoline-derived muscle relaxants, D-tubocurarine, metocurine, and atracurium. The cutaneous effects of morphine were significantly greater than those of the benzylisoquinoline muscle relaxants, suggesting both direct vascular changes and histamine release. Papaverine injection was followed by a significant wheal but no flare. Skin biopsies from vecuronium- and papaverine-induced wheals revealed normal intact mast-cell granules, suggesting a direct cutaneous vascular response rather than histamine release. Skin biopsies after morphine and atracurium injections revealed mast-cell degranulation. All evaluated benzylisoquinoline muscle relaxants are equipotent histamine releasers at equimolar concentrations. A hydrogenated, benzylisoquinoline-nitrogen-containing ring, present in atracurium but not in papaverine, appears to be the molecular conformation responsible for mast-cell degranulation by atracurium.

  9. Designing and constructing corrugated glass facades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Nijsse

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Flat glass panels are in use since the time of the Roman Empire. In the ruins of the city of Pompeii, destroyed by the Vulcan Vesuvius in 79 DC, a glass panel in a bronze frame of 300 × 600 mm was found. In this article we describe a mayor improvement in the structural behaviour of glass panels by making the glass curved, or more accurately, corrugated. Both the in- and out-plane loading meet far more resistance against deformation, and the corrugated glass panels have a largely increased bearing capacity with the same thickness of glass the flat panel has. Also architecturally the appearance of a corrugated glass panel in facades is far more appealing.

  10. Assessment of rail long-pitch corrugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valehrach, Jan; Guziur, Petr; Riha, Tomas; Plasek, Otto

    2017-09-01

    The paper focuses on defects of the running surface of the rail, namely the rail corrugation defect and specifically long-pitch corrugation in curves of small radii. These defects cause a shorter life of the rails, greater maintenance costs and increase the noise and vibration pollution. Therefore, it is very important to understand the formation and development of the imperfection of the rails. In the paper, various sections of railway tracks in the Czech Republic are listed, each of them completed with comparison of defect development, the particular track superstructure, rolling stock, axle load, traffic load etc. Based on performed measurements, defect development has been proved as different on sections with similar (or even same) parameters. The paper assumes that a train velocity is the significant circumstance for defect development rates. Assessment of track section with under sleeper pads, which are expected to be the one of the possible ways to suppress the corrugation defect development, is included in evaluation.

  11. THE EFFECT OF CORRUGATED ELEMENTS THICKNESS ON THE DEFLECTED MODE OF CORRUGATED METAL STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kovalchuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The work provides research the deflected mode and calculation the relative deformation of vertical and horizontal diameters of corrugated metal structures (CMS, horizontal ellipse type, and cross section in their interaction with soil backfill depending on the thickness of corrugated metal pipe. Such studies are required for optimal design of CMS, establishing the causes of defects timely, appropriate engineering solutions to improve the bearing capacity of the CMS and reasonable use of funds for their construction or rehabilitation of existing transportation facilities using corrugated metal pipes. Methodology. Stresses and stability calculations of CMS form are conducted using the developed mathematical algorithm in program environment Mathcad 14. In these studies different thickness of corrugated metal pipe were assigned, and further calculations were carried out at the design value of backfill soil compaction degree and magnitude of dynamic loading of railway transport. Findings. From the calculations is determined that the most influence the thickness of the corrugated metal pipe has on the strength in the calculation of the normal stresses and value of the vertical pipe strains. Therefore, the calculated parameters in the design of corrugated metal structures with small filling heights (from 1.2 m to 3 m above its peak is calculation of the strength by the normal stresses and determination of the vertical deformation of the pipe. Originality. For the first time, calculations of the deflected mode and relative deformations of vertical and horizontal cross-sectional diameters of CMS, horizontal ellipse type in the interaction with soil backfill. The factors complex was taken into account the backfill soil compaction degree, the value of dynamic loading of railway transport and different thickness of corrugated metal pipe. Practical value. The results of the deflected mode of corrugated metal structures such as horizontal ellipse of

  12. Modelling of Corrugated Paper Board Boxes with FEM

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    Peter Lorenz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this project is the comparison between the experimental and FEM results of loaded corrugated paper boards. The corrugated paper boards have an orthotropic material behaviour, which means that the boards, depending on the direction of the corrugation, have different modules of elasticity. The research should give results about theses different material data of the plates. These results are the basis for further product designs with corrugated paper boards.

  13. Design of Corrugated Plates for Optimal Fundamental Frequency

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    Nabeel Alshabatat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates shifting the fundamental frequency of plate structures by corrugation. Creating corrugations significantly improves the flexural rigidities of plate and hence increases its natural frequencies. Two types of corrugations are investigated: sinusoidal and trapezoidal corrugations. The finite element method (FEM is used to model the corrugated plates and extract the natural frequencies and mode shapes. The effects of corrugation geometrical parameters on simply supported plate fundamental frequency are studied. To reduce the computation time, the corrugated plates are modeled as orthotropic flat plates with equivalent rigidities. To demonstrate the validity of modeling the corrugated plates as orthotropic flat plates in studying the free vibration characteristics, a comparison between the results of finite element model and equivalent orthotropic models is made. A correspondence between the results of orthotropic models and the FE models is observed. The optimal designs of sinusoidal and trapezoidal corrugated plates are obtained based on a genetic algorithm. The optimization results show that plate corrugations can efficiently maximize plate fundamental frequency. It is found that the trapezoidal corrugation can more efficiently enhance the fundamental frequency of simply supported plate than the sinusoidal corrugation.

  14. Corrugated Membrane Nonlinear Deformation Process Calculation

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    A. S. Nikolaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic elements are widely used in instrumentation. They are used to create a particular interference between the parts, for accumulating mechanical energy, as the motion transmission elements, elastic supports, and sensing elements of measuring devices. Device reliability and quality depend on the calculation accuracy of the elastic elements. A corrugated membrane is rather common embodiment of the elastic element.The corrugated membrane properties depend largely on its profile i.e. a generatrix of the meridian surface.Unlike other types of pressure elastic members (bellows, tube spring, the elastic characteristics of which are close to linear, an elastic characteristic of the corrugated membrane (typical movement versus external load is nonlinear. Therefore, the corrugated membranes can be used to measure quantities, nonlinearly related to the pressure (e.g., aircraft air speed, its altitude, pipeline fluid or gas flow rate. Another feature of the corrugated membrane is that significant movements are possible within the elastic material state. However, a significant non-linearity of membrane characteristics leads to severe complicated calculation.This article is aimed at calculating the corrugated membrane to obtain the elastic characteristics and the deformed shape of the membrane meridian, as well as at investigating the processes of buckling. As the calculation model, a thin-walled axisymmetric shell rotation is assumed. The material properties are linearly elastic. We consider a corrugated membrane of sinusoidal profile. The membrane load is a uniform pressure.The algorithm for calculating the mathematical model of an axisymmetric corrugated membrane of constant thickness, based on the Reissner’s theory of elastic thin shells, was realized as the author's program in C language. To solve the nonlinear problem were used a method of changing the subspace of control parameters, developed by S.S., Gavriushin, and a parameter marching method

  15. Skeletal muscle responses to lower limb suspension in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hather, Bruce M.; Adams, Gregory R.; Tesch, Per A.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    The morphological responses of human skeletal muscle to unweighting were assessed by analyzing multiple transaxial magnetic resonance (MR) images of both lower limbs and skeletal muscle biopsies of the unweighted lower limb before and after six weeks of unilaterial (left) lower limb suspension (ULLS). Results indicated that, as a results of 6 weeks of unweighting (by the subjects walking on crutches using only one limb), the cross sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle of the unweighted left limb decreased 12 percent, while the CSA of the right thigh muscle did not change. The decrease was due to a twofold greater response of the knee extensors than the knee flexors. The pre- and post-ULLS biopsies of the left vastus lateralis showed a 14 percent decrease in average fiber CSA due to unweighting. The number of capillaries surrounding the different fiber types was unchanged after ULLS. Results showed that the adaptive responses of human skeletal muscle to unweighting are qualitatively, but not quantitatively, similar to those of lower mammals and not necessarily dependent on the fiber-type composition.

  16. The Effect of Web Corrugation in Cold-Formed Steel Beam with Trapezoidally Corrugated Web

    OpenAIRE

    R. Divahar; P. S. Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The corrugated steel plate is a widely used structural element in many fields of application because of its numerous favorable properties. To increase the shear capacity of web of large steel plate girders, the web with different patterns such as tapered web, haunches, corrugations of different shapes are used. This paper presents the results of the experimental study on load carrying capacity of cold-formed steel section with trapezoid web. A total of six cold-formed steel beams with plai...

  17. Designing the inner surface corrugations of hollow fibers to enhance CO2 absorption efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashandi, Hossein; Zarrebini, Mohammad; Ghodsi, Ali; Saghafi, Reza

    2016-08-15

    For the first time, a low cost strategy is introduced to enhance the efficiency of CO2 absorption using gas-liquid membrane contactors. This is implemented by designing the corrugations in the inner layer of poly(vinyl chloride) hollow fibers (PVC HFs) through changing the bore fluid composition. In fact, the number of corrugations in the HF inner layer is engineered via changing the phase separation time within the inner layer. Such that expedited phase separation leads to highly corrugated inner layer. In contrast, decelerated phase separation is responsible for reduced number of inner layer corrugations. Phase separation causes the initial polymer solution with low viscoelastic moduli to be transferred into polymer-rich domains with high viscoelastic moduli. These domains resist against stretching-induced radial forces toward the center of HF; therefore, the inner layer of HF buckles. Delayed phase separation defers formation of polymer-rich domains and hence, HF with less corrugated inner surface is expected. The phase separation within the HF inner layer is controlled through changing the rate of solvent/nonsolvent exchange. This is conducted by variation the solvent content in the bore fluid; as higher as solvent content, as slower as solvent/nonsolvent exchange. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Theoretical Simulation and Experimental Investigation of a Rail Damper to Minimize Short-Pitch Rail Corrugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyou Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cologne-egg fastening systems applied in metro lines, which can be subjected to rail corrugation, are considered in this paper. To understand the mechanism of the formation and development of rail corrugation, dynamic models of the wheel and the track with Cologne-egg fastening system in the frequency domain are developed to analyse the wheel and track vibration behaviour. A field test is also analysed to verify the validity of the mechanism. Using these experimental and theoretical results, the vibration mode of the rail that is responsible for rail corrugation is determined. Based on the results, a novel rail damper that can suppress the track pinned-pinned resonance and smooth the track receptance is presented to minimize short-pitch rail corrugation. It is ultimately found from theoretical simulation and experimental investigation that the application of the rail damper is a long-term and effective method of controlling short-pitch rail corrugation in metro lines.

  19. Rat hindlimb muscle responses to suspension hypokinesia/hypodynamia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Deavers, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Hypokinetic/hyupodynamic (H/H) whole body suspension of rats eliminates hindlimb load bearing functions while permitting continued use of the forelimbs. Responses of hindlimb muscles were assessed in terms of absolute and relative weights during 1 and 2 weeks of H/H suspension. Muscle mass loss was in the order soleus greater than gastrocnemius equal to plantaris greater than extensor digitorum longus (EDL). The soleus, a postural antigravity muscle composed mainly of slow twitch fibers, was most sensitive, losing 35 and 45 percent of its weight during the first and second weeks, respectively. The gastrocnemius and plantaris showed losses during the first week but no significant loss during the second wee. The EDL showed little or no weight loss. During post suspension recovery all muscles showed a weight gain. H/H suspended rats failed to grow; following removal from suspension they gained weight linearly, comparable to controls. Products of muscle metabolism including urea, ammonia, and 3-methylhistidine increased in the urine during H/H suspension and were significantly reduced approaching control levels during recovery. This suspension model offers considerable promise for comparison with H/H responses during weightlessness.

  20. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of the Fluted Corrugated Sheet in the Corrugated Cardboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of corrugated medium, flute size, combining adhesive, and linerboards can be varied to design a corrugated board with specific properties. In this paper, the nonlinear finite element analysis of the fluted corrugated sheet in the corrugated cardboard based on software SolidWorks2008 was investigated. The model of corrugated board with three or more flutes is reliable for stress and displacement measurement to eliminate the influence of the number of flutes in models. According to the static pressure test, with the increase of flute height H or arc radius of flute, the maximum stress in the models decreased and the maximum displacement increased. However the maximum stress and maximum displacement in the models increase nonlinearly in the static pressure test with the increase of the flute angle θ. According to the drop test, with the increase of flute height H, the maximum stress of goods on the upper board in the drop test decreased. The maximum stress of the model in the drop test decreases firstly and then increases with the increase of flute angle, and the optimal flute angle θ could be 60° for corrugated board. All the conclusions are consistent with experimental data or product standards.

  1. Repetitive muscle compression reduces vascular mechano-sensitivity and the hyperemic response to muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messere, A; Turturici, M; Millo, G; Roatta, S

    2017-06-01

    Animal studies have shown that the rapid hyperemic response to external muscle compression undergoes inactivation upon repetitive stimulation, but this phenomenon has never been observed in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 1) the vascular mechano-sensitivity underlying muscle compression-induced hyperemia is inactivated in an inter-stimulus interval (ISI)-dependent fashion upon repetitive stimulation, as suggested by animal studies, and 2) whether such inactivation also attenuates contraction-induced hyperemia. Brachial artery blood flow was measured by echo Doppler sonography in 13 healthy adults in response to 1) single and repetitive cuff muscle compression (CMC) of the forearm (20 CMCs, 1 s ISI); 2) a sequence of CMC delivered at decreasing ISI from 120 to 2 s; and 3) electrically-stimulated contraction of the forearm muscles before and after repetitive CMC. The peak amplitude of hyperemia in response to CMC normalized to baseline decreased from 2.2 ± 0.6 to 1.4 ± 0.4 after repetitive CMC and, in general, was decreased at ISI < 240 s. The peak amplitude of contraction-induced hyperemia was attenuated after as compared to before repeated CMC (1.7 ± 0.4 and 2.6 ± 0.6, respectively). Mechano-sensitivity of the vascular network can be conditioned by previous mechanical stimulation, and such preconditioning may substantially decrease contraction-induced hyperemia.

  2. Stiffness Matrices and Anisotropy in the Trapezoidal Corrugated Composite Sheets

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    Mohammad Golzar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the some applications like as morphing technology, high strain and anisotropic behavior are essential design requirements. The corrugated composite sheets due to their special geometries have potential to high deflection under axial loading through longitudinal direction of corrugation. In this research, the strain and the anisotropic behavior of corrugated composite sheets are investigated by fabricating glass/epoxy samples with trapezoidal geometries. For evaluation of the mechanical behavior of the composites the samples were subjected to tension and flexural tests in the longitudinal and transverse directions of corrugation. In order to determine anisotropic behavior of the corrugated sheets, two approaches were introduced: (1 tensile anisotropic (E* and (2 flexural anisotropic (D*. The anisotropic behavior and ultimate deflections were investigated theoretically and experimentally. In this paper, mechanical behaviors based on theoretical and experimental analysis including the elastic constants and stiffness matrices of trapezoidal corrugated composite sheets were studied and the results were verified by finite element method. The results of the numerical and analytical solutions were compared with those of experimental tests. Finally, the load-displacement curves of tensile tests in longitudinal direction of corrugation, the ultimate deflection and anisotropy behavior of these exclusive composite sheets in the corrugated composite sheets were studied experimentally. The experimental results of the trapezoidal corrugated sheets showed that one of the most important parameters in the ultimate strain was amplitude of the corrugation elements. Generally, increasing the amplitude and element per length unit of trapezoidal corrugated specimen led to higher ultimate strain.

  3. Effect of varying geometrical parameters of trapezoidal corrugated-core sandwich structure

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    Zaid N.Z.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich structure is an attractive alternative that increasingly used in the transportation and aerospace industry. Corrugated-core with trapezoidal shape allows enhancing the damage resistance to the sandwich structure, but on the other hand, it changes the structural response of the sandwich structure. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of varying geometrical parameters of trapezoidal corrugated-core sandwich structure under compression loading. The corrugated-core specimen was fabricated using press technique, following the shape of trapezoidal shape. Two different materials were used in the study, glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP. The result shows that the mechanical properties of the core in compression loading are sensitive to the variation of a number of unit cells and the core thickness.

  4. Loss of the Inducible Hsp70 Delays the Inflammatory Response to Skeletal Muscle Injury and Severely Impairs Muscle Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Travis M.; Ahn, Bumsoo; Ferreira, Leonardo F.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration following injury is a highly coordinated process that involves transient muscle inflammation, removal of necrotic cellular debris and subsequent replacement of damaged myofibers through secondary myogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms which coordinate these events are only beginning to be defined. In the current study we demonstrate that Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is increased following muscle injury, and is necessary for the normal sequence of events following severe injury induced by cardiotoxin, and physiological injury induced by modified muscle use. Indeed, Hsp70 ablated mice showed a significantly delayed inflammatory response to muscle injury induced by cardiotoxin, with nearly undetected levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers 24 hours post-injury. At later time points, Hsp70 ablated mice showed sustained muscle inflammation and necrosis, calcium deposition and impaired fiber regeneration that persisted several weeks post-injury. Through rescue experiments reintroducing Hsp70 intracellular expression plasmids into muscles of Hsp70 ablated mice either prior to injury or post-injury, we confirm that Hsp70 optimally promotes muscle regeneration when expressed during both the inflammatory phase that predominates in the first four days following severe injury and the regenerative phase that predominates thereafter. Additional rescue experiments reintroducing Hsp70 protein into the extracellular microenvironment of injured muscles at the onset of injury provides further evidence that Hsp70 released from damaged muscle may drive the early inflammatory response to injury. Importantly, following induction of physiological injury through muscle reloading following a period of muscle disuse, reduced inflammation in 3-day reloaded muscles of Hsp70 ablated mice was associated with preservation of myofibers, and increased muscle force production at later time points compared to WT. Collectively our findings indicate that

  5. Wnt and β-Catenin Signaling and Skeletal Muscle Myogenesis in Response to Muscle Damage and Resistance Exercise and Training

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    Dan Newmire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The factors that regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy in human adults in response to resistance training (RT has largely focused on endogenous endocrine responses. However, the endocrine response to RT as having an obligatory role in muscle hypertrophy has come under scrutiny, as other mechanisms and pathways seem to also be involved in up-regulating muscle protein synthesis (MPS. Skeletal muscle myogenesis is a multifactorial process of tissue growth and repair in response to resistance training is regulated by many factors.  As a result, satellite cell-fused myogenesis is a possible factor in skeletal muscle regeneration and hypertrophy in response to RT.  The Wnt family ligands interact with various receptors and activate different downstream signaling pathways and have been classified as either canonical (β-catenin dependent or non-canonical (β-catenin independent.  Wnt is secreted from numerous tissues in a paracrine fashion. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a highly-regulated and intricate pathway that is essential to skeletal muscle myogenesis.  The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway may influence satellite cells to myogenic commitment, differentiation, and fusion into muscle fibers in response to injury or trauma, self-renewal, and normal basal turnover.  The current literature has shown that, in response mechanical overload from acute resistance exercise and chronic resistance training, that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is stimulated which may actuate the process of muscle repair and hypertrophy in response to exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this review is to elaborate on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling  pathway, the current literature investigating the relationship of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and its effects on myogenesis is response to muscle damage and resistance exercise and training.      Keywords: skeletal muscle, hypertrophy, myogenesis, cell signaling, protein synthesis, resistance

  6. Responsive Polymers as Sensors, Muscles, and Self-Healing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang Matthew; Serpe, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Responsive polymer-based materials can adapt to their surrounding environment by expanding and shrinking. This swelling and shrinking (mechanotransduction) can result in a number of functions. For example, the response can be used to lift masses, move objects, and can be used for sensing certain species in a system. Furthermore, responsive polymers can also yield materials capable of self-healing any damage affecting their mechanical properties. In this chapter we detail many examples of how mechanical responses can be triggered by external electric and/or magnetic fields, hygroscopicity, pH, temperature, and many other stimuli. We highlight how the specific responses can be used for artificial muscles, self-healing materials, and sensors, with particular focus on detailing the polymer response yielding desired effects.

  7. Nonspastic hemifacial spasm confirmed by abnormal muscle responses

    OpenAIRE

    Tani, Shigeru; Inazuka, Mayuko; Maegawa, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Asami; Yokosako, Suguru; Yoshimura, Chika; Koseki, Hirokazu; Ohbuchi, Hidenori; Hirota, Kengo; Hagiwara, Shinji; Hirasawa, Motohiro; Sasahara, Atsushi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemifacial spasm is usually diagnosed by inspection which mainly identifies involuntary movements of orbicularis oculi. Assessing abnormal muscle responses (AMR) is another diagnostic method. Case Description: We report a case of left hemifacial spasm without detectable involuntary facial movements. The patient was a 48-year-old man with a long history of subjective left facial twitching. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the left VIIth cranial nerve was compressed by the left ...

  8. Double-corrugated metamaterial surfaces for broadband microwave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yongqiang; Cheng, Haifeng; Zhou, Yongjiang; Wang, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Double-corrugated metamaterial surfaces are proposed to achieve broadband absorbers in the microwave region. The principal corrugation having a long period is made of hypo-corrugated metal structures filled with a dielectric medium. It is shown that the incident electromagnetic wave with a certain frequency can be strongly absorbed by the corrugation region where the height is about λ/4, with λ being the corresponding wavelength in the dielectric. Assembling various heights of corrugations together to form a graded corrugation surface can excite many distinct absorption modes and their overlapping with each other results in a broadband absorption. We experimentally demonstrate a broadband metamaterial absorber with more than 80% absorbance in the frequency range of 7.22-18.0 GHz which agrees well with the numerical simulation.

  9. Muscles provide protection during microbial infection by activating innate immune response pathways in Drosophila and zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunita Chatterjee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction brings about movement and locomotion in animals. However, muscles have also been implicated in several atypical physiological processes including immune response. The role of muscles in immunity and the mechanism involved has not yet been deciphered. In this paper, using Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs as a model, we show that muscles are immune-responsive tissues. Flies with defective IFMs are incapable of mounting a potent humoral immune response. Upon immune challenge, the IFMs produce anti-microbial peptides (AMPs through the activation of canonical signaling pathways, and these IFM-synthesized AMPs are essential for survival upon infection. The trunk muscles of zebrafish, a vertebrate model system, also possess the capacity to mount an immune response against bacterial infections, thus establishing that immune responsiveness of muscles is evolutionarily conserved. Our results suggest that physiologically fit muscles might boost the innate immune response of an individual.

  10. Silicon Carbide Corrugated Mirrors for Space Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex Enterprises Corporation (Trex) proposes technology development to manufacture monolithic, lightweight silicon carbide corrugated mirrors (SCCM) suitable for...

  11. Investigation into response characteristics of the chitosan gel artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Yang, Junjie; Wang, Yujian; Zhao, Honghao; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Guangli; Yu, Shuqin; Wu, Yuda; Wei, Chengye; Liu, Xuxiong; Wang, Zhijie

    2018-01-01

    Bionic artificial muscle made from chitosan gel is an emerging type of the ionic electro active polymer with advantages of large deformation, low cost and environmental protection etc, which leads to a research focus and wide application in the fields of bionic engineering and intelligence material recently. In this paper, effects and improvement mechanisms of the direct casting and genipin cross-linking processes on response speed properties of the chitosan gel artificial muscle (CGAM) were mainly studied. Based on in-depth analysis of the CGAM response mechanism, a platform was built for testing the response performance of the CGAM, then its equivalent circuit and mathematical models were also established. Furthermore, control experiments were carried out to test and analyze several performances of the CGAM on response speed, electrical conductivity, mechanical properties and microstructure with different control variables. The experimental results illustrated that the CGAM assembled by direct casting enabled its electric actuating membrane and non-metallic electrode membrane tightly attached together with low contact resistance, which dramatically promoted the electrical conductivity of the CGAM resulting in nearly doubled response speed. Besides, different concentrations of genipin were adopted to cross-link the CGAM actuating membranes, and then it was found that the response speed of the uncross-linked CGAM was fast in the initial stage, but as time increased, it declined rapidly with poor steadiness. While there was no obvious decrease over time on the response speed of the CGAM cross-linked with low genipin concentration. Namely, its stability was getting better and better. In addition, the response speed of the CGAM cross-linked with low concentration of genipin was roughly the same as uncross-linked CGAM, which was quicker than that of high concentration. In this work, its internal mechanisms, feasible assembly technique and green modification method were

  12. PERSONAL RESPONSE TO DISEASE IN PARAFUNCTIONS OF MASTICATORY MUSCLES

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    A. K. Iordanishvili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Particularities of personality of a sick person play an important role in providing effective treatment and prevention of relapse in various pathologies. Therefore, the position of the patient in relation to his/her health and ongoing treatment, as well as to doctors and auxiliary medical personnel are important factors in the success of rehabilitation.Parafunctions of masticatory muscles, which are understood as an impractical inappropriate activity, are known to be often found. They are poorly amenable to treatment and very painful for patients. The use of psychopharmaceutical and psychotherapeutic methods aimed at changing the patient’s attitude to the disease can help to cure such dental patient. This can change the patient’s response to the disease and create realistic settings for treatment. At the same time, the study of the attitude of dental patients to the disease is practically not covered in the accessible domestic and foreign literature. The purpose of study is researchthe attitude to the disease of adults suffering from various forms of parafunctions of the masticatory muscles.Material and methods. The work was carried out to study the attitude of 29 adults suffering from various forms of parafunctions of the masticatory muscles to the disease. To determine the type of attitude to the patient’s disease,we used the TOBOL clinical test method (type of attitude to the disease, which implements the clinical and psychological typology of patient attitude and provides for the possibility of defining one of the twelve types of responses.Results. It was found that before treatment, regardless of age in individuals suffering from parafunction of the masticatory muscles,there were more common types of attitude to the disease, in which the observed maladaptive behavior with predominantly intrapsychic oriented response to the disease manifested the characteristic reactions of the type of irritable weakness, anxiety

  13. Dynamic tension testing equipment for paperboard and corrugated fiberboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. D. Godshall

    1965-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a method, the testing equipment, and the instrumentation with which dynamic stress-strain information may be obtained for paperboards and built-up corrugated fiberboards as used in corrugated fiberboard containers. Much information is available on the properties of these materials when subjected to static or low rates of...

  14. On the whistling of corrugated pipes with narrow cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golliard, J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; González Diez, N.; Bendiksen, E.; Frimodt, C.

    2013-01-01

    Pipes with a corrugated inner surface, as used inflexible pipes for gas production and transport, can be subject to Flow-Induced Pulsations when the flow velocities are higher than a certain onset velocity. The onset velocity for classical corrugated pipes can be predicted on basis of the geometry

  15. Proteomic responses of skeletal and cardiac muscle to exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regular exercise is effective in the prevention of chronic diseases and confers a lower risk of death in individuals displaying risk factors such as hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Thus, knowledge of the molecular responses to exercise provides a valuable contrast for interpreting investigations of disease and can highlight novel therapeutic targets. While exercise is an everyday experience and can be conceptualized in simple terms, exercise is a complex physiological phenomena and investigation of exercise responses requires sophisticated analytical techniques and careful standardization of the exercise stimulus. Proteomic investigation of exercise is in its infancy but the ability to link changes in function with comprehensive changes in protein expression and post-translational modification holds great promise for advancing physiology. This review highlights recent pioneering work investigating the effects of exercise in skeletal and cardiac muscle that has uncovered novel mechanisms underling the benefits of physical activity. PMID:21679117

  16. Proteomic responses of skeletal and cardiac muscle to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burniston, Jatin G; Hoffman, Eric P

    2011-06-01

    Regular exercise is effective in the prevention of chronic diseases and confers a lower risk of death in individuals displaying risk factors such as hypertension and dyslipidemia. Thus, knowledge of the molecular responses to exercise provides a valuable contrast for interpreting investigations of disease and can highlight novel therapeutic targets. While exercise is an everyday experience and can be conceptualized in simple terms, it is also a complex physiological phenomenon and investigation of exercise responses requires sophisticated analytical techniques and careful standardization of the exercise stimulus. Proteomic investigation of exercise is in its infancy but the ability to link changes in function with comprehensive changes in protein expression and post-translational modification holds great promise for advancing physiology. This article highlights recent pioneering work investigating the effects of exercise in skeletal and cardiac muscle that has uncovered novel mechanisms underlying the benefits of physical activity.

  17. Mechanical Behavior of Quasi-sinusoidal Corrugated Composite sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouyan Ghabezi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An aircraft wing needs to display different mechanical behavior in different directions. 1- stiffness in the spanwise (transverse to the corrugation direction which enables the aerodynamic and inertial loads to be carried. 2- compliance in the chordwise (corrugation direction which would allow shape changes and increases in surface area; whereas a corrugated sheet due to their special geometry has potential to use in morphing applications. Therefore, in this paper the mechanical behaviour of quasi-sinusoidal corrugated composites is studied by commercial FEM software ABAQUS and a simple analytical model which is used for the initial stiffness of the quasi-sinusoidal corrugated composites (Yokozeki model. The elongation and effective stiffness in longitudinal and transverse directions of quasi-sinusoidal  corrugated  skins  and fat  composites  are  calculated  and  compared together.  Using  frst  and  second  Castigliano’s  theorem  and  Bernoulli-Euler  beam theorem can be used to calculate the defection and rotational angle of a beam (sheet. In this research, different dimensions of quasi-sinusoidal element for unidirectional and woven composites of E-glass/epoxy are investigated. FEM results and analytical model are compared together. Then, the analytical model is validated by experimental results of plain woven E-glass/epoxy composites. The results of FEM, experimental and analytical simulations show that how a corrugated composite can afford with certainty larger deformation than the fat composite in using this analytical model to predict the mechanical behavior of quasi-sinusoidal corrugated composites. It was found that the corrugated composites display extremely high anisotropic behavior and have high  tensile and fexural stiffness  in  transverse direction while exhibiting  low stiffness in longitudinal direction of corrugation.

  18. Effects of Velocity on Electromyographic, Mechanomyographic, and Torque Responses to Repeated Eccentric Muscle Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ethan C; Housh, Terry J; Camic, Clayton L; Smith, Cory M; Cochrane, Kristen C; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Cramer, Joel T; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the velocity of repeated eccentric muscle actions on the torque and neuromuscular responses during maximal isometric and eccentric muscle actions. Twelve resistance-trained men performed 30 repeated, maximal, eccentric, isokinetic muscle actions at randomly ordered velocities of 60, 120, or 180°·s on separate days. Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs) were performed before (pretest) and after (posttest) the repeated eccentric muscle actions on each day. Eccentric isokinetic peak torque (EIPT) values were the averages of the first 3 and last 3 repetitions of the 30 repeated eccentric muscle actions. During the EIPT and MVIC muscle actions, electromyographic (EMG) and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude (EMG AMP and MMG AMP) and mean power frequency (EMG MPF and MMG MPF) values were assessed. These results indicated that the repeated eccentric muscle actions had no effects on EIPT, or the EMG AMP, EMG MPF, or MMG MPF values assessed during the EIPT muscle actions, but decreased MMG AMP. The repeated eccentric muscle actions, however, decreased MVIC torque, and also the EMG AMP and MMG MPF values assessed during the MVIC muscle actions, but increased MMG AMP. The results indicated that the velocity of the repeated eccentric muscle actions affected the MVIC torque responses, but not EIPT or any of the neuromuscular parameters. Furthermore, there are differences in the torque and neuromuscular responses for isometric vs. eccentric muscle actions after repeated eccentric muscle actions.

  19. Whiplash evokes descending muscle recruitment and sympathetic responses characteristic of startle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Daniel Wh; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    Whiplash injuries are the most common injuries following rear-end collisions. During a rear-end collision, the human muscle response consists of both a postural and a startle response that may exacerbate injury. However, most previous studies only assessed the presence of startle using data collected from the neck muscles and head/neck kinematics. The startle response also evokes a descending pattern of muscle recruitment and changes in autonomic activity. Here we examined the recruitment of axial and appendicular muscles along with autonomic responses to confirm whether these other features of a startle response were present during the first exposure to a whiplash perturbation. Ten subjects experienced a single whiplash perturbation while recording electromyography, electrocardiogram, and electrodermal responses. All subjects exhibited a descending pattern of muscle recruitment, and increasing heart rate and electrodermal responses following the collision. Our results provide further support that the startle response is a component of the response to whiplash collisions.

  20. Whiplash evokes descending muscle recruitment and sympathetic responses characteristic of startle

    OpenAIRE

    Mang, Daniel WH; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Whiplash injuries are the most common injuries following rear-end collisions. During a rear-end collision, the human muscle response consists of both a postural and a startle response that may exacerbate injury. However, most previous studies only assessed the presence of startle using data collected from the neck muscles and head/neck kinematics. The startle response also evokes a descending pattern of muscle recruitment and changes in autonomic activity. Here we examined the recruitment of ...

  1. Influence of Corrugation Depth on Lateral Stability of Cold-Formed Steel Beams of Corrugated Webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungureanu Viorel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The beams of thin corrugated web afford a significant weight reduction compared with hot-rolled or welded ones. In the initial solutions, the flanges are made of flat plates, welded to the sinusoidal web sheet, requiring a specific welding technology. A new solution is proposed by the authors, in which the beam is composed by a web of trapezoidal cold-formed steel sheet and flanges of back-to-back lipped channel sections. For connecting flanges to the web self-drilling screws are used. The paper summarizes the experimental and numerical investigations carried out at the CEMSIG Research Centre (www.ct.upt.ro/centre/cemsig/ of the Politehnica University of Timisoara and, at the end, presents the influence of corrugation depth of web on the lateral stability of the beams.

  2. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β2-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β2-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β2-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β2-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  3. Responses of muscle spindles in feline dorsal neck muscles to electrical stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, F; Roatta, S; Thunberg, J; Passatore, M; Djupsjöbacka, M

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies performed in jaw muscles of rabbits and rats have demonstrated that sympathetic outflow may affect the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The resulting impairment of MSA information has been suggested to be involved in the genesis and spread of chronic muscle pain. The present study was designed to investigate sympathetic influences on muscle spindles in feline trapezius and splenius muscles (TrSp), as these muscles are commonly affected by chronic pain in humans. Experiments were carried out in cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. The effect of electrical stimulation (10 Hz for 90 s or 3 Hz for 5 min) of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was investigated on the discharge of TrSp MSAs (units classified as Ia-like and II-like) and on their responses to sinusoidal stretching of these muscles. In some of the experiments, the local microcirculation of the muscles was monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry. In total, 46 MSAs were recorded. Stimulation of the CSN at 10 Hz powerfully depressed the mean discharge rate of the majority of the tested MSAs (73%) and also affected the sensitivity of MSAs to sinusoidal changes of muscle length, which were evaluated in terms of amplitude and phase of the sinusoidal fitting of unitary activity. The amplitude was significantly reduced in Ia-like units and variably affected in II-like units, while in general the phase was affected little and not changed significantly in either group. The discharge of a smaller percentage of tested units was also modulated by 3-Hz CSN stimulation. Blockade of the neuromuscular junctions by pancuronium did not induce any changes in MSA responses to CSN stimulation, showing that these responses were not secondary to changes in extrafusal or fusimotor activity. Further data showed that the sympathetically induced modulation of MSA discharge was not secondary to the concomitant reduction of muscle blood flow induced by the stimulation. Hence

  4. Functioning of peripheral Ia pathways in infants with typical development: responses in antagonist muscle pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulier, Caroline; Ulrich, Beverly D; Martin, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    In muscle responses of proprioceptive origin, including the stretch/tendon reflex (T-reflex), the corresponding reciprocal excitation and irradiation to distant muscles have been described from newborn infants to older adults. However, the functioning of other responses mediated primarily by Ia-afferents has not been investigated in infants. Understanding the typical development of these multiple pathways is critical to determining potential problems in their development in populations affected by neurological disease, such as spina bifida or cerebral palsy. Hence, the goal of the present study was to quantify the excitability of Ia-mediated responses in lower limb muscles of infants with typical development. These responses were elicited by mechanical stimulation applied to the distal tendons of the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (QAD) muscles of both legs in twelve 2- to 10-month-old infants and recorded simultaneously in antagonist muscle pairs by surface EMG. Tendon taps alone elicited responses in either, both or neither muscle. The homonymous response (T-reflex) was less frequent in the TA than the GS or QAD muscle. An 80 Hz vibration superimposed on tendon taps induced primarily an inhibition of monosynaptic responses; however, facilitation also occurred in either muscle of the recorded pair. These responses were not influenced significantly by age or gender. Vibration alone produced a tonic reflex response in the vibrated muscle (TVR) and/or the antagonist muscle (AVR). However, for the TA muscle the TVR was more frequently elicited in older than younger infants. High variability was common to all responses. Overall, the random distribution and inconsistency of muscle responses suggests that the gain of Ia-mediated feedback is unstable. We propose that during infancy the central nervous system needs to learn to set stable feedback gain, or destination of proprioceptive assistance, based on their use during functional

  5. Fatigue testing of corrugated and Teflon hoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steve M.; Swanson, Theodore D.; Costello, Frederick A.

    1990-01-01

    Single and two-phase heat transport systems for the thermal control of large space facilities require fluid lines that traverse joints and either rotate or move in some other manner. Flexible hoses are being considered as one means of traversing these joints. To test the resilience of flexible hoses to bending stress, a test assembly was constructed to determine the number of flexing cycles the hoses could withstand before losing their ability to maintain a constant pressure. Corrugated metal hoses and Teflon hoses were tested at different pressures with nitrogen gas. The metal hoses had lives ranging from 30,000 to 100,000 flexing cycles. But, even after 400,000 cycles, the Teflon hoses remained essentially intact, though some leakage in the convoluted Teflon is noted.

  6. Mathematical Model for Thin-walled Corrugated Tube under Axial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyvazian Arameh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, theoretical investigation of corrugated aluminum tubes is performed to predicting the energy absorption characteristics. Aim to deform plastic tubes in predetermined intervals, corrugations are introduced on its surface. Theoretical relations are presented for predicting the energy absorption and mean crushing load of corrugated tubes. Other than that, corrugation helps to control the failure mode.

  7. CONTRIBUTIONS ON THE DESIGN OF UNCONVENTIONAL CORRUGATED BOARD STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEIDONI Nadina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper depicts a few contributions on the design of several unconventional corrugated board structures. In general, cardboard and corrugated cardboard is strongly linked to packaging. However, limiting these materials to their primary use does nothing else but to restrict the possibilities of using them in other interesting areas. Consequently, new structures built from cardboard have been imagined and in the paper there are presented a few unconventional uses of the corrugated fiberboard, namely as furniture elements, along with the technology used in the design and the manufacturing process.

  8. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A; Dakin, Christopher J; Vardy, Alistair N; Happee, Riender; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain between-muscle differences. Two hypotheses were evaluated: 1) that muscle-specific motor-unit properties influence the bandwidth of vestibular reflexes; and 2) that frequency responses of vestibular reflexes differ between neck, back, and lower limb muscles because of neural filtering. Subjects were exposed to electrical vestibular stimuli over bandwidths of 0-25 and 0-75 Hz while recording activity in sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, erector spinae, soleus, and medial gastrocnemius muscles. Coherence between stimulus and muscle activity revealed markedly larger vestibular reflex bandwidths in neck muscles (0-70 Hz) than back (0-15 Hz) or lower limb muscles (0-20 Hz). In addition, vestibular reflexes in back and lower limb muscles undergo low-pass filtering compared with neck-muscle responses, which span a broader dynamic range. These results suggest that the wider bandwidth of head-neck biomechanics requires a vestibular influence on neck-muscle activation across a larger dynamic range than lower limb muscles. A computational model of vestibular afferents and a motoneuron pool indicates that motor-unit properties are not primary contributors to the bandwidth filtering of vestibular reflexes in different muscles. Instead, our experimental findings suggest that pathway-dependent neural filtering, not captured in our model, contributes to these muscle-specific responses. Furthermore, gain-phase discontinuities in the neck-muscle vestibular reflexes provide evidence of destructive interaction between different reflex components, likely via indirect vestibular-motor pathways.

  9. STAT3 Activation in Skeletal Muscle Links Muscle Wasting and the Acute Phase Response in Cancer Cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzevitzky, Noelia; Guttridge, Denis C.; Khuri, Sawsan; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cachexia, or weight loss despite adequate nutrition, significantly impairs quality of life and response to therapy in cancer patients. In cancer patients, skeletal muscle wasting, weight loss and mortality are all positively associated with increased serum cytokines, particularly Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the presence of the acute phase response. Acute phase proteins, including fibrinogen and serum amyloid A (SAA) are synthesized by hepatocytes in response to IL-6 as part of the innate immune response. To gain insight into the relationships among these observations, we studied mice with moderate and severe Colon-26 (C26)-carcinoma cachexia. Methodology/Principal Findings Moderate and severe C26 cachexia was associated with high serum IL-6 and IL-6 family cytokines and highly similar patterns of skeletal muscle gene expression. The top canonical pathways up-regulated in both were the complement/coagulation cascade, proteasome, MAPK signaling, and the IL-6 and STAT3 pathways. Cachexia was associated with increased muscle pY705-STAT3 and increased STAT3 localization in myonuclei. STAT3 target genes, including SOCS3 mRNA and acute phase response proteins, were highly induced in cachectic muscle. IL-6 treatment and STAT3 activation both also induced fibrinogen in cultured C2C12 myotubes. Quantitation of muscle versus liver fibrinogen and SAA protein levels indicates that muscle contributes a large fraction of serum acute phase proteins in cancer. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that the STAT3 transcriptome is a major mechanism for wasting in cancer. Through IL-6/STAT3 activation, skeletal muscle is induced to synthesize acute phase proteins, thus establishing a molecular link between the observations of high IL-6, increased acute phase response proteins and muscle wasting in cancer. These results suggest a mechanism by which STAT3 might causally influence muscle wasting by altering the profile of genes expressed and translated in muscle such

  10. Skeletal Muscle Responses to Negative Energy Balance: Effects of Dietary Protein12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, John W.; McClung, James P.; Pasiakos, Stefan M.

    2012-01-01

    Sustained periods of negative energy balance decrease body mass due to losses of both fat and skeletal muscle mass. Decreases in skeletal muscle mass are associated with a myriad of negative consequences, including suppressed basal metabolic rate, decreased protein turnover, decreased physical performance, and increased risk of injury. Decreases in skeletal muscle mass in response to negative energy balance are due to imbalanced rates of muscle protein synthesis and degradation. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms contributing to the loss of skeletal muscle during energy deprivation are not well described. Recent studies have demonstrated that consuming dietary protein at levels above the current recommended dietary allowance (0.8 g·kg−1·d−1) may attenuate the loss of skeletal muscle mass by affecting the intracellular regulation of muscle anabolism and proteolysis. However, the specific mechanism by which increased dietary protein spares skeletal muscle through enhanced molecular control of muscle protein metabolism has not been elucidated. This article reviews the available literature related to the effects of negative energy balance on skeletal muscle mass, highlighting investigations that assessed the influence of varying levels of dietary protein on skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Further, the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the regulation of skeletal muscle mass in response to negative energy balance and alterations in dietary protein level are described. PMID:22516719

  11. Shear Behavior of Corrugated Steel Webs in H Shape Bridge Girders

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Cao; Haibo Jiang; Haohan Wang

    2015-01-01

    In bridge engineering, girders with corrugated steel webs have shown good mechanical properties. With the promotion of composite bridge with corrugated steel webs, in particular steel-concrete composite girder bridge with corrugated steel webs, it is necessary to study the shear performance and buckling of the corrugated webs. In this research, by conducting experiment incorporated with finite element analysis, the stability of H shape beam welded with corrugated webs was tested and three fai...

  12. Association of interleukin-6 signalling with the muscle stem cell response following muscle-lengthening contractions in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon R McKay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The regulation of muscle stem cells in humans in response to muscle injury remains largely undefined. Recently, interleukin-6 (IL-6 has been implicated in muscle stem cell (satellite cell-mediated muscle hypertrophy in animals; however, the role of IL-6 in the satellite cell (SC response following muscle-lengthening contractions in humans has not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight subjects (age 22+/-1 y; 79+/-8 kg performed 300 maximal unilateral lengthening contractions (3.14 rad.s(-1 of the knee extensors. Blood and muscle samples were collected before and at 4, 24, 72, and 120 hours post intervention. IL-6, IL-6 receptor, IL-6R(alpha, cyclin D1, suppressor of cytokine signling-3 (SOCS3 mRNA were measured using quantitative RT-PCR and serum IL-6 protein was measured using an ELISA kit. JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylated and total protein was measured using western blotting techniques. Immunohistochemical analysis of muscle cross-sections was performed for the quantification of SCs (Pax7(+ cells as well as the expression of phosphorylated STAT3, IL-6, IL-6R(alpha, and PCNA across all time-points. The SC response, as defined by an amplification of Pax7(+ cells, was rapid, increasing by 24 h and peaking 72 h following the intervention. Muscle IL-6 mRNA increased following the intervention, which correlated strongly (R(2 = 0.89, p<0.002 with an increase in serum IL-6 concentration. SC IL-6R(alpha protein was expressed on the fiber, but was also localized to the SC, and IL-6(+ SC increased rapidly following muscle-lengthening contractions and returned to basal levels by 72 h post-intervention, demonstrating an acute temporal expression of IL-6 with SC. Phosphorylated STAT3 was evident in SCs 4 h after lengthening contraction, and the downstream genes, cyclin D1 and SOCS3 were significantly elevated 24 hours after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The increased expression of STAT3 responsive genes and expression of

  13. Minimizing downstream scour due to submerged hydraulic jump using corrugated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Mohamed Ali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Local scour downstream of hydraulic structures due to hydraulic jump is considered one of the tedious and complicated problems facing their stability. Throughout this paper, an experimental study was conducted to study the effect of using different spaced corrugated aprons on the downstream local scour due to submerged jump. Sixty runs were carried out in a horizontal rectangular flume to determine the optimal corrugation wavelength which minimizing the scour. A case of flat apron included to estimate the influence of corrugated aprons on scour holes dimensions. Two types of non-cohesive soil were used. Experiments were performed for a range of Froude numbers between 1.68 and 9.29. The results showed that using spaced triangular corrugated aprons minimize the scour depth and length of fine sand by average percentage of 63.4% and 30.2%, respectively and for coarse sand by 44.2% and 20.6% in comparing with classical jump.

  14. Sandwich Structure Based On Corrugated-Core: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid N. Z. M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich structures are commonly based on polymeric foam and honeycomb core material, for use in lightweight applications such as fuselage in aero plane, hull in marine construction and others. A review of sandwich structure based on corrugated-core is proposed and presented in this paper. Firstly, this paper aims to provide a means of comparing available sandwich structure in industries. Secondly, this paper aims to provide sandwich structure with corrugated-core for future research development efforts in field of sandwich construction. This paper starts with introduction of composite material such as sandwich structure, the advantages of sandwich structure was shown. After that these papers provide the structure of sandwich structure which includes the two faces and the cores. Furthermore, sandwich structure with different cores, which is honeycomb, foam core and corrugated core are discussed. At the end, the paper discussed more on corrugated-core for future research development.

  15. Stylus type MEMS texture sensor covered with corrugated diaphragm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takashiro; Asao, Hideaki; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a stylus type MEMS texture sensor covered with a corrugated palylene diaphragm, which prevent debris from jamming into the sensor without significant degradation of sensitivity and bandwidth, was reported. A new fabrication process using a lost-foil method to make the corrugated diaphragm on a 3-axis piezoresistive force sensor at wafer level has been developed. The texture sensor could detect the surface microstructure as small as about 10 \

  16. Whiplash evokes descending muscle recruitment and sympathetic responses characteristic of startle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mang, Daniel Wh; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Whiplash injuries are the most common injuries following rear-end collisions. During a rear-end collision, the human muscle response consists of both a postural and a startle response that may exacerbate injury...

  17. Heat transfer enhancement in two-start spirally corrugated tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid S. Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques have been tested on heat transfer enhancement to upgrade the involving equipment, mainly in thermal transport devices. These techniques unveiled significant effects when utilized in heat exchangers. One of the most essential techniques used is the passive heat transfer technique. Corrugations represent a passive technique. In addition, it provides effective heat transfer enhancement because it combined the features of extended surfaces, turbulators and artificial roughness. Therefore, A Computational Fluid Dynamics was employed for water flowing at low Reynolds number in spiral corrugated tubes. This article aimed for the determination of the thermal performance of unique smooth corrugation profile. The Performance Evaluation Criteria were calculated for corrugated tubes, and the simulation results of both Nusselt number and friction factor were compared with those of standard plain and corrugated tubes for validation purposes. Results showed the best thermal performance range of 1.8–2.3 for the tube which has the severity of 45.455 × 10−3 for Reynolds number range of 100–700. The heat transfer enhancement range was 21.684%–60.5402% with friction factor increase of 19.2–36.4%. This indicated that this creative corrugation can improve the heat transfer significantly with appreciably increasing friction factor.

  18. Impact of Corrugated Paperboard Structure on Puncture Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidas Bivainis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to its excellentprotective properties, lightness, a reasonable price, and ecology, corrugated paperboardis one of the most popular materials used in the production of packaging for variousproducts. During transportation or storage, packaging with goods can be exposedto the mass of other commodities, dropping from heights and transportationshock loads, which can lead to their puncture damage. Depending on the purposeand size of the packaging, the thickness, grammage, constituent paper layers,numbers of layers and type of fluting of corrugated paperboard used in itsproduction differ. A standard triangular prism, corrugated paperboard fixationplates and a universal tension-compression machine were used to investigate theimpact of corrugated paperboard structure and other parameters on the punctureresistance of the material. The investigation determines the maximum punctureload and estimates energy required to penetrate the corrugated paperboard. Itwas found that the greatest puncture resistance is demonstrated by paperboardwith a larger number of corrugating flutings and the board produced from harderpaper with a smaller amount of recycled paper. It was established that thegrammage of three-layered paperboard with two different fluting profiles has thegreatest impact on the level of static puncture energy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5713

  19. The adaptative response of jaw muscles to varying functional demands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünheid, T.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Korfage, J.A.M.; Zentner, A.; van Eijden, T.M.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Jaw muscles are versatile entities that are able to adapt their anatomical characteristics, such as size, cross-sectional area, and fibre properties, to altered functional demands. The dynamic nature of muscle fibres allows them to change their phenotype to optimize the required contractile function

  20. Influence of Corrugation Depth on Lateral Stability of Cold-Formed Steel Beams of Corrugated Webs

    OpenAIRE

    Ungureanu Viorel; Dubina Dan

    2016-01-01

    The beams of thin corrugated web afford a significant weight reduction compared with hot-rolled or welded ones. In the initial solutions, the flanges are made of flat plates, welded to the sinusoidal web sheet, requiring a specific welding technology. A new solution is proposed by the authors, in which the beam is composed by a web of trapezoidal cold-formed steel sheet and flanges of back-to-back lipped channel sections. For connecting flanges to the web self-drilling screws are used. The pa...

  1. Nonspastic hemifacial spasm confirmed by abnormal muscle responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Shigeru; Inazuka, Mayuko; Maegawa, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Asami; Yokosako, Suguru; Yoshimura, Chika; Koseki, Hirokazu; Ohbuchi, Hidenori; Hirota, Kengo; Hagiwara, Shinji; Hirasawa, Motohiro; Sasahara, Atsushi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm is usually diagnosed by inspection which mainly identifies involuntary movements of orbicularis oculi. Assessing abnormal muscle responses (AMR) is another diagnostic method. We report a case of left hemifacial spasm without detectable involuntary facial movements. The patient was a 48-year-old man with a long history of subjective left facial twitching. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the left VIIth cranial nerve was compressed by the left anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), which was in turn compressed by the left vertebral artery. We initially treated him with botulinum toxin. We were able to record AMR, and hemifacial spasm occurred after AMR stimulation, although no spasm was detectable by inspection. Subsequently, we performed microvascular decompression with transposition of the AICA that compressed the VIIth cranial nerve. His hemifacial spasm resolved by 5 weeks after surgery and was not induced by AMR stimulation. Hemifacial spasm can sometimes be diagnosed by detecting AMR rather than by visual inspection. We propose that such hemifacial spasm should be termed nonspastic hemifacial spasm.

  2. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Nicholas JC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM. We hypothesised that rhinovirus induction of inflammatory cytokine release from airway smooth muscle is augmented and differentially regulated in asthmatic compared to normal HASM cells. Methods HASM cells, isolated from either asthmatic or non-asthmatic subjects, were infected with rhinovirus. Cytokine production was assayed by ELISA, ICAM-1 cell surface expression was assessed by FACS, and the transcription regulation of IL-6 was measured by luciferase activity. Results RV-induced IL-6 release was significantly greater in HASM cells derived from asthmatic subjects compared to non-asthmatic subjects. This response was RV specific, as 5% serum- induced IL-6 release was not different in the two cell types. Whilst serum stimulated IL-8 production in cells from both subject groups, RV induced IL-8 production in only asthmatic derived HASM cells. The transcriptional induction of IL-6 was differentially regulated via C/EBP in the asthmatic and NF-κB + AP-1 in the non-asthmatic HASM cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates augmentation and differential transcriptional regulation of RV specific innate immune response in HASM cells derived from asthmatic and non-asthmatics, and may give valuable insight into the mechanisms of RV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  3. Evaluation of muscle hyperactivity of the grimacing muscles by unilateral tight eyelid closure and stapedius muscle tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Masato; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Nagai, Fumio

    2012-10-01

    Muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles, including the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles that cause crow's feet and a glabellar frown line with ageing, cannot be accurately evaluated by surface observation. In 71 subjects, this study investigated the extent to which grimacing muscles are innervated by the bilateral motor cortices, whether the corticofacial projection to the grimacing muscles affects the facially innervated stapedius muscle tone by measuring static compliance of the tympanic membrane, and whether unilateral tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles changes static compliance. Unilateral tight eyelid closure and its subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position revealed that motor neurons of the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles were innervated by the bilateral motor cortices with weak-to-strong contralateral dominance. The orbicularis oculi, corrugator supercilii, and stapedius muscles innervated by the bilateral motor cortices had increased muscle hyperactivity, which lowered the vertical medial eyebrow position and decreased the static compliance of the tympanic membrane more than those innervated by the unilateral motor cortex. Unilateral enhanced tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles in certain subjects ipsilaterally decreased the static compliance with increased contraction of the stapedius muscle, which probably occurs to immobilise the tympanic membrane and protect the inner ear from loud sound. Evaluation of unilateral tight eyelid closure and the subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position as well as a measurement of the static compliance for the stapedius muscle tone has revealed muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles.

  4. Implementation of the asymptotic corrugation boundary condition in the finite difference time domain method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Andrew E.; Kishk, Ahmed A.

    2005-12-01

    Geometry description in the finite difference time domain method is a tedious task if the geometry contains fine details, such as the case of corrugated objects. Such fine details constrain the cell size. The corrugated object can be modeled using the asymptotic corrugation boundary condition (ACBC) with a correction due to the width-over-period ratio. The ACBC forces certain field distributions inside the corrugation and allows for the removal of the corrugation teeth to have a homogeneous region with enforced field behavior that represents the actual corrugations. The ACBC approach is found to be accurate when the number of corrugations per wavelength is large (typically around 10 corrugations per wavelength). Computed results using ACBC are in good agreement with detailed simulations, which demonstrates the validity of the asymptotic approximations. Last, a major improvement in the computation time is achieved when using the ACBC to model structures that have a large number of corrugations per wavelength.

  5. Measuring the height-to-height correlation function of corrugation in suspended graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilenko, D.A., E-mail: Demid.Kirilenko@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya ul. 26, 194021 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); EMAT, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Brunkov, P.N. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya ul. 26, 194021 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); ITMO University, Kronverksky pr. 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Nanocorrugation of 2D crystals is an important phenomenon since it affects their electronic and mechanical properties. The corrugation may have various sources; one of them is flexural phonons that, in particular, are responsible for the thermal conductivity of graphene. A study of corrugation of just the suspended graphene can reveal much of valuable information on the physics of this complicated phenomenon. At the same time, the suspended crystal nanorelief can hardly be measured directly because of high flexibility of the 2D crystal. Moreover, the relief portion related to rapid out-of-plane oscillations (flexural phonons) is also inaccessible by such measurements. Here we present a technique for measuring the Fourier components of the height–height correlation function H(q) of suspended graphene which includes the effect of flexural phonons. The technique is based on the analysis of electron diffraction patterns. The H(q) is measured in the range of wavevectors q≈0.4–4.5 nm{sup −1}. At the upper limit of this range H(q) does follow the T/κq{sup 4} law. So, we measured the value of suspended graphene bending rigidity κ=1.2±0.4 eV at ambient temperature T≈300 K. At intermediate wave vectors, H(q) follows a slightly weaker exponent than theoretically predicted q{sup −3.15} but is closer to the results of the molecular dynamics simulation. At low wave vectors, the dependence becomes even weaker, which may be a sign of influence of charge carriers on the dynamics of undulations longer than 10 nm. The technique presented can be used for studying physics of flexural phonons in other 2D materials. - Highlights: • A technique for measuring free-standing 2D crystal corrugation is proposed. • The height-to-height correlation function of the suspended graphene corrugation is measured. • Various parameters of the intrinsic graphene properties are experimentally determined.

  6. Compact Elliptically Tapered Slot Antenna with Non-uniform Corrugations for Ultra-wideband Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Zhu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A small size elliptically tapered slot antenna (ETSA fed by coplanar waveguide (CPW for ultra-wideband (UWB applications is proposed. It is printed on an FR4 substrate and occupies a size of 37×34×0.8 mm^3. A pair of quarter circular shapes is etched on the radiator to reduce the size. To overcome the limitation of uniform corrugation, non-uniform corrugation is utilized to reduce the cross-polarization level. A parametric study is carried out to investigate the effects of circular cut and corrugations. In order to validate the design, a prototype is fabricated and measured. Both simulated and measured results confirm that the proposed antenna achieves a good performance of a reflection coefficient below -10 dB from 3.1 GHz to 10.6 GHz, including a maximum antenna gain of 8.1dBi, directional patterns in the end-fire direction, low cross-polarization level below -20 dB and linear phase response. The antenna is promising for applications in UWB impulse radar imaging.

