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Sample records for corrosive soils

  1. Screening of soil corrosivity by field testing: Results and design of an electrochemical soil corrosion probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars vendelbo; Bruun, Niels Kåre

    1996-01-01

    The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed...... on the plates during exposure. An electrochemical soil corrosion probe has been designed and manufactured allowing for simultaneous measurements of several qauntities to predict corrosion. The probe consists of individual sections capable of measuring redox-potential, corrosion potential, soil resistivity...

  2. Field corrosion characterization of soil corrosion of X70 pipeline steel in a red clay soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengrong Wang; Cuiwei Dun; Xiaogang Li; Zhiyong Liunn; Min Zhu; Dawei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of X70 pipeline steel buried in red soil environment has been studied. The surface morphology and elemental distribution were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion kinetics was evaluated by weight loss measurement. The results show that in red soil, the corrosion rate of X70 steel decreases with time, and follows the exponential decay law. General corrosion with non-uniform and localized pitting occurred on the steel surface.α-FeOOH was the dominate products during corrosion in whole buried periods, and the corrosion products exhibited well protective properties. The potentiodynamic polarization tests revealed that icorr decreased with time, indicating the improvement of corrosion resistance. The results of Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS) are consistent with potentiodynamic polarization tests.

  3. Field corrosion characterization of soil corrosion of X70 pipeline steel in a red clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengrong Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of X70 pipeline steel buried in red soil environment has been studied. The surface morphology and elemental distribution were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM,energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The corrosion kinetics was evaluated by weight loss measurement. The results show that in red soil, the corrosion rate of X70 steel decreases with time, and follows the exponential decay law. General corrosion with non-uniform and localized pitting occurred on the steel surface. α-FeOOH was the dominate products during corrosion in whole buried periods, and the corrosion products exhibited well protective properties. The potentiodynamic polarization tests revealed that icorr decreased with time, indicating the improvement of corrosion resistance. The results of Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS are consistent with potentiodynamic polarization tests.

  4. On Potentials of Ferrous Electrodes in Soil Corrosion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Tripathi

    1966-04-01

    Full Text Available Open circuit potentials of electrodes and short circuit of soil corrosion cells constituted by cast iron, mild steel and wrought iron electrodes in the typical Indian soils have been determined and the voltages and the internal resistances of the cells have been calculated. The electrode potentials do not have a simple correlation with any of the soil properties. In non-acidic soils, the cell voltage at first increases abruptly with moisture equivalent, reaches maximum at about 15 and then decreases gradually. Based on this an interpretation has been offered for the maximum corrosivity of soils, having moisture equivalent, 30, as observed for mild steel and wrought iron. In an acidic soil electrode potentials of all the ferrous metals are indentical and cell voltages, very small. Hence most of the corrosion proceeds through direct chemical reaction. Cast iron is slightly less corrodible than mild steel and wrought iron because of additional protective influence of liberated carbon deposited over the metal.

  5. On Corrosion of Ferrous in Typical Indian Soils-Part II Wrought Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajendra Nath Tripathi

    1965-07-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of wrought iron in ten Indian soils, employing Schwerdtfeger's soil corrosion cell procedure has been studied. The corrosion of wrought iron n non-acidic solid proceeds through electrochemical mechanism. Usually the rate of corrosion is maximum at the beginning and with the development of the film of the common products, the rate gradually decreases with time until it becomes more or less constant . In most of the cases 'uneven' general or local corrosion with pittings is observed. The maximum penetration is directly proportional to the corrodibility. Soils having moisture equivalent in the range 25-30% are most corrosive. The corrosivity of soils increases with increase in the concentration of soluble electrolytes. Ferric oxide present in laterite soil functions as a cathodic depolariser and hence increase the corrosivity. In and acidic sol the corrosion mainly proceeds through the mechanism of direct chemical reaction . The results have also been analyzed and correlated with various factors.

  6. Soil corrosion monitoring near a pipeline under CP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Locke, M.L. (NW Natural); Warthen, M.R. (NW Natural); Kane, Russell D. (Intercorr International Inc.); Eden, Dawn C. (Intercorr International Inc.)

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical noise (EN), linear polarization resistance (LPR), and harmonic distortion analysis (HDA) were used with three-electrode probes to monitor the corrosion occurring in soil in dry and wet conditions near a gas pipeline under cathodic protection. The test site was a cathodic protection (CP) test station where impressed current CP was applied to a 2 in. (5.1 cm) diameter FBE coated steel pipe using an 84 in. (0.2 m) TA-2 high-silicon cast iron anode. Electrochemical measurements were made at three locations, two inside the CP field and one outside the CP field. Electrochemical measurements were first made with the CP system off to establish the baseline corrosion and then with increasing levels of CP. The degree of protection was based on polarized potential and the adequacy of protection was determined by depolarization measurements. CP of an adjacent pipeline did not affect the measurement of either corrosion rate or pitting factor when using buried soil corrosion probes and the EN, LPR, and HDA techniques.

  7. On Corrosion of Ferrous Metals in Typical Indian Soils Part I : Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajendra Nath Tripathi

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrodibility of cast iron in ten typical Indian soils, employing Schwerdtfeger's soil corrosion cell procedure and the physico-chemical properties of the soils responsible for their corrosivity have been determined. The results have been statistically analysed, interpreted and correlated with various factors. Corrosion of cast iron in non acidic soils (p/supH4-10 proceeds through electro-chemical mechanism. Usually the rate of corrosion is maximum at the beginning and with development of the film of corrosion products, the rate gradually decrease with time until it becomes more or less constant, 'Even' general corrosion is observed on most of the cases. The maximum penetration is directly proportional corrodibility. The corrosivity of soils in situ is directly poroportional to the moisture equivalent or, in turn, to the clay content. The corrosivity of soils increases with the concentration at soluble electrolytes. Ferric oxide present in a laterite soil functions as a cathodic depolariser and hence increases its corrosivity. In an acidic soil, the corrosion mainly proceeds through the mechanism of direct chemical reaction.

  8. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  9. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  10. Corrosion behaviors of arc spraying single and double layer coatings in simulated Dagang soil solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Bi-lan; LU Xin-ying; LI Long

    2009-01-01

    Three kinds of single layer coatings of Zn,Zn15Al,316L stainless steel and two kinds of double layer coatings with inner layer of Zn or Zn15Al and outer layer of 316L stainless steel by arc spraying were developed to protect the metal ends of prestressed high-strength concrete (PHC) pipe piles against soil corrosion.The corrosion behaviors of the coated Q235 steel samples in the simulated Dagang soil solution were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and natural immersion tests.The results show that the corrosion of the matrix Q235 steel is effectively inhibited by Zn,Zn15Al,Zn+316L and Zn15Al+316L coatings.The corrosion rate value of Zn15Al coated samples is negative.The corrosion products on Zn and Zn15Al coated samples are compact and firm.The corrosion resistance indexes of both Zn and Zn15Al coated samples are improved significantly with corrosion time,and the latter are more outstanding than the former.But the corrosion resistance of 316L coated samples is decreased quickly with the increase in immersion time.When the coatings are sealed with epoxy resin,the corrosion resistance of the coatings will be enhanced significantly.

  11. Unique characteristics of Pb in soil contaminated by red lead anti-corrosion paint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brokbartold, M.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Weng, L.; Marschner, B.

    2013-01-01

    Red lead (Pb3O4) has been extensively used in the past in anti-corrosion paints for the protection of steel constructions such as electricity pylons or bridges. Until recently, little has been known about the behavior of these Pb compounds in soils. Therefore, three pylon soils and six red lead anti

  12. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Are Sprayed Zn and Zn(1)5Al Coatings in Simulated Salina Soil and Neutral Meadow Soil Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Bilan; LU Xinying; LI Long

    2011-01-01

    Arc sprayed Zn and Zn(1)5Al coatings were chosen to protect the metal ends of prestressed high-strength concrete (PHC) pipe piles against corrosion of salina soil in northern china and neutral meadow soil in northeast China.The corrosion behavior of the coated Q235 steel samples in two simulated soil solutions were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods.The experimental results show that the corrosion of the matrix Q235 steel in both simulated solutions is remarkably inhibited by Zn and Znl5A1 coatings.The corrosion products on Zn and Zn(1)5Al are thick,compact,firm and protective.The corrosion current density icorr of both Zn and Zn(1)5Al-coated samples is decreased evidently with corrosion time,and the charge transfer resistance Rct is increased greatly.The corrosion resistance indexes of Zn and Zn(1)5Al in simulated neutral meadow soil solution are more outstanding than those in salina soil.The corrosion resistance of Zn(1)5Al in salina soil is slightly superior to that of Zn.When the sprayed coatings are sealed with epoxy resin,the corrosion resistance of the coatings is further enhanced markedly.

  13. ICP Materials Trends in Corrosion, Soiling and Air Pollution (1987–2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidblad, Johan; Faller, Markus; de la Fuente, Daniel; Yates, Tim; Verney-Carron, Aurélie; Grøntoft, Terje; Hans, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    Results from the international cooperative programme on effects on materials including historic and cultural monuments are presented from the period 1987–2014 and include pollution data (SO2, NO2, O3, HNO3 and PM10), corrosion data (carbon steel, weathering steel, zinc, copper, aluminium and limestone) and data on the soiling of modern glass for nineteen industrial, urban and rural test sites in Europe. Both one-year and four-year corrosion data are presented. Corrosion and pollution have decreased significantly and a shift in the magnitude is generally observed around 1997: from a sharp decrease to a more modest decrease or to a constant level without any decrease. SO2 levels, carbon steel and copper corrosion have decreased even after 1997, which is more pronounced in urban areas, while corrosion of the other materials shows no decrease after 1997, when looking at one-year values. When looking at four-year values, however, there is a significant decrease after 1997 for zinc, which is not evident when looking at the one-year values. This paper also presents results on corrosion kinetics by comparison of one- and four-year values. For carbon steel and copper, kinetics is relatively independent of sites while other materials, especially zinc, show substantial variation in kinetics for the first four years, which needs to be considered when producing new and possibly improved models for corrosion. PMID:28825611

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Acid Soil Environment with SRB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Xie, Fei; Wu, Ming; Liu, Guangxin; Zong, Yue; Li, Xue

    2017-06-01

    Self-designed experimental device was adopted to ensure the normal growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sterile simulated Yingtan soil solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X80 pipeline steel in simulated acid soil environment was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, slow strain rate test, and scanning electron microscope. Results show that the presence of SRB could promote stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. In a growth cycle, polarization resistance first presents a decrease and subsequently an increase, which is inversely proportional to the quantities of SRB. At 8 days of growth, SRB reach their largest quantity of 1.42 × 103 cells/g. The corrosion behavior is most serious at this time point, and the SCC mechanism is hydrogen embrittlement. In other SRB growth stages, the SCC mechanism of X80 steel is anodic dissolution. With the increasing SRB quantities, X80 steel is largely prone to SCC behavior, and the effect of hydrogen is considerably obvious.

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Copper-Clad Steel Bars with Unclad Two-End Faces for Grounding Grids in the Red Clay Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yupei; Mu, Miaomiao; Zhang, Bing; Nie, Kaibin; Liao, Qiangqiang

    2017-02-01

    Iron-aluminum oxides in the red soil have a significant impact on the corrosion behavior of the metal for grounding grids. Effects of iron-aluminum oxides on the corrosion behavior of the cross section of copper-clad steel in the red soil have been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel polarization. All the data indicate that the iron-aluminum oxides can promote the corrosion of copper-clad steel in the red soil. The corrosivity of the red soil greatly increases after iron-aluminum oxides are added into the soil. Iron-aluminum oxides promote galvanic corrosion of copper-clad steel and increase the corrosion degree of the center steel layer. The iron-aluminum oxides stimulate corrosion process of copper-clad steel acting as a cathodic depolarizing agent. XRD results further validate that the corrosion products of the copper-clad steel bar mainly consist of Fe3O4 and Cu2O.

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Copper-Clad Steel Bars with Unclad Two-End Faces for Grounding Grids in the Red Clay Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yupei; Mu, Miaomiao; Zhang, Bing; Nie, Kaibin; Liao, Qiangqiang

    2017-04-01

    Iron-aluminum oxides in the red soil have a significant impact on the corrosion behavior of the metal for grounding grids. Effects of iron-aluminum oxides on the corrosion behavior of the cross section of copper-clad steel in the red soil have been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel polarization. All the data indicate that the iron-aluminum oxides can promote the corrosion of copper-clad steel in the red soil. The corrosivity of the red soil greatly increases after iron-aluminum oxides are added into the soil. Iron-aluminum oxides promote galvanic corrosion of copper-clad steel and increase the corrosion degree of the center steel layer. The iron-aluminum oxides stimulate corrosion process of copper-clad steel acting as a cathodic depolarizing agent. XRD results further validate that the corrosion products of the copper-clad steel bar mainly consist of Fe3O4 and Cu2O.

  17. Products of in Situ Corrosion of Depleted Uranium Ammunition in Bosnia and Herzegovina Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuheng; von Gunten, Konstantin; Bartova, Barbora; Meisser, Nicolas; Astner, Markus; Burger, Mario; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-11-15

    Hundreds of tons of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition were used in previous armed conflicts in Iraq, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Serbia/Kosovo. The majority (>90%) of DU penetrators miss their target and, if left in the environment, corrode in these postconflict zones. Thus, the best way to understand the fate of bulk DU material in the environment is to characterize the corrosion products of intact DU penetrators under field conditions for extended periods of time. However, such studies are scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we characterized corrosion products formed from two intact DU penetrators that remained in soils in Bosnia and Herzegovina for over seven years. We used a combination of X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that metaschoepite (UO3(H2O)2) was a main component of the two DU corrosion products. Moreover, studtite ((UO2)O2(H2O)2·2(H2O)) and becquerelite (Ca(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8(H2O)) were also identified in the corrosion products. Their formation through transformation of metaschoepite was a result of the geochemical conditions under which the penetrators corroded. Moreover, we propose that the transformation of metaschoepite to becquerelite or studtite in the DU corrosion products would decrease the potential for mobilization of U from corroded DU penetrators exposed to similar environments in postconflict areas.

  18. Plasma chemical reduction of model corrosion brass layers prepared in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radkova, Lucie; Mikova, Petra; Prikryl, Radek; Krcma, Frantisek

    2016-08-01

    The brass plates of (50 × 10 × 1) mm3 were prepared with model corrosion layer because the real archaeological artifacts could be damaged during the method optimization. Samples corroded naturally more than 2 years in the soil. Excavated samples were treated in the low pressure (150 Pa) quartz glass plasma reactor (90 cm long and 9.5 cm in diameter) which was surrounded by two external copper electrodes supplied by radio-frequency generator (13.56 MHz). The experiments were carried out in a hydrogen-argon gas mixture at mass flows of 30 sccm for hydrogen and 20 sccm for argon for 90 min. The plasma power was 100, 200, 300 and 400 W in continuous and pulsed mode. Maximum sample temperature was set at 120 °C. The whole process was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy and the obtained data were used to calculate the relative intensity of OH radicals and rotational temperature. The results showed that the higher power had the greater maximum intensity of the OH radicals and rapidly degraded the corrosion layer. Corrosion layer was not completely removed during the reduction, but due to the reactions which occur in the plasma corrosion layer became brittle and after plasma chemical treatment can be removed easily. Finally, the SEM-EDX analysis of the surface composition confirmed removal of chlorine and oxygen from the corrosion products layers. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  19. Analysis of the Long-Term Corrosion Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Acidic Red Soil Using Electrical Resistance Test Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaixing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term corrosion rate of X80 steel in an acidic red soil was monitored in situ by using a precise electrical resistance (ER test system. The corrosion characteristics of X80 steel were examined via SEM, EDS, and XRD. The results indicated that the corrosion rate determined from ER test was very similar to that obtained from the mass loss test. The ER test technique made it possible to predict the long-term corrosion rate of steel in soil in situ. The corrosion rate of X80 steel in acidic red soil was about 0.0902 mm/a at 38 weeks, but the corrosion rate was dropped to 0.0226 mm/a after 5 years. The final corrosion product layer was composed mainly of FeOOH, γ-Fe2O3, and FeCO3.

  20. Laboratory evaluation of soil stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of API grade steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, A.H.S.; Castro, B.B.; Ponciano, J.A.C. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). COPPE

    2004-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in carbon steels is a form of deterioration that can occur during the service life of a pipeline that is exposed to mechanical stress and strains. A study was conducted to investigate SCC and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of API grade steels in contact with soil. The physical, chemical and bacteriological characteristics of different soil samples were determined. Slow strain rate tests were performed using electrolytes obtained in the soil samples taken from different points near buried pipelines. Stress versus strain curves were obtained at different electrode potentials for API X46, X60 and X80 steels. The results showed the conjoint incidence of SCC and HE, depending on the potential imposed. It was revealed that HE contributes to the initiation of cracking and crack propagation. Cracking morphology was similar to the SCC found in field situations where transgranular cracking was detected in a pipeline that had collapsed as a result of land creeping. The material exhibited signs of secondary cracking and lower ductility, even under cathodic potentials. It was noted that the methodology used in this study was not able to reproduce the possible effect of microbial induced corrosion. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  1. On the corrosion and soiling effects on materials by air pollution in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tzanis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of the European project, entitled MULTI-ASSESS, specimens of structural metals, glass, stone and concrete materials were exposed to air pollution at a station, which was installed for this purpose on a building, located in the centre of Athens. The main purpose of this project was to determine the corrosion and soiling effects of air pollution on materials. A set of the specimens was exposed in a position that was sheltered from rain and partly from wind, and another set was exposed in unsheltered positions on the roof of the above said building. In addition, other specimens were exposed at different heights on the same building, in order to investigate for the first time the corrosion and soiling effects on various materials as a function of height. For the determination of these effects, chemical analysis of the specimens was performed and basic parameters as the weight change, the layer thickness and the optical properties were calculated. Finally, the results obtained are discussed and their plausible interpretation is attempted.

  2. Modelling carbon steels corrosion during a long period in soils: Contribution of A.C. impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, E.; Lemaitre, C.; Crusset, D.; David, D. [Laboratoire Roberval de Mecanique, UMR 6066 du CNRS, Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, BP 20529, F - 60205 Compiegne cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion of historical objects from World War I fields were studied by using two methods: characterization of the corrosion products by Raman Laser Spectroscopy, and behaviour of the corrosion layers by using electrochemical studies. The first technique, previously used, had shown that two layers are present on these objects, containing both different oxides and oxy-hydroxides of iron. In the present part of the work, the A.C. Impedance Spectroscopy was used to show the differences between the two layers concerning the corrosion of these objects. In order to observe the different behaviours, the specimens were studied in three surface states: with the two layers, with the internal layer only, and without oxide. The results have shown that the internal layer limits the corrosion kinetics. Then this layer was especially studied, particularly its porosity, by a comparison of the impedance results in two media with very different conductivity, and the evolution of these results with different immersion times. The buried objects had the behaviour of a porous electrode, due to the presence of the internal layer. Thus, this behaviour can be modelled with the simplified De Levie's theory, considering that each porosity is a semi-infinite hole. It appeared that the corrosion process at the oxidized interface corresponds to the transport in the electrolyte in the pores completed by a part of transport in the solid phase. These properties can be used to predict the long term corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in soils for long periods. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of aquifer protective capacity of overburden unit and soil corrosivity in Makurdi, Benue state, Nigeria, using electrical resistivity method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Daniel N Obiora; Adeolu E Ajala; Johnson C Ibuot

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents result of 30 vertical electrical soundings carried out in Makurdi, Benue state capital, north–central Nigeria to evaluate aquifer protective capacity and soil corrosivity of overburden units in the study area. This was done using the Schlumberger electrode array to obtain the data and was modelled using computer iteration (Winresist software). The field data gives a resolution with 3–4 geoelectric layers and the observed frequencies in curve types include: 30% of KQ, 16.67% of QH, 6.67% of AA and K, 3.33% of HA, Q and A, 10% of H, KH and HK. Using the longitudinal unit conductance (S), the protective capacities of the study area were classified as 36.67% weak, 10% poor, 40% moderate, and 13.33% as good. The corrosivity ratings of the study area show that 10% is strongly corrosive, 23% moderately corrosive, 37% slightly corrosive, and 30% noncorrosive The results reasonably provide information on areas where industries can be sited and iron pipes can be laid in order to safeguard the hydrological setting for resident’s safety in the study area. Regions with moderate/good protective capacity are good sites for locating boreholes.

  4. Corrosive effect of the type of soil in the systems of grounding more used (copper and stainless steel) for local soil samples from the city of Tunja (Colombia), by means of electrochemical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, L.; Salas, Y.; Blanco, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this work electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion behaviour of copper and stainless steel electrodes, used in grounding varying soil type with which they react. A slight but significant change in the corrosion rate, linear polarization resistance and equivalent parameters in the technique of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy circuit was observed. Electrolytes in soils are slightly different depending on laboratory study, but the influence was noted in the retention capacity of water, mainly due to clays, affecting ion mobility and therefore measures such as the corrosion rate. Behaviour was noted in lower potential for copper corrosion, though the corrosion rate regardless of the type of soil, was much higher for electrodes based on copper, by several orders of magnitude.

  5. An Experimental Investigation of Galvanic Anode Specifications for Suitable Cathodic Corrosion Protection of Low Carbon Steel in Kaduna Metropolitan Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Guma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper stresses corrosion risks from huge underground engineering steel structures within the metropolitan area of Kaduna-a top city in Nigeria. Cathodic protection (CP is examined as an effective, economical and durable method of preventing corrosion of such structures if suitably designed-installed. Variables that can cause wide differences and difficulties in CP designs such as material make, surface area and nature of structure, corrosivity level of environment, etc, are recognized. Some supplementary information that accounts for complexity of such variables which can be used to optimize CP design of the structures was sought experimentally. Relative performances by zinc, pure magnesium and magnesium alloy as common and cheap galvanic anodes were investigated in a laboratory CP of polished bare low carbon steel specimens in soil of surveyed resistivity spectrum 31.9-152.9 ohm-m from the area. Specimens were exposed with and without CP by the anodes at ambient temperature up to 40 days in various samples of the soil. Levels of specimen protections were determined by analysis of obtained information on their corrosion rates and polarized potentials relative to the un-protected ones at 8-day intervals. The analysis indicated that; corrosion of the structures can be optimally reduced to negligible rates by polarizing them to -0.85V versus Cu/CuSO4 electrode with the anodes, pure magnesium is comparatively the best of the anodes for CP of the structures in terms of economy and effectiveness followed by magnesium alloy, and a unit surface area of the anodes can protect up to nearly 1200 units of the structure with the -0.85V protective potential depending on the anode type.

  6. Corrosion of low-carbon steel under environmental conditions at Hanford: Two-year soil corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantatmula, R.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Divine, J.R. [ChemMet Ltd., West Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    At the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, nuclear production reactors were operated from 1944 to 1970. The handling and processing of radioactive nuclear fuels produced a large volume of low-level nuclear wastes, chemical wastes, and a combination of the two (mixed wastes). These materials have historically been packaged in US Department of Transportation (DOT) approved drums made from low-carbon steel, then handled in one of three ways: (A) Before 1970, the drums were buried in the dry desert soil. It was assumed that chemical and radionuclide mobility would be low and that the isolated, government-owned site would provide sufficient protection for employees and the public. (B) After 1970, the drums containing long-lived transuranic radionuclides were protected from premature failure by stacking them in an ordered array on an asphalt concrete pad in the bottom of a burial trench. The array was then covered with a large, 0.28-mm- (011-in.-) thick polyethylene tarp and the trench was backfilled with 1.3 m (4 ft) of soil cover. This burial method is referred to as soil-shielded burial . Other configurations were also employed but the soil-shielded burial method contains most of the transuranic drums. (C) Since 1987, US Department of Energy sites have complied with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulations. These regulations require mixed waste drums to be stored in RCRA compliant large metal sheds with provisions for monitoring. These sheds are provided with forced ventilation but are not heated or cooled.

  7. Relationship Between pH and Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Thermal-Sprayed Ni-Al-Coated Q235 Steel in Simulated Soil Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wu, Xin-qiang; Ke, Wei; Xu, Song; Feng, Bing; Hu, Bo-tao

    2017-09-01

    Electrochemical corrosion behavior of a thermal-sprayed Ni-Al-coated Q235 steel was investigated in the simulated soil solutions at different pH values using measurements of potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as well as surface analyses including x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Al-coated Q235 steel was dependent on the pH of the test solution. From pH = 3.53 to pH = 4.79, the corrosion resistance of the coated steel increased rapidly. In the pH range from 4.79 to 12.26, the corrosion resistance exhibited no significant change. At pH 13.25, the corrosion resistance of the sample was found to decrease. The calculated corrosion rate of Ni-Al-coated Q235 steel was lower than that of the uncoated Q235 steel and galvanized steel in all the test solutions. Over a wide range of pH values, the Ni-Al-coated Q235 steel exhibited extremely good corrosion resistance. The experimental data together with the potential-pH diagrams provided a basis for a detailed discussion of the related corrosion mechanisms of the coated steel.

  8. CORROSION CHARACTERISTICS OF Cu IN TYPICAL INLAND SALTY SOILS%铜在典型内陆盐土中的腐蚀特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鹿中晖; 章钢娅; 王永红; 李英志; 孙慧珍

    2009-01-01

    By means of naturally burying specimens in two typical inland salty soils the corrosion behavior of pure Cu was examined.Then the corrosion characteristics of pure Cu and its corrosion products were analyzed by using SEM,EDAX and XRD.The results showed that Cu was pit-corroded in large area in eermu salty soil and was partly deep spot-corroded in Kuerle desert soil which contained less salt.It was concluded that the corrosion of Cu mainly resulted from the amount of O_2,Cl~- ,SO_4~(2-) and water content in soil as well as the soil texture.%采用在两种西部内陆盐土中自然埋藏的试验方法,结合扫描电镜、EDAX能谱及X射线衍射分析研究了铜的产物及腐蚀特征.结果表明,铜在格尔木盐渍土中呈大面积斑坑腐蚀,在库尔勒荒漠土呈局部较深点蚀.土壤中氧气含量、氯离子和硫酸根离子含量、含水量及土壤质地是造成两种土壤中铜腐蚀差异的主要原因.

  9. Effect of pH Value on Stress Corrosion Cracking of X70 Pipeline Steel in Acidic Soil Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyong LIU; Cuiwei DU; Xin ZHANG; Fuming WANG; Xiaogang LI

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH value on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of API X70 pipeline steel in simulated acidic soil solutions was investigated by using slow strain rate test,electrochemical polarization curves,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,and scanning electron microscopy.pH plays an important role in the susceptibility and electrochemical mechanism of SCC.The pH higher than 5 has no significant effect on electrochemical processes.By contrast,the pH lower than 5 intensifies cathodic hydrogen evolution reactions,thus increasing the cathodic current and corrosion potential.Under different pH values,the SCC mechanism of X70 pipeline steel varies among anodic dissolution (AD),hydrogen embrittlement (HE),and the combination of AD and HE (AD + HE) with variations of applied potential.At-850 mVSCE,the SCC mechanism is HE if pH is less than 4 or AD + HE if pH value is more positive.

  10. 埋地输油管道防腐技术的研究现状%Progress of Pipeline Corrosion Protection in soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒炼; 李晓敏; 胡苏

    2015-01-01

    The domestic and foreign oil pipeline that buried in earth, and the current status of research about the anti-corrosion methods, which suffered soil corrosion and caused serious accidents, were mainly discussed. based on the investigation of current exposition of antisepsis methods, soil corrosion effect and problems of controlling corrosion were elaborated, different conditions were analyzed, and the corresponding anti-corrosion measures was put forward. The buried soil pipeline according to the actual environment should have maximum protection by protective coating, corrosion inhibitor, electrochemical protection, cathode protection, and so on.%主要探讨了国内外输油管道在埋地铺设后,遭受土壤腐蚀而引起的严重事故及目前防腐方法的研究现状。本文在目前防腐方法调研的基础上阐述了土壤腐蚀影响、控制问题、腐蚀措施等方面,分析了不同情况下的影响因素,并提出了相应的防腐措施。对于埋地土壤中输油管道应根据实际铺设环境应采取涂层保护、缓蚀剂保护、电化学保护、阴极保护等手段因地制宜相结合,使输油管线得到最大的保护。

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of X70 pipeline steel in near-neutral pH soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, B.Y.; Wang, J.Q.; Han, E.H.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Ke, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China). State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Inst. of Metal Research

    2004-07-01

    Near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is characterized by wide transgranular cracks with quasi-cleavage on the fracture surface, and there is usually little evidence of general or lateral corrosion. Near-neutral pH SCC is related to dissolution and hydrogen ingress into steel pipes because discharged atomic hydrogen can enter the steel so that cracks are initiated or grown by a combination of dissolution and hydrogen-embrittlement. In this study, the SCC cracking behaviour of an X70 pipeline was investigated using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and cyclic loading at high R and low frequency in a near-neutral pH soil solution saturated with 5 per cent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and 95 per cent nitrogen (N{sub 2}). Potentiodynamic polarization analyses and electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS) analyses were also conducted in order to examine the effect of the concentration of bicarbonate, bubbled gas and the addition of chloride ions on polarization behaviour. Results of the SSRT tests showed that transgranular SCC occurred in the soil solution. Crack initiation was associated with pitting. The pipe's susceptibility to SCC increased with decreases in applied electrochemical potential and strain rate. Cyclic loading tests showed that crack propagation processes were dominated by SCC. At high R and low frequencies, SCC was observed on fatigued, pre-cracked specimens. Results of the electrochemical tests showed that polarization behaviours were influenced by the concentrations of bicarbonate, bubbled gas, and the addition of chloride ions. It was concluded that the addition of chloride ion can influence film stability on pipeline specimen surfaces. 22 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  12. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil; Apport des analogues archeologiques a l'estimation des vitesses moyennes et a l'etude des mecanismes de corrosion a tres long terme des aciers non allies dans les sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, D

    2003-11-15

    In the context of the French nuclear waste storage, a multi-barriers disposal is envisaged. Wastes could be put in metallic overpacks disposed in a clay soil. As these overpacks could be made of low carbon steel, it is important to understand the corrosion behaviour of this material in soil during period of several centuries. Indeed, it is necessary to consolidate the empirical data by a phenomenological approach. This includes laboratory experiments and modelling of the phenomenon which have to be validated and completed by the study of archaeological artefacts. This was the aim of this PhD-work. To this purpose, an analytical protocol has been elaborated: about forty archaeological artefacts coming from five dated sites (2. to 16. centuries) have been studied on cross section in order to observe on the same sample all the constituents of the system: metallic substrate/corrosion products/environment. The corrosion products are divided into two zones: the Dense Product Layer (DPL) in contact with the metal, and the Transformed Medium (TM) which are the corrosion products formed around soil minerals (quartz grains). The metallic substrate has been studied by the classical methods of materials science (optical and scanning electron microscope, energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopies). It has been verified that despite their heterogeneity of structure and composition, they are all hypo-eutectoids steels that can contain phosphorous until 0.5 wt%. The corrosion products have been analysed by local structural analytical methods as micro-diffraction under synchrotron radiation ({mu}XRD) and Raman micro-spectroscopy. These two complementary techniques and also the elemental composition analysis conducted to the characterisation of the corrosion forms. On the majority of the samples coming from four sites, the DPL are constituted by goethite including marbles of magnetite/maghemite. On the artefacts from the fifth site, a particular corrosion form has been

  13. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiutong Wang; Jizhou Duan; Yan Li; Jie Zhang; Shide Ma; Baorong Hou

    2005-04-01

    Seabed sediment (SBS) is a special soil that is covered by seawater. With the developments in marine oil exploitation and engineering, more and more steel structures have been buried in SBS. SBS corrosion has now become a serious problem in marine environment and an important issue in corrosion science. In this paper, approach in the field of SBS corrosion is reviewed. Electrochemical and microbial corrosion factors, corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion evaluation and prediction of corrosion are also discussed here.