  7. Muscle metabolic remodelling in response to endurance exercise in salmonids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J Morash

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle is relevant to swimming performance and metabolism in fishes, especially those that undergo extreme locomotory feats, such as seasonal migration. However, the influence of endurance exercise and the molecular mechanisms coordinating this remodelling are not well understood. The present study examines muscle metabolic remodelling associated with endurance exercise in fed rainbow trout as compared to migrating salmon. Trout were swum for 4 weeks at 1.5BL/s, a speed similar to that of migrating salmon and red and white muscles were sampled after each week. We quantified changes in key enzymes in aerobic and carbohydrate metabolism (citrate synthase (CS, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD, hexokinase (HK and changes in mRNA expression of major regulators of metabolic phenotype (AMPK, PPARs and lipid (carnitine palmitoyltransferase, CPT I, protein (aspartate aminotransferase, AST and carbohydrate (HK oxidation pathways. After one week of swimming substantial increases were seen in AMPK and PPARα mRNA expression and of their downstream target genes, CPTI and HK in red muscle. However, significant changes in CS and HK activity occurred only after 4 weeks. In contrast, there were few changes in mRNA expression and enzyme activities in white muscle over the 4-weeks. Red muscle results mimic those found in migrating salmon suggesting a strong influence of exercise on red muscle phenotype. In white muscle, only changes in AMPK and PPAR expression were similar to that seen with migrating salmon. However, in contrast to exercise alone, in natural migration HK decreased while AST increased suggesting that white muscle plays a role in supplying fuel and intermediates possibly through tissue breakdown during prolonged fasting. Dissecting individual and potentially synergistic effects of multiple stressors will enable us to determine major drivers of the metabolic phenotype and their impacts on whole animal

  8. Muscle tissue oxygenation, pressure, electrical, and mechanical responses during dynamic and static voluntary contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Pernille; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Søgaard, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic muscle contractions have been shown to cause greater energy turnover and fatigue than static contractions performed at a corresponding force level. Therefore, we hypothesized that: (1) electro- (EMG) and mechanomyography (MMG), intramuscular pressure (IMP), and reduction in muscle oxygen...... similar in spite of major differences in the MMG and EMG responses of the muscle during contraction periods. This may relate to the surprisingly lower IMP in DYN than IST....

  9. Study of cervical muscle response and injury of driver during a frontal vehicle collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenhai; Li, Chuzhao; Hu, Hongyu; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Chaoyang; Yu, Huili

    2015-01-01

    Frontal vehicle collisions can cause injury to a driver's cervical muscles resulting from intense changes in muscle strain and muscle load. This study investigated the influence of collision forces in a sled test environment using a modified Hybrid III 50th percentile dummy equipped with simulated spring-type muscles. Cervical muscle responses including strain and load of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), splenius capitis (SPL), and trapezius (TRP) were analyzed, and muscle injury was assessed. The SCM, SPL, and TRP suffered average peak muscle strains of 21%, 40%, and 23%, respectively, exceeding the injury threshold. The average peak muscle loads of the SCM, SPL and TRP were 11 N, 25 N, and 25 N, respectively, lower than the ultimate failure load. The SPL endured the largest injury, while the injuries to the SCM and TRP were relatively small. This is a preliminary study to assess the cervical muscle of driver during a frontal vehicle collision. This study provides a foundation for investigating the muscle response and injury in sled test environments, which can lead to the improvement of occupant protections.

  10. The mechanistic bases of the power-time relationship: muscle metabolic responses and relationships to muscle fibre type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhatalo, Anni; Black, Matthew I; DiMenna, Fred J; Blackwell, Jamie R; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Thompson, Christopher; Wylie, Lee J; Mohr, Magni; Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Jones, Andrew M

    2016-08-01

    The power-asymptote (critical power; CP) of the hyperbolic power-time relationship for high-intensity exercise defines a threshold between steady-state and non-steady-state exercise intensities and the curvature constant (W') indicates a fixed capacity for work >CP that is related to a loss of muscular efficiency. The present study reports novel evidence on the muscle metabolic underpinnings of CP and W' during whole-body exercise and their relationships to muscle fibre type. We show that the W' is not correlated with muscle fibre type distribution and that it represents an elevated energy contribution from both oxidative and glycolytic/glycogenolytic metabolism. We show that there is a positive correlation between CP and highly oxidative type I muscle fibres and that muscle metabolic steady-state is attainable CP. Our findings indicate a mechanistic link between the bioenergetic characteristics of muscle fibre types and the power-time relationship for high-intensity exercise. We hypothesized that: (1) the critical power (CP) will represent a boundary separating steady-state from non-steady-state muscle metabolic responses during whole-body exercise and (2) that the CP and the curvature constant (W') of the power-time relationship for high-intensity exercise will be correlated with type I and type IIx muscle fibre distributions, respectively. Four men and four women performed a 3 min all-out cycling test for the estimation of CP and constant work rate (CWR) tests slightly >CP until exhaustion (Tlim ), slightly CP Tlim isotime to test the first hypothesis. Eleven men performed 3 min all-out tests and donated muscle biopsies to test the second hypothesis. Below CP, muscle [PCr] [42.6 ± 7.1 vs. 49.4 ± 6.9 mmol (kg d.w.)(-1) ], [La(-) ] [34.8 ± 12.6 vs. 35.5 ± 13.2 mmol (kg d.w.)(-1) ] and pH (7.11 ± 0.08 vs. 7.10 ± 0.11) remained stable between ∼12 and 24 min (P > 0.05 for all), whereas these variables changed with time >CP such that

  11. Convective heat transfer in non-uniformly heated corrugated slots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Arman; Floryan, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    An analysis of heat transfer in non-uniformly heated corrugated slots has been carried out. A sinusoidal corrugation is placed at the lower plate that is exposed to heating consisting of uniform and sinusoidal components, while the upper smooth plate is kept isothermal. The phase difference ΩTL describes the shift between the heating and geometric non-uniformities. The analysis is limited to heating conditions that do not give rise to secondary motions. Depending on ΩTL, the conductive heat flow is directed either upwards, or downwards, or is eliminated. Its magnitude is smallest for the long-wavelength systems and largest for the short-wavelength systems, and it increases proportionally to the corrugation amplitude and heating intensity. The same heating creates horizontal temperature gradients that give rise to convection whose form depends on ΩTL. Convection consists of counter-rotating rolls with the size dictated by the system wavelength when the hot spots (points of maximum temperature) overlap either with the corrugation tips or with the corrugation bottoms. Thermal drift forms for all other values of ΩTL. The convective heat flow is always directed upwards, and it is the largest in systems with wavelengths comparable to the slot height. The magnitude of the overall heat flow increases proportionally to the heating intensity when conductive effects dominate and proportionally to the second power of the heating intensity when convection dominates. It also increases proportionally to the corrugation amplitude. The system characteristics are dictated by convection when the relative position of the heating and corrugation patterns eliminates conduction. Addition of the uniform heating component amplifies the above processes, while uniform cooling reduces them. The processes described above are qualitatively similar for all Prandtl numbers of practical interest with the magnitude of the convective heat flow increasing with Pr.

  12. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-11-28

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  13. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorn Trommelen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  14. Dynamics of Acute Local Inflammatory Response after Autologous Transplantation of Muscle-Derived Cells into the Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Burdzinska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of myoblasts transplanted into the skeletal muscle die within the first week after injection. Inflammatory response to the intramuscular cell transfer was studied in allogeneic but not in autologous model. The aim of this study was to evaluate immune reaction to autotransplantation of myogenic cells and to assess its dynamics within the first week after injection. Muscle-derived cells or medium alone was injected into the intact skeletal muscles in autologous model. Tissue samples were collected 1, 3, and 7 days after the procedure. Our analysis revealed the peak increase of the gene expression of all evaluated cytokines (Il-1α, Il-1β, Il-6, Tgf-β, and Tnf-α at day 1. The mRNA level of analyzed cytokines normalized in subsequent time points. The increase of Il-β gene expression was further confirmed at the protein level. Analysis of the tissue sections revealed rapid infiltration of injected cell clusters with neutrophils and macrophages. The inflammatory infiltration was almost completely resolved at day 7. The survived cells were able to participate in the muscle regeneration process. Presented results demonstrate that autotransplanted muscle-derived cells induce classical early immune reaction in the site of injection which may contribute to cellular graft elimination.

  15. Deletion of Galgt2 (B4Galnt2) Reduces Muscle Growth in Response to Acute Injury and Increases Muscle Inflammation and Pathology in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Singhal, Neha; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Joshi, Mandar; Bauer, John A.; Janssen, Paulus M.L.; Martin, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic overexpression of Galgt2 (official name B4Galnt2) in skeletal muscle stimulates the glycosylation of α dystroglycan (αDG) and the up-regulation of laminin α2 and dystrophin surrogates known to inhibit muscle pathology in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophy 1A and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Skeletal muscle Galgt2 gene expression is also normally increased in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy compared with the wild-type mice. To assess whether this increased endogenous Galgt2 expression could affect disease, we quantified muscular dystrophy measures in mdx mice deleted for Galgt2 (Galgt2−/−mdx). Galgt2−/− mdx mice had increased heart and skeletal muscle pathology and inflammation, and also worsened cardiac function, relative to age-matched mdx mice. Deletion of Galgt2 in wild-type mice also slowed skeletal muscle growth in response to acute muscle injury. In each instance where Galgt2 expression was elevated (developing muscle, regenerating muscle, and dystrophic muscle), Galgt2-dependent glycosylation of αDG was also increased. Overexpression of Galgt2 failed to inhibit skeletal muscle pathology in dystroglycan-deficient muscles, in contrast to previous studies in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles. This study demonstrates that Galgt2 gene expression and glycosylation of αDG are dynamically regulated in muscle and that endogenous Galgt2 gene expression can ameliorate the extent of muscle pathology, inflammation, and dysfunction in mdx mice. PMID:26435413

  16. Systemic protein delivery by muscle-gene transfer is limited by a local immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2005-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been successfully used for therapeutic expression of systemic transgene products (such as factor IX or erythropoietin) following in vivo administration to skeletal muscle of animal models of inherited hematologic disorders. However, an immune response may be initiated if the transgene product represents a neoantigen. Here, we use ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and demonstrate immune-mediated elimination of expression on muscle-directed AAV-2 gene transfer. Administration to immune competent mice resulted in transient systemic OVA expression. Within 10 days, OVA-specific T-helper cells had been activated in draining lymph nodes, an inflammatory immune response ensued, and OVA-expressing muscle fibers were destroyed by a cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response. Use of a muscle-specific promoter did not prevent this immune response. Adoptively transferred CD4(+) cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specific to OVA peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II showed antigen-specific, vector dose-dependent proliferation confined to the draining lymph nodes of AAV-OVA-transduced muscle within 5 days after gene transfer and subsequently participated in lymphocytic infiltration of transduced muscle. This study documents that a local immune response limits sustained expression of a secreted protein in muscle gene transfer, a finding that may have consequences for design of clinical protocols.

  17. Trunk muscle response to various protocols of lumbar traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewicki, Jacek; Lee, Angela S; Reeves, N Peter; Calle, Elizabeth A

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare trunk muscle activity, spinal decompression force, and trunk flexibility resulting from various protocols of spinal traction. Four experiments explored the effects of (1) sinusoidal, triangular, square, and continuous distraction-force waveforms, (2) 0, 10, 20, and 30 degrees of pull angle, (3) superimposed low, medium and high frequency force oscillations, and (4) sham traction. Nineteen healthy subjects volunteered for this study. Surface EMG was recorded during traction and later used in a biomechanical model to estimate spine decompression force. Trunk flexibility was measured before and after each treatment. There were no differences in muscle activity between any of the experimental conditions except the thoracic erector spinae muscle, which had lower EMG during continuous compared to sinusoidal distraction-force waveform (p=0.02). Thoracic and lumbar erector spinae muscles were significantly less active during sham than real traction (p=0.01 and p=0.04, respectively). The estimated L4-L5 spine compression force was 25N. Trunk flexibility decreased after each experimental session (p=0.01), and there were no differences between sessions. Our results suggest that the trunk muscle activity is minimal and point toward fluid exchange in the disc as one of the key biomechanical effects of spinal traction.

  18. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Atsunori; Michikami, Daisaku; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Iwase, Satoshi; Hayano, Junichiro; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Mano, Tadaaki

    2004-05-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied muscles remain unknown. We hypothesized that bed rest would augment sympathetic responses to isometric exercise using antigravity leg muscles in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers were subjected to 14-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Before and after bed rest, they performed isometric exercises using leg (plantar flexion) and forearm (handgrip) muscles, followed by 2-min postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) that continues to stimulate the muscle metaboreflex. These exercises were sustained to fatigue. We measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the contralateral resting leg by microneurography. In both pre- and post-bed-rest exercise tests, exercise intensities were set at 30 and 70% of the maximum voluntary force measured before bed rest. Bed rest attenuated the increase in MSNA in response to fatiguing plantar flexion by approximately 70% at both exercise intensities (both P antigravity leg muscles.

  19. Spinal μ-opioid receptor-sensitive lower limb muscle afferents determine corticospinal responsiveness and promote central fatigue in upper limb muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Garten, Ryan S; Rossman, Matthew J; Richardson, Russell S; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Morgan, David E; Amann, Markus

    2014-11-15

    We investigated the influence of group III/IV lower limb muscle afferents on the development of supraspinal fatigue and the responsiveness of corticospinal projections to an arm muscle. Eight males performed constant-load leg cycling exercise (80% peak power output) for 30 s (non-fatiguing) and to exhaustion (∼9 min; fatiguing) both under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from μ-opioid receptor-sensitive lower limb muscle afferents. Voluntary activation (VA) of elbow flexors was assessed via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and corticospinal responsiveness was monitored via TMS-evoked potentials (MEPs) during a 25% MVC. Accompanied by a significant 5 ± 1% reduction in VA from pre- to post-exercise, elbow flexor MVC progressively decreased during the fatiguing trial (P muscle afferents, MVC and VA remained unchanged during fatiguing exercise (P > 0.3). MEPs decreased by 36 ± 6% (P lower corticospinal responsiveness during this short bout (P muscle fatigue, group III/IV-mediated leg muscle afferents facilitate responsiveness of the motor pathway to upper limb flexor muscles. By contrast, in the presence of cycling-induced leg fatigue, group III/IV locomotor muscle afferents facilitate supraspinal fatigue in remote muscle not involved in the exercise and disfacilitate, or inhibit, the responsiveness of corticospinal projections to upper limb muscles.

  20. Skeletal muscle response to spaceflight, whole body suspension, and recovery in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Dombrowski, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 7-day spaceflight (SF), 7- and 14-day-long whole body suspension (WBS), and 7-day-long recovery on the muscle weight and the morphology of the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats were investigated. It was found that the effect of 7-day-long SF and WBS were highly comparable for both the soleus and the EDL, although the soleus muscle from SF rats showed greater cross-sectional area reduction than that from WBS rats. With a longer duration of WBS, there was a continued reduction in cross-sectional fast-twitch fiber area. Muscle plasticity, in terms of fiber and capillary responses, showed differences in responses of the two types of muscles, indicating that antigravity posture muscles are highly susceptible to unloading.

  1. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atsunori Kamiya; Daisaku Michikami; Tomoke Shiozawa; Satoshi Iwase

    2004-01-01

      Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied...

  2. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atsunori Kamiya; Daisaku Michikami; Tomoki Shiozawa; Satoshi Iwase; Junichiro Hayano; Toru Kawada; Kenji Sunagawa; Tadaaki Mano

    2004-01-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied...

  3. Functional assessment of muscle response in lower limbs of tumbling gymnasts through tensiomyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Rojas-Barrionuevo

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Tensiomyography allows estimating the states of activation-enhancing of the musculature responsible of jumping in tumblers, as well as planning the training based on the state of muscle fatigue.

  4. Mitigation of whistling in vertical corrugated pipes by liquid addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eckeveld, A. C.; Westerweel, J.; Poelma, C.

    2017-09-01

    When a corrugated pipe is subject to a dry gas flow, high amplitude sound can be produced (so-called `whistling'). It was shown previously that liquid addition to corrugated pipe flow has the ability to reduce sound production. Small amounts of liquid are sufficient to mitigate whistling entirely. One of the mitigation mechanisms, cavity filling, is studied experimentally. Acoustic measurements are combined with a planar laser-induced fluorescence technique to measure the liquid accumulation in the cavities of a corrugated pipe. Using this technique, it is shown that the amount of filling of the cavities with liquid increases with increasing liquid injection rate and with reducing gas flow rate. The reduction in whistling amplitude caused by the liquid injection is closely related to the cavity filling. This indicates that the geometric alteration of the pipe wall, caused by the accumulation of liquid inside the cavities, is an important factor in the reduction in whistling amplitude.

  5. Characteristics of long size thermosyphons made of corrugated tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Masao; Nishikawa, Yuuji; Taguchi, Masakazu; Negishi, Kanji; Kanero, Ken-Ichi; Matsuoka, Takayoshi

    1988-03-01

    Two-phase closed thermosyphons made of corrugated tube operating in the gravitational field have different characteristics in comparison with that of smooth tube in some items. The cause depends on the accumulated working fluid in the concave space of corrugated tube which tends to induce a dry out phenomenon in the evaporator section. The difference of these characteristics between thermosyphons of corrugated tube and smooth tube seems to amplify with the increment of the length of the thermosyphon. The temperature distribution along the axis of thermosyphon, the heat transport and the heat transfer coefficient as a function of the inclination angle at a fill charge ratio 50 percent of the working fluid were obtained by the experiments and discussed herein. A correlating equation of the heat transfer coefficient was deduced also from the experiments.

  6. Numerical modeling of manufacturing process of corrugated plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodos Ol'ga Aleksandrovna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The rigidity increase of structures consisting of plates and shells is a relevant task. One way to obtain plates with enhanced stiffness performance is the corrugation, i.e. change of its topography elevation. Depending on the method, corrugation provides a plate with additional rigidity in one or several directions without weight gain. The most common way to get corrugated plates is pressure forming. The problem of finding the most energy saving method is very relevant. In this regard, a possible approach is to use buckling of thin cylinder. The idea of this technique comes from the fact that as a result of stability loss of cylindrical shell in compression along its elements, the cylinder walls are deformed periodically. The article considers the problem of corrugated plates manufacturing using smooth sheet metal. The method of manufacture is based on irreversible process of cylindrical buckling of a shell previously obtained from a worksheet. Such a deformation process may be useful if the energy spent on its implementation is smaller than the energy in standard process of forming. The task of defining the stiffness of a corrugated plate is quite difficult because it is difficult to experimentally measure the tension, bending and coupled stiffness. The numerical simulation of three ways to manufacture corrugated cylindrical shell made of smooth sheet by elastic-plastic deformation process are offered: the first way is to deform the cylindrical shell under the action of axial load on the butt end, and the second way is the influence of strutting internal pressure. In the third way the cylindrical shell is made of the leaf using the special techniques. In order to compare the effectiveness of the options presented for each case the internal energy is calculated. It is shown that the energy expenditure in buckling method is the smallest.

  7. Influence of charge carriers on corrugation of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, Demid A.; Gorodetsky, Andrei; Baidakova, Marina V.

    2018-02-01

    Electronic degrees of freedom are predicted to play a significant role in mechanics of two-dimensional crystalline membranes. Here we show that appearance of charge carriers may cause a considerable impact on suspended graphene corrugation, thus leading to additional mechanism resulting in charge carriers mobility variation with their density. This finding may account for some details of suspended graphene conductivity dependence on its doping level and suggests that proper modeling of suspended graphene-based device properties must include the influence of charge carriers on its surface corrugation.

  8. Decelerations and muscle responses during parachute opening shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladh, Kristofer; Ang, Björn O; Lindholm, Peter; Nilsson, Jenny; Westman, Anton

    2013-11-01

    Pain in the neck region among skydivers can be related to repeated parachute opening shocks (POS), but empirical data on ramair POS biomechanics is lacking in the literature. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a methodology for assessment of multidirectional accelerations and neck muscle activity during parachuting, and to describe preliminary data. In an experimental design, four experienced skydivers made two consecutive skydives. Deceleration was recorded with two triaxial accelerometers, one placed on the skydiver's cervicothoracic junction (acc-neck) and the other on the harness (acc-rig). Surface electromyography (EMG) was sampled from four sites bilaterally: anterior-neck, posterior upper and lower neck, and upper shoulder muscles. EMG activity was normalized against a premeasured maximum voluntarily produced electrical signal (MVE). The measuring equipment did not interfere with the parachute jumps. High-quality signals were recorded. The median peak POS deceleration for the acc-neck vs. acc-rig indicated differences (4.0 G vs. 5.1 G), in addition to significant differences emerging for medians of average and maximum onset rates of deceleration (avg: 1.2 G x s(-1) vs. 19.5 G x s(-1); max: 23.0 G x s(-1) vs. 80.0 G x s(-1)). The median of overall muscleactivity was as high as 87% MVE, but no differences in peak activity were found between muscles. Temporal activations of the posterior upper neck occurred less than 50 ms after deceleration initiation, indicating feedforward control of the neck. All instruments recorded data of good quality without impeding the skydiving activity. Triaxial accelerometry on the neck vs. the harness yielded dissimilar results, underlining the importance of correct accelerometer placement. Muscle activity was high during POS and neck muscles showed anticipatory tendencies.

  9. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P muscle activity.

  10. Metabolic and physiologic characteristics of skeletal muscle determine its response to clenbuterol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundal, Santosh; Katoch, Surender S; Sharma, Sushma

    2006-06-01

    beta-Adrenoceptor agonists are reported to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and hence serve as valuable adjunct to the treatment of wasting disorders. In the present study, we attempted to find out whether metabolic and physiologic characteristics of fibres are important in determining skeletal muscle response to clenbuterol (an adrenergic receptor agonist) therapy, as proposed in the treatment of wasting disorders. The treatment of mice with clenbuterol (2 mg/kg body wt for 30 days) resulted in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, more common amongst fast-twitch glycolytic fibres/muscle, with increase in body mass and a parallel rise in muscle mass to body mass ratio. Measurement of fibre diameters in soleus (rich in slow-twitch oxidative fibres), ALD or anterior latissimus dorsi (with a predominance of fast-twitch glycolytic fibres) and gastrocnemius (a mixed-type of muscle) from clenbuterol-treated mice for 30 days revealed noticeable increase in the per cent population of narrow slow-twitch fibre and a corresponding decline in white-type or fast-twitch glycolytic fibres in gastrocnemius and ALD. As revealed by counting of muscle cells in soleus, narrow red fibres declined with corresponding increase in white-type glycolytic fibres population. A significant decline in the succinic dehydrogenase activity was observed, thereby suggesting abnormality in oxidative activity of skeletal muscles in response to clenbuterol therapy.

  11. Determination of the Timing and Level of Activities of Lumbopelvic Muscles in Response to Postural Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ebrahimi Takamjani

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most important concerns in orthopedic medicine is the low back. Considering the importance of muscle function in preventing LBT by controlling too much load and stress applied on the spinal joints and ligaments. Materials and Methods: The aim of this research was to determine the timing and level of activities of lumbopelvic muscles in response to postural perturbations caused by unexpected loading of the upper limbs in standing on three different supporting surfaces (neutral, positive slope, negative slope in 20 healthy females 18 to 30 years old ( = 23.20 SD = 2.55 . The electromyographic signals were recorded from the deltoid, gluteus maximus, internal oblique abdominis and lumbar paraspinal muscles of the dominant side of the body to evaluate the onset time, end time, level of muscle activity (RMS and duration of different muscles in one task and one muscle in different tasks. Results: The results showed that the agonists (posterior muscles activated at first to compensate the flexor torque caused by loading and then the antagonists (anterior muscles switched-on to compensate the reaction forces caused by agonist activities. With regards to continuous activity of internal oblique and its attachments via thoracalumbar fascia to the transverse processes of the lumbar vertebrae, it can be considered as one of the major stabilizer muscles of the trunk . Conclusion: Finally the results indicated that supporting surface type didn’t have any effect on timing and scaling of muscle activities in different tasks suggesting that probably spinal and trunk priprioceptors are just responsible for triggering postural responses and they don’t have any role in determining timing and scaling.

  12. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-04

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling.

  13. Analysis of right anterolateral impacts: the effect of trunk flexion on the cervical muscle whiplash response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Yogesh

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cervical muscles are considered a potential site of whiplash injury, and there is a need to understand the cervical muscle response under non-conventional whiplash impact scenarios, including variable body position and impact direction. There is no data, however, on the effect of occupant position on the muscle response to frontal impacts. Therefore, the objective of the study was to measure cervical muscle response to graded right anterolateral impacts. Methods Twenty volunteers were subjected to right anterolateral impacts of 4.3, 7.8, 10.6, and 12.8 m/s2 acceleration with their trunk flexed forward 45 degrees and laterally flexed right or left by 45 degrees. Bilateral EMG of the sternocleidomastoids, trapezii, and splenii capitis and acceleration of the sled, torso, and head were measured. Results and discussion With either direction of trunk flexion at impact, the trapezius EMGs increased with increasing acceleration (p Conclusion When the subject sits with trunk flexed out of neutral posture at the time of anterolateral impact, the cervical muscle response is dramatically reduced compared to frontal impacts with the trunk in neutral posture. In the absence of bodily impact, the flexed trunk posture appears to produce a biomechanical response that would decrease the likelihood of cervical muscle injury in low velocity impacts.

  14. Ventilatory responses to muscle metaboreflex activation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Richard M; Turner, Alice; White, Michael J

    2016-10-15

    Recent evidence indicates a role for group III/IV muscle afferents in reflex control of the human ventilatory response to exercise. Dyspnoea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be linked to this reflex response. This study shows that activation of the muscle metaboreflex causes a ventilatory response in COPD patients but not in healthy controls. This indicates abnormal involvement of muscle afferents in the control of ventilation in COPD which may be a contributing factor to exercise dyspnoea. Blockade of thin fibre muscle afferent feedback during dynamic exercise reduces exercise hyperpnoea in health and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, we hypothesised that activation of the muscle metaboreflex at rest would cause hyperpnoea. We evaluated the effect of muscle metaboreflex activation on ventilation, in resting COPD patients and healthy participants. Following a bout of rhythmic hand grip exercise, post exercise circulatory occlusion (PECO) was applied to the resting forearm to sustain activation of the muscle metaboreflex, in 18 COPD patients (FEV 1 /FVC ratio abnormally involved in the control of ventilation in COPD and may be a contributing factor to exercise dyspnoea. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  15. Effects of trunk muscle fatigue and load timing on spinal responses during sudden hand loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Diane E; Potvin, Jim R

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the responses of the spine during sudden loading in the presence of back and abdominal muscle fatigue, with a primary focus on the implications for spinal stability. Fifteen females were studied and each received sudden loads to the hands, at both known and unknown times. Participants received these loading trials (a) while rested, (b) with back muscle fatigue, and (c) with a combination of back and abdominal muscle fatigue. Measures were taken on the EMG activity of two trunk extensor and two abdominal muscles, and on the trunk angle and centre of pressure. A 3x2 Repeated Measures ANOVA was also performed. There were no preparations made prior to the perturbation even when it could be anticipated. However, the peak responses that followed were greater in the unexpected versus the expected condition. In addition, trunk muscle fatigue led to an increase in the baseline activity of the trunk muscles but no additional increase in activity just prior to loading. There was increased activation of both (opposing) muscle groups when only one muscle group was fatigued. Because the peak responses following the perturbation were enhanced in the unknown timing condition, preparations must have taken place prior to the anticipated perturbations, perhaps in other segments of the body that were not measured. Also, the load impact may not have been great enough to elicit large preparations. The heightened baseline activity with fatigue suggests that there may have been increased spinal stiffness whenever the spine was fatigued, and not just immediately prior to an impending perturbation. The increased activation of opposing muscle groups is evidence of increased cocontraction in response to fatigue, possibly to maintain stability with decreasing coordination.

  16. Subchronic exposure to diisocyanates increases guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle responses to acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, W; Potthast, J; Marczynski, B; Mensing, T; Baur, X

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the threshold concentrations of isocyanates (IC) for induction of lung disorders, constrictive responses of tracheal smooth muscles to acetylcholine (ACH) in guinea pigs with and without diisocyanate [toluene diisocyanate (TDI), hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI)] exposure were investigated. An IC-induced increase in smooth muscle responsiveness was studied by measuring cumulative ACH dose responses (10(-10) to 10(-4) M ACH). Basal ACH dose-response curves, measured twice in intervals of 1 h using tracheal preparations of 11 guinea pigs previously not exposed to IC, were reproducible. Subchronic in vivo exposures to TDI, HDI, and MDI atmospheres of 10 and 20 parts per billion (ppb) on 5 consecutive days led to significantly (p < 0.05) increased ACH responsiveness of tracheal smooth muscle, whereas concentrations of 2.5 and 5 ppb were not effective. Exposure to HDI atmospheres of 10 ppb for 1, 2, 4, or 8 weeks resulted in a time-dependent increase in ACH responses (p < 0.05) of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle. Increased tracheal muscle responses to ACH were transient since tracheal preparations from animals exposed to 10 and 20 ppb MDI for 4 weeks and with an exposure-free interval of 8 weeks before preparation did not show enlarged ACH responses, which were present in preparations at the end of the exposure period (p < 0.05). Exposure to low IC concentrations as present in workplaces cause increased ACH responsiveness of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle. The increased responsiveness of the airways seems to be largely reversible, since normal responses were found after 8 weeks of IC avoidance. Reversibility of IC-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is of great occupational and preventive medical importance. Workers with acquired airway hyperresponsiveness might escape lung damage if the changes are detected in an early stage before alterations in lung function are in a chronic stage.

  17. Muscle cells challenged with saturated fatty acids mount an autonomous inflammatory response that activates macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillon Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Within adipose tissue of mice fed a high fat diet, resident and infiltrating macrophages assume a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by the production of cytokines which in turn impact on the surrounding tissue. However, inflammation is not restricted to adipose tissue and high fat-feeding is responsible for a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in muscle. Although skeletal muscle is the major disposer of dietary glucose and a major determinant of glycemia, the origin and consequence of muscle inflammation in the development of insulin resistance are poorly understood. We used a cell culture approach to investigate the vectorial crosstalk between muscle cells and macrophages upon exposure to physiological, low levels of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Inflammatory pathway activation and cytokine expression were analyzed in L6 muscle cells expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (L6GLUT4myc exposed to 0.2 mM palmitate or palmitoleate. Conditioned media thereof, free of fatty acids, were then tested for their ability to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Palmitate -but not palmitoleate- induced IL-6, TNFα and CCL2 expression in muscle cells, through activation of the NF-κB pathway. Palmitate (0.2 mM alone did not induce insulin resistance in muscle cells, yet conditioned media from palmitate-challenged muscle cells selectively activated macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of palmitate activate autonomous inflammation in muscle cells to release factors that turn macrophages pro-inflammatory. We hypothesize that saturated fat-induced, low-grade muscle cell inflammation may trigger resident skeletal muscle macrophage polarization, possibly contributing to insulin resistance in vivo.

  18. Uncertainty quantification of aeroacoustic power sources in corrugated pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swamy, M.; Shoeibi Omrani, P.; González Díez, N.

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in corrugated pipes often exhibit whistling behavior, due to periodic flow-induced pulsations generated in the pipe cavities. These aero-acoustic sources are strongly dependent on the geometrical dimensions and features of the cavities. As a result, uncertainties in the exact shape and

  19. Singing mitigation in corrugated tubes with liquid injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Golliard, J.; Vijlbrief, O.

    2013-01-01

    Pipes with a corrugated inner surface, as used in flexible pipes for gas production and transport, can generate a high amplitude tonal sound (singing). Small quantities of liquid can result in a significant amplitude reduction or total mitigation of this sound production. To evaluate different

  20. Measuring autogenous strain of concrete with corrugated moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2008-01-01

    A reliable technique to quantify autogenous strain is a prerequisite to numerical modeling in stress calculations for high performance concrete. The introducing of a special kind of corrugated tube mould helps to transforming volume strain measurement into liner strain measurement in horizontal...

  1. Fatigue-enhanced hyperalgesia in response to muscle insult: induction and development occur in a sex-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, N. S.; Gibson-Corley, K.; Frey-Law, L.; Sluka, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain affects 20–50% of the population, is more common in women than men, and is associated with increased pain during physical activity and exercise. Muscle fatigue is common in people with chronic muscle pain, occurs in response to exercise and is associated with release of fatigue metabolites. Fatigue metabolites can sensitize muscle nociceptors which could enhance pain with exercise. Using a mouse model we tested whether fatigue of a single muscle, induced by electrical stimulation, resulted in enhanced muscle hyperalgesia and if the enhanced hyperalgesia was more pronounced in female mice. Muscle fatigue was induced in combination with a sub-threshold muscle insult (2 injections of pH 5.0 saline) in male and female mice. We show that male and female mice, fatigued immediately prior to muscle insult in the same muscle, develop similar muscle hyperalgesia 24h later. However, female mice also develop hyperalgesia when muscle fatigue and muscle insult occur in different muscles, and when muscle insult is administered 24 hours after fatigue in the same muscle. Further, hyperalgesia lasts significantly longer in females. Finally, muscle insult with or without muscle fatigue results in minimal inflammatory changes in the muscle itself, and sex differences are not related to estradiol (ovariectomy) or changes in brainstem activity (pNR1). Thus, the current model mimics muscle fatigue-induced enhancement of pain observed in chronic muscle pain conditions in the human population. Interactions between fatigue and muscle insult may underlie the development of chronic widespread pain with an associated female predominance observed in human subjects. PMID:23906552

  2. Emerging roles of ER stress and unfolded protein response pathways in skeletal muscle health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Kyle R; McMillan, Joseph D; Kumar, Ashok

    2018-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the human body and can adapt its mass as a consequence of physical activity, metabolism, growth factors, and disease conditions. Skeletal muscle contains an extensive network of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), called sarcoplasmic reticulum, which plays an important role in the regulation of proteostasis and calcium homeostasis. In many cell types, environmental and genetic factors that disrupt ER function cause an accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins in the ER lumen that ultimately leads to ER stress. To alleviate the stress and restore homeostasis, the ER activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR has three arms, which regulate protein synthesis and expression of many ER chaperone and regulatory proteins. However, the role of individual UPR pathways in skeletal muscle has just begun to be investigated. Recent studies suggest that UPR pathways play pivotal roles in muscle stem cell homeostasis, myogenic differentiation, and regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. Moreover, markers of ER stress and the UPR are activated in skeletal muscle in diverse conditions such as exercise, denervation, starvation, high fat diet, cancer cachexia, and aging. Accumulating evidence also suggests that ER stress may have important roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies and genetic muscle disorders. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the role and potential mechanisms by which ER stress and the individual arms of the UPR regulate skeletal muscle formation, plasticity, and function in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The response of apoptotic and proteolytic systems to repeated heat stress in atrophied rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Toshinori; Sugiura, Takao; Yamamoto, Yuki; Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Kakigi, Ryo; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-10-01

    We examined the effect of repeated heat stress on muscle atrophy, and apoptotic and proteolytic regulation in unloaded rat slow- and fast-type skeletal muscles. Forty male Wistar rats (11 week-old) were divided into control (CT), hindlimb unweighting (HU), intermittent weight-bearing during HU (HU + IWB), and intermittent weight-bearing with heat stress during HU (41-41.5°C for 30 min; HU + IWB + HS) groups. The HU + IWB + HS and HU + IWB groups were released from unloading for 1 h every second day, during which the HU + IWB + HS group underwent the heating. Our results revealed that repeated bouts of heat stress resulted in protection against disuse muscle atrophy in both soleus and plantaris muscles. This heat stress-induced protection against disuse-induced muscular atrophy may be partially due to reduced apoptotic activation in both muscles, and decreased ubiquitination in only the soleus muscle. We concluded that repeated heat stress attenuated skeletal muscle atrophy via suppressing apoptosis but the response to proteolytic systems depend on the muscle phenotype. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  4. Origin of directionally tuned responses in lower limb muscles to unpredictable upper limb disturbances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Forghani

    Full Text Available Unpredictable forces which perturb balance are frequently applied to the body through interaction between the upper limb and the environment. Lower limb muscles respond rapidly to these postural disturbances in a highly specific manner. We have shown that the muscle activation patterns of lower limb muscles are organized in a direction specific manner which changes with lower limb stability. Ankle muscles change their activity within 80 ms of the onset of a force perturbation applied to the hand which is earlier than the onset of changes in ground reaction force, ankle angle or head motion. The latency of the response is sensitive to the perturbation direction. However, neither the latency nor the magnitude of the response is affected by stiffening the arm even though this alters the magnitude and timing of motion of the body segments. Based on the short latency, insensitivity of the change in ankle muscle activation to motion of the body segments but sensitivity to perturbation direction we reason that changes in ankle muscle activation are most likely triggered by sensory signals originating from cutaneous receptors in the hand. Furthermore, evidence that the latency of changes in ankle muscle activation depends on the number of perturbation directions suggests that the neural pathway is not confined to the spinal cord.

  5. Origin of directionally tuned responses in lower limb muscles to unpredictable upper limb disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Ali; Milner, Theodore E

    2017-01-01

    Unpredictable forces which perturb balance are frequently applied to the body through interaction between the upper limb and the environment. Lower limb muscles respond rapidly to these postural disturbances in a highly specific manner. We have shown that the muscle activation patterns of lower limb muscles are organized in a direction specific manner which changes with lower limb stability. Ankle muscles change their activity within 80 ms of the onset of a force perturbation applied to the hand which is earlier than the onset of changes in ground reaction force, ankle angle or head motion. The latency of the response is sensitive to the perturbation direction. However, neither the latency nor the magnitude of the response is affected by stiffening the arm even though this alters the magnitude and timing of motion of the body segments. Based on the short latency, insensitivity of the change in ankle muscle activation to motion of the body segments but sensitivity to perturbation direction we reason that changes in ankle muscle activation are most likely triggered by sensory signals originating from cutaneous receptors in the hand. Furthermore, evidence that the latency of changes in ankle muscle activation depends on the number of perturbation directions suggests that the neural pathway is not confined to the spinal cord.

  6. Origin of directionally tuned responses in lower limb muscles to unpredictable upper limb disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Ali; Milner, Theodore E.

    2017-01-01

    Unpredictable forces which perturb balance are frequently applied to the body through interaction between the upper limb and the environment. Lower limb muscles respond rapidly to these postural disturbances in a highly specific manner. We have shown that the muscle activation patterns of lower limb muscles are organized in a direction specific manner which changes with lower limb stability. Ankle muscles change their activity within 80 ms of the onset of a force perturbation applied to the hand which is earlier than the onset of changes in ground reaction force, ankle angle or head motion. The latency of the response is sensitive to the perturbation direction. However, neither the latency nor the magnitude of the response is affected by stiffening the arm even though this alters the magnitude and timing of motion of the body segments. Based on the short latency, insensitivity of the change in ankle muscle activation to motion of the body segments but sensitivity to perturbation direction we reason that changes in ankle muscle activation are most likely triggered by sensory signals originating from cutaneous receptors in the hand. Furthermore, evidence that the latency of changes in ankle muscle activation depends on the number of perturbation directions suggests that the neural pathway is not confined to the spinal cord. PMID:29095888

  7. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in corrugated pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Henrique S. de; Morales, Rigoberto E.M.; Franco, Admilson T.; Junqueira, Silvio L.M.; Erthal, Raul H. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. Academico de Mecanica (DAMEC)]. E-mails: rique.stel@gmail.com; rmorales@utfpr.edu.br; admilson@utfpr.edu.br; silvio@utfpr.edu.br; rherthal@utfpr.edu.br; Goncalves, Marcelo de Albuquerque Lima [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)]. E-mail: marcelog@petrobras.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Corrugated pipes are used in various engineering applications such heat exchangers and oil transport. In most cases these pipes consist of periodically distributed grooves at the duct inner wall. Numerical and experimental works reported the influence of grooves height and length in the turbulent flow by inspection of several turbulent properties such as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress. The present article aims to investigate the influence of grooves height and length in the global friction factor of turbulent flow through periodically corrugated pipes. Mass and momentum conservation equations are revised and specific boundary conditions are set to characterize a periodic fully developed regime in a single axisymmetric bidimensional module which represents the periodically corrugated duct geometry. The set of algebraic equations is discretized through the Finite Volume Method, with the Hybrid interpolation scheme applied to the convective terms, and solved using the commercial software PHOENICS CFD. The simulation of turbulent, incompressible, isothermal and single-phase flow is considered. The algebraic turbulence model LVEL is used. Four geometric configurations are assumed, including grooves height and length variations, in order to compare their influence on the friction factor. The obtained numerical friction factors show good agreement with previous experimental results, specially for Reynolds numbers over 20000. Numerical results for corrugated pipes compared to the Blasius smooth pipe correlation shows that the friction factor increases compared to smooth pipes, and such increase is more significant for higher Reynolds numbers and for larger grooves as well. These trends appear to be related to an enhancement of the momentum transport over the corrugated wall due to the recirculating pattern inside the grooves, in accordance with previous experimental works (author)

  8. Ischemic Preconditioning Blunts Muscle Damage Responses Induced by Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Alexander; Behringer, Michael; Harmsen, Jan-Frieder; Mayer, Constantin; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Zilkens, Christoph; Schumann, Moritz

    2017-08-22

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is known to reduce muscle damage induced by ischemia and reperfusion-injury (I/R-Injury) during surgery. Due to similarities between the pathophysiological formation of I/R-injury and eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), as characterized by an intracellular accumulation of Ca, an increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased pro-inflammatory signaling, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether IPC performed prior to eccentric exercise may also protect against EIMD. Nineteen healthy men were matched to an eccentric only (ECC) (n=9) or eccentric proceeded by IPC group (IPC+ECC) (n=10). The exercise protocol consisted of bilateral biceps curls (3x10 repetitions at 80% of the concentric 1RM). In IPC+ECC, IPC was applied bilaterally at the upper arms by a tourniquet (200 mmHg) immediately prior to the exercise (3x5 minutes of occlusion, separated by 5 minutes of reperfusion). Creatine Kinase (CK), arm circumference, subjective pain (VAS score) and radial displacement (Tensiomyography, Dm) were assessed before IPC, pre-exercise, post-exercise, 20 minutes-, 2 hours-, 24 hours-, 48 hours- and 72 hours post-exercise. CK differed from baseline only in ECC at 48h (pIPC+ECC (between groups: 24h: p=0.004, 48h: pIPC+ECC (between groups: all pIPC+ECC (between-groups pIPC performed prior to a bout of eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors blunts EIMD and exercise-induced pain, while maintaining the contractile properties of the muscle.

  9. Systemic protein delivery by muscle-gene transfer is limited by a local immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lixin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W.

    2005-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been successfully used for therapeutic expression of systemic transgene products (such as factor IX or erythropoietin) following in vivo administration to skeletal muscle of animal models of inherited hematologic disorders. However, an immune response may be initiated if the transgene product represents a neoantigen. Here, we use ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and demonstrate immune-mediated elimination of expression on muscle-directed AAV-2 gene ...

  10. Shear Behavior of Corrugated Steel Webs in H Shape Bridge Girders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In bridge engineering, girders with corrugated steel webs have shown good mechanical properties. With the promotion of composite bridge with corrugated steel webs, in particular steel-concrete composite girder bridge with corrugated steel webs, it is necessary to study the shear performance and buckling of the corrugated webs. In this research, by conducting experiment incorporated with finite element analysis, the stability of H shape beam welded with corrugated webs was tested and three failure modes were observed. Structural data including load-deflection, load-strain, and shear capacity of tested beam specimens were collected and compared with FEM analytical results by ANSYS software. The effects of web thickness, corrugation, and stiffening on shear capacity of corrugated webs were further discussed.

  11. Blood flow response to electrically induced twitch and tetanic lower-limb muscle contractions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of electric stimulation (ES)-induced twitch with tetanic leg muscle contractions on blood flow responses and to assess blood flow responses in the contralateral inactive leg. DESIGN: Intervention with within-subject comparisons. SETTING: University research

  12. Blood flow response to electrically induced twitch and tetanic lower-limb muscle contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effect of electric stimulation (ES)-induced twitch with tetanic leg muscle contractions on blood flow responses and to assess blood flow responses in the contralateral inactive leg. Design: Intervention with within-subject comparisons. Setting: University research

  13. The contrasting stretch reflex responses of the long and short flexor muscles of the human thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, P B

    1984-03-01

    The electromyographic activity of flexors pollicis longus and brevis (with its synergists) has been compared on forcibly extending the thumb at various velocities with the muscles initially contracting. Both muscles gave short- and long-latency responses, but these differed in their relative magnitude with short-latency responses being better developed for the short flexor. With jerk-type stimuli both muscles gave short-latency responses with the expected slight difference in latency due to their different position in the arm. That of the long flexor was sometimes immediately followed by a long-latency response to the same stimulus. With slower displacements the short flexor regularly showed much more short-latency response than did the long flexor. The ensuing long-latency activity of the short flexor was normally appreciably less than that of the long flexor. However, since the short-latency response may be presumed to leave the motoneurones refractory it cannot be definitively concluded from this that acting in isolation long-latency pathways would be less potent for the short flexor, though this seems quite likely to be so. In some cases the first reflex activity occurred nearly synchronously for the two muscles in spite of their different separation from the spinal cord. That for the more distal short flexor was a short-latency response, whereas that for the more proximal long flexor was a long-latency response. The findings conflict with the provisional generalization that for muscles of the primate hand short-latency responses have been regularly supplanted by long-latency responses. They also provide the basis for a teleological argument against the view that the long-latency response is mediated transcortically.

  14. Responsiveness of muscle size and strength to physical training in very elderly people: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, V H; Saunders, D H; Greig, C A

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine whether very elderly muscle (>75 years) hypertrophies in response to physical training. The databases MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL Plus and SPORTDiscus were systematically literature searched with reference lists of all included studies and relevant reviews. Controlled trials (inactive elderly control group) involving healthy elderly participants over 75 years participating in an intervention complying with an established definition of physical training were included. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed using the PEDro scale. Data analysis was performed on muscle size and strength using RevMan (software version 5.1). Four studies were included of which four of four measured changes in gross muscle size. Training induced increases in muscle size from 1.5%-15.6% were reported in three of four studies, and one of four studies reported a decrease in muscle size (3%). The greatest gain in muscle mass was observed in a study of whole body vibration training. Meta-analysis of three studies found an increase of thigh muscle cross-sectional area (mean difference 2.31 cm(2) or 0.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62 to 4.00; P = 0.008) and muscle strength (standardized mean difference 1.04, 95% CI: 0.65 to 1.43; P training when delivered as resistance training has the ability to elicit hypertrophy and increase muscle strength in very elderly muscle. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Immune Response and Mitochondrial Metabolism Are Commonly Deregulated in DMD and Aging Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, Gérard; Steenman, Marja; Fayet, Guillemette; Chevalier, Catherine; Jourdon, Philippe; Houlgatte, Rémi; Savagner, Frédérique; Pereon, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a complex process involving multiple pathways downstream of the primary genetic insult leading to fatal muscle degeneration. Aging muscle is a multifactorial neuromuscular process characterized by impaired muscle regeneration leading to progressive atrophy. We hypothesized that these chronic atrophying situations may share specific myogenic adaptative responses at transcriptional level according to tissue remodeling. Muscle biopsies from four young DMD and four AGED subjects were referred to a group of seven muscle biopsies from young subjects without any neuromuscular disorder and explored through a dedicated expression microarray. We identified 528 differentially expressed genes (out of 2,745 analyzed), of which 328 could be validated by an exhaustive meta-analysis of public microarray datasets referring to DMD and Aging in skeletal muscle. Among the 328 validated co-expressed genes, 50% had the same expression profile in both groups and corresponded to immune/fibrosis responses and mitochondrial metabolism. Generalizing these observed meta-signatures with large compendia of public datasets reinforced our results as they could be also identified in other pathological processes and in diverse physiological conditions. Focusing on the common gene signatures in these two atrophying conditions, we observed enrichment in motifs for candidate transcription factors that may coordinate either the immune/fibrosis responses (ETS1, IRF1, NF1) or the mitochondrial metabolism (ESRRA). Deregulation in their expression could be responsible, at least in part, for the same transcriptome changes initiating the chronic muscle atrophy. This study suggests that distinct pathophysiological processes may share common gene responses and pathways related to specific transcription factors. PMID:22096509

  16. Immune response and mitochondrial metabolism are commonly deregulated in DMD and aging skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Baron

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a complex process involving multiple pathways downstream of the primary genetic insult leading to fatal muscle degeneration. Aging muscle is a multifactorial neuromuscular process characterized by impaired muscle regeneration leading to progressive atrophy. We hypothesized that these chronic atrophying situations may share specific myogenic adaptative responses at transcriptional level according to tissue remodeling. Muscle biopsies from four young DMD and four AGED subjects were referred to a group of seven muscle biopsies from young subjects without any neuromuscular disorder and explored through a dedicated expression microarray. We identified 528 differentially expressed genes (out of 2,745 analyzed, of which 328 could be validated by an exhaustive meta-analysis of public microarray datasets referring to DMD and Aging in skeletal muscle. Among the 328 validated co-expressed genes, 50% had the same expression profile in both groups and corresponded to immune/fibrosis responses and mitochondrial metabolism. Generalizing these observed meta-signatures with large compendia of public datasets reinforced our results as they could be also identified in other pathological processes and in diverse physiological conditions. Focusing on the common gene signatures in these two atrophying conditions, we observed enrichment in motifs for candidate transcription factors that may coordinate either the immune/fibrosis responses (ETS1, IRF1, NF1 or the mitochondrial metabolism (ESRRA. Deregulation in their expression could be responsible, at least in part, for the same transcriptome changes initiating the chronic muscle atrophy. This study suggests that distinct pathophysiological processes may share common gene responses and pathways related to specific transcription factors.

  17. Aerodynamic effects of corrugation and deformation in flapping wings of hovering hoverflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Gang; Sun, Mao

    2012-05-07

    We investigated the aerodynamic effects of wing deformation and corrugation of a three-dimensional model hoverfly wing at a hovering condition by solving the Navier-Stokes equations on a dynamically deforming grid. Various corrugated wing models were tested. Insight into whether or not there existed significant aerodynamic coupling between wing deformation (camber and twist) and wing corrugation was obtained by comparing aerodynamic forces of four cases: a smooth-plate wing in flapping motion without deformation (i.e. a rigid flat-plate wing in flapping motion); a smooth-plate wing in flapping motion with deformation; a corrugated wing in flapping motion without deformation (i.e. a rigid corrugated wing in flapping motion); a corrugated wing in flapping motion with deformation. There was little aerodynamic coupling between wing deformation and corrugation: the aerodynamic effect of wing deformation and corrugation acting together was approximately a superposition of those of deformation and corrugation acting separately. When acting alone, the effect of wing deformation was to increase the lift by 9.7% and decrease the torque (or aerodynamic power) by 5.2%, and that of wing corrugation was to decrease the lift by 6.5% and increase the torque by 2.2%. But when acting together, the wing deformation and corrugation only increased the lift by ~3% and decreased the torque by ~3%. That is, the combined aerodynamic effect of deformation and corrugation is rather small. Thus, wing corrugation is mainly for structural, not aerodynamic, purpose, and in computing or measuring the aerodynamic forces, using a rigid flat-plate wing to model the corrugated deforming wing at hovering condition can be a good approximation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical behavior of a sandwich with corrugated GRP core: numerical modeling and experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tumino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the mechanical behaviour of a core reinforced composite sandwich structure is studied. The sandwich employs a Glass Reinforced Polymer (GRP orthotropic material for both the two external skins and the inner core web. In particular, the core is designed in order to cooperate with the GRP skins in membrane and flexural properties by means of the addition of a corrugated laminate into the foam core. An analytical model has been developed to replace a unit cell of this structure with an orthotropic equivalent thick plate that reproduces the in plane and out of plane behaviour of the original geometry. Different validation procedures have been implemented to verify the quality of the proposed method. At first a comparison has been performed between the analytical model and the original unit cell modelled with a Finite Element mesh. Elementary loading conditions are reproduced and results are compared. Once the reliability of the analytical model was assessed, this homogenised model was implemented within the formulation of a shell finite element. The goal of this step is to simplify the FE analysis of complex structures made of corrugated core sandwiches; in fact, by using the homogenised element, the global response of a real structure can be investigated only with the discretization of its mid-surface. Advantages are mainly in terms of time to solution saving and CAD modelling simplification. Last step is then the comparison between this FE model and experiments made on sandwich beams and panels whose skins and corrugated cores are made of orthotropic cross-ply GRP laminates. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results confirms the validity of the proposed model.

  19. Electromyographic responses from the hindlimb muscles of the decerebrate cat to horizontal support surface perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Gottschall, Jinger S; Nichols, T Richard

    2009-06-01

    The sensory and neural mechanisms underlying postural control have received much attention in recent decades but remain poorly understood. Our objectives were 1) to establish the decerebrate cat as an appropriate model for further research into the sensory mechanisms of postural control and 2) to observe what elements of the postural response can be generated by the brain stem and spinal cord. Ten animals were decerebrated using a modified premammillary technique, which consists of a premammillary decerebration that is modified with a vertical transection near the subthalamic nucleus to eliminate spontaneous locomotion. Horizontal support surface perturbations were applied to all four limbs and electromyographic recordings were collected from 14 muscles of the right hindlimb. Muscle activation was quantified with tuning curves, which compared increases and decreases in muscle activity to background and graphed the difference against perturbation direction. Parallels were drawn between these tuning curves, which were further quantified with a principal direction and breadth (range of directions of muscle activation), and data collected by other researchers from the intact animal. We found a strong similarity in the direction and breadth of the tuning curves generated in the decerebrate and intact cat. These results support our hypothesis that directionally specific tuning of muscles in response to support surface perturbations does not require the cortex, further indicating a strong role for the brain stem and spinal cord circuits in mediating directionally appropriate muscle activation patterns.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle at rest and in response to exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Martins Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose uptake is an important phenomenon for cell homeostasis and for organism health. Under resting conditions, skeletal muscle is dependent on insulin to promote glucose uptake.Insulin, after binding to its membrane receptor, triggers a cascade of intracellular reactions culminating in activation of the glucose transporter 4, GLUT4, among other outcomes.This transporter migrates to the plasma membrane and assists in glucose internalization.However, under special conditions such as physical exercise, alterations in the levels of intracellular molecules such as ATP and calcium actto regulate GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, regardless of insulinlevels.Regular physical exercise, due to stimulating pathways related to glucose uptake, is an important non-pharmacological intervention for improving glycemic control in obese and diabetic patients. In this mini-review the main mechanisms involved in glucose uptake in skeletal muscle in response to muscle contraction will be investigated.

  1. The cellular stress response of rat skeletal muscle following lengthening contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock-Tahiri, Evan; Locke, Marius

    2017-07-01

    The cellular stress response of the rat tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was investigated following 20, 40, or 60 lengthening contractions (LCs) using an in vivo model of electrical stimulation. Muscles were removed at 0, 1, 3, or 24 h after LCs and assessed for heat shock transcription factor (HSF) activation, heat shock protein (HSP) content, and/or morphological evidence of muscle fibre damage. When compared with the first muscle contraction, peak muscle torque was reduced by 26% (p < 0.05) after 20 LCs and further reduced to 56% and 60% (p < 0.001) after 40 and 60 LCs, respectively. Following 60 LCs, HSF activation was detected at 0, 1, and 3 h but was undetectable at 24 h. Hsp72 content was elevated at 24 h after 20 LCs (2.34 ± 0.37 fold, p < 0.05), 40 LCs (3.02 ± 0.31 fold, p < 0.01), and 60 LCs (3.37 ± 0.21 fold, p < 0.001). Hsp25 content increased after 40 (2.36 ± 0.24 fold, p < 0.01) and 60 LCs (2.80 ± 0.37 fold, p < 0.01). Morphological assessment of TA morphology revealed that very few fibres were damaged following 20 LCs while multiple sets of LCs (40 and 60) caused greater amounts of fibre damage. Electron microscopy showed disrupted Z-lines and sarcomeres were detectable in some muscles fibres following 20 LCs but were more prevalent and severe in muscles subjected to 40 or 60 LCs. These results suggest LCs elevate HSP content by an HSF-mediated mechanism (60 LC) and a single set of 20 LCs is capable of increasing muscle HSP content without causing significant muscle fibre damage.

  2. Excitatory neurotransmitters in the tentacle flexor muscles responsible for space positioning of the snail olfactory organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcs, N; Hernádi, L; Elekes, K; Kimura, S; Kiss, T

    2014-03-01

    Recently, three novel flexor muscles (M1, M2 and M3) in the posterior tentacles of the snail have been described, which are responsible for the patterned movements of the tentacles of the snail, Helix pomatia. In this study, we have demonstrated that the muscles received a complex innervation pattern via the peritentacular and olfactory nerves originating from different clusters of motoneurons of the cerebral ganglia. The innervating axons displayed a number of varicosities and established neuromuscular contacts of different ultrastructural forms. Contractions evoked by nerve stimulation could be mimicked by external acetylcholine (ACh) and glutamate (Glu), suggesting that ACh and Glu are excitatory transmitters at the neuromuscular contacts. Choline acetyltransferase and vesicular glutamate transporter immunolabeled axons innervating flexor muscles were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and in Western blot experiments. Nerve- and transmitter-evoked contractions were similarly attenuated by cholinergic and glutamatergic antagonists supporting the dual excitatory innervation. Dopamine (DA, 10⁻⁵ M) oppositely modulated thin (M1/M2) and thick (M3) muscle responses evoked by stimulation of the olfactory nerve, decreasing the contractions of the M1/M2 and increasing those of M3. In both cases, the modulation site was presynaptic. Serotonin (5-HT) at high concentration (10⁻⁵ M) increased the amplitude of both the nerve- and the ACh-evoked contractions in all muscles. The relaxation rate was facilitated suggesting pre- and postsynaptic site of action. Our data provided evidence for a DAergic and 5-HTergic modulation of cholinergic nerves innervating flexor muscles of the tentacles as well as the muscles itself. These effects of DA and 5-HT may contribute to the regulation of sophisticated movements of tentacle muscles lacking inhibitory innervation.