  14. Effect of deteriorated microstructures on stress corrosion cracking of X70 pipeline steel in acidic soil environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X70 pipeline steel and its weld joint area in acidic soil environmeat in China,two simulating methods were used: one was to obtain bad mierostructures in heat affected zone by annealing at 1300℃ for 10 rain and then,quenching in water; the other was to get different simulating solutions of acidic soil in Yingtan in southeast China.The SCC susceptibilities of X70 pipeline steel before and after quenching in the simulating solutions were analyzed using slow stain rate test (SSRT) and poteatiodynamic polarization technique to investigate the SCC electrochemical mechanism of different mierostruetures further.The results show that SCC appears in the original mierostrueture and the quenched mierostructure as the polarization potential decreases.Hydrogen revolution accelerates SCC of the two tested materials within the range of-850 mV to -1200 mV vs.SCE.Microstructural hardening and grain coarsening also increase SCC.The SCC mechanisms are different,anodic dissolution is the key of causing SCC as the polarization potential is higher than the null eurreat potential,and hydrogen embrittlemeat will play a more important role to SCC as the polarization potential lower than the null current potential.

  15. Evaluation of soil corrosivity and aquifer protective capacity using geoelectrical investigation in Bwari basement complex area, Abuja

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A E Adeniji; O V Omonona; D N Obiora; J U Chukudebelu

    2014-04-01

    Bwari is one of the six municipal area councils of the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Abuja with its attendant growing population and infrastructural developments. Groundwater is the main source of water supply in the area, and urbanization and industrialization are the predominant contributors of contaminants to the hydrological systems. In order to guarantee a continuous supply of potable water, there is a need to investigate the vulnerability of the aquifers to contaminants emanating from domestic and industrial wastes. A total of 20 vertical electrical soundings using Schlumberger electrode array with a maximum half current electrodes separation of 300 m was employed. The results show that the area is characterized by 3–6 geoelectric subsurface layers. The measured overburden thickness ranges from 1.0 to 24.3 m, with a mean value of 7.4 m. The resistivity and longitudinal conductance of the overburden units range from 18 to 11,908 m and 0.047 to 0.875 mhos, respectively. Areas considered as high corrosivity are the central parts with > 180 m. The characteristic longitudinal unit conductance was used to classify the area into zones of good (0.7–4.49 mhos), moderate (0.2–0.69 mhos), weak (0.1–0.19 mhos), and poor (> 0.1) aquifer protective capacity. Zones characterized by materials of moderate to good protective capacity serve as sealing potential for the underlying hydrogeological system in the area. This study is aimed at delineating zones that are very prone to groundwater contamination from surface contaminants and subsurface soils that are corrosive to utility pipes buried underground. Hence the findings of this work will constitute part of the tools for groundwater development and management and structural/infrastructural development planning of the area.

  16. Study of API 5L X70 steel corrosion processes when in contact with some Brazilian soils; Estudo dos processos de corrosao de acos API 5L X70 em contato com alguns dos solos do Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Sergio Luis de

    2007-07-01

    Pipelines, fuel storage tanks and other metallic structures are in permanent contact and exposed to different types of soils, of horizons or layers, or of soil aggressiveness. This interaction may cause expressive damages to the environment and to the planned work. Contamination may occur due to leakage of stored products, splitting during transportation, accidents caused by pipelines without extensive maintenance. The result of these accidents could be, among others, some financial losses. In order to recognize the dynamic interactions between metallic surfaces and the environment it is crucial to have preventive actions and to develop better-applied materials. API steel 5L X70 has been used in structures of low and high pressure with high mechanical strength and corrosion and, even so, it is susceptible to etching corrosion since it is in contact with different environments from mangrove regions to industrial environments. The present case evaluated the role of 5L X70 API steel in contact with different soil horizons representative of the Brazilian soil. This investigation correlated chemical species with solute ions in soil solution, secondary and primary phase minerals besides physical and chemical characteristics as pH, electric conductivity, total dissolved solids, among others, to the results of corrosion resistance and ways of corrosion. The evaluation was carried out using x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, total reflection x-ray fluorescence, fuel injection flow besides texture and gravimetric analyses to soil characterization and mineralogy, identification of corrosion products, soil solution analyses, evaluation of tested materials and classification of ways and types of corrosion. This was an attempt to integrate the data to a better understanding of the process involving reagents and products. The results showed that different soil horizons such as different types of analyzed soils produce specific etching in metallic structures

  17. Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON, HOWARD L.; BACA, JULIANNE; KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.; STOCKMAN, HARLAN W.; THOMPSON, MOLLIE E.

    1999-09-01

    Uranium fragments from the Sandia Sled Track were studied as analogues for weapons components and depleted uranium buried at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site in Nevada. The Sled Track uranium fragments originated as weapons mockups and counterweights impacted on concrete and soil barriers, and experienced heating and fragmentation similar to processes thought to affect the Nuclear Weapons Accident Residues (NWAR) at GCD. Furthermore, the Sandia uranium was buried in unsaturated desert soils for 10 to 40 years, and has undergone weathering processes expected to affect the GCD wastes. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analyses of the fragments show rapid alteration from metals to dominantly VI-valent oxy-hydroxides. Leaching studies of the samples give results consistent with published U-oxide dissolution rates, and suggest longer experimental periods (ca. 1 year) would be required to reach equilibrium solution concentrations. Thermochemical modeling with the EQ3/6 code indicates that the uranium concentrations in solutions saturated with becquerelite could increase as the pore waters evaporate, due to changes in carbonate equilibria and increased ionic strength.

  18. Corrosion behaviors of metal end of PHC pipe pile in simulated soil solutions%PHC管桩金属端头在土壤模拟液中的腐蚀行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林碧兰; 路新瀛; 李龙

    2011-01-01

    通过自然浸泡、动电位极化、电化学阻抗谱测量、电偶腐蚀试验研究预应力高强混凝土(PHC)管桩金属端头处端板和主筋在氯盐土、盐碱土、中性草甸土和酸性土模拟液中的腐蚀速率、电化学腐蚀行为以及电偶腐蚀行为.研究结果表明:主筋的耐蚀性能比端板的差,盐渍土中主筋的耐蚀程度差;端板和主筋的阴极过程受氧扩散控制;盐渍土中端板和主筋的锈层不具保护作用;主筋与端板偶接时主筋为阳极,端板为阴极;主筋在酸性土中的电偶腐蚀效应最大,而在草甸土中最小.%The corrosion rate, electrochemical corrosion and galvanic corrosion behaviors of the end plate and the steel bar at metal end of prestressed high-strength concrete (PHC) pipe pile in simulated solutions of chloride salt soil, salina soil, neutral meadow soil and acid soil were investigated by natural immersion tests, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and galvanic corrosion tests. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the end plate is inferior to that of the steel bar, and in saline soil the corrosion resistance grade of the steel bar is poor. The cathodic processes of the end plate and the steel bar in four simulated soil solutions are controlled by oxygen diffusion. The corrosion products on end plate and steel bar immersed in saline soil are hardly protective. Steel bar is anodic and end plate is cathodic when they were coupled and immersed in four solutions. The galvanic corrosion effect of stell bar in acid soil is maximal, while that in neutral meadow soil is minimal.

  19. X60管线钢在盐碱性土壤中的腐蚀行为与机理%Corrosion behaviors and mechanism of X60 pipe steel in saline and alkali soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄亮亮; 孟惠民; 黄晓林; 陈建民; 胡景克; 王育青

    2013-01-01

    基于土壤性质检测,室内模拟实验,实际管道防腐层绝缘性测试、杂散电流测试,爆管处腐蚀形貌比较,管道埋地实际状况分析,研究了X60管线钢在黄河下游冲击平原土壤中的腐蚀行为.结果表明:黄河下游冲击平原土壤具有强碱、高含盐(主要为高NaCl)、高腐蚀性质;X60管线钢均匀腐蚀轻微,但会发生严重的坑腐蚀,腐蚀过程是:X60管线钢在水含量高甚至饱和的高含NaCl土壤中发生Fe氧化腐蚀反应,钢表面先形成含水FeOOH内腐蚀产物膜,腐蚀产物膜虽对基体具有一定的保护作用,但因Cl-渗入内腐蚀产物膜产生局部破坏,导致严重的坑腐蚀,并可能发展为爆管破坏.%In this paper, the corrosion behavior of X60 pipe steel is studied in the soil of alluvial plain downstream of the Yellow River based on soil property test, indoor simulation experiment, actual pipeline coating insulation test, stray current test and comparison of corrosion morphology at pipe bursting location, and actual buried situation of pipeline. Results show that the soil of alluvial plain downstream of the Yellow River is strong basic, high salt content (mainly including NaCl) and highly corrosive soil. For X60 pipe steel, uniform corrosion is slight but pit corrosion is serious, the corrosion process is that X60 pipe steel undergoes iron oxidation reaction in the soil with high water content even saturated water content and high NaCl content, an FeOOH inner corrosion product film containing water will firstly form on the steel surface and have certain protective functions against base material, but local damage may occur for inner corrosion product film due to Cl-penetration, and thus resulting in serious pit corrosion, which may develop into pipe bursting damage.

  20. 吉林市船营区土壤中变电站接地网的腐蚀性研究%Soil Corrosion of Grounding Grid of Substation in Chuanying District of Jilin City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兰河; 张雪峰; 张万友; 张海丰

    2013-01-01

    The main physicochemical properties of the soil at Chuanying District of Jilin City was examined according to the Code for Inyestigation of Geotechnical Engineering (GB50021-94) and test method of national soil corrosion test network. Then the main influence factors on the soil corrosion of the grounding grid were analyzed. The results showed that the soil resistivity was merely decreased from 53.2 Ω·m to 25.1 Ω·m when the moisture content was increased from 17.14 % to 21.21%. However, the soil resistivity was drastically increased from 234.6 Ω·m to 2253.5 Ω·m when the moisture content decreased from 11.25% to 2.04%. When the pH of soil was lower than 7.0, the maximum corrosion rate of the Q235 steel electrode was 0.6773 mm/a and the corrosion current density was 59.37 uA o cm2, respectively. The minimum corrosion rate of electrode was 0.2328 mm/a and the corrosion current density was 23.01 μA o cm2, respectively, when the soil pH was 7.0~8.5. The maximum corrosion current density was 98.76 μA·cm2 and the Q235 steel electrode corrosion was the most serious when the Cl concentration of soil was about 1.0 mass%. However, when the Cl- concentration of soil was increased to 4.0 mass%, the electrode corrosion was weakened with corrosion current density of 29.40 μA·cm2.%根据《岩土工程勘察规范》(GB50021-94)和全国土壤腐蚀性试验网站对吉林市船营区土壤的主要理化性质进行了综合评价,分析了接地网在土壤中的腐蚀机理及影响土壤腐蚀性的主要因素.结果表明:当土壤含水率从17.14%增到21.21%时,土壤电阻率从53.2 Ω·m减小至25.1 Ω·m;当土壤含水率从11.25% WHC下降至2.04% WHC时,土壤电阻率从234.6Ω·m增加到22535Ω·m.当土壤pH<7.0时,Q235钢电极的最大腐蚀速率为0.6773 mm/a,腐蚀电流密度为59.37 μA·cm-2;当pH=7.0~8.5时,电极的最小腐蚀速率为0.2328 mm/a,腐蚀电流密度为23.01 μA·cm2.当土壤C1-为1.0%左右时,Q235钢电

  1. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  2. 模拟酸雨对铝在土壤中腐蚀行为的影响%Effects of Simulated Acid Rain on the Corrosion Behaviors of Aluminum in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍远辉; 罗宿星; 勾华

    2012-01-01

    Effects of simulated acid rain(SAR) on the corrosion behaviors of aluminum in soil were studied by means of polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the SAR increased the corrosion rate of the aluminum in soil. The corrosion rate of the aluminum increase with decreasing pH value of SAR. There are two capacitive arcs which included two time constants for the acid rain with the low pH values, and one capacitive loop for the high pH value, indicating the control step of corrosion was the charge-transfer process. The corrosion products of aluminum surface in soil are mainly composed of O, Al and Si.%利用极化曲线、电化学阻抗和扫描电镜等方法,研究了模拟酸雨对铝在土壤中腐蚀行为的影响.结果表明,模拟酸雨加速了土壤中铝的腐蚀.随着模拟酸雨pH值减小,土壤中铝的腐蚀速率增加.模拟酸雨pH值较低时,铝的电化学阻抗谱为2个时间常数的双容抗弧,模拟酸雨pH值较高时,铝的电化学阻抗谱为单容抗弧,腐蚀主要由电荷转移过程控制.土壤中铝表面的腐蚀产物主要由O、Al和Si等元素组成.

  3. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  4. Corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  5. Corrosive effects of hvdc transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornwell, F.E.; Backstrom, T.E.

    1966-02-01

    Field tests using ac transmission lines for introduction of direct current into the earth at widely separated points are described. One test circuit was between a Tracy pumping plant and a Shasta power plant in California, and two others were in the Hoover power plant area. Evaluation of the effects of such ground currents on corrosion of buried metalwork was a primary aim of the tests. Potential gradients, pipe-to-soil potentials, and soil resistivities are discussed in detail. Estimates are made of the distances from ehv dc terminal installations within which corrosion prevention procedures may become necessary.

  6. Microbiological Corrosion Rules of X80 Pipeline Steel in Three Simulated Soil Solutions%X80管线钢在三种土壤模拟溶液中的微生物腐蚀规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 谢飞; 吴明; 孙东旭; 赵启慧; 程龙生

    2016-01-01

    Immersion test for 14 days and electrochemical test were carried out in Yingtan,Shenyang and Dagang simulated soil solutions with sulfate-reducing bacteria(SRB),the microbiological corrosion rules of X80 steel in the three simulated soil solutions were studied.The results show that the corrosion rates of X80 steel in Dagang simulated soil solution was maximum,and the corrosion rate in Yingtan simulated soil solution was minimum.The combined action of SRB and Cl- promoted the formation of pits on X80 steel surface.The corrosion process of X80 steel in three simulation soil solutions was the same,the cathodic process was predominantly controlled by hydrogen reduction,the anodic dissolution generated the yellow loose corrosion products FeO(OH), and Fe2+ with SRB produced iron sulfur compounds.The hydrolysis reaction was inhibited in Yingtan soil with a lower pH.Due to the corrosion process was controlled by cathodic reduction,therefore FeS did not detect in corrosion products formed in Dagang simulated soil solution.%在含硫酸盐还原菌(SRB)的鹰潭、沈阳、大港土壤模拟溶液中进行14 d 的挂片浸泡试验和电化学试验,研究了 X80管线钢在三种土壤模拟溶液中的微生物腐蚀规律。结果表明:X80钢在大港土壤模拟溶液中的腐蚀速率最大,在鹰潭土壤模拟溶液中的最小,SRB和Cl-的共同作用可促进X80钢表面点蚀坑的形成;X80钢在上述三种土壤模拟溶液中的腐蚀过程相同,阴极过程是以氢去极化为主的控制过程,阳极过程为金属溶解,生成黄色疏松的腐蚀产物 FeO(OH),同时Fe2+与SRB结合生成铁硫化合物;鹰潭土壤的p H 较低,可抑制水解反应;在大港土壤模拟溶液中生成的腐蚀产物中未检测出FeS,这是体系中少量SRB参与氢去极化过程的结果。

  7. Causticity and Anti-corrosion Measures for Soil in Northwest Gobi Region%西北戈壁地区岩土腐蚀性与防腐措施分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任治军; 任亚群; 宋志远

    2013-01-01

      本文针对±800kV哈密南-郑州特高压直流输电线路工程的岩土工程勘测实践,对西北戈壁地区特高压送电线路工程的场地土腐蚀性评价工作方法进行了论述,主要包括样本采取原则、取样点布置、试验结果分析等。在分析试验成果的基础上,根据规范对线路地基土的腐蚀性进行了综合评价,并提出了相应的防腐处理建议。%This thesis focuses on the geotechnical engineering practice of the 800kV direct-current (DC) transmission line project from south of Hami to Zhengzhou. Corrosive evaluation methods for site soil of the ultra-high voltage transmission line engineering in Northwest Gobi region are discussed, mainly including sampling principle, sampling point layout and test result analysis, etc. Based on the analysis of test results, comprehensive foundation soil corrosive evaluation is conducted and corresponding suggestions on anti-corrosive treatment are put forward according to relevant codes.

  8. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  9. CORROSION IN AIRFRAMES

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  10. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  11. Impact of soil and groundwater corrosion on the Hierakonpolis Temple Town archaeological site, Wadi Abu Sufian, Idfu, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, A M; Atwia, M G; El-Gohary, A; Parizek, R R

    2013-06-01

    Hierakonpolis, Greek for City of the Hawk, nearly 25 km NW of Idfu (Egypt), is an important and extensive archaeological discovery covering a large area. Its richness in archaeological artifacts makes it a valuable site. It has a valid claim to be the first nation state, as indicated by the Palette of Narmer discovered in its main mound. Geological and hydrogeological investigations at the Hierakonpolis Temple Town site documented nearly a 4.0-m water table rise from as early as 1892 to the present. In addition to the rising water levels, the increase of both subsoil water salinity and humidity threatens and damages fragile carvings and paintings within tombs in Kingdom Hill, the foundation stability of the site, and the known and still to be discovered artifact that recent pottery finds dates at least 4,000 BCE. Representative rock and soil samples obtained from drilled cores in the study area were chosen for conducting detailed grain size and X-ray analysis, light and heavy mineral occurrences, distribution of moisture and total organic matter, and scanning electron microscopy investigations. Mineralogical analysis of clays indicated that the soil samples are composed of smectite/illite mixed layers with varying proportions of smectite to illite. Kaolinite is the second dominant clay constituent, besides occasional chlorite. Swelling of the clay portion of the soil, due to the presence of capillary groundwater, in contact with buried mudbrick walls expands and causes severe damage to important exposed and buried mudbrick structures, including the massive ancient "fort" believed to date from the Second Dynasty (from 2,890 to 2,686 BC). The "fort" is 1.0 km south of the Temple Town mounds near to confluence of Wadi Abu Sufian. Groundwater samples from the shallow aquifer close by the intersection of Wadi Abu Sufian and the Nile flood plain were analyzed for chemical composition and stable isotope ratios. The groundwater in the upper zone (subsoil water) within fine

  12. Investigation of corrosion property of four kinds of coating in the transformer substation soil%4种涂层钢在变电站土壤中的腐蚀行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Pure Al coating, AlSi alloy coating, NiAl alloy coating and 316L stainless steel coating were prepared on the Q235 steel by arc spraying technology. The corrosion of the four sprayed alloy coatings in the 220 kV transformer substation soil and soil solution was studied by buried specimens and electrochemical test in Hunan. The corrosion behaviors of the coating steel samples in transformer substation soil solution were investigated by line polarization, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy ( EIS ) tests. The macrography and corrosion products were carried out scanning electron microscopy ( SEM) and electron diffraction spectra ( EDS) . The results show that the best corrosion resistance of the four sprayed alloy coatings was AlSi coating, sequentially in the order of NiAl and stainless steel coating, and the Al coating was easy bouffant in a long time in the underground, so that the corrosion resistance is not good.%采用高速电弧喷涂方法在Q235钢表面上分别制备纯Al涂层、 AlSi合金涂层、NiAl合金涂层、316L不锈钢涂层,通过对涂层钢在湖南某220 kV变电站中进行埋样和土壤溶液中的电化学实验,研究涂层在变电站土壤及其溶液中的耐蚀性能。通过电化学线性极化、动电位极化、交流阻抗试验,研究涂层在变电站土壤过滤液中的电化学腐蚀行为,并利用扫描电子显微镜和X射线电子能谱对埋样的腐蚀产物进行观察和分析,结果表明: AlSi涂层具有最好的耐土壤腐蚀性,其次是镍铝涂层和不锈钢涂层,而纯铝涂层长时间埋地容易鼓泡,耐土壤腐蚀性不佳。

  13. On Corrrosion of Ferrous Metals in Typical Indian Soils Part II-Mild Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajendra Nath Tripathi

    1965-04-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of mild steel in ten Indian soils, employing Schwerdtfeger's soil corrosion cell procedure, has been studied. The results have been analysed and correlated with various factors. The study reveals that the rate of corrosion in non- acidic soils is maximum at the beginning gradually decreasing with time. The soils of moisture equivalents ranging 25-30% are most corrosive. Direct chemical corrosion has been found to be very predominant in acidic soil.

  14. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  15. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  16. Corrosion mitigation of buried structures by soils modification Mitigación de la corrosión de estructuras enterradas mediante la modificación de suelos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. C Córdoba

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon steel samples were buried in loamy soil modified with lime, fly-ash and Portland cement in ratio of 5 and 10% during 60 days. Corrosion attack was assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Loamy soil without modification was taken as reference. The corrosion products in rust were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. It was found that soil with fly-ash and Portland cement can develop corrosion protection to bare steel due to the changing of formed rust on steel samples. Lepidocrocite and Goethite were found as major constituents in formed rust on buried steel in soil modified with fly-ash and cement, while Magnetite was found informed rust on buried steel in soil without addition of cementitious materials and modified with lime. According to the electrochemical results, the soil with 5% of fly-ash exhibited the anticorrosive best performance.Muestras de acero al carbono fueron enterradas en el suelo arcilloso modificado con cal, ceniza volante y cemento Portland en proporción de 5 y un 10% durante 60 días. El ataque corrosivo fue evaluado mediante espectroscopia de impedancia electroquímica. Muestras de suelo arcilloso sin modificación fueron tomadas como referencia. Los productos de corrosión se caracterizaron por espectroscopía Raman. Se encontró que el suelo con la adición de cenizas volantes y el cemento Portland puede desarrollar protección contra la corrosión del acero desnudo por la modificación del óxido formado sobre muestras de acero. La lepidocrocita y goetita se encontraron como los principales componentes de la herrumbre formada en el acero enterrado en suelos modificados con cenizas volantes y cemento, mientras que la magnetita se encuentra en la herrumbre formada en el acero enterrado en suelo modificado con cal y el suelo sin modificación. De acuerdo con los resultados electroquímicos, el suelo modificado con un 5% de cenizas volantes mostró el mejor desempeño anticorrosivo.

  17. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  18. Development of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}|Cu composite as AISI 1020 steel thermal spray coating for protection against corrosion by soil in buried structures; Desenvolvimento e uso do composito de Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}|Cu como revestimento aplicado por aspersao termica sobre o aco AISI 1020 para protecao contra a corrosao pelo solo em estruturas enterradas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regis Junior, Oscar [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Mecanica; Silva, Jose Maurilio da; Portella, Kleber Franke [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Pesquisa em Engenharia Civil; Paredes, Ramon Sigifredo Cortes, E-mail: regis@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Mecanica

    2012-07-01

    An Nb{sub 2}O|Cu corrosion-resistant coating was developed and applied onto AISI 1020 steel substrate by Powder Flame Spray. A galvanostatic electrochemical technique was employed, with and without ohmic drop, in four different soils (two corrosively aggressive and two less aggressive). Behavior of coatings in different soils was compared using a cathodic hydrogen reduction reaction (equilibrium potential, overvoltage and exchange current density) focusing on the effect of ohmic drop. Results allow recommendation of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}|Cu composite for use in buried structure protection. (author)

  19. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  20. Long-term behaviour of iron in clay soils: a study of world war 1 remains by physico-chemical and electrochemical characterization; Corrosion a long terme du fer dans les sols argileux: etude physico-chimique et electrochimique de vestiges de 1914-1918

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, E.; Uran, L.; Lemaitre, C.; David, D. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Lab. Roberval, UMR CNRS 6066, 60 (France); Joiret, S.; Hugot-Le Goff, A. [Paris-6 Univ., Lab. de Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie, 75 (France)

    2003-02-01

    Iron archaeological analogues constitute a good way to contribute to the definition of the containers for high-level radioactive wastes. In the present study we considered objects from a battle field of world war 1. Visual and microscopic observations revealed 2 corrosion layers of similar thickness: an external layer that appeared orange-brown, about 200 {mu}m to 1 mm thick and in contact with the metallic cores an internal layer which was dark-grey. The Raman spectroscopy testing showed that the external layer was made out of oxy-hydroxides, mixed with crystals from the soil, while the presence of oxides was always associated with the internal corrosion layer. Electrochemical measurements clearly illustrated a different behaviour between the 2 corrosion layers. Impedance spectroscopy measuring confirmed the porosity of the external layer. Polarization tests were performed in Evian water to better understand the behaviour of the internal corrosion layer, an indicative corrosion current was defined and its measurement confirmed the protective role of the internal layer against corrosion. Nevertheless the burial environment seems to play also a significant role in the slowdown of the corrosion. (A.C.)

  1. Laboratory Study on Urban Heat Island Effect on the Acid Corrosion of Concrete in Superficial Soil Layers%城市热岛效应下浅层土中混凝土的酸腐蚀试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢毅; 施斌; 刘瑾; 顾凯; 唐朝生; 高磊

    2011-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the concrete acid corrosion in the superficial soil layers of urban area at the higher ground temperature owing to the urban heat island effect. The compressive strength properties of concrete specimens, which were held in the situation of temperature 5 ℃, 20 ℃ and 40 ℃, acid concentration 0%, 5% and 10%, and erosion time 30 d and 90 d were studied. And the mechanism of concrete acid corrosion and the urban heat island effect on the concrete strength in superficial soil layers for Nanjing area was analyzed. The test results indicate that the coefficient of corrosion of concrete specimens increases with the increasing of the temperature; and the temperature has an increasingly powerful influence on the coefficient of corrosion with higher acid concentration. Under the situation of sulfuric acid concentration 10 % and immersing time 30 d, the coefficient of corrosion of concrete specimen reaches 45.21% at the temperature 40 ℃, which was almost twice of the corrosion coefficient at temperature 5 ℃.In other words, the coefficient of corrosion increases 0. 64% with the rising 1 ℃ of the environment temperature. The research achievement has a clear meaning to reduce the urban heat island effect in geotechnical engineering.%针对城市热岛效应引起城区浅层土地温场升高这一观测结果,采用室内快速模拟试验方法,对城区酸性土壤腐蚀混凝土材料的温度效应开展了试验研究.试验研究了在温度为5℃、20℃和40℃条件下,混凝土试样在酸浓度分别为0%、5%和10%的沙土介质中放置30 d、90 d后的抗压强度变化规律,并对混凝土试样在腐蚀过程中的腐蚀系数变化规律和微观机理进行了分析;最后,对南京城区热岛效应环境下浅层土中混凝土材料酸腐蚀的强度变化规律进行了分析.试验结果表明,在同一腐蚀浓度下,混凝土试样抗压强度的下降速度随着温度的升高而不断

  2. Iron corrosion in an anoxic soil: Comparison between thermodynamic modelling and ferrous archaeological artefacts characterised along with the local in situ geochemical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saheb, M.; Neff, D.; Michelin, A.; Dillmann, P. [CEA Saclay, CNRS, LAPA SIS2M, UMR3299, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saheb, M. [ANDRA, F-92298 Chatenay Malabry (France); Descostes, M. [CEA Saclay, DEN DANS DPC SECR, Lab Radionuclides Migrat Measurements and Modelling, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Descostes, M. [Univ Evry, CEA, CNRS, UMR 8587, Evry (France); Dillmann, P. [CNRS, Inst Rech Archeomat, UMR 5060, F-75700 Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    This article is part of an ongoing study on the long-term corrosion behaviour of ferrous archaeological artefacts. The aim of this study is to correlate the corrosion products formed on ancient artefacts in an anoxic medium to the environmental data using thermodynamic modelling. For this purpose, measurement campaigns have been conducted on the archaeological site of Glinet (16. century, High Normandy (Seine-Maritime), France) where the evolution of the pore water chemistry has been recorded for a period of one year. Three evolution steps have been distinguished after the oxidizing perturbation which was induced by the piezometers installation. The first step was related to an oxidizing environment in which pore water was in equilibrium with a Fe(III) precipitated phase: ferri-hydrite (FeOOH center dot 0.4 H{sub 2}O). The second step was considered as an intermediate step and Fe speciation had evolved; equilibrium was achieved between ferri-hydrite and a Fe(II) carbonate phase: siderite (Fe(II)CO{sub 3}). The last step of the evolution was related to a reducing stage where pore water was in equilibrium with magnetite (Fe(II, III){sub 3}O{sub 4}) and with chukanovite (Fe(II){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}). As these phases were present in the corrosion layers formed on the archaeological samples, it is possible to conclude that the thermodynamic approach was helpful in developing a better understanding of the effect of geochemical conditions on the composition and mineralogy of the corrosion products formed on archaeological artefacts. This work could be used as a reference for further corrosion studies, especially on long-term corrosion processes applied to nuclear waste disposal. (authors)

  3. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    allowed to dry. The area is then checked for the golden brown color which is produced by the chemical conversion material. If the work area requires...Materials, pp. 258-3074 1968. 41. W. IH. Ailor, "Seven-year exposure at Point leyes , California," "Corrosion in Natural Environments, ASTM STP 558," American... Color Units 3 Turbidity Units 0.7 pH Units 7.6 Temperature OF 76 Sp. Conductivity MMhos 425 B.O.D. (5 days at 206C) 0.2 SjV i;~-- 1201 A .9 8 ~ 8 kl

  4. Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2000-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria, e.g. on pipelines buried in soil and on marine structures. MIC of carbon steel must be monitored on-line in order to provide an efficient protection...... corrosion and detects localised corrosion, but the sensitivity is not high enough for monitoring initiation of pitting and small attacks. Electrochemical techniques as LPR and EIS give distorted data and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and corrosion products cover the steel surface. However, EIS...... and control the corrosion. A number of monitoring techniques is industrially used today, and the applicability and reliability of these for monitoring MIC is evaluated. Coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic techniques even though localised corrosion rate cannot be measured. FSM measures general...