  3. Prestretched airway smooth muscle response to length oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M; Roos, Kevin; Bessaguet, Sandy; Jo Avila, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperconstriction is the cause of many respiratory diseases including asthma. In vitro testing has demonstrated that the active forces of ASM are reduced by length oscillation (LO) mimicking tidal breathing. In a previous study, we demonstrated that this force reduction can be further enhanced when superimposing oscillations (with certain frequencies and amplitudes) on this LO In contrast, it has been reported that pressurizing the lung may help in relieving asthmatic airway constrictions. Ultimately, this pressurizing stretches the ASM and may disturb the acto-myosin cross-bridges in a manner similar to LO; however, it is of a static rather than dynamic nature. This research investigates the effect of combining both prestretch- and LO-applications on contracted porcine ASM Isolated porcine ASM relaxation was tested with a 0.56%, 2%, or 4% stretch of its reference length (Lref) in addition to LO These oscillations are composed of a main wave mimicking the normal breathing (frequency of 0.33 Hz and amplitude of 4% Lref) and superimposed oscillations (frequencies of 20, 30, 40, 60 and 80 Hz and amplitude of 1% Lref). The oscillations were maintained for 10 min. The results demonstrate that a prestretch of 0.56% and 2% Lref does enhance the contracted ASM relaxation at certain superimposed length oscillations frequencies while of 4% Lref does not. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  4. Sympathetic Responses to Noxious Stimulation of Muscle and Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander R Burton; Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Vaughan G Macefield

    2016-01-01

    Acute pain triggers adaptive physiological responses that serve as protective mechanisms that prevent continuing damage to tissues and cause the individual to react to remove or escape the painful stimulus. However, an extension of the pain response beyond signaling tissue damage and healing, such as in chronic pain states, serves no particular biological function; it is maladaptive. The increasing number of chronic pain sufferers is concerning, and the associated disease burden is putting he...

  5. Corrugated interfaces in multiphase core-annular flow

    CERN Document Server

    Shum, Ho Cheung; Fernandez-nieves, Alberto; Stone, Howard A; Weitz, David A

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidic devices can be used to produce highly controlled and monodisperse double or multiple emulsions. The presence of inner drops inside a jet of the middle phase introduces deformations in the jet, which leads to breakup into monodisperse double emulsions. However, the ability to generate double emulsions can be compromised when the interfacial tension between the middle and outer phases is low, leading to flow with high capillary and Weber numbers. In this case, the interface between the fluids is initially deformed by the inner drops but the jet does not break into drops. Instead, the jet becomes highly corrugated, which prevents formation of controlled double emulsions. We show using numerical calculations that the corrugations are caused by the inner drops perturbing the interface and the perturbations are then advected by the flow into complex shapes.

  6. Analysis of right anterolateral impacts: the effect of head rotation on the cervical muscle whiplash response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Yogesh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cervical muscles are considered a potential site of whiplash injury, and there are many impact scenarios for whiplash injury. There is a need to understand the cervical muscle response under non-conventional whiplash impact scenarios, including variable head position and impact direction. Methods Twenty healthy volunteers underwent right anterolateral impacts of 4.0, 7.6, 10.7, and 13.0 m/s2 peak acceleration, each with the head rotated to the left, then the head rotated to the right in a random order of impact severities. Bilateral electromyograms of the sternocleidomastoids, trapezii, and splenii capitis following impact were measured. Results At a peak acceleration of 13.0 m/s2, with the head rotated to the right, the right trapezius generated 61% of its maximal voluntary contraction electromyogram (MVC EMG, while all other muscles generated 31% or less of this variable (31% for the left trapezius, 13% for the right spleinus. capitis, and 16% for the left splenius capitis. The sternocleidomastoids muscles also tended to show an asymmetric EMG response, with the left sternocleidomastoid (the one responsible for head rotation to the right generating a higher percentage (26% of its MVC EMG than the left sternocleidomastoid (4% (p Conclusion The EMG response to a right anterolateral impact is highly dependent on the head position. The sternocleidomastoid responsible for the direction of head rotation and the trapezius ipsilateral to the direction of head rotation generate the most EMG activity.

  7. Mapping speed for an array of corrugated horns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padin, Stephen

    2010-01-20

    I address the choice of horn diameter for millimeter-wave array receivers with corrugated horns. For maximum point-source mapping speed, in both total power and polarization with typical receiver noise contributions and a close-packed horn array that fills the field of view, the optimum horn diameter is 1.6-1.7Flambda, where F is the focal ratio. A +/-25% change in horn diameter gives effect on the mapping speed and optimum horn diameter.

  8. Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, George A.; Cookson, Alan H.

    1981-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

  9. Electric Arc Holes in Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Richard; Larson, Harold R; Eagar, Thomas W

    2017-01-01

    Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) has become a common product installed in new and retrofitted older homes. The ease of installation due to its flexibility and the need for fewer joints significantly lowers labor costs. Despite the advantages of lower cost and ease of installation, however, the thin wall of CSST presents an increased risk of perforation by both mechanical puncturing and electrical arcing from either household current or lightning strikes. In the course of forensic inve...

  10. Skeletal muscle plasticity: cellular and molecular responses to altered physical activity paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Haddad, Fadia

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine our current understanding of the chain of events known to be involved in the adaptive process whereby specific genes and their protein products undergo altered expression; specifically, skeletal muscle adaptation in response to altered loading states will be discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of the contractile protein, myosin heavy chain gene expression. This protein, which is both an important structural and regulatory protein comprising the contractile apparatus, can be expressed as different isoforms, thereby having an impact on the functional diversity of the muscle. Because the regulation of the myosin gene family is under the control of a complex set of processes including, but not limited to, activity, hormonal, and metabolic factors, this protein will serve as a cellular "marker" for studies of muscle plasticity in response to various mechanical perturbations in which the quantity and type of myosin isoform, along with other important cellular proteins, are altered in expression.

  11. Effect of Losartan on the Acute Response of Human Elderly Skeletal Muscle to Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisterberg, Mette Flindt; Andersen, Jesper L; Schjerling, Peter

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of blocking the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) upon the response to acute heavy resistance exercise in elderly human skeletal muscle. The hypothesis was that AT1R blocking would result in a superior myogenic response accompanied by downregulation of TGF......-β and upregulation of IGF-1 signalling. METHODS: 28 healthy elderly men (+64 years) were randomized into two groups, consuming either AT1R blocker (Losartan, 100mg/day) or Placebo for 18 days prior to exercise. Participants performed one bout of heavy unilateral resistance exercise. Six muscle biopsies were obtained...... from the vastus lateralis muscles of each subject: two before exercise, and four after exercise (4.5 hours and 1, 4 and 7 days). Blood pressure and blood samples were collected at the same time points. Biopsies were sectioned for immunohistochemistry to determine the number of satellite cells...

  12. Simplified data access on human skeletal muscle transcriptome responses to differentiated exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Kristian; Schjerling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    and interpret by individuals that are inexperienced with bioinformatics procedures. In a comparative study, we therefore; (1) investigated the human skeletal muscle transcriptome responses to differentiated exercise and non-exercise control intervention, and; (2) set out to develop a straightforward search tool......Few studies have investigated exercise-induced global gene expression responses in human skeletal muscle and these have typically focused at one specific mode of exercise and not implemented non-exercise control models. However, interpretation on effects of differentiated exercise necessitate...... direct comparison between essentially different modes of exercise and the ability to identify true exercise effect, necessitate implementation of independent non-exercise control subjects. Furthermore, muscle transcriptome data made available through previous exercise studies can be difficult to extract...

  13. Measurements of terahertz radiation generated using a metallic, corrugated pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl, E-mail: kbane@slac.stanford.edu [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stupakov, Gennady [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Antipov, Sergey [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States); Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Swinson, Christina [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Xiang, Dao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-02-01

    A method for producing narrow-band THz radiation proposes passing an ultra-relativistic beam through a metallic pipe with small periodic corrugations. We present results of a measurement of such an arrangement at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). Our pipe was copper and was 5 cm long; the aperture was cylindrically symmetric, with a 1 mm (radius) bore and a corrugation depth (peak-to-peak) of 60 µm. In the experiment we measured both the effect on the beam of the structure wakefield and the spectral properties of the radiation excited by the beam. We began by injecting a relatively long beam compared to the wavelength of the radiation, but with short rise time, to excite the structure, and then used a downstream spectrometer to infer the radiation wavelength. This was followed by injecting a shorter bunch, and then using an interferometer (also downstream of the corrugated pipe) to measure the spectrum of the induced THz radiation. For the THz pulse we obtain and compare with calculations: the central frequency, the bandwidth, and the spectral power—compared to a diffraction radiation background signal.

  14. Detection of titin fragments in urine in response to exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Kanda

    Full Text Available Many studies have attempted to determine the associations between blood biomarkers and exercise-induced muscle damage. However, poor correlations between the changes in biomarker levels and the magnitude of muscle symptoms have been reported. Recent advances in proteomic tools offer a strategy for the comprehensive analysis of protein expression, which can be used to identify biomarkers. Here, we used a proteomic analysis to identify urinary proteins that appear in response to a calf-raise exercise, including repetitive eccentric muscle contractions, and found that a titin (also known as connectin N-terminal fragment molecule appears in the urine after eccentric exercise. We measured the titin fragment in urine samples from nine individuals before and after eccentric exercise using a newly-established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found that the titin fragment excretion rate increased 96 h after the exercise (5.1 to 77.6 pg/min, p <0.01. The changes in the titin fragment excretion rate were correlated strongly with blood markers of muscle damage and with muscle symptoms. These findings suggest that the urinary titin fragment is potentially a noninvasive biomarker of muscle damage.

  15. Delayed trunk muscle reflex responses increase the risk of low back injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewicki, Jacek; Silfies, Sheri P; Shah, Riaz A; Greene, Hunter S; Reeves, N Peter; Alvi, Kashif; Goldberg, Barry

    2005-12-01

    Prospective observational study with a 2- to 3-year follow-up. To determine whether delayed muscle reflex response to sudden trunk loading is a result of or a risk factor for sustaining a low back injury (LBI). Differences in motor control have been identified in individuals with chronic low back pain and in athletes with a history of LBI when compared with controls. However, it is not known whether these changes are a risk for or a result of LBI. Muscle reflex latencies in response to a quick force release in trunk flexion, extension, and lateral bending were measured in 303 college athletes. Information was also obtained regarding their personal data, athletic experience, and history of LBI. The data were entered into a binary logistic regression model to identify the predictors of future LBI. RESULTS.: A total of 292 athletes were used for the final analysis (148 females and 144 males). During the follow-up period, 31 (11%) athletes sustained an LBI. The regression model, consisting of history of LBI, body weight, and the latency of muscles shutting off during flexion and lateral bending load releases, predicted correctly 74% of LBI outcomes. The odds of sustaining LBI increased 2.8-fold when a history of LBI was present and increased by 3% with each millisecond of abdominal muscle shut-off latency. On average, this latency was 14 milliseconds longer for athletes who sustained LBI in comparison to athletes who did not sustain LBI (77 [36] vs. 63 [31]). There were no significant changes in any of the muscle response latencies on retest following the injury. The delayed muscle reflex response significantly increases the odds of sustaining an LBI. These delayed latencies appear to be a preexisting risk factor and not the effect of an LBI.

  16. Is disgust sensitive to classical conditioning as indexed by facial electromyography and behavioural responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Charmaine; Bosman, Renske C; Engelhard, Iris; Olatunji, Bunmi O; de Jong, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies provided preliminary support for the role of classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning, yet this evidence has been limited to self-report. This study included facial electromyographical (EMG) measurements (corrugator and levator muscles) and a behavioural approach task to assess participants' motivation-to-eat the actual food items (conditioned stimuli, CS). Food items served as CS and film excerpts of a woman vomiting served as unconditioned stimuli (US). Following acquisition the CS+ (neutral CS paired with US disgust) was rated as more disgusting and less positive. Notably, the conditioned response was transferred to the actual food items as evidenced by participants' reported lowered willingness-to-eat. Participants also showed heightened EMG activity in response to the CS+ which seemed driven by the corrugator indexing a global negative affect. These findings suggest that classical conditioning as a pathway of disgust learning can be reliably observed in subjective but not in disgust-specific physiological responding.

  17. Effects of force detecting sense organs on muscle synergies are correlated with their response properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Sasha N; Neff, David; Chaudhry, Sumaiya; Exter, Annelie; Schmitz, Josef; Büschges, Ansgar

    2017-07-01

    Sense organs that monitor forces in legs can contribute to activation of muscles as synergist groups. Previous studies in cockroaches and stick insects showed that campaniform sensilla, receptors that encode forces via exoskeletal strains, enhance muscle synergies in substrate grip. However synergist activation was mediated by different groups of receptors in cockroaches (trochanteral sensilla) and stick insects (femoral sensilla). The factors underlying the differential effects are unclear as the responses of femoral campaniform sensilla have not previously been characterized. The present study characterized the structure and response properties (via extracellular recording) of the femoral sensilla in both insects. The cockroach trochantero-femoral (TrF) joint is mobile and the joint membrane acts as an elastic antagonist to the reductor muscle. Cockroach femoral campaniform sensilla show weak discharges to forces in the coxo-trochanteral (CTr) joint plane (in which forces are generated by coxal muscles) but instead encode forces directed posteriorly (TrF joint plane). In stick insects, the TrF joint is fused and femoral campaniform sensilla discharge both to forces directed posteriorly and forces in the CTr joint plane. These findings support the idea that receptors that enhance synergies encode forces in the plane of action of leg muscles used in support and propulsion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Leukocytosis, muscle damage and increased lymphocyte proliferative response after an adventure sprint race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tossige-Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of an adventure sprint race (ASR on T-cell proliferation, leukocyte count and muscle damage was evaluated. Seven young male runners completed an ASR in the region of Serra do Espinhaço, Brazil. The race induced a strong leukocytosis (6.22±2.04×103 cells/mm3 before vs 14.81±3.53×103 cells/mm3 after the race, marked by a significant increase of neutrophils and monocytes (P<0.05, but not total lymphocytes, CD3+CD4+ or CD3+CD8+ cells. However, the T-cell proliferative response to mitogenic stimulation was increased (P=0.025 after the race, which contradicted our hypothesis that ASR, as a high-demand competition, would inhibit T-cell proliferation. A positive correlation (P=0.03, r=0.79 was observed between the proliferative response of lymphocytes after the race and the time to complete the race, suggesting that the proliferative response was dependent on exercise intensity. Muscle damage was evident after the race by increased serum levels of aspartate amino transferase (24.99±8.30 vs 50.61±15.76 U/L, P=0.003. The results suggest that humoral factors and substances released by damaged muscle may be responsible for lymphocyte activation, which may be involved in muscle recovery and repair.

  19. Single sodium channels from human skeletal muscle in planar lipid bilayers: characterization and response to pentobarbital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wartenberg, Hans C.; Urban, Bernd W.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the response to general anesthetics of different sodium-channel subtypes, we examined the effects of pentobarbital, a close thiopental analogue, on single sodium channels from human skeletal muscle and compared them to existing data from human brain and human ventricular

  20. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Dakin, C.J.; Vardy, A.N.; Happee, R.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Blouin, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain

  1. Effect of felodipine on the myogenic response to dynamic stretch in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, A; Johansson, B

    1991-04-01

    In the present experiments we examined the effect of felodipine, a vasoselective dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, on contractile responses to dynamic and static stretch of the isolated portal vein of the rat. Dynamic stretch was applied to the vascular smooth muscle at graded rates (from 0.5-1.5% muscle length s-1). Earlier observations (Johansson & Mellander 1975) of a rate-dependent excitation of the vascular smooth muscle by dynamic stretch were confirmed. Addition of felodipine, 3 nM, reduced the spontaneous activity at static lengths to about 50% but resulted in much stronger inhibition of the dynamic stretch responses. Particularly the rate-dependent increase in active force was no longer evident since the response at high rates of passive lengthening was most clearly reduced by felodipine. By contrast, lowering of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration resulted in a comparable attenuation of the spontaneous contractile activity and of the dynamic stretch responses which still showed the typical rate dependence. Therefore, the pronounced inhibition by felodipine of the dynamic myogenic reactivity of the rat portal vein appeared to be a specific effect and not simply related to the overall reduction in contractile activity. We suggest that felodipine, in addition to its inhibition of action potentials and excitation-contraction coupling may exert a special negative influence on the mechano-electrical coupling, i.e. the process that couples dynamic stretch of the vascular smooth muscle to membrane excitation.

  2. F response and H reflex analysis of physiological unity of gravity and antigravity muscles in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, H A; Fisher, M A

    1977-01-01

    Observational differences between reflex (H reflex) and antidromic (F response) activation of segmental motoneurons by a peripheral electrical stimulus are described. In contrast to H reflexes, the percentage of F responses found after a series of stimuli is directly related to the pick-up field of the recording electrode consistent with this response being due to the variable activation of a small fraction of the available motoneuron pool. Despite the differing physiological mechanisms, both F responses and H reflexes can be used to demonstrate similar relative "central excitatory states" for antigravity muscles (i.e. extensors in the lower extremity and flexors in the upper extremity) and their antagonist gravity muscles. H reflexes were elicited not only in their usual location in certain antigravity muscles but also in unusual locations by length/tension changes in agonist and antagonist groups as well as by passive stretch. The data argue for the physiological unity of similarly acting gravity and antigravity muscles as well as supporting a meaningful role of group II afferents in normal segmental motoneuron pool excitability.

  3. Core Muscle Response Times and Postural Reactions in Soccer Players and Nonplayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghuis, Arend Jan; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Hof, At L.

    BORGHUIS, A. J., K. A. P. M. LEMMINK, and A. L. HOF. Core Muscle Response Times and Postural Reactions in Soccer Players and Nonplayers. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 43, No. 1, pp. 108-114, 2011. Decreased core stability has been suggested to be associated with a higher occurrence of lower

  4. A mechanographic method for measurement of muscle tone in the conscious rat. The calf muscle stretch response in reserpine-induced rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnels, B; Steg, G

    1982-07-01

    A simple mechanographic method for the measurement of muscle tone in awake rats is presented. It utilizes principles corresponding to those in clinical assessment of tone and it has been applied to an animal model of Parkinson's disease: the reserpine-treated rat. The rat was restrained by a plastic cylinder and by metal cuffs at the ankles. The hind feet were repeatedly dorsiflexed by an electromechanical manipulator and the resulting calf muscle tension was indirectly measured with a strain-gauge system. The relative contributions to the stretch response from the different muscle groups acting on the ankle joint in the awake and untreated rat and during reserpine-induced rigidity are described. Very little active tension was found in the untreated rat. After treatment with reserpine, continuous activation of the muscle was found in EMG recordings and there was a sharp increase in the tension recorded during stretch. The static response to the increased isometric stretch was augmented. An additional, tonic response to ramp stretch was elicited at all stretch velocities. There was no evidence for phasic responses to rapid stretch in reserpine-induced rigidity. The amplitude of the myomechanogram was thus found to be independent of the ramp stretch velocity. Subsequent injection of apomorphine abolished the increased stretch response. It is demonstrated that changes in muscle tone could be followed during drug treatment and that the method can be used in investigations of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind the disorders of muscle tone.

  5. Mode coupling in multimode step-index plastic-clad silica fibers with corrugated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savović, Svetislav; Djordjevich, Alexandar

    2017-12-01

    The state of mode coupling in step-index plastic-clad silica fibers with corrugated surfaces is investigated in this article using the power flow equation. The coupling coefficient in this equation was obtained using our previously reported method. This enabled us to obtain the length of the corrugated piece of the fiber at which equilibrium mode distribution is achieved as well as the length at which a steady state distribution is established. It was found that the plastic-clad silica fibers with corrugated surfaces showed much stronger mode coupling than plastic-clad silica fibers without corrugated surfaces. Consequently, the equilibrium as well as steady state mode distributions were achieved at shorter fiber lengths in plastic-clad silica fibers with corrugated surfaces than in the same type of optical fibers without corrugated surfaces.

  6. Modulation of Muscle Fiber Compositions in Response to Hypoxia via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nguyen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscle fiber-type changes in hypoxic conditions in accordance with pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk-1 and hypoxia inducible factor (Hif-1α were investigated in rats. Hif-1α and its down-stream molecule Pdk-1 are well known for readily response to hypoxia. We questioned their roles in relation to changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC composition in skeletal muscles. We hypothesize that the level of Pdk-1 with respect to the level of Hif-1α determines MyHC composition of the muscle in rats in hypoxia. Young male rats were housed in a chamber maintained at 11.5% (for sustained hypoxia or fluctuating between 11.5% and 20.8% (for intermittent hypoxia or IH oxygen levels. Then, muscle tissues from the geniohyoid (GH, soleus, and anterior tibialis (TA were obtained at the end of hypoxic conditionings. After both hypoxic conditionings, protein levels of Pdk-1 and Hif-1 increased in GH muscles. GH muscles in acute sustained hypoxia favor an anaerobic glycolytic pathway, resulting in an increase in glycolytic MyHC IIb protein-rich fibers while maintain original fatigue-resistant MyHC IIa protein in the fibers; thus, the numbers of IIa- and IIb MyHC co-expressing fibers increased. Exogenous Pdk-1 over-expression using plasmid vectors elevated not only the glycolytic MyHC IIb, but also IIx as well as IIa expressions in C2C12 myotubes in ambient air significantly. The increase of dual expression of IIa- and IIb MyHC proteins in fibers harvested from the geniohyoid muscle has a potential to improve endurance as shown in our fatigability tests. By increasing the Pdk-1/Hif-1 ratio, a mixed-type muscle could alter endurance within the innate characteristics of the muscle toward more fatigue resistant. We conclude that an increased Pdk-1 level in skeletal muscle helps maintain MyHC compositions to be a fatigue resistant mixed-type muscle.

  7. Hanging on for the ride: adhesion to the extracellular matrix mediates cellular responses in skeletal muscle morphogenesis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F; Sher, Roger B; Henry, Clarissa A

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle specification and morphogenesis during early development are critical for normal physiology. In addition to mediating locomotion, skeletal muscle is a secretory organ that contributes to metabolic homeostasis. Muscle is a highly adaptable tissue, as evidenced by the ability to increase muscle cell size and/or number in response to weight bearing exercise. Conversely, muscle wasting can occur during aging (sarcopenia), cancer (cancer cachexia), extended hospital stays (disuse atrophy), and in many genetic diseases collectively known as the muscular dystrophies and myopathies. It is therefore of great interest to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate skeletal muscle development and adaptation. Muscle morphogenesis transforms short muscle precursor cells into long, multinucleate myotubes that anchor to tendons via the myotendinous junction. This process requires carefully orchestrated interactions between cells and their extracellular matrix microenvironment. These interactions are dynamic, allowing muscle cells to sense biophysical, structural, organizational, and/or signaling changes within their microenvironment and respond appropriately. In many musculoskeletal diseases, these cell adhesion interactions are disrupted to such a degree that normal cellular adaptive responses are not sufficient to compensate for accumulating damage. Thus, one major focus of current research is to identify the cell adhesion mechanisms that drive muscle morphogenesis, with the hope that understanding how muscle cell adhesion promotes the intrinsic adaptability of muscle tissue during development may provide insight into potential therapeutic approaches for muscle diseases. Our objectives in this review are to highlight recent studies suggesting conserved roles for cell-extracellular matrix adhesion in vertebrate muscle morphogenesis and cellular adaptive responses in animal models of muscle diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Proteomic responses of skeletal and cardiac muscle to exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2011-01-01

    Regular exercise is effective in the prevention of chronic diseases and confers a lower risk of death in individuals displaying risk factors such as hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Thus, knowledge of the molecular responses to exercise provides a valuable contrast for interpreting investigations of disease and can highlight novel therapeutic targets. While exercise is an everyday experience and can be conceptualized in simple terms, exercise is a complex physiological phenomena and investigat...

  9. Training can modify back muscle response to sudden trunk loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Essendrop, Morten; Skotte, Jørgen H; Jørgensen, Kurt; Fallentin, Nils

    2004-10-01

    Sudden, unexpected loading to the trunk has been reported in the literature as a potential cause of low-back disorders. This study's aim was to investigate the effect of "readiness training" on the response to sudden back loading among untrained healthy individuals. The study included 19 participants and 19 matched controls. All were employees at the National Institute of Occupational Health. The participants received ten 45-min training sessions during a 4-week period. The training focused on reactions to a variety of expected and unexpected sudden trunk loadings, including balance and coordination exercises. Before and after the training, all subjects were tested for reaction to sudden trunk loading (SL). This entailed applying a horizontal force of 58 N to the subject's upper back. Elapsed time--measured between SL and stopping--decreased significantly in the training group (from 337 to 311 ms) compared with the control group. The improved stopping time was associated with a changed EMG signal, characterized by an increase in the early parts of the response (up to 225 ms) and a subsequent decrease. EMG onset latency was unaffected by training. This study is apparently one of the first to demonstrate that the response to sudden trunk loading can be improved in healthy subjects without an increase in pre-activation and associated trunk stiffness. In perspective, the results indicate a possibility for a training-induced reduction of the risk of low-back injuries, e.g., in nurses exposed to sudden trunk perturbations during patient handling.

  10. Two weeks of muscle immobilization impairs functional sympatholysis but increases exercise hyperemia and the vasodilatory responsiveness to infused ATP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Mørkeberg, Jakob S; Thaning, Pia

    2012-01-01

    with immobilization. These results suggest that muscle inactivity impairs functional sympatholysis and that the magnitude of hyperemia and blood pressure response to exercise is dependent on the training status of the muscle. Immobilization also increases the vasodilatory response to infused ATP....

  11. Inflammatory responses in primary muscle cell cultures in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Nicholas J; Tacchi, Luca; Secombes, Christopher J; Martin, Samuel A M

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between fish health and muscle growth is critical for continued expansion of the aquaculture industry. The effect of immune stimulation on the expression of genes related to the energy balance of fish is poorly understood. In mammals immune stimulation results in major transcriptional changes in muscle, potentially to allow a reallocation of amino acids for use in the immune response and energy homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of immune stimulation on fish muscle gene expression. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) primary muscle cell cultures were stimulated with recombinant (r)IL-1β, a major proinflammatory cytokine, for 24 h in order to simulate an acute immune response. The transcriptomic response was determined by RNA hybridization to a 4 × 44 K Agilent Atlantic salmon microarray platform. The rIL-1β stimulation induced the expression of genes related to both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In addition there were highly significant changes in the expression of genes related to regulation of the cell cycle, growth/structural proteins, proteolysis and lipid metabolism. Of interest were a number of IGF binding proteins that were differentially expressed, which may demonstrate cross talk between the growth and immune systems. We show rIL-1β modulates the expression of not only immune related genes, but also that of genes involved in processes related to growth and metabolism. Co-stimulation of muscle cells with both rIGF-I and rIL-1β demonstrates cross talk between these pathways providing potential avenues for further research. This study highlights the potential negative effects of inflammation on muscle protein deposition and growth in fish and extends our understanding of energy allocation in ectothermic animals.

  12. Inflammation-induced acute phase response in skeletal muscle and critical illness myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Claudia; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Schmidt, Franziska; Hamati, Jida; Kny, Melanie; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Wollersheim, Tobias; Koch, Susanne; Krebs, Martin; Schulz, Herbert; Lodka, Doerte; Saar, Kathrin; Labeit, Siegfried; Spies, Claudia; Hubner, Norbert; Spranger, Joachim; Spuler, Simone; Boschmann, Michael; Dittmar, Gunnar; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Fielitz, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a major risk factor for critical-illness myopathy (CIM) but its pathogenic role in muscle is uncertain. We observed that interleukin 6 (IL-6) and serum amyloid A1 (SAA1) expression was upregulated in muscle of critically ill patients. To test the relevance of these responses we assessed inflammation and acute-phase response at early and late time points in muscle of patients at risk for CIM. Prospective observational clinical study and prospective animal trial. Two intensive care units (ICU) and research laboratory. 33 patients with Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores ≥ 8 on 3 consecutive days within 5 days in ICU were investigated. A subgroup analysis of 12 patients with, and 18 patients without CIM (non-CIM) was performed. Two consecutive biopsies from vastus lateralis were obtained at median days 5 and 15, early and late time points. Controls were 5 healthy subjects undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. A septic mouse model and cultured myoblasts were used for mechanistic analyses. Early SAA1 expression was significantly higher in skeletal muscle of CIM compared to non-CIM patients. Immunohistochemistry showed SAA1 accumulations in muscle of CIM patients at the early time point, which resolved later. SAA1 expression was induced by IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in human and mouse myocytes in vitro. Inflammation-induced muscular SAA1 accumulation was reproduced in a sepsis mouse model. Skeletal muscle contributes to general inflammation and acute-phase response in CIM patients. Muscular SAA1 could be important for CIM pathogenesis. ISRCTN77569430.

  13. Sequenced response of extracellular matrix deadhesion and fibrotic regulators after muscle damage is involved in protection against future injury in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Brandstetter, Simon; Schjerling, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that remodeling of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) is involved in protecting human muscle against injury. Biopsies were obtained from medial gastrocnemius muscles after a single bout of electrical stimulation (B) or a repeated bout (RB......) 30 d later, or 30 d after a single stimulation bout (RBc). A muscle biopsy was collected from the control leg for comparison with the stimulated leg. Satellite cell content, tenascin C, and muscle regeneration were assessed by immunohistochemistry; real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA levels...... of collagens, laminins, heat-shock proteins (HSPs), inflammation, and related growth factors. The large responses of HSPs, CCL2, and tenascin C detected 48 h after a single bout were attenuated in the RB trial, indicative of protection against injury. Satellite cell content and 12 target genes, including IGF-1...

  14. ACCOUNT FOR PERFORMANCE OF CORRUGATED WEB BEAMS IN THE ANALYSIS OF CONSTRAINED TORSION

    OpenAIRE

    Solovev Aleksey Vitalevich; Lukin Aleksey Olegovich; Alpatov Vadim Yurevich; Savostyanov Vadim Nikolaevich

    2012-01-01

    The authors cover the problems of the numerical analysis of corrugated web beams exposed to constrained torsion. The calculation is performed using the finite element method. Virtual solid models and software package "Lira" are employed to perform the structural analysis. The results of the comparative analysis of performance of beams that have flat and corrugated webs and that are exposed to constrained torsion are presented in the article. Corrugated web beams that have diffe...

  15. Minimum Weight Design of Sinusoidal Corrugated Web Beam Using Real-Coded Genetic Algorithms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sudeok Shon; Sangwook Jin; Seungjae Lee

    2017-01-01

    .... Nonetheless, because shear buckling behavior of corrugated web is very complex, the design mechanism for beams and local, global, and interactive buckling problems should be considered in designing...

  16. Pulsed-squeezed-light generation in a waveguide with second-subharmonic generation and periodic corrugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peřina, Jan, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum pulsed second-subharmonic generation in a planar waveguide with a small periodic corrugation at the surface is studied. Backscattering of the interacting fields on the corrugation enhances the nonlinear interaction, giving larger values of squeezing. The problem of backscattering is treated by perturbation theory, using the Fourier transform for nondispersion propagation, and by numerical approach in the general case. Optimum spectral modes for squeezed-light generation are found using the Bloch-Messiah reduction. An improvement in squeezing and increase of the numbers of generated photons are quantified for the corrugation resonating with the fundamental and second-subharmonic field. Splitting of the generated pulse by the corrugation is predicted.

  17. Miniaturized iPS-Cell-Derived Cardiac Muscles for Physiologically Relevant Drug Response Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Loskill, Peter; Deveshwar, Nikhil; Spencer, C Ian; Judge, Luke M; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Fox, Cade B; Mohamed, Tamer M A; Ma, Zhen; Mathur, Anurag; Sheehan, Alice M; Truong, Annie; Saxton, Mike; Yoo, Jennie; Srivastava, Deepak; Desai, Tejal A; So, Po-Lin; Healy, Kevin E; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-04-20

    Tissue engineering approaches have the potential to increase the physiologic relevance of human iPS-derived cells, such as cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM). However, forming Engineered Heart Muscle (EHM) typically requires >1 million cells per tissue. Existing miniaturization strategies involve complex approaches not amenable to mass production, limiting the ability to use EHM for iPS-based disease modeling and drug screening. Micro-scale cardiospheres are easily produced, but do not facilitate assembly of elongated muscle or direct force measurements. Here we describe an approach that combines features of EHM and cardiospheres: Micro-Heart Muscle (μHM) arrays, in which elongated muscle fibers are formed in an easily fabricated template, with as few as 2,000 iPS-CM per individual tissue. Within μHM, iPS-CM exhibit uniaxial contractility and alignment, robust sarcomere assembly, and reduced variability and hypersensitivity in drug responsiveness, compared to monolayers with the same cellular composition. μHM mounted onto standard force measurement apparatus exhibited a robust Frank-Starling response to external stretch, and a dose-dependent inotropic response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Based on the ease of fabrication, the potential for mass production and the small number of cells required to form μHM, this system provides a potentially powerful tool to study cardiomyocyte maturation, disease and cardiotoxicology in vitro.

  18. Sweating responses and the muscle metaboreflex under mildly hyperthermic conditions in sprinters and distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Masashi; Koga, Shunsaku; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Kondo, Narihiko

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the effects of different training methods on nonthermal sweating during activation of the muscle metaboreflex, we compared sweating responses during postexercise muscle occlusion in endurance runners, sprinters, and untrained men under mild hyperthermia (ambient temperature, 35°C; relative humidity, 50%). Ten endurance runners, nine sprinters, and ten untrained men (maximal oxygen uptakes: 57.5 ± 1.5, 49.3 ± 1.5, and 36.6 ± 1.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), respectively; P sprinters than in untrained men (32.2 ± 4.4 vs. 17.3 ± 2.6 mmHg, respectively; P sprinters and untrained men (0.38 ± 0.07, 0.19 ± 0.03, and 0.11 ± 0.04 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), respectively; P sprinters and untrained men. Our results suggest that the specificity of training modalities influences the sweating response during activation of the muscle metaboreflex. In addition, these results imply that a greater activation of the muscle metaboreflex does not cause a greater sweating response in sprinters.

  19. Logarithmic superposition of force response with rapid length changes in relaxed porcine airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijpma, G; Al-Jumaily, A M; Cairns, S P; Sieck, G C

    2010-12-01

    We present a systematic quantitative analysis of power-law force relaxation and investigate logarithmic superposition of force response in relaxed porcine airway smooth muscle (ASM) strips in vitro. The term logarithmic superposition describes linear superposition on a logarithmic scale, which is equivalent to multiplication on a linear scale. Additionally, we examine whether the dynamic response of contracted and relaxed muscles is dominated by cross-bridge cycling or passive dynamics. The study shows the following main findings. For relaxed ASM, the force response to length steps of varying amplitude (0.25-4% of reference length, both lengthening and shortening) are well-fitted with power-law functions over several decades of time (10⁻² to 10³ s), and the force response after consecutive length changes is more accurately fitted assuming logarithmic superposition rather than linear superposition. Furthermore, for sinusoidal length oscillations in contracted and relaxed muscles, increasing the oscillation amplitude induces greater hysteresivity and asymmetry of force-length relationships, whereas increasing the frequency dampens hysteresivity but increases asymmetry. We conclude that logarithmic superposition is an important feature of relaxed ASM, which may facilitate a more accurate prediction of force responses in the continuous dynamic environment of the respiratory system. In addition, the single power-function response to length changes shows that the dynamics of cross-bridge cycling can be ignored in relaxed muscle. The similarity in response between relaxed and contracted states implies that the investigated passive dynamics play an important role in both states and should be taken into account.

  20. Myogenic response of human skeletal muscle to 12 weeks of resistance training at light loading intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Holm, L; Reitelseder, S

    2011-01-01

    There is strong evidence for enhanced numbers of satellite cells with heavy resistance training. The satellite cell response to very light muscle loading is, however, unknown. We, therefore, designed a 12-week training protocol where volunteers trained one leg with a high load (H) and the other leg...... with a light load (L). Twelve young healthy men [mean age 25 ± 3 standard deviation (SD) years] volunteered for the study. Muscle biopsies were collected from the m. vastus lateralis of both legs before and after the training period and satellite cells were visualized by CD56 immunohistochemistry....... A significant main effect of time was observed (Ptraining skeletal muscle even with very light loads can induce an increase in the number of satellite...

  1. Short-latency crossed responses in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew J T; Kamavuako, Ernest N; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2015-01-01

    Interlimb reflexes contribute to the central neural coordination between different limbs in both humans and animals. Although commissural interneurons have only been directly identified in animals, spinally mediated interlimb reflexes have been discovered in a number of human lower limb muscles......, indicating their existence in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether short-latency crossed-spinal reflexes are present in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle following ipsilateral knee (iKnee) joint rotations during a sitting task, where participants maintained a slight pre...... fast for a transcortical pathway to contribute. The cBF inhibitory and facilitatory reflexes followed the automatic gain control principle, with the size of the response increasing as the level of background pre-contraction in the cBF muscle increased. In addition to the surface EMG, both short...

  2. The PERK arm of the unfolded protein response regulates satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Mann, Aman K; Gallot, Yann S; Bohnert, Kyle R; Cavener, Douglas R; Whittemore, Scott R; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-23

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults is mediated by satellite stem cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress that leads to unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is relayed to the cell through the activation of PERK, IRE1/XBP1, and ATF6. Here, we demonstrate that levels of PERK and IRE1 are increased in satellite cells upon muscle injury. Inhibition of PERK, but not the IRE1 arm of the UPR in satellite cells inhibits myofiber regeneration in adult mice. PERK is essential for the survival and differentiation of activated satellite cells into the myogenic lineage. Deletion of PERK causes hyper-activation of p38 MAPK during myogenesis. Blocking p38 MAPK activity improves the survival and differentiation of PERK-deficient satellite cells in vitro and muscle formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that the PERK arm of the UPR plays a pivotal role in the regulation of satellite cell homeostasis during regenerative myogenesis.

  3. Cervical flexion-relaxation response to neck muscle fatigue in males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbarte, Ashish D; Zreiqat, Majed M; Chowdhury, Suman Kanti

    2014-12-01

    In this study the effect of muscle fatigue on the cervical spine flexion-relaxation response was studied. Twenty healthy participants (10 males and 10 females) were recruited for data collection. The Sorenson protocol was utilized to induce neck muscle fatigue. Surface electromyography and optical motion capture systems were used to measure neck muscle activation and head-neck posture, respectively. A post-fatigue reduction in the Flexion-Relaxation Ratio (FRR) and higher FRR for females compared to males were observed. A post-fatigue decrease was also observed in the onset and offset angles resulting in an expansion of the myoelectric silence period. Gender had no effect on the onset and offset angles of the silence period. Post-fatigue shift in the onset and offset angles and the expansion of the silence period indicate an increased contribution by the passive viscoelastic tissues in stabilizing the cervical spine under fatigued condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of leg covering in humans on muscle activity and thermal responses in a cool environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, S; Oksa, J; Rintamäki, H; Tokura, H

    1996-01-01

    Thermal responses and muscle performance in humans were studied during rest and exercise in a cool environment with different clothing distributions over the legs. Nine female subjects were exposed to 5 degrees C wearing shorts (SS), trousers with long legs (LL) or trousers with one long leg and one short leg (LS: LSc covered leg, LSu uncovered leg). The subjects also wore T-shirts and long-sleeved shirts. The subjects were seated for 60 min and after this they performed light stepping exercise for a further 60 min. Rectal temperature (T(re)) and skin temperature from seven (LL, SS) or nine sites (LS) were measured continuously. Surface electromyography (EMG) from three muscles (biceps femoris, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior) were recorded during the exercise from six subjects. Integrated EMG (iEMG) and mean power frequency (MPF) were used to describe muscle activity. The T(re) was virtually unchanged during rest in every ensemble, whereas during exercise T(re) was significantly lower in SS than in LL. Mean skin temperature (T(sk)) decreased during rest in every ensemble, being significantly lower in SS than in LL. After the rest period local T(sk) of thigh and calf were significantly lower in SS than in LL and they were also lower in LSu than in LSc. At the beginning of the exercise the iEMG of the tibialis anterior muscle in SS and LL averaged 84 (SEM 7) and 64 (SEM 3) mu V (P muscle was significantly higher in LL 102 (SEM 5) Hz than in SS 90 (SEM 5) Hz (P muscle was also higher in LL 111 (SEM 5) Hz than in SS 100 (SEM 5) Hz (P muscle strain in comparison with wearing long trousers. Our results showing a unilateral increase in EMG activity during unilateral cooling suggest that the increase of strain is restricted to the uncovered part of the limb.

  5. The 'late' reflex responses to muscle stretch: the 'resonance hypothesis' versus the 'long-loop hypothesis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, G; Hagbarth, K E; Hägglund, J V; Wallin, E U

    1982-05-01

    1. Experiments were performed to check the validity of previous claims concerning the ;long-loop' aetiology of ;late' reflex electromyogram (e.m.g.) responses to muscle stretch in man. The primary aim was to investigate whether observations previously presented in favour of the ;long-loop hypothesis' are explicable also in terms of the ;resonance hypothesis', according to which the ;late' reflex components represent spinal, short-latency responses to intramuscular oscillations initiated by the impact.2. The contracting wrist flexors of healthy subjects were exposed to trains of recurrent 25-50 Hz stretch stimuli (wrist torque pulses). Each of the initial two or three pulses in the train was followed by e.m.g. peaks with a latency of 20-25 msec. The e.m.g. peaks driven in this way had the following characteristics in common with the successive two or three e.m.g. peaks which were induced by single ramp stretches or tendon taps. (a) Changes in stimulus parameters which altered the strength of the initial e.m.g. peak often had an opposite effect on the strength of the succeeding peak(s). Muscle vibration which attenuated the initial peak often enchanced the succeeding one(s). (b) The initial e.m.g. peak was less affected than the succeeding peak(s) by the subjects' attempts to respond with rapid ;resist' or ;let go' reactions.3. Intramuscular oscillations (monitored by a needle accelerometer) and e.m.g. responses evoked by single ramp stretches and/or tendon taps were also studied in the long thumb flexor, the calf muscles and the masseter muscle. In the thumb flexor, the initial accelerometer deflexion was only rarely succeeded by a short latency e.m.g. peak, but the succeeding wave in the needle accelerogram was followed by such a peak, appearing about 40 msec after stimulus application. By contrast, the calf muscles and the jaw elevators exhibited a high amplitude, short-latency e.m.g. response to the first but only rarely to the second intramuscular oscillation

  6. Compensatory strategies during manual wheelchair propulsion in response to weakness in individual muscle groups: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowik, Jonathan S; McNitt-Gray, Jill L; Requejo, Philip S; Mulroy, Sara J; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-03-01

    The considerable physical demand placed on the upper extremity during manual wheelchair propulsion is distributed among individual muscles. The strategy used to distribute the workload is likely influenced by the relative force-generating capacities of individual muscles, and some strategies may be associated with a higher injury risk than others. The objective of this study was to use forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion to identify compensatory strategies that can be used to overcome weakness in individual muscle groups and identify specific strategies that may increase injury risk. Identifying these strategies can provide rationale for the design of targeted rehabilitation programs aimed at preventing the development of pain and injury in manual wheelchair users. Muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion were analyzed to identify compensatory strategies in response to individual muscle group weakness using individual muscle mechanical power and stress as measures of upper extremity demand. The simulation analyses found the upper extremity to be robust to weakness in any single muscle group as the remaining groups were able to compensate and restore normal propulsion mechanics. The rotator cuff muscles experienced relatively high muscle stress levels and exhibited compensatory relationships with the deltoid muscles. These results underline the importance of strengthening the rotator cuff muscles and supporting muscles whose contributions do not increase the potential for impingement (i.e., the thoracohumeral depressors) and minimize the risk of upper extremity injury in manual wheelchair users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of ER stress and unfolding protein response pathways causes skeletal muscle wasting during cancer cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Kyle R.; Gallot, Yann S.; Sato, Shuichi; Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia is a devastating syndrome that causes morbidity and mortality in a large number of patients with cancer. However, the mechanisms of cancer cachexia remain poorly understood. Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes stress. The ER responds to this stress through activating certain pathways commonly known as the unfolding protein response (UPR). The main function of UPR is to restore homeostasis, but excessive or prolonged activation of UPR can lead to pathologic conditions. In this study, we examined the role of ER stress and UPR in regulation of skeletal muscle mass in naïve conditions and during cancer cachexia. Our results demonstrate that multiple markers of ER stress are highly activated in skeletal muscle of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and ApcMin/+ mouse models of cancer cachexia. Treatment of mice with 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), a chemical chaperon and a potent inhibitor of ER stress, significantly reduced skeletal muscle strength and mass in both control and LLC-bearing mice. Blocking the UPR also increased the proportion of fast-type fibers in soleus muscle of both control and LLC-bearing mice. Inhibition of UPR reduced the activity of Akt/mTOR pathway and increased the expression of the components of the ubiquitin–proteasome system and autophagy in LLC-bearing mice. Moreover, we found that the inhibition of UPR causes severe atrophy in cultured myotubes. Our study provides initial evidence that ER stress and UPR pathways are essential for maintaining skeletal muscle mass and strength and for protection against cancer cachexia.—Bohnert, K. R., Gallot, Y. S., Sato, S., Xiong, G., Hindi, S. M., Kumar, A. Inhibition of ER stress and unfolding protein response pathways causes skeletal muscle wasting during cancer cachexia. PMID:27206451

  8. Sympathetic outflow enhances the stretch reflex response in the relaxed soleus muscle in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortskov, Nis; Skotte, Jørgen; Hye-Knudsen, Christian; Fallentin, Nils

    2005-04-01

    Animal experiments suggest that an increase in sympathetic outflow can depress muscle spindle sensitivity and thus modulate the stretch reflex response. The results are, however, controversial, and human studies have failed to demonstrate a direct influence of the sympathetic nervous system on the sensitivity of muscle spindles. We studied the effect of increased sympathetic outflow on the short-latency stretch reflex in the soleus muscle evoked by tapping the Achilles tendon. Nine subjects performed three maneuvers causing a sustained activation of sympathetic outflow to the leg: 3 min of static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, followed by 3 min of posthandgrip ischemia, and finally during a 3-min mental arithmetic task. Electromyography was measured from the soleus muscle with bipolar surface electrodes during the Achilles tendon tapping, and beat-to-beat changes in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were monitored continuously. Mean arterial pressure was significantly elevated during all three maneuvers, whereas heart rate was significantly elevated during static handgrip exercise and mental arithmetic but not during posthandgrip ischemia. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the short-latency stretch reflex was significantly increased during mental arithmetic (P < 0.05), static handgrip exercise (P < 0.001), and posthandgrip ischemia (P < 0.005). When expressed in percent change from rest, the mean peak-to-peak amplitude increased by 111 (SD 100)% during mental arithmetic, by 160 (SD 103)% during static handgrip exercise, and by 90 (SD 67)% during posthandgrip ischemia. The study clearly indicates a facilitation of the short-latency stretch reflex during increased sympathetic outflow. We note that the enhanced stretch reflex responses observed in relaxed muscles in the absence of skeletomotor activity support the idea that the sympathetic nervous system can exert a direct influence on the human muscle spindles.

  9. Effect of protons on the mechanical response of rat muscle nociceptive fibers and neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Norio; Kubo, Asako; Mizumura, Kazue

    2015-03-01

    Strong exercise makes muscle acidic, and painful. The stimulus that activates muscle nociceptors in such instance may be protons. Reportedly, however, not many afferents are excited by protons alone. We, therefore, posited that protons sensitize muscular nociceptors to mechanical stimuli. We examined effects of protons on mechanical sensitivity of muscle nociceptors by single-fiber recording from rat muscle-nerve preparations in vitro and by whole cell patch-clamp recording of mechanically activated (MA) currents from cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. We recorded 38 Aδ- and C-fibers. Their response magnitude was increased by both pH 6.2 and pH 6.8; in addition the mechanical threshold was lowered by pH 6.2. Decrease in the threshold by pH6.2 was also observed in MA currents. Presently observed sensitization by protons could be involved in several types of ischemic muscle pain, and may also be involved in cardiovascular and respiratory controls during exercise. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Skeletal muscle PGC-1a is required for maintaining an acute LPS-induced TNFa response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jesper; Larsson, Signe; Iversen, Ninna

    2012-01-01

    Many lifestyle-related diseases are associated with low-grade inflammation and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ¿ coactivator (PGC)-1a has been suggested to be protective against low-grade inflammation. However, whether these anti-inflammatory properties affect acute inflammation is not...... does not exert anti-inflammatory effects during acute inflammation. Lack of skeletal muscle PGC-1a seems however to impair the acute TNFa response, which may reflect a phenotype more susceptible to infections as also observed in type 2 diabetes patients.......Many lifestyle-related diseases are associated with low-grade inflammation and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ¿ coactivator (PGC)-1a has been suggested to be protective against low-grade inflammation. However, whether these anti-inflammatory properties affect acute inflammation...... is not known. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the role of muscle PGC-1a in acute inflammation. Quadriceps muscles were removed from 10-week old whole body PGC-1a knockout (KO), muscle specific PGC-1a KO (MKO) and muscle-specific PGC-1a overexpression mice (TG), 2 hours after...

  11. Spinal manipulation causes variable spine kinematic and trunk muscle electromyographic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, G J; McGill, S M

    2001-05-01

    Analytic cohort with a convenience sample in a research clinic. To determine the influence of a spinal manipulation on trunk kinematics and associated trunk myoelectric activity. While the mechanism of spinal manipulation is unknown, it has been theorized to influence spinal range of motion and trunk muscle activity. Trunk kinematics were measured in low back pain patients (n = 14) during simple range of motion tasks in three planes, while trunk muscle electromyogram signals were recorded bilaterally from paraspinal and abdominal musculature. Kinematics and electromyogram signals were assessed pre-post manipulation. Electromyogram activity was also assessed pre-post manipulation during quiet stance. While no consistent kinematic or electromyographic changes occurred following manipulation across the population, individual changes were observed. The largest changes (> 6 degrees ) in range of motion occurred in the sagittal plane of three patients experiencing the greatest amount of pain. During quiet stance 17 muscles across all subjects exhibited changes in muscle activity following manipulation. Sixteen of those changes were decreases in muscle amplitude. This study offers some preliminary data on the short-term effects of manipulation on lumbar range of motion and dynamic electromyogram. The findings suggest that the response to manipulation is variable and dependent on the individual, with no change in some to the largest changes seen in the more pained patients. Relevance. Basic science investigations into the mechanisms and biomechanical influences of spinal manipulation are few. This study attempts to address issues of measureable functional change with manipulative therapy.

  12. Response of masticatory muscles to passive stretch stimulus - from perspectives of functional appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to examine whether a passive stretch stimulus by means of a functional appliance induces changes in the fiber composition of masticatory muscles and whether these changes are similar to the changes in stretched limb muscle fibers by using RT-PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemical assays. Methods Five male New Zealand White rabbits were fitted with a prefabricated inclined plane on the maxillary central incisors to force the mandible forward (- 2 mm) and downward (- 4 mm). Further, 1 hind limb was extended and constrained with a cast so that the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) was stretched when the animal used the limb. The animals were sacrificed after 1 week and the masseter, lateral pterygoid, and EDL were processed and compared with those from control animals (n = 3). Results The stretched EDL had a significantly higher percentage of slow fibers, whereas the stretched masticatory muscles did not show changes in the composition of the major contractile proteins after 7 days. Conclusions The transition of fiber phenotypes in response to a stretch stimulus may take longer in the masticatory muscles than in the limb muscles. PMID:23112934

  13. Developmental Programming in Response to Intrauterine Growth Restriction Impairs Myoblast Function and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Yates

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal adaptations to placental insufficiency alter postnatal metabolic homeostasis in skeletal muscle by reducing glucose oxidation rates, impairing insulin action, and lowering the proportion of oxidative fibers. In animal models of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, skeletal muscle fibers have less myonuclei at birth. This means that myoblasts, the sole source for myonuclei accumulation in fibers, are compromised. Fetal hypoglycemia and hypoxemia are complications that result from placental insufficiency. Hypoxemia elevates circulating catecholamines, and chronic hypercatecholaminemia has been shown to reduce fetal muscle development and growth. We have found evidence for adaptations in adrenergic receptor expression profiles in myoblasts and skeletal muscle of IUGR sheep fetuses with placental insufficiency. The relationship of β-adrenergic receptors shifts in IUGR fetuses because Adrβ2 expression levels decline and Adrβ1 expression levels are unaffected in myofibers and increased in myoblasts. This adaptive response would suppress insulin signaling, myoblast incorporation, fiber hypertrophy, and glucose oxidation. Furthermore, this β-adrenergic receptor expression profile persists for at least the first month in IUGR lambs and lowers their fatty acid mobilization. Developmental programming of skeletal muscle adrenergic receptors partially explains metabolic and endocrine differences in IUGR offspring, and the impact on metabolism may result in differential nutrient utilization.

  14. Disruption of cutaneous feedback alters magnitude but not direction of muscle responses to postural perturbations in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nichols, T Richard

    2010-06-01

    Quadrupeds and bipeds respond to horizontal perturbations of the support surface with muscular responses that are broadly tuned and directionally sensitive. Since the discovery of this directional sensitivity, interest has turned toward the critical sensory systems necessary to generate these responses. We hypothesize that cutaneous feedback affects the magnitude of muscle responses to postural perturbation but has little effect on the directionality of the muscle response. We developed a modified premammillary decerebrate cat preparation to evaluate the sensory mechanisms driving this directionally sensitive muscle activation in response to support surface perturbation. This preparation allows us the flexibility to isolate the proprioceptive (cutaneous and muscle receptors) system from other sensory influences. We found that loss of cutaneous feedback leads to a significant loss in background activity causing a smaller muscular response to horizontal perturbations. However, the directional properties of the muscular responses remained intact.

  15. Muscle afferent receptors engaged in augmented sympathetic responsiveness in peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exercise pressor reflex (EPR is a neural control mechanism responsible for the cardiovascular responses to exercise. As exercise is initiated, thin fiber muscle afferent nerves are activated by mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising in the contracting muscles. This leads to reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate primarily through activation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Studies of humans and animals have indicated that the EPR is exaggerated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. For the last several years, studies have specifically employed a rodent model to examine the mechanisms at receptor and cellular levels by which responses of SNA and blood pressure to static exercise are heightened in peripheral artery disease (PAD, one of the most common cardiovascular disorders. A rat model of this disease has well been established. Specifically, femoral artery occlusion is used to study intermittent claudication that is observed in human PAD. The receptors on thin fiber muscle afferents that are engaged in this disease include transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1, purinergic P2X and acid sensing ion channel (ASIC. The role played by nerve growth factor (NGF in regulating those sensory receptors in the processing of amplified EPR was also investigated. The purpose of this review is to focus on a theme namely that PAD accentuates autonomic reflex responses to exercise and further address regulatory mechanisms leading to abnormal sympathetic responsiveness. This review will present some of recent results in regard with several receptors in muscle sensory neurons in contribution to augmented autonomic reflex responses in PAD. Review of the findings from recent studies would lead to a better understanding in integrated processing of sympathetic nervous system in PAD.