  5. Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2000-01-01

    and control the corrosion. A number of monitoring techniques is industrially used today, and the applicability and reliability of these for monitoring MIC is evaluated. Coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic techniques even though localised corrosion rate cannot be measured. FSM measures general......Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria, e.g. on pipelines buried in soil and on marine structures. MIC of carbon steel must be monitored on-line in order to provide an efficient protection...... corrosion and detects localised corrosion, but the sensitivity is not high enough for monitoring initiation of pitting and small attacks. Electrochemical techniques as LPR and EIS give distorted data and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and corrosion products cover the steel surface. However, EIS...

  6. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  7. External Corrosion of Pipes in District Heating Systems; Utvaendig korrosion paa fjaerrvaermeroer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sund, Goeran [Det Norske Veritas, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    Corrosion damages of pipes in district heating systems can occur both external and internal. The aim with this work has been to clarify external corrosion damages of pipes, and try to correlate the damages to the corrosivity of different soils and waters. For the analysis the Swedish District Heating Association's district heating system statistics has been used. The district heating system statistics shows that the cost for corrosion damages is high, and pipes older than 20 years have increased risk for corrosion. The knowledge about corrosion concerning steel poles and water pipes in soils can not be applied to external corrosion of steel pipes in district heating systems. The corrosion rate of steel poles in soils is low. The corrosion of steel pipes in district heating systems can locally give high rates, up to 0,5 mm/year. The mechanism for this type of corrosion is different compared to the corrosion mechanism of poles in soils. The temperature is higher and aggressive water, with road-salt and chloride content, falls in drops on the steel pipe, and impurities evaporate on the steel surface. These factors increase the corrosion rate. If the material thickness is 5 mm, fracture can occur in the pipe within ten years. The number of copper pipe corrosion damage is limited. The most determining corrosion factors of copper pipes are pH-value and impurities as chloride and sulphate in the water. Stainless steel pipes of type 304 can not be used in soils due to the risk of local corrosion. Higher alloyed stainless steels, with molybdenum and higher chromium content should be used. It is concluded that failures can occur due to external corrosion of steel pipes. This failure is expensive and can lead to human damage. One way to eliminate failures of steel pipes is to carry out risk analysis.

  8. Cathodic corrosion protection of steel pipes; Kathodischer Korrosionsschutz von Rohrleitungsstaehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Markus [SGK Schweizerische Gesellschaft fuer Korrosionsschutz, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schoeneich, Hanns-Georg [Open Grid Europe, Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The cathodic corrosion protection has been proven excellently in the practical use for buried steel pipelines. This is evidenced statistically by a significantly less frequency of loss compared to non-cathodically protected pipelines. Based on thermodynamic considerations, the authors of the contribution under consideration describe the operation of the cathodic corrosion protection and regular adjustment of the electrochemical potential at the interface steel / soil in practical use. Subsequently, the corrosion scenarios are discussed that may occur when an incorrect setting of the potential results from an operation over several decades. This incorrect setting also can be caused by the failure of individual components of the corrosion protection.

  9. Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria, e.g. on pipelines buried in soil and on marine structures. MIC...... of carbon steel must be monitored on-line in order to provide an efficient protection and control the corrosion. A number of monitoring techniques is industrially used today, and the applicability and reliability of these for monitoring MIC is evaluated. Coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic...... techniques even though localised corrosion rate cannot be measured. FSM measures general corrosion and detects localised corrosion, but the sensitivity is not high enough for monitoring initiation of pitting and small attacks. Electrochemical techniques as LPR and EIS give distorted data and unreliable...

  10. Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2000-01-01

    of carbon steel must be monitored on-line in order to provide an efficient protection and control the corrosion. A number of monitoring techniques is industrially used today, and the applicability and reliability of these for monitoring MIC is evaluated. Coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic......Abstract Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria, e.g. on pipelines buried in soil and on marine structures. MIC...... techniques even though localised corrosion rate cannot be measured. FSM measures general corrosion and detects localised corrosion, but the sensitivity is not high enough for monitoring initiation of pitting and small attacks. Electrochemical techniques as LPR and EIS give distorted data and unreliable...

  11. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  12. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  13. Corrosion inhibitors; Los inhibidores de corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinez, L. A.; Meas, Y.; Ortega-Borges, R.; Corona, A.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we briefly describe the characteristics, cost and electrochemical nature of the corrosion phenomena as well as some of the technologies that are currently employed to minimize its effect. The main subject of the paper however, deals with the description, classification and mechanism of protection of the so-called corrosion inhibitors. Examples of the use of these substances in different aggressive environments are also presented as means to show that these compounds, or their combination, can in fact be used as excellent and relatively cheap technologies to control the corrosion of some metals. In the last part of the paper, the most commonly used techniques to evaluate the efficiency and performance of corrosion inhibitors are presented as well as some criteria to make a careful and proper selection of a corrosion inhibitor technology in a given situation. (Author) 151 refs.

  14. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, C; Milodowski, A E; Baker, A C

    2014-02-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm(-2) y(-1) and 2.5-48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area.

  15. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments...... and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  16. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  17. Erosion-corrosion; Erosionkorrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghili, B

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment 32 refs, 16 figs, tabs

  18. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  19. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  20. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D. (Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)); Edwards, R. (Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States)); Hayman, A. (Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France)); Hill, D. (Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States)); Mehta, S. (Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom)); Semerad, T. (Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia))

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  1. Handbook of corrosion data, 2nd edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, B.; Anderson, D. [eds.

    1995-12-31

    As in the prior edition, in one convenient volume this book makes it easy to find what effect environment has on the corrosion of metals and alloys. Coverage on all the environments in the first edition has been updated and expanded and some 80 or more environments have been added, including food products (chocolate, milk, cider, beer, etc.), fruit juices (grape, pineapple, lemon, etc.), soil, blood, gasoline, fertilizers, etc. Presentation of the tabular information for all environments has been standardized throughout the book. The environments are listed alphabetically. Each listing includes a general description of the conditions, a comment on the corrosion characteristics of various alloys in such a situation, a bibliography of recent articles specific to the environment, tables consolidating and comparing corrosion rates at various temperatures and concentrations for various alloys, and graphical information. also included are summaries on the general corrosion characteristics of major metals and alloys. This separate section of the book considers each material group, such as aluminum, stainless steel, zinc and so forth. Additional tables are presented here to give the corrosion characteristics of various alloys in hundreds of environments.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2008-01-01

    CO2 corrosion is a general problem in the industry and it is expensive. The focus of this study is an oil gas production related problem. CO2 corrosion is observed in offshore natural gas transportation pipelines. A general overview of the problem is presented in chapter 1. The chemical system co...

  3. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of {+-} 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs.

  4. Avionics Corrosion Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    found at seacoast (harsn) environnents is the most destructive. Differences in electrolte concentration and oxygen concentration promote corrosion...against corrosion by acting as moisture and gas barriers. CMCVIT B0.4ID *COATINGS Polyurethane’s, cprxies, silicones, and polystyrenes are the most

  5. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...... with sensitive electrical resistance technique and crevice corrosion current measurements....

  6. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Xuming Zhang; Guosong Wu; Xiang Peng; Limin Li; Hongqing Feng; Biao Gao; Kaifu Huo; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface c...

  7. Corrosion Failures in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krishnan

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description of typical marine environments and the most common form of corrosion of materials used in this environment. Some typical case histories of failures pertaining to pitting, bimetallic corrosion, dealloying, cavitation and stress corrosion cracking are illustrated as typical examples of corrosion failures.

  8. Corrosion Inhibitors for Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Steel corrosion in reinforced concrete structures has been a major problem across the U.S. Steel-reinforced concrete structures are continually subject to attack by corrosion brought on by naturally occurring environmental conditions. FerroGard, a corrosion inhibitor, developed by Sika Corporation, penetrates hardened concrete to dramatically reduce corrosion by 65% and extend the structure's service life.

  9. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  10. The Corrosion and Preservation of Iron Antiques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Discusses general corrosion reactions (iron to rust), including corrosion of iron, sulfur dioxide, chlorides, immersed corrosion, and underground corrosion. Also discusses corrosion inhibition, including corrosion inhibitors (anodic, cathodic, mixed, organic); safe/dangerous inhibitors; and corrosion/inhibition in concrete/marble, showcases/boxes,…

  11. Corrosion control in mining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telekesi, J.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of corrosion effects in mining technology and the importance of protection is presented. The most common corrosion processes and effects are summarized and the system and criteria of their avoidance are discussed in detail. Preventive measures are recommended to decrease possible corrosion effects including the selection of corrosion-resistive constructions, to use protective coatings and inhibition techniques and some other protection possibilities where applicable. The organization aspects and the economic impact of corrosion control in mining are discussed.

  12. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  13. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  14. Corrosion assessment of dry fuel storage containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    The structural stability as a function of expected corrosion degradation of 75 dry fuel storage containers located in the 200 Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds was evaluated. These containers include 22 concrete burial containers, 13 55-gal (208-l) drums, and 40 Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) transport/storage casks. All containers are buried beneath at least 48 in. of soil and a heavy plastic tarp with the exception of 35 of the EBR-II casks which are exposed to atmosphere. A literature review revealed that little general corrosion is expected and pitting corrosion of the carbon steel used as the exterior shell for all containers (with the exception of the concrete containers) will occur at a maximum rate of 3.5 mil/yr. Penetration from pitting of the exterior shell of the 208-l drums and EBR-II casks is calculated to occur after 18 and 71 years of burial, respectively. The internal construction beneath the shell would be expected to preclude containment breach, however, for the drums and casks. The estimates for structural failure of the external shells, large-scale shell deterioration due to corrosion, are considerably longer, 39 and 150 years respectively for the drums and casks. The concrete burial containers are expected to withstand a service life of 50 years.

  15. Study of techniques applicable for monitoring MIC in soil or sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1999-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion of carbon steel in anaerobic environment is difficult to monitor with electrochemical techniques because of heterogeneous surface conditions and electrochemically active corrosion products. Weight loss measurement, LPR, EIS, hydrogen permeation, and a refined ER...... technique have been evaluated including field tests in soil and marine sediment. The conclusions are that EIS can detect combined biofilm and corrosion product film formation, but corrosion rate is overestimated. The ER technique seems to give a correct and sensitive corrosion rate measurement within...

  16. Study of techniques applicable for monitoring MIC in soil or sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1999-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion of carbon steel in anaerobic environment is difficult to monitor with electrochemical techniques because of heterogeneous surface conditions and electrochemically active corrosion products. Weight loss measurement, LPR, EIS, hydrogen permeation, and a refined ER...... technique have beeen evaluated including field tests in soil and marine sediment. The conclusions are that EIS can detect combined biofilm and corrosion product film formation, but corrosion rate is overestimated. The ER technique seems to give a correct and sensitive corrosion rate measurement within...

  17. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold...... is reached causing the formation of anodic and cathodic regions along the reinforcement. Critical chloride thresholds, randomly distributed along the reinforcement sur-face, link the initiation and propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion. To demonstrate the potential use of the developed model......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  18. Corrosion and Corrosion Control in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Barry M.

    2013-08-01

    Serious corrosion problems have plagued the light water reactor (LWR) industry for decades. The complex corrosion mechanisms involved and the development of practical engineering solutions for their mitigation will be discussed in this article. After a brief overview of the basic designs of the boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR), emphasis will be placed on the general corrosion of LWR containments, flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon steel components, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in BWRs, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in PWRs, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in both systems. Finally, the corrosion future of both plants will be discussed as plants extend their period of operation for an additional 20 to 40 years.

  19. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... calendar years, but with intervals not exceeding 39 months Offshore At least once each calendar year, but... attention to pipe at soil-to-air interfaces, under thermal insulation, under disbonded coatings, at pipe supports, in splash zones, at deck penetrations, and in spans over water. (c) If atmospheric corrosion...

  20. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohorst, Frederick A.

    1995-12-05

    A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

  1. Severe Environmental Corrosion Erosion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany, OR, allows researchers to safely examine the performance of materials in highly corrosive or erosive...

  2. Corrosion-resistant metallic coatings

    OpenAIRE

    F. Presuel-Moreno; M.A. Jakab; N. Tailleart; Goldman, M.; J. R. Scully

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent computational and experimental studies on the corrosion properties of metallic coatings that can be tailored (tuned) to deliver up to three corrosion-inhibiting functions to an underlying substrate. Attributes are tuned by a selection of alloy compositions and nanostructures, ideally in alloy systems that offer flexibility of choice to optimize the corrosion-resisting properties. An amorphous Al-based coating is tuned for corrosion protection by on-demand release of ionic i...

  3. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  4. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  5. Solving A Corrosion Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion problem, it turned out, stemmed from the process called electrolysis. When two different metals are in contact, an electrical potential is set up between them; when the metals are surrounded by an electrolyte, or a conducting medium, the resulting reaction causes corrosion, often very rapid corrosion. In this case the different metals were the copper grounding system and the ferry's aluminum hull; the dockside salt water in which the hull was resting served as the electrolyte. After identifying the source of the trouble, the Ames engineer provided a solution: a new wire-and-rod grounding system made of aluminum like the ferry's hull so there would no longer be dissimilar metals in contact. Ames research on the matter disclosed that the problem was not unique to the Golden Gate ferries. It is being experienced by many pleasure boat operators who are probably as puzzled about it as was the Golden Gate Transit Authority.

  6. Thin film corrosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut, M.K.

    1980-06-01

    Corrosion of chromium/gold (Cr/Au) thin films during photolithography, prebond etching, and cleaning was evaluated. Vapors of chromium etchant, tantalum nitride etchant, and especially gold etchant were found to corrosively attack chromium/gold films. A palladium metal barrier between the gold and chromium layers was found to reduce the corrosion from gold etchant.

  7. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K.; Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  8. 变电站接地装置的腐蚀机理及防腐措施研究%Research on Corrosion Mechanism and Anti-corrosion Measure for Grounding Deviee at Substations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧洲华

    2009-01-01

    本文针对变电站接地装置的腐蚀问题,简单介绍了接地装置易发生腐蚀的部位和原因,分析了在土壤中发生化学腐蚀,电化学腐蚀、微生物腐蚀和杂散电流腐蚀的腐蚀机理,并对影响腐蚀速率的主要因素及相互关系作了说明.在此基础上,提出了如下防腐技术措施:采用耐蚀材料和金属镀层;使用导电防腐涂料;实施阴极保护;采用高效膨润土降阻防腐剂,以适应多种土壤腐蚀环境.%Aiming at the corrosion issues of grounding device used in substation,its corrosion position occurred frequently and corrosion reason are introduced briefly.Several types of corrosion mechanism are also analyzed,such as chemical corrosion,electrochemical corrosion,microbiological corrosion and stray current corrosion,when grounding device lie in soil and corrosion occurs.Furthermore,some main factors,which can influence on rate of corrosion,and their correlation are illustrated.On the basis of these analysis,several technology measures are put forward to avoid grounding device corrosion to fit many kinds of soil corrosion environment.They are:selecting corrosion resistant material and metal coating,employing anti-corrosive paint,carrying out cathodic protection and adopting high efficient bentonite resistance.

  9. Corrosion protection by anaerobiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkland, H P; Harms, H; Wanner; Zehnder, A J

    2001-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria can protect mild (unalloyed) steel from corrosion. Mild steel coupons incubated with Rhodoccocus sp. strain C125 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 in an aerobic phosphate-buffered medium containing benzoate as carbon and energy source, underwent a surface reaction leading to the formation of a corrosion-inhibiting vivianite layer [Fe3(PO4)2]. Electrochemical potential (E) measurements allowed us to follow the buildup of the vivianite cover. The presence of sufficient metabolically active bacteria at the steel surface resulted in an E decrease to -510 mV, the potential of free iron, and a continuous release of ferrous iron. Part of the dissolved iron precipitated as vivianite in a compact layer of two to three microns in thickness. This layer prevented corrosion of mild steel for over two weeks, even in a highly corrosive medium. A concentration of 20 mM phosphate in the medium was found to be a prerequisite for the formation of the vivianite layer.

  10. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  11. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions.

  12. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  13. Corrosion-resistant metallic coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Presuel-Moreno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe recent computational and experimental studies on the corrosion properties of metallic coatings that can be tailored (tuned to deliver up to three corrosion-inhibiting functions to an underlying substrate. Attributes are tuned by a selection of alloy compositions and nanostructures, ideally in alloy systems that offer flexibility of choice to optimize the corrosion-resisting properties. An amorphous Al-based coating is tuned for corrosion protection by on-demand release of ionic inhibitors to protect defects in the coating, by formation of an optimized barrier to local corrosion in Cl− containing environments, as well as by sacrificial cathodic prevention. Further progress in this field could lead to the design of the next generation of adaptive or tunable coatings that inhibit corrosion of underlying substrates.

  14. Automated methods of corrosion measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of corrosion rates and other parameters connected with corrosion processes are important, first as indicators of the corrosion resistance of metallic materials and second because such measurements are based on general and fundamental physical, chemical, and electrochemical relations....... Hence improvements and innovations in methods applied in corrosion research are likeliy to benefit basic disciplines as well. A method for corrosion measurements can only provide reliable data if the beckground of the method is fully understood. Failure of a method to give correct data indicates a need...... to revise assumptions regarding the basis of the method, which sometimes leads to the discovery of as-yet unnoticed phenomena. The present selection of automated methods for corrosion measurements is not motivated simply by the fact that a certain measurement can be performed automatically. Automation...

  15. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  16. Automated methods of corrosion measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of corrosion rates and other parameters connected with corrosion processes are important, first as indicators of the corrosion resistance of metallic materials and second because such measurements are based on general and fundamental physical, chemical, and electrochemical relations....... Hence improvements and innovations in methods applied in corrosion research are likeliy to benefit basic disciplines as well. A method for corrosion measurements can only provide reliable data if the beckground of the method is fully understood. Failure of a method to give correct data indicates a need...... to revise assumptions regarding the basis of the method, which sometimes leads to the discovery of as-yet unnoticed phenomena. The present selection of automated methods for corrosion measurements is not motivated simply by the fact that a certain measurement can be performed automatically. Automation...

  17. Nuclear corrosion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Understanding corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods necessary for accurately measuring their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry for the safe, economic and competitive running of its plants. This book reviews the fundamentals of nuclear corrosion. Corrosion of nuclear materials, i.e. the interaction between these materials and their environments, is a major issue for plant safety as well as for operation and economic competitiveness. Understanding these corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods to accurately measure their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry. Combining assessment techniques and analytical models into this understanding allows operators to predict the service life of corrosion-affected nuclear plant materials, and to apply the most appropriate maintenance and mitigation options to ensure safe long term operation. This book critically reviews the fundamental corrosion mechani...

  18. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    in each dimen- sion than bacteria and archaea. Fungi are eukaryotic organisms. Yeasts , molds, and mushrooms are examples of fungi. The majority of...occurs widely in natural waters and can be carried out by a variety of organisms including bacteria, yeast , and fungi (42). Ghiorse (43) prepared a...and its alloys is due to an aluminum oxide passive film. Anodizing produces thicker insulating films and better corrosion resistance. The natural

  19. Corrosion resistant coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  20. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  1. Corrosion of bio implants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U Kamachi Mudali; T M Sridhar; Baldev Raj

    2003-06-01

    Chemical stability, mechanical behaviour and biocompatibility in body fluids and tissues are the basic requirements for successful application of implant materials in bone fractures and replacements. Corrosion is one of the major processes affecting the life and service of orthopaedic devices made of metals and alloys used as implants in the body. Among the metals and alloys known, stainless steels (SS), Co–Cr alloys and titanium and its alloys are the most widely used for the making of biodevices for extended life in human body. Incidences of failure of stainless steel implant devices reveal the occurrence of significant localised corroding viz., pitting and crevice corrosion. Titanium forms a stable TiO2 film which can release titanium particles under wear into the body environment. To reduce corrosion and achieve better biocompatibility, bulk alloying of stainless steels with titanium and nitrogen, surface alloying by ion implantation of stainless steels and titanium and its alloys, and surface modification of stainless steel with bioceramic coatings are considered potential methods for improving the performance of orthopaedic devices. This review discusses these issues in depth and examines emerging directions.

  2. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  3. Corrosion detection by induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddenberry, Joshua L.

    Bridges in Florida are exposed to high amounts of humidity due to the state's geography. This excess moisture results in a high incidence of corrosion on the bridge's steel support cables. Also, the inclusion of ineffective waterproofing has resulted in additional corrosion. As this corrosion increases, the steel cables, responsible for maintaining bridge integrity, deteriorate and eventually break. If enough of these cables break, the bridge will experience a catastrophic failure resulting in collapse. Repairing and replacing these cables is very expensive and only increases with further damage. As each of the cables is steel, they have strong conductive properties. By inducing a current along each group of cables and measuring its dissipation over distance, a picture of structural integrity can be determined. The purpose of this thesis is to prove the effectiveness of using electromagnetic techniques to determine cable integrity. By comparing known conductive values (determined in a lab setting) to actual bridge values, the tester will be able to determine the location and severity of any damage, if present.

  4. The role of soil data in pipeline integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marr, J.E.; Bates, N.; Portelance, D.; Farthing, S. [Marr Associates, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Protective coatings and cathodic protection (CP) are routinely used to mitigate external corrosion on buried metallic pipelines. These methods place a barrier between the soil and the pipe surface. When properly designed and maintained, these systems can protect the pipeline for its entire service life. However, coating systems deteriorate with time to the point that the environment can either migrate through the coating or come in direct contact with the pipe surface. Although CP systems can also deteriorate, they can be monitored through measurement techniques at a given interval. The CP system can provide a sufficient level of protection, thereby minimizing potential threats to pipeline integrity. This paper presented a historical review of the use of soils and soil survey information. Experiences regarding the use of data effecting external corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on line pipe steels were also outlined. The soil measurement criteria that have been developed to define a corrosive soil condition were summarized along with a soil survey and soil sampling issues. The soil parameters that must be properly identified in order to assess integrity threat include soil type and oxygen availability; soil resistivity and moisture; pH, total acidity and cation exchange capacity; redox potential; chlorides and sulfates; carbonates; and, bacteria. It was shown that pipeline operators can predict where significant external corrosion, SCC and other integrity threats may occur on a pipeline by incorporating soil survey data and soils related information with other surveys and maintenance information on a pipeline. 26 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Corrosion Monitors for Embedded Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casias, Adrian L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorensen, Neil R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We have developed and characterized novel in-situ corrosion sensors to monitor and quantify the corrosive potential and history of localized environments. Embedded corrosion sensors can provide information to aid health assessments of internal electrical components including connectors, microelectronics, wires, and other susceptible parts. When combined with other data (e.g. temperature and humidity), theory, and computational simulation, the reliability of monitored systems can be predicted with higher fidelity.

  6. Automated Methods of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    1997-01-01

    electrochemical measurements as well as elemental analysis look very promising for elucidating corrosion reaction mechanisms. The study of initial surface reactions at the atomic or submicron level is becoming an important field of research in the understanding of corrosion processes. At present, mainly two...... scanning microscope techniques are employed investigating corrosion processes, and usually in situ: in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM) and in situ scanning force microscopy (in situ AFM). It is these techniques to which attention is directed here....

  7. Panel report on corrosion in energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    Corrosion problems in high-temperature (non aqueous) energy systems, corrosion in aqueous energy systems and institutional problems inhibiting the development of corrosion science and engineering are discussed. (FS)

  8. Panel report on corrosion in energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    Corrosion problems in high-temperature (non aqueous) energy systems, corrosion in aqueous energy systems and institutional problems inhibiting the development of corrosion science and engineering are discussed. (FS)

  9. Corrosion of archaeological iron artefacts compared to modern iron at the waterlogged site Nydam, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Henning; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Gregory, David;

    2004-01-01

    loss, corrosion potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrical resistivity. 3) Measurements of environmental parameter such as water level, redox potential, oxygen concentration, soil pH, and the concentration of a range of dissolved species in the pore water. This presentation shows...... focuses solely on the iron objects. A three-pronged approach has been used in the studies in Nydam: Studies of the excavated artefacts, including the compositon of corrosion products and a mapping of their exact state of preservation. 2) Use of modern iron samples placed in the soil for studies of weight...... some of the results obtained during the seven years of studies at the site. It is demonstrated how the three pronged approach is useful in understanding not only the current corrosion rate and threats against the artefacts but also the corrosion history, i.e. when were the deterioration patterns...

  10. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  11. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  12. Archaeological analogs and corrosion; Analogues archeologiques et corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, D

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  13. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  14. Underground Cordon by Microorganisms-Part-III Role of Soil Inhabiting Actinomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Dayal

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain strains of soil inhabiting actinomycetes were found to substantially corrode aluminium alloy (54-S which has bscn found tobe more resistant to bacterial or fungal corrosion in our earlier studies.These strains did not produce any corrosion on the mild steel and galvanised iron panels which were heavily corroded by bacteria and fungi. The corrosive isolates have been partialiy characterised after their isolation and purification. The extent of corrosion caused by eachstrain has been determined.

  15. Development of an electrochemistry-based corrosion sensor to monitor corrosion of boiler tubes, pipes, and painted structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Guy D.; Dacres, C. M.; Shook, M. B.

    1998-03-01

    An electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based in-situ corrosion sensor has been adapted and evaluated for use with steel heat exchanger tubes in boilers, coated buried steel pipes, and painted steel structures. An excellent correlation was obtained between the algorithm of the ratio of the breakpoint frequencies, as measured by the sensor, and corrosion rate for the boiler tubes. Use of this sensor and appropriate electronics would allow the corrosion of the boiler tubes to be monitored in real time and the inhibitor concentration automatically controlled to prevent excessive corrosion. The EIS sensor is also sensitive to the quality of coating of a buried steel pipe with and without the application of cathodic protection. Similar results were obtained from a sensor attached to the pipe and from a separate electrode driven into the soil. A hand-held version of the EIS in-situ sensor is suitable for inspecting painted metal structures, such as storage tanks and locks and dams, under ambient, service conditions. An excellent correlation was obtained between the sensor measurements, and the amount of corrosion on test panels immersed for up to 28 years.

  16. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  17. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  18. Agricultural Polymers as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural polymers were composed of extra-cellular polysaccharides secreted by Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substantially pure exopolysaccharide has a general structure consisting of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose backbone and appr...

  19. INHIBITION OF CORROSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, J.E. Jr.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-06-24

    A method is described for preventing corrosion of metallic container materials by a high-temperature liquid bismuth flowing therein. The method comprises fabricating the containment means from a steel which contains between 2 and 12% chromium, between 0.5 and 1.5% of either molybdenum and silicon, and a minimum of nickel and manganese, and maintaining zirconium dissolved in the liquid bismuth at a concentration between 50 parts per million and its saturation value at the lowest temperature in the system.

  20. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  1. Investigation on corrosion stratigraphy and morphology in some Iron Age bronze alloys vessels by OM, XRD and SEM-EDS methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudbashi, Omid; Hasanpour, Ata; Davami, Parviz

    2016-04-01

    The recently study of the corrosion in some bronze artefacts from the Sangtarashan Iron Age site, western Iran, was established to identify corrosion morphology and mechanism in these objects. The corrosion layers in 22 samples were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. The results showed that a thin corrosion crust has formed on the surface of bronzes with a triple-layer structure, including two internal and one external corrosion layers. The formation of these layers is due to copper leaching from the bronze surface. The internal corrosion part has been a compact, tin-rich corrosion/oxidation product (noble patina) with some evidences from original metallurgical aspects of the bronze as well as a very thin layer beneath the tin-rich layer. External corrosion products have been identified as basic copper carbonates, malachite and azurite. Based on the results, the corrosion morphology in the Sangtarashan Iron Age bronzes is due to long-term burial in an appropriate environment in a moderately corrosive soil. Although it is the first time to investigate Iron Age bronzes from Iran, this corrosion morphology is partially similar to type I corrosion morphology observed in archaeological bronze objects; nevertheless, some deviations are visible in comparison with previously established patterns.