  16. Anticipation of direction and time of perturbation modulates the onset latency of trunk muscle responses during sitting perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Matija; Shinya, Masahiro; Masani, Kei; Patel, Kramay; McConville, Kristiina M V; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Popovic, Milos R

    2016-02-01

    Trunk muscles are responsible for maintaining trunk stability during sitting. However, the effects of anticipation of perturbation on trunk muscle responses are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to identify the responses of trunk muscles to sudden support surface translations and quantify the effects of anticipation of direction and time of perturbation on the trunk neuromuscular responses. Twelve able-bodied individuals participated in the study. Participants were seated on a kneeling chair and support surface translations were applied in the forward and backward directions with and without direction and time of perturbation cues. The trunk started moving on average approximately 40ms after the perturbation. During unanticipated perturbations, average latencies of the trunk muscle contractions were in the range between 103.4 and 117.4ms. When participants anticipated the perturbations, trunk muscle latencies were reduced by 16.8±10.0ms and the time it took the trunk to reach maximum velocity was also reduced, suggesting a biomechanical advantage caused by faster muscle responses. These results suggested that trunk muscles have medium latency responses and use reflexive mechanisms. Moreover, anticipation of perturbation decreased trunk muscles latencies, suggesting that the central nervous system modulated readiness of the trunk based on anticipatory information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The exercise-induced stress response of skeletal muscle, with specific emphasis on humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, James P; Kayani, Anna C; McArdle, Anne; Drust, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adapts to the stress of contractile activity via changes in gene expression to yield an increased content of a family of highly conserved cytoprotective proteins known as heat shock proteins (HSPs). These proteins function to maintain homeostasis, facilitate repair from injury and provide protection against future insults. The study of the exercise-induced production of HSPs in skeletal muscle is important for the exercise scientist as it may provide a valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms by which regular exercise can provide increased protection against related and non-related stressors. As molecular chaperones, HSPs are also fundamental in facilitating the cellular remodelling processes inherent to the training response. Whilst the exercise-induced stress response of rodent skeletal muscle is relatively well characterized, data from humans are more infrequent and less insightful. Data indicate that acute endurance- and resistance-type exercise protocols increase the muscle content of ubiquitin, alphaB-crystallin, HSP27, HSP60, HSC70 and HSP70. Although increased HSP transcription occurs during exercise, immediately post-exercise or several hours following exercise, time-course studies using western blotting techniques have typically demonstrated a significant increase in protein content is only detectable within 1-2 days following the exercise stress. However, comparison amongst studies is complicated by variations in exercise protocol (mode, intensity, duration, damaging, non-damaging), muscle group examined, predominant HSP measured and, perhaps most importantly, differences in subject characteristics both within and between studies (training status, recent activity levels, nutritional status, age, sex, etc.). Following 'non-damaging' endurance-type activities (exercise that induces no overt structural and functional damage to the muscle), the stress response is thought to be mediated by redox signalling (transient and reversible

  18. Proteome-wide muscle protein fractional synthesis rates predict muscle mass gain in response to a selective androgen receptor modulator in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; Shearer, Todd W; Stimpson, Stephen A; Turner, Scott M; King, Chelsea; Wong, Po-Yin Anne; Shen, Ying; Turnbull, Philip S; Kramer, Fritz; Clifton, Lisa; Russell, Alan; Hellerstein, Marc K; Evans, William J

    2016-03-15

    Biomarkers of muscle protein synthesis rate could provide early data demonstrating anabolic efficacy for treating muscle-wasting conditions. Androgenic therapies have been shown to increase muscle mass primarily by increasing the rate of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that the synthesis rate of large numbers of individual muscle proteins could serve as early response biomarkers and potentially treatment-specific signaling for predicting the effect of anabolic treatments on muscle mass. Utilizing selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) treatment in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat, we applied an unbiased, dynamic proteomics approach to measure the fractional synthesis rates (FSR) of 167-201 individual skeletal muscle proteins in triceps, EDL, and soleus. OVX rats treated with a SARM molecule (GSK212A at 0.1, 0.3, or 1 mg/kg) for 10 or 28 days showed significant, dose-related increases in body weight, lean body mass, and individual triceps but not EDL or soleus weights. Thirty-four out of the 94 proteins measured from the triceps of all rats exhibited a significant, dose-related increase in FSR after 10 days of SARM treatment. For several cytoplasmic proteins, including carbonic anhydrase 3, creatine kinase M-type (CK-M), pyruvate kinase, and aldolase-A, a change in 10-day FSR was strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.90-0.99) to the 28-day change in lean body mass and triceps weight gains, suggesting a noninvasive measurement of SARM effects. In summary, FSR of multiple muscle proteins measured by dynamics of moderate- to high-abundance proteins provides early biomarkers of the anabolic response of skeletal muscle to SARM. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Muscle-specific deletion of SOCS3 increases the early inflammatory response but does not affect regeneration after myotoxic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, Kristy; Thakur, Savant S; Naim, Timur; Trieu, Jennifer; Chee, Annabel; Stapleton, David I; Koopman, René; Lynch, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    Muscles of old animals are injured more easily and regenerate poorly, attributed in part to increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling cascade is a key mediator of inflammatory cytokine action, and signaling via this pathway is increased in muscles with aging. As a negative regulator of JAK/STAT signaling, a key mediator of myogenic proliferation and differentiation, altered expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS3) is likely to have important consequences for muscle regeneration. To model this scenario, we investigated the effect of SOCS3 deletion within mature muscle fibers on injury and repair. We tested the hypothesis that reduced SOCS3 function would alter the inflammatory response and impair muscle regeneration after myotoxic injury. Mice with a specific deletion of SOCS3 within mature skeletal muscle fibers were used to assess the effect of SOCS3 deletion on muscle injury and repair. Twelve-week-old or 24-month-old SOCS3 muscle-specific knockout (SOCS3 MKO) mice and littermate controls were either left uninjured or injured with a single injection of notexin (10 μg/ml) into the right tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. At 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, or 14 days post-injury, the right TA muscle was excised and subjected to histological, western immunoblotting, and gene expression analyses. Force production and fatigue were assessed in uninjured muscles and at 7 days post-notexin injury. In uninjured muscles, SOCS3 deletion decreased force production during fatigue but had no effect on the gross or histological appearance of the TA muscles. After notexin injury, deletion of SOCS3 increased STAT3 phosphorylation at day 1 and increased the mRNA expression of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α , and the inflammatory cell markers F4/80 and CD68 at day 2. Gene expression analysis of the regeneration markers Pax7 , MyoD , and Myogenin indicated SOCS3 deletion had no

  20. Skeletal Muscle Remodeling in Response to Eccentric vs. Concentric Loading: Morphological, Molecular, and Metabolic Adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino V. Franchi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle contracts either by shortening or lengthening (concentrically or eccentrically, respectively; however, the two contractions substantially differ from one another in terms of mechanisms of force generation, maximum force production and energy cost. It is generally known that eccentric actions generate greater force than isometric and concentric contractions and at a lower metabolic cost. Hence, by virtue of the greater mechanical loading involved in active lengthening, eccentric resistance training (ECC RT is assumed to produce greater hypertrophy than concentric resistance training (CON RT. Nonetheless, prevalence of either ECC RT or CON RT in inducing gains in muscle mass is still an open issue, with some studies reporting greater hypertrophy with eccentric, some with concentric and some with similar hypertrophy within both training modes. Recent observations suggest that such hypertrophic responses to lengthening vs. shortening contractions are achieved by different adaptations in muscle architecture. Whilst the changes in muscle protein synthesis in response to acute and chronic concentric and eccentric exercise bouts seem very similar, the molecular mechanisms regulating the myogenic adaptations to the two distinct loading stimuli are still incompletely understood.Thus, the present review aims to, (a critically discuss the literature on the contribution of eccentric vs. concentric loading to muscular hypertrophy and structural remodeling, and, (b clarify the molecular mechanisms that may regulate such adaptations.We conclude that, when matched for either maximum load or work, similar increase in muscle size is found between ECC and CON RT. However, such hypertrophic changes appear to be achieved through distinct structural adaptations, which may be regulated by different myogenic and molecular responses observed between lengthening and shortening contractions.

  1. Vascular smooth muscle Emilin-1 is a regulator of arteriolar myogenic response and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litteri, Gaia; Carnevale, Daniela; D'Urso, Alessandra; Cifelli, Giuseppe; Braghetta, Paola; Damato, Antonio; Bizzotto, Dario; Landolfi, Alessandro; Ros, Francesco Da; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Facchinello, Nicola; Maffei, Angelo; Volpin, Dino; Colombatti, Alfonso; Bressan, Giorgio M; Lembo, Giuseppe

    2012-09-01

    Emilin-1 is a protein of elastic extracellular matrix involved in blood pressure (BP) control by negatively affecting transforming growth factor (TGF)-β processing. Emilin1 null mice are hypertensive. This study investigates how Emilin-1 deals with vascular mechanisms regulating BP. This study uses a phenotype rescue approach in which Emilin-1 is expressed in either endothelial cells or vascular smooth muscle cells of transgenic animals with the Emilin1(-/-) background. We found that normalization of BP required Emilin-1 expression in smooth muscle cells, whereas expression of the protein in endothelial cells did not modify the hypertensive phenotype of Emilin1(-/-) mice. We also explored the effect of treatment with anti-TGF-β antibodies on the hypertensive phenotype of Emilin1(-/-) mice, finding that neutralization of TGF-β in Emilin1 null mice normalized BP quite rapidly (2 weeks). Finally, we evaluated the vasoconstriction response of resistance arteries to perfusion pressure and neurohumoral agents in different transgenic mouse lines. Interestingly, we found that the hypertensive phenotype was coupled with an increased arteriolar myogenic response to perfusion pressure, while the vasoconstriction induced by neurohumoral agents remained unaffected. We further elucidate that, as for the hypertensive phenotype, the increased myogenic response was attributable to increased TGF-β activity. Our findings clarify that Emilin-1 produced by vascular smooth muscle cells acts as a main regulator of resting BP levels by controlling the myogenic response in resistance arteries through TGF-β.

  2. Altered S-nitrosylation of p53 is responsible for impaired antioxidant response in skeletal muscle during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldelli, Sara; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2016-12-20

    p53 transcriptional activity has been proposed to regulate both homeostasis and sarcopenia of skeletal muscle during aging. However, the exact molecular function of p53 remains to be clearly defined. We demonstrated a requirement of nuclear p53 S-nitrosylation in inducing a nitric oxide/PGC-1α-mediated antioxidant pathway in skeletal muscle. Importantly, mutant form of p53-DNA binding domain (C124S) did not undergo nuclear S-nitrosylation and failed in inducing the expression of antioxidant genes (i.e. SOD2 and GCLC). Moreover, we found that during aging the nuclear S-nitrosylation of p53 significantly declines in gastrocnemius/soleus leading to an impairment of redox homeostasis of skeletal muscle. We suggested that decreased level of nuclear neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/Syntrophin complex, which we observed during aging, could be responsible for impaired nuclear S-nitrosylation. Taken together, our data indicate that altered S-nitrosylation of p53 during aging could be a contributing factor of sarcopenia condition and of other skeletal muscle pathologies associated with oxidative/nitrosative stress.

  3. Effects of Duchenne muscular dystrophy on muscle stiffness and response to electrically-induced muscle contraction: A 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourpaille, Lilian; Gross, Raphaël; Hug, François; Guével, Arnaud; Péréon, Yann; Magot, Armelle; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Nordez, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the ability of muscle stiffness (shear modulus) and response to electrically-induced muscle contraction to detect changes in muscle properties over a 12-month period in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Ten children with DMD and nine age-matched healthy male controls participated in two experimental sessions (T0 and T+12months) separated by 12.4 ± 0.9 months. Two contractions of the biceps brachii were electrically-induced during which an ultrasound probe was placed over the muscle. The resting shear modulus was measured using elastography from six muscles. Evoked maximal torque was increased at T+12months in controls (+11.2 ± 7.6%, P muscle stiffness at T+12months in children with DMD for tibialis anterior (+75.1 ± 93.5%, P= 0.043), gastrocnemius medialis (+144.8 ± 180.6%, P= 0.050) and triceps brachii (+35.5 ± 32.2%, P= 0.005). This 12-month follow-up study demonstrates that electromechanical delay and elastography may help detect subtle muscle impairments in patients with DMD. These sensitive outcomes may improve the follow-up of innovative therapeutic interventions within the field of DMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of myotrophic actions by testosterone and trenbolone on androgen-responsive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fan; McCoy, Sean C; Ross, Heather H; Bernardo, Joseph A; Beharry, Adam W; Senf, Sarah M; Judge, Andrew R; Beck, Darren T; Conover, Christine F; Cannady, Darryl F; Smith, Barbara K; Yarrow, Joshua F; Borst, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    Androgens regulate body composition and skeletal muscle mass in males, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, we demonstrated that trenbolone (a potent synthetic testosterone analogue that is not a substrate for 5-alpha reductase or for aromatase) induces myotrophic effects in skeletal muscle without causing prostate enlargement, which is in contrast to the known prostate enlarging effects of testosterone. These previous results suggest that the 5α-reduction of testosterone is not required for myotrophic action. We now report differential gene expression in response to testosterone versus trenbolone in the highly androgen-sensitive levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscle complex of the adult rat after 6weeks of orchiectomy (ORX), using real time PCR. The ORX-induced expression of atrogenes (Muscle RING-finger protein-1 [MuRF1] and atrogin-1) was suppressed by both androgens, with trenbolone producing a greater suppression of atrogin-1 mRNA compared to testosterone. Both androgens elevated expression of anabolic genes (insulin-like growth factor-1 and mechano-growth factor) after ORX. ORX-induced increases in expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA were suppressed by trenbolone treatment, but not testosterone. In ORX animals, testosterone promoted WNT1-inducible-signaling pathway protein 2 (WISP-2) gene expression while trenbolone did not. Testosterone and trenbolone equally enhanced muscle regeneration as shown by increases in LABC mass and in protein expression of embryonic myosin by western blotting. In addition, testosterone increased WISP-2 protein levels. Together, these findings identify specific mechanisms by which testosterone and trenbolone may regulate skeletal muscle maintenance and growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the equine skeletal muscle transcriptome identifies novel functional responses to exercise training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGivney, Beatrice A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Digital gene expression profiling was used to characterize the assembly of genes expressed in equine skeletal muscle and to identify the subset of genes that were differentially expressed following a ten-month period of exercise training. The study cohort comprised seven Thoroughbred racehorses from a single training yard. Skeletal muscle biopsies were collected at rest from the gluteus medius at two time points: T(1) - untrained, (9 +\\/- 0.5 months old) and T(2) - trained (20 +\\/- 0.7 months old). RESULTS: The most abundant mRNA transcripts in the muscle transcriptome were those involved in muscle contraction, aerobic respiration and mitochondrial function. A previously unreported over-representation of genes related to RNA processing, the stress response and proteolysis was observed. Following training 92 tags were differentially expressed of which 74 were annotated. Sixteen genes showed increased expression, including the mitochondrial genes ACADVL, MRPS21 and SLC25A29 encoded by the nuclear genome. Among the 58 genes with decreased expression, MSTN, a negative regulator of muscle growth, had the greatest decrease.Functional analysis of all expressed genes using FatiScan revealed an asymmetric distribution of 482 Gene Ontology (GO) groups and 18 KEGG pathways. Functional groups displaying highly significant (P < 0.0001) increased expression included mitochondrion, oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid metabolism while functional groups with decreased expression were mainly associated with structural genes and included the sarcoplasm, laminin complex and cytoskeleton. CONCLUSION: Exercise training in Thoroughbred racehorses results in coordinate changes in the gene expression of functional groups of genes related to metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and muscle structure.

  6. Immediate effects of trunk stabilizer muscles training on muscle response time in individuals with non-specific chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earde, Poramet; Vongsirinavarat, Mantana; Sakulsriprasert, Prasert; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa

    2014-07-01

    To investigate immediate effects of biofeedback training on motor control performance in participants with nonspecific chronic low back pain. RCT was conducted. The training group received isolated and co-contraction training of trunk stabilizers in lying on the left side, sitting on stool and sitting on a gymnastic ball, while the control group was asked to rest comfortably on a chair. Trunk muscles response time during rapid arm movement test was recorded using surface electromyography. Two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test were used to detect changes within and between groups. In the training group, the trunk muscles response times were significantly decreased after training when compared with those in the control group (p<0.05). Trunk stabilizer training has a beneficial effect on motor response time of the trunk muscles. The long-term effects of exercise should be further considered with a larger sample size.

  7. Bilateral muscle fiber and nerve influences by TNF-alpha in response to unilateral muscle overuse - studies on TNF receptor expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renström, Lina; Stål, Per; Song, Yafeng; Forsgren, Sture

    2017-11-28

    TNF-alpha is suggested to be involved in muscle damage and muscle inflammation (myositis). In order to evaluate whether TNF-alpha is involved in the myositis that occurs in response to muscle overuse, the aim was to examine the expression patterns of TNF receptors in this condition. A rabbit muscle overuse model leading to myositis in the soleus muscle was used. The expression patterns of the two TNF receptors Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor type 1 (TNFR1) and Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor type 2 (TNFR2) were investigated. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence were utilized. Immunostainings for desmin, NK-1R and CD31 were made in parallel. Immunoreactions (IR) for TNF receptors were clearly observed in white blood cells, fibroblasts and vessel walls, and most interestingly also in muscle fibers and nerve fascicles in the myositis muscles. There were very restricted reactions for these in the muscles of controls. The upregulation of TNF receptors was for all types of structures seen for both the experimental side and the contralateral nonexperimental side. TNF receptor expressing muscle fibers were present in myositis muscles. They can be related to attempts for reparation/regeneration, as evidenced from results of parallel stainings. Necrotic muscle fibers displayed TNFR1 mRNA and TNFR2 immunoreaction (IR) in the invading white blood cells. In myositis muscles, TNFR1 IR was observed in both axons and Schwann cells while TNFR2 IR was observed in Schwann cells. Such observations were very rarely made for control animals. The findings suggest that there is a pronounced involvement of TNF-alpha in the developing myositis process. Attempts for reparation of the muscle tissue seem to occur via both TNFR1 and TNFR2. As the myositis process also occurs in the nonexperimental side and as TNF receptors are confined to nerve fascicles bilaterally it can be asked whether TNF-alpha is involved in the spreading of the myositis process to the contralateral side via the

  8. Ultrasound assessment of lower limb muscle mass in response to resistance training in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Manoj K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantifying the improvements in lower limb or quadriceps muscle mass following resistance training (RT, is an important outcome measure in COPD. Ultrasound is a portable, radiation free imaging technique that can measure the size of superficial muscles belonging to the quadriceps group such as the rectus femoris, but has not been previously used in COPD patients following RT. We compared the responsiveness of ultrasound derived measures of quadriceps mass against dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, in patients with COPD and healthy controls following a programme of high intensity knee extensor RT. Methods Portable ultrasound was used to assess the size of the dominant quadriceps in 45 COPD patients and 19 healthy controls-before, during, and after 8 weeks of bilateral high intensity isokinetic knee extensor RT. Scanning was performed at the mid-thigh region, and 2 indices of quadriceps mass were measured-rectus femoris cross-sectional area (RFcsa and quadriceps muscle thickness (Qt. Thigh lean mass (Tdexa was determined by DEXA. Results Training resulted in a significant increase in Tdexa, RFcsa and Qt in COPD patients [5.7%, 21.8%, 12.1% respectively] and healthy controls [5.4%, 19.5%, 10.9 respectively]. The effect size for the changes in RFcsa (COPD= 0.77; Healthy=0.83 and Qt (COPD=0.36; Healthy=0.78 were greater than the changes in Tdexa (COPD=0.19; Healthy=0.26 following RT. Conclusions Serial ultrasound measurements of the quadriceps can detect changes in muscle mass in response to RT in COPD. The technique has good reproducibility, and may be more sensitive to changes in muscle mass when compared to DEXA. Trial registration http://www.controlled-trials.com (Identifier: ISRCTN22764439

  9. The Skeletal Muscle Anabolic Response to Plant- versus Animal-Based Protein Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Stephan; Burd, Nicholas A; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-09-01

    Clinical and consumer market interest is increasingly directed toward the use of plant-based proteins as dietary components aimed at preserving or increasing skeletal muscle mass. However, recent evidence suggests that the ingestion of the plant-based proteins in soy and wheat results in a lower muscle protein synthetic response when compared with several animal-based proteins. The possible lower anabolic properties of plant-based protein sources may be attributed to the lower digestibility of plant-based sources, in addition to greater splanchnic extraction and subsequent urea synthesis of plant protein-derived amino acids compared with animal-based proteins. The latter may be related to the relative lack of specific essential amino acids in plant- as opposed to animal-based proteins. Furthermore, most plant proteins have a relatively low leucine content, which may further reduce their anabolic properties when compared with animal proteins. However, few studies have actually assessed the postprandial muscle protein synthetic response to the ingestion of plant proteins, with soy and wheat protein being the primary sources studied. Despite the proposed lower anabolic properties of plant vs. animal proteins, various strategies may be applied to augment the anabolic properties of plant proteins. These may include the following: 1) fortification of plant-based protein sources with the amino acids methionine, lysine, and/or leucine; 2) selective breeding of plant sources to improve amino acid profiles; 3) consumption of greater amounts of plant-based protein sources; or 4) ingesting multiple protein sources to provide a more balanced amino acid profile. However, the efficacy of such dietary strategies on postprandial muscle protein synthesis remains to be studied. Future research comparing the anabolic properties of a variety of plant-based proteins should define the preferred protein sources to be used in nutritional interventions to support skeletal muscle mass gain

  10. Whistling of a pipe system with multiple side branches: comparison with corrugated pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonon, D.; Landry, B.J.T.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Willems, J.F.H.; Hofmans, G.C.J.; Hirschberg, A.

    2010-01-01

    Corrugated pipes are widely used because they combine local rigidity with global flexibility. Whistling induced by flow through such pipes can lead to serious environmental and structural problems. The whistling of a multiple side branch system is compared to the whistling behavior of corrugated

  11. Direct measurements of acoustic damping and sound amplification in corrugated pipes with flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golliard, J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Vijlbrief, O.; Lunde, K.

    2015-01-01

    The flow-induced pulsations in corrugated pipes result from a feedback loop between an acoustic resonator and the noise amplification at each shear layer in the axisymmetric cavities forming the corrugations. The quality factor of the resonator is determined by the reflection coefficients at the

  12. Adhesive in the buckling failure of corrugated fiberboard : a finite element investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeeb A. Rahman; Said M. Abubakr

    1998-01-01

    This research study proposed to include the glue material in a finite element model that represents the actual geometry and material properties of a corrugated fiberboard. The model is a detailed representation of the different components of the structure (adhesive, linerboard, medium) to perform buckling analysis of corrugated structures under compressive loads. The...

  13. Whistling of pipes with narrow corrugations: scale model tests and consequences for carcass design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golliard, J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Bendiksen, E.; Frimodt, C.

    2013-01-01

    Pipes for gas production and transport with a corrugated inner surface, as used in flexible pipes, can be subject to Flow-Induced Pulsations when the flow velocity is larger than a certain velocity. This onset velocity is dependent on the geometry of the corrugations, the operational conditions and

  14. Acoustic damping in smooth and corrugated pipes with and without liquid injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golliard, J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Vijlbrief, O.

    2013-01-01

    From previous experiments, it was shown that small quantities of liquids reduce or eliminate the singing phenomenon in corrugated tubes. The singing mitigation was attributed to filling up of the corrugations, interference with the boundary layer or due to the increased acoustic damping. To evaluate

  15. A linear model for the onset of whistling in corrugated pipe segments: influence of geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudenko, O.; Meertens, D.; Nakiboǧlu, G.; Hirschberg, A.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Corrugated pipes combine small-scale rigidity and large-scale flexibility, which makes them very useful in industrial applications. The flow through such a pipe can induce strong undesirable whistling noises and even drive dangerous structural vibrations. Placing a short corrugated segment along a

  16. Muscle irisin response to aerobic vs HIIT in overweight female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archundia-Herrera, Carolina; Macias-Cervantes, Maciste; Ruiz-Muñoz, Bernardo; Vargas-Ortiz, Katya; Kornhauser, Carlos; Perez-Vazquez, Victoriano

    2017-01-01

    Exercise stimulates the production of fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5), which is cleaved to release a protein called irisin. This protein induces browning of white adipose tissue resulting in increased thermogenesis. Different studies have measured circulating irisin at baseline and in response to exercise among a wide variety of individuals; yet, regarding the effect of different exercise intensities in obese adolescent girls, limited insight is available. This study compares the effect of acute aerobic exercise of moderate intensity and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on irisin levels in skeletal muscle and plasma of sedentary overweight or obese female adolescents. The aerobic group (n = 15) and HIIT group (n = 15) underwent anthropometric and metabolic measurements, electrocardiogram, peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak ), and two vastus lateralis muscle biopsies before and after session of workout. The session of aerobic exercise included cycling at 65% of their peak heart rate (HRpeak) for 40 min. In the HIIT group, exercise included six bouts of 1 min at 85-95% HRpeak separated by 1 min of recovery. Irisin levels were evaluated in samples of skeletal muscle (western blot) and plasma (ELISA). The levels of expression of irisin in skeletal muscle increased significantly after a session of HIIT (p HIIT session. No increases in plasma irisin concentration were observed.

  17. Maternal blood pressure and heart rate response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cristine H; Naldoni, Luciane M V; Ribeiro, Juliana Dos Santos; Meirelles, Maria Cristina C C; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Bø, Kari

    2014-07-01

    To assess whether maternal blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) change significantly in response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. Longitudinal exploratory study with repeated measurements. Twenty-seven nulliparous healthy women of mean age 23.3 years (range 18-36) and mean body mass index 23.4 (range 23.1-29.5). Individual supervised pelvic floor muscle training from gestational week 20 till 36 with assessment of BP and HR at gestational weeks 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured before and after each training session and HR was monitored during each session. Pelvic floor muscle training did not change BP. 77% (n = 21) of participants exceeded 70% of estimated maximum HR during at least one session. The time for exceeding 70% of estimated maximum HR was between 2.2 and 3.2 % of the total exercise session. Increases in BP and HR from gestational weeks 20 till 36 were within normal limits for pregnant women. Pelvic floor muscle training in nulliparous sedentary pregnant women does not increase BP. It significantly increases HR during the exercise sessions, but only for a limited period of time and with no negative long-term effect on BP or HR. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Growth responses of breast and leg muscles to essential amino acids in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, M; Bagherzadeh-Kasmani, F; Rokouei, M

    2016-03-01

    The first three essential amino acids (EAA) for broilers including methionine (Met), lysine (Lys) and threonine (Thr) may greatly influence the growth of chick muscles at early stages of life. In order to survey the potential effects of those EAA on growth muscles, a rotatable three-variable central composite design (CCD) was conducted to track the interrelationships of dietary digestible Met (dMet), Lys (dLys) and Thr (dThr) for optimization of processing yields in broiler chicks using response surface methodology. A total of 60 floor pens of six birds each were assigned to 15 dietary treatments based on CCD containing five levels of dMet (0.416% to 0.584% of diet), dLys (0.881% to 1.319% of diet) and dThr (0.532% to 0.868% of diet) from 3 to 16 days of age. Experimental treatments significantly affected breast mass (BM) and leg mass (LM) of the birds (Pmuscle may indicate the higher importance of these EAA in this muscle than those in thigh muscle.

  19. Influence of different types of carbon nanotubes on muscle cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraczek-Szczypta, Aneta, E-mail: afraczek@agh.edu.pl [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Menaszek, Elzbieta [Department of Cytobiology, Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Medyczna 9, 30-068 Krakow (Poland); Blazewicz, Stanislaw [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Adu, Jimi; Shevchenko, Ross [Pharmidex Pharmaceutical Services, 72 New Bond Street, Mayfair London, W1S 1RR (United Kingdom); Syeda, Tahmina Bahar; Misra, Anil; Alavijeh, Mohammad [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Huxley Building, University of Brighton, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), before and after chemical surface functionalization on muscle cell response in vitro and in vivo conditions. Prior to biological tests the surface physicochemical properties of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) deposited on a polymer membrane were investigated. To 'evaluate microstructure and structure of CNTs scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used. During in vitro study CNTs deposited on polymer membrane were contacted directly with myoblast cells, and after 7 days of culture cytotoxicity of samples was analyzed. Moreover, cell morphology in contact with CNTs was observed using SEM and fluorescence microscopy. The cytotoxicity of CNTs modified in a different way was comparable and significantly lower in comparison with pure polymer membrane. Microscopy analysis of cultured myoblasts confirms intense cell proliferation of all investigated samples with CNTs while for two kinds of CNTs myoblasts' differentiation into myotubes was observed. Histochemical reactions for the activity of enzymes such as acid phosphatase, cytochrome C oxidase, and non-specific esterase allowed the analysis of the extent of inflammation, degree of regeneration process of the muscle fibers resulting from the presence of the satellite cells and the neuromuscular junction on muscle fibers in contact with CNTs after implantation of CNTs into gluteal muscle of rat.

  20. Genetic response in masseter muscle after orthognathic surgery in comparison with healthy controls - A Microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marewski, Maya; Petto, Carola; Schneider, Matthias; Harzer, Winfried

    2017-04-01

    One third of adult patients with orthognathic surgery of a prognathic or retrognathic mandible show relapse. The sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible leads to a displacement of both parts up to 10 mm without any changes of muscle attachment. Changed mandible length needs adaptation of muscle capacity because of changed force to moment ratio. The aim of this Microarray study was to analyze the general genetic response of masseter muscle in patients with retrognathism or prognathism of the mandible six months after surgery in comparison with healthy untreated controls. We found in tissue samples from masseter muscle a reduction of different entities between patients and controls but less in retrognathic than in prognathic patients (274/429). The different entities to controls in prognathia were reduced from 1862 to 1749 but increased in retrognathia from 1070 to 1563. We have to consider that the total amount of different entities to the controls is higher in patients with prognathic mandible (7364) because of their strong genetic controlled development compared with that in patients with retrognathic mandible (4126), which is more environmentally influenced. It can be concluded that function follows form after surgical change with high inheritance. In retrognathic patients the adaptation could be delayed or the capacity of regeneration potential is not sufficient. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Corrugated Textile based Triboelectric Generator for Wearable Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, A. Young; Lee, Chang Jun; Park, Jiwon; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Youn Tae

    2017-03-01

    Triboelectric energy harvesting has been applied to various fields, from large-scale power generation to small electronics. Triboelectric energy is generated when certain materials come into frictional contact, e.g., static electricity from rubbing a shoe on a carpet. In particular, textile-based triboelectric energy-harvesting technologies are one of the most promising approaches because they are not only flexible, light, and comfortable but also wearable. Most previous textile-based triboelectric generators (TEGs) generate energy by vertically pressing and rubbing something. However, we propose a corrugated textile-based triboelectric generator (CT-TEG) that can generate energy by stretching. Moreover, the CT-TEG is sewn into a corrugated structure that contains an effective air gap without additional spacers. The resulting CT-TEG can generate considerable energy from various deformations, not only by pressing and rubbing but also by stretching. The maximum output performances of the CT-TEG can reach up to 28.13 V and 2.71 μA with stretching and releasing motions. Additionally, we demonstrate the generation of sufficient energy from various activities of a human body to power about 54 LEDs. These results demonstrate the potential application of CT-TEGs for self-powered systems.

  2. Elderly mouse skeletal muscle fibres have a diminished capacity to upregulate NCAM production in response to denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, Ashley; Sheard, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Sarcopenia is a major contributor to the loss of independence and deteriorating quality of life in elderly individuals, it manifests as a decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength beyond the age of 65. Muscle fibre atrophy is a major contributor to sarcopenia and the most severely atrophic fibres are commonly found in elderly muscles to have permanently lost their motor nerve input. By contrast with elderly fibres, when fibres in young animals lose their motor input they normally mount a response to induce restoration of nerve contact, and this is mediated in part by upregulated expression of the nerve cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Therefore, skeletal muscles appear to progressively lose their ability to become reinnervated, and here we have investigated whether this decline occurs via loss of the muscle's ability to upregulate NCAM in response to denervation. We performed partial denervation (by peripheral nerve crush) of the extensor digitorum longus muscle of the lower limb in both young and elderly mice. We used immunohistochemistry to compare relative NCAM levels at denervated and control innervated muscle fibres, focused on measurements at neuromuscular junctional, extra-junctional and cytoplasmic locations. Muscle fibres in young animals responded to denervation with significant (32.9%) increases in unpolysialylated NCAM at extra-junctional locations, but with no change in polysialylated NCAM. The same partial denervation protocol applied to elderly animals resulted in no significant change in either polysialylated or unpolysialylated NCAM at junctional, extra-junctional or cytoplasmic locations, therefore muscle fibres in young mice upregulated NCAM in response to denervation but fibres in elderly mice failed to do so. Elevation of NCAM levels is likely to be an important component of the muscle fibre's ability to attract or reattract a neural input, so we conclude that the presence of increasing numbers of long-term denervated fibres in elderly muscles

  3. Investigation into the vibration of metro bogies induced by rail corrugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Liang; Li, Wei; Foo, Elbert; Wu, Lei; Wen, Zefeng; Jin, Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    The current research of rail corrugation mainly focuses on the mechanisms of its formation and development. Compared with the root causes and development mechanisms, the wheel-rail impacts, the fatigue failure of vehicle-track parts, and the loss of ride comfort due to rail corrugation should also be taken into account. However, the influences of rail corrugation on vehicle and track vibration, and failure of vehicle and track structural parts are barely discussed in the literature. This paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation of the structural vibration of metro bogies caused by rail corrugation. Extensive experiments are conducted to investigate the effects of short-pitch rail corrugation on the vibration accelerations of metro bogies. A dynamic model of a metro vehicle coupled with a concrete track is established to study the influence of rail corrugation on the structural vibration of metro bogies. The field test results indicate that the short-pitch rail corrugation generates strong vibrations on the axle-boxes and the bogie frames, therefore, accelerates the fatigue failure of the bogie components. The numerical results show that short-pitch rail corrugation may largely reduce the fatigue life of the coil spring, and improving the damping value of the primary vertical dampers is likely to reduce the strong vibration induced by short-pitch rail corrugation. This research systematically studies the effect of rail corrugation on the vibration of metro bogies and proposes some remedies for mitigating strong vibrations of metro bogies and reducing the incidence of failure in primary coil springs, which would be helpful in developing new metro bogies and track maintenance procedures.

  4. Histopathology and the inflammatory response of European perch, Perca fluviatilis muscle infected with Eustrongylides sp. (Nematoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Bahram S; Manera, Maurizio; Lorenzoni, Massimo; Pironi, Flavio; Shinn, Andrew P; Giari, Luisa

    2015-04-15

    The European perch, Perca fluviatilis L. is a common paratenic host of dioctophymatid nematodes belonging to the genus Eustrongylides. In this host, once infected oligochaetes, which serve as the first intermediate host, are ingested, Eustrongylides migrates through the intestine and is frequently encountered within the musculature, free within the body cavity, or encapsulated on the viscera. The current study details the first Italian record of Eustrongylides sp. with larvae reported in the muscle of P. fluviatilis. Uninfected and nematode-infected muscle tissues of perch were fixed and prepared for histological evaluation and electron microscopy. Some sections were subjected to an indirect immunohistochemical method using anti-PCNA, anti-piscidin 3 and anti-piscidin 4 antibodies. A total of 510 P. fluviatilis (TL range 15-25 cm) from Lake Trasimeno, Perugia were post-mortemed; 31 individuals had encysted nematode larvae within their musculature (1-2 worms fish(-1)). Histologically, larvae were surrounded by a capsule with an evident acute inflammatory reaction. Muscle degeneration and necrosis extending throughout the sarcoplasm, sarcolemmal basal lamina, endomysial connective tissue cells and capillaries was frequently observed. Within the encapsulating reaction, macrophage aggregates (MAs) were seen. Immunohistochemical staining with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) revealed numerous PCNA-positive cells within the thickness of the capsule and in the immediate vicinity surrounding Eustrongylides sp. larvae (i.e. fibroblasts and satellite cells), suggesting a host response had been initiated to repair the nematode-damaged muscle. Mast cells (MCs) staining positively for piscidin 3, were demonstrated for the first time in response to a muscle-infecting nematode. The piscidin 3 positive MC's were seen principally in the periphery of the capsule surrounding the Eustrongylides sp. larva. A host tissue response to Eustrongylides sp. larvae infecting the

  5. Frequency characteristics of human muscle and cortical responses evoked by noisy Achilles tendon vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn L; Peters, Ryan M; Hill, Aimee J; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G; Inglis, J Timothy

    2017-05-01

    Noisy stimuli, along with linear systems analysis, have proven to be effective for mapping functional neural connections. We explored the use of noisy (10-115 Hz) Achilles tendon vibration to examine somatosensory reflexes in the triceps surae muscles in standing healthy young adults ( n = 8). We also examined the association between noisy vibration and electrical activity recorded over the sensorimotor cortex using electroencephalography. We applied 2 min of vibration and recorded ongoing muscle activity of the soleus and gastrocnemii using surface electromyography (EMG). Vibration amplitude was varied to characterize reflex scaling and to examine how different stimulus levels affected postural sway. Muscle activity from the soleus and gastrocnemii was significantly correlated with the tendon vibration across a broad frequency range (~10-80 Hz), with a peak located at ~40 Hz. Vibration-EMG coherence positively scaled with stimulus amplitude in all three muscles, with soleus displaying the strongest coupling and steepest scaling. EMG responses lagged the vibration by ~38 ms, a delay that paralleled observed response latencies to tendon taps. Vibration-evoked cortical oscillations were observed at frequencies ~40-70 Hz (peak ~54 Hz) in most subjects, a finding in line with previous reports of sensory-evoked γ-band oscillations. Further examination of the method revealed 1 ) accurate reflex estimates could be obtained with vibration; 2 ) responses did not habituate over 2 min of exposure; and importantly, 3 ) noisy vibration had a minimal influence on standing balance. Our findings suggest noisy tendon vibration is an effective novel approach to characterize somatosensory reflexes during standing. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We applied noisy (10-115 Hz) vibration to the Achilles tendon to examine the frequency characteristics of lower limb somatosensory reflexes during standing. Ongoing muscle activity was coherent with the noisy vibration (peak coherence ~40 Hz), and

  6. The neural response properties and cortical organization of a rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response that overlaps with the frequencies that elicit the kinesthetic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Paul D; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Shell, Courtney E; Granja-Vazquez, Rafael; Ina, Jason G

    2017-01-01

    Kinesthesia is the sense of limb movement. It is fundamental to efficient motor control, yet its neurophysiological components remain poorly understood. The contributions of primary muscle spindles and cutaneous afferents to the kinesthetic sense have been well studied; however, potential contributions from muscle sensory group responses that are different than the muscle spindles have not been ruled out. Electrophysiological recordings in peripheral nerves and brains of male Sprague Dawley rats with a degloved forelimb preparation provide evidence of a rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response that overlaps with vibratory inputs known to generate illusionary perceptions of limb movement in humans (kinesthetic illusion). This group was characteristically distinct from type Ia muscle spindle fibers, the receptor historically attributed to limb movement sensation, suggesting that type Ia muscle spindle fibers may not be the sole carrier of kinesthetic information. The sensory-neural structure of muscles is complex and there are a number of possible sources for this response group; with Golgi tendon organs being the most likely candidate. The rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response projected to proprioceptive brain regions, the rodent homolog of cortical area 3a and the second somatosensory area (S2), with similar adaption and frequency response profiles between the brain and peripheral nerves. Their representational organization was muscle-specific (myocentric) and magnified for proximal and multi-articulate limb joints. Projection to proprioceptive brain areas, myocentric representational magnification of muscles prone to movement error, overlap with illusionary vibrational input, and resonant frequencies of volitional motor unit contraction suggest that this group response may be involved with limb movement processing.

  7. Oestrogen status in relation to the early training responses in human thumb adductor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onambele, G N L; Bruce, S A; Woledge, R C

    2006-09-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the mechanisms for the early response to training in women of different oestrogen status and to determine whether any oestrogen and exercise effects on these would be additive. We monitored training (ten 5-s contractions per day for 12 weeks)-induced changes in the size, strength, voluntary activation capacity and index of crossbridge force state (i.e. rapid stretch to isometric torque ratio), in the thumb adductor muscles of postmenopausal [eight who had never used, and 14 who were using, hormone replacement therapy (HRT)] and seven premenopausal eumenorrhoeic women. The contralateral untrained muscle was used as a control. There was a significant effect of oestrogen status on the magnitude of training-induced strength increment, with the non-HRT postmenopausal group exhibiting the greatest benefits (28 +/- 6%, P = 0.024) from training. There were no significant or commensurate changes in either cross-sectional area or voluntary activation capacity. The index of crossbridge force state improved most in the no-HRT group (19 +/- 7%, P < 0.05). Presence, rather than absence of oestrogen, is associated with relatively higher muscle function which limits the potential for any further training-induced increments in muscle performance, as would be expected if the muscle strengthening actions of training and oestrogen share a common, partially saturable physiological pathway. The mechanism that is involved in the early training-induced strength increment in the three differing oestrogen groups cannot be due to increased size or recruitment. It would appear instead that increased motor unit firing frequency is involved.

  8. Responses of Electromyogram Activity in Adductor Longus Muscle of Rats to the Altered Gravity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Takashi; Wang, Xiao Dong; Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Higo, Yoko; Nakai, Naoya; Ochiai, Toshimasa; Gyotoku, Jyunichirou; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Ogura, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Responses of electromyogram (EMG) activities in the rostral and caudal regions of adductor longus (AL) muscle to altered gravity levels during parabolic flight of a jet airplane, as well as hindlimb suspension, were investigated in adult rats. Tonic EMGs in both regions were noted when the rats were exposed to hyper-G, as well as 1-G. The hip joints were adducted and the sedental quadrupedal position was maintained at these G levels. However, the EMG activities in these regions decreased and became phasic, when the hip joints were abducted and extended backward in μ-G environment. Such changes of joint angles caused passive shortening of sarcomeres only in the caudal region of AL. Atrophy and shift toward fast-twitch type were noted in fibers of the caudal region after 16-day unloading. Although fiber transformation was also induced in the rostral region, no atrophy was seen in fast-twitch fibers. The data may suggest that the atrophy and shift of phenotype caused by gravitational unloading in fibers of the caudal region may be related to the decrease in the neural and mechanical activities. Fiber type transformation toward fast-twitch type may be also related to the change of muscle activity from tonic to phasic patterns, which are the typical characteristics of fast-twitch muscle. However, the responses to unloading in fibers of rostral region were not related to the reduction of mechanical load.

  9. Acute molecular responses to concurrent resistance and high-intensity interval exercise in untrained skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Jamie K; Faulkner, Steve H; Jackson, Andrew P; King, James A; Nimmo, Myra A

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent training involving resistance and endurance exercise may augment the benefits of single-mode training for the purpose of improving health. However, muscle adaptations, associated with resistance exercise, may be blunted by a subsequent bout of endurance exercise, via molecular interference. High-intensity interval training (HIIT), generating similar adaptations to endurance exercise, may offer an alternative exercise mode to traditional endurance exercise. This study examined the influence of an acute HIIT session on the molecular responses following resistance exercise in untrained skeletal muscle. Ten male participants performed resistance exercise (4 × 8 leg extensions, 70% 1RM, (RE)) or RE followed by HIIT (10 × 1 min at 90% HRmax, (RE+HIIT)). Muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis before, 2 and 6 h post-RE to determine intramuscular protein phosphorylation and mRNA responses. Phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) decreased at 6 h in both trials (P HIIT (P HIIT with PGC-1α and PGC-1α-ex1b remaining elevated at 6 h, whereas RE-induced increases at 2 and 6 h for PGC-1α-ex1b only (P HIIT versus RE at 2 and 6 h (P HIIT may be an alternative to endurance exercise when performed after resistance exercise in the same training session to optimize adaptations. PMID:25902785

  10. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  11. Effect of corrugation profile on the thermal–hydraulic performance of corrugated channels using CuO–water nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, laminar flow and heat transfer characteristics of CuO–water nanofluid in straight and corrugated channels are numerically investigated over the Reynolds number and nanoparticles volume fraction ranges of 100–800 and 0–0.05, respectively. The governing equations in body-fitted coordinates are discretized using finite volume approach (FVM on a collocated grid and solved iteratively using SIMPLE technique. Three different shapes of corrugated channels such as sinusoidal, triangular and trapezoidal channel are considered in this study. The streamwise velocity contours, temperature contours, non-dimensional pressure drop, average Nusselt number and thermal–hydraulic performance factor are presented and analyzed. Results show that the average Nusselt number and thermal–hydraulic performance factor increases with increasing nanoparticles volume fraction and Reynolds number for all channel shapes. In addition, the non dimensional pressure drop increases with increasing nanoparticles volume fraction, while it decreases as Reynolds number increases for all channel geometries. Furthermore, the trapezoidal channel has the highest Nusselt number and followed by the sinusoidal, triangular and straight channel.

  12. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans.(Author Abstract)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michikami, Daisaku; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Hayano, Junichiro; Sunagawa, Kenji; Kawada, Toru; Kamiya, Atsunori

    2004-01-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied...

  13. Reproducibility and responsiveness of a noninvasive EMG technique of the respiratory muscles in COPD patients and in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, ML; van Eykern, LA; Vennik, PW; Koeter, GH; Maarsingh, EJW; Wijkstra, PJ

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the reproducibility and responsiveness of transcutaneous electromyography (EMG) of the respiratory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( COPD) and healthy subjects during breathing against an inspiratory load. In seven healthy subjects and

  14. Brain Mechanisms Underlying Urge Incontinence and its Response to Pelvic Floor Muscle Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Derek; Clarkson, Becky; Tadic, Stasa D; Resnick, Neil M

    2015-09-01

    Urge urinary incontinence is a major problem, especially in the elderly, and to our knowledge the underlying mechanisms of disease and therapy are unknown. We used biofeedback assisted pelvic floor muscle training and functional brain imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging) to investigate cerebral mechanisms, aiming to improve the understanding of brain-bladder control and therapy. Before receiving biofeedback assisted pelvic floor muscle training functionally intact, older community dwelling women with urge urinary incontinence as well as normal controls underwent comprehensive clinical and bladder diary evaluation, urodynamic testing and brain functional magnetic resonance imaging. Evaluation was repeated after pelvic floor muscle training in those with urge urinary incontinence. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was done to determine the brain reaction to rapid bladder filling with urgency. Of 65 subjects with urge urinary incontinence 28 responded to biofeedback assisted pelvic floor muscle training with 50% or greater improvement of urge urinary incontinence frequency on diary. However, responders and nonresponders displayed 2 patterns of brain reaction. In pattern 1 in responders before pelvic floor muscle training the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the adjacent supplementary motor area were activated as well as the insula. After the training dorsal anterior cingulate cortex/supplementary motor area activation diminished and there was a trend toward medial prefrontal cortex deactivation. In pattern 2 in nonresponders before pelvic floor muscle training the medial prefrontal cortex was deactivated, which changed little after the training. In older women with urge urinary incontinence there appears to be 2 patterns of brain reaction to bladder filling and they seem to predict the response and nonresponse to biofeedback assisted pelvic floor muscle training. Moreover, decreased cingulate activation appears to be a consequence of the improvement

  15. Acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular but not anabolic responses to amino acids in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna; Limb, Marie C; Williams, John P; Smith, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The anabolic effects of nutrition on skeletal muscle may depend on adequate skeletal muscle perfusion, which is impaired in older people. Cocoa flavanols have been shown to improve flow-mediated dilation, an established measure of endothelial function. However, their effect on muscle microvascular blood flow is currently unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore links between the consumption of cocoa flavanols, muscle microvascular blood flow, and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in response to nutrition in older men. To achieve this objective, leg blood flow (LBF), muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), and MPS were measured under postabsorptive and postprandial (intravenous Glamin (Fresenius Kabi, Germany), dextrose to sustain glucose ∼7.5 mmol·L(-1)) conditions in 20 older men. Ten of these men were studied with no cocoa flavanol intervention and a further 10 were studied with the addition of 350 mg of cocoa flavanols at the same time that nutrition began. Leg (femoral artery) blood flow was measured by Doppler ultrasound, muscle MBV by contrast-enhanced ultrasound using Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, Mass., USA) perflutren contrast agent and MPS using [1, 2-(13)C2]leucine tracer techniques. Our results show that although older individuals do not show an increase in LBF or MBV in response to feeding, these absent responses are apparent when cocoa flavanols are given acutely with nutrition. However, this restoration in vascular responsiveness is not associated with improved MPS responses to nutrition. We conclude that acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular responses to nutrition, independently of modifying muscle protein anabolism.

  16. Different fatigue-resistant leg muscles and EMG response during whole-body vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Deniz

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of static whole-body vibration (WBV) on the Electromyograhic (EMG) responses of leg muscles, which are fatigue-resistant in different manner. The study population was divided into two groups according to the values obtained by the Fatigue Index [Group I: Less Fatigue Resistant (LFR), n=11; Group II: More Fatigue Resistant (MFR), n=11]. The repeated electromyographic (EMG) activities of four leg muscles were analyzed the following determinants: (1) frequency (30 Hz, 35 Hz and 40 Hz); (2) stance position (static squat position); (3) amplitude (2 mm and 4 mm) and (4) knee flexion angle (120°), (5) vertical vibration platform. Vibration data were analyzed using Minitab 16 (Minitab Ltd, State College, PA, USA). The significance level was set at pfatigue (pvibration exercise and can serve to guide the development of training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tackling proteome changes in the longissimus thoracis bovine muscle in response to pre-slaughter stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Daniel; Mato, Ariadna; Salgado, Francisco J; López-Pedrouso, María; Carrera, Mónica; Bravo, Susana; Parrado, María; Gallardo, José M; Zapata, Carlos

    2015-06-03

    associated with the response to pre-slaughter stress in the LT bovine muscle of the Rubia Gallega breed. The functions of those significantly changed proteins have a clear biological relationship with stress response. These findings contribute to a deeper insight into the molecular pathways that respond to stress in cattle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development temperature has persistent effects on muscle growth responses in gilthead sea bream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de la serrana, Daniel; Vieira, Vera L A; Andree, Karl B; Darias, Maria; Estévez, Alicia; Gisbert, Enric; Johnston, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    Initially we characterised growth responses to altered nutritional input at the transcriptional and tissue levels in the fast skeletal muscle of juvenile gilthead sea bream. Fish reared at 21-22°C (range) were fed a commercial diet at 3% body mass d(-1) (non-satiation feeding, NSF) for 4 weeks, fasted for 4d (F) and then fed to satiation (SF) for 21d. 13 out of 34 genes investigated showed consistent patterns of regulation between nutritional states. Fasting was associated with a 20-fold increase in MAFbx, and a 5-fold increase in Six1 and WASp expression, which returned to NSF levels within 16h of SF. Refeeding to satiation was associated with a rapid (growth factors FGF6 and IGF1 increased 6.0 and 4.5-fold within 16 h and 24 h of refeeding respectively. The average growth in diameter of fast muscle fibres was checked with fasting and significant fibre hypertrophy was only observed after 13d and 21d SF. To investigate developmental plasticity in growth responses we used the same experimental protocol with fish reared at either 17.5-18.5°C (range) (LT) or 21-22°C (range) (HT) to metamorphosis and then transferred to 21-22°C. There were persistent effects of development temperature on muscle growth patterns with 20% more fibres of lower average diameter in LT than HT group of similar body size. Altering the nutritional input to the muscle to stimulate growth revealed cryptic changes in the expression of UNC45 and Hsp90α with higher transcript abundance in the LT than HT groups, whereas there were no differences in the expression of MAFbx and Six1. It was concluded that myogenesis and gene expression patterns during growth are not fixed, but can be modified by temperature during the early stages of the life cycle.

  19. The effects of game and training loads on perceptual responses of muscle soreness in Australian football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Paul G; Hopkins, Will G

    2013-05-01

    Australian Football is an intense team sport played over ~120 min on a weekly basis. To determine the effects of game and training load on muscle soreness and the time frame of soreness dissipation, 64 elite Australian Football players (age 23.8 ± 1.8 y, height 183.9 ± 3.8 cm, weight 83.2 ± 5.0 kg; mean ± SD) recorded perceptions of muscle soreness, game intensity, and training intensity on scales of 1-10 on most mornings for up to 3 competition seasons. Playing and training times were also recorded in minutes. Data were analyzed with a mixed linear model, and magnitudes of effects on soreness were evaluated by standardization. All effects had acceptably low uncertainty. Game and training-session loads were 790 ± 182 and 229 ± 98 intensity-minutes (mean ± SD), respectively. General muscle soreness was 4.6 ± 1.1 units on d 1 postgame and fell to 1.9 ± 1.0 by d 6. There was a small increase in general muscle soreness (0.22 ± 0.07-0.50 ± 0.13 units) in the 3 d after high-load games relative to low-load games. Other soreness responses showed similar timelines and magnitudes of change. Training sessions made only small contributions to soreness over the 3 d after each session. Practitioners should be aware of these responses when planning weekly training and recovery programs, as it appears that game-related soreness dissipates after 3 d regardless of game load and increased training loads in the following week produce only small increases in soreness.

  20. Evidence of adaptations of locomotor neural drive in response to enhanced intermuscular connectivity between the triceps surae muscles of the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabei, Michel; van Dieën, Jaap H.; Maas, Huub

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate changes 1) in the coordination of activation of the triceps surae muscle group, and 2) in muscle belly length of soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) during locomotion (trotting) in response to increased stiffness of intermuscular connective tissues in the rat. We measured muscle activation and muscle belly lengths, as well as hindlimb kinematics, before and after an artificial enhancement of the connectivity between SO and LG muscles obtained ...

  1. Distinct Fiber Type Signature in Mouse Muscles Expressing a Mutant Lamin A Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy in a Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barateau, Alice; Vadrot, Nathalie; Agbulut, Onnik; Vicart, Patrick; Batonnet-Pichon, Sabrina; Buendia, Brigitte

    2017-04-24

    Specific mutations in LMNA, which encodes nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A/C, affect skeletal muscle tissues. Early-onset LMNA myopathies reveal different alterations of muscle fibers, including fiber type disproportion or prominent dystrophic and/or inflammatory changes. Recently, we identified the p.R388P LMNA mutation as responsible for congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) and lipodystrophy. Here, we asked whether viral-mediated expression of mutant lamin A in murine skeletal muscles would be a pertinent model to reveal specific muscle alterations. We found that the total amount and size of muscle fibers as well as the extent of either inflammation or muscle regeneration were similar to wildtype or mutant lamin A. In contrast, the amount of fast oxidative muscle fibers containing myosin heavy chain IIA was lower upon expression of mutant lamin A, in correlation with lower expression of genes encoding transcription factors MEF2C and MyoD. These data validate this in vivo model for highlighting distinct muscle phenotypes associated with different lamin contexts. Additionally, the data suggest that alteration of muscle fiber type identity may contribute to the mechanisms underlying physiopathology of L-CMD related to R388P mutant lamin A.

  2. Distinct Fiber Type Signature in Mouse Muscles Expressing a Mutant Lamin A Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy in a Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Barateau

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific mutations in LMNA, which encodes nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A/C, affect skeletal muscle tissues. Early-onset LMNA myopathies reveal different alterations of muscle fibers, including fiber type disproportion or prominent dystrophic and/or inflammatory changes. Recently, we identified the p.R388P LMNA mutation as responsible for congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD and lipodystrophy. Here, we asked whether viral-mediated expression of mutant lamin A in murine skeletal muscles would be a pertinent model to reveal specific muscle alterations. We found that the total amount and size of muscle fibers as well as the extent of either inflammation or muscle regeneration were similar to wildtype or mutant lamin A. In contrast, the amount of fast oxidative muscle fibers containing myosin heavy chain IIA was lower upon expression of mutant lamin A, in correlation with lower expression of genes encoding transcription factors MEF2C and MyoD. These data validate this in vivo model for highlighting distinct muscle phenotypes associated with different lamin contexts. Additionally, the data suggest that alteration of muscle fiber type identity may contribute to the mechanisms underlying physiopathology of L-CMD related to R388P mutant lamin A.

  3. Short-term response of mitomycin C on the human rectus muscle following strabismus surgery: histological, ultrastructural, and biomechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samjin; Cheong, Youjin; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Kyung A; Bang, Jae Beum; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the inflammatory effect of intraoperative mitomycin C (MMC) on adhesion reformation in human rectus muscles. Ten consecutive patients who underwent medial rectus resection had their postoperative rectus muscles divided into two groups: control group (n = 10) and MMC group (n = 10). In the MMC group, the muscle was soaked for 2 min with MMC, prepared as a 0.2 mg/mL (0.02%) solution. The 0.02% MMC reactions were examined using histological analysis with hematoxylin-eosin (inflammatory response) and Masson's trichrome (collagen fibrils), immunoreactivities of cyclooxygenase-II (inflammatory response), and collagen type I and III, scanning electron microscopy analysis to quantify the diameter and D-periodicity of collagen fibrils, and atomic force microscopy analysis to quantify the diameter, D-periodicity, and adhesion force of collagen fibrils. The rectus muscles treated with 0.02% MMC showed a significantly increased inflammatory response (p collagen density (p collagen fibril network.

  4. Bed rest reduces metabolic protein content and abolishes exercise-induced mRNA responses in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Biensø, Rasmus S; Kiilerich, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim was to test the hypothesis that one week of bed rest will reduce mitochondrial number and expression and activity of oxidative proteins in human skeletal muscle, but that exercise-induced intracellular signaling as well as mRNA and microRNA (miR) responses are maintained after...... kinase phosphorylation, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ¿ coactivator-1a and VEGF mRNA content in skeletal muscle before bed rest, but the responses were abolished after bed rest. Conclusion: The present findings indicate that only 7 days of physical inactivity reduce skeletal muscle metabolic...... capacity as well as abolish exercise-induced adaptive gene responses likely reflecting the interference with the ability of skeletal muscle to adapt to exercise....

  5. The heat shock protein response following eccentric exercise in human skeletal muscle is unaffected by local NSAID infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Paulsen, G; Schjerling, P

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed in relation to pain and injuries in skeletal muscle, but may adversely affect muscle adaptation probably via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Induction of heat shock proteins (HSP) represents an important adaptive response...... in muscle subjected to stress, and in several cell types including cardiac myocytes prostaglandins are important in induction of the HSP response. This study aimed to determine the influence of NSAIDs on the HSP response to eccentric exercise in human skeletal muscle. Healthy males performed 200 maximal...... eccentric contractions with each leg with intramuscular infusion of the NSAID indomethacin or placebo. Biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis before and after (5, 28 hrs and 8 days) the exercise bout from both legs (NSAID vs unblocked leg) and analysed for expression of the HSPs HSP70, HSP27 and a...

  6. The effect of morphologically representative corrugation on hovering insect flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Jeffrey; Battaglia, Francine; Bayandor, Javid

    2017-11-01

    The present work explores the influence of morphologically representative wing corrugation in three-dimensional symmetric hovering. The kinematics are applied to a processed μCT scan of a Bombus pensylvanicus and compared with a wing utilizing the same planform but a flat, rectangular cross-section. The Bombus pensylvanicus wing used in the present study was captured in Virginia, killed with Ethyl acetate dying with wings extended with the fore and hind wings connected by the wing humuli. The aerodynamics resulting from geometric differences between the true wing and flat plate are quantified using CL and CD, and qualified using slices of vorticity and pressure. Three-dimensional flow structures are visualized using vorticity magnitude and streamlines. The present analysis is to begin to determine and understand the effects of insect wing venation on aerodynamic performance and further, to better understand the effects of assuming a simplified cross-sectional geometry.