  2. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  3. Corrosion Prevention and Control Applications Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-31

    Money, Manpower Called Keys to Progress, Aviation Week & Space Technology, October 6, 1980. 12. Reboul , M. C., Galvanic Corrosion of Aluminum, National...PA, April 1980. 25. Reboul , M.C., Galvanic Corrosion of Aluminum, National Association of Corrosion Engineers, Corrosion, V. 35#9, September 1979. 146

  4. Investigation on Atmospheric Corrosiveness in Hainan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    According to the results of four-year exposure tests for carbon steel samples in Hainan province, the influences of meteorological factors and Cl- on atmospheric corrosion were investigated. The feature of atmospheric corrosion in this area was summarized. A corrosive map for the area was drawn. The corrosion products on carbon steel at some typical places were analyzed by XRD and XPS.

  5. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  6. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  7. Some peculiarities of corrosion of wheel steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander SHRAMKO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion mechanism and rate of different chemical composition and structural condition of wheel steel were investigated. It was shown that “white layers”, variation in grain size and banding of wheel steel structure results in corrosion rate. Microstructure of steel from different elements of railway wheels after operation with corrosion was investigated. Wheel steel with addition of vanadium corroded more quickly than steel without vanadium. Non-metallic inclusions are the centre of corrosion nucleation and their influence on corrosion depends on type of inclusion. Mechanism of corrosion of wheel steel corrosion was discussed.

  8. Diffusion Coatings as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Radoslav; Ignatova-Ivanova, Tsveteslava

    2016-03-01

    Corrosion is the cause of irretrievable loss of huge amounts of metals and alloys. The harmful effects of corrosion can be reduced significantly by applying appropriate methods of corrosion protection. One method to protect metals against corrosion is the formation of diffusion coatings on them. High corrosion resistance is typical for the boride diffusion layers. Aluminothermy is one of the main methods for diffusion saturation of the surface of metal products with various elements, including boron, and under certain conditions with aluminum, too. Samples of steel 45 were put to aluminothermic diffusion saturation with boron in a pressurized steel container at a temperature of 1100K, for 6 hours in powdered aluminothermic mixtures. The content of B2O3 in the starting mixtures decreased from the optimum - 20% to 0%, and the content of Al and the activator - (NH4)2.4BF3 is constant, respectively 7% and 0.5%. Al2O3 was used as filler. The borided samples were tested for corrosion resistance in 10% HCl for 72 hours. The results show that their corrosion resistance depends on the composition of the starting saturating mixture (mainly on the content of B2O3), and respectively on the composition, structure, thickness and degree of adhesion of the layer to the metal base.

  9. Corrosion behavior of duplex coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raghu Ram Mohan Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The titanium alloys are used in defense, aerospace, automobile, chemical plants and biomedical applications due to their very high strength and lightweight properties. However, corrosion is a life-limiting factor when Ti alloys are exposed to different chemical environments at high temperatures. In the present paper, duplex NiCrAlY/WC–Co coating is coated onto Ti6Al4V substrate to investigate the corrosion behavior of both coated samples and the substrate. The duplex coating was performed with NiCrAlY as the intermediate coat of 200 μm thickness deposited by HVOF process and WC–Co ceramic top coat with varying thicknesses of 250 μm, 350 μm and 450 μm deposited by DS process. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were employed to investigate the corrosion performance of duplex coated samples and substrate in Ringer’s solution at 37 °C and pH value was set to 5.7. Finally the results reveal that 350 μm thick coated samples showed highest corrosion resistance compared to 250 μm thick samples as well as bare substrate. However, the 450 μm thick coated sample showed poor corrosion resistance compared to the substrate. The scale formed on the samples upon corrosion was characterized by using SEM analysis to understand the degree of corrosion behavior.

  10. Diffusion Coatings as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Radoslav

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is the cause of irretrievable loss of huge amounts of metals and alloys. The harmful effects of corrosion can be reduced significantly by applying appropriate methods of corrosion protection. One method to protect metals against corrosion is the formation of diffusion coatings on them. High corrosion resistance is typical for the boride diffusion layers. Aluminothermy is one of the main methods for diffusion saturation of the surface of metal products with various elements, including boron, and under certain conditions with aluminum, too. Samples of steel 45 were put to aluminothermic diffusion saturation with boron in a pressurized steel container at a temperature of 1100K, for 6 hours in powdered aluminothermic mixtures. The content of В2О3 in the starting mixtures decreased from the optimum - 20% to 0%, and the content of Al and the activator - (NH42.4BF3 is constant, respectively 7% and 0.5%. Al2O3 was used as filler. The borided samples were tested for corrosion resistance in 10% HCl for 72 hours. The results show that their corrosion resistance depends on the composition of the starting saturating mixture (mainly on the content of В2О3, and respectively on the composition, structure, thickness and degree of adhesion of the layer to the metal base.

  11. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  12. Corrosion Protection of Electrically Conductive Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Song; Liangliang Wang; Andre Zibart; Christian Koch

    2012-01-01

    The basic function of the electrically conductive surface of electrical contacts is electrical conduction. The electrical conductivity of contact materials can be largely reduced by corrosion and in order to avoid corrosion, protective coatings must be used. Another phenomenon that leads to increasing contact resistance is fretting corrosion. Fretting corrosion is the degradation mechanism of surface material, which causes increasing contact resistance. Fretting corrosion occurs when there is...

  13. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  14. Shutdown corrosion in geothermal energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Peter F.

    1982-10-08

    Experience has shown that corrosion occurring during geothermal energy utilization system downtime--shutdown corrosion--can pose a serious threat to successful operations. Shutdown corrosion in geothermal plants appears more severe than would be expected in their nongeothermal analogs, and its mitigation may pose a severe challenge to corrosion engineering personnel. This paper presents four case histories of geothermal shutdown corrosion problems. General methods of mitigation are explored.

  15. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  16. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  17. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  18. Review on Stress Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Failure of Centrifugal Compressor Impeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jiao; CHEN Songying; QU Yanpeng; LI Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  19. Erosion--Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, B.

    1978-01-01

    The deterioration of materials by corrosion or erosion by itself presents a formidable problem and for this reason investigators have studied these two phenomena independently. In fact, there are very few systematic studies on E-C and the majority of references mention it only in passing. In most real systems, however, the two destructive processes take place simultaneously, hence the purpose of this review is to present the various interactions between the chemical and mechanical agents leading to accelerated degradation of the material. The papers cited in the review are those that lead to a better understanding of the process involved in the accelerated rate of material loss under E-C conditions.

  20. Greener Approach towards Corrosion Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Patni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion control of metals is technically, economically, environmentally, and aesthetically important. The best option is to use inhibitors for protecting metals and alloys against corrosion. As organic corrosion inhibitors are toxic in nature, so green inhibitors which are biodegradable, without any heavy metals and other toxic compounds, are promoted. Also plant products are inexpensive, renewable, and readily available. Tannins, organic amino acids, alkaloids, and organic dyes of plant origin have good corrosion-inhibiting abilities. Plant extracts contain many organic compounds, having polar atoms such as O, P, S, and N. These are adsorbed on the metal surface by these polar atoms, and protective films are formed, and various adsorption isotherms are obeyed. Various types of green inhibitors and their effect on different metals are mentioned in the paper.

  1. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  2. Accelerated corrosion test and corrosion failure distribution model of aircraft structural aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen-lin; MU Zhi-tao; JIN Ping

    2006-01-01

    Based on corrosion damage data of 10 years for a type of aircraft aluminum alloy, the statistical analysis was conducted by Gumbel, Normal and two parameters Weibull distribution function. The results show that aluminum alloy structural member has the corrosion history of pitting corrosion-intergranular corrosion-exfoliation corrosion, and the maximum corrosion depth is in conformity to normal distribution. The accelerated corrosion test was carried out with the complied equivalent airport accelerated environment spectrum. The corrosion damage failure modes of aluminum alloy structural member indicate that the period of validity of the former protective coating is about 2.5 to 3 years, and that of the novel protective coating is about 4.0 to 4.5 years. The corrosion kinetics law of aluminum spar flange was established by fitting corrosion damage test data. The law indicates two apparent corrosion stages of high strength aluminum alloy section material: pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion/exfoliation corrosion.The test results agree with the statistical fit result of corrosion data collected from corrosion member in service. The fractional error is 5.8% at the same calendar year. The accelerated corrosion test validates the corrosion kinetics law of aircraft aluminum alloy in service.

  3. Electrochemical Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Todynamlc polarization curves using a mod ifiedatmospheric corrosion mon i tor (ACM). Norma l Tafel behavior was observed , the limiting current for oxygen...following a suggestion of Peter Serada, who is heading a task group on time-of-wetness measurements In ASTM GO1 .04, in which the author is participating...about 5 papers except for 1968 where a symposium on atmospheric corrosion was held which resulted in the publ ication of an ASTM Special Technical

  4. Corrosion Control Anniston Army Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    parts. • Anodize, Chrome, and Black Oxide (et.al.) • Substrate Prep and CARC paint. Stowage • Climate controlled storage (limited). • Weather...resistant (rain, uv) stowage . • Right Material – Right Time In Process Actions Bldgs 129 and 114 • Installation of new cleaning technologies for small... Rack Dehydration Prep Area CARC Application Flash-Off Oven De-mask and Anti- Corrosion App. Planned Future Actions Survey • Perform a corrosion survey

  5. Materials selection and corrosion problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornet, I.; Greif, R.; Treseder, R.S.

    1974-06-28

    Data tabulated for chemical composition of geothermal waters are presented for four areas of interest in Nevada: Beowawe steam well and Beowawe Hot Spring, Buffalo Valley Hot Springs, Kyle Hot Springs, and Leach Hot Springs. Material recommendations were prepared for the Nevada geothermal well. A detailed field corrosion test program planned for the Nevada test well is included. A progress report is presented for a laboratory research program on velocity effects in corrosion. (MHR)

  6. Maintainability Improvement Through Corrosion Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    potential, current, pH, and chloride ion concentration were made along a simulated corrosion fatigue crack for HY80 (UNS K31820) steel in seawater...frequency range of 0.05-50 Hz, a 7075-T6 aluminium alloy and 304 and 316L stainless steels were fatigue tested in 3.0% NaCl solution. The increments...DESCRIPTORS: Conference Paper; Aluminum base alloys- Mechanical properties; Austenitic stainless steels - Mechanical properties; Corrosion fatigue

  7. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  8. The Impact of Road Maintenance Substances on Metals Surface Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolita Petkuvienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research is to assess changes in the visual metal surface due to the exposure of road maintenance salts and molasses (‘Safecote’. Chlorides of deicing salts (NaCl, CaCl2 are the main agents affecting soil and water resources as well as causing the corrosion of roadside metallic elements. Molasses (‘Safecote’ is offered as an alternative to deice road pavement by minimizing the corrosion of metal elements near the road. A laboratory experiment was carried out to immerse and spray metals with NaCl, CaCl2, NaCl:CaCl2 and NaCl:Safecote solutions. The obtained results showed that NaCl:Safecote solution had the lowest coating with corrosion products (the average 17±4 % of the surface. The solutions of NaCl, CaCl2 and NaCl:CaCl2 had the highest percentage rate of the corrosion product on the metal surface reaching an average of 33±5 %. Article in English

  9. Construction and Application of a National Data-Sharing Service Network of Material Environmental Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Li

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the key features of a newly developed national data-sharing online network for material environmental corrosion. Written in Java language and based on Oracle database technology, the central database in the network is supported with two unique series of corrosion failure data, both of which were accumulated during a long period of time. The first category of data, provided by national environment corrosion test sites, is corrosion failure data for different materials in typical environments (atmosphere, seawater and soil. The other category is corrosion data in production environments, provided by a variety of firms. This network system enables standardized management of environmental corrosion data, an effective data sharing process, and research and development support for new products and after-sale services. Moreover this network system provides a firm base and data-service platform for the evaluation of project bids, safety, and service life. This article also discusses issues including data quality management and evaluation in the material corrosion data sharing process, access authority of different users, compensation for providers of shared historical data, and finally, the related policy and law legal processes, which are required to protect the intellectual property rights of the database.

  10. Investigations on Atmospheric Corrosion of Low carbon Steel in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    2008-07-17

    Jul 17, 2008 ... index which is directly related to the weight loss due to corrosion. The corrosion index ... easily observed by visual inspection, and the robust Gaussian filter was used. .... Method of removal of corrosion products from corrosion.

  11. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  12. Solutions of corrosion Problems in advanced Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, Asger

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic and ferritic steels were exposed in the superheater area of a straw-fired CHP plant. The specimens were exposed for 1400 hours at 450-600°C. The rate of corrosion was assessed based on unattacked metal remaining. The corrosion products and course of corrosion for the various steel types...... were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The ferritic steels suffered from corrosion mainly via material loss. The austenitic steels suffered from predominantly selective corrosion resulting in chromium depletion from the alloy. A clear trend was observed that selective...... corrosion increased with increasing chromium content of the alloy....

  13. Corrosion behavior of corrosion resistant alloys in stimulation acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheldi, Tiziana [ENI E and P Division, 20097 San Donato Milanese Milano (Italy); Piccolo, Eugenio Lo; Scoppio, Lucrezia [Centro Sviluppo Materiali, via Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    In the oil and gas industry, selection of CRAs for downhole tubulars is generally based on resistance to corrosive species in the production environment containing CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, chloride and in some case elemental sulphur. However, there are non-production environments to which these materials must also be resistant for either short term or prolonged duration; these environments include stimulation acids, brine and completion fluids. This paper reports the main results of a laboratory study performed to evaluate the corrosion and stress corrosion behaviour to the acidizing treatments of the most used CRAs for production tubing and casing. Laboratory tests were performed to simulate both 'active' and 'spent' acids operative phases, selecting various environmental conditions. The selected steel pipes were a low alloyed steel, martensitic, super-martensitic, duplex 22 Cr, superduplex 25 Cr and super-austenitic stainless steels (25 Cr 35 Ni). Results obtained in the 'active' acid environments over the temperature range of 100-140 deg. C, showed that the blend acids with HCl at high concentration and HCl + HF represented too much severe conditions, where preventing high general corrosion and heavy localised corrosion by inhibition package becomes very difficult, especially for duplex steel pipe, where, in some case, the specimens were completely dissolved into the solution. On the contrary, all steels pipes were successfully protected by inhibitor when organic acid solution (HCOOH + CH{sub 3}COOH) were used. Furthermore, different effectiveness on corrosion protection was showed by the tested inhibitors packages: e.g. in the 90% HCl at 12% + 10 CH{sub 3}COOH acid blend. In 'spent' acid environments, all steel pipes showed to be less susceptible to the localised and general corrosion attack. Moreover, no Sulphide Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) was observed. Only one super-austenitic stainless steel U-bend specimen showed

  14. Study of techniques applicable for monitoring MIC in soil or sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1999-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion of carbon steel in anaerobic environment is difficult to monitor with electrochemical techniques because of heterogeneous surface conditions and electrochemically active corrosion products. Weight loss measurement, LPR, EIS, hydrogen permeation, and a refined ER...... technique have beeen evaluated including field tests in soil and marine sediment. The conclusions are that EIS can detect combined biofilm and corrosion product film formation, but corrosion rate is overestimated. The ER technique seems to give a correct and sensitive corrosion rate measurement within...... minutes. Hydrogen permeation measurements can indirectly identify sulphide....

  15. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  16. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  17. Detective probe prevents corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2001-07-01

    A black liquor recovery boiler is the main investment in a pulp mill, accounting for: about a third of the total cost of FIM 3-4 billion. Environmental aspects required that all the harmful chemicals involved in the process have to be kept within a pulp mill, rather than be released outside, and closed water circulation systems have to be introduced. These have led to the enrichment of some process and non-process chemicals causing corrosion problems and process disturbances in the boiler. The recovery boiler receives the liquor after the digestion stage, i.e. when woodchips are cooked to make cellulose, and burns it. During digestion, the wood produces out lignin, mixed with the liquor (consisting of sodium sulphide and hydroxide). The black liquor is burnt at the bottom of the boiler after the organic parts have been fired off. The rest goes into the recovery system and the chemicals are recycled producing energy, saving repurchasing chemicals and protecting the environment from toxic emissions.

  18. Corrosion of archaeological iron artefacts compared to modern iron at the waterlogged site Nydam, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Henning; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Gregory, David

    2004-01-01

    loss, corrosion potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrical resistivity. 3) Measurements of environmental parameter such as water level, redox potential, oxygen concentration, soil pH, and the concentration of a range of dissolved species in the pore water. This presentation shows...

  19. Corrosion in Electronic Devices and Sensors to Prevent Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Dev

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of metal and alloys are used in various electronic devices and components like computers, microchips, printed circuit board (PCB, integrated circuits, transistors, and diodes etc. Such components have variety of applications in the field of medical, aerospace, automotive sectors, telecommunication and defense. These components are exposed to different types of environments. The increased used of electronics has also increased the demand for reliability. The size of electronic equipment is also very significant parameter and it has been decreasing presently at a faster rate. The smaller size of equipment has undetectable failures. Though the corrosion taking place in electronic components is generally of micro level which can not be detected easily but the services of device are seized. The paper deals with the various types of corrosion in electronic components as a case study and an approach towards development of some sensor for corrosion monitoring.

  20. Estimation of Corrosion Induced Flaw Sizes on Buried Gas Pipeline in the Nigerian Sector of Niger Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.F. Evans

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A geoelectrical survey was conducted to investigate pipeline corrosion in the coastal plain sands of the Nigerian sector of the Niger Delta. The objective is to estimate corrosion flaw sizes on the pipeline quantitatively instead of direct excavation of the pipeline and eventual use of measuring tape to measure the flaws on the pipeline. The pipelines buried in the Benin sands at Ikot Abasi, South of the Niger Delta Basin became instructive for this study. The survey consisted of electrical potential profiling using Close Interval Pipe-Soil potential survey (CIPS and Horizontal Electrical Profiling (HEP according to Wenner electrodes arrangement. Two permanent test points (PS were used for the study and the flaw sizes were estimated at points delineated to be of high corrosion risk in the study area. The data for close interval potential and HEP were analyzed and interpreted in line with the threshold protective potential (-850 mV as well as the American Water Works Association (AWWA soil corrosivity rating. Results indicate high risk zones due to external corrosion at pipeline length 25-30 m from PS1 and 80 m from PS2. These locations contain significant saline groundwater that facilitates corrosion of metal pipes buried within the area. The results also suggest that the corrosion protection systems for the pipeline need to be reinforced to mitigate further growth of the flaws on the pipeline segment. The impact of the flaws could be severe if allowed to continue.

  1. Quantitative measures of corrosion and prevention: application to corrosion in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.C.; Gellings, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion protection factor (c.p.f.) and the corrosion condition (c.c.) are simple instruments for the study and evaluation of the contribution and efficiency of several methods of corrosion prevention and control. The application of c.p.f. and c.c. to corrosion and prevention in agriculture in

  2. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  3. Quantitative measures of corrosion and prevention: application to corrosion in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.C.; Gellings, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion protection factor (c.p.f.) and the corrosion condition (c.c.) are simple instruments for the study and evaluation of the contribution and efficiency of several methods of corrosion prevention and control. The application of c.p.f. and c.c. to corrosion and prevention in agriculture in

  4. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  5. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  6. Microencapsulation of Corrosion Indicators for Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.; Calle, Luz M.; Hanna,Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous detection, indication, and control of corrosion is been developed based on microencapsulation technology. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed for early detection and indication of corrosion when incorporated into a smart coating. Results from experiments designed to test the ability of the microcapsules to detect and indicate corrosion, when blended into several paint systems, show that these experimental coatings generate a color change, indicative of spot specific corrosion events, that can be observed with the naked eye within hours rather than the hundreds of hours or months typical of the standard accelerated corrosion test protocols.. Key words: smart coating, corrosion detection, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH-sensitive microcapsule, corrosion indicator, corrosion sensing paint

  7. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  8. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  9. Multicomponent Oxide Systems for Corrosion Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-15

    and Si(OEt) 4 are somewhat lpss corrosive to aluminum than is SiCI 4 alone, although some pitting occurs for slow hydrolysis after coating by solutions...humidity (x) 86 A𔃻 determinants of corrosion resistance. The magnesium-silicon- aluminum alloy AA 6061 is generally considered to have good corrosion ... 6061 ), the corrosion resistance exceeded that of the chromate coatings. The feasibilityof the basic approach taken here has been validated. It

  10. Surface modification for corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-06-01

    The raw gas environments that arise from coal gasification have chemical compositions that are low in pO{sub 2} and moderate-to-high in pS{sub 2}. Metallic materials for service in such an environment undergo predominantly sulfidation attack at temperatures of 400 to 700{degree}C. Modification of alloy compositions in bulk can alter the scaling processes and lead to improvements in corrosion resistance, but the benefits can only be attained at temperatures much higher than the service temperatures of the components. Modification of surfaces of structural components by several of the coating techniques examined in this study showed substantial benefit in corrosion resistance when tested in simulated coal gasification environments. The paper presents several examples of surface modification and their corrosion performance.

  11. Electrochemical corrosion of metallic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbaix, M

    1984-05-01

    Methods of electrochemical thermodynamics (electrode potential-pH equilibrium diagrams) and electrochemical kinetics (polarization curves) may help to understand and predict the corrosion behaviour of metals and alloys in the presence of body fluids. A short review of the literature is given concerning some applications of such methods, both in vitro and in vivo, relating to surgical implants (stainless steels, chromium-cobalt-molybdenum alloys, titanium and titanium alloys) and to dental alloys (silver-tin-copper amalgams, silver-base and gold-base casting alloys, nickel-base casting alloys). Attention is drawn to the necessity of more basic research on crevice- and fretting-corrosion of surgical implant materials and dental alloys, and to the toxicity of corrosion products. A perfect understanding of the exact significance of electrode-potentials is essential for the success of such a task.

  12. Electrometrical Methods Application for Detection of Heating System Pipeline Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrov, A.; Ilyin, Y.; Isaev, V.; Rondel, A.; Shapovalov, N.

    2004-12-01

    Coated steel underground pipelines are widely used for the petroleum and gaze transportation, for the water and heat supply. The soils, where the pipelines are placed, are usually highly corrosive for pipe's metal. In the places of crippling of external coating the corrosion processes begin, and this can provoke a pipe breakage. To ensure the pipeline survivability it is necessary to carry out the control of pipeline conditions. The geophysical methods are used to provide such diagnostic. Authors have studied the corrosion processes of the municipal heating system pipelines in Saint-Petersburg (Russia) using the air thermal imaging method, the investigation of electromagnetic fields and spontaneous polarization, measurements of electrode potentials of metal tubes. The pipeline reparation works, which have been provided this year, allowed us to make the visual observation of pipes. The investigation object comprises a pipeline composed of two parallel tubes, which are placed 1-2 meters deep. The fact that the Russian Federation and CIS countries still use the direct heat supply system makes impossible any addition of anticorrosion components to circulating water. Pipelines operate under high pressure (up to 5 atm) and high temperature (designed temperature is 150°C). Tube's isolation is meant for heat loss minimization, and ordinary has poor hydro-isolation. Some pipeline construction elements (sliding and fixed bearings, pressure compensators, heat enclosures) are often non-isolated, and tube's metal contacts with soil. Hard usage condition, ingress of technical contamination cause, stray currents etc. cause high accidental rate. Realization of geophysical diagnostics, including electrometry, is hampered in a city by underground communication systems, power lines, isolating ground cover (asphalt), limitation of the working area with buildings. These restrictions form the investigation conditions. In order to detect and localize isolation (coat) defects authors

  13. Strain Measurement Technology for Corrosion Fatigue Specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Wei-hua; NING; Guang-sheng; ZHANG; Chang-yi; TONG; Zhen-feng; YANG; Wen

    2015-01-01

    Main pipeline is the key component of nuclear power plants(NPPs).Under the first loop water and low-cyclic load condition,the main pipeline may be induced to corrosion fatigue failure.Thus,it’s necessary to test and get the corrosion fatigue property of main pipeline material.During the corrosion fatigue test,the strain

  14. 7 CFR 2902.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 2902.44 Section 2902.44... Items § 2902.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  16. Corrosion-Induced Concrete Cracking Model Considering Corrosion-Filled Paste

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yuxi; Wu, Yingyao; Jin, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    A TCP–TCL model is established to describe the relationship between the thickness of the corrosion-filled paste (CP) and that of the corrosion layer (CL). This model can describe the phenomenon that the corrosion filling in the concrete pores and accumulating at the steel/concrete interface occur synchronously. Based on the TCP–TCL model, a corrosion-induced concrete cracking model, which can quantitatively consider corrosion-filled paste at concrete/steel interface, is proposed. Combined wit...

  17. Corrosion-Inhibitor Efficiency Control: Comparison by Means of Different Portable Corrosion Rate Meters

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez Sierra, Isabel; Andrade Perdrix, Maria del Carmen; Rebolledo Ramos, Nuria; Luo, L; De Schutter, G

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion-inhibiting substances have been applied to suppress corrosion mainly on bare steel, but when corrosion is progressing, suppression can be achieved if anodic and cathodic reactions are avoided, which is not an easy objective, particularly if the bare metal is surrounded by concrete. In the present article, several corrosion inhibitors are studied to identify their inhibition efficiency in concrete. The percentage of reduction of the corrosion rate without and with inhibitor is named ...

  18. Electrochemical Measurement of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Anna H.; Davis, Dennis D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion of Shuttle thruster components in atmospheres containing high concentrations of nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and water is an important issue in ground operations of bipropellant systems in humid locations. Measurements of the corrosivities of NTO-containing atmospheres and the responses of different materials to these atmospheres have been accomplished using an electrochemical sensor. The sensor is composed of alternating aluminum/titanium strips separated by thin insulating layers. Under high humidity conditions a thin film of water covers the surface of the sensor. Added NTO vapor reacts with the water film to form a conductive medium and establishes a galvanic cell. The current from this cell can be integrated with respect to time and related to the corrosion activity. The surface layer formed from humid air/NTO reacts in the same way as an aqueous solution of nitric acid. Nitric acid is generally considered an important agent in NTO corrosion situations. The aluminum/titanium sensor is unresponsive to dry air, responds slightly to humid air (> 75% RH), and responds strongly to the combination of humid air and NTO. The sensor response is a power function (n = 2) of the NTO concentration. The sensor does not respond to NTO in dry air. The response of other materials in this type of sensor is related to position of the material in a galvanic series in aqueous nitric acid. The concept and operation of this electrochemical corrosion measurement is being applied to other corrosive atmospheric contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, sulfur dioxide, and acidic aerosols.

  19. Corrosion performance of structural alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1999-07-15

    Component reliability and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential in power-generating and gasification processes that utilize coal as a feedstock. During combustion and conversion of coal, the environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional boilers to air-deficient conditions in 10W-NO{sub x} and gasification systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion and conversion, one concern from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the gaseous/deposit environment toward structural components such as waterwall tubes, steam superheaters, syngas coolers, and hot-gas filters. The corrosion tests in the program described in this paper address the individual and combined effects of oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded structural alloys that were exposed to air-deficient and excess-air environments typical of coal-combustion and gasification processes. Data in this paper address the effects of preoxidation on the subsequent corrosion performance of structural materials such as 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel, Type 347 austenitic stainless steel, Alloys 800, 825, 625, 214, Hastelloy X, and iron aluminide when exposed at 650 C to various mixed-gas environments with and without HCI. Results are presented for scaling kinetics, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, detailed evaluations of near-surface regions of the exposed specimens, gains in our mechanistic understanding of the roles of S and Cl in the corrosion process, and the effect of preoxidation on subsequent corrosion.

  20. Cyclone reburning retrofit: Corrosion evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarv, H.; Paul, L.D. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Reburning is an emerging NO{sub x} reducing technology which offers cyclone boiler owners a promising alternative to the more expensive flue gas cleanup techniques. Pilot-scale test results have shown that the corrosive H{sub 2}S gas can evolve during reburn. This can pose a potential problem and concern in retrofits burning high-sulfur Illinois coals. This research program is intended to assess tube corrosion under simulated reburning conditions (temperature, stoichiometry, and H{sub 2}S concentration). Performance of existing carbon steel as well as other alloys will be tested and compared. 1 fig.

  1. Cyclone reburning retrofit: Corrosion evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzan, H.; Paul, L.D. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Reburning is an emerging NO{sub x} reducing technology which offers cyclone boiler owners a promising alternative to the more expensive flue gas cleanup techniques. Pilot-scale test results have shown that the corrosive H{sub 2}S gas can evolve during reburn. This can pose a potential problem and concern in retrofits burning high-sulfur Illinois coals. This research program is intended to assess tube corrosion under simulated reburning conditions (temperature, stoichiometry, and H{sub 2}S concentration). Performance of existing carbon steel as well as other alloys will be tested and compared. 1 fig.

  2. Corrosion Reliability of Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Jensen, Stine G.; Møller, Per

    2008-01-01

    Inherently two factors namely multi-material usage and potential bias makes electronic devices susceptible to corrosion if exposed to humid conditions. The problem is compounded today due to miniaturization and contamination effects. The reduction in size of the components and close spacing...... on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) for high density packing has greatly increased the risk of corrosion under humid conditions. An important issue is the failures due to electrolytic metal migration. This paper describes an investigation of the electrolytic migration of Sn-Pb solder lines on PCBs in humid...

  3. Microbial Influenced Corrosion (MIC) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    low lying areas breaks down protective coating system and causes structural corrosion , • Water and organic/inorganic nutrients BUSINESS SENSITIVE...Chemical disinfection (T.O 1-1-8 and T.O 1-1-691) • Biocidal rinses and coatings • Biocidal Corrosion Preventative Compounds or CPCs BUSINESS...Type: H    Proprietary  Coating  w/ Silver  Inhibitor   Non‐Chrome Treatment + Mg‐Rich  Primer  Coupon Type: I    Prekote® (Pantheon Chemical) N/A

  4. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  5. Coatings for improved corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1992-05-01

    Several coating approaches are being developed to resist attack in coal-fired environments and thereby minimize corrosion of underlying substrate alloys and extend the time for onset of breakaway corrosion. In general, coating systems can be classified as either diffusion or overlay type, which are distinguished principally by the method of deposition and the structure of the resultant coating-substrate bond. The coating techniques examined are pack cementation, electrospark deposition, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spray, and ion implantation. In addition, ceramic coatings are used in some applications.

  6. Analysis of a corrosion failure on a prestressed concrete cylinder pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, R.L. [Corrosion Consulting Service Corp., Fallbrook, CA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    In the arid or semi-arid western part of the United States, there are special parameters that may require investigation to determine whether the right-of-way soils are corrosive to cementitious-coated pipe. Cyclical wetting and drying, especially in arid environments, can cause an increase in chloride concentration in the capillary system of mortar by a factor of at least five. Under the right circumstances, with cyclical wetting and drying, a soil chloride content of 140 mg/kg will exceed the corrosion threshold of 700 mg/kg and initiate corrosion on prestress wire. Several actual field examples encountered in an investigation on a PCCP failure are described. Also included is a simple field test to quickly and economically determine which combinations of gravel, sand, and silty clay that are helpful in predicting both the likelihood and severity of cyclical wetting and drying stimulated corrosion on prestress concrete cylinder pipe. Other parameters examined were mortar properties of thickness, compressive strength, absorption, density, pH and total alkalinity vs. chloride penetration into the mortar, and degree of corrosion on prestress concrete cylinder pipe.

  7. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  8. Assessing Level and Effectiveness of Corrosion Education in the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwee Ling Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of corrosion can be minimized by an engineering workforce well trained in corrosion fundamentals and management. Since the United Arab Emirates incurs the second highest cost of corrosion after Saudi Arabia, this paper examined the quality of corrosion education in the UAE. Surveys with academia and industry respondents showed that dedicated corrosion courses and engineering courses that integrated corrosion into the curricula were available in UAE universities, but graduates had insufficient knowledge of corrosion engineering and superficial understanding of corrosion in real-life design contexts. The effectiveness of corrosion education is determined by both competence in corrosion knowledge/skills and availability of resources (faculty and research. Though most departments would not hire new corrosion-specialist faculty, department research efforts and industry partnerships in corrosion research were present. The paper concluded with recommendations for improving knowledge and skills of future engineers in corrosion and enhancing corrosion instruction to better meet industry needs.

  9. Evaluation and control of corrosion and encrustation in tube wells of the Indus Plains, West Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Frank Eldridge; Barnes, Ivan

    1969-01-01

    Seepage from rivers and irrigation canals has contributed to waterlogging and soil salinization problems in much of the Indus Plains of West Pakistan. These problems are being overcome in part by tube-well dewatering and deep leaching of salinized soils. The ground waters described here are anaerobic and some are supersaturated with troublesome minerals such as calcium carbonate (calcite) and iron carbonate (siderite). These waters are moderately corrosive to steel. Some wells contain sulfate-reducing bacteria, which catalyze corrosion, and pH-electrode potential relationships favorable to the solution of iron also are rather common. Corrosion is concentrated in the relatively active (anodic) saw slots of water-well filter pipes (screens), where metal loss is least tolerable. Local changes in chemical properties of the water, because of corrosion, apparently cause deposition of calcium carbonate, iron carbonate, and other minerals which clog the filter pipes. In some places well capacities are seriously reduced in very short periods of time. There appears to be no practicable preventive treatment for corrosion and encrustation in these wells. Even chemical sterilization for bacterial control has yielded poor results. Periodic rehabilitation by down-hole blasting or by other effective mechanical or chemical cleaning methods will prolong well life. It may be possible to repair severely damaged well screens by inserting perforated sleeves of plastic or other inert material. The most promising approach to future, well-field development is to use filter pipes of epoxy-resin-bonded fiber glass, stainless steel, or other inert material which minimizes both corrosion and corrosion-catalyzed encrustation. Fiberglass plastic pipe appears to be the most economically practicable construction material at this time and already is being used with promising results.

  10. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    2000-01-28

    Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

  11. Atmospheric corrosion sensor based on strain measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Naoya; Hiroki, Masatoshi; Yamada, Toshirou; Kihira, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Kazumi; Kuriyama, Yukihisa; Okazaki, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an in situ atmospheric corrosion sensor based on strain measurement is discussed. The theoretical background for measuring the reduction in thickness of low carbon steel is also presented. Based on the theoretical considerations, a test piece and apparatus for an atmospheric corrosion sensor were designed. Furthermore, in a dry–wet cyclic accelerated exposure experiment, the measured strain indicated thinning of the test piece, although the corrosion product generated on the surface of the test piece affected the results. The atmospheric corrosion sensor would be effective for evaluating atmospheric corrosion of many types of infrastructure.

  12. Nodular Corrosion Characteristics of Zirconium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Gil; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, D. J

    2003-01-15

    This study was reported the effect of the nodular corrosion on the nuclear reactor environmental along with metallurgical influence, also suggested experimental scheme related to evaluate nodular corrosion characteristics of Zr-1 Nb alloy. Remedial strategies against the nodular corrosion should firstly develop plan to assess the effect of the water quality condition (Oxygen, Hydrogen) as well as the boiling on the nodular corrosion, secondarily establish plan to control heat treatment process to keep a good resistance on nodular corrosion in Zr-1Nb alloy as former western reactor did.

  13. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  14. Analysis of Pipeline Steel Corrosion Data From NBS (NIST) Studies Conducted Between 1922-1940 and Relevance to Pipeline Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    Between 1911 and 1984, the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) conducted a large number of corrosion studies that included the measurement of corrosion damage to samples exposed to real-world environments. One of these studies was an investigation conducted between 1922 and 1940 into the corrosion of bare steel and wrought iron pipes buried underground at 47 different sites representing different soil types across the Unites States. At the start of this study, very little was known about the corrosion of ferrous alloys underground. The objectives of this study were to determine (i) if coatings would be required to prevent corrosion, and (ii) if soil properties could be used to predict corrosion and determine when coatings would be required. While this study determined very quickly that coatings would be required for some soils, it found that the results were so divergent that even generalities based on this data must be drawn with care. The investigators concluded that so many diverse factors influence corrosion rates underground that planning of proper tests and interpretation of the results were matters of considerable difficulty and that quantitative interpretations or extrapolations could be done "only in approximate fashion" and attempted only in the "restricted area" of the tests until more complete information is available. Following the passage of the Pipeline Safety Improvement Act in 2002 and at the urging of the pipeline industry, the Office of Pipeline Safety of the U.S. Department of Transportation approached the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NBS became NIST in 1988) and requested that the data from this study be reexamined to determine if the information handling and analysis capabilities of modern computers and software could enable the extraction of more meaningful information from these data. This report is a summary of the resulting investigations. The data from the original NBS studies were analyzed using a variety of

  15. Analysis of Pipeline Steel Corrosion Data From NBS (NIST) Studies Conducted Between 1922–1940 and Relevance to Pipeline Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Between 1911 and 1984, the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) conducted a large number of corrosion studies that included the measurement of corrosion damage to samples exposed to real-world environments. One of these studies was an investigation conducted between 1922 and 1940 into the corrosion of bare steel and wrought iron pipes buried underground at 47 different sites representing different soil types across the Unites States. At the start of this study, very little was known about the corrosion of ferrous alloys underground. The objectives of this study were to determine (i) if coatings would be required to prevent corrosion, and (ii) if soil properties could be used to predict corrosion and determine when coatings would be required. While this study determined very quickly that coatings would be required for some soils, it found that the results were so divergent that even generalities based on this data must be drawn with care. The investigators concluded that so many diverse factors influence corrosion rates underground that planning of proper tests and interpretation of the results were matters of considerable difficulty and that quantitative interpretations or extrapolations could be done “only in approximate fashion” and attempted only in the “restricted area” of the tests until more complete information is available. Following the passage of the Pipeline Safety Improvement Act in 2002 and at the urging of the pipeline industry, the Office of Pipeline Safety of the U.S. Department of Transportation approached the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NBS became NIST in 1988) and requested that the data from this study be reexamined to determine if the information handling and analysis capabilities of modern computers and software could enable the extraction of more meaningful information from these data. This report is a summary of the resulting investigations. The data from the original NBS studies were analyzed using a variety of

  16. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  17. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  18. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  19. Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Schneibel, Joachim H.; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2007-05-01

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

  20. CORROSION INHIBITOR FOR CARBON STEELS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in 3% ac]neon.s' NaCl solution (pH 6) ... compared to stainless steels (Buchweishaija & Hagen 1997). Organic compounds are ... resistant dust for break and clutch linings, wood binders and mould (Gedam.

  1. Encapsulated Multifunction Corrosion Inhibitive Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Tec #19 (alkaline detergent), scrubbed vigorously with cheese cloth, then perform R.I.A. drop test for cleanliness (ASTM 7.1.6.22) (Turco Air Tec...Systems, DOE/NASA TM-78180 (1978). 39. Gouda , V.K. and Shater, M.A., Corrosion Sci. 15 199 (1975). 40. Controlled release, Pesticide Symposium 41

  2. Corrosion inhibition for distillation apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Kenneth L.; Sagues, Alberto A.; Davis, Burtron H.; Schweighardt, Frank K.

    1985-01-01

    Tower material corrosion in an atmospheric or sub-atmospheric distillation tower in a coal liquefaction process is reduced or eliminated by subjecting chloride-containing tray contents to an appropriate ion-exchange resin to remove chloride from such tray contents materials.

  3. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Reactor faul elements of the elongated cylindrical type which are jacketed in a corrosion resistant material are described. Each feel element is comprised of a plurality of jacketed cylinders of fissionable material in end to end abutting relationship, the jackets being welded together at their adjoining ends to retain the individual segments together and seat the interior of the jackets.

  4. Evolutionary Computation Techniques for Predicting Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Marref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion occurs in many engineering structures such as bridges, pipelines, and refineries and leads to the destruction of materials in a gradual manner and thus shortening their lifespan. It is therefore crucial to assess the structural integrity of engineering structures which are approaching or exceeding their designed lifespan in order to ensure their correct functioning, for example, carrying ability and safety. An understanding of corrosion and an ability to predict corrosion rate of a material in a particular environment plays a vital role in evaluating the residual life of the material. In this paper we investigate the use of genetic programming and genetic algorithms in the derivation of corrosion-rate expressions for steel and zinc. Genetic programming is used to automatically evolve corrosion-rate expressions while a genetic algorithm is used to evolve the parameters of an already engineered corrosion-rate expression. We show that both evolutionary techniques yield corrosion-rate expressions that have good accuracy.

  5. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  6. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  7. Effect of corrosion on flexural bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshatha Shetty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is one of the main causes affecting durability of structures. Corrosion effects on structures cannot be ignored and replaced. To understand the performance of structures there is a need to study the rate at which different corrosion levels occur. Hence the present investigation has been taken up to study the behaviour of NBS (National Bureau of Standard beam specimens made up of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC and Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC concrete matrix were subjected to accelerated corrosion for different corrosion levels of 2.5 % to 10 % at 2.5 % interval. Results are compared with those for control beam specimen. It is observed that bond stress value decreases with the increase in corrosion levels. Also corrosion leads to the decline of load carrying capacity.

  8. High Temperature Corrosion on Biodust Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi

    The high content of alkali metals and chlorine in biomass gives rise to fouling/slagging and corrosion of heat exchange components, such as superheaters, in biomass fired power plants. Increasing the lifetime of these components, and in addition, preventing unwarranted plant shutdowns due...... to their failure, requires understanding of the complex corrosion mechanisms, as well as development of materials that are resistant to corrosion under biomass firing conditions, thereby motivating the current work. To understand the mechanisms of corrosion attack, comprehensive analysis of corrosion products...... was necessary. In the present work, two complementary methodologies based on analysis of cross sections and plan views were applied to achieve comprehensive characterization of corrosion products. The suitability of these methods for both laboratory scale and full scale corrosion investigations was demonstrated...

  9. Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

    2008-01-01

    A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and

  10. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  11. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  12. Corrosion inhibition of a hygroscopic inorganic dust-depressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longzhe Jin; Lu Wang; Dongke Chen

    2006-01-01

    Metallic corrosion is a serious problem in the application of a hygroscopic inorganic dust-depressor. The basic characteristics of a hygroscopic inorganic dust-depressor and its corrosivity, corrosion mechanism, as well as the principle of corrosion inhibition were analyzed. The static mass-loss test was carried out to investigate the corrosion behavior and the effect of the dustdepressor. The static corrosion rates of steel specimens were measured in six different corrosion inhibitor solutions of the dustdepressor, and the suitable corrosion inhibitors for the dust-depressor to reduce the corrosivity were found out.

  13. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  14. Electrochemical characterisation speeds up prediction of corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, E.W.; Hooijmans, J.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    The contents of this presentation show the following elements: Introduction; Corrosion in real life; Why Electrochemical characterisation of corrosion; Applications (corrosion resistance coatings, corrosion behaviour (brazed) joints); Available electrochemical corrosion techniques; Standards; Conclusions. In the Conclusions the corrosion screening method is summarized: ECN method fast; within 1h -1 week results depending on test method; Fast pre-selection of promising materials/combinations (cost savings); Determining of corrosion initiation; Determination of corrosion mechanisms and propagation; Life time predictions possible; Strong combination with metallographic post-investigation; Ranking materials / constructions for corrosion performance.

  15. INTERNAL CORROSION MONITORING IN OFFSHORE PLATFORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Benedicto Mainier

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is one of the main causes of failures in equipment and pipes in off-shore oil production. These failures harm the process, slow the production operational chronogram, and generate high costs of maintenance, beyond generation risks to health and environment. Due to the fact that most of the equipment, tubing and pipes of production platforms are made of steel, in general, carbon steel, the industry of petroleum exploration will always coexist with the corrosive process. The use of a Corrosion Monitoring Plan to diagnostic, to control and to manage the evolution of corrosives process in off-shore oil platforms is the strategy proposed in this work to prevent problems as described above. The Internal Corrosion Monitoring Plan (ICMP, is based on lab analysis of the corrosively of fluids and residues showed periodically in off-shore operational platform; in the corrosion rate determined by the periodic use of test bodies installed inside off-shore oil platforms tubing systems, as mass loss coupons and electric resistance probes; and finally, in periodic operational data collect obtained during the off-shore oil platform systems operation. The ICMP will direct and manage the actions to be taken in case of aggravation of a corrosive process, quickly identifying to the corrosive mechanisms and its localization in the various systems of the platforms. The optimized use of the corrosion inhibitor and other chemical products are one of the main advantages of the ICMP.

  16. Corrosion Protection of Electrically Conductive Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic function of the electrically conductive surface of electrical contacts is electrical conduction. The electrical conductivity of contact materials can be largely reduced by corrosion and in order to avoid corrosion, protective coatings must be used. Another phenomenon that leads to increasing contact resistance is fretting corrosion. Fretting corrosion is the degradation mechanism of surface material, which causes increasing contact resistance. Fretting corrosion occurs when there is a relative movement between electrical contacts with surfaces of ignoble metal. Avoiding fretting corrosion is therefore extremely challenging in electronic devices with pluggable electrical connections. Gold is one of the most commonly used noble plating materials for high performance electrical contacts because of its high corrosion resistance and its good and stable electrical behavior. The authors have investigated different ways to minimize the consumption of gold for electrical contacts and to improve the performance of gold plating. Other plating materials often used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces are tin, nickel, silver and palladium. This paper will deal with properties and new research results of different plating materials in addition to other means used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces and the testing of corrosion resistance of electrically conductive surfaces.

  17. 49 CFR 192.477 - Internal corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.477... Control § 192.477 Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. If corrosive gas is being transported, coupons... internal corrosion. Each coupon or other means of monitoring internal corrosion must be checked two...

  18. 49 CFR 192.491 - Corrosion control records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion control records. 192.491 Section 192.491... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.491 Corrosion... detail to demonstrate the adequacy of corrosion control measures or that a corrosive condition does...

  19. Corrosion Behaviour of Titanium Anodized Film in Different Corrosive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Sunil D. Kahar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Anodizing is an electrochemical process in which thickness of the natural oxide layer is increased and converted it into a decorative, durable, corrosion-resistant film. Titanium is used as a biocompatible material in human implants due to its excellent corrosion and wears resistance. Stable, continuous, highly adherent, and protective oxide films can be developed on titanium using various acid or alkaline baths. Anodizing of titanium generates a spectrum of different color without use of dyes. This spectrum of color dependent on the thickness of the oxide, voltage ranges, interference of light reflecting off the oxide surface and reflecting off the underlying metal surface. The anodized film of Titanium is mainly consists of TiO2 or mixtures of TiO2 & Ti2O3 etc. In the present work, Pure Titanium plate has been anodized using bath of Chromic Acid at different voltage range. The anodized film is characterized by visual observation, SEM & EDAX analysis & A.C Impedance Spectroscopy, while the corrosion studies were performed using Potentiodynamic studies were performed in 3.5% NaCl & 0.1N H2SO4. The Results show that the anodized film of Titanium show different spectrum of colors from Brown-Violet-Tea or Peacock. SEM & EDAX analyses show that the anodized film of Titanium is mainly made up of TiO2 and Ti2O3. Potentiodynamic study implies that the film developed on Titanium using the bath of Chromic Acid exhibits good corrosion resistance. The A.C. Impedance study shows that the film is more compact, adherent and more uniform in chromic acid bath.

  20. Microbial Corrosion of API 5L X-70 Carbon Steel by ATCC 7757 and Consortium of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various cases of accidents involving microbiology influenced corrosion (MIC were reported by the oil and gas industry. Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB have always been linked to MIC mechanisms as one of the major causes of localized corrosion problems. In this study, SRB colonies were isolated from the soil in suspected areas near the natural gas transmission pipeline in Malaysia. The effects of ATCC 7757 and consortium of isolated SRB upon corrosion on API 5L X-70 carbon steel coupon were investigated using a weight loss method, an open circuit potential method (OCP, and a potentiodynamic polarization curves method in anaerobic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS were then used to determine the corrosion morphology in verifying the SRB activity and corrosion products formation. Results from the study show that the corrosion rate (CR of weight loss method for the isolated SRB is recorded as 0.2017 mm/yr compared to 0.2530 mm/yr for ATCC 7757. The Tafel plot recorded the corrosion rate of 0.3290 mm/yr for Sg. Ular SRB and 0.2500 mm/yr for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The results showed that the consortia of isolated SRB were of comparable effects and features with the single ATCC 7757 strain.

  1. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela;

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...

  2. The sky is falling: chemical characterization and corrosion evaluation of deposition produced during the static testing of solid rocket motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, William J; McNeill, Laurie S; Mendenhall, Scout; Hancock, Paul V; Wells, Jason E; Thackeray, Kevin J; Gosen, David P

    2013-03-01

    Static tests of horizontally restrained rocket motors at the ATK facility in Promontory UT, USA result in the deposition of entrained soil and fuel combustion products, referred to as Test Fire Soil (TFS), over areas as large as 30-50 mile (80-130 km) and at distances up to 10-12 miles (16-20 km) from the test site. Chloride is the main combustion product generated from the ammonium perchlorate-aluminum based composite propellant. Deposition sampling/characterization and a 6-month field corrosivity study using mild steel coupons were conducted in conjunction with the February 25th 2010 FSM-17 static test. The TFS deposition rates at the three study sites ranged from 1 to 5 g/min/m. TFS contained significantly more chloride than the surface soil collected from the test site. The TFS collected during two subsequent tests had similarly elevated chloride, suggesting that the results obtained in this study are applicable to other tests assuming that the rocket fuel composition remains similar. The field-deployed coupons exposed to the TFS had higher corrosion rates (3.6-5.0 mpy) than paired non-exposed coupons (1.6-1.8 mpy). Corrosion rates for all coupons decreased over time, but coupons exposed to the TFS always had a higher rate than the non-exposed. Differences in corrosion rates between the three study sites were also observed, with sites receiving more TFS deposition having higher corrosion rates.

  3. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry. The NASA Kennedy Space Centers Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion

  4. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-12-14

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys.

  5. CORROSION MONITORING OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE AND SNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, D.G.; Haas, C.M.; Smith, C.M.; Ohl, P.C.

    2003-02-27

    While developing a method to measure pressure in totally sealed stainless steel containers holding spent nuclear fuel at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site, Vista Engineering Technologies, LLC (Vista Engineering) personnel adapted the central concept to corrosion monitoring techniques for the same containers. The ability to monitor corrosion within vessels containing spent nuclear fuel, plutonium and other hazardous materials is imperative for safe storage. Vista Engineering personnel have devised a way to monitor corrosion in a totally sealed stainless steel container using a Magnetically Coupled Corrosion Gauge (MCCG) Patent Pending. The MCCG can be used to detect corrosion as well as measure corrosion rate and does not require any penetration of the containment vessel, which minimizes pressure boundary surface area and sensitive weld materials in the vessels.

  6. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    the material that failed was carbon steel and the electrolyte were saline waters, but the microorgan- isms, the environments and the corrosion...different salinities . Martin et al.42 demonstrated that Ecorr ennoblement was site specific, varying 100 mV versus SCE between locations, with higher...microbial consortium of the fungus Aspergillus niger and bacteria influenced the corrosion–inhibiting effectiveness of Crz6 leached from chromate (CrO{24

  7. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  8. Corrosion behavior in heat pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurak Rodbumrung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to perform life testing and determine the effect of working fluid on the corrosion of a heat pipe with a sintered wick. The heat pipe was made from a copper tube. The inner heat pipe was filled with 99.97% pure copper powder as a dendritic for the sintering process. The heat pipe had an outer diameter of 6 mm with a length of 200 mm, and distilled water and ethanol were the working fluids. The operating temperature at the evaporator was 125°C. The analysis consisted of using a scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results of the scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis showed that the corrosion of the heat pipe was uniform. The result of the atomic absorption spectroscopy indicated that the concentration of the copper in the ethanol as the working fluid was greater than in the distilled water as the working fluid, and the highest concentration of copper particles in the ethanol was 22.7499 ppm or 0.0409 mg after testing for 3000 h. The concentration of copper was higher when the length of the life test increased due to corrosion of the heat pipe.

  9. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  10. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  11. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe[sub 3]Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000[degrees]C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  12. Optimising corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Andersen, A.

    2002-01-01

    A three-year project - financially supported by the Nordic Industrial Fund - on monitoring of corrosion in district heating systems has been initiated with participation of researchers and industrial partners in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The primary objective of the project...... is to improve the quality control in district heating systems by corrosion monitoring. In Danish systems electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarisation resistance (LPR), high-sensitive electrical resistance (ER) technology, crevice corrosion probes, as well as weight loss coupons...

  13. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Suess

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, materi...

  14. Corrosive acid injury of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, T; Ratnatunga, C; Dharrmapala, A; Samarasinghe, T

    2015-03-01

    Ingestion of corrosives with accidental or suicidal intent is a common problem in Sri Lanka. Management options and outcomes of corrosive injuries on stomach are not well documented in our setting. The clinical presentation, complications and management outcomes of nine patients with corrosive injury to stomach are presented. Gastric outlet obstruction seen in majority, was managed with bypass procedure (n=5) or resection (n=4). The outcomes of management were successful with both methods.

  15. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  16. Oxidation And Hot Corrosion Of ODS Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Report reviews oxidation and hot corrosion of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, intended for use at high temperatures. Classifies environmental resistances of such alloys by rates of growth of oxides, volatilities of oxides, spalling of oxides, and limitations imposed by hot corrosion. Also discusses environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. Concludes ODS NICrAl and FeCrAl alloys highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion and can be used uncoated.

  17. Corrosion of oil-fired domestic boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koebel, M.; Elsener, M.

    1989-05-01

    Depending on the surface temperature of the flue gas side the corrosion of oil fired domestic boilers proceeds either mainly by acid corrosion or by oxygen corrosion: (1) At surface temperatures of 60/sup 0/C and higher the corrosion mechanism of acid corrosion prevails and the corrosion rates amount to 0.1-0.3 mm/year (values referred to continuous burner operation). The corrosion products consist of soluble iron(II)- and iron(III)sulfates. Higher corrosion rates can be attributed to an appreciable catalytic formation of sulfur trioxide on the corrosion products formed on the convective heating surfaces. (2) At surface temperatures of 40/sup 0/C the mechanism of oxygen corrosion already dominates and the corrosion rates are about ten times higher (1.5-3 mm/year, referred to continuous burner operation). The high portion of iron oxide hydrates, especially goethit (/alpha/-FeOOH), makes the corrosion products difficult to remove. (3) Distinctly reduced service lives are also expected for the so called reduced temperature boilers ('Niedertemperaturkessel') and low temperature boilers ('Tieftemperaturkessel'): According to the manufacturers these boilers may be operated at boiler water temperatures well below 60/sup 0/C, as they are equipped with constructive measures to enhance the surface temperature on the flue gas side. However, these measures are only fully effective under stationary conditions. Some of the results were obtained from weight loss measurements on test specimen made from St 35.8 and gray cast iron, that were exposed to the flue gases of an fired experimental boiler. Other important results come from field measurements of the sulfuric acid content of about 30 boilers that are in practical use. (orig.).

  18. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  19. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Suess

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, materi...

  20. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  1. Corrosion problems and solutions in oil refining and petrochemical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses corrosion problems and their solutions at facilities in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, including cooling water and boiler feed water units. Further, it describes and analyzes corrosion control actions, corrosion monitoring, and corrosion management. Corrosion problems are a perennial issue in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, as they lead to a deterioration of the functional properties of metallic equipment and harm the environment – both of which need to be protected for the sake of current and future generations. Accordingly, this book examines and analyzes typical and atypical corrosion failure cases and their prevention at refineries and petrochemical facilities, including problems with: pipelines, tanks, furnaces, distillation columns, absorbers, heat exchangers, and pumps. In addition, it describes naphthenic acid corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen damages, sulfidic corrosion, microbiologically induced corrosion, erosion-corrosion, and corrosion...

  2. Accelerated corrosion testing results for specimens containing uncoated reinforcing steel and corrosion inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratova, I. L.; Montes, P.; Bremner, T. W. [New Brunswick Univ., Dept, of Civil Engineering, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Concrete mixtures (water-cement ratios of 0.25, 0.40. or 0.60) containing uncoated reinforcing bars with a simulated crack, formed transverse to the axis of the bar, and with three commercial corrosion inhibitors added for corrosion protection (organic corrosion inhibitor,calcium nitrate-based corrosion inhibitor, and migratory corrosion inhibitor), were tested for corrosion damage. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the different corrosion inhibitors in uncracked and cracked concrete slabs in a simulated marine environment. The specimens were placed in an accelerated exposure cabinet with four cycles of wetting and drying per day in simulated seawater, and corrosion rates measured using the linear polarization technique. Water-soluble chloride content in the rebars was analyzed at the end of the exposure period. The three corrosion inhibitors were found to show a wide variation in performance. There was a direct correlation between their effectiveness and addition rate. All three appeared to be more effective in reducing corrosion rate in a higher water-to-cement ratio concrete. Consistent performance was provided only by calcium nitrate at an addition rate of 25 litre/cu m of concrete, with water-to-cement ratios of 0.60 and 0.40. Pitting corrosion was observed in all pre-cracked high performance concrete specimens; the depth of the pit tended to be deeper when a corrosion inhibitor was used. 6 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  3. New corrosion issues in gas sweetening plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G. (CLI International and Asperger Technologies, Houston, TX (United States))

    Gas treating plants are experiencing corrosion problems which impact on efficiency and safety. While general corrosion is not particularly hazardous in the gas processing industry, local corrosion is very dangerous since it has several different mechanisms, all of which have dangerously high rates, and it occurs at locations which are hard to find and hard to predict. A newly discovered, velocity-dependent type of corrosion is reported. It is related to yet-undefined species which cause excessively high corrosion in areas of turbulence. This accelerated corrosion is not due to erosion or cavitation, but to a diffusion-limited reaction accelerated by turbulence. A full-flow test loop was built to evaluate the corrosiveness of gas plant solutions at their normal temperature and flow rates. Test runs were conducted with Co[sub 2]-loaded amine solutions for periods of 12 days. Carbon steel specimens mounted in the test loop were examined and corrosion rates calculated. Chromium alloys were shown to be attacked by corrodents in the low-velocity part of the loop and very aggressively attacked in the high-velocity part. The tests demonstrate the need for rigorous monitoring of corrosion in areas of higher velocity such as piping elbows and other points of turbulence. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Fouling corrosion in aluminum heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jingxin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fouling deposits on aluminum heat exchanger reduce the heat transfer efficiency and cause corrosion to the apparatus. This study focuses on the corrosive behavior of aluminum coupons covered with a layer of artificial fouling in a humid atmosphere by their weight loss, Tafel plots, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, and scanning electron microscope (SEM observations. The results reveal that chloride is one of the major elements found in the fouling which damages the passive film and initiates corrosion. The galvanic corrosion between the metal and the adjacent carbon particles accelerates the corrosive process. Furthermore, the black carbon favors the moisture uptake, and gives the dissolved oxygen greater chance to migrate through the fouling layer and form a continuous diffusive path. The corrosion rate decreasing over time is conformed to electrochemistry measurements and can be verified by Faraday’s law. The EIS results indicate that the mechanism of corrosion can be interpreted by the pitting corrosion evolution mechanism, and that pitting was observed on the coupons by SEM after corrosive exposure.