  7. An Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for Microwave Corrugated Filters Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Mantilla-Gaviria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A practical and useful application of the Ant Colony Optimization (ACO method for microwave corrugated filter design is shown. The classical, general purpose ACO method is adapted to deal with the microwave filter design problem. The design strategy used in this paper is an iterative procedure based on the use of an optimization method along with an electromagnetic simulator. The designs of high-pass and band-pass microwave rectangular waveguide filters working in the C-band and X-band, respectively, for communication applications, are shown. The average convergence performance of the ACO method is characterized by means of Monte Carlo simulations and compared with that obtained with the well-known Genetic Algorithm (GA. The overall performance, for the simulations presented herein, of the ACO is found to be better than that of the GA.

  8. Transition from diffusive to localized regimes in surface corrugated waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Martin, A.; Saenz, J. J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Nieto-Vesperinas, M. [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Exact calculations of transmission and reflection coefficients in surface randomly corrugated waveguides are presented. The elastic scattering of diffuse light classical waves from a rough surface induces a diffusive transport along the waveguide axis. As the length of the corrugated part of the waveguide increases, a transition from the diffusive to the localized regime is observed. This involves an analogy with electron conduction in nano wires, and hence, a concept analogous to that of resistance can be introduced. An oscillatory behavior of different transport properties (elastic mean free path, localization length, enhanced backscattering), versus the wavelength is predicted. An analysis of the transmission coefficients (transmitted speckle) shows that as the length of the corrugated part of the waveguide increases there is a strong preference to forward coupling through the lowest mode. This marks a clear anisotropy in the forward propagation which is absent in the case of volume disorder. The statistics of reflection coefficients is analyzed, first using random matrix theory (Rm) to analytically deduce the probability densities in the localization regime, afterwards exact numerical calculations of the coupling to backward modes in surface corrugated waveguides will be put forward for comparison. We show that the reflected speckle distribution are independent of the transport regime, at variance with the regime transition found in the transmission case. Despite the strong anisotropy, the analysis of the probability distributions of both transmitted and reflected waves confirms the distributions predicted by Random Matrix Theory for volume disorder. [Spanish] Presentamos calculos exactos de los coeficientes de transmision y reflexion en guias de onda con desorden de superficie. La dispersion elastica de luz difusa o de otras ondas clasicas por una superficie rugosa induce un transporte difusivo a lo largo del eje de la guia. A medida que la longitud de la zona

  9. Numerical Investigation of the Fully-Developed Periodic Flow Field for Optimal Heat Transfer in Spirally Corrugated Tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hærvig, Jakob; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Sørensen, Kim

    Even though the corrugated tube is a widely used technique to enhance transfer heat, the exact heat transfer enhancing mechanism remains relatively un-documented. Most studies attribute the favourable heat transfer characteristics to a swirling flow being present at higher corrugation....... In this study, a systematic approach relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used to study and compare the heat transfer characteristics with the detailed flow field in the spirally corrugated tubes. By comparing the flow in 12 different spirally corrugated tubes at a fixed Reynolds number of 5000......, this study compares the flow field with the surface averaged Nusselt number to gain valuable insight into which flow phenomena causes favourable heat transfer characteristics. While the flow at low corrugations approximates the non-corrugated tube, higher corrugations of h/D creates a significant tangential...

  10. Geometrical properties of turbulent premixed flames and other corrugated interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesset, F.; Maurice, G.; Halter, F.; Mazellier, N.; Chauveau, C.; Gökalp, I.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the geometrical properties of turbulent flame fronts and other interfaces. Toward that end, we use an original tool based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), which is applied to the interface spatial coordinates. The focus is mainly on the degree of roughness of the flame front, which is quantified through the scale dependence of its coverage arclength. POD is first validated by comparing with the caliper technique. Fractal characteristics are extracted in an unambiguous fashion using a parametric expression which appears to be impressively well suited for representing Richardson plots. Then it is shown that, for the range of Reynolds numbers investigated here, the scale-by-scale contribution to the arclength does not comply with scale similarity, irrespectively of the type of similarity which is invoked. The finite ratios between large and small scales, referred to as finite Reynolds number effects, are likely to explain this observation. In this context, the Reynolds number that ought to be achieved for a proper inertial range to be discernible, and for scale similarity to be likely to apply, is calculated. Fractal characteristics of flame folding are compared to available predictions. It is confirmed that the inner cutoff satisfactorily correlates with the Kolmogorov scale while the outer cutoff appears to be proportional to the integral length scale. However, the scaling for the fractal dimension is much less obvious. It is argued that much higher Reynolds numbers have to be reached for drawing firm statements about the evolution (or constancy) of the fractal dimension with respect to flame and flow parameters. Finally, a heuristic phenomenology of corrugated interfaces is highlighted. The degree of generality of the latter phenomenology is confirmed by comparing the folding of different interfaces including a turbulent-nonturbulent interface, a liquid jet destabilized by a surrounding air jet, a cavitating flow, and an isoscalar

  11. Effects of amplitude and predictability of perturbations to the arm on anticipatory and reactionary muscle responses to maintain balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Ali; Preuss, Richard; Milner, Theodore Edgar

    2017-08-01

    Disturbances to balance arising from forces applied to the upper limb have received relatively little attention compared to disturbances arising from support surface perturbations. In this study we applied fast ramp perturbations to the hand in anterior, posterior, medial and lateral directions. The effects of perturbation predictability and amplitude on the postural response of upper limb, trunk and lower limb muscles were investigated. Perturbations were applied either in blocks of constant amplitude and direction (predictable) or with direction and amplitude varying randomly (random) from trial to trial. The spatial-temporal patterns of anticipatory muscle activation under the predictable condition and the reactionary responses following the perturbation under both conditions were similarly organized. The size of the response increased systematically with the perturbation magnitude for both anticipatory and reactionary changes in muscle activation. However, the slope of the relation between perturbation amplitude and the magnitude of the change in muscle activation was greater when perturbations were predictable than when they were randomly selected. The timing of both the anticipatory and reactionary increases in muscle activation was invariant across perturbation amplitudes. The characteristics of the reactionary responses have a similar organization to the long latency muscle responses to support surface perturbations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The PERK arm of the unfolded protein response regulates satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Mann, Aman K; Gallot, Yann S; Bohnert, Kyle R; Cavener, Douglas R; Whittemore, Scott R; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults is mediated by satellite stem cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress that leads to unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is relayed to the cell through the activation of PERK, IRE1/XBP1, and ATF6. Here, we demonstrate that levels of PERK and IRE1 are increased in satellite cells upon muscle injury. Inhibition of PERK, but not the IRE1 arm of the UPR in satellite cells inhibits myofiber regeneration in adult mice. PERK is essential for the survival and differentiation of activated satellite cells into the myogenic lineage. Deletion of PERK causes hyper-activation of p38 MAPK during myogenesis. Blocking p38 MAPK activity improves the survival and differentiation of PERK-deficient satellite cells in vitro and muscle formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that the PERK arm of the UPR plays a pivotal role in the regulation of satellite cell homeostasis during regenerative myogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22871.001 PMID:28332979

  13. Influence of active muscle contribution on the injury response of restrained car occupants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Dipan; Crandall, Jeff R

    2008-10-01

    Optimal performance of adaptive restraint systems requires an accurate assessment of occupant parameters including physical properties and pre-collision behavior of the occupant. Muscle bracing, one of the key reflexive actions adopted by car occupants to mitigate the severity of an impending collision, is ignored in restraint designing since conventional human surrogate tools used for injury assessment due to collision loading provide limited insight into this effect. This study is aimed at evaluating the effect of pre-collision muscle bracing on the injury outcome of an occupant using a simplified numerical musculoskeletal model. The activation levels for 12 major muscle groups loading the ankle, knee, hip and elbow joints, were determined using an optimization routine with data collected from previously reported volunteer sled tests. A whole body injury metric, weighted to the severity of injury and the injured body region, was used to evaluate the potential risk of injuries estimated for different levels of bracing. The musculoskeletal model was further used to determine the requirements on the restraint system properties to minimize overall injuries for an occupant in a relaxed and a braced condition. Significant variation was observed in the load-limiting value and pre-tensioner firing time, as the restraint properties were optimized to account for the bracing behavior. The results of the study provide a framework for improving the performance of adaptive restraint systems, currently designed for passive anthropometric tests devices, by taking into account realistic response of the occupant involved in a collision.

  14. Hormonal and neuromuscular responses to mechanical vibration applied to upper extremity muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Di Giminiani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acute residual hormonal and neuromuscular responses exhibited following a single session of mechanical vibration applied to the upper extremities among different acceleration loads. METHODS: Thirty male students were randomly assigned to a high vibration group (HVG, a low vibration group (LVG, or a control group (CG. A randomized double-blind, controlled-parallel study design was employed. The measurements and interventions were performed at the Laboratory of Biomechanics of the University of L'Aquila. The HVG and LVG participants were exposed to a series of 20 trials ×10 s of synchronous whole-body vibration (WBV with a 10-s pause between each trial and a 4-min pause after the first 10 trials. The CG participants assumed an isometric push-up position without WBV. The outcome measures were growth hormone (GH, testosterone, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during bench-press, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during handgrip, and electromyography root-mean-square (EMGrms muscle activity (pectoralis major [PM], triceps brachii [TB], anterior deltoid [DE], and flexor carpi radialis [FCR]. RESULTS: The GH increased significantly over time only in the HVG (P = 0.003. Additionally, the testosterone levels changed significantly over time in the LVG (P = 0.011 and the HVG (P = 0.001. MVC during bench press decreased significantly in the LVG (P = 0.001 and the HVG (P = 0.002. In the HVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the TB (P = 0.006 muscle. In the LVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the DE (P = 0.009 and FCR (P = 0.006 muscles. CONCLUSION: Synchronous WBV acutely increased GH and testosterone serum concentrations and decreased the MVC and their respective maximal EMGrms activities, which indicated a possible central fatigue effect. Interestingly, only the GH response was dependent on the acceleration with respect to the subjects' responsiveness.

  15. Back muscle response to sudden trunk loading can be modified by training among healthcare workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Essendrop, Morten; Skotte, Jørgen H.

    2007-01-01

    of the trunk (stopping time). Data on the possibilities of a training-induced improvement in the reflex response among workers exposed to sudden trunk loading on the job are, however, nonexistent, and there is no evidence of long-term benefits, i.e., the sustainability of a positive training effect. Methods......Study Design. Experimental study of the effect of physical training on the reaction to sudden back loading. Objective. To investigate the effect and sustainability of "on the job training" on the reaction to sudden back loading among employees at a geriatric ward. Summary of Background Data....... Available data suggest that a delayed muscle reflex response to sudden trunk loading may increase the risk of low back injuries. We have previously shown that training may alter the response to sudden trunk loading in healthy subjects and decrease the time elapsed until stopping of the forward movement...

  16. The effects of resistance exercise training on macro- and micro-circulatory responses to feeding and skeletal muscle protein anabolism in older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    KEY POINTS: Increases in limb blood flow in response to nutrition are reduced in older age. Muscle microvascular blood flow (MBF) in response to nutrition is also reduced with advancing age and this may contribute to age-related 'anabolic resistance'. Resistance exercise training (RET) can...... rejuvenate limb blood flow responses to nutrition in older individuals. We report here that 20 weeks of RET also restores muscle MBF in older individuals. Restoration of MBF does not, however, enhance muscle anabolic responses to nutrition. ABSTRACT: The anabolic effects of dietary protein on skeletal muscle...... depend on adequate skeletal muscle perfusion, which is impaired in older people. This study explores fed state muscle microvascular blood flow, protein metabolism and exercise training status in older men. We measured leg blood flow (LBF), muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV) and muscle protein...

  17. Beam Expansion of Blind Spot Detection Radar Antennas Using a Radome with Defected Corrugated Inner Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayeon Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A beam expanding radome for 76.5 GHz automotive radar antennas is presented whose inner surface is engraved with corrugations. The radar used for blind spot detection (BSD requires a very wide beam width to ensure longer time for tracking out-of-sight objects. It is found that the corrugations modulate the phase velocities of the waves along the surface, which increases beam width in the far field. In addition, defects in the corrugation increase beam width even further. The presented structure satisfies the beam width requirement while keeping a low profile.

  18. Ballet dancers cardiorespiratory, oxidative and muscle damage responses to classes and rehearsals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Krause, Mauricio; Cunha, Giovani Dos Santos; Perin, Diana; Martins, Jocelito B; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Schaun, Maximiliano I; De Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to describe and compare ballet dancers' cardiorespiratory responses, muscle damage and oxidative stress levels during a ballet class (practice of isolated ballet exercises performed with barre/hand-rail support and across-the-floor movements to improve technical skills) and rehearsal (practice of ballet choreography involving technical-artistic skills to improve dancers' performance for shows). The 12 advanced female ballet dancers undertook three exercise sessions: maximum effort test, class and rehearsal. Heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were continuously measured. Lactate was determined before 15 min and after class and rehearsal. Blood was sampled pre, post and 48 h after class and rehearsal for creatine kinase (CK), lipid peroxides (LPO) and glutathione analysis (GSSG/GSH). Class was of lower intensity than rehearsal as shown by VO2, HR and lactate values: VO2 (mL.kg(-1).min(-1)): 14.5±2.1 vs. 19.1±1.7 (p Ballet dancers' muscle damage and oxidative stress responses seem not to be dependent on exercise intensity based on VO2 responses.

  19. Effects of alkaloids of Himatanthus lancifolius (Muell. Arg.) Woodson, Apocynaceae, on smooth muscle responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattmann, Yanna D; Terluk, Márcia R; Souza, Wesley M; Santos, Cid A M; Biavatti, Maique W; Torres, Luce B; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Rieck, Lia; da Silva-Santos, José E; Marques, Maria C de A

    2005-09-14

    Himatanthus lancifolius, popularly known as "agoniada" in Brazil, is largely used in folk medicine against asthma, dysmenorrhea and as an emenagogue and abortive. This study reveals the effects of an alkaloid rich fraction (AlkF) obtained from the bark of Himatanthus lancifolius in vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle responsiveness. Incubation of AlkF (3-30 microg/ml) during 15 min generates a concentration-related and fully reversible reduction in maximal contractile responses evoked by acetylcholine and phenylephrine in rat jejune and aorta preparations, respectively. Exposition of endothelium-denuded pre-contracted rat aorta rings to AlkF results in a complete relaxation, with EC(50) of 22.2 (16.2-28.2 microg/ml). AlkF is also able to induce a concentration-related rightward shift of cumulative concentration curves for calcium in uterus and aorta rings maintained in depolarizing nutritive solution. Moreover, addition of AlkF in calcium-free solution also reduces, in a concentration-dependent manner, the ability of caffeine and phenylephrine to contract aorta rings. This study reveals that the bark of Himatanthus lancifolius possesses one or more indole alkaloids able to alter non-vascular and vascular smooth muscle responsiveness, an event that may involve the blocking of calcium entry or changes on intracellular calcium utilization or mobilization.

  20. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana de Oliveira Sarmento,1–3 Amilton da Cruz Santos,1,4 Ivani Credidio Trombetta,2,5 Marciano Moacir Dantas,1 Ana Cristina Oliveira Marques,1,4 Leone Severino do Nascimento,1,4 Bruno Teixeira Barbosa,1,2 Marcelo Rodrigues Dos Santos,2 Maria do Amparo Andrade,3 Anna Myrna Jaguaribe-Lima,3,6 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos1,3,4 1Laboratory of Physical Training Studies Applied to Health, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, Brazil; 2Unit of Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology – Heart Institute (InCor/HC-FMUSP, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Graduate Program in Physiotherapy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 4Associate Graduate Program in Physical Education UPE/UFPB, João Pessoa, Brazil; 5Graduate Program in Medicine, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Department of Morphology and Animal Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver. Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac

  1. Development temperature has persistent effects on muscle growth responses in gilthead sea bream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garcia de la serrana

    Full Text Available Initially we characterised growth responses to altered nutritional input at the transcriptional and tissue levels in the fast skeletal muscle of juvenile gilthead sea bream. Fish reared at 21-22°C (range were fed a commercial diet at 3% body mass d(-1 (non-satiation feeding, NSF for 4 weeks, fasted for 4d (F and then fed to satiation (SF for 21d. 13 out of 34 genes investigated showed consistent patterns of regulation between nutritional states. Fasting was associated with a 20-fold increase in MAFbx, and a 5-fold increase in Six1 and WASp expression, which returned to NSF levels within 16h of SF. Refeeding to satiation was associated with a rapid (<24 h 12 to 17-fold increase in UNC45, Hsp70 and Hsp90α transcripts coding for molecular chaperones associated with unfolded protein response pathways. The growth factors FGF6 and IGF1 increased 6.0 and 4.5-fold within 16 h and 24 h of refeeding respectively. The average growth in diameter of fast muscle fibres was checked with fasting and significant fibre hypertrophy was only observed after 13d and 21d SF. To investigate developmental plasticity in growth responses we used the same experimental protocol with fish reared at either 17.5-18.5°C (range (LT or 21-22°C (range (HT to metamorphosis and then transferred to 21-22°C. There were persistent effects of development temperature on muscle growth patterns with 20% more fibres of lower average diameter in LT than HT group of similar body size. Altering the nutritional input to the muscle to stimulate growth revealed cryptic changes in the expression of UNC45 and Hsp90α with higher transcript abundance in the LT than HT groups, whereas there were no differences in the expression of MAFbx and Six1. It was concluded that myogenesis and gene expression patterns during growth are not fixed, but can be modified by temperature during the early stages of the life cycle.

  2. The Response of Muscle Protein Anabolism to Combined Hyperaminoacidemia and Glucose-Induced Hyperinsulinemia Is Impaired in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    VOLPI, ELENA; MITTENDORFER, BETTINA; RASMUSSEN, BLAKE B.; WOLFE, ROBERT R.

    2011-01-01

    Muscle mass declines with aging. Amino acids alone stimulate muscle protein synthesis in the elderly. However, mixed nutritional supplementation failed to improve muscle mass. We hypothesized that the failure of nutritional supplements is due to altered responsiveness of muscle protein anabolism to increased amino acid availability associated with endogenous hyperinsulinemia. We measured muscle protein synthesis and breakdown, and amino acid transport in healthy young (30 ± 3 yr) and elderly (72 ± 1 yr) volunteers in the basal postabsorptive state and during the administration of an amino acid-glucose mixture, using l-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine infusion, femoral artery and vein catheterization, and muscle biopsies. Basal muscle amino acid turnover was similar in young and elderly subjects. The mixture increased phenylalanine leg delivery and transport into the muscle in both groups. Phenylalanine net balance increased in both groups (young, −27 ± 8 to 64 ± 17; elderly, −16 ± 4 to 29 ± 7 nmol/(min·100 mL); P anabolism to hyperaminoacidemia with endogenous hyperinsulinemia is impaired in healthy elderly due to the unresponsiveness of protein synthesis. PMID:11134097

  3. From Innate to Adaptive Immune Response in Muscular Dystrophies and Skeletal Muscle Regeneration: The Role of Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Madaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is able to restore contractile functionality after injury thanks to its ability to regenerate. Following muscle necrosis, debris is removed by macrophages, and muscle satellite cells (MuSCs, the muscle stem cells, are activated and subsequently proliferate, migrate, and form muscle fibers restoring muscle functionality. In most muscle dystrophies (MDs, MuSCs fail to properly proliferate, differentiate, or replenish the stem cell compartment, leading to fibrotic deposition. However, besides MuSCs, interstitial nonmyogenic cells and inflammatory cells also play a key role in orchestrating muscle repair. A complete understanding of the complexity of these mechanisms should allow the design of interventions to attenuate MDs pathology without disrupting regenerative processes. In this review we will focus on the contribution of immune cells in the onset and progression of MDs, with particular emphasis on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. We will briefly summarize the current knowledge and recent advances made in our understanding of the involvement of different innate immune cells in MDs and will move on to critically evaluate the possible role of cell populations within the acquired immune response. Revisiting previous observations in the light of recent evidence will likely change our current view of the onset and progression of the disease.

  4. The effect of elbow flexor fatigue on spine kinematics and muscle activation in response to sudden loading at the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwambag, Derek P; Freeman, Nikole E; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-04-01

    Sudden loads, originating at either the hands or the feet, can cause injury to spine structures. As muscles are primarily responsible for stabilization following a perturbation, the effect of spine muscle fatigue in this context has been well investigated. However, the effect of fatigue of arm muscles, which can help control perturbations originating at the hands, on the spine is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the magnitude of spine flexion or the pre-activation, reflex amplitude, and reflex latency of spine muscles were altered by elbow flexor fatigue during a sudden loading (6.8 kg) perturbation at the hands. Elbow flexor fatigue was induced by an isometric 30% maximal elbow flexion moment until failure. Results demonstrate that spine kinematics were not altered in the presence of elbow flexor fatigue. Small magnitude differences in trunk muscle pre- and peak activation indicate that the presence of elbow flexor fatigue does not necessitate substantially greater spine muscle action under the tested conditions. Despite fatigued elbow flexors, the arm muscles were sufficiently able to control the perturbation. Interestingly, 5/14 participants demonstrated altered reflex latencies in all observed muscles that lasted up to 10 min after the fatiguing task. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteomic changes of the porcine skeletal muscle in response to chronic heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanjun; Hao, Yue; Li, Jielei; Gao, Yanli; Gu, Xianhong

    2017-12-14

    Heat stress (HS) has an adverse effect on meat quality; yet, the underlying molecular mechanisms altering meat quality due to muscle responses to stress remain unclear. Sixteen castrated male crossbreeds between Landrace × Yorkshire sows and Duroc boars (79.00 ± 1.50 kg body weight) were exposed to either thermal neutral (22 °C, n=8) or heat stress (30 °C, n=8) conditions for 3 weeks. Subsequently, the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of all pigs was assayed for meat quality parameters and proteome analysis. HS decreased postmortem pH (24 h) and intramuscular fat, changed ultimate L*a*b*values, and increased drip loss and shear force. Proteome analysis of the LD was conducted by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 23 differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which 3 were verified by western blotting analysis. The identified proteins were involved in six type of biological process: carbohydrate metabolism, myofibrillar and cytoskeleton structure, stress response, antioxidant and detoxification, calcium binding and cellular apoptosis. Interestingly, heat stress induced higher levels of heat shock protein, antioxidants, and calcium-binding proteins, which are involved in the mechanisms of defense and homeostasis. The results indicate that HS-induced changes in the expression of myofibrillar proteins, glucose and energy metabolism-related proteins, heat shock protein, and antioxidant enzymes might, at least partly, contribute to increase in meat tenderness. These findings will provide the foundation for developing future mitigating solutions and preventative therapies to reduce the detrimental effects of chronic heat stress on muscle function, metabolism and meat quality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of different rearing temperatures on muscle development and stress response in the early larval stages of Acipenser baerii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Aidos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at investigating muscle development and stress response in early stages of Siberian sturgeon when subjected to different rearing temperatures, by analysing growth and development of the muscle and by assessing the stress response of yolk-sac larvae. Siberian sturgeon larvae were reared at 16°C, 19°C and 22°C until the yolk-sac was completely absorbed. Sampling timepoints were: hatching, schooling and complete yolk-sac absorption stage. Histometrical, histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in order to characterize muscle growth (total muscle area, TMA; slow muscle area, SMA; fast muscle area, FMA, development (anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen -PCNA or anticaspase as well as stress conditions by specific stress biomarkers (heat shock protein 70 or 90, HSP70 or HSP90. Larvae subjected to the highest water temperature showed a faster yolk-sac absorption. Histometry revealed that both TMA and FMA were larger in the schooling stage at 19°C while no differences were observed in the SMA at any of the tested rearing temperatures. PCNA quantification revealed a significantly higher number of proliferating cells in the yolk-sac absorption phase at 22°C than at 16°C. HSP90 immunopositivity seems to be particularly evident at 19°C. HPS70 immunopositivity was never observed in the developing lateral muscle.

  7. Myofibrillar proteolysis in response to voluntary or electrically stimulated muscle contractions in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Trappe, T; Crameri, R M

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge about the effects of exercise on myofibrillar protein breakdown in human subjects is limited. Our purpose was to measure the changes in the degradation of myofibrillar proteins in response to different ways of eliciting muscle contractions using the local interstitial 3-methyl-histidine......Knowledge about the effects of exercise on myofibrillar protein breakdown in human subjects is limited. Our purpose was to measure the changes in the degradation of myofibrillar proteins in response to different ways of eliciting muscle contractions using the local interstitial 3-methyl...... contractions (ES). Microdialysis probes were placed in m. vastus lateralis in both the legs immediately after, and 1 and 3 days post-exercise. Interstitial 3-MH was higher in ES vs VOL immediately after exercise (Pexercise no difference between the two exercise types was observed...... enhanced after ES compared with VOL immediately after exercise, while the level of 3-MH did not change in the post-exercise period after VOL. These results indicate that the local myofibrillar breakdown is accelerated after ES associated with severe myofiber damage....

  8. Short communication: Muscle protein synthetic response to microparticulated whey protein in middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C J; D'Souza, R F; Fanning, A C; Poppitt, S D; Cameron-Smith, D

    2017-06-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is a high-quality dairy ingredient that is often included in formulated food products designed to stimulate muscle anabolism. Whey protein concentrate can be affected by UHT processing, and its sensory properties are not compatible with some formulated food products. Microparticulated WPC (mWPC) is a novel ingredient that is resistant to heat treatment and has enhanced sensory properties. When 16 healthy middle-aged men consumed 20 g of either WPC or mWPC, both proteins increased plasma essential AA and leucine concentrations with no detectable difference in curve kinetics. Myofibrillar protein synthesis was increased in both groups for 90 min after ingestion with no difference between groups. Ingestion of mWPC resulted in a muscle anabolic response that was equivalent to that of WPC over the full 210-min measurement period. Formulated products incorporating mWPC or standard WPC would provoke equivalent anabolic responses. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical response of knee muscles in high level bodyboarders during performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Rodríguez-Matoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: bodyboarding is a kind of surfing that has been growing very rapidly over the last decade and has now developed into one of the fastest growing water sports in the world. OBJECTIVES: evaluate the effects of fatigue on rectus femoris RF, vastus lateralis VL and vastus medialis VM and biceps femoris BF and semitendinosus ST during a high-level bodyboard competition using tensiomyography TMG. METHODS: subjects were 11 highly experienced years of practice: 15, SD=4.65 male bodyboarders age: 28.17, SD=2.89, body weight: 74.83, SD=6.13kg; height: 179.25, SD=3.93cm; BMI: 23.29, SD=1.81 participating in the final of the 2010 Spanish championship. RESULTS: the fatigue is especially evident due to a decrease in the values of relaxation time Tr and sustain time Ts caused by the specific characteristics of waves, how the waves evolve and the type of manoeuvre executed in competition due to the wave characteristics. The maximum radial displacement Dm value increased slightly in all muscles analysed and normalised response speed Vrn was stable, with a tendency to improve as athletes adapted to the type of physical effort and the environmental conditions of the competition. CONCLUSIONS: the study shows that the fatigue in the extensor and flexor muscles of the knee occurs in response to the demands of competition.

  10. Differences in muscle strength after ACL reconstruction do not influence cardiorespiratory responses to isometabolic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília S. Andrade

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate whether the muscle strength decrease that follows anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction would lead to different cardiorespiratory adjustments during dynamic exercise. Method: Eighteen active male subjects were submitted to isokinetic evaluation of knee flexor and extensor muscles four months after ACL surgery. Thigh circumference was also measured and an incremental unilateral cardiopulmonary exercise test was performed separately for both involved and uninvolved lower limbs in order to compare heart rate, oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, and ventilatory pattern (breath rate, tidal volume, inspiratory time, expiratory time, tidal volume/inspiratory time at three different workloads (moderate, anaerobic threshold, and maximal. Results: There was a significant difference between isokinetic extensor peak torque measured in the involved (116.5±29.1 Nm and uninvolved (220.8±40.4 Nm limbs, p=0.000. Isokinetic flexor peak torque was also lower in the involved limb than in the uninvolved limb (107.8±15.4 and 132.5±26.3 Nm, p=0.004, respectively. Lower values were also found in involved thigh circumference as compared with uninvolved limb (46.9±4.3 and 48.5±3.9 cm, p=0.005, respectively. No differences were found between the lower limbs in any of the variables of the incremental cardiopulmonary tests at all exercise intensities. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that, four months after ACL surgery, there is a significant deficit in isokinetic strength in the involved limb, but these differences in muscle strength requirement do not produce differences in the cardiorespiratory adjustments to exercise. Based on the hypotheses from the literature which explain the differences in the physiological responses to exercise for different muscle masses, we can deduce that, after 4 months of a rehabilitation program after an ACL reconstruction, individuals probably do not present differences in muscle oxidative and

  11. Performance enhancement of sandwich panels with honeycomb–corrugation hybrid core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of combining metallic honeycomb with folded thin metallic sheets (corrugation to construct a novel core type for lightweight sandwich structures is proposed. The honeycomb–corrugation hybrid core is manufactured by filling the interstices of aluminum corrugations with precision-cut trapezoidal aluminum honeycomb blocks, bonded together using epoxy glue. The performance of such hybrid-cored sandwich panels subjected to out-of-plane compression, transverse shear, and three-point bending is investigated, both experimentally and numerically. The strength and energy absorption of the sandwich are dramatically enhanced, compared to those of a sandwich with either empty corrugation or honeycomb core. The enhancement is induced by the beneficial interaction effects of honeycomb blocks and folded panels on improved buckling resistance as well as altered crushing modes at large plastic deformation. The present approach provides an effective method to further improve the mechanical properties of conventional honeycomb-cored sandwich constructions with low relative densities.

  12. Stability and bearing capacity of arch-shaped corrugated shell elements: experimental and numerical study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Piekarczuk; K. Malowany; P. Więch; M. Kujawińska; P. Sulik

    2015-01-01

    .... For each model the comparison of numerical and experimental results has been made for samples of a single-wave trapezoidal profile with corrugated web and lower flanges subjected to compression and bending...

  13. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  14. Finite elements sensitivity study in the buckling behaviours of corrugated web girder under shear load

    Science.gov (United States)

    De'nan, Fatimah; Hassan, Md Hadli Abu; Rahim, Mohd Asri Ab

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a study on the ultimate load behaviour of corrugated girder webs under shear loading following nonlinear finite element analysis. Sensitivity analyses conducted herein are numbers of corrugation wave, elements density, initial imperfection and material nonlinearities. This paper aimed to investigate the influence of this sensitivity to the ultimate shear load, buckling and post-buckling behaviours of the corrugated web girder under shear loading condition. Two web thicknesses have been considered in the study, while flanges were designed to be strong enough to ensure the shear governed. The corrugated profiled geometry remained constant for all models. The ultimate shear loads were reported and compared with the existing theoretical design. Based on the numerical results, this sensitivity analysis does not have a major effect on ultimate shear load and post-buckling behaviours. However, when the girder is controlled by elastic buckling, the shear resistance is higher compared to the sear calculated according to the existing theoretical design.

  15. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, N.; Samanta, Amiya K.; Roy, Dilip Kr. Singha; Thanikal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  16. Surface impedance formalism for a metallic beam pipe with small corrugations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stupakov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A metallic pipe with wall corrugations is of special interest in light of recent proposals to use such a pipe for the generation of terahertz radiation and for energy dechirping of electron bunches in free electron lasers. In this paper we calculate the surface impedance of a corrugated metal wall and show that it can be reduced to that of a thin layer with dielectric constant ϵ and magnetic permeability μ. We develop a technique for the calculation of these constants, given the geometrical parameters of the corrugations. We then calculate, for the specific case of a round metallic pipe with small corrugations, the frequency and strength of the resonant mode excited by a relativistic beam. Our analytical results are compared with numerical simulations, and are shown to agree well. They are also shown to be more accurate when compared to the earlier used analytical model.

  17. Modeling of the plastic flow kinematics in the forming process of the lightweight flange corrugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Fomenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the forming maximum possibilities of the flange corrugation by stretching with a free movement of the billets end in the rigid sectional matrices detachable by the flexible filler.

  18. Excitation of a double corrugation slow-wave structure in terahertz range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Krozer, Viktor; Kotiranta, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    problem of a terahertz double corrugation slow-wave structure is considered and practical realization of the structure using currently available technological processes is discussed. The parameters of the realized excitation structure are optimized for vacuum electronics applications while taking...

  19. Additives for enhancing the drying properties of adhesives for corrugated boards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Vishnuvarthanan; N. Rajeswari

    2013-01-01

    .... The additives are also used to enrich the properties. The objective of this paper is to increase the drying speed of the starch adhesive by adding suitable additives and thereby increasing the production speed of corrugated board manufacturing...

  20. Numerical and Experimental Investigations on Mechanical Behavior of Composite Corrugated Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayyani, Iman; Ziaei-Rad, Saeed; Salehi, Hamid

    2012-06-01

    Tensile and flexural characteristics of corrugated laminate panels were studied using numerical and analytical methods and compared with experimental data. Prepreg laminates of glass fiber plain woven cloth were hand-laid by use of a heat gun to ease the creation of the panel. The corrugated panels were then manufactured by using a trapezoidal machined aluminium mould. First, a series of simple tension tests were performed on standard samples to evaluate the material characteristics. Next, the corrugated panels were subjected to tensile and three-point bending tests. The force-displacement graphs were recorded. Numerical and analytical solutions were proposed to simulate the mechanical behavior of the panels. In order to model the energy dissipation due to delamination phenomenon observed in tensile tests in all members of corrugated core, plastic behavior was assigned to the whole geometry, not only to the corner regions. Contrary to the literature, it is shown that the three-stage mechanical behavior of composite corrugated core is not confined to aramid reinforced corrugated laminates and can be observed in other types such as fiber glass. The results reveal that the mechanical behavior of the core in tension is sensitive to the variation of core height. In addition, for the first time, the behavior of composite corrugated core was studied and verified in bending. Finally, the analytical and numerical results were validated by comparing them with experimental data. A good degree of correlation was observed which showed the suitability of the finite element model for predicting the mechanical behavior of corrugated laminate panels.

  1. MicroRNA-761 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle in response to exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yanli [Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Zhao, Chaoxian; Sun, Xuewen [Medical College of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Liu, Zhijun, E-mail: liuzhij1207@163.com [Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Zhang, Jianzhong, E-mail: zhangjianzhong@icdc.cn [National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention (ICDC), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), Beijing, 102206 (China)

    2015-11-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play critical roles in skeletal muscle in response to exercise. Previous study has shown that miR-761 was involved in a novel model regulating the mitochondrial network. However, its role in mitochondrial biogenesis remains poorly understood. Therefore, the current study was aimed to examine the effect of miR-761 on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that aberrantly expressed miR-761 is involved in exercise activity and miR-761 is decreased by exercise training compared with the sedentary control mice. miR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis of C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes by targeting the 3′-UTR of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) coactivator-1 (PGC-1α). Overexpression of miR-761 was capable of inhibiting the protein expression levels of PGC-1α. Moreover, miR-761 overexpression suppressed the p38 MAPK signaling pathway and down-regulated the expression of phosphorylated MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (P-MK2), a downstream kinase of p38 MAPK. The phosphorylation of activating transcription factors 2 (ATF2) that plays a functional role in linking the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway to enhanced transcription of the PGC-1α was also inhibited by the overexpression of miR-761. These findings revealed a novel regulation mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes, and contributed to a better understanding of the modulation of skeletal muscle in response to exercise. - Highlights: • Endurance exercise decreases miR-761 expression in skeletal muscle. • MiR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes. • MiR-761 directly targeted PGC-1α expression. • MiR-761 suppresses p38 MAPK signaling pathways in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes. • A novel mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes is demonstrated.

  2. Stimulus-response characteristics of motor evoked potentials and silent periods in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A.A. van; Anker, L.C.; Pasman, J.W.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Elswijk, G.A.F. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare stimulus-response characteristics of both motor evoked potentials (MEP) and silent periods (SP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles. METHODS: Stimulus-response curves of MEPs and SPs were obtained from the biceps

  3. Facial EMG responses to emotional expressions are related to emotion perception ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Künecke

    Full Text Available Although most people can identify facial expressions of emotions well, they still differ in this ability. According to embodied simulation theories understanding emotions of others is fostered by involuntarily mimicking the perceived expressions, causing a "reactivation" of the corresponding mental state. Some studies suggest automatic facial mimicry during expression viewing; however, findings on the relationship between mimicry and emotion perception abilities are equivocal. The present study investigated individual differences in emotion perception and its relationship to facial muscle responses - recorded with electromyogram (EMG--in response to emotional facial expressions. N° = °269 participants completed multiple tasks measuring face and emotion perception. EMG recordings were taken from a subsample (N° = °110 in an independent emotion classification task of short videos displaying six emotions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the m. corrugator supercilii in response to angry, happy, sad, and neutral expressions showed that individual differences in corrugator activity can be separated into a general response to all faces and an emotion-related response. Structural equation modeling revealed a substantial relationship between the emotion-related response and emotion perception ability, providing evidence for the role of facial muscle activation in emotion perception from an individual differences perspective.

  4. Facial EMG responses to emotional expressions are related to emotion perception ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künecke, Janina; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Recio, Guillermo; Sommer, Werner; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Although most people can identify facial expressions of emotions well, they still differ in this ability. According to embodied simulation theories understanding emotions of others is fostered by involuntarily mimicking the perceived expressions, causing a "reactivation" of the corresponding mental state. Some studies suggest automatic facial mimicry during expression viewing; however, findings on the relationship between mimicry and emotion perception abilities are equivocal. The present study investigated individual differences in emotion perception and its relationship to facial muscle responses - recorded with electromyogram (EMG)--in response to emotional facial expressions. N° = °269 participants completed multiple tasks measuring face and emotion perception. EMG recordings were taken from a subsample (N° = °110) in an independent emotion classification task of short videos displaying six emotions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the m. corrugator supercilii in response to angry, happy, sad, and neutral expressions showed that individual differences in corrugator activity can be separated into a general response to all faces and an emotion-related response. Structural equation modeling revealed a substantial relationship between the emotion-related response and emotion perception ability, providing evidence for the role of facial muscle activation in emotion perception from an individual differences perspective.

  5. Synchronous imaging of the pulse response of the ciliary muscle and lens with SD-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Cherng; Pham, Alex; Williams, Siobhan; Alawa, Karam A.; de Freitas, Carolina; Ruggeri, Marco; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Manns, Fabrice

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dynamic interaction between ciliary muscle and lens during accommodation and disaccommodation through synchronous imaging of ciliary muscle and lens response to pulse stimulus Methods: The ciliary muscle and lens were imaged simultaneously in a 33 year old subject responding to a 4D pulse stimulus (accommodative stimulus at 1.7 s, disaccommodative stimulus at 7.7 s) using an existing imaging system (Ruggeri et al, 2016) consisting of an Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography system, Ciliary Muscle Optical Coherence Tomography system, and custom-built accommodation module. OCT images were recorded at an effective frame rate of 13.0 frames per second for a total scan time of 11.5 s. An automated segmentation algorithm was applied to images of the anterior segment to detect the boundaries of the cornea and lens, from which lens thickness was extracted. Segmentation of the ciliary muscle was performed manually and then corrected for distortion due to refraction of the beam to obtain measurements of thicknesses at the apex and fixed distances from the scleral spur. Results: The dynamic biometric response to a pulse stimulus at 4D was determined for both the ciliary muscle and lens, suggesting the ciliary muscle and lens interact differently in accommodation and disaccommodation. Conclusions: The study introduces new data and analyses of the ciliary muscle and lens interaction during a complete accommodative response from the relaxed to the accommodated state and back, providing insight into the interplay between individual elements in the accommodative system and how their relationships may change with age.

  6. Effect of elastic-band exercise on muscle damage and inflammatory responses in Taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Gadruni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Elastic bands offer variable elastic resistance (ER throughout a range of motion and their incorporation with exercise movements has been used for variable strength training and rehabilitation purposes. Objective: Investigate the effect of acute bout of progressive elastic-band exercise on muscle damage and inflammatory response in Taekwondo athletes (TKD compared with untrained ones.METHODS: Fourteen (TKD, n = 7 and untrained, n = 7 men performed 3 sets of progressive resistance elastic exercise. Blood samples were taken pre-exercise and also immediately and 24h post exercise. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity, total leukocyte counts, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP were analyzed.RESULTS: Only DOMS increased in untrained group, but elevation of DOMS was observed in both groups (TKD and untrained at 24h after exercise (p<0.05. CK and LDH activity increased in both groups significantly. Also TKD group only showed CK increasing 24h post exercise (p<0.05. Total circulating leukocyte counts increased immediately in post exercise experiments and decreased in 24h ones in both groups (p<0.05. Serum IL-6 immediately increased in both groups and 24h post exercises but there was no significant difference between immediate and 24h post exercise experiments in TKD group. Furthermore, CRP just increased 24h after exercise in both groups (p<0.05.CONCLUSION: Progressive resistance elastic exercise induced muscle damage and inflammation in TKD athletes, but also had smaller changes in comparison with untrained group and other forms of exercise.

  7. Determining the optimal whole-body vibration dose-response relationship for muscle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo E; De Hoyo, Moisés; Sañudo, Borja; Carrasco, Luis; García-Manso, Juan M

    2011-12-01

    Da Silva-Grigoletto, ME, de Hoyo, M, Sañudo, B, Corrales, L, and García-Manso, JM. Determining the optimal whole-body vibration dose-response relationship for muscle performance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3326-3333, 2011-The aim of this investigation was twofold: first, to determine the optimal duration of a single whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure (phase 1) and second to find out the ideal number of sets per intervention to maximize muscle performance (phase 2). All participants were young (age: 19.4 ± 1.6 years), healthy, physically active men. In both studies, a 30-Hz frequency and a 4-mm peak-to-peak displacement were used. In phase 1, subjects (n = 30) underwent 3 sets of different durations (30, 60, and 90 seconds), whereas in phase 2, subjects (n = 27) underwent 3 interventions where the duration remained fixed at 60 seconds, and the number of sets performed (3, 6, or 9) was modified. The recovery time between sets was set at 2 minutes. In all interventions, each set consisted of 1 isometric repetition in a squat position with knees flexed at 100°. Before and after each session, jump height (countermovement jump [CMJ] and squat jump [SJ]) and power output in half squat (90° knee flexion) were assessed. In phase 1, an improvement in jump ability and power output was observed after the 30- and 60-second intervention (p effect for the program of 6 sets (p < 0.05). In conclusion, a WBV intervention consisting of six 60-second sets produces improved muscle performance measured by SJ, CMJ, and power output.

  8. EMG responses of the vertical eye muscles to dynamic and static natural vestibular stimulation about different axes in alert rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favilla, M; Ghelarducci, B; La Noce, A; Starita, A

    1983-12-05

    The EMG responses of the vertical eye muscles have been recorded in alert intact rabbits submitted to both dynamic and static natural vestibular stimulations about different axes. Following dynamic vestibular stimulation, the phase lead of the EMG response with respect to head position as well as its sensitivity increased with stimulus frequency in all the stimulation modalities. This indicates a progressive recruitment by the stimulus of the second-order vestibular neurons related to semicircular canals. The sensitivity of the response was consistently higher in the effective intermediate roll-pitch modality for all the 4 muscles. Following static stimulation, the EMG response showed an asymmetric modulation. The excitatory response was always higher than the inhibitory one and linearly related with the stimulus. Also for the static stimulation the amplitude of the response was significantly higher when the animal was tilted about the effective intermediate roll-pitch axis for all the 4 muscles. The presence of a maximal EMG response in the same modality for both static and dynamic stimulation indicates a similar spatial organization of those subgroups of ampullar and macular receptors projecting to the same eye muscle.

  9. Essential amino acids are primarily responsible for the amino acid stimulation of muscle protein anabolism in healthy elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Elena; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Mittendorfer, Bettina; Wolfe, Robert R

    2003-08-01

    Nutritional supplementation may be used to treat muscle loss with aging (sarcopenia). However, if physical activity does not increase, the elderly tend to compensate for the increased energy delivered by the supplements with reduced food intake, which results in a calorie substitution rather than supplementation. Thus, an effective supplement should stimulate muscle anabolism more efficiently than food or common protein supplements. We have shown that balanced amino acids stimulate muscle protein anabolism in the elderly, but it is unknown whether all amino acids are necessary to achieve this effect. We assessed whether nonessential amino acids are required in a nutritional supplement to stimulate muscle protein anabolism in the elderly. We compared the response of muscle protein metabolism to either 18 g essential amino acids (EAA group: n = 6, age 69 +/- 2 y; +/- SD) or 40 g balanced amino acids (18 g essential amino acids + 22 g nonessential amino acids, BAA group; n = 8, age 71 +/- 2 y) given orally in small boluses every 10 min for 3 h to healthy elderly volunteers. Muscle protein metabolism was measured in the basal state and during amino acid administration via L-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine infusion, femoral arterial and venous catheterization, and muscle biopsies. Phenylalanine net balance (in nmol x min(-1). 100 mL leg volume(-1)) increased from the basal state (P anabolism in the elderly.

  10. Commentary on Muscle dysmorphia as an addiction: a response to Grant (2015) and Nieuwoudt (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark D; Foster, Andrew C; Shorter, Gillian W

    2015-03-01

    Following the publication of our paper ‘Muscle Dysmorphia: Could it be classified as an addiction to body image?’ in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, two commentaries by Jon Grant and Johanna Nieuwoudt were published in response to our paper. Using the ‘addiction components model’, our main contention is that muscle dysmorphia (MD) actually comprises a number of different actions and behaviors and that the actual addictive activity is the maintaining of body image via a number of different activities such as bodybuilding, exercise, eating certain foods, taking specific drugs (e.g., anabolic steroids), shopping for certain foods, food supplements, and purchase or use of physical exercise accessories. This paper briefly responds to these two commentaries. While our hypothesized specifics relating to each addiction component sometimes lack empirical support (as noted explicitly by both Nieuwoudt and Grant), we still believe that our main thesis (that almost all the thoughts and behaviors of those with MD revolve around the maintenance of body image) is something that could be empirically tested in future research by those who already work in the area. We hope that the ‘Addiction to Body Image’ model we proposed provides a new framework for carrying out work in both empirical and clinical settings. The idea that MD could potentially be classed as an addiction cannot be negated on theoretical grounds as many people in the addiction field are turning their attention to research in new areas of behavioral addiction.

  11. Balance ability and muscle response of the preferred and nonpreferred leg in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gstöttner, Michaela; Neher, Andreas; Scholtz, Arne; Millonig, Martin; Lembert, Sandra; Raschner, Christian

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate balance abilities and electromyographic (EMG) latency times of the preferred and nonpreferred leg in soccer players. Whereas side differences between the two legs in force, kicking speed, and joint laxity have been demonstrated in athletes in previous studies, no data are so far available on balance differences. Low balance ability is generally associated with an increased risk of ligament injuries, and the detection of a possible asymmetry in balance is important because a bilateral difference may be a contributing factor to injury. Twenty-one amateur soccer players were tested. Two different balance test instruments were used: the Biodex Stability System and the Tetrax System. For the evaluation of muscle latency times, EMGs were recorded by means of the EquiTest system. None of the tests performed in this study revealed statistically significant differences in balance ability between the preferred and the nonpreferred leg. The investigations of balance function and muscle response in amateur soccer players did not reveal significant differences between the preferred and nonpreferred leg in the current study. However, a certain tendency to better balance in the nonpreferred leg was observed.

  12. Human skeletal muscle HSP70 response to physical training depends on exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Lormes, W; Baur, C; Opitz-Gress, A; Altenburg, D; Lehmann, M; Steinacker, J M

    2000-07-01

    We have previously reported that HSP70 in human skeletal muscle could be induced by training. However, whether HSP70 induction is dependent upon exercise volume or exercise intensity remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between HSP70 and training intensity in rowers. Fourteen well-trained male rowers were divided into two groups (group A, n = 6; group B, n = 8). Group A performed higher intensity exercise during 1st phase, whereas group B performed higher intensity exercise during 2nd training phase. Training volume in 2nd phase increased in both groups. Both training intensity and volume were reduced in 3rd phase. Muscle samples were taken from m. vastus lateralis by fine needle biopsy before training, at the end of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd training phases. HSP70 was quantitatively determined using SDS-PAGE with silver stain. In group A, HSP70 increased significantly from 38 +/- 12 etag before training to 59 +/- 16 etag at the end of the lst training phase (loaded total protein 2.5microg), and decreased afterwards. In group B, HSP70 increase (from 36 +/- 11 etag to 50 +/- 13 etag) in the 1st phase was significantly smaller, there was a further increase of HSP70 in the 2nd phase (60 +/- 14 etag). At the end of the training, HSP70 decreased in both groups. Thus, HSP70 response to training seems to be dependent upon exercise intensity.

  13. Effects of concurrent strength and endurance training on genes related to myostatin signaling pathway and muscle fiber responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Eduardo O; Tricoli, Valmor; Aoki, Marcelo S; Roschel, Hamilton; Brum, Patrícia C; Bacurau, Aline V N; Silva-Batista, Carla; Wilson, Jacob M; Neves, Manoel; Soares, Antonio G; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Concurrent training (CT) seems to impair training-induced muscle hypertrophy. This study compared the effects of CT, strength training (ST) and interval training (IT) on the muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) response, and on the expression of selected genes involved in the myostatin (MSTN) signaling mRNA levels. Thirty-seven physically active men were randomly divided into 4 groups: CT (n = 11), ST (n = 11), IT (n = 8), and control group (C) (n = 7) and underwent an 8-week training period. Vastus lateralis biopsy muscle samples were obtained at baseline and 48 hours after the last training session. Muscle fiber CSA, selected genes expression, and maximum dynamic ST (1 repetition maximum) were evaluated before and after training. Type IIa and type I muscle fiber CSA increased from pre- to posttest only in the ST group (17.08 and 17.9%, respectively). The SMAD-7 gene expression significantly increased at the posttest in the ST (53.9%) and CT groups (39.3%). The MSTN and its regulatory genes ActIIb, FLST-3, FOXO-3a, and GASP-1 mRNA levels remained unchanged across time and groups. One repetition maximum increased from pre- to posttest in both the ST and CT groups (ST = 18.5%; CT = 17.6%). Our findings are suggestive that MSTN and their regulatory genes at transcript level cannot differentiate muscle fiber CSA responses between CT and ST regimens in humans.

  14. Time-course of changes in indirect markers of muscle damage responses following a 130-km cycling race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Rodrigues

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2016v18n3p322   The purpose of the present investigation was to identify the effects of a 130-km cycling race on indices of biochemical indirect markers of muscle damage and muscle soreness responses during a 72-hour recovery period. Fifteen endurance-trained male cyclists which were competing for more than 2 years and were involved in systematic training at least of 3 days/wk underwent a collection of indirect biochemical markers of muscle damage (CK, LDH, Myo and delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS, at five different moments of data collection: before (PRE and immediately after (POST a 130-km cycling race, and 24, 48, 72 hours following the cycling race. CK and LDH plasma concentrations significantly increased POST-race (p 0.05. A 130-km cycling race has a noteworty effect on indices of biochemical indirect markers of muscle damage and muscle soreness responses, indicating that 72 hour recovery period do not seems to be enough for long-distance cyclist, and reinforce the propositions of scientific literature about the need of a sufficient recovery period for cycling endurance athletes.

  15. Rhinovirus-mediated changes in airway smooth muscle responsiveness: induced autocrine role of interleukin-1beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakonarson, H; Carter, C; Maskeri, N; Hodinka, R; Grunstein, M M

    1999-07-01

    An important interplay exists between specific viral respiratory pathogens, most commonly rhinovirus (RV), and altered airway responsiveness in the development and exacerbations of asthma. Given that RV infection reportedly induces the release of various cytokines in different cell types and that the reported effects of RV on airway smooth muscle (ASM) responsiveness are highly comparable to those obtained in ASM exposed to the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1beta, this study examined whether RV (serotype 16)-mediated pertubations in ASM responsiveness are mechanistically coupled to altered induced expression and action of IL-1beta in RV-exposed isolated rabbit and human ASM tissue and cultured cells. Relative to control tissues, ASM inoculated with RV exhibited significantly increased maximal isometric contractility to ACh (P exposure; and 3) the latter effect of RV was inhibited in the presence of a monoclonal antibody to intercellular adhesion molecule-1, the endogenous receptor for most RV. Collectively, these observations provide new evidence demonstrating that "pro-asthmatic-like" pertubations in agonist responsiveness elicited in RV-exposed ASM are largely attributed to the induced autologous expression and autocrine action of IL-1beta in the virus-infected ASM.

  16. Stabilometric response during single-leg stance after lower limb muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. V. Bruniera

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study sought to analyze the effect of muscle fatigue induced by active isotonic resistance training at a moderate intensity by measuring the knee extension motion during the stabilometric response in a single-leg stance among healthy university students who perform resistance training on a regular basis. METHOD: Eleven healthy university students were subjected to a one-repetition maximum (1RM test. In addition, stabilometric assessment was performed before and after the intervention and consisted of a muscle fatiguing protocol, in which knee extension was selected as the fatiguing task. The Shapiro-Wilk test was used to investigate the normality of the data, and the Wilcoxon test was used to compare the stabilometric parameters before and after induction of muscle fatigue, at a significance level of p≤0.05. Descriptive statistics were used in the analysis of the volunteers' age, height, body mass, and body mass index (BMI. RESULTS: The sample population was 23.1±2.7 years of age, averaged 1.79.2±0.07 m in height and 75.6±8.0 Kg in weight, and had a BMI of 23.27±3.71 Kg.m-2. The volunteers performed exercises 3.36±1.12 days/week and achieved a load of 124.54±22.07 Kg on 1RM and 74.72±13.24 Kg on 60% 1RM. The center of pressure (CoP oscillation on the mediolateral plane before and after fatigue induction was 2.89±0.89 mm and 4.09±0.59 mm, respectively, while the corresponding values on the anteroposterior plane were 2.5±2.2 mm and 4.09±2.26 mm, respectively. The CoP oscillation amplitude on the anteroposterior and mediolateral planes exhibited a significant difference before and after fatigue induction (p=0.04 and p=0.05, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that muscle fatigue affects postural control, particularly with the mediolateral and anteroposterior CoP excursion.

  17. Freeze-responsive regulation of MEF2 proteins and downstream gene networks in muscles of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Oscar A; Hadj-Moussa, Hanane; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-07-01

    The wood frog survives frigid North American winters by retreating into a state of suspended animation characterized by the freezing of up to 65% of total body water as extracellular ice and displaying no heartbeat, breathing, brain activity, or movement. Physiological and biochemical adaptations are in place to facilitate global metabolic depression and protect against the consequences of whole body freezing. This study examined the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factor family, proteins responsible for coordinating selective gene expression of a myriad of cellular functions from muscle development and remodelling to various stress responses. Immunoblotting, subcellular localization, and RT-PCR were used to analyze the regulation of MEF2A and MEF2C transcription factors and selected downstream targets under their control at transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels in skeletal and cardiac muscles from control, frozen and thawed frogs. Both MEF2A/C proteins were freeze-responsive in skeletal muscle, displaying increases of 1.7-2 fold for phosphorylated MEF2A Thr312 and MEF2C Thr300 during freezing with an enrichment of nuclear phosphorylated MEF2 proteins (by 1.7-2.1 fold) observed as early as 4h post-freezing. Despite the reduced response of total and phosphorylated MEF2A/C protein levels observed in cardiac muscle, the MEF2 downstream gene targets (glucose transporter-4, calreticulin, and creatine kinase brain and muscle isozymes) displayed similar increases in transcript levels (1.7-4.8 fold) after 24h freezing in both muscle types. This study describes a novel freeze-responsive function for MEF2 transcription factors and further elaborates our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying natural freeze tolerance. This novel freeze-responsive regulation suggests a role for MEF2s and downstream genes in cryoprotectant glucose distribution, calcium homeostasis, and maintenance of energy reserves vital for successful

  18. Driving corrugated donut rotors with Laguerre-Gauss beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Vincent L Y; Asavei, Theodor; Stilgoe, Alexander B; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2014-08-11

    Tightly-focused laser beams that carry angular momentum have been used to trap and rotate microrotors. In particular, a Laguerre-Gauss mode laser beam can be used to transfer its orbital angular momentum to drive microrotors. We increase the torque efficiency by a factor of about 2 by designing the rotor such that its geometry is compatible with the driving beam, when driving the rotation with the optimum beam, rather than beams of higher or lower orbital angular momentum. Based on Floquet's theorem, the order of discrete rotational symmetry of the rotor can be made to couple with the azimuthal mode of the Laguerre-Gauss beam. We design corrugated donut rotors, that have a flat disc-like profile, with the help of the discrete dipole approximation and the T-matrix methods in parallel with experimental demonstrations of stable trapping and torque measurement. We produce and test such a rotor using two-photon photopolymerization. With a rotor that has 8-fold discrete rotational symmetry, an outer radius of 1.85 μm and a hollow core radius of 0.5 μm, we were able to transfer approximately 0.3 h̄ per photon of the orbital angular momentum from an LG04 beam.

  19. Corrugated quantum well infrared photodetectors for far infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwong-Kit; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Forrai, David; Sun, Jason; Endres, Darrel

    2011-06-01

    We have extended our investigation of corrugated quantum well infrared photodetector focal plane arrays (FPAs) into the far infrared regime. Specifically, we are developing the detectors for the thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) used in the Landsat Data Continuity Mission. To maintain a low dark current, we adopted a low doping density of 0.6×1018 cm-3 and a bound-to-bound state detector. The internal absorption quantum efficiency (QE) is calculated to be 25.4%. With a pixel fill factor of 80% and a substrate transmission of 70.9%, the external QE is 14.4%. To yield the theoretical conversion efficiency (CE), the photoconductive gain was measured and is 0.25 at 5 V, from which CE is predicted to be 3.6%. This value is in agreement with the 3.5% from the FPA measurement. Meanwhile, the dark current is measured to be 2.1×10-6 A/cm2 at 43 K. For regular infrared imaging above 8 μm, the FPA will have an noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 16 mK at 2 ms integration time in the presence of 260 read noise electrons. The highest operability of the tested FPAs is 99.967%. With the CE agreement, we project the FPA performance in the far infrared regime up to 30 μm cutoff.