  5. Classification of corrosion risk zones using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Nikolas; Anastasiou, Constantina; Tantele, Elia A.; Votsis, Renos A.; Danezis, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the major deterioration factor of the RC infrastructures. Several factors are contributing towards increasing the corrosion risk like the exposure and environmental conditions which are a function of the geographical location of the infrastructure. Information for these conditions and their affected areas can be proved valuable at design stage and/or during maintenance planning. This study aims to relate corrosion risk of RC infrastructures with their geographical location. The corrosion risk is quantified through data from NDT methods and subsequently correlated with its location. Therefore high risk areas with structures prone to corrosion deterioration are identified. The latter is implemented via GIS tools in order to create maps that describe how corrosion risk is related to the location of each structure. Two GIS methods are suggested, the grid system and the use of classified areas. Corrosion data has been collected from labs about various constructions in Cyprus and used in conjunction with GIS tools to provide useful information on corrosion identification. The outcome is a digitized map of the Limassol area which indicates the risks levels associated with corrosion of the steel reinforcement.

  6. NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR VISION 21 SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng Ban

    2004-12-01

    Advanced sensor technology is identified as a key component for advanced power systems for future energy plants that would have virtually no environmental impact. This project intends to develop a novel high temperature corrosion sensor and subsequent measurement system for advanced power systems. Fireside corrosion is the metal loss caused by chemical reactions on surfaces exposed to the combustion environment. Such corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and has emerged to be a significant concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions reduction, efficiency improvement, or fuel/oxidant flexibility. Corrosion damage can lead to catastrophic equipment failure, explosions, and forced outages. Proper management of corrosion requires real-time indication of corrosion rate. However, short-term, on-line corrosion monitoring systems for fireside corrosion remain a technical challenge to date due to the extremely harsh combustion environment. The overall objective of this proposed project is to develop a technology for on-line corrosion monitoring based on a new concept. This report describes the initial results from the first-year effort of the three-year study that include laboratory development and experiment, and pilot combustor testing.

  7. Recent Corrosion Research Trends in Weld Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Woon Suk [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The increasing interest in the corrosion properties of weld joints in the corrosive environment is placing stringent demands on the manufacturing techniques and performance requirements, and the manufacture employs the high quality and efficiency welding process to produce welds. Welding plays an important role in the fabrication of chemical plants, nuclear power plant, ship construction, and this has led to an increasing attention to the corrosion resistant weld joints. This paper covers recent technical trends of welding technologies for corrosion resistance properties including the COMPENDEX DB analysis of welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrications

  8. Corrosion Fatigue in District Heating Water Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1996-01-01

    Three candidate materials for construction of buffer tanks for district heating water have been tested for corrosion fatigue properties in a district heating water environment. The investigation included Slow Strain Rate Testing of plain tensile specimens, crack initiation testing by corrosion...... fatigue of plain tensile specimens and crack growth rate determination for Compact Tensile Specimens under corrosion fatigue conditions. The three materials are equal with respect to stress corrosion sensibility and crack initiation. Crack growth rate is increased with a factor of 4-6 relative to an inert...

  9. Interaction between soils and gas pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpachevskii, L. O.; Goroshevskii, A. V.; Zubkova, T. A.

    2011-03-01

    The interaction between pipelines and soils manifests itself in the soil disturbance in the course of the pipe installation, in the transformation of the water and temperature regimes in the trenches, and in the appearance of corrosion and cracks on the pipe walls. The more contrasting the soil water regime in the pipe-adjacent sections of the trench, the greater the amount of the pipe damage. The damage of the pipe insulation activates the pipe corrosion. The emission of gases (H2S, CH4, CO2, CO, and H2) and the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria are the main causes of the pipes' destruction. The humus content and the redox potential decrease, and the soil density and concentrations of ferrous compounds increase in the soils of the trench zone. Accidents along pipelines occur most often in the area of serozems and chestnut soils, and this is related to the salinization in the lower soil horizons and to the contrasting soil water regime near the pipe. The number of accidents along the pipelines installed into soddy-podzolic soils is lower.

  10. The effect of organic matter associated with the corrosion products on the corrosion of mild steel in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Wagh, A.B.

    the corrosion of mild steel and the temperature and dissolved oxygen of seawater. In contrast to this, the corrosion and mild steel was inversely related to the organic carbon and water extractable carbohydrates associated with the corrosion products of mild...

  11. Corrosion of New-Generation Steel in Outer Oil Pipeline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyan, Faysal Fayez; Kish, J. R.; Alfantazi, Akram

    2017-01-01

    New-generation high-strength pipeline steels are susceptible to corrosion attacks at their outer surfaces, from bicarbonate and carbonate in the hydrated soils in which pipelines are buried. The nature of the corrosion attacks requires implementing modified electrochemical methods by which the corrosion reactions can be studied comprehensively. From that, the findings can be linked to the alloying elements of the new pipeline materials, to modify them from both the strength and corrosion resistance perspectives. This paper presents an electrochemical study on the corrosion of API-X100 steel, in aerated bicarbonate-carbonate solutions, with cyclic voltammetry. At a fast 10 mV/s scan, over ten cycles, the passive films appeared as transparent layers, regardless of bicarbonate and carbonate concentrations. The surface controlled the reactions more than the passive films. The passive films showed evidence of forming gradually with increased cycling. Carbonate competed with bicarbonate during dissolution, decreasing its rate and making passivation faster. Bicarbonate in carbonate solutions catalyzed dissolution and disrupted passivation. The passive films with increased bicarbonate concentrations had higher transpassivation potentials.

  12. Numerical modeling of stray current corrosion of ductile iron pipe induced by foreign cathodic protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, SeonYeob; Kim, Young-Geun

    2013-07-01

    Stray current corrosion phenomena of ductile iron pipe (DIP) located in the vicinity of cathodically protected steel pipe was assessed using the boundary element method. When all joints in DIP were electrically connected, the maximum corrosion rate was 0.005 mm/y. However, when the joints were isolated, the corrosion rate increased due to the jumping effect of stray current at isolated joints, which resulted in the increase of maximum corrosion rate to 0.87 mm/y at the isolated point. Moreover, the electrical bonding between the DIP and steel pipe could not act effectively but showed an adverse effect of collecting more cathodic protection (CP) currents into the DIP, which eventually jumped out into the soil and resulted in larger amount of stray current corrosion. Therefore it is desirable to apply control methods from the design and construction stage, which include the increase of anodebed and the pipe distance, electrical connection of DIP joints, installation of sacrificial anode at isolated joints, or the application of CP on DIP, etc.

  13. Controlling external corrosion of oil and gas pipelines : the PreCaution program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron, A.; Papavinasam, S. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2009-07-01

    Strategies to maintain the integrity of the pipeline coating can be developed using information available from laboratory tests, field operating conditions, above-ground survey, and below-ground measurements. The materials assessment team at Natural Resources Canada has developed a PreCaution software program to predict the external corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) rate of oil and gas pipelines. The PreCaution software program predicts the corrosion rate using the following 4 different input data: (1) projection, based on laboratory evaluation, (2) adaptation, based on field operating conditions, (3) validation, based on above-ground survey, and (4) verification, based on below-ground measurements from field excavation. The four steps are meant to be used in sequence, but can be used independently through certain sections. Within each step, there are 5 categories that consider the most useful properties of pipeline coatings for comparing laboratory test results and field performance. These include adhesion; resistance to soil stresses; chemical and physical stability; resistance to impact; and resistance to cathodic disbonding. Each of these properties are assigned a score based on a specific set of criteria. A category score is then determined from the property scores. The software program can be used to predict the corrosion rate and the lifetime of a pipe. Although a corrosion rate is predicted for each step, only 1 lifetime prediction is made based on the most accurate steps. 18 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  14. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  15. Environmental Friendly Coatings and Corrosion Prevention For Flight Hardware Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz

    2014-01-01

    Identify, test and develop qualification criteria for environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and corrosion preventative compounds (CPC's) for flight hardware an ground support equipment.

  16. Integral evaluation of the external corrosion control system for buried pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, A.R. [Asesoria Adiestramiento y Construccion, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    The External Corrosion Control System of a 16 inch diameter (406 mm), 70 miles long (113 km) pipeline, was evaluated using the Direct Current Voltage Gradient DCVG, Close Interval Potential Survey CIPS and Continuous Soil Resistivity Evaluation CSRE techniques. Sixteen thousand five hundred meters (16,500 meters) of the pipeline were evaluated using the three techniques simultaneously and the rest was inspected separately in previous years. The results from the survey were taken as parameters to classify all defects found on the protective coating. A Defect Severity Classification (DSC) was established and used as an input for a maintenance program for the rehabilitation of the pipeline integrity. The parameters taken to establish the DSC were: (a) Instant Off Potential, (b) %IR, (c) Soil Resistivity, (d) defect shape, (e) Geographic location, (f) Distance from drain point. A Maintenance Program for the Pipeline External Corrosion Control System was designed by implementing the Integral Evaluation of the Corrosion Control System for Buried Pipelines (IEECCSBP). The priority was to achieve pipeline integrity and then, gradually improve the protection level of the system. The implementation of IEECCSBP will help to reduce the frequency of Electromagnetic Metal Loss Inspections, which in the future will serve only as an audit of the External Corrosion Control System performance.

  17. Civil Engineering Corrosion Control. Volume 1. Corrosion Control - General

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    source, consisting of " artificial " anodes energized by rectified A.C. or galvanic voltage, is used. Where current leaves a metal surface, corrosion occurs...additional data. 2 Losses of weight sustained by 5.1- by 10.2- cm. (2- by 4- inc.) specimens made of open- hearth iron (0.007 percent copper) are used as a...Al(OH)3 ) that forms, tending to prevent further cor- rosion. This film can be artificially induced by anodizing, passing electric current through

  18. High Temperature Corrosion under Laboratory Conditions Simulating Biomass-Firing: A Comprehensive Characterization of Corrosion Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    characterization of the corrosion products. The corrosion products consisted of three layers: i) the outermost layer consisting of a mixed layer of K2SO4 and FexOy on a partly molten layer of the initial deposit, ii) the middle layer consists of spinel (FeCr2O4) and Fe2O3, and iii) the innermost layer is a sponge......-like Ni3S2 containing layer. At the corrosion front, Cl-rich protrusions were observed. Results indicate that selective corrosion of Fe and Cr by Cl, active oxidation and sulphidation attack of Ni are possible corrosion mechanisms....

  19. Colorimetric visualization of tin corrosion: A method for early stage corrosion detection on printed circuit boards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    A majority of printed circuit board surfaces are covered with tin, therefore tin corrosion under humid conditions and movement of tin ions under the influence of an electric field plays an important role in the corrosion failure development. Tracking tin corrosion products spread on the printed...... a colorimetric tin ion indicator applied as a gel. The examples provided in this paper include visualization of corrosion caused by weak organic acids found in solder fluxes, corrosion profiling on the PCBAs after climatic device level testing, and failure analysis of field returns....

  20. High Temperature Corrosion under Laboratory Conditions Simulating Biomass-Firing: A Comprehensive Characterization of Corrosion Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    characterization of the corrosion products. The corrosion products consisted of three layers: i) the outermost layer consisting of a mixed layer of K2SO4 and FexOy on a partly molten layer of the initial deposit, ii) the middle layer consists of spinel (FeCr2O4) and Fe2O3, and iii) the innermost layer is a sponge......-like Ni3S2 containing layer. At the corrosion front, Cl-rich protrusions were observed. Results indicate that selective corrosion of Fe and Cr by Cl, active oxidation and sulphidation attack of Ni are possible corrosion mechanisms....

  1. Novel Corrosion Sensor for Vision 21 Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng Ban; Bharat Soni

    2007-03-31

    Advanced sensor technology is identified as a key component for advanced power systems for future energy plants that would have virtually no environmental impact. This project intends to develop a novel high temperature corrosion sensor and subsequent measurement system for advanced power systems. Fireside corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and has emerged to be a significant concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions reduction, efficiency improvement, or fuel/oxidant flexibility. Corrosion damage can lead to catastrophic equipment failure, explosions, and forced outages. Proper management of corrosion requires real-time indication of corrosion rate. However, short-term, on-line corrosion monitoring systems for fireside corrosion remain a technical challenge to date due to the extremely harsh combustion environment. The overall goal of this project is to develop a technology for on-line fireside corrosion monitoring. This objective is achieved by the laboratory development of sensors and instrumentation, testing them in a laboratory muffle furnace, and eventually testing the system in a coal-fired furnace. This project successfully developed two types of sensors and measurement systems, and successful tested them in a muffle furnace in the laboratory. The capacitance sensor had a high fabrication cost and might be more appropriate in other applications. The low-cost resistance sensor was tested in a power plant burning eastern bituminous coals. The results show that the fireside corrosion measurement system can be used to determine the corrosion rate at waterwall and superheater locations. Electron microscope analysis of the corroded sensor surface provided detailed picture of the corrosion process.

  2. Corrosion of RoHS-Compliant Surface Finishes in Corrosive Mixed Flowing Gas Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, K.; Reid, M.; Collins, M. N.; Dalton, E.; Xu, C.; Wright, B.; Demirkan, K.; Opila, R. L.; Reents, W. D.; Franey, J. P.; Fleming, D. A.; Punch, J.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, the corrosion resistance of printed wiring board (PWB) finishes has generated considerable interest due to field failures observed in various parts of the world. This study investigates the corrosion issues associated with the different lead-free PWB surface finishes. Corrosion products on various PWB surface finishes generated in mixed flowing gas (MFG) environments were studied, and analysis techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray, x-ray diffraction, focused ion beam, and scanning Auger microscopy were used to quantify the corrosion layer thickness and determine the composition of corrosion products. The corrosion on organic solderability preservative samples shows similar corrosion products to bare copper and is mainly due to direct attack of copper traces by corrosive gases. The corrosion on electroless nickel immersion gold occurs primarily through the porosity in the film and is accelerated by the galvanic potential between gold and copper; similar results were observed on immersion silver. Immersion tin shows excellent corrosion resistance due to its inherent corrosion resistance in the MFG environment as well as the opposite galvanic potential between tin and copper compared with gold or silver and copper.

  3. Corrosion Products and Formation Mechanism During Initial Stage of Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Kui; DONG Chao-fang; LI Xiao-gang; WANG Fu-ming

    2008-01-01

    The formation and development of corrosion products on carbon steel surface during the initial stage of atmospheric corrosion in a laboratory simulated environment have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)and Raman spectroscopy.The results showed that two different shapes of corrosion products,that is,ring and chain,were formed in the initial stage of corrosion.MnS clusters were found in the nuclei of corrosion products at the active local corrosion sites.The ring-shaped products were composed of lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and maghemite(γ-Fe2 O3) transformed from lepidocrocite.The chain-type products were goethite (α-FeOOH).A formation mechanism of the corrosion products is proposed.

  4. Corrosion Mechanism of Corrosion-Resistant Steel Developed for Bottom Plate of Cargo Oil Tanks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feilong SUN; Xiaogang LI; Fan ZHANG; Xuequn CHENG; Cheng ZHOU; Nianchun WU; Yuqun YIN

    2013-01-01

    A new type of corrosion-resistant steel consisting of ferrite and bainite phases was developed for cargo oil tanks of crude oil tankers.The corrosion rate of this new steel was 0.22 mm/a,which was equivalent to ca.1/5 of the criterion (≤ 1 mm/a) for corrosion-resistant steels.The composition and element distribution of the corrosion products were investigated by micro-Raman spectrometry and energy dispersive spectrometer.The results demonstrated that the corrosion product was composed of α-FeOOH,Fe3O4 and a continuous Cu enrichment layer.This kind of corrosion product was protective to the steel matrix and accounted for the enhancement of the corrosion resistance of the new developed steel.

  5. Effects of alternating magnetic field on the corrosion rate and corrosion products of copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Bin; ZHANG Peng; JIN Yongping; CHENG Shukang

    2008-01-01

    The effects of alternating magnetic field on the corrosion morphologies, corrosion rate, and corrosion products of copper in 3.5% NaCl solution, sea water, and magnetized sea water were investigated using electrochemical test, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis system of X-ray (SEM/EDAX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the corrosion rate of copper in magnetized sea water is minimal. Moreover, the surface of the specimen in magnetized sea water is uniform and compact as compared with those in 3.5% NaCl solution and sea water. The corrosion products of copper in magnetized sea water are mainly Cu2O and CuCl2. However, the corrosion products in sea water are CuCl, Cu2Cl(OH)3, and FeCl3·6H2O. The electrochemical corrosion mechanisms of copper in the three media were also discussed.

  6. Corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    Present study relates to the corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel (SS) as a construction material for the effluent treatment plant (ETP). Accordingly, immersion test and electrochemical polarization tests were performed on SS 304 L, 316 L and duplex 2205 in paper mill effluent and synthetic effluent. This paper presents electrochemical polarization measurements, performed for the first time to the best of the authors' information, to see the influence of chlorophenols on the corrosivity of effluents. The corrosivity of the effluent was observed to increase with the decrease in pH and increase in Cl- content while the addition of SO4- tends to inhibit corrosion. Mill effluent was found to be more corrosive as compared to synthetic effluent and has been attributed to the presence of various chlorophenols. Corrosion performance of SS was observed to govern by the presence of Cr, Mo and N contents.

  7. Review of studies on corrosion of magnesium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rong-chang; ZHANG jin; HUANG Wei-jiu; W. DIETZEL; K. U. KAINER; C. BLAWERT; KE Wei

    2006-01-01

    This review provided some recent progress of the research on corrosion mechanisms of magnesium and its alloys and a basis for follow-on research. Galvanic corrosion,pitting corrosion,intergranular corrosion (IGC),filiform corrosion,crevice corrosion,stress corrosion cracking (SCC),and corrosion fatigue (CF) were discussed. The influence of metallurgical factors such as alloying elements,microstructure and secondary phases,processing factors such as heat treatment and weld,and environmental factors including temperature,relative humidity,solution pH values and concentration on corrosion were discussed. In particular,a mechanism of pitting corrosion caused by AlMn particles was proposed. The corrosion properties of AZ91D weld material were investigated.

  8. Inhibitor treatment program for chlorine dioxide corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, J.G.; Holder, E.P.

    1991-11-12

    This patent describes a method of inhibiting corrosion by chlorine dioxide in oil field waterflood systems by adding a sufficient amount of a corrosion inhibiting composition. It comprises a phosphonate, a copolymer consisting of repeating units of acrylic acid/allyl hydroxy propyl sulfonate ether, and a permangante.

  9. Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management at John F. Kennedy Space Center. The contents include: 1) Corrosion at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC); 2) Requirements and Objectives; 3) Program Description, Background and History; 4) Approach and Implementation; 5) Challenges; 6) Lessons Learned; 7) Successes and Benefits; and 8) Summary and Conclusions.

  10. Aircraft Integral Fuel Tank Corrosion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    biology of Amorphoteca resinae . Materials und Organismen, 6, (3), p. 161, (1971). 8. D. Cabral. Corrosion by microorganisms of jet aircraft integral fuel...the mycelium of the fungus Hormoconis resinae in the MIC of Al alloys. Proc. XI Int. Corrosion Congress, Houston, USA, 5B, p. 3773, (1993). 14. M

  11. Corrosion problems with aqueous coolants, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diegle, R B; Beavers, J A; Clifford, J E

    1980-04-11

    The results of a one year program to characterize corrosion of solar collector alloys in aqueous heat-transfer media are summarized. The program involved a literature review and a laboratory investigation of corrosion in uninhibited solutions. It consisted of three separate tasks, as follows: review of the state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes; study of corrosion in multimetallic systems; and determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 1 involved a comprehensive review of published literature concerning corrosion under solar collector operating conditions. The reivew also incorporated data from related technologies, specifically, from research performed on automotive cooling systems, cooling towers, and heat exchangers. Task 2 consisted of determining the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys of construction for solar collectors in different types of aqueous coolants containing various concentrations of corrosive ionic species. Task 3 involved measuring the degradation rates of glycol-based heat-transfer media, and also evaluating the effects of degradation on the corrosion behavior of metallic collector materials.

  12. Corrosion effects on soda lime glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although soda lime glass is the most common used transparent material in architecture, little is known about the corrosion effects on long term strength and the interaction between corrosion and defects. Extensive testing on soda lime bars under different environmental conditions and different degre

  13. Biobased polymers for corrosion protection of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticorrosive biobased polymers were developed in our lab. We isolated an exopolysaccharide produced by a microbe that, when coated on metal substrates, exhibited unique corrosion inhibition. Corrosion is a worldwide problem and impacts the economy, jeopardizes human health and safety, and impedes t...

  14. Erosion–corrosion and corrosion properties of DLC coated low temperature Erosion–corrosion and corrosion properties of DLC coated low temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    of AISI 316 as substrate for DLC coatings are investigated. Corrosion and erosion–corrosion measurements were carried out on low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 and on low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 with a top layer of DLC. The combination of DLC and low temperature...

  15. Factors affecting the corrosivity of pulping liquors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlewood, Patrick Evan

    Increased equipment failures and the resultant increase in unplanned downtime as the result of process optimization programs continue to plague pulp mills. The failures are a result of a lack of understanding of corrosion in the different pulping liquors, specifically the parameters responsible for its adjustment such as the role and identification of inorganic and organic species. The current work investigates the role of inorganic species, namely sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, on liquor corrosivity at a range of process conditions beyond those currently experienced in literature. The role of sulfur species, in the activation of corrosion and the ability of hydroxide to passivate carbon steel A516-Gr70, is evaluated with gravimetric and electrochemical methods. The impact of wood chip weathering on process corrosion was also evaluated. Results were used to identify black liquor components, depending on the wood species, which play a significant role in the activation and inhibition of corrosion for carbon steel A516-Gr70 process equipment. Further, the effect of black liquor oxidation on liquor corrosivity was evaluated. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance of selected materials provided information on classes of materials that may be reliably used in aggressive pulping environments.

  16. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, D.J.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced pr

  17. Dissolution properties of cerium dibutylphosphate corrosion inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soestbergen, M. van; Erich, S.J.F.; Huinink, H.P.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion inhibitor cerium dibutylphosphate, Ce(dbp)3, prevents corrosion by cerium and dbp deposition at the alkaline cathode and acidic anode respectively. The pH dependent Ce(dbp)3 solubility seems to play an essential role in the inhibition degree. We found that Ce(dbp) 3 scarcely dissolves

  18. EXTRACT OF COMBRETUM MICRANTHUM AS CORROSION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... Aluminum and aluminum alloys lend themselves to many engineering ... Table 1: Elemental composition of the alloy Al-Si-Mg. Element. Si. Mg. Cu. Zn. Al. Composition (wt. ..... microstructure of the control Al- Si- Mg alloy with the lowest C.R in the ... silicate as a corrosion inhibitor for iron and zinc,. Corrosion ...

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Hosseinpour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  20. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  1. Solutions of corrosion Problems in advanced Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, Asger

    1999-01-01

    were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The ferritic steels suffered from corrosion mainly via material loss. The austenitic steels suffered from predominantly selective corrosion resulting in chromium depletion from the alloy. A clear trend was observed that selective...

  2. Corrosion effects on soda lime glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although soda lime glass is the most common used transparent material in architecture, little is known about the corrosion effects on long term strength and the interaction between corrosion and defects. Extensive testing on soda lime bars under different environmental conditions and different

  3. Remote computer monitors corrosion protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendrick, A.

    Effective corrosion protection with electrochemical methods requires some method of routine monitoring that provides reliable data that is free of human error. A test installation of a remote computer control monitoring system for electrochemical corrosion protection is described. The unit can handle up to six channel inputs. Each channel comprises 3 analog signals and 1 digital. The operation of the system is discussed.

  4. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm. PMID:28772781

  5. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, D.J.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced

  6. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...

  7. Electrochemical corrosion measurements on noble electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1998-01-01

    Novel electrodeposits are compared with hard chrome and electroless Ni-P with respect to production, corrosion resistance and hardness.......Novel electrodeposits are compared with hard chrome and electroless Ni-P with respect to production, corrosion resistance and hardness....

  8. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  9. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua; K. Mon

    2003-06-24

    The recommended waste package (WP) design is described in BSC (2001a). The design includes a double-wall WP underneath a protective drip shield (DS) (BSC 2003a). The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation (DOX), general corrosion (GC) and localized corrosion (LC) of the DS plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. The DS design also includes structural supports fabricated from Ti Grade 24. Degradation of Ti Grade 24 is not considered in this report. The DS provides protection for the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. This Model Report (MR) serves as a feed to the Integrated Waste Package Degradation Model (IWPD) analyses, and was developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (BSC 2002a). The models contained in this report serve as a basis to determine whether or not the performance requirements for the DS can be met.

  10. Steam generator corrosion 2007; Dampferzeugerkorrosion 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M. (ed.)

    2007-07-01

    Between 8th and 9th November, 2007, SAXONIA Standortentwicklungs- und -verwertungsgesellschaft GmbH (Freiberg, Federal Republic of Germany) performed the 3rd Freiberger discussion conference ''Fireside boiler corrosion''. The topics of the lectures are: (a) Steam generator corrosion - an infinite history (Franz W. Alvert); (b) CFD computations for thermal waste treatment plants - a contribution for the damage recognition and remedy (Klaus Goerner, Thomas Klasen); (c) Experiences with the use of corrosion probes (Siegfried R. Horn, Ferdinand Haider, Barbara Waldmann, Ragnar Warnecke); (d) Use of additives for the limitation of the high temperature chlorine corrosion as an option apart from other measures to the corrosion protection (Wolfgang Spiegel); (e) Current research results and aims of research with respect to chlorine corrosion (Ragnar Warnecke); (f) Systematics of the corrosion phenomena - notes for the enterprise and corrosion protection (Thomas Herzog, Wolfgang Spiegel, Werner Schmidl); (g) Corrosion protection by cladding in steam generators of waste incinerators (Joerg Metschke); (h) Corrosion protection and wear protection by means of thermal spraying in steam generators (Dietmar Bendix); (i) Review of thick film nickelized components as an effective protection against high-temperature corrosion (Johann-Wilhelm Ansey); (j) Fireproof materials for waste incinerators - characteristics and profile of requirement (Johannes Imle); (k) Service life-relevant aspects of fireproof linings in the thermal recycling of waste (Till Osthoevener and Wolfgang Kollenberg); (l) Alternatives to the fireproof material in the heating space (Heino Sinn); (m) Cladding: Inconal 625 contra 686 - Fundamentals / applications in boiler construction and plant construction (Wolfgang Hoffmeister); (n) Thin films as efficient corrosion barriers - thermal spray coating in waste incinerators and biomass firing (Ruediger W. Schuelein, Steffen Hoehne, Friedrich

  11. Launch Pad Coatings for Smart Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Bucherl, Cori N.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Whitten, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material as a result of its interaction with the environment. The environment at the KSC launch pads has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the US. The 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that are generated by the solid rocket boosters during a launch exacerbate the corrosiveness of the environment at the pads. Numerous failures at the pads are caused by the pitting of stainless steels, rebar corrosion, and the degradation of concrete. Corrosion control of launch pad structures relies on the use of coatings selected from the qualified products list (QPL) of the NASA Standard 5008A for Protective Coating of Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel, and Aluminum on Launch Structures, Facilities, and Ground Support Equipment. This standard was developed to establish uniform engineering practices and methods and to ensure the inclusion of essential criteria in the coating of ground support equipment (GSE) and facilities used by or for NASA. This standard is applicable to GSE and facilities that support space vehicle or payload programs or projects and to critical facilities at all NASA locations worldwide. Environmental regulation changes have dramatically reduced the production, handling, use, and availability of conventional protective coatings for application to KSC launch structures and ground support equipment. Current attrition rate of qualified KSC coatings will drastically limit the number of commercial off the shelf (COTS) products available for the Constellation Program (CxP) ground operations (GO). CxP GO identified corrosion detection and control technologies as a critical, initial capability technology need for ground processing of Ares I and Ares V to meet Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD) CxP 70000 operability requirements for reduced ground processing complexity, streamlined integrated testing, and operations phase affordability

  12. Stifling of Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mon, K G; Gordon, G M; Rebak, R B

    2005-06-08

    Artificially creviced Alloy 22 (N06022) specimens may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in presence of hot chloride containing solutions. The presence of oxyanions in the electrolyte, especially nitrate, may inhibit the nucleation and growth of crevice corrosion. Constant potential tests were performed using tightly creviced specimens of Alloy 22. It was found that crevice corrosion may initiate when a constant potential above the crevice repassivation potential is applied. It was found that as the crevice corrosion nucleated, the current initially increased but later decreased. The net measured current can be converted into penetration following a power law fit of the experimental data. The average power law coefficient ''n'' was found to be 0.439, suggesting that even under constant applied potential crevice corrosion penetration is diffusion controlled.

  13. STIFLING OF CREVICE CORROSION IN ALLOY 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon; G.M. Gordon; R.B. Rebak

    2005-07-01

    Artificially creviced Alloy 22 (N06022) specimens may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in presence of hot chloride containing solutions. The presence of oxyanions in the electrolyte, especially nitrate, may inhibit the nucleation and growth of crevice corrosion. Constant potential tests were performed using tightly creviced specimens of Alloy 22. It was found that crevice corrosion may initiate when a constant potential above the crevice repassivation potential is applied. It was found that as the crevice corrosion nucleated, the current initially increased but later decreased. The net measured current can be converted into penetration following a power law fit of the experimental data. The average power law coefficient ''n'' was found to be 0.439, suggesting that even under constant applied potential, crevice corrosion penetration is diffusion controlled.

  14. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  15. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sen; R Balasubramaniam; A V Ramesh Kumar

    2000-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of two carbon-alloyed intermetallics of composition Fe–28.1Al–2.1C and Fe–27.5Al–3.7C has been studied and compared with that of binary intermetallics. Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicated that the intermetallics exhibited active–passive behaviour in an acidic solution of pH = 1, whereas they exhibited stable passivity in a buffer solution of pH 8.4. Corrosion rates were also obtained by immersion testing. The variation of corrosion rate as a function of time was similar for both the intermetallics. The variation in corrosion rate as a function of time has been explained based on the observed potentiodynamic polarization behaviour. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to galvanic corrosion, due to the presence of carbides.