  20. Neuroticism modifies psychophysiological responses to fearful films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Reynaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroticism is a personality component frequently found in anxious and depressive psychiatric disorders. The influence of neuroticism on negative emotions could be due to its action on stimuli related to fear and sadness, but this remains debated. Our goal was thus to better understand the impact of neuroticism through verbal and physiological assessment in response to stimuli inducing fear and sadness as compared to another negative emotion (disgust. METHODS: Fifteen low neurotic and 18 high neurotic subjects were assessed on an emotional attending task by using film excerpts inducing fear, disgust, and sadness. We recorded skin conductance response (SCR and corrugator muscle activity (frowning as indices of emotional expression. RESULTS: SCR was larger in high neurotic subjects than in low neurotics for fear relative to sadness and disgust. Moreover, corrugator activity and SCR were larger in high than in low neurotic subjects when fear was induced. CONCLUSION: After decades of evidence that individuals higher in neuroticism experience more intense emotional reactions to even minor stressors, our results indicate that they show greater SCR and expressive reactivity specifically to stimuli evoking fear rather than to those inducing sadness or disgust. Fear processing seems mainly under the influence of neuroticism. This modulation of autonomic activity by neurotics in response to threat/fear may explain their increased vulnerability to anxious psychopathologies such as PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder.

  1. Neuroticism modifies psychophysiological responses to fearful films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Emmanuelle; El Khoury-Malhame, Myriam; Rossier, Jérôme; Blin, Olivier; Khalfa, Stéphanie

    2012-01-01

    Neuroticism is a personality component frequently found in anxious and depressive psychiatric disorders. The influence of neuroticism on negative emotions could be due to its action on stimuli related to fear and sadness, but this remains debated. Our goal was thus to better understand the impact of neuroticism through verbal and physiological assessment in response to stimuli inducing fear and sadness as compared to another negative emotion (disgust). Fifteen low neurotic and 18 high neurotic subjects were assessed on an emotional attending task by using film excerpts inducing fear, disgust, and sadness. We recorded skin conductance response (SCR) and corrugator muscle activity (frowning) as indices of emotional expression. SCR was larger in high neurotic subjects than in low neurotics for fear relative to sadness and disgust. Moreover, corrugator activity and SCR were larger in high than in low neurotic subjects when fear was induced. After decades of evidence that individuals higher in neuroticism experience more intense emotional reactions to even minor stressors, our results indicate that they show greater SCR and expressive reactivity specifically to stimuli evoking fear rather than to those inducing sadness or disgust. Fear processing seems mainly under the influence of neuroticism. This modulation of autonomic activity by neurotics in response to threat/fear may explain their increased vulnerability to anxious psychopathologies such as PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder).

  2. Contributions of white and brown adipose tissues and skeletal muscles to acute cold-induced metabolic responses in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, Denis P; Labbé, Sébastien M; Phoenix, Serge; Guérin, Brigitte; Turcotte, Éric E; Richard, Denis; Carpentier, André C; Haman, François

    2015-02-01

    Both brown adipose tissue (BAT) and skeletal muscle activation contribute to the metabolic response of acute cold exposure in healthy men even under minimal shivering. Activation of adipose tissue intracellular lipolysis is associated with BAT metabolic response upon acute cold exposure in healthy men. Although BAT glucose uptake per volume of tissue is important, the bulk of glucose turnover during cold exposure is mediated by skeletal muscle metabolic activation even when shivering is minimized. Cold exposure stimulates the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), triggering the activation of cold-defence responses and mobilizing substrates to fuel the thermogenic processes. Although these processes have been investigated independently, the physiological interaction and coordinated contribution of the tissues involved in producing heat or mobilizing substrates has never been investigated in humans. Using [U-(13)C]-palmitate and [3-(3)H]-glucose tracer methodologies coupled with positron emission tomography using (11)C-acetate and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose, we examined the relationship between whole body sympathetically induced white adipose tissue (WAT) lipolysis and brown adipose tissue (BAT) metabolism and mapped the skeletal muscle shivering and metabolic activation pattern during a mild, acute cold exposure designed to minimize shivering response in 12 lean healthy men. Cold-induced increase in whole-body oxygen consumption was not independently associated with BAT volume of activity, BAT oxidative metabolism, or muscle metabolism or shivering intensity, but depended on the sum of responses of these two metabolic tissues. Cold-induced increase in non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) appearance rate was strongly associated with the volume of metabolically active BAT (r = 0.80, P = 0.005), total BAT oxidative metabolism (r = 0.70, P = 0.004) and BAT glucose uptake (r = 0.80, P = 0.005), but not muscle glucose metabolism. The total glucose uptake was more than one order of

  3. Decrease in intramuscular lipid droplets and translocation of HSL in response to muscle contraction and epinephrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Donsmark, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    A better understanding of skeletal muscle lipid metabolism is needed to identify the molecular mechanisms relating intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) to muscle metabolism and insulin sensitivity. An increasing number of proteins have been reported to be associated with intracellular triglyceride (...

  4. Ultrasonic Thickness of Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles in Response to Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction in women with stress incontinency with and without Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Dehghan-Manshadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Urinary Incontinence (UI as a common lower urinary tract dysfunction , results from Pelvic Floor Muscle's (PFM underactivity.Because of co-activation of PFM and the Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles (LAWM, this study was aimed to investigate the changes in the ultrasonic thickness of the LAWM in response to PFM contraction in stress urinary incontinent (SUIwomen with and without Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. Materials & Methods: A total of 28 women, 10 healthy, 18 SUI with and without CLBP (9 in each group participated in this quasi-experimental study. After collecting demographic information and assessment of PFM function, changes in ultrasonic thickness of right LAWM were measured in response to PFM contraction. One way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson’s correlation tests were performed to analyze the data. Values of P0.05. There was a significant increase in thickness of the Traversus Abdominis Muscle (TrA during PFM contraction in control group comparing experimental groups (P=0.03. Women in control group showed significantly higher PFM strength and more intravaginal pressure (P=0.001. Conclusion: Changes in ultrasonic thickness of the TrA during PFM contraction revealed disturbance of co-activation of the LAWM and the PFM in women with and without SUI CLBP.

  5. Origin of directionally tuned responses in lower limb muscles to unpredictable upper limb disturbances

    OpenAIRE

    Forghani, Ali; Milner, Theodore E.

    2017-01-01

    Unpredictable forces which perturb balance are frequently applied to the body through interaction between the upper limb and the environment. Lower limb muscles respond rapidly to these postural disturbances in a highly specific manner. We have shown that the muscle activation patterns of lower limb muscles are organized in a direction specific manner which changes with lower limb stability. Ankle muscles change their activity within 80 ms of the onset of a force perturbation applied to the h...

  6. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Chounghun; Lim, Wonchung

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function (?Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle? [1], ?Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle? [2]). However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mit...

  7. Muscles of the trunk and pelvis are responsive to testosterone administration: data from testosterone dose-response study in young healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, J; Arver, S; Pencina, K M; Martling, A; Blomqvist, L; Buchli, C; Li, Z; Gagliano-Jucá, T; Travison, T G; Huang, G; Storer, T W; Bhasin, S; Basaria, S

    2018-01-01

    Testosterone dose-dependently increases appendicular muscle mass. However, the effects of testosterone administration on the core muscles of the trunk and the pelvis have not been evaluated. The present study evaluated the effects of testosterone administration on truncal and pelvic muscles in a dose-response trial. Participants were young healthy men aged 18-50 years participating in the 5α-Reductase (5aR) Trial. All participants received monthly injections of 7.5 mg leuprolide acetate to suppress endogenous testosterone production and weekly injections of 50, 125, 300, or 600 mg of testosterone enanthate and were randomized to receive either 2.5 mg dutasteride (5aR inhibitor) or placebo daily for 20 weeks. Muscles of the trunk and the pelvis were measured at baseline and the end of treatment using 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. The dose effect of testosterone on changes in the psoas major muscle area was the primary outcome; secondary outcomes included changes in paraspinal, abdominal, pelvic floor, ischiocavernosus, and obturator internus muscles. The association between changes in testosterone levels and muscle area was also assessed. Testosterone dose-dependently increased areas of all truncal and pelvic muscles. The estimated change (95% confidence interval) of muscle area increase per 100 mg of testosterone enanthate dosage increase was 0.622 cm2 (0.394, 0.850) for psoas; 1.789 cm2 (1.317, 2.261) for paraspinal muscles, 2.530 cm2 (1.627, 3.434) for total abdominal muscles, 0.455 cm2 (0.233, 0.678) for obturator internus, and 0.082 cm2 (0.003, 0.045) for ischiocavernosus; the increase in these volumes was significantly associated with the changes in on-treatment total and free serum testosterone concentrations. In conclusion, core muscles of the trunk and pelvis are responsive to testosterone administration. Future trials should evaluate the potential role of testosterone administration in frail men who are predisposed to falls and men with

  8. Back muscle response to sudden trunk loading can be modified by training among healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Essendrop, Morten; Skotte, Jørgen H; Jørgensen, Kurt; Schibye, Bente; Fallentin, Nils

    2007-06-01

    Experimental study of the effect of physical training on the reaction to sudden back loading. To investigate the effect and sustainability of "on the job training" on the reaction to sudden back loading among employees at a geriatric ward. Available data suggest that a delayed muscle reflex response to sudden trunk loading may increase the risk of low back injuries. We have previously shown that training may alter the response to sudden trunk loading in healthy subjects and decrease the time elapsed until stopping of the forward movement of the trunk (stopping time). Data on the possibilities of a training-induced improvement in the reflex response among workers exposed to sudden trunk loading on the job are, however, nonexistent, and there is no evidence of long-term benefits, i.e., the sustainability of a positive training effect. The study included 23 participants and 14 controls. All were healthy without prior history of low back pain (LBP). The training group participated in a total of 18 training sessions during a 9-week period. The training focused on reactions to a variety of sudden trunk loadings. Before and after the training intervention and at a 1-year follow-up, all subjects were tested for their reaction to expected and unexpected sudden trunk loading by applying a horizontal force of 58 N to the upper back of the subjects and measuring the electromyographic (EMG) response from the erector spinae muscles. In the training group, the stopping time and the distance moved after unexpected sudden trunk loading decreased significantly (13%-19%, P = 0.02). The improved stopping time was associated with marked changes in the time-wise distribution of the EMG signal after training. In addition, the follow-up study showed a high sustainability of the training effect. The results demonstrated a training-induced improvement of the response to sudden trunk loading that may be beneficial in workers, such as nurses, who are exposed to sudden trunk perturbations

  9. Aging related ER stress is not responsible for anabolic resistance in mouse skeletal muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalil, S.; Pierre, N.; Bakker, A.D.; Manders, R.J.; Pletsers, A.; Francaux, M.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Jaspers, R.T.; Deldique, L.

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic resistance reflects the inability of skeletal muscle to maintain protein mass by appropriate stimulation of protein synthesis. We hypothesized that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to anabolic resistance in skeletal muscle with aging. Muscles were isolated from adult (8 mo) and

  10. On the Fully-Developed Heat Transfer Enhancing Flow Field in Sinusoidally, Spirally Corrugated Tubes Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hærvig, Jakob; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2017-01-01

    in the ranges 0–0.16 and 0–2.0 respectively. The 3D Unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) equations combined with the transition SST turbulence model are solved using the finite volume method to obtain the fully-developed flow field in a repeatable section of the heat exchangers at a constant wall......A numerical study has been carried out to investigate heat transfer enhancing flow field in 28 geometrically different sinusoidally, spirally corrugated tubes. To vary the corrugation, the height of corrugation e/D and the length between two successive corrugated sections p/D are varied...

  11. Heat transfer enhancement and pumping power optimization using CuO-water nanofluid through rectangular corrugated pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehin, Musfequs; Ehsan, Mohammad Monjurul; Islam, A. K. M. Sadrul

    2017-06-01

    Heat transfer enhancement by corrugation in fluid domain is a popular method. The rate of improvement is more when it is used highly thermal conductive fluid as heating or cooling medium. In this present study, heat transfer augmentation was investigated numerically by implementing corrugation in the fluid domain and nanofluid as the base fluid in the turbulent forced convection regime. Finite volume method (FVM) was applied to solve the continuity, momentum and energy equations. All the numerical simulations were considered for single phase flow. A rectangle corrugated pipe with 5000 W/m2 constant heat flux subjected to the corrugated wall was considered as the fluid domain. In the range of Reynolds number 15000 to 40000, thermo-physical and hydrodynamic behavior was investigated by using CuO-water nanofluid from 1% to 5% volume fraction as the base fluid through the corrugated fluid domain. Corrugation justification was performed by changing the amplitude of the corrugation and the corrugation wave length for obtaining the increased heat transfer rate with minimum pumping power. For using CuO-water nanofluid, augmentation was also found more in the rectangle corrugated pipe both in heat transfer and pumping power requirement with the increase of Reynolds number and the volume fraction of nanofluid. For the increased pumping power, optimization of pumping power by using nanofluid was also performed for economic finding.

  12. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  13. Graphene on Ni(111): Electronic Corrugation and Dynamics from Helium Atom Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamtögl, Anton; Bahn, Emanuel; Zhu, Jianding; Fouquet, Peter; Ellis, John; Allison, William

    2015-11-19

    Using helium atom scattering, we have studied the structure and dynamics of a graphene layer prepared in situ on a Ni(111) surface. Graphene/Ni(111) exhibits a helium reflectivity of ∼20% for a thermal helium atom beam and a particularly small surface electron density corrugation ((0.06 ± 0.02) Å peak to peak height). The Debye-Waller attenuation of the elastic diffraction peaks of graphene/Ni(111) and Ni(111) was measured at surface temperatures between 150 and 740 K. A surface Debye temperature of θD = (784 ± 14) K is determined for the graphene/Ni(111) system and θD = (388 ± 7) K for Ni(111), suggesting that the interlayer interaction between graphene and the Ni substrate is intermediary between those for strongly interacting systems like graphene/Ru(0001) and weakly interacting systems like graphene/Pt(111). In addition we present measurements of low frequency surface phonon modes on graphene/Ni(111) where the phonon modes of the Ni(111) substrate can be clearly observed. The similarity of these findings with the graphene/Ru(0001) system indicates that the bonding of graphene to a metal substrate alters the dynamic properties of the graphene surface strongly and is responsible for the high helium reflectivity of these systems.

  14. HDAC6 contributes to pathological responses of heart and skeletal muscle to chronic angiotensin-II signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos-Davies, Kimberly M; Ferguson, Bradley S; Cavasin, Maria A; Mahaffey, Jennifer H; Williams, Sarah M; Spiltoir, Jessica I; Schuetze, Katherine B; Horn, Todd R; Chen, Bo; Ferrara, Claudia; Scellini, Beatrice; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado; Jeong, Mark Y; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2014-07-15

    Little is known about the function of the cytoplasmic histone deacetylase HDAC6 in striated muscle. Here, we addressed the role of HDAC6 in cardiac and skeletal muscle remodeling induced by the peptide hormone angiotensin II (ANG II), which plays a central role in blood pressure control, heart failure, and associated skeletal muscle wasting. Comparable with wild-type (WT) mice, HDAC6 null mice developed cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in response to ANG II. However, whereas WT mice developed systolic dysfunction upon treatment with ANG II, cardiac function was maintained in HDAC6 null mice treated with ANG II for up to 8 wk. The cardioprotective effect of HDAC6 deletion was mimicked in WT mice treated with the small molecule HDAC6 inhibitor tubastatin A. HDAC6 null mice also exhibited improved left ventricular function in the setting of pressure overload mediated by transverse aortic constriction. HDAC6 inhibition appeared to preserve systolic function, in part, by enhancing cooperativity of myofibrillar force generation. Finally, we show that HDAC6 null mice are resistant to skeletal muscle wasting mediated by chronic ANG-II signaling. These findings define novel roles for HDAC6 in striated muscle and suggest potential for HDAC6-selective inhibitors for the treatment of cardiac dysfunction and muscle wasting in patients with heart failure. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Polar bears experience skeletal muscle atrophy in response to food deprivation and reduced activity in winter and summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, John P.; Harlow, Henry J.; Durner, George M.; Regehr, Eric V.; Rourke, Bryan C.; Robles, Manuel; Amstrup, Steven C.; Ben-David, Merav

    2017-01-01

    When reducing activity and using stored energy during seasonal food shortages, animals risk degradation of skeletal muscles, although some species avoid or minimize the resulting atrophy while experiencing these conditions during hibernation. Polar bears may be food deprived and relatively inactive during winter (when pregnant females hibernate and hunting success declines for other demographic groups) as well as summer (when sea ice retreats from key foraging habitats). We investigated muscle atrophy in samples of biceps femoris collected from free-ranging polar bears in the Southern Beaufort Sea (SBS) throughout their annual cycle. Atrophy was most pronounced in April–May as a result of food deprivation during the previous winter, with muscles exhibiting reduced protein concentration, increased water content, and lower creatine kinase mRNA. These animals increased feeding and activity in spring (when seal prey becomes more available), initiating a period of muscle recovery. During the following ice melt of late summer, ~30% of SBS bears abandon retreating sea ice for land; in August, these ‘shore’ bears exhibited no muscle atrophy, indicating that they had fully recovered from winter food deprivation. These individuals subsequently scavenged whale carcasses deposited by humans and by October, had retained good muscle condition. In contrast, ~70% of SBS bears follow the ice north in late summer, into deep water with less prey. These ‘ice’ bears fast; by October, they exhibited muscle protein loss and rapid changes in myosin heavy-chain isoforms in response to reduced activity. These findings indicate that, unlike other bears during winter hibernation, polar bears without food in summer cannot mitigate atrophy. Consequently, prolonged summer fasting resulting from climate change-induced ice loss creates a risk of greater muscle atrophy and reduced abilities to travel and hunt.

  16. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ae [Department of Pharmacology, Aging-Associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Aging-Associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  17. Electrostimulation, response of the pelvic floor muscles, and urinary incontinence in elderly patients post prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Zaidan

    Full Text Available Objective to investigate the response of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM, and urinary incontinence (UI, in patients having undergone a prostatectomy, after treatment using electrical stimulation. Materials and methods this observational study was conducted in an outpatient urogynecologic physical therapy clinic of Hospital dos Servidores in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from August to September 2012. Ten patients (aged, 64 ± 7 years with urinary incontinence resulting from radical prostatectomy, having received surgery within six months of study entry, without urinary infection, and without metallic implants underwent electrical stimulation of the PFM, while in lateral decubitus position with knees and hips flexed. The parameters used were 65 Hz frequency, pulse width of 500 µs, biphasic current, intensity according to the tolerance level reported by the patient, perineal contraction time of four seconds, and rest time of eight seconds for 20 minutes twice a week, totaling 16 sessions of electrical stimulation with active-assisted contraction. Patients were evaluated before and after electrical stimulation through physical therapy evaluation of urinary incontinence, by being asked about the number of disposable guards used daily, using a visual analogue scale (VAS to measure how the UI interfered with activities of daily living, and by electromyographic biofeedback to measure the work of the PFM. Data were analyzed using Student’s paired t-tests and a significance level of 0.05. Results after 16 sessions of electrical stimulation, the electromyographic biofeedback evaluation showed a significant increase in muscle strength of 10.73 ± 8.64 to 17.16 ± 9.00 µV (t = -3.39, P = 0.008, a significant decrease in the number of diapers used before and after treatment (3.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 1.5, respectively; t = 5.16, P = 0.0006, and a significant decrease in the interference of urinary incontinence on daily activities of 9.6 ± 0.5 to 4.0 ± 3.8 (t = 5

  18. Impaired autophagy, chaperone expression, and protein synthesis in response to critical illness interventions in porcine skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banduseela, Varuna C; Chen, Yi-Wen; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Norman, Holly S; Aare, Sudhakar; Radell, Peter; Eriksson, Lars I; Hoffman, Eric P; Larsson, Lars

    2013-06-17

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is characterized by a preferential loss of the motor protein myosin, muscle wasting, and impaired muscle function in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. CIM is associated with severe morbidity and mortality and has a significant negative socioeconomic effect. Neuromuscular blocking agents, corticosteroids, sepsis, mechanical ventilation, and immobilization have been implicated as important risk factors, but the causal relationship between CIM and the risk factors has not been established. A porcine ICU model has been used to determine the immediate molecular and cellular cascades that may contribute to the pathogenesis prior to myosin loss and extensive muscle wasting. Expression profiles have been compared between pigs exposed to the ICU interventions, i.e., mechanically ventilated, sedated, and immobilized for 5 days, with pigs exposed to critical illness interventions, i.e., neuromuscular blocking agents, corticosteroids, and induced sepsis in addition to the ICU interventions for 5 days. Impaired autophagy as well as impaired chaperone expression and protein synthesis were observed in the skeletal muscle in response to critical illness interventions. A novel finding in this study is impaired core autophagy machinery in response to critical illness interventions, which when in concert with downregulated chaperone expression and protein synthesis may collectively affect the proteostasis in skeletal muscle and may exacerbate the disease progression in CIM.

  19. Exercise training and work task induced metabolic and stress-related mRNA and protein responses in myalgic muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Zebis, Mette K; Kiilerich, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to assess mRNA and/or protein levels of heat shock proteins, cytokines, growth regulating, and metabolic proteins in myalgic muscle at rest and in response to work tasks and prolonged exercise training. A randomized controlled trial included 28 females with trapezius myalgia and 16 he...

  20. Heat transfer and fluid flow behaviors in a five-start spiral corrugated tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promthaisong, Pitak; Jedsadaratanachai, Withada; Chuwattanakul, Varesa; Eiamsa-ard, Smith

    2017-08-01

    This paper presented a numerical investigation on turbulent periodic flow, heat transfer, pressure loss and thermal enhancement factor in a 3D five-start spiral corrugated tube. Air was used as the working fluids through the tube for Reynolds numbers of about 5000-20,000. In the current studied, the five-start spiral corrugated tube with six relative pitch ratios (p/D, PR=1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.5) with constant depth ratio (e/D, DR=0.06). The numerical results reveal that the five-start spiral corrugated tube can generated a swirl flow, main swirl flow and five-secondary swirl flow. This behavior lead to the major change of temperature in transverse plane, reduced thermal layer thickness and enhanced heat transfer on the tube wall. The five-start spiral corrugated tube in range investigated provided the heat transfer rate and friction factor up to 2.02 and 6.12 times, respectively, over the straight circular tube. The thermal enhancement factor of the five-start spiral corrugated tube in the range of 0.89-1.16 where its maximum found as the optimum point is at PR=2.0.

  1. Fracture Behaviours in Compression-loaded Triangular Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid N.Z.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure modes occurring in sandwich panels based on the corrugations of aluminium alloy, carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP and glass fibre-reinforced plastic (GFRP are analysed in this work. The fracture behaviour of these sandwich panels under compressive stresses is determined through a series of uniform lateral compression performed on samples with different cell wall thicknesses. Compression test on the corrugated-core sandwich panels were conducted using an Instron series 4505 testing machine. The post-failure examinations of the corrugated-core in different cell wall thickness were conducted using optical microscope. Load-displacement graphs of aluminium alloy, GFRP and CFRP specimens were plotted to show progressive damage development with five unit cells. Four modes of failure were described in the results: buckling, hinges, delamination and debonding. Each of these failure modes may dominate under different cell wall thickness or loading condition, and they may act in combination. The results indicate that thicker composites corrugated-core panels tend can recover more stress and retain more stiffness. This analysis provides a valuable insight into the mechanical behaviour of corrugated-core sandwich panels for use in lightweight engineering applications.

  2. Hollow fiber membranes with different external corrugated surfaces for desalination by membrane distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Loreto; García-Payo, Carmen; Khayet, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) hollow fiber membranes were prepared using the phase inversion spinning technique under a wet gap mode. Different corrugated outer surfaces were obtained by means of a micro-engineered spinneret, spraying the external coagulant on the nascent fiber along gap, and different spinning parameters, namely, the gap distance and the external coagulant flow rate. A quantitative evaluation of the corrugation size and shape was carried out by electron scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The effect of the corrugation size and shape on the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) performance has been studied. The corrugated outer surface acted as micro-turbulence promoters mitigating the temperature polarization effect and enhanced the external effective surface area for condensation. Both factors improved the DCMD permeability of the hollow fiber membranes. However, corrugations with V-shaped valleys depths greater than about 30 μm did not always improve the DCMD permeate flux. It was found that the membrane prepared with the spray wetting mode exhibited the best desalination performance. The salt rejection factor of all prepared hollow fiber membranes was greater than 99.9% and the highest DCMD permeate flux of this study was greater than those reported so far for the PVDF-HFP hollow fiber membranes.

  3. Effects of load on the acute response of muscles proximal and distal to blood flow restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, Matthew B; Mouser, J Grant; Buckner, Samuel L; Dankel, Scott J; Mattocks, Kevin T; Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2018-01-18

    To determine the effects of load and blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscular responses, we asked 12 participants to perform chest presses under four different conditions [30/0, 30/40, 50/0, and 50/40, presented as percentage one-repetition maximum (1RM)/percentage arterial occlusion pressure (AOP)]. Muscle thickness increased pre- to post-exercise [chest: mean 0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21, 0.37 cm; triceps: mean 0.44, 95% CI 0.34, 0.54 cm], remaining elevated for 15 min post-exercise. Electromyography amplitude was greater with 50% 1RM and increased over time for the first three repetitions of each set of chest presses. The last three repetitions differed across time only. AOP increased from pre- to post-exercise, augmented by BFR [30/0: mean 31, 95% CI 18, 44 mmHg; 30/40: mean 39, 95% CI 28, 50 mmHg; 50/0: mean 32, 95% CI 23, 41 mmHg; 50/40: mean 46, 95% CI 32, 59 mmHg). Tranquility decreased and physical exhaustion increased from the pre- to post-condition, with both parameters returning to the baseline 15 min post-exercise level. In conclusion, load and BFR do not elicit meaningful differences in the acute response of chest press exercise taken to failure.

  4. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chounghun; Lim, Wonchung

    2016-06-01

    Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function ("Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle" [1], "Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle" [2]). However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mitochondrial function in aged mice, male C57BL/6 mice at age 24 months were randomly assigned to 3 groups: non-exercise (NE), low-intensity (LE) and high-intensity treadmill exercise group (HE). Mitochondrial complex activity and respiration were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function in mouse skeletal muscle. The data described here are related to the research article entitled "Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice" [3].

  5. Peripheral muscle abnormalities in cystic fibrosis: Etiology, clinical implications and response to therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruet, Mathieu; Troosters, Thierry; Verges, Samuel

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral muscle dysfunction is an important systemic consequence of cystic fibrosis (CF) with major clinical implications, such as exercise intolerance and reduced quality of life. Evidence is now accumulating that lack of physical activity is unlikely to be the sole explanation for peripheral muscle dysfunction of patients with CF. Particularly, the demonstration of CFTR expression in both murine and human skeletal muscle suggests the potential implication of intrinsic CF-related factors. By combining data from both human and animal models, this review describes CF peripheral muscle abnormalities and critically reviews the advances in understanding the impact of the underlying mechanisms. We also describe how peripheral muscles respond to intervention in this population. Methodological concerns and directions for future research are also considered. Peripheral muscle atrophy and weakness is prevalent in patients with CF and associated with reduced aerobic and anaerobic performances. Further investigations are however needed to confirm alterations in peripheral muscle endurance and fatigability. Physical inactivity is probably the major contributor of peripheral muscle abnormalities in patients with CF with mild-to-moderate phenotypes. However, the relative influence of additional factors (e.g. inflammation, metabolic abnormalities) probably increases with disease severity making specific and individualized interventions necessary in severe patients. Exercise training is the most effective intervention to address peripheral muscle dysfunction but other strategies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation and nutritional or hormonal supplementation may be of interest in some patients. Investigations are needed to determine whether pharmacological interventions such as CFTR modulators are effective to address this condition. To better elucidate the etiology of peripheral muscle dysfunction in CF, future studies should combine measurements at the cellular level

  6. Study of the response of the penile corporal tissue and cavernosus muscles to micturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Sibai Olfat

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reaction of the corpora cavernosa (CC, the corpus spongiosum (CS, the bulbocavernosus (BCM and ischiocavernosus (ICM muscles to passage of urine through the urethra during micturition is not known. We investigated the hypothesis that the passage of urine through the urethra stimulates the corporal tissue and cavernosus muscles. Methods In 30 healthy men (mean age 42.8 ± 11.7 years, the electromyographic activity (EMG of the CC, CS, BCM, and ICM were recorded before and during micturition, and on interruption of and straining during micturition. These tests were repeated after individual anesthetization of urethra, corporal tissue, and cavernosus muscles. Results During micturition, the slow wave variables (frequency, amplitude, conduction velocity of the CC and CS decreased while the motor unit action potentials of the BCM and ICM increased; these EMG changes were mild and returned to the basal values on interruption or termination of micturition. Micturition after individual anesthetization of urethra, corporal tissue and cavernosal muscles did not effect significant EMG changes in these structures, while saline administration produced changes similar to those occurring before saline administration. Conclusion The decrease of sinusoidal and increase of cavernosus muscles' EMG activity during micturition apparently denotes sinusoidal relaxation and cavernosus muscles contraction. Sinusoidal muscle relaxation and cavernosus muscles contraction upon micturition are suggested to be mediated through a 'urethro-corporocavernosal reflex'. These sinusoidal and cavernosus muscle changes appear to produce a mild degree of penile tumescence and stretch which might assist in urinary flow during micturition.

  7. Comparison of blood pressure and heart rate responses to isometric exercise and passive muscle stretch in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, K; Selle, K; Leyk, D; Essfeld, D

    1995-01-01

    The responses of mean arterial blood pressure (BPa) and heart rate (fc) to isometric contraction and passive stretch were compared in seven healthy male subjects at identical external forces. They were investigated in the sitting position with the hip and knee joint flexed to 90 degrees. Each subject performed two tests, separated by a day, in which the stimuli were applied in random order. After 5 min of rest they performed either 10-min static plantar flexion of one calf (200 N) or 10 min of passive calf muscle stretch at the same load. After 5-min rest, the second stimulus was applied for a further 10 min followed by 5-min rest. The second test was identical except for the sequence of the stimuli. The BPa was measured by a noninvasive and continuous method. Contraction of the vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius lateralis, and soleus muscles were determined by the myo-electric activity (electromyogram, EMG) by means of surface electrodes. The EMG activity of the vastus lateralis muscle remained at resting values throughout the experiments. Increases in EMG activity could only be detected for the triceps surae muscles during isometric contraction. During the initial 2 min of stimulation the BPa and fc responses to active contraction and passive stretch were comparable. Thereafter, both parameters showed significantly higher values during contraction. It was concluded that mechanical stress may have contributed to the early response of BPa during both passive stretch and voluntary contraction but that chemical stimuli were needed to maintain the peripheral cardiovascular drive.

  8. Hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Lee, Joshua F.; Berbert, Amanda; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for exercise intolerance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the present study sought to evaluate the hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in this cohort. In 25 HFrEF patients (64 ± 2 yr) and 17 healthy, age-matched control subjects (64 ± 2 yr), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and limb blood flow were examined during graded static-intermittent handgrip (HG) and dynamic single-leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise. During HG exercise, MAP increased similarly between groups. CO increased significantly (+1.3 ± 0.3 l/min) in the control group, but it remained unchanged across workloads in HFrEF patients. At 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), forearm blood flow was similar between groups, while HFrEF patients exhibited an attenuated increase at the two highest intensities compared with controls, with the greatest difference at the highest workload (352 ± 22 vs. 492 ± 48 ml/min, HFrEF vs. control, 45% MVC). During KE exercise, MAP and CO increased similarly across work rates between groups. However, HFrEF patients exhibited a diminished leg hyperemic response across all work rates, with the most substantial decrement at the highest intensity (1,842 ± 64 vs. 2,675 ± 81 ml/min; HFrEF vs. control, 15 W). Together, these findings indicate a marked attenuation in exercising limb perfusion attributable to impairments in peripheral vasodilatory capacity during both arm and leg exercise in patients with HFrEF, which likely plays a role in limiting exercise capacity in this patient population. PMID:25260608

  9. Oblique chain resonance of internal waves by three-dimensional seabed corrugations

    CERN Document Server

    Couston, L -A; Alam, M -R

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that the interaction of a low-mode internal wave with small oblique seabed corrugations can lead to a chain resonance of many other freely propagating internal waves with a broad range of wavenumbers and directions of propagation. The chain resonance results in a complex internal wave dynamics over the corrugated seabed that can lead to a significant redistribution of energy across the internal wave spectrum. In order to obtain a quantitative understanding of the energy transfer rates between the incident and resonated waves over the seabed topography, here we derive an equation for the evolution of the wave envelopes using multiple-scale analysis in the limit of small-amplitude corrugations. Strong energy transfers from the incident internal wave toward shorter internal waves are demonstrated for a broad range of incidence angles, and the theoretical predictions are compared favorably with direct simulations of the full Euler's equation. The key results show that: (i) a large number of distinct ...

  10. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeão; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-09-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels.1-4 Experimental studies usually involve expensive and sophisticated equipment that is out of reach of school laboratory facilities.3-6 In this paper we show how to investigate quantitatively the sounds produced by a flexible sound tube corrugated on the inside by using educational equipment readily available in school laboratories, such as the oscilloscope, the microphone, the anemometer, and the air pump. We show that it is possible for students to study the discontinuous spectrum of sounds produced by a flexible corrugated tube and go even further, computing the speed of sound in air with a simple experimental procedure.

  11. Characteristics of Linerboard and Corrugated Medium Paper Made from Durian Rinds Chemi-mechanical Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masrol Shaiful Rizal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been tremendous growth of interest in the utilization of non-wood based material to support the insufficient raw materials availability for the pulp and paper industry. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the characteristics of 120 gsm linerboard and corrugated medium paper made from unbeaten durian rinds chemi-mechanical (CMP pulp. The linerboard and corrugated medium paper were prepared and tested according to Malaysian Standards / International Organization for Standardization (MS ISO and Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI standard methods. Based on the burst index (2.03 kPa.m2/g, RCT (1.97 N.m2/g and CMT (129N, the linerboard and corrugated medium from CMP durian rind pulp have shown a good potential as an alternative raw material for papermaking and comparable with other types of wood and non-wood based papers as well as current commercial papers.

  12. Lifelong training preserves some redox-regulated adaptive responses after an acute exercise stimulus in aged human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, J N; Sakellariou, G K; Owens, D J; Murray, S; Waldron, S; Gregson, W; Fraser, W D; Burniston, J G; Iwanejko, L A; McArdle, A; Morton, J P; Jackson, M J; Close, G L

    2014-05-01

    Several redox-regulated responses to an acute exercise bout fail in aged animal skeletal muscle, including the ability to upregulate the expression of antioxidant defense enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs). These findings are generally derived from studies on sedentary rodent models and thus may be related to reduced physical activity and/or intraspecies differences as opposed to aging per se. This study, therefore, aimed to determine the influence of age and training status on the expression of HSPs, antioxidant enzymes, and NO synthase isoenzymes in quiescent and exercised human skeletal muscle. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from the vastus lateralis before and 3 days after an acute high-intensity-interval exercise bout in young trained, young untrained, old trained, and old untrained subjects. Levels of HSP72, PRX5, and eNOS were significantly higher in quiescent muscle of older compared with younger subjects, irrespective of training status. 3-NT levels were elevated in muscles of the old untrained but not the old trained state, suggesting that lifelong training may reduce age-related macromolecule damage. SOD1, CAT, and HSP27 levels were not significantly different between groups. HSP27 content was upregulated in all groups studied postexercise. HSP72 content was upregulated to a greater extent in muscle of trained compared with untrained subjects postexercise, irrespective of age. In contrast to every other group, old untrained subjects failed to upregulate CAT postexercise. Aging was associated with a failure to upregulate SOD2 and a downregulation of PRX5 in muscle postexercise, irrespective of training status. In conclusion, lifelong training is unable to fully prevent the progression toward a more stressed muscular state as evidenced by increased HSP72, PRX5, and eNOS protein levels in quiescent muscle. Moreover, lifelong training preserves some (e.g., CAT) but not all (e.g., SOD2, HSP72, PRX5) of the adaptive redox-regulated responses after an

  13. Leveraging corporate social responsibility to improve consumer safety of dietary supplements sold for weight loss and muscle building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anvita; Huerto, Ryan; Roberto, Christina A; Austin, S Bryn

    2017-03-01

    The potential dangers associated with dietary supplements sold for weight loss and muscle building are well documented and increasingly garnering the attention of the media, public, and government leaders. Public health professionals have an opportunity to improve population health in the context of dietary supplement use by translating scientific evidence into action. In this commentary, we discuss the potential to motivate corporate social responsibility (CSR) among manufacturers and retailers of dietary supplements sold for weight loss and muscle building. We examine levers available to public health professionals for generating voluntary corporate self-regulation by reviewing examples from successful CSR initiatives in other domains of public health and offering recommendations highlighting effective advocacy strategies. We encourage public health professionals to use one or multiple advocacy strategies to improve consumer protections for dietary supplements sold for weight loss and muscle building.

  14. Algesia and local responses induced by neurokinin A and substance P in human skin and temporal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Nielsen, L B; Jensen, K

    1989-01-01

    Neurokinin A (NKA), substance P (SP) and the two peptides combined (SP + NKA) were injected intracutaneously on the forearm and into the temporal muscle of healthy volunteers. Pain intensity, cutaneous wheal and flare responses and tenderness of the temporal muscle were quantitated. SP but not NKA...... induced cutaneous pain. This relates the algesic effect of SP to the specific N-terminal amino acid sequence of the peptide, not shared by NKA. NKA, however, potentiated the algesic effect of SP as SP + NKA induced a significantly prolonged cutaneous pain sensation. Both peptides induced wheals, but only...... SP induced flare. These results confirm previous studies relating wheal formation to the identical C-terminal amino acid sequence of the two peptides and flare reaction to the N-terminal part of SP. Injections into the temporal muscle did not cause pain or tenderness....

  15. A parametric study on the whistling of multiple side branch system as a model for corrugated pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakiboglu, G.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Tonon, D.; Willems, J.F.H.; Hirschberg, A.

    2010-01-01

    Corrugated pipes are widely used in industry due to their inherent character of being globally flexible and locally rigid. Under certain conditions flow through the corrugated pipes causes severe noise and vibration problems. Thus, to understand the phenomenon and parameters that play role is a real

  16. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  17. Bradykinin does not acutely sensitize the reflex pressor response during hindlimb skeletal muscle stretch in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Korynne S; Smith, Joshua R; Esau, Peter J; Kempf, Evan A; Hopkins, Tyler D; Copp, Steven W

    2017-10-01

    Hindlimb skeletal muscle stretch (i.e., selective activation of the muscle mechanoreflex) in decerebrate rats evokes reflex increases in blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity. Bradykinin has been found to sensitize mechanogated channels through a bradykinin B2 receptor-dependent mechanism. Moreover, bradykinin B2 receptor expression on sensory neurons is increased following chronic femoral artery ligation in the rat (a model of simulated peripheral artery disease). We tested the hypothesis that injection of bradykinin into the arterial supply of a hindlimb in decerebrate, unanesthetized rats would acutely augment (i.e., sensitize) the increase in blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity during hindlimb muscle stretch to a greater extent in rats with a ligated femoral artery than in rats with a freely perfused femoral artery. The pressor response during static hindlimb muscle stretch was compared before and after hindlimb arterial injection of 0.5 µg of bradykinin. Injection of bradykinin increased blood pressure to a greater extent in "ligated" (n = 10) than "freely perfused" (n = 10) rats. The increase in blood pressure during hindlimb muscle stretch, however, was not different before vs. after bradykinin injection in freely perfused (14 ± 2 and 15 ± 2 mmHg for pre- and post-bradykinin, respectively, P = 0.62) or ligated (15 ± 3 and 14 ± 2 mmHg for pre- and post-bradykinin, respectively, P = 0.80) rats. Likewise, the increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity during stretch was not different before vs. after bradykinin injection in either group of rats. We conclude that bradykinin did not acutely sensitize the pressor response during hindlimb skeletal muscle stretch in freely perfused or ligated decerebrate rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Developmental plasticity and stability in the tracheal networks supplying Drosophila flight muscle in response to rearing oxygen level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jon F; Waters, James S; Biddulph, Taylor A; Kovacevic, Aleksandra; Klok, C Jaco; Socha, John J

    2017-09-18

    While it is clear that the insect tracheal system can respond in a compensatory manner to both hypoxia and hyperoxia, there is substantial variation in how different parts of the system respond. However, the response of tracheal structures, from the tracheoles to the largest tracheal trunks, have not been studied within one species. In this study, we examined the effect of larval/pupal rearing in hypoxia, normoxia, and hyperoxia (10, 21 or 40kPa oxygen) on body size and the tracheal supply to the flight muscles of Drosophila melanogaster, using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-µCT) to assess flight muscle volumes and the major tracheal trunks, and confocal microscopy to assess the tracheoles. Hypoxic rearing decreased thorax length whereas hyperoxic-rearing decreased flight muscle volumes, suggestive of negative effects of both extremes. Tomography at the broad organismal scale revealed no evidence for enlargement of the major tracheae in response to lower rearing oxygen levels, although tracheal size scaled with muscle volume. However, using confocal imaging, we found a strong inverse relationship between tracheole density within the flight muscles and rearing oxygen level, and shorter tracheolar branch lengths in hypoxic-reared animals. Although prior studies of larger tracheae in other insects indicate that axial diffusing capacity should be constant with sequential generations of branching, this pattern was not found in the fine tracheolar networks, perhaps due to the increasing importance of radial diffusion in this regime. Overall, D. melanogaster responded to rearing oxygen level with compensatory morphological changes in the small tracheae and tracheoles, but retained stability in most of the other structural components of the tracheal supply to the flight muscles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of heat transfer in straight and corrugated minichannels with two-phase flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peukert P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of heat transfer rates performed with an experimental condensation heat exchanger are reported for a corrugated minichannel tube and for a straight minichannel tube. The two cases were compared at same flow regimes. The corrugation appears advantageous for relatively low steam pressures and flow rates where much higher heat transfer rates were observed close to the steam entrance, thus allowing shortening the heat exchanger with the associated advantages of costs lowering and smaller built-up space. At high steam pressures and high flow rates both tubes performed similarly.

  20. Elastic stability of superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper concerns the elastic buckling behavior of a newly developed superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plate. Uniaxial buckling loads were calculated for this type of sandwich plate with simply supported edges by using orthotropic sandwich plate theory. The buckling behavior of this sandwich plate was then compared with that of an SPF/DB unidirectionally corrugated core sandwich plate under conditions of equal structural density. It was found that the buckling load for the former was considerably higher than that of the latter.

  1. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Series Cushioning System Made with Expanded Polyethylene and Corrugated Paperboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the constitutive models of expanded polyethylene (EPE and C-flute corrugated paperboard (CCP, the drop impact model for expanded polyethylene in series with CCP was established to consider the effect of cushioning action for CCP box. A numerical procedure was adopted for the optimization of the product packaging system by considering the action of the corrugated paperboard box. Then the optimal results were obtained and compared without considering the effect of CCP. Finally, the calculation reliability was proved by the comparison between calculated results and experimental data.

  2. Improved Refractive Index Sensitivity Utilizing Long-Period Gratings with Periodic Corrugations on Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new structure of Long-Period Gratings (LPGs sensor is introduced as a sensitive ambient RI sensor. This structure consists of creating periodic corrugations on the cladding of the LPG. The experimental results show that this LPG structure has good performances in terms of linearity and sensitivity and serves as a highly sensitive and cost-effective sensor. It also has the advantage of portability as the corrugation can also serve as the reservoir for the specimen collection to be tested.

  3. Responses of mouse skeletal muscle to endurance exercise. Functional, metabolic, and genomic adaptations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Snoo, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Endurance exercise is commonly known to improve skeletal muscle performance with respect to fatigue resistance. The exact mechanisms, however, as to how skeletal muscle adapts to increased physical demand are still largely unknown, despite extensive research. These processes were originally studied

  4. Skeletal muscle autophagy and mitophagy in response to high-fat feeding and endurance training

    OpenAIRE

    Tarpey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with reduced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, a major risk factor for development of type II diabetes. These metabolic diseases are commonly associated with an accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction, which is speculated to contribute toward insulin resistance. High-fat diets reduce human skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function. Conversely, endurance training increases insulin sensitivity and enhances mitochondrial performance. Recent evidenc...

  5. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  6. Does vitamin-D intake during resistance training improve the skeletal muscle hypertrophic and strength response in young and elderly men? – a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jakob; Trøstrup, Jeanette; Uth, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have shown that vitamin-D intake can improve skeletal muscle function and strength in frail vitamin-D insufficient individuals. We investigated whether vitamin-D intake can improve the muscular response to resistance training in healthy young and elderly individuals...... (December-April, 56°N). During the last 12 weeks of the supplementation the subjects underwent progressive resistance training of the quadriceps muscle. Muscle hypertrophy, measured as changes in cross sectional area (CSA), and isometric strength of the quadriceps were determined. Muscle biopsies were...... compared to the placebo group (p = 0.006). Neither resistance training nor vitamin-D intake changed VDR mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: No additive effect of vitamin-D intake during 12 weeks of resistance training could be detected on either whole muscle hypertrophy or muscle strength, but improved muscle...

  7. Effects of Muscle Fatigue, Creep, and Musculoskeletal Pain on Neuromuscular Responses to Unexpected Perturbation of the Trunk: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Lardon, Arnaud; Boivin, Frédéric; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Trunk neuromuscular responses have been shown to adapt under the influence of muscle fatigue, as well as spinal tissue creep or even with the presence of low back pain (LBP). Despite a large number of studies exploring how these external perturbations affect the spinal stability, characteristics of such adaptations remains unclear. Aim: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the quality of evidence of studies investigating trunk neuromuscular responses to unexpected trunk perturbation. More specifically, the targeted neuromuscular responses were trunk muscle activity reflex and trunk kinematics under the influence of muscle fatigue, spinal creep, and musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A research of the literature was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and Sport-Discus databases using terms related to trunk neuromuscular reflex responses, measured by electromyography (baseline activity, reflex latency, and reflex amplitude) and/or trunk kinematic, in context of unexpected external perturbation. Moreover, independent variables must be either trunk muscle fatigue or spinal tissue creep or LBP. All included articles were scored for their electromyography methodology based on the "Surface Electromyography for the Non-Invasive Assessment of Muscles (SENIAM)" and the "International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK)" recommendations whereas overall quality of articles was scored using a specific quality checklist modified from the Quality Index. Meta-analysis was performed on reflex latency variable. Results: A final set of 29 articles underwent quality assessments. The mean quality score was 79%. No effect of muscle fatigue on erector spinae reflex latency following an unexpected perturbation, nor any other distinctive effects was found for back muscle fatigue and reflex parameters. As for spinal tissue creep effects, no alteration was found for any of the trunk reflex variables. Finally, the meta-analysis revealed an increased erector

  8. Influence of past injurious exercise on fiber type-specific acute anabolic response to resistance exercise in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ryo; Ogasawara, Riki; Takegaki, Junya; Tsutaki, Arata; Nakazato, Koichi; Ishii, Naokata

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the influence of past injurious exercise on anabolic response of skeletal muscle fibers to resistance exercise (RE). Wistar rats were divided into exercise (E) and exercise-after-injury (I-E) groups. At age 10 wk, the right gastrocnemius muscle in each rat in the I-E group was subjected to strenuous eccentric contractions. Subsequently, RE was imposed on the same muscle of each rat at 14 wk of age in both groups. Peak joint torque and total force generation per body mass during RE were similar between the groups. Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in the I-E group was higher than that in the E group 6 h after RE. Furthermore, levels of phospho-p70S6 kinase (Thr 389 ) and phospho-ribosomal protein S6 (phospho-rpS6) (Ser 240/244 ), a downstream target of p70S6 kinase, were higher in the I-E group than in the E group. For the anabolic response in each fiber type, the I-E group showed a higher MPS response in type IIb, IIa, and I fibers and a higher phospho-rpS6 response in type IIx, IIa, and I fibers than the E group. In the I-E group, the relative content of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIa was higher and that of MHC IIb was lower than those in the E group. In addition, type IIa fibers showed a lower MPS response to RE than type IIb fibers in the I-E group. In conclusion, the past injurious exercise enhanced the MPS and phospho-rpS6 responses in type IIb, IIa, and I fibers and type IIx, IIa, and I fibers, respectively. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Past injurious exercise increased the muscle protein synthesis (MPS) response and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling activation to resistance exercise. In the responses of each fiber type, the past injurious exercise increased the MPS and phosphorylation ribosomal protein (Ser 240/244 ) responses in type IIb, IIa, and I fibers and type IIx, IIa, and I fibers, respectively.

  9. High-intensity interval training in hypoxia does not affect muscle HIF responses to acute hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Stefan; D'Hulst, Gommaar; Poffé, Chiel; Van Thienen, Ruud; Berardi, Emanuele; Hespel, Peter

    2018-02-08

    The myocellular response to hypoxia is primarily regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs thus conceivably are implicated in muscular adaptation to altitude training. Therefore, we investigated the effect of hypoxic versus normoxic training during a period of prolonged hypoxia ('living high') on muscle HIF activation during acute ischaemia. Ten young male volunteers lived in normobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks (5 days per week, ~ 15.5 h per day, FiO2: 16.4-14.0%). One leg was trained in hypoxia (TRHYP, 12.3% FiO2) whilst the other leg was trained in normoxia (TRNOR, 20.9% FiO2). Training sessions (3 per week) consisted of intermittent unilateral knee extensions at 20-25% of the 1-repetition maximum. Before and after the intervention, a 10-min arterial occlusion and reperfusion of the leg was performed. Muscle oxygenation status was continuously measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. Biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis before and at the end of the occlusion. Irrespective of training, occlusion elevated the fraction of HIF-1α expressing myonuclei from ~ 54 to ~ 64% (P Training in both TRNOR and TRHYP raised muscular oxygen extraction rate upon occlusion by ~ 30%, whilst muscle hyperperfusion immediately following the occlusion increased by ~ 25% in either group (P training during 'living high' altered muscle HIF translocation, stabilisation, or transcription in response to acute hypoxia induced by arterial occlusion.

  10. Response of chick lines selected on carcass quality to dietary lysine supply: live performance and muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesseraud, S; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Peresson, R; Michel, J; Chagneau, A M

    1999-01-01

    Broiler carcass quality can be improved by conventional selection techniques. In this regard, an experimental "quality" line (QL) was selected for high breast meat yield. We analyzed the effects of this selection on the dietary lysine requirement in chicks from 0 to 3 wk. Control (CL) and QL chicks were provided ad libitum access to isoenergetic diets containing 20% crude protein but differing in their lysine content (0.75, 0.88, 1.01, and 1.13%). Two-way ANOVA showed a significant effect (P body weight, growth rate, feed intake, and weight of Pectoralis major and Gastrocnemius muscles. Conversely, the Sartorius muscle weight was not modified (P = 0.21) by genotype. Lysine deficiency markedly reduced body weight, growth rate, and feed intake, and increased feed conversion ratio (P weight of Gastrocnemius, Sartorius, and P. major (P body or muscle weight response to diet lysine concentration depended on the line, with QL chicks appearing less sensitive to lysine deficiency. Consequently, their dietary requirements could be lower. Finally, when weight gain and P. major muscle protein deposition were plotted against lysine intake, QL chicks appeared to be more efficient than CL chicks. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this await clarification.

  11. Molecular plasticity and functional enhancements of leg muscles in response to hypergravity in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, Rudolf J; Raynor, Megan

    2017-10-01

    Studies of organismal and tissue biomechanics have clearly demonstrated that musculoskeletal design is strongly dependent on experienced loads, which can vary in the short term, as a result of growth during life history and during the evolution of animal body size. However, how animals actually perceive and make adjustments to their load-bearing musculoskeletal elements that accommodate variation in their body weight is poorly understood. We developed an experimental model system that can be used to start addressing these open questions, and uses hypergravity centrifugation to experimentally manipulate the loads experienced by Drosophila melanogaster We examined effects of this manipulation on leg muscle alternative splicing of the sarcomere gene troponin T (Dmel\\up; Fbgn0004169, herein referred to by its synonym TnT), a process that was previously demonstrated to precisely correlate with quantitative variation in body weight in Lepidoptera and rat. In a similar fashion, hypergravity centrifugation caused fast (i.e. within 24 h) changes to fly leg muscle TnT alternative splicing that correlated with body weight variation across eight D. melanogaster lines. Hypergravity treatment also appeared to enhance leg muscle function, as centrifuged flies showed an increased negative geotaxis response and jump ability. Although the identity and location of the sensors and effectors involved remains unknown, our results provide further support for the existence of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that translates signals that encode body weight into appropriate skeletal muscle molecular and functional responses. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1 Variants Associate with the Muscle Strength and Size Response to Resistance Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett I Ash

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1 polymorphisms associate with obesity, muscle strength, and cortisol sensitivity. We examined associations among four NR3C1 polymorphisms and the muscle response to resistance training (RT. European-American adults (n = 602, 23.8±0.4yr completed a 12 week unilateral arm RT program. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC assessed isometric strength (kg and MRI assessed biceps size (cm2 pre- and post-resistance training. Subjects were genotyped for NR3C1 -2722G>A, -1887G>A, -1017T>C, and +363A>G. Men carrying the -2722G allele gained less relative MVC (17.3±1.2vs33.5±6.1% (p = 0.010 than AA homozygotes; men with -1887GG gained greater relative MVC than A allele carriers (19.6±1.4vs13.2±2.3% (p = 0.016. Women carrying the -1017T allele gained greater relative size (18.7±0.5vs16.1±0.9% (p = 0.016 than CC homozygotes. We found sex-specific NR3C1 associations with the muscle strength and size response to RT. Future studies should investigate whether these associations are partially explained by cortisol's actions in muscle tissue as they interact with sex differences in cortisol production.

  13. The acute satellite cell response and skeletal muscle hypertrophy following resistance training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeann M Bellamy

    Full Text Available The extent of skeletal muscle hypertrophy in response to resistance training is highly variable in humans. The main objective of this study was to explain the nature of this variability. More specifically, we focused on the myogenic stem cell population, the satellite cell (SC as a potential mediator of hypertrophy. Twenty-three males (aged 18-35 yrs participated in 16 wk of progressive, whole body resistance training, resulting in changes of 7.9±1.6% (range of -1.9-24.7% and 21.0±4.0% (range of -7.0 to 51.7% in quadriceps volume and myofibre cross-sectional area (CSA, respectively. The SC response to a single bout of resistance exercise (80% 1RM, analyzed via immunofluorescent staining resulted in an expansion of type II fibre associated SC 72 h following exercise (pre: 11.3±0.9; 72 h: 14.8±1.4 SC/type II fibre; p<0.05. Training resulted in an expansion of the SC pool associated with type I (pre: 10.7±1.1; post: 12.1±1.2 SC/type I fibre; p<0.05 and type II fibres (pre: 11.3±0.9; post: 13.0±1.2 SC/type II fibre; p<0.05. Analysis of individual SC responses revealed a correlation between the relative change in type I associated SC 24 to 72 hours following an acute bout of resistance exercise and the percentage increase in quadriceps lean tissue mass assessed by MRI (r2 = 0.566, p = 0.012 and the relative change in type II associated SC following 16 weeks of resistance training and the percentage increase in quadriceps lean tissue mass assessed by MRI (r2 = 0.493, p = 0.027. Our results suggest that the SC response to resistance exercise is related to the extent of muscular hypertrophy induced by training.

  14. Non-invasive ventilation abolishes the IL-6 response to exercise in muscle-wasted COPD patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannink, J D C; van Hees, H W H; Dekhuijzen, P N R; van Helvoort, H A C; Heijdra, Y F

    2014-02-01

    Systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been related to the development of comorbidities. The level of systemic inflammatory mediators is aggravated as a response to exercise in these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether unloading of the respiratory muscles attenuates the inflammatory response to exercise in COPD patients. In a cross-over design, eight muscle-wasted stable COPD patients performed 40 W constant work-rate cycle exercise with and without non-invasive ventilation support (NIV vs control). Patients exercised until symptom limitation for maximally 20 min. Blood samples were taken at rest and at isotime or immediately after exercise. Duration of control and NIV-supported exercise was similar, both 12.9 ± 2.8 min. Interleukin- 6 (IL-6) plasma levels increased significantly by 25 ± 9% in response to control exercise, but not in response to NIV-supported exercise. Leukocyte concentrations increased similarly after control and NIV-supported exercise by ∼15%. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein, carbonylated proteins, and production of reactive oxygen species by blood cells were not affected by both exercise modes. This study demonstrates that NIV abolishes the IL-6 response to exercise in muscle-wasted patients with COPD. These data suggest that the respiratory muscles contribute to exercise-induced IL-6 release in these patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Facial feedback and autonomic responsiveness reflect impaired emotional processing in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Pala, Francesca; Manenti, Rosa; Brambilla, Michela; Cobelli, Chiara; Rosini, Sandra; Benussi, Alberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara; Cotelli, Maria

    2016-08-11

    Emotional deficits are part of the non-motor features of Parkinson's disease but few attention has been paid to specific aspects such as subjective emotional experience and autonomic responses. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of emotional recognition in Parkinson's Disease (PD) using the following levels: explicit evaluation of emotions (Self-Assessment Manikin) and implicit reactivity (Skin Conductance Response; electromyographic measure of facial feedback of the zygomaticus and corrugator muscles). 20 PD Patients and 34 healthy controls were required to observe and evaluate affective pictures during physiological parameters recording. In PD, the appraisal process on both valence and arousal features of emotional cues were preserved, but we found significant impairment in autonomic responses. Specifically, in comparison to healthy controls, PD patients revealed lower Skin Conductance Response values to negative and high arousing emotional stimuli. In addition, the electromyographic measures showed defective responses exclusively limited to negative and high arousing emotional category: PD did not show increasing of corrugator activity in response to negative emotions as happened in heathy controls. PD subjects inadequately respond to the emotional categories which were considered more "salient": they had preserved appraisal process, but impaired automatic ability to distinguish between different emotional contexts.

  16. Isolation of vascular smooth muscle cell cultures with altered responsiveness to the antiproliferative effect of heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleb, B L; Hardenbrook, M; Cherington, V; Castellot, J J

    1996-05-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia in the arterial wall is an important component of both atherogenesis and post-vascular surgical restenosis. One naturally-occurring group of molecules which can suppress SMC proliferation in animal models and in cell culture systems are the complex carbohydrates of the heparan sulfate class, including heparin. In this communication, we have used retrovirus vectors to introduce several oncogenes into SMC: SV40 Large T antigen (SVLT), polyoma virus Large T antigen (PyLT), v-myc, and adenovirus E1a. We analyzed a total of 11 cultures. A combination of Western blot analysis, immunoprecipitation, and indirect immunofluorescence confirmed the expression of the infected oncogenic protein in each culture we isolated. All four oncogenes permitted the maintenance of a normal SMC phenotype, as assessed by the general morphology of cells in the light microscope and the presence of SMC-specific alpha-actin in an immunofluorescence assay. Doubling times in infected cells ranged from 20 to 33 hr, and final cell densities in infected cultures ranged from 4 x 10(4) to 5 x 10(5) cells per cm2. By comparison, the parent line had a doubling time of 30 hr and reached a final cell density of 1 x 10(5) cells per cm2. Despite the differences sometimes observed in these proliferation parameters, neither one was strongly correlated with heparin responsiveness. PyLT, v-myc, and E1a all produced SMC cultures or lines which retained sensitivity to the antiproliferative activity of heparin (ED50 = 50 micrograms/ml). In contrast, SVLT expression yielded SMC lines which were highly resistant to heparin (ED50 > 300 micrograms/ml). These results suggest that altered responsiveness to heparin is dependent upon which oncogenic protein is being expressed in the cells. The availability of cloned, immortal SMC lines with a wide range of heparin responsiveness should aid in the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism of action of this potentially

  17. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on muscle response to sudden trunk perturbation among healthcare workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus D.; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    . Conclusions. Although training adherence was higher following WORK compared to HOME this additional training volume did not lead to significant between-group differences in the responses to sudden trunk perturbations. However, WORK led to reduced fear avoidance and reduced muscle preactivity prior......Objectives. The present study investigates the effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on muscle reflex response to sudden trunk perturbation among healthcare workers. Methods. Two hundred female healthcare workers (age: 42 [SD 11], BMI: 24 [SD 4], and pain intensity: 3.1 [SD 2...... perturbation. Furthermore, EMG preactivation of the erector spinae and fear avoidance were reduced more following WORK than HOME (95% CI -2.7--0.7 (P training sessions per week, respectively...

  18. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chounghun Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function (“Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle” [1], “Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle” [2]. However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mitochondrial function in aged mice, male C57BL/6 mice at age 24 months were randomly assigned to 3 groups: non-exercise (NE, low-intensity (LE and high-intensity treadmill exercise group (HE. Mitochondrial complex activity and respiration were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function in mouse skeletal muscle. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice” [3].

  19. Comparative decline of the protein profiles of nebulin in response to denervation in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Jih-Hua [Department of Internal Medicine, Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Nen-Chung [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Sy-Ping [Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Geraldine, Pitchairaj [Department of Animal Science, School of Life Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu (India); Jayakumar, Thanasekaran, E-mail: tjaya_2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Pharmacology and Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fong, Tsorng-Harn, E-mail: thfong@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-09

    The sliding filament model of the sarcomere was developed more than half a century ago. This model, consisting only of thin and thick filaments, has been efficacious in elucidating many, but not all, features of skeletal muscle. Work during the 1980s revealed the existence of two additional filaments: the giant filamentous proteins titin and nebulin. Nebulin, a giant myofibrillar protein, acts as a protein ruler to maintain the lattice arrays of thin filaments and plays a role in signal transduction and contractile regulation. However, the change of nebulin and its effect on thin filaments in denervation-induced atrophic muscle remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the content and pattern of nebulin, myosin heavy chain (MHC), actin, and titin in innervated and denervated tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of rats using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), densitometry and electron microscopic (EM) analyses. The results revealed that denervation induced muscle atrophy is accompanied by decreased nebulin content in a time-dependent manner. For instant, the levels of nebulin in denervated muscles were markedly (P < 0.05) decreased, about 24.6% and 40.2% in comparison with innervated muscle after denervation of 28 and 56 days, respectively. The nebulin/MHC, nebulin/actin, and nebulin/titin ratios were decreased, suggesting a concomitant reduction of nebulin in denervated muscle. Moreover, a western blotting assay proved that nebulin declined faster than titin on 28 and 56 days of denervated muscle. In addition, EM study revealed that the disturbed arrangements of myofilaments and a disorganized contractile apparatus were also observed in denervated muscle. Overall, the present study provides evidence that nebulin is more sensitive to the effect of denervation than MHC, actin, and titin. Nebulin decline indeed resulted in disintegrate of thin filaments and shortening of sarcomeres. - Highlights: • We successfully

  20. Results of measurements at a laboratory condensation heat exchanger with a corrugated minichanel tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hrubý

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article present a short selection of results obtained from measurements done at a laboratory condensation heat-exchanger with a corrugated mini-channel tube. It also touches a little the metering method and design of the heat-exchanger.

  1. New rapid method for determining edgewise compressive strength of corrugated fiberboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Koning

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if corrugated fiberboard specimens that had been necked down with a common router would yield acceptable edgewise compressive strength values. Tests were conducted on specimens prepared using a circular saw and router, and the results were compared with those obtained on specimens prepared according to TAPPI Test Method T...

  2. Controllable corrugation of chemically converted graphene sheets in water and potential application for nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ling; Zhang, Xuehua; Yang, Wenrong; Wang, Yufei; Simon, George P; Li, Dan

    2011-05-28

    A combination of AFM, SEM and permeation experiments suggests that the amplitude of corrugation of chemically converted graphene (CCG) sheets in water can be readily controlled by hydrothermal treatment, leading to a new class of permeation-tuneable nanofiltration membranes. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  3. Evaluation of Mechanical Strength of Five Layered Corrugated Cardboard Depending on the Types of Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Budimir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the growing need for material saving in the production of paper packaging, its industrial production is faced with the problem of quality assurance. By controlling the cost of production of corrugated cardboard, paperboard mechanical properties depend directly on the flute profile. Therefore, the corrugated cardboard can be observed both from technological and environmental aspects. Five layered corrugated cardboard of different types of flute profile was used for this research. It is assumed that the characteristic shape of the wave has a positive effect on its mechanical properties. On the other hand, it is supposed if the material saving can be achieved without the characteristic flute profile effects on the reduction of mechanical strength of paperboard. The aim of the research is to determine whether there is a direct impact on the type of waveform on its mechanical strength. Statistical methods were used for the evaluation of expectation values ​​of the estimated strength of corrugated board with respect to the flute profile.

  4. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeao; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-01-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels. Experimental studies usually…

  5. Design and Realization Aspects of 1-THz Cascade Backward Wave Amplifier Based on Double Corrugated Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoloni, Claudio; Di Carlo, Aldo; Bouamrane, Fayçal

    2013-01-01

    The design and fabrication challenges in the first ever attempt to realize a 1-THz vacuum tube amplifier are described. Implementation of innovative solutions including a slow-wave structure in the form of a double corrugated waveguide, lateral tapered input and output couplers, deep X-ray LIGA f...

  6. Evaluation of Steel Shear Walls Behavior with Sinusoidal and Trapezoidal Corrugated Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Hosseinpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement of structures aims to control the input energy of unnatural and natural forces. In the past four decades, steel shear walls are utilized in huge constructions in some seismic countries such as Japan, United States, and Canada to lessen the risk of destructive forces. The steel shear walls are divided into two types: unstiffened and stiffened. In the former, a series of plates (sinusoidal and trapezoidal corrugated with light thickness are used that have the postbuckling field property under overall buckling. In the latter, steel profile belt series are employed as stiffeners with different arrangement: horizontal, vertical, or diagonal in one side or both sides of wall. In the unstiffened walls, increasing the thickness causes an increase in the wall capacity under large forces in tall structures. In the stiffened walls, joining the stiffeners to the wall is costly and time consuming. The ANSYS software was used to analyze the different models of unstiffened one-story steel walls with sinusoidal and trapezoidal corrugated plates under lateral load. The obtained results demonstrated that, in the walls with the same dimensions, the trapezoidal corrugated plates showed higher ductility and ultimate bearing compared to the sinusoidal corrugated plates.

  7. Comparison of postbuckling model and finite element model with compression strength of corrugated boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Urbanik; Edmond P. Saliklis

    2002-01-01

    Conventional compression strength formulas for corrugated fiberboard boxes are limited to geometry and material that produce an elastic postbuckling failure. Inelastic postbuckling can occur in squatty boxes and trays, but a mechanistic rationale for unifying observed strength data is lacking. This study employs a finite element model, instead of actual experiments, to...

  8. Evaluation of Mechanical Strength of Five Layered Corrugated Cardboard Depending on the Types of Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Budimir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the growing need for material saving in the production of paper packaging, its industrial production is faced with the problem of quality assurance. By controlling the cost of production of corrugated cardboard, paperboard mechanical properties depend directly on the flute profile. Therefore, the corrugated cardboard can be observed both from technological and environmental aspects.Five layered corrugated cardboard of different types of flute profile was used for this research. It is assumed that the characteristic shape of the wave has a positive effect on its mechanical properties. On the other hand, it is supposed if the material saving can be achieved without the characteristic flute profile effects on the reduction of mechanical strength of paperboard. The aim of the research is to determine whether there is a direct impact on the type of waveform on its mechanical strength. Statistical methods were used for the evaluation of expectation values ​​of the estimated strength of corrugated board with respect to the flute profile.

  9. Pressure drop and stability of flow in Archimedean spiral tube with transverse corrugations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Isothermal pressure drop experiments were carried out for the steady Newtonian fluid flow in Archimedean spiral tube with transverse corrugations. Pressure drop correlations and stability criteria for distinguishing the flow regimes have been obtained in a continuous Reynolds number range from 150 to 15 000. The characterizing geometrical groups which take into account all the geometrical parameters of Archimedean spiral and corrugated pipe has been acquired. Before performing experiments over the Archimedean spiral, the corrugated straight pipe having high relative roughness e/d = 0.129 of approximately sinusoidal type was tested in order to obtain correlations for the Darcy friction factor. Insight into the magnitude of pressure loss in the proposed geometry of spiral solar receiver for different flow rates is important because of its effect upon the efficiency of the receiver. Although flow in spiral and corrugated geometries has the advantages of compactness and high heat transfer rates, the disadvantage of greater pressure drops makes hydrodynamic studies relevant. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006 i br. TR 33015

  10. Design of Ultra-Wideband Tapered Slot Antenna by Using Binomial Transformer with Corrugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chareonsiri, Yosita; Thaiwirot, Wanwisa; Akkaraekthalin, Prayoot

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the tapered slot antenna (TSA) with corrugation is proposed for UWB applications. The multi-section binomial transformer is used to design taper profile of the proposed TSA that does not involve using time consuming optimization. A step-by-step procedure for synthesis of the step impedance values related with step slot widths of taper profile is presented. The smooth taper can be achieved by fitting the smoothing curve to the entire step slot. The design of TSA based on this method yields results with a quite flat gain and wide impedance bandwidth covering UWB spectrum from 3.1 GHz to 10.6 GHz. To further improve the radiation characteristics, the corrugation is added on the both edges of the proposed TSA. The effects of different corrugation shapes on the improvement of antenna gain and front-to-back ratio (F-to-B ratio) are investigated. To demonstrate the validity of the design, the prototypes of TSA without and with corrugation are fabricated and measured. The results show good agreement between simulation and measurement.

  11. Measurement with corrugated tubes of early-age autogenous shrinkage of cement-based material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    The use of a special corrugated mould enables transformation of volume strain into horizontal, linear strain measurement in the fluid stage. This allows continuous measurement of the autogenous shrinkage of cement-based materials since casting, and also effectively eliminates unwanted influence...

  12. Effects of Traumeel (Tr14 on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Response in Healthy Subjects: A Double-Blind RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Muders

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial intended to test whether ingestion of a natural combination medicine (Tr14 tablets affects serum muscle damage and inflammatory immune response after downhill running. 96 male subjects received Tr14 tablets, which consist of 14 diluted biological and mineral components, or a placebo for 72 h after the exercise test, respectively. Changes in postexercise levels of various serum muscle damage and immunological markers were investigated. The area under the curve with respect to the increase (AUCi of perceived pain score and creatine kinase (CK were defined as primary outcome measures. While for CK the p value of the difference between the two groups is borderline, the pain score and muscle strength were not statistically significant. However, a trend towards lower levels of muscle damage (CK, p=0.05; LDH, p=0.06 in the Tr14 group was shown. Less pronounced lymphopenia (p=0.02, a trend towards a lower expression of CD69 count (p=0.07, and antigen-stimulated ICAM-1 (p=0.01 were found in the verum group. The Tr14 group showed a tendentially lower increase of neutrophils (p=0.10, BDNF (p=0.03, stem cell factor (p=0.09, and GM-CSF (p=0.09 to higher levels. The results of the current study indicate that Tr14 seems to limit exercise-induced muscle damage most likely via attenuation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01912469.

  13. The ‘Goldilocks Zone’ from a redox perspective - Adaptive versus deleterious responses to oxidative stress in striated muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick J Alleman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consequences of oxidative stress may be beneficial or detrimental in physiological systems. An organ system’s position on the ‘hormetic curve’ is governed by the source and temporality of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, proximity of ROS to moieties most susceptible to damage, and the capacity of the endogenous cellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. Most importantly, the resilience of the tissue (the capacity to recover from damage is a decisive factor, and this is reflected in the disparate response to ROS in cardiac and skeletal muscle. In myocytes, a high oxidative capacity invariably results in a significant ROS burden which in homeostasis, is rapidly neutralized by the robust antioxidant network. The up-regulation of key pathways in the antioxidant network is a central component of the hormetic response to ROS. Despite such adaptations, persistent oxidative stress over an extended time-frame (e.g. months to years inevitably leads to cumulative damages, maladaptation and ultimately the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Indeed, persistent oxidative stress in heart and skeletal muscle has been repeatedly demonstrated to have causal roles in the etiology of heart disease and insulin resistance, respectively. Deciphering the mechanisms that underlie the divergence between adaptive and maladaptive responses to oxidative stress remains an active area of research for basic scientists and clinicians alike, as this would undoubtedly lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we provide an overview of major types of ROS in striated muscle and the divergent adaptations that occur in response to them. Emphasis is placed on highlighting newly uncovered areas of research on this topic, with particular focus on the mitochondria, and the diverging roles that ROS play in muscle health (e.g., exercise or preconditioning and disease (e.g., cardiomyopathy, ischemia, metabolic syndrome.

  14. Response of turkey muscle satellite cells to thermal challenge. I. transcriptome effects in proliferating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Kent M.; Kristelle M Mendoza; Abrahante, Juan E.; Barnes, Natalie E.; Velleman, Sandra G.; Strasburg, Gale M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Climate change poses a multi-dimensional threat to food and agricultural systems as a result of increased risk to animal growth, development, health, and food product quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells cultured under cold or hot thermal challenge to better define molecular mechanisms by which thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure. Results Satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major mu...

  15. Augmentation of bovine airway smooth muscle responsiveness to carbachol, KCl, and histamine by the isoprostane 8-iso-PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalli, Adriana; Janssen, Luke J

    2004-11-01

    Isoprostanes are generated during periods of oxidative stress, which characterize diseases such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. They also elicit functional responses and may therefore contribute to the pathology of these diseases. We set out to examine the effects of isoprostanes on airway responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation. Muscle bath techniques were employed using isolated bovine tracheal smooth muscle. 8-Isoprostaglandin E2 (8-iso-PGE2) increased tone directly on its own, although the magnitude of this response, even at the highest concentration tested, was only a fraction of that evoked by KCl or carbachol. More importantly, though, pretreatment of the tissues with 8-iso-PGE2 (10 microM) markedly augmented responses to submaximal and even subthreshold concentrations of KCl, carbachol, or histamine, whereas maximal responses to these agents were unaffected by the isoprostane. The augmentative effect on cholinergic responsiveness was mimicked by PGE2 (0.1 microM) and by the FP agonists PGF2 (0.1 microM) and fluprostenol (0.1 microM), but not by the EP3 agonist sulprostone (0.1 microM) or the TP agonist U-46619 (0.1 microM). Antagonists of EP1 receptors (AH-6809 and SC-19920, 10 microM) and TP receptors (ICI-192605, 1 microM) had no effect on 8-iso-PGE2-induced augmentation of cholinergic responsiveness. We conclude that 8-iso-PGE2 induces nonspecific airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness through a non-TP non-EP prostanoid receptor.

  16. Fermented milk, Kefram-Kefir enhances glucose uptake into insulin-responsive muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruya, Kiichiro; Yamashita, Maiko; Tominaga, Rumi; Nagira, Tsutomu; Shim, Sun-Yup; Katakura, Yoshinori; Tokumaru, Sennosuke; Tokumaru, Koichiro; Barnes, David; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2002-11-01

    Diminution of insulin-responses in the target organ is the primary cause of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM).It is thought to be correlated to the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this article, we attempted to evaluate whether fermented milk, Kefram-Kefir known as an antioxidant, reduces the cellular ROS levels and can stimulate the glucose uptake in L6 skeletal muscle cells. Water-soluble or chloroform/methanol-extracted fractions from Kefram-Kefir were examined to evaluate the glucose uptake ability of L6 myotubes.As a result, the water-soluble fraction augmented the uptake of glucose in L6 myotubes both in the presence and absence of insulin stimulation. Estimation of intracellular ROS level revealed that the water-soluble fraction of Kefram-Kefir reduced the intracellular ROS level on both the undifferentiated and differentiated L6 cells. Especially, glucose uptake was augmented up to six times with the addition of water-soluble fraction in the insulin-stimulated L6 myotubes. Glucose transport determination revealed that the active agent in Kefram-Kefir was resistant to autoclave and stable in pH range from 4 to 10, and the small molecule below the molecular weight of 1000. Furthermore, this augmentation was inhibited in the presence of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) inhibitor wortmannin. Considering together with the reports that PI 3-kinase is locatedin the insulin signaling pathway and the participation in the translocation of glucose transporter 4 to the cell membrane, it is suggested that the water-soluble fraction of Kefram-Kefir activates PI 3-kinase or other upstream molecules in the insulin signaling pathway, which resulted in the augmentation of glucose uptake and its specific inhibition by wortmannin.

  17. Myostatin promotes distinct responses on protein metabolism of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers of rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H. Manfredi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin is a novel negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Myostatin expression is also found in heart in a much less extent, but it can be upregulated in pathological conditions, such as heart failure. Myostatin may be involved in inhibiting protein synthesis and/or increasing protein degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Herein, we used cell cultures and isolated muscles from rats to determine protein degradation and synthesis. Muscles incubated with myostatin exhibited an increase in proteolysis with an increase of Atrogin-1, MuRF1 and LC3 genes. Extensor digitorum longus muscles and C2C12 myotubes exhibited a reduction in protein turnover. Cardiomyocytes showed an increase in proteolysis by activating autophagy and the ubiquitin proteasome system, and a decrease in protein synthesis by decreasing P70S6K. The effect of myostatin on protein metabolism is related to fiber type composition, which may be associated to the extent of atrophy mediated effect of myostatin on muscle.

  18. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Chemoreflex Response, Heart Rate Variability, and Respiratory Mechanics in Rats With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Quagliotto, Edson; Chechi, Chalyne; Calegari, Leonardo; Dos Santos, Fernando; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate respiratory muscle training (RMT) effects on hemodynamic function, chemoreflex response, heart rate variability, and respiratory mechanics in rats with heart failure (HF rats). Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary-sham (Sed-Sham, n = 8), respiratory muscle trained-sham (RMT-Sham, n = 8), sedentary-HF (Sed-HF, n = 8) and respiratory muscle trained-HF (RMT-HF, n = 8). Animals were submitted to an RMT protocol performed 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week for 6 weeks, whereas the sedentary animals did not exercise. In HF rats, RMT promoted the reduction of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. Moreover, RMT produced a reduction in pressure response during chemoreflex activation, sympathetic modulation, and sympathetic vagal balance in addition to an increase in parasympathetic modulation. Also after RMT, HF rats demonstrated a reduction in respiratory system resistance, tissue resistance, Newtonian resistance, respiratory system compliance, and quasistatic compliance. These findings suggested that 6 weeks of RMT in HF rats promoted beneficial adaptations in hemodynamics, autonomic function, and respiratory mechanics and attenuated pressure response evoked by chemoreflex activation in HF rats. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence of adaptations of locomotor neural drive in response to enhanced intermuscular connectivity between the triceps surae muscles of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernabei, Michel; van Dieën, Jaap H.; Maas, Huub

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate changes 1) in the coordination of activation of the triceps surae muscle group, and 2) in muscle belly length of soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) during locomotion (trotting) in response to increased stiffness of intermuscular connective tissues

  20. The skeletal muscle satellite cell response to a single bout of resistance-type exercise is delayed with aging in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, T.; Verdijk, L.B.; Smeets, J.S.J.; McKay, B.R.; Senden, J.M.G.; Hartgens, F.; Parise, G.; Greenhaff, P.; van Loon, L.J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) have been shown to be instrumental in the muscle adaptive response to exercise. The present study determines age-related differences in SC content and activation status following a single bout of exercise. Ten young (22 +/- 1 years) and 10 elderly (73 +/- 1

  1. Brainstem neurons responsible for postural, masseter or pharyngeal muscle atonia during paradoxical sleep in freely-moving cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K; Neuzeret, P-C

    2011-12-01

    In this mini review, we summarize our findings regarding the brainstem neurons responsible for the postural, masseter, or pharyngeal muscle atonia observed during paradoxical sleep (PS) in freely moving cats. Both the pons and medulla contain neurons showing tonic activation selective to PS and atonia, referred to as PS/atonia-on-neurons. The PS/atonia-on neurons, characterized by their most slow conducting property and located in the peri-locus coeruleus alpha (peri-LCa) and adjacent LCa of the mediodorsal pontine tegmentum, play a critical executive role in the somatic and orofacial muscle atonia observed during PS. Slow conducting medullary PS/atonia-on neurons located in the nuclei reticularis magnocellularis (Mc) and parvocellularis (Pc) may play a critical executive role in the generation of, respectively, antigravity or orofacial muscle atonia during PS. In addition, either tonic or phasic cessation of activity of medullary serotonergic neurons may play an important role in the atonia of genioglossus muscles during PS via a mechanism of disfacilitation.

  2. Exercise Training and Work Task Induced Metabolic and Stress-Related mRNA and Protein Responses in Myalgic Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Sjøgaard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to assess mRNA and/or protein levels of heat shock proteins, cytokines, growth regulating, and metabolic proteins in myalgic muscle at rest and in response to work tasks and prolonged exercise training. A randomized controlled trial included 28 females with trapezius myalgia and 16 healthy controls. Those with myalgia performed ~7 hrs repetitive stressful work and were subsequently randomized to 10 weeks of specific strength training, general fitness training, or reference intervention. Muscles biopsies were taken from the trapezius muscle at baseline, after work and after 10 weeks intervention. The main findings are that the capacity of carbohydrate oxidation was reduced in myalgic compared with healthy muscle. Repetitive stressful work increased mRNA content for heat shock proteins and decreased levels of key regulators for growth and oxidative metabolism. In contrast, prolonged general fitness as well as specific strength training decreased mRNA content of heat shock protein while the capacity of carbohydrate oxidation was increased only after specific strength training.

  3. The Role of CorrugateDrain In Decreasing Postoperative Complication Of Penile Fracture Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Abd El-Ameer Almosawi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:tostudy the role of corrugate drain (which is used by some urosurgeons followed surgical correction of fractured penis in decreasing post operative complications such as penile swelling, pain and curvature. Patient and method:comparative cross sectional study was carried out at the urological department of Al-Hilla teaching hospital from March 2008 to April 2011. Twenty male patients (age between 21-40 years admitted to the urological department in Al-Hila teaching hospital suffering from penile fracture from March 2008 to April 2011 were included in this study. Immediate surgical repair done to all those patients ,corrugate drain put post operatively for 10 patients while the remaining 10 patients without drains. All patients are fallowed for at least 3 months regarding postoperative penile swelling, deformity, pain and sexual function. Result:regarding age distribution of patients suffering from fracture penis, from twenty patients included in this study 11 patients their agerange from (20-30years, 7 patients their age group range from (31-45years and only 2 patients their age range from (46-60years. Fifteen patients are married and only 5 patients are unmarried. No one develop postoperative penile swelling in patients with corrugate drain and only one patient develops swelling in patients without corrugate drain. Regarding postoperative pain, in patients surgically corrected with drain, 6 patients develop pain and only 2 patients surgically corrected without drain develops pain. Conclusion:No beneficial effect of corrugate drain in decreasing postoperative penile swelling or curvature and on the other hand it increase post operative penile pain.

  4. The Role of CorrugateDrain In Decreasing Postoperative Complication Of Penile Fracture Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Abd El-Ameer Almosawi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:tostudy the role of corrugate drain (which is used by some urosurgeons followed surgical correction of fractured penis in decreasing post operative complications such as penile swelling, pain and curvature. Patient and method:comparative cross sectional study was carried out at the urological department of Al-Hilla teaching hospital from March 2008 to April 2011. Twenty male patients (age between 21-40 years admitted to the urological department in Al-Hila teaching hospital suffering from penile fracture from March 2008 to April 2011 were included in this study. Immediate surgical repair done to all those patients ,corrugate drain put post operatively for 10 patients while the remaining 10 patients without drains. All patients are fallowed for at least 3 months regarding postoperative penile swelling, deformity, pain and sexual function. Result:regarding age distribution of patients suffering from fracture penis, from twenty patients included in this study 11 patients their agerange from (20-30years, 7 patients their age group range from (31-45years and only 2 patients their age range from (46-60years. Fifteen patients are married and only 5 patients are unmarried. No one develop postoperative penile swelling in patients with corrugate drain and only one patient develops swelling in patients without corrugate drain. Regarding postoperative pain, in patients surgically corrected with drain, 6 patients develop pain and only 2 patients surgically corrected without drain develops pain. Conclusion:No beneficial effect of corrugate drain in decreasing postoperative penile swelling or curvature and on the other hand it increase post operative penile pain

  5. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF HORIZONTAL PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION ON CORRUGATED STEEL SILO WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kachurenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper aims: 1 qualitative assessment of the nature of the container corrugated wall deformation caused by the load from bulk materials. 2 determination of the horizontal pressure redistribution scheme for each individual corrugation plate and the calculation method that is closer to the real situation. 3 obtaining the quantitativedeformation indicators to compare them with the calculated ones produced by means of mathematical model simulation. Methodology.To achieve this purpose the different types of capacitive structure profiles were investigated and the values of total vertical displacement under load were obtained. The computational experiment used the design computer system Structure CAD for Windows. In addition, the laboratory experiment was conducted, the analysis of which is important to confirm the correctness of pre-made computer models. Findings. The conducted experiment allowed receiving the confirmation of the FEM calculated data, namely qualitatively and quantitatively the deformation direction and nature completely repeated the design situation in SCAD. Thework ofcorrugatedprofile was analysedfordifferenttheoreticallypossibleload schemesanddifferentcalculation methods. Alsotheworkcontainstherecommendationsfortherealcalculationusingcomputersimulation. During a joint study the authors obtained the data that allow for more accurate assessment of the corrugated profile performance under the pressure from bulk materials. Originality. The conducted research and experimental tests explain and clarify the ways for possible redistribution of bulk material pressure on each corrugation plate, while there is no such information in the existing recommendation literature and regulatory framework concerning the capacitive structure design. Practical value.The use of the proposed solutions is useful for correct design of containers with corrugated walls during further calculations and search of new directions for future research.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of the effect of rail corrugation on the behaviour of rail fastenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Liang; Li, Wei; Shang, Hongxia; Xiao, Xinbiao; Wen, Zefeng; Jin, Xuesong

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a detailed investigation of the effects of rail corrugation on the dynamic behaviour of metro rail fastenings, obtained from extensive experiments conducted on site and from simulations of train-track dynamics. The results of tests conducted with a metro train operating on corrugated tracks are presented and discussed first. A three-dimensional (3D) model of the metro train and a slab track was developed using multi-body dynamics modelling and the finite element method to simulate the effect of rail corrugation on the dynamic behaviour of rail fastenings. In the model, the metro train is modelled as a multi-rigid body system, and the slab track is modelled as a discrete elastic support system consisting of two Timoshenko beams for the rails, a 3D solid finite element (FE) model for the slabs, periodic discrete viscoelastic elements for the rail fastenings that connect the rails to the slabs, and uniformly viscoelastic elements for the subgrade beneath the slabs. The proposed train-track model was used to investigate the effects of rail corrugation on the dynamic behaviour of the metro track system and fastenings. An FE model for the rail fastenings was also developed and was used to calculate the stresses in the clips, some of which rupture under the excitation of rail corrugation. The results of the field experiments and dynamics simulations provide an insight into the root causes of the fracture of the clips, and several remedies are suggested for mitigating strong vibrations and failure of metro rail fastening systems.

  7. Early Transcriptomic Response to LDL and oxLDL in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Damián-Zamacona

    Full Text Available Although nowadays it is well known that the human transcriptome can importantly vary according to external or environmental condition, the reflection of this concept when studying oxidative stress and its direct relationship with gene expression profiling during the process of atherogenesis has not been thoroughly achieved.The ability to analyze genome-wide gene expression through transcriptomics has shown that the genome responds dynamically to diverse stimuli. Here, we describe the transcriptome of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC stimulated by native and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (nLDL and oxLDL respectively, with the aim of assessing the early molecular changes that induce a response in this cell type resulting in a transcriptomic transformation. This expression has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo and in vitro, particularly in the light of the oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis.Total RNA was isolated with TRIzol reagent (Life Technologies and quality estimated using an Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer. The transcriptome of hVSMC under different experimental conditions (1,5 and 24 hours for nLDL and oxLDL was obtained using the GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST (Affymetrix designed to measure gene expression of 28,869 well-annotated genes. A fixed fold-change cut-off corresponding to ± 2 was used to identify genes exhibiting the most significant variation and statistical significance (P< 0.05, and 8 genes validated by qPCR using Taqman probes.10 molecular processes were significantly affected in hVSMC: Apoptosis and cell cycle, extracellular matrix remodeling, DNA repair, cholesterol efflux, cGMP biosynthesis, endocytic mechanisms, calcium homeostasis, redox balance, membrane trafficking and finally, the immune response to inflammation. The evidence we present supporting the hypothesis for the involvement of oxidative modification of several processes and metabolic pathways in atherosclerosis is

  8. Early Transcriptomic Response to LDL and oxLDL in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damián-Zamacona, Salvador; Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; Ibarra-Abundis, Mabel Z; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Macedo-Alcibia, Karla Paola; Delgado-Coello, Blanca; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Although nowadays it is well known that the human transcriptome can importantly vary according to external or environmental condition, the reflection of this concept when studying oxidative stress and its direct relationship with gene expression profiling during the process of atherogenesis has not been thoroughly achieved. The ability to analyze genome-wide gene expression through transcriptomics has shown that the genome responds dynamically to diverse stimuli. Here, we describe the transcriptome of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) stimulated by native and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (nLDL and oxLDL respectively), with the aim of assessing the early molecular changes that induce a response in this cell type resulting in a transcriptomic transformation. This expression has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo and in vitro, particularly in the light of the oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Total RNA was isolated with TRIzol reagent (Life Technologies) and quality estimated using an Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer. The transcriptome of hVSMC under different experimental conditions (1,5 and 24 hours for nLDL and oxLDL) was obtained using the GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST (Affymetrix) designed to measure gene expression of 28,869 well-annotated genes. A fixed fold-change cut-off corresponding to ± 2 was used to identify genes exhibiting the most significant variation and statistical significance (Pimmune response to inflammation. The evidence we present supporting the hypothesis for the involvement of oxidative modification of several processes and metabolic pathways in atherosclerosis is strengthen by the fact that gene expression patterns obtained when hVSMC are incubated for a long period of time in the presence of nLDL, correspond very much the same as when cells are incubated for a short period of time in the presence of chemically modified oxLDL. Our results indicate that under physiological conditions and directly

  9. Response of turkey muscle satellite cells to thermal challenge. I. transcriptome effects in proliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kent M; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Abrahante, Juan E; Barnes, Natalie E; Velleman, Sandra G; Strasburg, Gale M

    2017-05-06

    Climate change poses a multi-dimensional threat to food and agricultural systems as a result of increased risk to animal growth, development, health, and food product quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells cultured under cold or hot thermal challenge to better define molecular mechanisms by which thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure. Satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major muscle of 7-weeks-old male turkeys from two breeding lines (16 weeks body weight-selected and it's randombred control) were proliferated in culture at 33 °C, 38 °C or 43 °C for 72 h. Total RNA was isolated and 12 libraries subjected to RNAseq analysis. Statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed among treatments and between turkey lines with a greater number of genes altered by cold treatment than by hot and fewer differences observed between lines than between temperatures. Pathway analysis found that cold treatment resulted in an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell signaling/signal transduction and cell communication/cell signaling as compared to control (38 °C). Heat-treated muscle satellite cells showed greater tendency towards expression of genes related to muscle system development and differentiation. This study demonstrates significant transcriptome effects on turkey skeletal muscle satellite cells exposed to thermal challenge. Additional effects on gene expression could be attributed to genetic selection for 16 weeks body weight (muscle mass). New targets are identified for further research on the differential control of satellite cell proliferation in poultry.

  10. Cardiovascular Responses to Skeletal Muscle Stretching: "Stretching" the Truth or a New Exercise Paradigm for Cardiovascular Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Nicholas T; Scheuermann, Barry W

    2017-08-05

    Stretching is commonly prescribed with the intended purpose of increasing range of motion, enhancing muscular coordination, and preventing prolonged immobilization induced by aging or a sedentary lifestyle. Emerging evidence suggests that acute or long-term stretching exercise may modulate a variety of cardiovascular responses. Specifically, at the onset of stretch, the mechanical deformation of the vascular bed coupled with stimulation of group III muscle afferent fibers initiates a cascade of events resulting in both peripheral vasodilation and a heart rate-driven increase in cardiac output, blood pressure, and muscle blood flow. This potential to increase shear stress and blood flow without the use of excessive muscle energy expenditure may hold important implications for future therapeutic vascular medicine and cardiac health. However, the idea that a cardiovascular component may be involved in human skeletal muscle stretching is relatively new. Therefore, the primary intent of this review is to highlight topics related to skeletal muscle stretching and cardiovascular regulation and function. The current evidence suggests that acute stretching causes a significant macro- and microcirculatory event that alters blood flow and the relationship between oxygen availability and oxygen utilization. These acute vascular changes if performed chronically may result in improved endothelial function, improved arterial blood vessel stiffness, and/or reduced blood pressure. Although several mechanisms have been postulated, an increased nitric oxide bioavailability has been highlighted as one promising candidate for the improvement in vessel function with stretching. Collectively, the evidence provided in this review suggests that stretching acutely or long term may serve as a novel and alternative low intensity therapeutic intervention capable of improving several parameters of vascular function.

  11. Quantitative sensory response of the SCM muscle on sustained low level activation simulating co-contractions during bruxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Lydia; Terebesi, Sophia; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Hellmann, Daniel; Schindler, Hans-Jürgen; Schmitter, Marc; Pfau, Doreen

    2017-11-10

    Bruxism is discussed as an etiological factor in the pathogenesis of orofacial and cervical pain. As the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) is co-activated during clenching, our aim was to investigate, whether the muscle loading leads to peripheral or central sensitizations. In twenty-one healthy female volunteers, somatosensory profiles of the SCM were recorded according to the test battery of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS) prior to and after an isometric muscle exercise. QST comprised thermal and mechanical stimuli. A submaximal activation of the SCM (15% MVC) was kept for 10min in sitting position. In separate test sessions one month apart, one sham and one verum experiment were conducted in randomized order. During the muscle loading, the parameters cold detection threshold (CDT), mechanical pain sensitivity (MPS) and pressure pain treshold (PPT) were tested and experimental pain recorded by visual analogoue scales (VAS). All test sessions were performed during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (day 5), to avoid effects on pain perception. Data were analyzed with Repeated Measures ANOVA (SPSS 22.0) RESULTS: No significant changes were found during or after (sham) loading except for stimulus-response-function (SR, P=0.01) and PPT (P=0.02) in the sham test. No effect was observed in the verum experiment (P=0.12 up to 1.0). Prolonged low level contraction of the SCM does not evoke painful sensitization. In contrast, submaximal muscle activation seems to have a protective effect corresponding to a training effect preventing sensitization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Dose-response effects of customised foot orthoses on lower limb muscle activity and plantar pressures in pronated foot type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfer, Scott; Abbott, Mandy; Steultjens, Martijn; Rafferty, Daniel; Woodburn, James

    2013-07-01

    Customised foot orthoses (FOs) featuring extrinsic rearfoot posting are commonly prescribed for individuals with a symptomatic pronated foot type. By altering the angle of the posting it is purported that a controlled dose-response effect during the stance phase of gait can be achieved, however these biomechanical changes have yet to be characterised. Customised FOs were administered to participant groups with symptomatic pronated foot types and asymptomatic normal foot types. The electromyographic (EMG) and plantar pressure effects of varying the dose were measured. Dose was varied by changing the angle of posting from 6° lateral to 10° medial in 2° steps on customised devices produced using computer aided orthoses design software. No effects due to posting level were found for EMG variables. Significant group effects were seen with customised FOs reducing above knee muscle activity in pronated foot types compared to normal foot types (biceps femoris p=0.022; vastus lateralis pcustomised FOs can provide a dose response effect for selected plantar pressure variables, but no such effect could be identified for muscle activity. Foot type may play an important role in the effect of customised orthoses on activity of muscles above the knee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in skeletal muscle qualities during enzyme replacement therapy in late-onset type II glycogenosis: temporal and spatial pattern of mass vs. strength response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaglia, Sabrina; Pichiecchio, Anna; Ponzio, Michela; Danesino, Cesare; Saeidi Garaghani, Kolsoum; Poloni, Guy Umberto; Toscano, Antonio; Moglia, Arrigo; Carlucci, Annalisa; Bini, Paola; Ceroni, Mauro; Bastianello, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    Muscle quality is defined as muscle strength generated per unit muscle mass. If enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has some effects on type II glycogenosis (GSDII) skeletal muscle pathology, we should be able to measure a change in strength and mass. We conducted a prospective study including 11 patients aged 54.2 ± 11.2 years, referring to a single institution and receiving ERT for ≥2 years. Median Walton score was 3 (2.5-6). Lower limb skeletal muscles were assessed by dynamometry and quantitative muscle MRI. Three segments (anterior thigh, posterior thigh, leg) were analysed separately. Clinical-MRI correlations were searched for at T0, T6/T8, and T18/24. Changes in lean and fat body composition were assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. We found that the anterior thigh showed the best therapeutic response, with an improvement in muscle quality (muscle mass: +7.5%, p = 0.035; strength: +45%, p = 0.002). BMI and lean body mass increased (p = 0.007). Patients with low BMI showed a better outcome. Intramuscular fat accumulation significantly progressed in spite of ERT (+3.7%, p = 0.001), especially in the poorly responsive posterior thigh muscles. Both clinical assessment and MRI revealed a definite improvement in the anterior thigh muscles. However, progression of intramuscular fat accumulation during ERT, as well as the limited responsiveness of posterior thigh muscles, suggests the necessity for early treatment intervention. The better outcome of patients with low BMI, if confirmed, may indicate that dietary protocols could be adopted as adjuvant measures to ERT in adult GSDII.

  14. Evidence of adaptations of locomotor neural drive in response to enhanced intermuscular connectivity between the triceps surae muscles of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, Michel; van Dieën, Jaap H; Maas, Huub

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate changes 1) in the coordination of activation of the triceps surae muscle group, and 2) in muscle belly length of soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) during locomotion (trotting) in response to increased stiffness of intermuscular connective tissues in the rat. We measured muscle activation and muscle belly lengths, as well as hindlimb kinematics, before and after an artificial enhancement of the connectivity between SO and LG muscles obtained by implanting a tissue-integrating surgical mesh at the muscles' interface. We found that SO muscle activation decreased to 62%, while activation of LG and medial gastrocnemius muscles increased to 134 and 125%, respectively, compared with the levels measured preintervention. Although secondary additional or amplified activation bursts were observed with enhanced connectivity, the primary pattern of activation over the stride and the burst duration were not affected by the intervention. Similar muscle length changes after manipulation were observed, suggesting that length feedback from spindle receptors within SO and LG was not affected by the connectivity enhancement. We conclude that peripheral mechanical constraints given by morphological (re)organization of connective tissues linking synergists are taken into account by the central nervous system. The observed shift in activity toward the gastrocnemius muscles after the intervention suggests that these larger muscles are preferentially recruited when the soleus has a similar mechanical disadvantage in that it produces an unwanted flexion moment around the knee.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Connective tissue linkages between muscle-tendon units may act as an additional mechanical constraint on the musculoskeletal system, thereby reducing the spectrum of solutions for performing a motor task. We found that intermuscular coordination changes following intermuscular connectivity enhancement. Besides showing that the extent of such

  15. Skeletal muscle remodeling in response to alpine skiing training in older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, M V; Flueck, M; Koesters, A; Gimpl, M; Reifberger, A; Seynnes, O R; Niebauer, J; Rittweger, J; Mueller, E

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated whether regular alpine skiing could reverse sarcopenia and muscle weakness in older individuals. Twenty-two older men and women (67 ± 2 years) underwent 12 weeks of recreational skiing, two to three times a week, each session lasting ∼ 3.5 h. An age-matched, inactive group (n=20, 67 ± 4 years) served as a control (CTRL). Before and after the training period, knee extensors muscle thickness (T(m) ), pennation angle (θ) and fascicle length (L(f) ) of the vastus lateralis muscle were measured by ultrasound. Maximum isokinetic knee extensor torque (MIT) at an angular velocity of 60°/s was measured by dynamometry. After the training, T(m) increased by 7.1% (Palpine skiing is an effective intervention for combating sarcopenia and weakness in old age. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Effects of dietary soybean oil inclusion to replace fish oil on growth, muscle fatty acid composition, and immune responses of juvenile darkbarbel catfish, Pelteobagrus vachelli

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Erchao; Chen, Liqiao; Jiang, Xueqin; Qin, Chuanjie; Jiang, Haibo; Qin, Jianguang

    2013-01-01

    An 80 day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary inclusion of soybean oil to replace fish oil in the diet on growth, muscle fatty acids and immune responses of Pelteobagrus vachelli...

  17. Acclimation temperature affects the metabolic response of amphibian skeletal muscle to insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ann M; Gleeson, Todd T

    2011-09-01

    Frog skeletal muscle mainly utilizes the substrates glucose and lactate for energy metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on the uptake and metabolic fate of lactate and glucose at rest in skeletal muscle of the American bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeiana, under varying temperature regimens. We hypothesize that lactate and glucose metabolic pathways will respond differently to the presence of insulin in cold versus warm acclimated frog tissues, suggesting an interaction between temperature and metabolism under varying environmental conditions. We employed radiolabeled tracer techniques to measure in vitro uptake, oxidation, and incorporation of glucose and lactate into glycogen by isolated muscles from bullfrogs acclimated to 5 °C (cold) or 25 °C (warm). Isolated bundles from Sartorius muscles were incubated at 5 °C, 15 °C, or 25 °C, and in the presence and absence of 0.05 IU/mL bovine insulin. Insulin treatment in the warm acclimated and incubated frogs resulted in an increase in glucose incorporation into glycogen, and an increase in intracellular [glucose] of 0.5 μmol/g (Pglycogen was reduced (Pglycogen synthesis, and a reduction in free intracellular glucose levels (Pmetabolism was attenuated or even reversed. Therefore, a significant interaction between insulin and acclimation condition in controlling skeletal muscle metabolism appears to exist. Our findings further suggest that one of insulin's actions in frog muscle is to increase glucose incorporation into glycogen, and to reduce reliance on lactate as the primary metabolic fuel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Muscle and Liver Carbohydrates: Response to Military Task Performance by Women and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    This technique maximizes suppression of the lipid signal that arises from the subcutaneous fat layer and optimizes signal from the muscle. The ’H...Med. 12: 348-363, 1989. 6. Burke, L.M., G.R. Collier, and M. Hargreaves. Muscle glycogen storage after prolonged exercise: Effect of the glycemic ... index of carbohydrate feedings. J. Appl. Physiol. 75: 1019-1023, 1993. 7. Carrithers, J.A., D.L. Williamson, P.M. Gallagher, M.P. Godard, K.E. Schulze

  19. Increased cellular proliferation in rat skeletal muscle and tendon in response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Bayer, Monika L; Mackey, Abigail

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate exercise-induced cellular proliferation in rat skeletal muscle/tendon with the use of 3'-[F-18]fluoro-3'deoxythymidine (FLT) and to quantitatively study concomitant changes in the proliferation-associated factor, Ki67. PROCEDURES: Wistar rats (......-derived results were supported by a correlation in calf muscle to Ki67 (protein and mRNA level), while this coherence was not found in tendon. CONCLUSION: FLT-PET seems to be a promising tool for imaging of exercise-induced cellular proliferation in musculo-tendinous tissue....

  20. Changes in the human muscle force-velocity relationship in response to resistance training and subsequent detraining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Magnusson, S Peter

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies show that cessation of resistance training, commonly known as "detraining," is associated with strength loss, decreased neural drive, and muscular atrophy. Detraining may also increase the expression of fast muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The present study examined...... the effect of detraining subsequent to resistance training on contractile performance during slow-to-medium velocity isokinetic muscle contraction vs. performance of maximal velocity "unloaded" limb movement (i.e., no external loading of the limb). Maximal knee extensor strength was measured in an isokinetic...... in response to 3 mo of resistance training. After 3 mo of detraining these gains were lost, whereas in contrast maximal unloaded knee extension velocity and power increased 14% (P

  1. PGC-1alpha is not mandatory for exercise- and training-induced adaptive gene responses in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Johansen, Sune T.

    2008-01-01

    a single treadmill-running exercise bout. Soleus and white gastrocnemius (WG) were obtained immediately, 2 h, or 6 h after exercise. Another group of PGC-1alpha KO and WT mice performed 5-wk exercise training. Soleus, WG, and quadriceps were obtained approximately 37 h after the last training session......The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC) 1alpha is required for exercise-induced adaptive gene responses in skeletal muscle. Whole body PGC-1alpha knockout (KO) and littermate wild-type (WT) mice performed....... Resting muscles of the PGC-1alpha KO mice had lower ( approximately 20%) cytochrome c (cyt c), cytochrome oxidase (COX) I, and aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) 1 mRNA and protein levels than WT, but similar levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) alpha1, AMPKalpha2, and hexokinase (HK) II compared...

  2. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  3. Muscle sympathetic nerve responses to passive and active one-legged cycling: insights into the contributions of central command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Connor J; Incognito, Anthony V; Notay, Karambir; Burns, Matthew J; Slysz, Joshua T; Seed, Jeremy D; Nardone, Massimo; Burr, Jamie F; Millar, Philip J

    2018-01-01

    The contribution of central command to the peripheral vasoconstrictor response during exercise has been investigated using primarily handgrip exercise. The purpose of the present study was to compare muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses during passive (involuntary) and active (voluntary) zero-load cycling to gain insights into the effects of central command on sympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise. Hemodynamic measurements and contralateral leg MSNA (microneurography) data were collected in 18 young healthy participants at rest and during 2 min of passive and active zero-load one-legged cycling. Arterial baroreflex control of MSNA burst occurrence and burst area were calculated separately in the time domain. Blood pressure and stroke volume increased during exercise ( P cycling ( P > 0.05). In contrast, heart rate, cardiac output, and total vascular conductance were greater during the first and second minute of active cycling ( P cycling ( P 0.05). Reductions in total MSNA were attenuated during the first ( P cycling, in concert with increased MSNA burst amplitude ( P = 0.02 and P = 0.005, respectively). The sensitivity of arterial baroreflex control of MSNA burst occurrence was lower during active than passive cycling ( P = 0.01), while control of MSNA burst strength was unchanged ( P > 0.05). These results suggest that central feedforward mechanisms are involved primarily in modulating the strength, but not the occurrence, of a sympathetic burst during low-intensity dynamic leg exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Muscle sympathetic nerve activity burst frequency decreased equally during passive and active cycling, but reductions in total muscle sympathetic nerve activity were attenuated during active cycling. These results suggest that central command primarily regulates the strength, not the occurrence, of a muscle sympathetic burst during low-intensity dynamic leg exercise.

  4. A mixed-effects model of the dynamic response of muscle gene transcript expression to endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, Thierry; Flück, Martin

    2013-05-01

    Altered expression of a broad range of gene transcripts after exercise reflects the specific adjustment of skeletal muscle makeup to endurance training. Towards a quantitative understanding of this molecular regulation, we aimed to build a mixed-effects model of the dynamics of co-related transcript responses to exercise. It was built on the assumption that transcript levels after exercise varied because of changes in the balance between transcript synthesis and degradation. It was applied to microarray data of 231 gene transcripts in vastus lateralis muscle of six subjects 1, 8 and 24 h after endurance exercise and 6-week training on a stationary bicycle. Cluster analysis was used to select groups of transcripts having highest co-correlation of their expression (r > 0.70): Group 1 comprised 45 transcripts including factors defining the oxidative and contractile phenotype and Group 2 included 39 transcripts mainly defined by factors found at the cell periphery and the extracellular space. Data from six subjects were pooled to filter experimental noise. The model fitted satisfactorily the responses of Group 1 (r (2) = 0.62 before and 0.85 after training, P < 0.001) and Group 2 (r (2) = 0.75 and 0.79, P < 0.001). Predicted variation in transcription rate induced by exercise yielded a difference in amplitude and time-to-peak response of gene transcripts between the two groups before training and with training in Group 2. The findings illustrate that a mixed-effects model of transcript responses to exercise is suitable to explore the regulation of muscle plasticity by training at the transcriptional level and indicate critical experiments needed to consolidate model parameters empirically.

  5. A comparison of models of the isometric force of locust skeletal muscle in response to pulse train inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emma; Rustighi, Emiliano; Newland, Philip L; Mace, Brian R

    2012-03-01

    Muscle models are an important tool in the development of new rehabilitation and diagnostic techniques. Many models have been proposed in the past, but little work has been done on comparing the performance of models. In this paper, seven models that describe the isometric force response to pulse train inputs are investigated. Five of the models are from the literature while two new models are also presented. Models are compared in terms of their ability to fit to isometric force data, using Akaike's and Bayesian information criteria and by examining the ability of each model to describe the underlying behaviour in response to individual pulses. Experimental data were collected by stimulating the locust extensor tibia muscle and measuring the force generated at the tibia. Parameters in each model were estimated by minimising the error between the modelled and actual force response for a set of training data. A separate set of test data, which included physiological kick-type data, was used to assess the models. It was found that a linear model performed the worst whereas a new model was found to perform the best. The parameter sensitivity of this new model was investigated using a one-at-a-time approach, and it found that the force response is not particularly sensitive to changes in any parameter.

  6. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  7. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    -extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate...

  8. Glycogenin activity and mRNA expression in response to volitional exhaustion in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shearer, Jane; Graham, Terry E.; Battram, Danielle S.

    2005-01-01

    ) exercised to volitional exhaustion (Exh) on a cycle ergometer at 75% maximal O2 uptake. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest, 30 min, and Exh (99 ± 10 min). At rest, total glycogen concentration was 497 ± 41 and declined to 378 ± 51 mmol glucosyl units/kg dry wt following 30 min of exercise (P

  9. Grandpaternal-induced transgenerational dietary reprogramming of the unfolded protein response in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Petter S; de Castro Barbosa, Thais; Barrès, Romain

    2017-01-01

    impacts the transcriptome and lipidome in skeletal muscle. Our aim was to identify tissue-specific pathways involved in transgenerational inheritance of environmental-induced phenotypes. METHODS: F0 male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a HFD or chow for 12 weeks before breeding with chow-fed females...

  10. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rotta Bonfim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.

  11. Proteomic analysis of skeletal muscle in insulin-resistant mice: response to 6-week aerobic exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairui Yuan

    Full Text Available Aerobic exercise has beneficial effects on both weight control and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity through a number of specific signaling proteins. To investigate the targets by which exercise exerts its effects on insulin resistance, an approach of proteomic screen was applied to detect the potential different protein expressions from skeletal muscle of insulin-resistant mice after prolonged aerobic exercise training and their sedentary controls. Eighteen C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: 6 mice were fed normal chow (NC and 12 mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD for 10 weeks to produce an IR model. The model group was then subdivided into HFD sedentary control (HC, n = 6 and HFD exercise groups (HE, n = 6. Mice in HE group underwent 6 weeks of treadmill running. After 6 weeks, mice were sacrificed and skeletal muscle was dissected. Total protein (n = 6, each group was extracted and followed by citrate synthase, 2D proteome profile analysis and immunoblot. Fifteen protein spots were altered between the NC and HC groups and 23 protein spots were changed between the HC and HE groups significantly. The results provided an array of changes in protein abundance in exercise-trained skeletal muscle and also provided the basis for a new hypothesis regarding the mechanism of exercise ameliorating insulin resistance.

  12. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta, E-mail: mrb-unesp@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Motricidade, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista “Júlio de Mesquita Filho” (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle [Setor de Doenças Neuromusculares, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaral, Sandra Lia do; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz [Departamento de Educação Física, Faculdade de Ciências, UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.

  13. Oral quercetin supplementation hampers skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, R A; Martínez-López, E J; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test exercise-induced adaptations on skeletal muscle when quercetin is supplemented. Four groups of rats were tested: quercetin sedentary, quercetin exercised, placebo sedentary, and placebo exercised. Treadmill exercise training took place 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Quercetin groups ...

  14. Response of Turkey Muscle Satellite Cells to Thermal Challenge. II. Transcriptome Effects in Differentiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent M. Reed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure of poultry to extreme temperatures during the critical period of post-hatch growth can seriously affect muscle development and thus compromise subsequent meat quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells by thermal challenge during differentiation. Our goal is to better define how thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure and subsequent development.Results: Skeletal muscle satellite cells previously isolated from the Pectoralis major muscle of 7-wk-old male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo from two breeding lines: the F-line (16 wk body weight-selected and RBC2 (randombred control line were used in this study. Cultured cells were induced to differentiate at 38°C (control or thermal challenge temperatures of 33 or 43°C. After 48 h of differentiation, cells were harvested and total RNA was isolated for RNAseq analysis. Analysis of 39.9 Gb of sequence found 89% mapped to the turkey genome (UMD5.0, annotation 101 with average expression of 18,917 genes per library. In the cultured satellite cells, slow/cardiac muscle isoforms are generally present in greater abundance than fast skeletal isoforms. Statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed among treatments and between turkey lines, with a greater number of genes affected in the F-line cells following cold treatment whereas more differentially expressed (DE genes were observed in the RBC2 cells following heat treatment. Many of the most significant pathways involved signaling, consistent with ongoing cellular differentiation. Regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis appears to be significantly affected by temperature treatment, particularly cold treatment.Conclusions: Satellite cell differentiation is directly influenced by temperature at the level of gene transcription with greater effects attributed to selection for fast growth. At lower temperature, muscle-associated genes in the

  15. Ischemic preconditioning does not alter muscle sympathetic responses to static handgrip and metaboreflex activation in young healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incognito, Anthony V; Doherty, Connor J; Lee, Jordan B; Burns, Matthew J; Millar, Philip J

    2017-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has been hypothesized to elicit ergogenic effects by reducing feedback from metabolically sensitive group III/IV muscle afferents during exercise. If so, reflex efferent neural outflow should be attenuated. We investigated the effects of IPC on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during static handgrip (SHG) and used post-exercise circulatory occlusion (PECO) to isolate for the muscle metaboreflex. Thirty-seven healthy men (age: 24 ± 5 years [mean ± SD]) were randomized to receive sham (n = 16) or IPC (n = 21) interventions. Blood pressure, heart rate, and MSNA (microneurography; sham n = 11 and IPC n = 18) were collected at rest and during 2 min of SHG (30% maximal voluntary contraction) and 3 min of PECO before (PRE) and after (POST) sham or IPC treatment (3 × 5 min 20 mmHg or 200 mmHg unilateral upper arm cuff inflation). Resting mean arterial pressure was higher following sham (79 ± 7 vs. 83 ± 6 mmHg, P IPC (81 ± 6 vs. 82 ± 6 mmHg, P > 0.05), while resting MSNA burst frequency was unchanged (P > 0.05) with sham (18 ± 7 vs. 19 ± 9 bursts/min) or IPC (17 ± 7 vs. 19 ± 7 bursts/min). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and total vascular conductance responses during SHG and PECO were comparable PRE and POST following sham and IPC (All P > 0.05). Similarly, MSNA burst frequency, burst incidence, and total MSNA responses during SHG and PECO were comparable PRE and POST with sham and IPC (All P > 0.05). These findings demonstrate that IPC does not reduce hemodynamic responses or central sympathetic outflow directed toward the skeletal muscle during activation of the muscle metaboreflex using static exercise or subsequent PECO. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  16. Gender differences in fatigability and muscle activity responses to a short-cycle repetitive task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Divya; Sinden, Kathryn E; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Côté, Julie N

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiological research has identified women to be more susceptible to developing neck-shoulder musculoskeletal disorders when performing low-force, repetitive work tasks. Whether this is attributable to gender differences in fatigability and motor control is currently unclear. This study investigated the extent to which women differ from men in fatigability and motor control while performing a short-cycle repetitive task. 113 healthy young adults (58 women, 55 men) performed a standardized repetitive pointing task. The task was terminated when the subject's perceived exertion reached 8 on the Borg scale. The time to task termination, and changes in means and cycle-to-cycle variabilities of surface electromyography signals from start to end of the task, were compared between women and men, for the upper trapezius, anterior deltoid, biceps and triceps muscles. Women and men terminated the task after 6.5 (SD 3.75) and 7 (SD 4) min on average (p > 0.05). All four muscles showed an increase of 25-35 % in average muscle activity with fatigue (no significant sex differences). However, men exhibited a higher increase than women in trapezius muscle variability with fatigue (31 vs. 7 %; p muscle variability where women had an increase (-23 vs. 12 %; p < 0.05). Our results suggest that women and men may not differ in the ability to perform repetitive tasks at low-to-moderate force levels. However, differences in motor control strategies employed in task performance may explain gender differences in susceptibility to developing musculoskeletal disorders when performing repetitive work for prolonged periods in occupational life.