  16. Laser-controllable coatings for corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorb, Ekaterina V; Skirtach, Andre G; Sviridov, Dmitry V; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2009-07-28

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach to the corrosion protection by use of "smart" laser-controllable coating. The main advantage of the proposed technique is that one could terminate the corrosion process by very intensive healing after an appearance of corrosion centers using local laser irradiation. It is also shown that by applying a polyelectrolyte shell with noble metal particles over the mesoporous titania and silica via layer-by-layer assembly it is possible to fabricate micro- and nanoscaled reservoirs, which, being incorporated into the zirconia-organosilica matrix, are responsible for the ability of laser-driven release of the loaded materials (e.g., corrosion inhibitor). Furthermore, the resultant films are highly adhesive and could be easily deposited onto different metallic substrates. Laser-mediated remote release of incorporated corrosion inhibitor (benzotriazole) from engineered mesoporous containers with silver nanoparticles in the container shell is observed in real time on single and multicontainer levels.

  17. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface....

  18. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate.

  19. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  20. Complete corrosion inhibition through graphene defect passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Hofmann, Mario; Chang, Kai-Wen; Jhu, Jian Gang; Li, Yuan-Yao; Chen, Kuang Yao; Yang, Chang Chung; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2014-01-28

    Graphene is expected to enable superior corrosion protection due to its impermeability and chemical inertness. Previous reports, however, demonstrate limited corrosion inhibition and even corrosion enhancement of graphene on metal surfaces. To enable the reliable and complete passivation, the origin of the low inhibition efficiency of graphene was investigated. Combining electrochemical and morphological characterization techniques, nanometer-sized structural defects in chemical vapor deposition grown graphene were found to be the cause for the limited passivation effect. Extremely fast mass transport on the order of meters per second both across and parallel to graphene layers results in an inhibition efficiency of only ∼50% for Cu covered with up to three graphene layers. Through selective passivation of the defects by atomic layer deposition (ALD) an enhanced corrosion protection of more than 99% was achieved, which compares favorably with commercial corrosion protection methods.

  1. Inhibition of aluminum corrosion using Opuntia extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Etre, A.Y

    2003-11-01

    The inhibitive action of the mucilage extracted from the modified stems of prickly pears, toward acid corrosion of aluminum, is tested using weight loss, thermometry, hydrogen evolution and polarization techniques. It was found that the extract acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for aluminum corrosion in 2.0 M HCl solution. The inhibition action of the extract was discussed in view of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. It was found that the adsorption of the extract on aluminum surface is a spontaneous process. The inhibition efficiency (IE) increases as the extract concentration is increased. The effect of temperature on the IE was studied. It was found that the presence of extract increases the activation energy of the corrosion reaction. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process were calculated. It was found also that the Opuntia extract provides a good protection to aluminum against pitting corrosion in chloride ion containing solutions.

  2. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  3. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...

  4. A study on species transport in the corrosion products of ferrous archaeological analogues - a contribution to the modelling of iron long term corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, E.; Dillmann, Ph.; Fluzin, Ph. [LRC CEA DSM 01-27: IRAMAT UMR5060 CNRS et Laboratoire Pierre Sue (CEA/CNRS), CEA Saclay 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    One of the main technological and environmental challenges for the next centuries is the safe storage of nuclear wastes. For this purpose, the behaviour during several centuries of every material constituting the barrier between wastes and environment must be predicted. In addition to modelling and laboratory simulations, the only mean to study corrosion systems formed during several centuries is to analyse archaeological ferrous artefacts buried in soil. Precedent studies on this kind of artefacts have shown that the corrosion system is formed by the metallic core, a dense corrosion product layer, a transformed medium constituted of a mix of corrosion products and soil compounds, and the soil itself. Moreover, analytical and electrochemical studies seem to show that the corrosion mechanisms are driven by the species transport in the dense product layer (DPL) and especially by oxygen migration in the DPL pores. Thus, it seems necessary to precise the species transport properties in the DPL. A characterisation study on ferrous artefacts coming from the site of Glinet (16. AD) have been carried out. The rust layers have been studied using several techniques. The composition analyses were performed with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) coupled to the Scanning Electron Microscope, and Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA). Structural information have been obtained by X-ray micro-diffraction ({mu}XRD) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The aim of this communication is to present the results of a study performed with markers in order to better understand the species transport in the DPL. Experiments focus on an archaeological artefact part from Glinet excavation. The migration in the DPL of I and Na ions (which have roughly the same diffusion coefficient in water than oxygen) will be studied by immersion of an archaeological analogue with his DPL in a saturated iodide (NaI) aqueous solution. After different immersion times (1 h, 3 h, 7 h and 168 h), the concentration

  5. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3-2 and NO-3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10-4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  6. Microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Chen, C Y; Wei, C B; Lin, Y T

    1996-11-01

    Several microbes were isolated from the contaminated fuel-oil in Taiwan and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy A356-T6 was tested by MIL-STD-810E test method. Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and Cladosporium resinac ATCC 22712 had significant adsorption and pitting on the surface of aluminum alloy, Pseudomonas acruginosa AM-B5 had weak adsorption and some precipitation in the bottom, and Candida sp. AM-Y1 had the less adsorption and few cavities formation on the surface. pH of the aqueous phase decreased 0.3 to 0.7 unit for 4 months of incubation. The corrosion of aluminum alloy was very significant in the cultures of Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and C. resinac ATCC 22712. The major metabolites in the aqueous phase with the inoculation of C. resinac were citric acid and oxalic acid, while succinic acid and fumaric acid were the minors.

  7. Migrating corrosion inhibitor blend for reinforced concrete: Part 1 -- Prevention of corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsener, B.; Buechler, M.; Stalder, F.; Boehni, H.

    1999-12-01

    The efficiency of a migrating corrosion inhibitor in preventing corrosion of mild steel was investigated in saturated calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]{sub 2}) solutions and in mortar. The protective effect of the inhibitor against pitting corrosion caused by chloride attack and against uniform corrosion as a result of carbonation was determined. Results showed that high concentrations ({approx}10%) allowed the inhibition of pitting corrosion tritiation in solution containing 1 M/L sodium chloride (NaCl). However, inhibiting properties can be lost by evaporation of the volatile constituent of the inhibitor or by the precipitation of the nonvolatile fraction of the inhibitor in presence of calcium ions. Addition of the inhibitor blend to mortar yielded a retardation of the corrosion initiation in the case of chloride-induced corrosion, but o significant reduction in corrosion rate. No effect was found in carbonated samples, and no influence on the corrosion rate was detected. Additionally, the estimation of the extent of the retarding effect on corrosion initiation on real structures was difficult, as the inhibitor was found to evaporate from the mortar. This evaporation resulted in a loss of inhibiting properties. Hence, the long-term efficiency of the inhibitor could not be guaranteed.

  8. Atmospheric Corrosivity at Australian and Overseas Airbases and Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    protective coating systems and corrosion inhibitor treatments deteriorate and become less effective. The CLIMAT environmental corrosion test has...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Atmospheric Corrosivity at Australian and Overseas Airbases and Airports J C Bitcon Maritime...Division Defence Science and Technology Organisation DSTO-TN-1320 ABSTRACT Atmospheric corrosivity at 25 airbases and airports in Australia

  9. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by—...

  10. 49 CFR 192.475 - Internal corrosion control: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: General. 192.475... Control § 192.475 Internal corrosion control: General. (a) Corrosive gas may not be transported by... taken to minimize internal corrosion. (b) Whenever any pipe is removed from a pipeline for any...

  11. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2627 - Atmospheric corrosion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control. 193.2627 Section... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2627 Atmospheric corrosion... atmospheric corrosion by— (a) Material that has been designed and selected to resist the corrosive...

  13. Corrosion damage evolution and residual strength of corroded aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhong Zhang; Guozhi Lv; Hui Wang; Bomei Si; Yueliang Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The LY12CZ aluminum alloy specimens were eurroded under the conditions of different test temperatures and exposure durations. After corrosion exposure, fatigue tests were performed. Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscope analyses on corrosion damage were carried out. The definition of surface corrosion damage ratio was provided to describe the extent of surface corrosion damage. On the basis of the measured data sets of the corrosion damage ratio, the probabilistic model of corrosion damage evolution was built. The corrosion damage decreased the fatigue life by a factor of about 1.25 to 2.38 and the prediction method of residual strength of the corroded structure was presented.

  14. A Calculation Model for Corrosion Cracking in RC Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Gang; Wei Jun; Zhang Keqiang; Zhou Xiwu

    2007-01-01

    A novel calculation model is proposed aiming at the problem of concrete cover cracking induced by reinforcement corrosion. In this article, the relationship between the corrosion depth of the bar and the thickness of the rust layer is established. By deducing the radial displacement expression of concrete, the formula for corrosion depth and corrosion pressure before cracking is proposed. The crack depth of cover in accordance with the maximum corrosion pressure is deduced; furthermore, the corrosion depth and corrosion pressure at the cracking time are obtained. Finally, the theoretical model is validated by several experiments, and the calculated values agree well with the experiment results.

  15. Corrosion inhibitors for intermediate cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, I.; Suhr, L.

    1985-04-01

    The selected inhibitors were tested for heat and radiation stability and corrosion protection on the bench scale. Based on the results from these tests two of the products were selected, Bycoguard 81 and Bycoguard MP4S for continuing corrosion tests in an autoclave loop at 90 degrees C and 120 degrees C. Oxygen saturated deionized water with an addition of 1 ppm chloride was recirculated in the loop. Samples of copper and carbon steel were exposed to the water in the autoclave for periods up to 10 weeks. The purpose of this project was to find a substitute for hydrazine and chromates. Besides good corrosion protection qualities the toxic and environmental effect of the inhibitors should be minimal. The investigation has shown that the copper inhibitor BTA (benzotriazole) loses its corrosion protection qualities at a water temperature of 120 degrees C. The protection effects at 90 degrees C were satisfactory for both of the materials. The corrosion rates measured were 0.01 mm/y or less for the copper and carbon steel samples. The environment in the autoclave during the testing was more corrosive than is to be found in intermediate cooling systems. Due to the low corrosion rates measured the two inhibitors are to be recommended as alternatives to hydrazine and chromates.

  16. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for active corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Dimitriya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Shchukin, Dmitry G

    2011-03-22

    This work presents the synthesis of monodisperse, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and their application as nanocontainers loaded with corrosion inhibitor (1H-benzotriazole (BTA)) and embedded in hybrid SiOx/ZrOx sol-gel coating for the corrosion protection of aluminum alloy. The developed porous system of mechanically stable silica nanoparticles exhibits high surface area (∼1000 m2·g(-1)), narrow pore size distribution (d∼3 nm), and large pore volume (∼1 mL·g(-1)). As a result, a sufficiently high uptake and storage of the corrosion inhibitor in the mesoporous nanocontainers was achieved. The successful embedding and homogeneous distribution of the BTA-loaded monodisperse silica nanocontainers in the passive anticorrosive SiOx/ZrOx film improve the wet corrosion resistance of the aluminum alloy AA2024 in 0.1 M sodium chloride solution. The enhanced corrosion protection of this newly developed active system in comparison to the passive sol-gel coating was observed during a simulated corrosion process by the scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET). These results, as well as the controlled pH-dependent release of BTA from the mesoporous silica nanocontainers without additional polyelectrolyte shell, suggest an inhibitor release triggered by the corrosion process leading to a self-healing effect.

  17. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcillo, M.; Alcantara, J.; Diaz, I.; Chico, B.; Simancas, J.; Fuente, D. de la

    2015-07-01

    Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a) environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b) characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c) corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d) exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e) long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f) behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camarinas, Galicia) in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy. (Author)

  18. Recent Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Chigondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, reduction of corrosion has been managed by various methods including cathodic protection, process control, reduction of the metal impurity content, and application of surface treatment techniques, as well as incorporation of suitable alloys. However, the use of corrosion inhibitors has proven to be the easiest and cheapest method for corrosion protection and prevention in acidic media. These inhibitors slow down the corrosion rate and thus prevent monetary losses due to metallic corrosion on industrial vessels, equipment, or surfaces. Inorganic and organic inhibitors are toxic and costly and thus recent focus has been turned to develop environmentally benign methods for corrosion retardation. Many researchers have recently focused on corrosion prevention methods using green inhibitors for mild steel in acidic solutions to mimic industrial processes. This paper provides an overview of types of corrosion, corrosion process, and mainly recent work done on the application of natural plant extracts as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel.

  19. Novel Corrosion Sensor for Vision 21 Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng Ban

    2005-12-01

    Advanced sensor technology is identified as a key component for advanced power systems for future energy plants that would have virtually no environmental impact. This project intends to develop a novel high temperature corrosion sensor and subsequent measurement system for advanced power systems. Fireside corrosion is the metal loss caused by chemical reactions on surfaces exposed to the combustion environment. Such corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and has emerged to be a significant concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions reduction, efficiency improvement, or fuel/oxidant flexibility. Corrosion damage can lead to catastrophic equipment failure, explosions, and forced outages. Proper management of corrosion requires real-time indication of corrosion rate. However, short-term, on-line corrosion monitoring systems for fireside corrosion remain a technical challenge to date due to the extremely harsh combustion environment. The overall objective of this project is to develop a technology for on-line corrosion monitoring based on a new concept. This objective is to be achieved by a laboratory development of the sensor and instrumentation, testing of the measurement system in a laboratory muffle furnace, and eventually testing the system in a coal-fired furnace. The initial plan for testing at the coal-fired pilot-scale furnace was replaced by testing in a power plant, because the operation condition at the power plant is continuous and more stable. The first two-year effort was completed with the successful development sensor and measurement system, and successful testing in a muffle furnace. Because of the potential high cost in sensor fabrication, a different type of sensor was used and tested in a power plant burning eastern bituminous coals. This report summarize the experiences and results of the first two years of the three-year project, which include laboratory

  20. Corrosion Evaluation of Tank 40 Leak Detection Box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    1999-07-29

    'Leak detection from the transfer lines in the tank farm has been a concern for many years because of the need to minimize exposure of personnel and contamination of the environment. The leak detection box (LDB) is one line of defense, which must be maintained to meet this objective. The evaluation of a failed LDB was one item from an action plan aimed at minimizing the degradation of LDBs. The Tank 40 LDB, which failed in service, was dug up and shipped to SRTC for evaluation. During a video inspection while in service, this LDB was found to have black tubercles on the interior, which suggested possible microbial involvement. The failure point, however, was believed to have occurred in the drain line from the transfer line jacket. Visual, metallurgical, and biological analyses were performed on the LDB. The analysis results showed that there was not any adverse microbiological growth or significant localized corrosion. The corrosion of the LDB was caused by exposure to aqueous environments and was typical of carbon steel pipes in soil environments.'

  1. Zinc corrosion runoff process induced by humid tropical climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veleva, L. [Center for Investigation and Advanced Study (CINVESTAV-Merida), Applied Physics Department, Carr. Ant. a Progreso, Km.6, C.P. 97310, Merida, Yuc. (Mexico); Meraz, E. [Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Division Academica de Ingenieria y Arquitectura, Km 1 Carretera Cunduacan-Jalpa de M., A.P. 24, C.P. 86690, Cunduacan, Tabasco (Mexico); Acosta, M. [Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Division Academica de Ciencias Basicas, Km 1 Carretera Cunduacan-Jalpa de M., A.P. 24, C.P. 86690, Cunduacan, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2007-05-15

    Zinc and hot dip galvanized steel are frequently used metals in building application. They have relatively good atmospheric resistance to corrosion, due to its oxidation in air and formation of protective rust on its surface, which acts as barrier between the metal and environment. However, some part of the rust can be dissolved by pluvial precipitations and water condensed on the metal surface. This process, called metal runoff, contributes for zinc dispersion in soils and waters. In order to make accurate estimation of zinc runoff induced by atmosphere in humid tropical climate, samples of pure Zn and hot dip galvanized steel have been exposed in the Gulf of Mexico. The data reveal that this process is strongly influenced by factors which determine the aggressivity of the environment (pluvial precipitations, cycles of dry and rainy periods, atmospheric pollutants, air humidity). High annual rates of zinc runoff (6.5 - 8.5 {+-} 0.30 g Zn m{sup -2}yr{sup -1}) were released, being the runoff 63 - 87% of the zinc corrosion rust. The zinc mass loss has been related to several independent parameters, presenting linear equation, which indicates the air contaminant SO{sub 2} as the major factor controlling the runoff of zinc. The reported results show higher runoff of zinc samples, compared to that of hot dip galvanized steel. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Glass-metal objects from archaeological excavation: corrosion study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner-Wronowa, Elżbieta; Zabiegaj, Dominika; Piccardo, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    This paper contributes to the investigations on history, technology, and degradation of middle age objects (metallic rings with mounted glass beads) recently excavated under the Main Square in Krakow (Poland). Moreover, they were discovered in soil layers differing by chemical composition and microclimate parameters. Historical material is indeed very limited in terms of quantity and sample size, and the following nondestructive analyses were applied: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The glass and the metal were separately tested. Metallography on cross-sections (by both optical and scanning electron microscopy) was applied only on microfragments sampled from metallic rings. The achieved results pointed out how the local microclimate affected the degradation of the analyzed rings developing locally different corrosion processes. Each tested glass of "ring eye" shows a specific chemical composition. All glass pieces were covered by silica gel, and locally more advanced corrosion has been found.

  3. Slurry Chemical Corrosion and Galvanic Corrosion during Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Seiichi; Sakuma, Noriyuki; Homma, Yoshio; Ohashi, Naofumi

    2000-11-01

    Copper (Cu) corrosion during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) was controlled in order to improve the Cu damascene interconnect process. Slurry chemical corrosion was found to be enhanced when the slurry was diluted by deionized (DI) water during rinsing just after CMP@. Since the corrosion inhibitor, benzotriazole (BTA), reduces the Cu removal rate, adding it to the rinse solution prevents chemical corrosion more effectively than adding it to the slurry. On the other hand, galvanic corrosion occurs at the interface between Cu and the barrier metal, and it can be prevented by selecting appropriate barrier metals. Because the difference between the electrochemical potentials of Cu and the barrier metal is small in the slurry, refractory metals such as Ta, TaN, and TiN were found to be appropriate barrier metals. On the other hand, W, WN, and Ti have large potential differences, so galvanic corrosion was clearly observed when Cu/W damascene interconnects were fabricated.

  4. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-08-21

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

  5. Corrosion risks with polyethylene pipes in district cooling systems; Korrosionsrisker vid anvaendning av polyetenroer i fjaerrkylesystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinka, Tor-Gunnar; Almquist, Joergen; Gubner, Rolf [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    between carbon steel and stainless steel. Calculations show that the amount of oxygen gas that is transported through the walls of polyethylene tubes in air is very small. This amount of oxygen causes a slow corrosion on carbon steel. For polyethylene tubes in soil the oxygen transport through the tubes will be considerably lower than for tubes in air. Recommendations state that the area of carbon steel should be at least 10 % of the area of the polythene tubes if the polyethylene tubes are placed outdoors or indoors in air and not in soil. The reason is that the carbon steel tubes should use up the oxygen that is transported through the tubes. The most important reason for reducing the oxygen content in the system is the risk of bimetallic corrosion on the carbon steel. Another purpose for recommending a certain minimum area of carbon steel in the system is that any oxygen from unforeseen air intakes, from system starts and major additions of makeup water to the system with un-degassed water should be consumed, without causing significant corrosion on the carbon steel. For district cooling systems with polyethylene tubes placed in soil it is recommended that the area of carbon steel should be at least 5 % of the polyethylene tube area, to take care of unintentional intakes of air and system starts and major toppings with un-degassed water. It is recommended that the risks of accidental intakes of oxygen into the district cooling system should be considered. With the present use of soil-placed polyethylene tubes in district cooling systems the risks connected with accidental oxygen intakes are judged to be greater than the risk of oxygen diffusion through the polyethylene tubes. Furthermore, it is recommended that the risks of bimetallic corrosion should be taken in account at the design of district heating systems. The current use of soil-placed polyethylene tubes in district cooling systems with large quantities of carbon steel in the system is not considered to cause

  6. Corrosion risks with polyethylene pipes in district cooling systems; Korrosionsrisker vid anvaendning av polyetenroer i fjaerrkylesystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinka, Tor-Gunnar; Almquist, Joergen; Gubner, Rolf [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    between carbon steel and stainless steel. Calculations show that the amount of oxygen gas that is transported through the walls of polyethylene tubes in air is very small. This amount of oxygen causes a slow corrosion on carbon steel. For polyethylene tubes in soil the oxygen transport through the tubes will be considerably lower than for tubes in air. Recommendations state that the area of carbon steel should be at least 10 % of the area of the polythene tubes if the polyethylene tubes are placed outdoors or indoors in air and not in soil. The reason is that the carbon steel tubes should use up the oxygen that is transported through the tubes. The most important reason for reducing the oxygen content in the system is the risk of bimetallic corrosion on the carbon steel. Another purpose for recommending a certain minimum area of carbon steel in the system is that any oxygen from unforeseen air intakes, from system starts and major additions of makeup water to the system with un-degassed water should be consumed, without causing significant corrosion on the carbon steel. For district cooling systems with polyethylene tubes placed in soil it is recommended that the area of carbon steel should be at least 5 % of the polyethylene tube area, to take care of unintentional intakes of air and system starts and major toppings with un-degassed water. It is recommended that the risks of accidental intakes of oxygen into the district cooling system should be considered. With the present use of soil-placed polyethylene tubes in district cooling systems the risks connected with accidental oxygen intakes are judged to be greater than the risk of oxygen diffusion through the polyethylene tubes. Furthermore, it is recommended that the risks of bimetallic corrosion should be taken in account at the design of district heating systems. The current use of soil-placed polyethylene tubes in district cooling systems with large quantities of carbon steel in the system is not considered to cause

  7. Waste of cleaning emulsion sewage as inhibitors of steel corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazullin, D. D.; Mavrin, G. V.; Shaikhiev, I. G.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the corrosion test of steel of the brand 20 in the stratal water. To increase corrosion resistance as a corrosion inhibitor the concentrate waste emulsion of the mark "Incam- 1" was provided. The article presents studies of the corrosion rate with different dosages of corrosion inhibitor in the stratal water. Based on these research results are revealed that the degree of protection of steel is 27% at a dosage of 3.8 g / dm3.

  8. Assessment of Commercial Corrosion Inhibiting Admixtures for Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Michael Carey

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments is a well-known and documented phenomenon. The need for cost effective systems for protection against corrosion has become increasingly clear since the first observations of severe corrosion damage to interstate bridges in the 1960's. As one potential solution to the mounting problem of corrosion deterioration of structures, corrosion-inhibiting admixtures have been researched and introduced into service. ...

  9. A Localised Corrosion Cell for Industrial Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Jansen, P.

    2003-01-01

    The LOCORR-CELL™ developed by FORCE TECHNOLOGY is an electrochemical cell for industrial applications estimating localised corrosion. The cell is constructed in a carbon steel casing for direct mounting into the system. It is based on an oxygen concentration element reflecting the interaction...... between the environment formed under a deposit or in a crevice. The essential feature of the method is that it reflects the influence of oxygen content, conductivity and temperature as well as the influence of corrosion inhibitors, MIC and other effects that have an effect on localised corrosion under...

  10. Numerical Modeling of Weld Joint Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-03-01

    A numerical model is presented in this work that predicts the corrosion rate of weld joint. The model is able to track moving boundary of the corroding constituent of weld joint. The corrosion rates obtained from the model are compared with those estimated from mixed potential theory and two experimental techniques, namely immersion test and constant potential polarization test. The corrosion rate predicted using the model is within 10% of the estimate from the mixed potential theory, within 20% of that got from the immersion experiment and within 10% of that got from the constant potential polarization experiment for weld joint.

  11. Numerical modelling of corrosion - Theoretical backgrounds -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warkus, J.; Raupach, M. [ibac, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Gulikers, J. [Ministry of Transport, Rijkswaterstaat, Bouwdienst, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-08-15

    During recent years research projects with different approaches have been carried out to develop models which are suitable to assess the metal removal rate in case of reinforcement corrosion. Some of them are based on empirical methods and correlate the corrosion rate to parameters like concrete resistivity, temperature and relative humidity. Another type of model is based on a quantification of the ongoing electrochemical processes. In this paper the theoretical backgrounds and mathematical descriptions of reinforcement corrosion with regard to a numerical modelling are presented and discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Donald G.; Davis, Mary S.

    1990-01-01

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  13. A Localised Corrosion Cell for Industrial Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Jansen, P.

    2003-01-01

    The LOCORR-CELL™ developed by FORCE TECHNOLOGY is an electrochemical cell for industrial applications estimating localised corrosion. The cell is constructed in a carbon steel casing for direct mounting into the system. It is based on an oxygen concentration element reflecting the interaction...... between the environment formed under a deposit or in a crevice. The essential feature of the method is that it reflects the influence of oxygen content, conductivity and temperature as well as the influence of corrosion inhibitors, MIC and other effects that have an effect on localised corrosion under...

  14. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  15. Corrosion Effects on the Strength Properties of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Containing Slag and Corrosion Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar Anandan; Sounthararajan Vallarasu Manoharan; Thirumurugan Sengottian

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion in steel can be detrimental in any steel rebar reinforced concrete as well as in the case of steel fibre reinforced concrete. The process of corrosion occurring in steel fibre incorporated concrete subjected to corrosive environment was systematically evaluated in this study. Concrete specimens were prepared with steel fibre inclusions at 1.5% Vf (volume fraction) of concrete and were added in slag based concrete (containing manufactured sand) and replaced with cement at 20%, 40%, ...

  16. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh [Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Tru, Nguyen Nhi [Vietnam Institute for Tropical Technology and Environmental Protection, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Yoshino, Tsujino [Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan); Yasuki, Maeda [Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time.

  17. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of steel wires in a coalmine with a corrosive medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Songquan; Zhang Dekun; Wang Dagang; Zhang Zefeng

    2011-01-01

    A 6 × 19 point-contact hoisting cable was used as our research object to examine the progress of corrosion of steel wires in a laboratory, simulating the actual working conditions in a coalmine. An electrochemical method was used to investigate the corrosion behavior of steel wires with different surface treatments of a corrosive acid solution. The results show that anode activation of steel wire mainly occurs during pre-corrosion, where the anode activation process of bare steel wires is the fastest as is their corresponding corrosion speed, while the anode activation process of oil coated steel wires and their corresponding corrosion speed are the lowest. During the intermediate and late immersion periods,a passive film is generated on the surface of steel wires, which are gradually damaged with the passage of time. Local pitting corrosion occurs easily on the surface of steel wires with a high-polarization potential.Suitable equivalent circuits were chosen to fit the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of steel wires over various corrosive times and different surface treatments, which indicate good fitting results.The double electrical layer charge-transfer resistance increases in the sequence: bare steel wire,untreated steel wire and oil coated steel wire and their corrosion resistance decreases in turn, which is consistent with their polarization curves. The oil layer provides a certain protective effect on untreated steel wires, but its effect is not entirely clear.

  18. CORROSION INHIBITION BY CASHEW NUT SHELL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is the primary step in the action of organic corrosion inhibitors (Trabanelli. 1989). ... polarized. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements .... solutions and UV/VIS to determine the adsorption of the CNSL inhibitor on.

  19. Fighting against corrosion; Kampf dem Substanzverlust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2012-03-09

    Corrosion protection is not a new problem for the offshore industry, but requirements are particularly high in the wind power industry. There are hardly any international standards that could provide orientation.

  20. Fatigue - corrosion of endoprosthesis titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, A; Muster, D; Jaeger, J H

    1979-01-01

    Commercial total hip prostheses often show certain metallurgical faults (porosities, coarse grains, growth dendrites, carbide networks). In order to investigate more accurately the role played by these different parameters in prostheses failure we performed a large number of systematic corrosion, fatigue and fatigue - corrosion tests on these materials and on commercial total hip prostheses. Ultimate strengthes seem to be reached for cast cobalt alloys, whereas titanium alloys, such as Ta 6 V, present very high fatigue limit under corrosion. Thus, rotative bending fatigue - corrosion tests in biological environment provide values about 50 DaN/mm2. This value, is nevertheless appreciably higher than those obtained with stellites and stainless steel. Titanium alloys, because of their mechanical performances, their weak Young's modulus (11000 DaN/mm2) and their relative lightness (4.5. g/cm3), which are associated with a good biocompatibility, seem very promising for permanent implants realisation.

  1. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, R.J.

    1984-01-10

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  2. Polarized Neutron Reflectometry of Nickel Corrosion Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mary H; Welbourn, Rebecca J L; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Gutfreund, Philipp; Clarke, Stuart M

    2015-06-30

    Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to investigate the detailed adsorption behavior and corrosion inhibition mechanism of two surfactants on a nickel surface under acidic conditions. Both the corrosion of the nickel surface and the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer could be monitored in situ by the use of different solvent contrasts. Layer thicknesses and roughnesses were evaluated over a range of pH values, showing distinctly the superior corrosion inhibition of one negatively charged surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) compared to a positively charged example (dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide) due to its stronger binding interaction with the surface. It was found that adequate corrosion inhibition occurs at significantly less than full surface coverage.

  3. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  4. Amplified OTDR systems for multipoint corrosion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Jehan F; Silva, Marcionilo J; Coêlho, Isnaldo J S; Cipriano, Eliel; Martins-Filho, Joaquim F

    2012-01-01

    We present two configurations of an amplified fiber-optic-based corrosion sensor using the optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) technique as the interrogation method. The sensor system is multipoint, self-referenced, has no moving parts and can measure the corrosion rate several kilometers away from the OTDR equipment. The first OTDR monitoring system employs a remotely pumped in-line EDFA and it is used to evaluate the increase in system reach compared to a non-amplified configuration. The other amplified monitoring system uses an EDFA in booster configuration and we perform corrosion measurements and evaluations of system sensitivity to amplifier gain variations. Our experimental results obtained under controlled laboratory conditions show the advantages of the amplified system in terms of longer system reach with better spatial resolution, and also that the corrosion measurements obtained from our system are not sensitive to 3 dB gain variations.