  17. Physiological and electromyographic responses during 40-km cycling time trial: relationship to muscle coordination and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Rodrigo R; Carpes, Felipe P; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; Mota, Carlos B; Guimarães, Antônio Carlos S

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the oxygen uptake (VO(2)), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), cadence and muscle activity during cycling a 40-km time trial (TT), and to analyse the relationship between muscle activity and power output (PO). Eight triathletes cycled a 40-km TT on their own bicycles, which were mounted on a stationary cycle simulator. The VO(2), RER and muscle activity (electromyography, EMG) from tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GA), biceps femoris (BF), rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) of the lower limb were collected. The PO was recorded from the cycle simulator. The data were collected at the 3rd, 10th, 20th, 30th and 38th km. The root mean square envelope (RMS) of EMG was calculated. The VO(2) and PO presented a significant increase at the 38th km (45.23+/-8.35 ml kg min(-1) and 107+/-7.11% of mean PO of 40-km, respectively) compared to the 3rd km (38.12+/-5.98 ml kg min(-1) and 92+/-8.30% of mean PO of 40-km, respectively). There were no significant changes in cadence and RER throughout the TT. The VL was the only muscle that presented significant increases in the RMS at the 10th km (22.56+/-3.05% max), 20th km (23.64+/-2.52% max), 30th km (25.27+/-3.00% max), and 38th km (26.28+/-3.57%max) when compared to the 3rd km (21.03+/-1.88%max). The RMS of VL and RF presented a strong relationship to PO (r=0.89 and 0.86, respectively, pmuscles, probably in attempt to avoid premature muscle fatigue.

  18. Patterns of gene expression in atrophying skeletal muscles: response to food deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoe, R. Thomas; Lecker, Stewart H.; Gomes, Marcelo; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2002-01-01

    During fasting and many systemic diseases, muscle undergoes rapid loss of protein and functional capacity. To define the transcriptional changes triggering muscle atrophy and energy conservation in fasting, we used cDNA microarrays to compare mRNAs from muscles of control and food-deprived mice. Expression of >94% of genes did not change, but interesting patterns emerged among genes that were differentially expressed: 1) mRNAs encoding polyubiquitin, ubiquitin extension proteins, and many (but not all) proteasome subunits increased, which presumably contributes to accelerated protein breakdown; 2) a dramatic increase in mRNA for the ubiquitin ligase, atrogin-1, but not most E3s; 3) a significant suppression of mRNA for myosin binding protein H (but not other myofibrillar proteins) and IGF binding protein 5, which may favor cell protein loss; 4) decreases in mRNAs for several glycolytic enzymes and phosphorylase kinase subunits, and dramatic increases in mRNAs for pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and glutamine synthase, which should promote glucose sparing and gluconeogenesis. During fasting, metallothionein mRNA increased dramatically, mRNAs for extracellular matrix components fell, and mRNAs that may favor cap-independent mRNA translation rose. Significant changes occurred in mRNAs for many growth-related proteins and transcriptional regulators. These transcriptional changes indicate a complex adaptive program that should favor protein degradation and suppress glucose oxidation in muscle. Similar analysis of muscles atrophying for other causes is allowing us to identify a set of atrophy-specific changes in gene expression.

  19. The menstrual cycle and exercise: performance, muscle glycogen, and substrate responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklas, B J; Hackney, A C; Sharp, R L

    1989-08-01

    Six eumenorrheic females (age = 26.3 +/- 2.4 yrs; X +/- SE) exercised until exhaustion (EE; 70% VO2max) at the midluteal (LP, 7-8 days after ovulation) and midfollicular (FP, days 7-8) phases of their menstrual cycles. Phases were confirmed by estradiol and progesterone concentrations. Each EE test was preceded by a depletion exercise bout (DE; 90 min, 60% VO2max and 4 x 1 min, 100% VO2max) and 3 days of rest/diet control. Muscle biopsies 1% (vastus lateralis) were taken post-DE, pre-EE, and post-EE and then analyzed for glycogen content. There was a strong tendency (P less than 0.07) for EE duration to be greater during LP (139.2 +/- 14.9 min) than FP (126 +/- 17.5 min). Glycogen repletion (pre-EE minus post-DE) following DE was greater (P = 0.05) during the LP than FP (88.2 +/- 4.7 vs 72.8 +/- 5.7 mumol/g w. w. muscle). However, EE glycogen utilization (pre-EE minus post-EE/EE time) did not differ between phases (LP = 0.41 +/- 0.08 mumol/g w. w. muscle/min vs FP = 0.33 +/- 0.11 mumol/g w. w. muscle/min; P = 0.17). The results suggest that exercise performance and muscle glycogen content are enhanced during the LP of the menstrual cycle. These findings imply athletic performance may be affected by the phases of the menstrual cycle.

  20. In Vivo Molecular Responses of Fast and Slow Muscle Fibers to Lipopolysaccharide in a Teleost Fish, the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo J. Magnoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The physiological consequences of the activation of the immune system in skeletal muscle in fish are not completely understood. To study the consequences of the activation of the immune system by bacterial pathogens on skeletal muscle function, we administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an active component of Gram-negative bacteria, in rainbow trout and performed transcriptomic and proteomic analyses in skeletal muscle. We examined changes in gene expression in fast and slow skeletal muscle in rainbow trout at 24 and 72 h after LPS treatment (8 mg/kg by microarray analysis. At the transcriptional level, we observed important changes in metabolic, mitochondrial and structural genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle. In slow skeletal muscle, LPS caused marked changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, while in fast skeletal muscle LPS administration caused major changes in the expression of genes coding for glycolytic enzymes. We also evaluated the effects of LPS administration on the fast skeletal muscle proteome and identified 14 proteins that were differentially induced in LPS-treated trout, primarily corresponding to glycolytic enzymes. Our results evidence a robust and tissue-specific response of skeletal muscle to an acute inflammatory challenge, affecting energy utilization and possibly growth in rainbow trout.

  1. Influence of the Repetitive Corrugation on the Mechanism Occuring During Plastic Deformation of CuSn6 Alloy

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    Nuckowski P.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research results of CuSn6 alloy strip at semi-hard state, plastically deformed in the process of repetitive corrugation. The influence of process parameters on the mechanical properties and structure of examined alloy were investigated. Examination in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM confirmed the impact of the repetitive corrugation to obtain the nano-scale structures. It has been found, that the application of repetitive corrugation increases the tensile strength (Rm, yield strength (Rp0.2 and elastic limit (Rp0,05 of CuSn6 alloy strips. In the present work it has been confirmed that the repetitive corrugation process is a more efficient method for structure and mechanical properties modification of commercial CuSn6 alloy strip (semi-hard as compared with the classic rolling process.

  2. Input-output properties of motor unit responses in muscles stretched by imposed displacements of the monkey wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatton, W G; Bawa, P

    1979-01-01

    Reflex responses are "servo-like" where the output is graded with the input or are "triggered" where the output is independent of input once an input threshold is exceeded. Imposed displacements of monkey or human upper limb joints result in prolonged EMG output in the muscles stretched by the displacements. The longer-latency portions of the prolonged output have been variously reported to be servo-like or to be triggered in nature. In monkeys and humans, angular wrist displacements imposed by step loads result in three peaks (M1, M2 and M3) in the gross EMG recorded from the stretched muscles. Each gross EMG peak largely results from the firing of a separately-responding subpopulation of single motor units (SMUs). We studied the responses of SMUs to loads that were presented to the monkeys in a random order as to magnitude, duration and onset time. Average response histograms were constructed for the SMU responses for individual step load magnitudes. Averages were also constructed for the simultaneously-recorded gross EMG responses for each step load magnitude. The input parameters used were the initial velocity of displacement or the magnitude of step load, while the output was taken as the probability of firing/millisecond/presentation above baseline for the SMUs or the area under the response peaks above baseline for gross EMG. The results establish: 1) That it is not possible to unambiguously determine the input-output properties of the responses to imposed displacements utilizing the analysis of gress EMG activity due to the response characteristics of the various subpopulations of motor units contributing to the gross response. 2) That the SMU activity during all of the peak intervals is monotonically graded with increases in magnitude of the step load or the initial velocity of displacement. Hence, the long-latency portions of the EMG responses are servo-like in nature and are not preprogrammed or triggered responses. 3) That the gain (output/input) of the

  3. Assessment of abdominal muscle function in individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Squair, Jordan W; Chua, Romeo; Lam, Tania; Chen, Zhen; Carpenter, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To use transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography to assess the potential for preserved function in the abdominal muscles in individuals classified with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6. Five individuals with spinal cord injury (C5-T3) and 5 able-bodied individuals. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the abdominal region of primary motor cortex during resting and sub-maximal (or attempted) contractions. Surface electromyography was used to record motor-evoked potentials as well as maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions in the abdominal muscles and the diaphragm. Responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in the abdominal muscles occurred in all spinal cord injury subjects. Latencies of muscle response onsets were similar in both groups; however, peak-to-peak amplitudes were smaller in the spinal cord injury group. During maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions all spinal cord injury subjects were able to elicit electromyography activity above resting levels in more than one abdominal muscle across tasks. Individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 were able to activate abdominal muscles in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation and during maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions. The activation was induced directly through corticospinal pathways, and not indirectly by stretch reflex activations of the diaphragm. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measurements provide a useful method to assess motor preservation of abdominal muscles in persons with spinal cord injury.

  4. Your Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Should You Go to School? Breast Cancer Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  5. Transcriptional response of zebrafish embryos exposed to neurotoxic compounds reveals a muscle activity dependent hspb11 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Klüver

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitors are widely used as pesticides and drugs. Their primary effect is the overstimulation of cholinergic receptors which results in an improper muscular function. During vertebrate embryonic development nerve activity and intracellular downstream events are critical for the regulation of muscle fiber formation. Whether AChE inhibitors and related neurotoxic compounds also provoke specific changes in gene transcription patterns during vertebrate development that allow them to establish a mechanistic link useful for identification of developmental toxicity pathways has, however, yet not been investigated. Therefore we examined the transcriptomic response of a known AChE inhibitor, the organophosphate azinphos-methyl (APM, in zebrafish embryos and compared the response with two non-AChE inhibiting unspecific control compounds, 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DMB and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP. A highly specific cluster of APM induced gene transcripts was identified and a subset of strongly regulated genes was analyzed in more detail. The small heat shock protein hspb11 was found to be the most sensitive induced gene in response to AChE inhibitors. Comparison of expression in wildtype, ache and sop(fixe mutant embryos revealed that hspb11 expression was dependent on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR activity. Furthermore, modulators of intracellular calcium levels within the whole embryo led to a transcriptional up-regulation of hspb11 which suggests that elevated intracellular calcium levels may regulate the expression of this gene. During early zebrafish development, hspb11 was specifically expressed in muscle pioneer cells and Hspb11 morpholino-knockdown resulted in effects on slow muscle myosin organization. Our findings imply that a comparative toxicogenomic approach and functional analysis can lead to the identification of molecular mechanisms and specific marker genes for potential neurotoxic compounds.

  6. The Impact of Experience on Affective Responses during Action Observation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise P Kirsch

    Full Text Available Perceiving others in action elicits affective and aesthetic responses in observers. The present study investigates the extent to which these responses relate to an observer's general experience with observed movements. Facial electromyographic (EMG responses were recorded in experienced dancers and non-dancers as they watched short videos of movements performed by professional ballet dancers. Responses were recorded from the corrugator supercilii (CS and zygomaticus major (ZM muscles, both of which show engagement during the observation of affect-evoking stimuli. In the first part of the experiment, participants passively watched the videos while EMG data were recorded. In the second part, they explicitly rated how much they liked each movement. Results revealed a relationship between explicit affective judgments of the movements and facial muscle activation only among those participants who were experienced with the movements. Specifically, CS activity was higher for disliked movements and ZM activity was higher for liked movements among dancers but not among non-dancers. The relationship between explicit liking ratings and EMG data in experienced observers suggests that facial muscles subtly echo affective judgments even when viewing actions that are not intentionally emotional in nature, thus underscoring the potential of EMG as a method to examine subtle shifts in implicit affective responses during action observation.

  7. Vibroacoustic Characterization of Corrugated-Core and Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert; Schiller, Noah

    2016-01-01

    The vibroacoustic characteristics of two candidate launch vehicle fairing structures, corrugated- core and honeycomb-core sandwich designs, were studied. The study of these structures has been motivated by recent risk reduction efforts focused on mitigating high noise levels within the payload bays of large launch vehicles during launch. The corrugated-core sandwich concept is of particular interest as a dual purpose structure due to its ability to harbor resonant noise control systems without appreciably adding mass or taking up additional volume. Specifically, modal information, wavelength dispersion, and damping were determined from a series of vibrometer measurements and subsequent analysis procedures carried out on two test panels. Numerical and analytical modeling techniques were also used to assess assumed material properties and to further illuminate underlying structural dynamic aspects. Results from the tests and analyses described herein may serve as a reference for additional vibroacoustic studies involving these or similar structures.

  8. Thermal Characteristics of a Primary Surface Heat Exchanger with Corrugated Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Won Seo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a primary surface heat exchanger (PSHE with corrugated surfaces. The PSHE was experimentally investigated for a Reynolds number range of 156–921 under various flow conditions on the hot and cold sides. The inlet temperature of the hot side was maintained at 40 °C, while that of the cold side was maintained at 20 °C. A counterflow was used as it has a higher temperature proximity in comparison with a parallel flow. The heat transfer rate and pressure drop were measured for various Reynolds numbers on both the hot and cold sides of the PSHE, with the heat transfer coefficients for both sides computed using a modified Wilson plot method. Based on the results of the experiment, both Nusselt number and friction factor correlations were suggested for a PSHE with corrugated surfaces.

  9. Analysis of Vibrations Generated by the Presence of Corrugation in a Modeled Tram Track

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia I. Real Herráiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the development of the railway system. Despite the huge benefits of railways, one of the main drawbacks of this mode of transport is vibrations caused by vehicles in service, especially in the case of trams circulating in urban areas. Moreover, this undesirable phenomenon may be exacerbated by the presence of irregularities in the rail-wheel contact. Thus, an analytical model able to reproduce the vibrational behavior of a real stretch of tram track was implemented. Besides, a simulation of different types of corrugation was carried out by calculating in an auxiliary model the dynamic overloads generated by corrugation. These dynamic overloads fed the main model to obtain the vibrations generated and then transmitted to the track.

  10. Low-frequency metamaterial absorber with small-size unit cell based on corrugated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the design, analysis, and simulation of the low-frequency perfect metamaterial absorber (MMA based on corrugated surface, which has very small unit-cell size. The proposed MMA consist of a regular square-array and a metallic background plane, separated by a corrugated surface with periodic square-pillar-array. Through the optimized design, the ratios between lattice constant and resonance wavelength for nearly-perfect and high absorption MMA are close to 1/15 and 1/21, respectively. To explain the absorption mechanism of suggested structures, the surface current and electromagnetic field distributions are given. Moreover, the absorption peaks remain high with large angles of incidence for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations, which provide more efficient absorptions for oblique incident electromagnetic wave.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Buckling Load of Circular and Corrugated Tubes by Utilizing Key Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur Rahim, Mohammad Reyaz; Akhtar, S.; Bharti, P. K.

    2017-08-01

    The performance of buckling load of tubular structures under quasi-static axial loading is quite appreciable, numerous tubes of various cross-section have been extensively investigated and corrugated sections have been designed to further improve the performance. In this paper, a carefully designed set of key performance indicators (KPIs) is utilized to assess and compare the buckling load of circular and corrugated tubes. A series of diagrams related to KPIs with various parameters of tubes are presented to demonstrate the influence of sectional configuration on the performance of tubes as well as the effect of the material on the potential of the same. The work is inestimable to engineering designs and applications, and further studies on the buckling load of other configurations.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Buckling Load of Circular and Corrugated Tubes by Utilizing Key Performance Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ur Rahim Mohammad Reyaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of buckling load of tubular structures under quasi-static axial loading is quite appreciable, numerous tubes of various cross-section have been extensively investigated and corrugated sections have been designed to further improve the performance. In this paper, a carefully designed set of key performance indicators (KPIs is utilized to assess and compare the buckling load of circular and corrugated tubes. A series of diagrams related to KPIs with various parameters of tubes are presented to demonstrate the influence of sectional configuration on the performance of tubes as well as the effect of the material on the potential of the same. The work is inestimable to engineering designs and applications, and further studies on the buckling load of other configurations.

  13. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-01

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  14. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu [Changzhou Key Laboratory of Sensor Networks and Environmental Sensing, College of IOT, Hohai University Changzhou, Jiangsu, 213022 (China)

    2014-02-18

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  15. Preserved skeletal muscle protein anabolic response to acute exercise and protein intake in well-treated rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Dideriksen, Kasper; Andersen, Mads Bisgaard

    2015-01-01

    and anabolic signaling response in patients with RA compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Thirteen RA patients (age range 34-84 years; diagnosed for 1-32 years, median 8 years) were individually matched with 13 healthy controls for gender, age, BMI and activity level (CON). Plasma levels of C-reactive protein...... of genes related to inflammatory signaling, myogenesis and muscle growth/atrophy were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: CRP was significantly higher in the RA patients (2.25 (0.50) mg/l) than in controls (1.07 (0.25) mg/l; p = 0.038) and so was TNF......-α (RA 1.18 (0.30) pg/ml vs. CON 0.64 (0.07) pg/ml; p = 0.008). Muscle myofibrillar protein synthesis in both RA patients and CON increased in response to PROT and PROT + EX, and even more with PROT + EX (p 0.05). The gene expression response was largely...

  16. Injection of a recombinant AAV serotype 2 into canine skeletal muscles evokes strong immune responses against transgene products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, K; Yoshimura, M; Urasawa, N; Ohshima, S; Howell, J M; Nakamura, A; Hijikata, T; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Y; Takeda, S

    2007-09-01

    Using murine models, we have previously demonstrated that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated microdystrophin gene transfer is a promising approach to treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To examine further therapeutic effects and the safety issue of rAAV-mediated microdystrophin gene transfer using larger animal models, such as dystrophic dog models, we first investigated transduction efficiency of rAAV in wild-type canine muscle cells, and found that rAAV2 encoding beta-galactosidase effectively transduces canine primary myotubes in vitro. Subsequent rAAV2 transfer into skeletal muscles of normal dogs, however, resulted in low and transient expression of beta-galactosidase together with intense cellular infiltrations in vivo, where cellular and humoral immune responses were remarkably activated. In contrast, rAAV2 expressing no transgene elicited no cellular infiltrations. Co-administration of immunosuppressants, cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil could partially improve rAAV2 transduction. Collectively, these results suggest that immune responses against the transgene product caused cellular infiltration and eliminated transduced myofibers in dogs. Furthermore, in vitro interferon-gamma release assay showed that canine splenocytes respond to immunogens or mitogens more susceptibly than murine ones. Our results emphasize the importance to scrutinize the immune responses to AAV vectors in larger animal models before applying rAAV-mediated gene therapy to DMD patients.

  17. Comparison of thermal and hemodynamic responses in skin and muscles to heating with electric and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Glažar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 12.00 Introduction: It has been shown that sufficient amount of energy provided by electromagnetic diathermy induces the increase of skin temperature and underlying tissues. However, scarce information is available on the differences in responses initiated by various techniques of diathermy. The goal of the present study was to compare thermal and hemodynamic responses of the skin and underlying muscles of the forearm to diathermy applied with electric (EF or magnetic field (MF. Methods: Eleven healthy volunteers participated in the study. On two separate occasions, they randomly received 20-minut diathermy with EF or with MF. Skin and tympanic temperature, and heart rate were measured. Further, kinetics of muscle oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin kinetics were obtained. Thermal perception and thermal comfort were noted through the application of EF and MF. Results: The skin temperature increased similarly during the administration of EF and MF, by ~ 8.0 ± 1.3°C on both occasions. The thermal perception was more intense during the application of EF. Accordingly, the thermal comfort during the application of EF was perceived as less comfortable as compared with MF. During MF the increase in minute muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption was for ~ 42 % higher compared to the heating with EF. Conclusion: Although the increase in skin temperature was similar between EF and MF, the application of diathermy with MF was perceived more comfortable by the participants. Furthermore, the increase in minute muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption was higher in MF compared with EF. Thus, when muscle is the target tissue for physical therapy, a diathermy with magnetic field is the technique of choice. Normal 0 21 false false false SL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Navadna tabela"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso

  18. Electromyographic, cerebral and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii at three submaximal intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagesh eBhambhani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the electromyographic, cerebral and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent isometric contractions of biceps brachii at 20%, 40% and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. Eleven volunteers completed two minutes of intermittent isometric contractions (12/min at an elbow angle of 90° interspersed with three minutes rest between intensities in systematic order. Surface electromyography (EMG was recorded from the right biceps brachii and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS was used to simultaneously measure left prefrontal and right biceps brachii oxyhemoglobin (HbO2, deoxyhemoglobin (HHb and total hemoglobin (Hbtot. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to measure middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv bilaterally. Finger photoplethysmography was used to record beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate. EMG increased with force output from 20% to 60% MVC (P0.05. MCAv increased from rest to exercise but was not different among intensities (P>0.05. Force output correlated with the root mean square EMG and changes in muscle HbO2 (P0.05 at all three intensities. Force output declined by 8% from the 1st to the 24th contraction only at 60% MVC and was accompanied by systematic increases in RMS, cerebral HbO2 and Hbtot with a levelling off in muscle HbO2 and Hbtot. These changes were independent of alterations in mean arterial pressure. Since cerebral blood flow and oxygenation were elevated at 60% MVC, we attribute the development of fatigue to reduced muscle oxygen availability rather than impaired central n

  19. Electromyographic, cerebral, and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii at three submaximal intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhambhani, Yagesh; Fan, Jui-Lin; Place, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Kayser, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the electromyographic, cerebral and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent isometric contractions of biceps brachii at 20, 40, and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Eleven volunteers completed 2 min of intermittent isometric contractions (12/min) at an elbow angle of 90° interspersed with 3 min rest between intensities in systematic order. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the right biceps brachii and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to simultaneously measure left prefrontal and right biceps brachii oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HHb), and total hemoglobin (Hbtot). Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to measure middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) bilaterally. Finger photoplethysmography was used to record beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate. EMG increased with force output from 20 to 60% MVC (P MVC (P MVC (P MVC (P > 0.05). MCAv increased from rest to exercise but was not different among intensities (P > 0.05). Force output correlated with the root mean square EMG and changes in muscle HbO2 (P 0.05) at all three intensities. Force output declined by 8% from the 1st to the 24th contraction only at 60% MVC and was accompanied by systematic increases in RMS, cerebral HbO2 and Hbtot with a leveling off in muscle HbO2 and Hbtot. These changes were independent of alterations in mean arterial pressure. Since cerebral blood flow and oxygenation were elevated at 60% MVC, we attribute the development of fatigue to reduced muscle oxygen availability rather than impaired central neuronal activation. PMID:24966837

  20. Plasma cytokine response, lipid peroxidation and NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle following maximum progressive swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Cleto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine lipid peroxidation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle and the plasma cytokine profile following maximum progressive swimming. Adult male Swiss mice (N = 15 adapted to the aquatic environment were randomly divided into three groups: immediately after exercise (EX1, 3 h after exercise (EX2 and control. Animals from the exercising groups swam until exhaustion, with an initial workload of 2% of body mass attached to the tail. Control mice did not perform any exercise but were kept immersed in water for 20 min. Maximum swimming led to reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in skeletal muscle, as indicated by increased thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS levels (4062.67 ±1487.10 vs 19,072.48 ± 8738.16 nmol malondialdehyde (MDA/mg protein, control vs EX1. Exercise also promoted NF-κB activation in soleus muscle. Cytokine secretion following exercise was marked by increased plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels 3 h post-exercise (P < 0.05. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 levels were reduced following exercise and remained reduced 3 h post-exercise (P < 0.05. Plasma levels of other cytokines investigated, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin-12 (IL-12, were not altered by exercise. The present findings showed that maximum swimming, as well as other exercise models, led to lipid peroxidation and NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle and increased plasma IL-6 levels. The plasma cytokine response was also marked by reduced IL-10 levels. These results were attributed to exercise type and intensity.

  1. Resveratrol modulates the angiogenic response to exercise training in skeletal muscle of aged men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann Hybholt, Lasse; Olesen, Jesper; Biensø, Rasmus S

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The polyphenol resveratrol has in animal studies been shown to influence several pathways of importance for angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the angiogenic effect of resveratrol supplementation with parallel exercise training in aged men. Methods: Forty-three healthy...... physically inactive aged men (65±1 years) were divided into A) a training group that conducted 8 weeks of intense exercise training where half of the subjects received a daily intake of either 250 mg trans resveratrol (n=14) and the other half received placebo (n=13); and B) a non-training group...... that received either 250 mg trans resveratrol (n=9) or placebo (n=7). Results: The group that trained with placebo showed a ~20% increase in capillary to fiber (C:F) ratio, an increase in the muscle protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2, and tissue inhibitor of matrix...

  2. Transcription rates of SERCA and phospholamban genes change in response to chronic stimulation of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, P; Zhang, K M; Spratt, J A; Wechsler, A S; Briggs, F N

    1998-01-07

    Chronic low frequency stimulation of predominantly fast-twitch skeletal muscles decrease the levels of SERCA1 (fast-twitch sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase) mRNA, and increase the levels of SERCA2 (slow-twitch sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase) and phospholamban mRNAs. To assess the role of transcription in these changes in mRNA levels, nuclei were isolated from chronically stimulated canine latissimus dorsi muscles and transcription rates were estimated by nuclear run-on assays. Decreases in the rates of SERCA1 gene transcription matched the fall in its mRNA level and increases in the rates of SERCA2 and phospholamban gene transcription matched the increases in their mRNAs.

  3. Variable stiffness corrugated composite structure with shape memory polymer for morphing skin applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaobo; Liu, Liwu; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju

    2017-03-01

    This work presents a variable stiffness corrugated structure based on a shape memory polymer (SMP) composite with corrugated laminates as reinforcement that shows smooth aerodynamic surface, extreme mechanical anisotropy and variable stiffness for potential morphing skin applications. The smart composite corrugated structure shows a low in-plane stiffness to minimize the actuation energy, but also possess high out-of-plane stiffness to transfer the aerodynamic pressure load. The skin provides an external smooth aerodynamic surface because of the one-sided filling with the SMP. Due to variable stiffness of the shape memory polymer the morphing skin exhibits a variable stiffness with a change of temperature, which can help the skin adjust its stiffness according different service environments and also lock the temporary shape without external force. Analytical models related to the transverse and bending stiffness are derived and validated using finite element techniques. The stiffness of the morphing skin is further investigated by performing a parametric analysis against the geometry of the corrugation and various sets of SMP fillers. The theoretical and numerical models show a good agreement and demonstrate the potential of this morphing skin concept for morphing aircraft applications. We also perform a feasibility study of the use of this morphing skin in a variable camber morphing wing baseline. The results show that the morphing skin concept exhibits sufficient bending stiffness to withstand the aerodynamic load at low speed (less than 0.3 Ma), while demonstrating a large transverse stiffness variation (up to 191 times) that helps to create a maximum mechanical efficiency of the structure under varying external conditions.

  4. Additives for enhancing the drying properties of adhesives for corrugated boards

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnuvarthanan, M.; Rajeswari, N.

    2013-01-01

    Adhesives play a fundamental role in many modern technologies, and adhesive failure can have catastrophic consequences. It is, therefore, valuable to understand the factors important for the production of a good durable adhesive bond. The additives are also used to enrich the properties. The objective of this paper is to increase the drying speed of the starch adhesive by adding suitable additives and thereby increasing the production speed of corrugated board manufacturing. The other functio...

  5. Histomorphometric analysis of the response of rat skeletal muscle to swimming, immobilization and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.F. Nascimento

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine to what extent, if any, swimming training applied before immobilization in a cast interferes with the rehabilitation process in rat muscles. Female Wistar rats, mean weight 260.52 ± 16.26 g, were divided into 4 groups of 6 rats each: control, 6 weeks under baseline conditions; trained, swimming training for 6 weeks; trained-immobilized, swimming training for 6 weeks and then immobilized for 1 week; trained-immobilized-rehabilitated, swimming training for 6 weeks, immobilized for 1 week and then remobilized with swimming for 2 weeks. The animals were then sacrificed and the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were dissected, frozen in liquid nitrogen and processed histochemically (H&E and mATPase. Data were analyzed statistically by the mixed effects linear model (P < 0.05. Cytoarchitectural changes such as degenerative characteristics in the immobilized group and regenerative characteristics such as centralized nucleus, fiber size variation and cell fragmentation in the groups submitted to swimming were more significant in the soleus muscle. The diameters of the lesser soleus type 1 and type 2A fibers were significantly reduced in the trained-immobilized group compared to the trained group (P < 0.001. In the tibialis anterior, there was an increase in the number of type 2B fibers and a reduction in type 2A fibers when trained-immobilized rats were compared to trained rats (P < 0.001. In trained-immobilized-rehabilitated rats, there was a reduction in type 2B fibers and an increase in type 2A fibers compared to trained-immobilized rats (P < 0.009. We concluded that swimming training did not minimize the deleterious effects of immobilization on the muscles studied and that remobilization did not favor tissue re-adaptation.

  6. Respiratory response to exercise in postpolio patients with severe inspiratory muscle dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, J; Borg, J; Bevegård, S; Sinderby, C

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the limiting factors of exercise performance and to analyze the respiratory strategies adopted during exercise in postpolio patients with severe inspiratory muscle dysfunction. Five patients with prior poliomyelitis associated with scoliosis and with respiratory muscle dysfunction (mean vital capacity, 1.74L [range, 1.1 to 2.4]) were studied at rest and during leg or arm cycle exercise. Gas exchange was examined by arterial blood gases and mass spectrometry of expired air. Ventilatory mechanics were studied by measurement of esophageal and gastric pressures. Blood gases at rest were normal, except for subnormal PO2 levels in three patients. In all but one patient, ventilatory insufficiency was the limiting factor for exercise. A compensatory breathing pattern with abdominal muscle recruitment during expiration was present already at rest in three of the patients. The pressures generated by the diaphragm were below fatiguing margins, ie, levels that in healthy subjects can be sustained for at least 45 minutes. The extent of ventilatory dysfunction was not evident in blood gas values at rest; however, it was revealed by blood gas values during the exercise test. Diaphragm fatigue seems to be avoided at the cost of impaired blood gases.

  7. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  8. Dose response of endotoxin on hepatocyte and muscle mitochondrial respiration in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeger, Victor; Brandt, Sebastian; Porta, Francesca; Jakob, Stephan M; Takala, Jukka; Djafarzadeh, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Results on mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis are controversial. We aimed to assess effects of LPS at wide dose and time ranges on hepatocytes and isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) were exposed to placebo or LPS (0.1, 1, and 10 μg/mL) for 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours and primary human hepatocytes to 1 μg/mL LPS or placebo (4, 8, and 16 hours). Mitochondria from porcine skeletal muscle samples were exposed to increasing doses of LPS (0.1-100 μg/mg) for 2 and 4 hours. Respiration rates of intact and permeabilized cells and isolated mitochondria were measured by high-resolution respirometry. In HepG2 cells, LPS reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP content but did not modify basal respiration. Stimulated complex II respiration was reduced time-dependently using 1 μg/mL LPS. In primary human hepatocytes, stimulated mitochondrial complex II respiration was reduced time-dependently using 1 μg/mL LPS. In isolated porcine skeletal muscle mitochondria, stimulated respiration decreased at high doses (50 and 100 μg/mL LPS). LPS reduced cellular ATP content of HepG2 cells, most likely as a result of the induced decrease in membrane potential. LPS decreased cellular and isolated mitochondrial respiration in a time-dependent, dose-dependent and complex-dependent manner.

  9. Design and Characterization of a Novel Rotating Corrugated Drum Reactor for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Meunier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel photoreactor system consisting of a TiO2-coated corrugated drum and a UV light source is experimentally characterized for the treatment of phenol-polluted wastewaters. The design incorporates periodic illumination and increased agitation through the introduction of rotation. The effects ofrent degrees and flat fins to increase surface area, varying rotational speed, initial pollutant concentration, and illumination intensities were studied. The corrugated and finned drums did not exhibit a critical rotational speed, indicating that there is excellent mass transfer in the system. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic analysis was applied to the degradation, and an average adsorption coefficient of K=0.120 L/mg was observed. The overall reaction rate increased with increasing surface area from 0.046 mg/L/min for the annular drum to 0.16 mg/L/min for the 40-fin drum. The apparent photonic efficiency was found to increase with increasing surface area at a faster rate for the corrugations than for the fin additions. The energy efficiency (EE/O found for the drums varied from 380–550 kWh/m3, which is up to 490% more energy-efficient than the annular drum.

  10. Coupled-Mode Theory for Complex-Index, Corrugated Multilayer Stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüder, Hannes; Gerken, Martina; Adam, Jost

    We present a coupled-mode theory (CMT) approach for modelling the modal behaviour of multi- layer thinfilm devices with complex material parameters and periodic corrugations. Our method provides fast computation and extended physical insight as compared to standard numerical methods. Nanostructur......We present a coupled-mode theory (CMT) approach for modelling the modal behaviour of multi- layer thinfilm devices with complex material parameters and periodic corrugations. Our method provides fast computation and extended physical insight as compared to standard numerical methods......-film devices [1] and for increasing the sensitivity of refractive index sensors [2]. Here, we show a coupled-mode theory approach for modelling such devices. We first calculate the unperturbed waveguide modes (Fig.1), used as basis functions in the coupled-mode formalism. The waveguide corrugation is treated...... to be non-Hermitian, introducing two major consequences. First, the eigenvalues (i. e. the mode neff) have to be found in the complex plane (Fig. 2). Second, the classical mode orthogonality is no longer valid. We address both challenges by a combination of three complex-root solving algorithms...

  11. Corrugation Architecture Enabled Ultraflexible Wafer-Scale High-Efficiency Monocrystalline Silicon Solar Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabry, Rabab R.

    2018-01-02

    Advanced classes of modern application require new generation of versatile solar cells showcasing extreme mechanical resilience, large-scale, low cost, and excellent power conversion efficiency. Conventional crystalline silicon-based solar cells offer one of the most highly efficient power sources, but a key challenge remains to attain mechanical resilience while preserving electrical performance. A complementary metal oxide semiconductor-based integration strategy where corrugation architecture enables ultraflexible and low-cost solar cell modules from bulk monocrystalline large-scale (127 × 127 cm) silicon solar wafers with a 17% power conversion efficiency. This periodic corrugated array benefits from an interchangeable solar cell segmentation scheme which preserves the active silicon thickness of 240 μm and achieves flexibility via interdigitated back contacts. These cells can reversibly withstand high mechanical stress and can be deformed to zigzag and bifacial modules. These corrugation silicon-based solar cells offer ultraflexibility with high stability over 1000 bending cycles including convex and concave bending to broaden the application spectrum. Finally, the smallest bending radius of curvature lower than 140 μm of the back contacts is shown that carries the solar cells segments.

  12. Development of a human body finite element model with multiple muscles and their controller for estimating occupant motions and impact responses in frontal crash situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masami; Nakahira, Yuko; Kimpara, Hideyuki; Sugiyama, Takahiko; Min, Kyuengbo

    2012-10-01

    A few reports suggest differences in injury outcomes between cadaver tests and real-world accidents under almost similar conditions. This study hypothesized that muscle activity could primarily cause the differences, and then developed a human body finite element (FE) model with individual muscles. Each muscle was modeled as a hybrid model of bar elements with active properties and solid elements with passive properties. The model without muscle activation was firstly validated against five series of cadaver test data on impact responses in the anterior-posterior direction. The model with muscle activation levels estimated based on electromyography (EMG) data was secondly validated against four series of volunteer test data on bracing effects for stiffness and thickness of an upper arm muscle, and braced driver's responses under a static environment and a brake deceleration. A muscle controller using reinforcement learning (RL), which is a mathematical model of learning process in the basal ganglia associated with human postural controls, were newly proposed to estimate muscle activity in various occupant conditions including inattentive and attentive conditions. Control of individual muscles predicted by RL reproduced more human like head-neck motions than conventional control of two groups of agonist and antagonist muscles. The model and the controller demonstrated that head-neck motions of an occupant under an impact deceleration of frontal crash were different in between a bracing condition with maximal braking force and an occupant condition predicted by RL. The model and the controller have the potential to investigate muscular effects in various occupant conditions during frontal crashes.

  13. Adenosine A3 receptor stimulation reduces muscle injury following physical trauma and is associated with alterations in the MMP/TIMP response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Maria L; Wang, Ruibo; Zambraski, Edward J; Liang, Bruce T

    2012-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that in response to traumatic injury in skeletal muscle, there is a dysregulation of the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs), a response hypothesized to interfere with proper skeletal muscle regeneration. Moreover, we have shown that pharmacological activation of the adenosine A(3) receptor by Cl-IBMECA in skeletal muscle can protect against ischemia-reperfusion and eccentric exercise injury. However, the mechanism by which Cl-IBMECA protects muscle tissue is poorly defined. This study evaluated the effects of Cl-IBMECA on MMP/TIMP expression in skeletal muscle and tested the hypothesis that adenosine A(3) receptor-stimulated protection of skeletal muscle following traumatic injury is associated with a blunting of MMPs involved in inflammatory processes and collagen degradation, and an increase in MMPs associated with extracellular matrix remodeling. Sixty C57BL/6J male mice were injected with Cl-IBMECA (n = 30) or a vehicle (n = 30), and Evans blue dye. Injury was induced by applying a cold steel probe (-79°C) to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle for 10 s. TA muscles from uninjured and injured legs were collected 3, 10, and 24 h postinjury for analysis of muscle injury and MMP/TIMP mRNA and protein levels. Twenty-four hours postinjury, 56.8% of the fibers were damaged in vehicle-treated mice vs. 35.4% in Cl-IBMECA-treated mice (P = 0.02). Cl-IBMECA treatment reduced membrane type 1 (MT1)-MMP, MMP-3, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 mRNA expression 2- to 20-fold compared with vehicle-treated mice (P muscle injury.

  14. Splicing of the rSlo Gene Affects the Molecular Composition and Drug Response of Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Antonietta; Latorre, Ramon; Conte Camerino, Diana; Tricarico, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The molecular composition and drug responses of calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels of skeletal muscle are unknown. Patch-clamp experiments combined with transcript scanning of the Kcnma1 gene encoding the alpha subunit of the BK channel were performed in rat slow-twitch soleus (Sol) and fast-twitch flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) skeletal muscles. Five splicing products of the Kcnma1 gene were isolated from Sol and FDB: the e17, e22, +29 aa, Slo27 and Slo0 variants. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of e22 and Slo0 were 80–90% higher in FDB than Sol, whereas the expression of Slo27 was 60% higher in Sol than FDB, and the +29 aa variant was equally expressed in both muscle types. No beta 1-4 subunits were detected. In Sol, a large BK current with low Ca2+ sensitivity was recorded. The BK channel of Sol also showed a reduced response to BK channel openers, such as NS1619, acetazolamide and related drugs. In FDB, a reduced BK current with high Ca2+ sensitivity and an enhanced drug response was recorded. The total BK RNA content, which was 200% higher in Sol than in FDB, correlated with the BK currents in both muscles. Drug responses primarily correlated with e22 and Slo0 expression levels in FDB and to Slo27 expression in Sol muscle. In conclusion, phenotype-dependent BK channel biophysical and pharmacological properties correlated with the expression levels of the variants in muscles. These findings may be relevant to conditions affecting postural muscles, such as prolonged bed-rest, and to diseases affecting fast-twitch muscles, such as periodic paralysis. Down-regulation or up-regulation of the variants associated with pathological conditions may affect channel composition and drug responses. PMID:22808126

  15. Muscle damage, inflammatory, immune and performance responses to three football games in 1 week in competitive male players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Magni; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Barbero-Álvarez, Jose Carlos; Castagna, Carlo; Douroudos, Ioannis; Avloniti, Alexandra; Margeli, Alexandra; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Flouris, Andreas D; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Krustrup, Peter; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2016-01-01

    We examined effects of a three-game, 1-week microcycle (G1, G2, G3) on recovery of performance and inflammatory responses in professional male footballers. Players were randomized into an experimental (EXP; N = 20) and a control group (CON; N = 20). Blood was drawn and repeated sprint ability (RSA), muscle soreness and knee range of motion (KJRM) were determined pre- and post-games and during recovery. High-intensity running during G2 was 7-14% less compared to G1 and G3. RSA declined in EXP by 2-9% 3 days post-game with G2 causing the greatest performance impairment. In EXP, game play increased muscle soreness (~sevenfold) compared to CON with G2 inducing the greatest rise, while KJRM was attenuated post-game in EXP compared to CON (5-7%) and recovered slower post G2 and G3 than G1. CK, CRP, sVCAM-1, sP-Selectin and cortisol peaked 48 h post-games with G2 eliciting the greatest increase. Leukocyte count, testosterone, IL-1β and IL6 responses, although altered 24 h post each game, were comparable among games. Plasma TBARS and protein carbonyls rose by ~50% post-games with G2 eliciting the greatest increase 48 h of recovery. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio declined for 24 h post all games with G2 displaying the slowest recovery. Total antioxidant capacity and glutathione peroxidase activity increased (9-56%) for 48 h in response to game play. In summary, post-game performance recovery and inflammatory adaptations in response to a three-game weekly microcycle displayed a different response pattern, with strong indications of a largest physiological stress and fatigue after the middle game that was preceded by only a 3-day recovery.

  16. mRNA-seq reveals skeletal muscle atrophy in response to handling stress in a marine teleost, the red cusk-eel (Genypterus chilensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Jorge E; Maldonado, Jonathan; Aballai, Víctor; Estrada, Juan M; Bastias-Molina, Macarena; Meneses, Claudio; Gallardo-Escarate, Cristian; Silva, Herman; Molina, Alfredo; Valdés, Juan A

    2015-12-01

    Fish reared under intensive conditions are repeatedly exposed to stress, which negatively impacts growth. Although most fish follow a conserved pattern of stress response, with increased concentrations of cortisol, each species presents specificities in the cell response and stress tolerance. Therefore, culturing new species requires a detailed knowledge of these specific responses. The red cusk-eel (Genypterus chilensis) is a new economically important marine species for the Chilean aquaculture industry. However, there is no information on the stress- and cortisol-induced mechanisms that decrease skeletal muscle growth in this teleost. Using Illumina RNA-seq technology, skeletal muscle sequence reads for G. chilensis were generated under control and handling stress conditions. Reads were mapped onto a reference transcriptome, resulting in the in silico identification of 785 up-regulated and 167 down-regulated transcripts. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of catabolic genes associated with skeletal muscle atrophy. These results were validated by RT-qPCR analysis for ten candidates genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, autophagy and skeletal muscle growth. Additionally, using a primary culture of fish skeletal muscle cells, the effect of cortisol was evaluated in relation to red cusk-eel skeletal muscle atrophy. The present data demonstrated that handling stress promotes skeletal muscle atrophy in the marine teleost G. chilensis through the expression of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome systems. Furthermore, cortisol was a powerful inductor of skeletal muscle atrophy in fish myotubes. This study is an important step towards understanding the atrophy system in non-model teleost species and provides novel insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control skeletal muscle growth in early vertebrates.

  17. Reduced nuclear translocation of serum response factor is associated with skeletal muscle atrophy in a cigarette smoke-induced mouse model of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ran Ma, Xuefang Gong, Hua Jiang, Chunyi Lin, Yuqin Chen, Xiaoming Xu, Chenting Zhang, Jian Wang, Wenju Lu, Nanshan ZhongGuangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, The 1st Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Skeletal muscle atrophy and dysfunction are common complications in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Serum response factor (SRF is a transcription factor which is critical in myocyte differentiation and growth. In this study, we established a mouse COPD model induced by cigarette smoking (CS exposure for 24 weeks, with apparent pathophysiological changes, including increased airway resistance, enlarged alveoli, and skeletal muscle atrophy. Levels of upstream regulators of SRF, striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS, and ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA were decreased in quadriceps muscle of COPD mice. Meanwhile, the nucleic location of SRF was diminished along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. There was a downregulation of the target muscle-specific gene, Igf1. These results suggest that the CS is one of the major cause for COPD pathogenesis, which induces the COPD-associated skeletal muscle atrophy which is closely related to decreasing SRF nucleic translocation, consequently downregulating the SRF target genes involved in muscle growth and nutrition. The STARS/RhoA signaling pathway might contribute to this course by impacting SRF subcellular distribution. Keywords: SRF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, skeletal muscle atrophy, cigarette smoking

  18. The effects of resistance exercise training on macro- and micro-circulatory responses to feeding and skeletal muscle protein anabolism in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna; Limb, Marie C; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Sjøberg, Kim A; Smith, Kenneth; Williams, John P

    2015-06-15

    Increases in limb blood flow in response to nutrition are reduced in older age. Muscle microvascular blood flow (MBF) in response to nutrition is also reduced with advancing age and this may contribute to age-related 'anabolic resistance'. Resistance exercise training (RET) can rejuvenate limb blood flow responses to nutrition in older individuals. We report here that 20 weeks of RET also restores muscle MBF in older individuals. Restoration of MBF does not, however, enhance muscle anabolic responses to nutrition. The anabolic effects of dietary protein on skeletal muscle depend on adequate skeletal muscle perfusion, which is impaired in older people. This study explores fed state muscle microvascular blood flow, protein metabolism and exercise training status in older men. We measured leg blood flow (LBF), muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV) and muscle protein turnover under post-absorptive and fed state (i.v. Glamin to double amino acids, dextrose to sustain glucose ∼7-7.5 mmol l(-1) ) conditions in two groups: 10 untrained men (72.3 ± 1.4 years; body mass index (BMI) 26.5 ± 1.15 kg m(2) ) and 10 men who had undertaken 20 weeks of fully supervised, whole-body resistance exercise training (RET) (72.8 ± 1.4 years; BMI 26.3 ± 1.2 kg m(2) ). We measured LBF by Doppler ultrasound and muscle MBV by contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) was measured using [1, 2-(13) C2 ] leucine with breakdown (MPB) and net protein balance (NPB) by ring-[D5 ] phenylalanine tracers. Plasma insulin was measured via ELISA and indices of anabolic signalling (e.g. Akt/mTORC1) by immunoblotting from muscle biopsies. Whereas older untrained men did not exhibit fed-state increases in LBF or MBV, the RET group exhibited increases in both LBF and MBV. Despite our hypothesis that enhanced fed-state circulatory responses would improve anabolic responses to nutrition, fed-state increases in MPS (∼50-75%; P < 0.001) were identical in both groups

  19. Dynamic muscle O2 saturation response is impaired during major non-cardiac surgery despite goal-directed haemodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldheiser, A; Hunsicker, O; Kaufner, L; Köhler, J; Sieglitz, H; Casans Francés, R; Wernecke, K-D; Sehouli, J; Spies, C

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a vascular occlusion test (VOT) could indicate an impairment of microvascular reactivity (MVR) in septic patients by detecting changes in dynamic variables of muscle O2 saturation (StO2). However, in the perioperative context the consequences of surgical trauma on dynamic variables of muscle StO2 as indicators of MVR are still unknown. This study is a sub-analysis of a randomised controlled trial in patients with metastatic primary ovarian cancer undergoing debulking surgery, during which a goal-directed haemodynamic algorithm was applied using oesophageal Doppler. During a 3 min VOT, near-infrared spectroscopy was used to assess dynamic variables arising from changes in muscle StO2. At the beginning of surgery, values of desaturation and recovery slope were comparable to values obtained in healthy volunteers. During the course of surgery, both desaturation and recovery slope showed a gradual decrease. Concomitantly, the study population underwent a transition to a surgically induced systemic inflammatory response state shown by a gradual increase in norepinephrine administration, heart rate, and Interleukin-6, with a peak immediately after the end of surgery. Higher rates of norepinephrine and a higher heart rate were related to a faster decline in StO2 during vascular occlusion. Using near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a VOT during surgery showed a gradual deterioration of MVR in patients treated with optimal haemodynamic care. The deterioration of MVR was accompanied by the transition to a surgically induced systemic inflammatory response state. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface facial electromyography, skin conductance, and self-reported emotional responses to light- and season-relevant stimuli in seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Kathryn Tierney; Rohan, Kelly J; Roecklein, Kathryn A; Mahon, Jennifer N

    2011-09-01

    Learned associations between depressive behavior and environmental stimuli signaling low light availability and winter season may play a role in seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The purpose of this study was to determine whether light and season environmental cues elicit emotional responses that are distinct in individuals with SAD. Twenty-four currently depressed SAD participants were compared to 24 demographically-matched controls with no depression history on emotional responses to outdoor scenes captured under two light intensity (i.e., clear, sunny vs. overcast sky) and three season (i.e., summer with green leaves, fall with autumn foliage, and winter with bare trees) conditions. Emotion measures included surface facial electromyography (EMG) activity in the corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major muscle regions, skin conductance, and self-reported mood state on the Profile of Mood States Depression-Dejection Subscale. Light intensity was a more salient cue than season in determining emotional reactions among SAD participants. Relative to controls, SAD participants displayed more corrugator activity, more frequent significant skin conductance responses (SCR), greater SCR magnitude, and more self-reported depressed mood in response to overcast stimuli and less corrugator activity, lower SCR magnitude, and less self-reported depressed mood in response to sunny stimuli. Study limitations include the single, as opposed to repeated, assessment and the lack of a nonseasonal depression group. These findings suggest that extreme emotional reactivity to light-relevant stimuli may be a correlate of winter depression; and future work should examine its potential onset or maintenance significance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microcirculatory responses to carotid sinus nerve stimulation at various ambient O2 tension in the rabbit tenuissimus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, M; Kamiya, A

    1985-11-01

    To quantify the integrated effects of local and central control mechanisms through tissue metabolites and the autonomic nervous system on the peripheral vascular beds, microcirculatory responses to the carotid sinus nerve stimulation at various levels of ambient oxygen tension (PO2) were measured in the rabbit tenuissimus muscle suffused with oxygenated Tyrode solution, using a microscope-TV system. The statistical analysis of the experimental data exhibited that both capillary red cell velocity and perfused capillary density at the control state were significantly decreased as PO2 was elevated (P less than 0.01) and that the stimulation also significantly augmented their values (P less than 0.01) except for the peak velocity data. Regression analysis indicated that both the velocity and density responses to PO2 changes during stimulation were less sensitive than those at the control state. For instance, the vasodilating effect of stimulation on density at PO2 20 mm Hg was enhanced by about four-fold at 80 mm Hg, although the effect on velocity was increased only by 16% with the same PO2 change. From these results, it was concluded that the microcirculatory changes due to the arteriolar smooth muscle contraction evoked by unit sympathetic discharge was significantly influenced by the ambient PO2 level. Such synergistic interaction of the local and central control mechanisms like a series-coupled gain control system was suspected to play an important role in the overall regulation of the microcirculation.

  2. Skeletal muscle radio-density is an independent predictor of response and outcomes in follicular lymphoma treated with chemoimmunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Chu

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle radio-density (SMD measures muscle radiation attenuation (in Hounsfield Units, HU on computed tomography (CT scans. Low SMD is prognostic of poor survival in melanoma, however its significance is unknown for hematologic malignancies. We performed a single institution, retrospective review of all follicular lymphoma (FL patients who received chemoimmunotherapy from 2004-2009. Patient demographics, FL International Prognostic Index 1 (FLIPI-1, progression free (PFS and overall survival (OS were collected as primary endpoints. Objective response rates (ORR were secondary. SMD was calculated using pre-treatment CT scans. In 145 patients reviewed, median values were age 59, FLIPI-1 of 2, stage III, and 8 chemoimmunotherapy cycles received. Median PFS for those with low SMD ( 25 kg/m2, respectively compared to those with high SMD was profoundly worse, 69.6 vs. 106.7 months (hazard ratio [HR] 1.85; p = 0.01, respectively. Median OS was not reached in patients with high SMD vs. 92.7 months in low SMD patients (HR 4.02; p = 0.0002. Multivariate analysis supported lower SMD's OS detriment (HR = 3.40; p = 0.002 independent of FLIPI-1 (HR 1.46-2.76, p = 0.05 or gender. Low SMD predicted lower ORR, 83 vs. 96% (p = 0.01. SMD predicts survival independent of FLIPI-1 and potentially chemoimmunotherapy response. SMD is an inexpensive and powerful tool that can complement FLIPI-1.

  3. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 on the relaxation responses of the cavernous smooth muscle from aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhan-Ping; Wang, Huai-Peng; Liu, Jiu-Min; Zheng, Xiang-Guang; Wu, Dan; Pu, Xiao-Yong

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was determine whether intracavernosal injection (ICI) of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) protein can improve corpus cavernosal smooth muscle relaxation in aging rats. Ten young (4-month-old) and 30 old (24-month-old) Sprague-Dawley male rats were enrolled in the study. The old rats were divided into three groups: vehicle-only (n = 10), IGF-1 1 µg/kg (n = 10) and IGF-1 10 µg/kg treatment groups (n = 10). After 4 weeks of single IGF-1 injection treatment, strips of corporal tissue were precontracted with phenylephrine, and dose-response curves were generated to evaluate endothelial-dependent [acetylcholine (ACh)], endothelial-independent [sodium nitroprusside (SNP)] and electrical field stimulation (EFS) vasoreactivity. The changes in percentage of cavernosal smooth muscle and the concentration of nitric oxide (NO) in penile tissue were also evaluated. After IGF-1 treatment, the vasoreactivity was significantly improved in both the 1 µg/kg and the 10 µg/kg treatment groups compared with the vehicle-only group at 4 weeks in response to ACh, SNP and EFS (all p corpus cavernosum of the aging rat.

  4. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Amaral, Sandra Lia do; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz

    2015-02-13

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords "statin" AND "exercise" AND "muscle", restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.A associação do tratamento medicamentoso por estatinas com a prática de exercícios físicos pode reduzir substancialmente o risco de mortalidade cardiovascular de indivíduos dislipidêmicos, porém sua realização vem sendo associada à exacerbação de quadros miopáticos. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo apresentar os resultados mais recentes da literatura específica sobre os efeitos da associação de estatinas ao exercício físico na musculatura esquelética. Para tanto, realizou

  5. EFFECTS OF THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT ON PLAYERS' PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE, HORMONAL RESPONSES, MUSCLE DAMAGE AND RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo Ojala

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine changes in selected physiological and performance variables of male tennis players (n=8 during a 3-day tennis tournament and the following 2-day recovery period. Each player played three two-hour tennis matches. The following measurements were taken: blood samples for serum testosterone T, cortisol C, creatinekinase CK, performance tests of maximal isometric leg press MVC and maximal rate of force development RFD, 5m run 5m, 5-leap 5l, counter movement jump CMJ and serve velocity S and DOMS questionnaire. During the games at 40 and 80 minutes the following tests were made: blood sample, MVC, 5m, CMJ and S. Both MVC and RFD were before the 2nd and 3rd match significantly lower than before the 1st match (p < 0.02 and remained reduced after 1 to 2 days of recovery. Serum C was significantly higher than the baseline value before each match (p < 0.05 and after 40 minutes of playing (p < 0.03. Serum T elevated from the baseline during every match at T40 (p < 0.02. CK elevated during the whole tournament peaking after the 3rd match. After one rest day CK was still significantly higher than the baseline value. Upper and lower body DOMS were elevated significantly but remained above the baseline after one rest day. The tennis tournament leads to reduced MVC and RFD, increased muscle damage and soreness and reduced recovery. It seems that a tennis tournament causes such a heavy speed strength load for the legs in addition to muscle damage that the recovery of explosive attributes of leg extensor muscles is impaired after two days of rest after the tournament. Serum cortisol and testosterone concentration elevated before and during the tennis match, but the outcome of the tennis match is difficult to predict using C or/and T levels before, during or after the match

  6. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  7. Sweating responses to isometric hand-grip exercise and forearm muscle metaboreflex in prepubertal children and elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Kai, Seiko; Nakajima, Michi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Gerrett, Nicola; Kondo, Narihiko; Inoue, Yoshimitsu

    2017-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Non-thermal factors (e.g. muscle metaboreflex) contribute to the sweating response during exercise. Although it is well recognized that the sweating responses caused by core temperature elevation in prepubertal children and the elderly are attenuated compared with young adults, it is unknown whether non-thermal sweating is also attenuated in these populations. What is the main finding and its importance? The non-thermal sweating response during isometric hand-grip exercise and isolated muscle metaboreflex were attenuated in prepubertal children compared with young adults in a non-uniform manner over the body, but only during the muscle metaboreflex in the elderly. This may explain the maturation- and ageing-related decline of sweating during exercise.