  5. Amplified OTDR Systems for Multipoint Corrosion Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim F. Martins-Filho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present two configurations of an amplified fiber-optic-based corrosion sensor using the optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR technique as the interrogation method. The sensor system is multipoint, self-referenced, has no moving parts and can measure the corrosion rate several kilometers away from the OTDR equipment. The first OTDR monitoring system employs a remotely pumped in-line EDFA and it is used to evaluate the increase in system reach compared to a non-amplified configuration. The other amplified monitoring system uses an EDFA in booster configuration and we perform corrosion measurements and evaluations of system sensitivity to amplifier gain variations. Our experimental results obtained under controlled laboratory conditions show the advantages of the amplified system in terms of longer system reach with better spatial resolution, and also that the corrosion measurements obtained from our system are not sensitive to 3 dB gain variations.

  6. Electrochemical Corrosion of Carbon—Containing Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENZhao-you

    1994-01-01

    The electrochemical examination on the cor-rosion of carbon or carbon containing refractiories at molten slag-liquid interface has been carried out.The electromotive force(E.M.F)of cells with different molten slags:C|molten slag | Fe at elevated temperatures has been measured by means of potentiometer and it is in the range from 250 to 450mV .It is found that the carbon electrode in these cells is anode and whn a counter E.M.F.is applied externally to the cel,the corrosion of carbon electrode will be sup-pressed entirely.Test results show that the local corrosion of carbon containing refractories at slag-metal interface is mainly caused by the mechanism of electrochemical corrosion.

  7. Controlling Corrosion in Defence Equipment - Technical Meeting,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    corrosion of Ni/Al bronze in neutral solution, (2) the inhibited corrosion of mild steel in sulphuric acid, (3) comparison and ranking of a number of... electropolish : alkaline clean: pumice scrub: anodic etch: chromium plate. It must be remembered that mild steel is not being used, but a low alloy steel ...Wolsley shows no such damage. After all they are both made - from similar steels and both have been exposed to the two essential ingredients required

  8. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith...dominate the metal’s cathodic behavior. Within an alkaline environment, we expect the following reduction reactions to be catalyzed on the oxide

  9. Corrosion of surface defects in fine wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentler, R M; Greene, N D

    1975-11-01

    Defects were observed on the surfaces of various fine diameter wires commonly used in biomedical applications. These surface irregularities were viewed at high magnifications using a scanning electron microscope which has a much greater depth of field than normal light microscopy. Defects include scratches, pits, and crevices, which are the result of commercial wire drawing practices. Corrosion test results show that imperfections can serve as sites for localized corrosion attack which could lead to premature failures.

  10. METAL CORROSION IN WATERBORNE PRESERVATIVE- TREATED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisdianto Sugiyanto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The rigidity and firmness of wooden construction and furniture those are joined by metal screws depend on corrosion rate of these metals. This paper examines the weight-loss percentage of metal screws used in wood samples that have been treated with water-borne preser vative (i.e.3% borax boric acid and 3% diffusol CB and concurrently investigates the effect of brake fluid on preventing metal corrosion. Wood samples tested included three acacia and one eucalypts wood species which were grouped into sapwood and heartwood containing samples. Wood samples fastened with metal screws were freely suspended in glass jars that contained 25 ml of sulphuric acid (H2SO4 to keep the humidity rate above 90%. After 12 months, the metal screws lost their weight due to the corrosion brought about by the related factors either in separate individual or in combination, which comprised brake and fluid-dipping , wood species, wood portion (sapwood and heartwood, kinds of preser vatives used. Corrosion rates of metal screws fastened in eucalypts wood sample as indicated by the screw-weight loss (i.e. 5.8% was more severe than that fastened in acacia wood. Furthermore, corrosion rate of metal screws as fixed firmly in sapwood sample proceeded faster than that in heartwood. This might be caused by the higher moisture content in sapwood. On the other hand, corrosion rate of the screws as fastened in waterborne-preser vative-treated wood samples was greater than that in non-preser ved wood due to electrokinetic characteristics and ionic potential exhibited by the preser vative thereby intensif ying the screw-corrosion process. Meanwhile, less severe corrosion was obser ved and recorded on the screws pre-dipped in brake fluid compared to those on the non-dipped screws

  11. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  12. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures; Corrosion et protection des materiaux a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Duhamel, Cecile [Mines ParisTech, Centre des materiaux UMR-CNRS 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France); Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane [CEA, Laboratoire d' Etude de la Corrosion Aqueuse (France); Molins, Regine [Mines ParisTech, Direction de la Recherche, 60 Bvd Saint Michel, 75272 Paris Cedex 06 (France); Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O. [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 5209 CNRS, Univ. de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, Univ. Henri Poincare Nancy-1 - CNRS, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A. [SIMAP UMR CNRS 5266, Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 rue de la Piscine BP 75, 38402 Saint-Martin-d' Heres Cedex (France); Mangelinck, D. [IM2NP, UMR6242, CNRS, Univ. Paul Cezanne, Case 142, Faculte de Saint Jerome, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Viguier, B.; Monceau, D. [Univ. de Toulouse, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, INP-ENSIACET, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 44362, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Soustelle, M. [Ecole nationale superieure des mines, Saint Etienne (France); Pijolat, M. [Centre Spin, Ecole des mines de Saint Etienne (France); Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K. [Laboratoire Roberval, UTC (France); Wolski, K.; Barnier, V. [Centre SMS, EMSE, UMR 5146, LCG, Univ. de Lyon, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint Etienne (France); Rebillat, F. [LCTS, Univ. de Bordeaux (France); Lavigne, O. [Onera, Dep. Materiaux et Structures Metalliques, BP 72, 29 av. de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon (France); Brossard, J.M. [Dep. energetique et procedes, Veolia Environnement Recherche et Innovation, Limay (France); Ropital, F. [IFP Energies Nouvelles, BP 3, 69360 Solaize (France); Mougin, J. [CEA-Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-07-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  13. Controlling internal corrosion of oil and gas pipelines : the corrosion inhibitor selection software (CISS) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron, A.; Papavinasam, S. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2009-07-01

    The internal pitting corrosion of oil and gas pipelines can be effectively controlled through the addition of inhibitors. However, simulation of field operating conditions is necessary because the performance of corrosion inhibitors is influenced by several interacting parameters. This paper reviewed the Corrosion Inhibitor Selection Software (CISS) program. The materials transported in production pipelines are often multiphase, containing oil, aqueous (brine), and gas phases. The corrosion rate and inhibitor performance are influenced by composition, temperature, flow and pressure. Steel composition and structure also influence both the rate and type of corrosion. Improvements in corrosion test methodologies are aimed at simulating field corrosion conditions in the laboratory in a compressed time-scale. The parameters that influence the types of corrosion must be simulated in order for laboratory methodology to be relevant. The variables controlled should be quantifiable. There should also be a correlation between the influence of variables controlled in the laboratory and of the same variables in the field. The CISS program evaluates inhibitors in the following 4 steps: (1) pipeline operating conditions, (2) selection of laboratory methodology, (3) determination of operating conditions for the laboratory methodologies, and (4) selection of corrosion inhibitors. The 7 objectives of the CISS program are to optimize the strategies of inhibitor selection for pipeline applications; determine the hydrodynamic parameters of the pipe from field operating conditions; select appropriate laboratory methodologies for evaluating inhibitors; determine flow conditions for high-shear laboratory methodologies; develop a qualitative relationship between corrosion rates of non-shear laboratory methodologies and of pipelines; evaluate corrosion inhibitors based on results from different laboratory methodologies; and design cost-effective inhibitors for future applications. 47 refs

  14. Silica nanocontainers for active corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Frederico; Tedim, João; Lisenkov, Aleksey D.; Salak, Andrei N.; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L.; Ferreira, Mário G. S.

    2012-02-01

    Novel self-healing protective coatings with nanocontainers of corrosion inhibitors open new opportunities for long-term anticorrosion protection of different metallic materials. In this paper a new type of functional nanoreservoir based on silica nanocapsules (SiNC) synthesized and loaded with corrosion inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) in a one-stage process is reported for the first time. Unlike conventional mesoporous silica nanoparticles, SiNC possess an empty core and shell with gradual mesoporosity, arising from the particular conditions of the synthetic route adopted, which confers significant loading capacity and allows prolonged and stimuli-triggered release of the inhibiting species. The kinetics of inhibitor release was studied at different pH values and concentrations of NaCl. The results show a clear dependence of the release profiles on corrosion relevant triggers such as pH and Cl- concentration. When SiNC loaded with MBT are dispersed in NaCl solution, there is a significant decrease of the corrosion activity on aluminium alloy 2024. More importantly, when SiNC-MBT is added to a conventional water-based coating formulation, the modified coating hampers corrosion activity at the metal interface, better than in the case of direct addition of corrosion inhibitor. Furthermore, self-healing is observed before and after artificially inflicting defects in the modified coatings. As a result, the developed nanocontainers show high potential to be used in new generation of active protective coatings.

  15. Theoretical Analysis of Reinforcement Tunnel Lining Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhiQiang Zhangand

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of ageing damage in reinforced concrete structures is reinforcement corrosion. Damage can be detected visually as coincident cracks along the reinforcement bar, which are significant of both reduction of the re-bar, cross-section and loss of bond strength for reinforced concrete. The reinforced concrete is one of the most widely used engineering materials as final lining of tunnels. The corrosion is common durability problems that have significant effect on the tunnel performance. This study intends to analysis reinforcement concrete corrosion at the tunnel lining by applying temperature expansion theory on steel through numerical simulation process, with expansive force effect. The thickness of concrete cover and the diameter of steel bar have an impact on the stress for reinforcement concrete during propagation of corrosion process. The corrosion cracks appear at the corner of a tunnel lining then in invert and vault because the maximum stress will be in the corner then in invert and vault. The internal force in the concrete lining changes differently when the corrosion rate change.

  16. Recent Developments on Autonomous Corrosion Protection Through Encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Gillis, M.; Blanton, M.; Hanna, J.; Rawlins, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating, based on microencapsulation, for the autonomous detection and control of corrosion. Microencapsulation has been validated and optimized to incorporate desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition, through corrosion-initiated release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release triggered by mechanical damage. While proof-of-concept results have been previously reported, more recent research and development efforts have concentrated on improving coating compatibility and synthesis procedure scalability, with a targeted goal of obtaining easily dispersible pigment-grade type microencapsulated materials. The recent progress has resulted in the development of pH-sensitive microparticles as a corrosion-triggered delivery system for corrosion indicators and inhibitors. The synthesis and early corrosion indication results obtained with coating formulations that incorporate these microparticles are reported. The early corrosion indicating results were obtained with color changing and with fluorescent indicators.

  17. Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a serious problem that has enormous costs and serious safety implications. Localized corrosion, such as pitting, is very dangerous and can cause catastrophic failures. The NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center is developing a smart coating based on pH-sensitive microcapsules for corrosion applications. These versatile microcapsules are designed to be incorporated into a smart coating and deliver their core content when corrosion starts. Corrosion indication was the first function incorporated into the microcapsules. Current efforts are focused on incorporating the corrosion inhibition function through the encapsulation of corrosion inhibitors into water core and oil core microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of encapsulated corrosion inhibitors are shown.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  19. Corrosion studies in brines of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.P.; McCawley, F.X.; Cramer, S.D.; Needham, P.B. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Toward the goal of maximizing minerals and metals recovery from domestic resources, the Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, has conducted in situ corrosion studies at the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) in the Imperial Valley, Calif., to evaluate and characterize materials of construction for geothermal resources recovery plants. General-, pitting, and crevice-corrosion characteristics of 13 commercially available alloys were investigated for periods of 15 and 30 days in seven process environments expected to be found in typical geothermal resources plants. Stainless steel alloy 29-4, Inconel 625, and the Hastelloys G, S, and C-276 were the most resistant to general corrosion, did not pit, and exhibited little susceptibility to crevice corrosion. Stainless steel alloys 430, E-Brite 26-1, and 6X had low general corrosion rates, but pitted and were susceptible to crevice corrosion. Stainless steel alloy 316 L had a low corrosion rate, but corroded intergranularly, pitted, and was susceptible to crevice corrosion and to stress-corrosion cracking. Titanium--1.5 nickel and TiCode-12 had low corrosion rates, did not pit, and were not susceptible to crevice corrosion. Carbon and 4130 steels had high corrosion rates, pitted, and had high susceptibilities to crevice corrosion. The major scale-forming mineral on the corrosion samples in most of the process environments studied was galena mixed with lesser amounts of other minerals.

  20. Corrosion Behavior of S450EW Low-alloy Weathering Steel in Cyclically Alternate Corrosion Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-shan WANG; Pei-yang SHI; Cheng-jun LIU; Mao-fa JIANG

    2015-01-01

    Weathering steel is widely used in various ifelds due to its excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. The effect of chromium content on the S450EW weathering steel in cyclic immersion test was studied. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of S450EW weathering steel is closely related to chromium content. The addition of chromium signiif-cantly inhibited the weathering steel corrosion. The corrosion rate of experimental steel after 96 h immersion was 1.101 g·m−2·h−1. The rust of S450EW weathering steel was mainly constituted of FeOOH and Fe3O4 phase, and the elevation of chromium content promoted the formation of α-FeOOH. The ifne precipitates of the two phases contributed to the formation of dense dust layer of test steel. Furthermore, the increase of chromium is beneifcial for the cure of original defects and cracks of the rust layer via the enrich-ment of chromium. The corrosion potential and the resistance of corrosion process were thus increased, protecting the experimental steel from further corrosion. A S450EW steel with corrosion resistance more than 1.5 times of Q450NQR1 steel was prepared.

  1. The Corrosion Inhibition Characteristics of Sodium Nitrite Using an On-line Corrosion Rate Measurement System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mal-Yong; Kang, Dae-Jin [Korea Polytechnic University, Shiheung (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jeon-Soo [Future Technology Research Laboratory, KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    An on-line corrosion rate measurement system was developed using a personal computer, a data acquisition board and program, and a 2-electrode corrosion probe. Reliability of the developed system was confirmed with through comparison test. With this system, the effect of sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) as a corrosion inhibitor were studied on iron and aluminum brass that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Corrosion rate was measured based on the linear polarization resistance method. The corrosion rates of aluminum brass and iron in 1% NaCl solutions were measured to be 0.290 mm per year (mmpy) and 0.2134 mmpy, respectively. With the addition of 200 ppm of NO{sub 2}{sup -}, the corrosion rates decreased to 0.0470 mmpy and 0.0254 mmpy. The addition of NO{sub 2}{sup -} caused a decrease in corrosion rates of both aluminum brass and iron, yet the NO{sub 2}{sup -} acted as a more effective corrosion inhibitor for iron. than aluminum brass.

  2. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment, sulfate-re

  3. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  4. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment,

  5. Analysis of corrosion failure of petrochemical pipe elbow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-yan; L(U) Tao

    2005-01-01

    Corrosive failure is frequently found in petrochemical pipelines which may lead to the leakage of the pipes and even the shutdown of the system. However, the corrosion mechanism is still not well understood due to the complex service environment, e.g. the corrosive fluids and the long term operation at higher temperature. The corrosion behaviour of a petrochemical pipe elbow was evaluated via visual examination and microanalysis with optical microscope and scanning electron microscope(SEM) together with energy dispersive analysis X-ray (EDAX). The corresponding corrosion mechanisms, the combination of grain boundary attach and the crevice attach together with the flow-accelerated corrosion, were proposed consequently.

  6. High temperature corrosion during biomass firing: improved understanding by depth resolved characterisation of corrosion products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature corrosion of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG), widely utilised as a superheater tube material in Danish power stations, was investigated to verify the corrosion mechanisms related to biomass firing. KCl coated samples were exposed isothermally to 560 degrees C...... changes within the near surface region (covering both the deposit and the steel surface). Such cross-section analysis was further complemented by plan view investigations (additionally involving X-ray diffraction) combined with removal of the corrosion products. Improved insights into the nature...... of the corrosion products as a function of distance from the deposit surface were revealed through this comprehensive characterisation. Corrosion attack during simulated straw-firing conditions was observed to occur through both active oxidation and sulphidation mechanisms....

  7. Soils - NRCS Web Soil Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Web Soil Survey (WSS) provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation...

  8. FEM-models for the propagation period of chloride induced reinforcement corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redaelli, E.; Bertolini, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' ' G. Natta' ' , Via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milan (Italy); Peelen, W.; Polder, R. [TNO Structures and Safety, P.O. Box 49, 2600 AA Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-08-15

    The paper reports the results of numerical simulations carried out with FEM and aimed at evaluating the corrosion conditions of steel bars in concrete elements subjected to chlorides. Two case studies were analysed: a reinforced concrete element subjected to de-icing salt in the presence of a crack and a concrete tunnel in a chloride-contaminated, water saturated soil. Attention was focused on the selection of proper values of concrete resistivity and of the parameters suitable to describe the electrochemical behaviour of steel in the different conditions of exposure. The results allowed to quantify the effects of the galvanic coupling between active and passive areas on the corrosion rate of steel. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  10. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister construction. General corrosion of the copper is not expected to be the limiting factor in the waste repository environment when estimating the life-time of the canister construction. However, different forms of localised corrosion, i.e. pitting, stress corrosion cracking, or environmentally assisted creep fracture may cause premature failure of the copper shield. Of the probable constituents in the groundwater, nitrites, chlorides, sulphides and carbonates have been suggested to promote localised corrosion of copper. The main assumption made in planning this research program is that the surface films forming on copper in the repository environment largely determine the susceptibility of copper to the different forms of localised corrosion. The availability of reactants, which also may become corrosion rate limiting, is investigated in several other research programs. This research program consists of a set of successive projects targeted at characterising the properties of surface films on copper in repository environment containing different detrimental anions. A further aim was to assess the significance of the anion-induced changes in the stability of the oxide films with regard to localised corrosion of copper. This report summarises the results from a series of investigations on properties of surface films forming on copper in water of pH = 8.9 at temperature of 80 deg C and pressure of 2 MPa. The main results gained so far in this research program are as follows: The surface films forming on copper in the thermodynamic stability region of monovalent copper at 80 deg C consist of a bulk part (about 1 mm thick) which is a good ionic and electronic conductor, and an outer, interfacial layer (0.001 - 0.005 mm thick) which shows p-type semiconductor

  11. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias to

  12. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy`s treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation.

  13. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion damage that has been found in a number of nuclear power plant containment structures can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. This has prompted concerns regarding the capacity of corroded containments to withstand accident loadings. To address these concerns, finite element analyses have been performed for a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment structure. Using ABAQUS, the pressure capacity was calculated for a typical vessel with no corrosion damage. Multiple analyses were then performed with the location of the corrosion and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis. Using a strain-based failure criterion, a {open_quotes}lower bound{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes}, and {open_quotes}upper bound{close_quotes} failure level was predicted for each case. These limits were established by: determining the amount of variability that exists in material properties of typical containments, estimating the amount of uncertainty associated with the level of modeling detail and modeling assumptions, and estimating the effect of corrosion on the material properties.

  14. Monitoring corrosion in reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Many defects can cause deterioration and cracks in concrete; these are results of poor concrete mix, poor workmanship, inadequate design, shrinkage, chemical and environmental attack, physical or mechanical damage, and corrosion of reinforcing steel (RS). We want to develop a suite of sensors and systems that can detect that corrosion is taking place in RS and inform owners how serious the problem is. By understanding the stages of the corrosion process, we can develop special a sensor that detects each transition. First, moisture ingress can be monitored by a fiber optics humidity sensor, then ingress of Chloride, which acts as a catalyst and accelerates the corrosion process by converting iron into ferrous compounds. We need a fiber optics sensor which can quantify Chloride ingress over time. Converting ferric to ferrous causes large volume expansion and cracks. Such pressure build-up can be detected by a fiber optic pressure sensor. Finally, cracks emit acoustic waves, which can be detected by a high frequency sensor made with phase-shifted gratings. This paper will discuss the progress in our development of these special sensors and also our plan for a field test by the end of 2014. We recommend that we deploy these sensors by visually inspecting the affected area and by identifying locations of corrosion; then, work with the designers to identify spots that would compromise the integrity of the structure; finally, drill a small hole in the concrete and insert these sensors. Interrogation can be done at fixed intervals with a portable unit.

  15. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

    1992-08-01

    The problems connected with gas side corrosion for the design of the lA4 (POC) channel hardware are explored and results of gas side wear rate tests in the Textron Mark VII facility are presented. It is shown that the proposed designs meet a 2000 hour lifetime criterion based upon these materials tests. Improvement in cathode lifetime is demonstrated with lower voltage intercathode gaps. The corrosion of these materials is discussed and it is shown how lifetimes are dependent upon gap voltage and average metal temperature. The importance of uniformity of slagging to the durability of the anode wall is demonstrated. The wear mechanism of the anodes in the MHD channel is analyzed. In addition to gas-side corrosion, the results of specific water corrosion tests of sidewall materials are discussed. All of the tests reported here were carried out to confirm the gas-side performance and the manufacturability of anode and sidewall designs and to address questions posed about the durability of tungsten-copper on the waterside. the results of water corrosion tests of the tungsten copper alloy sidewall material are presented to show that with proper control of waterside pH and, if necessary, dissolved oxygen, one can obtain reliable performance with no degradation of heat transfer with this material. The final choice of materials was determined primarily by the outcome of these tests and also by the question of the manufacturability of the prospective designs.

  16. Anomalous dissolution of metals and chemical corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGUTIN M. DRAZIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of the anomalous behavior of some metals, in particular Fe and Cr, in acidic aqueous solutions during anodic dissolution. The anomaly is recognizable by the fact that during anodic dissolutionmore material dissolves than would be expected from the Faraday law with the use of the expected valence of the formed ions. Mechanical disintegration, gas bubble blocking, hydrogen embrittlement, passive layer cracking and other possible reasons for such behavior have been discussed. It was shown, as suggested by Kolotyrkin and coworkers, that the reason can be, also, the chemical reaction in which H2O molecules with the metal form metal ions and gaseous H2 in a potential independent process. It occurs simultaneously with the electrochemical corrosion process, but the electrochemical process controls the corrosion potential. On the example of Cr in acid solution itwas shown that the reason for the anomalous behavior is dominantly chemical dissolution, which is considerably faster than the electrochemical corrosion, and that the increasing temperature favors chemical reaction, while the other possible reasons for the anomalous behavior are of negligible effect. This effect is much smaller in the case of Fe, but exists. The possible role of the chemical dissolution reacton and hydrogen evolution during pitting of steels and Al and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue are discussed.

  17. Corrosion-Resistant High-Entropy Alloys: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhu Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion destroys more than three percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Therefore, the design of highly corrosion-resistant materials is urgently needed. By breaking the classical alloy-design philosophy, high-entropy alloys (HEAs possess unique microstructures, which are solid solutions with random arrangements of multiple elements. The particular locally-disordered chemical environment is expected to lead to unique corrosion-resistant properties. In this review, the studies of the corrosion-resistant HEAs during the last decade are summarized. The corrosion-resistant properties of HEAs in various aqueous environments and the corrosion behavior of HEA coatings are presented. The effects of environments, alloying elements, and processing methods on the corrosion resistance are analyzed in detail. Furthermore, the possible directions of future work regarding the corrosion behavior of HEAs are suggested.

  18. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  19. A rapid stress-corrosion test for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Stressed alloy specimens are immersed in a salt-dichromate solution at 60 degrees C. Because of the minimal general corrosion of these alloys in this solution, stress corrosion failures are detected by low-power microscopic examination.

  20. Low Toxicity Corrosion Inhibitors for Smart Coatings Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is located near one of the most corrosive natural environments in the world. Corrosion of KSC ground assets is exacerbated by the...

  1. A physical corrosion model for bioabsorbable metal stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2014-05-01

    Absorbable metal stents (AMSs) are an emerging technology in the treatment of heart disease. Computational modelling of AMS performance will facilitate the development of this technology. In this study a physical corrosion model is developed for AMSs based on the finite element method and adaptive meshing. The model addresses a gap between currently available phenomenological corrosion models for AMSs and physical corrosion models that have been developed for more simple geometries than those of a stent. The model developed in this study captures the changing surface of a corroding three-dimensional AMS structure for the case of diffusion-controlled corrosion. Comparisons are made between model predictions and those of previously developed phenomenological corrosion models for AMSs in terms of predicted device geometry and mechanical performance during corrosion. Relationships between alloy solubility and diffusivity in the corrosion environment and device performance during corrosion are also investigated.

  2. Biofilms: strategies for metal corrosion inhibition employing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Rongjun

    2007-10-01

    Corrosion causes dramatic economic loss. Currently widely used corrosion control strategies have disadvantages of being expensive, subject to environmental restrictions, and sometimes inefficient. Studies show that microbial corrosion inhibition is actually a common phenomenon. The present review summarizes recent progress in this novel strategy: corrosion control using beneficial bacteria biofilms. The possible mechanisms may involve: (1) removal of corrosive agents (such as oxygen) by bacterial physiological activities (e.g., aerobic respiration), (2) growth inhibition of corrosion-causing bacteria by antimicrobials generated within biofilms [e.g., sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) corrosion inhibition by gramicidin S-producing Bacillus brevis biofilm], (3) generation of protective layer by biofilms (e.g., Bacillus licheniformis biofilm produces on aluminum surface a sticky protective layer of gamma-polyglutamate). Successful utilization of this novel strategy relies on advances in study at the interface of corrosion engineering and biofilm biology.

  3. PH and Electrochemical Responsive Materials for Corrosion Smart Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a costly issue for military operations and civil industries. While most corrosion initiates from localized corrosion form, such as pitting, failure directly caused by localized corrosion is the most dangerous kind, because it is difficult to anticipate and prevent, occurs very suddenly and can be catastrophic. One way of preventing these failures is with a coating that can detect and heal localized corrosion. pH and other electrochemical changes are often associated with localized corrosion, so it is expected that materials that are pH or otherwise electrochemical responsive can be used to detect and control corrosion. This paper will review various pH and electrochemical responsive materials and their potential applications in corrosion smart coatings. Current research results in this field will also be reported.

  4. Concrete cover cracking with localized corrosion of reinforcing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Acosta, A. A.; Sagues, A. A. [South Florida Univ., Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tampa FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The critical amount of steel corrosion needed for concrete cover cracking of a reinforced concrete element was measured, focusing on cases where only a fraction of the steel bar length is corroding. The amount of corrosion needed to crack the concrete cover was found to range between 49 micrometre to 137 micrometre in specimens of localized corrosion. In contrast, in cases of uniform corrosion of comparable systems the corrosion needed to crack the concrete cover varied from 15 micrometre to 75 micrometer. Based on this and previous work on this problem, an empirical equation is proposed for the critical amount of steel corrosion as a function of specimen dimensions. The model proposed for estimating the critical amount of steel corrosion showed reasonable agreement between estimates of the work of corrosion expansion and the energy required to crack the concrete. 23 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  5. effect of municipal liquid waste on corrosion susceptibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    The corrosion rate of the galvanized steel pipe was measured using the gravimetric technique. ... three stagnant liquid waste samples collected outside the city (SLW4,SLW5, and ... increased exposure time, a layer of protective corrosion ...

  6. pH Responsive Microcapsules for Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Muehlberg, Aaron; Boraas, Samuel; Webster, Dean; JohnstonGelling, Victoria; Croll, Stuart; Taylor, S Ray; Contu, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The best coatings for corrosion protection provide not only barriers to the environment, but also a controlled release of a corrosion inhibitor, as demanded by the presence of corrosion or mechanical damage. NASA has developed pH sensitive microcapsules (patent pending) that can release their core contents when corrosion starts. The objectives of the research presented here were to encapsulate non-toxic corrosion inhibitors, to incorporate the encapsulated inhibitors into paint formulations, and to test the ability of the paints to control corrosion. Results showed that the encapsulated corrosion inhibitors, specifically Ce(NO3)3 , are effective to control corrosion over long periods of time when incorporated at relatively high pigment volume concentrations into a paint formulation.

  7. Detection of microbiologically influenced corrosion by electrochemical noise transients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homborg, A.M.; Morales, C.F. Leon; Tinga, Tiedo; de Wit, J.H.W.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the electrochemical processes involved in pitting corrosion induced by microbiologically influenced corrosion by using time-resolved instantaneous frequency information of electrochemical current noise (ECN) transients obtained from Hilbert spectra. In addition to the

  8. Soil friability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2011-01-01

    has been found but it is not possible to identify a specific lower critical level of organic matter across soil types. Sustainable management of soil requires continuous and adequate inputs of organic matter to sustain or improve soil friability. Intensive tillage and traffic in unfavorable conditions...... for optimal friability. There is a strong need to get more detailed knowledge about effects of soil water content on soil friability and especially to be able to quantify the least limiting water range for soil friability and therefore soil tillage. A strong relationship between organic matter and friability...

  9. Corrosion circumstance in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant and evaluation of the corrosion rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Akira [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai Reprocessing Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    In the reprocessing plant, corrosive circumstances arise, because the major equipment contains a high concentration of the metal ions that originate from the fission products. They are also equipped in the various concentrations of nitric acid and various temperatures. Based on failed experiments due to corrosion, repairing the equipment and exchanging materials, the corrosion rate of stainless steel containing Nb was measured over 1 mm/yr in the heat transfer surface of the dissolver. Pin-holes in the weld zone of the heat conduction surface of the dissolver and the acid recovery evaporator were observed. Although the corrosion rate of Ti-5Ta in the vapor zone of the plutonium solution evaporator reached 0.1 - 0.3 mm/yr, no local attacks were confirmed. On the other hand, the corrosion of Ti-5Ta was not observed in the acid recovery evaporator. This report presents the survey result of the corrosion equipment and an outline of the corrosion tests, with the wall thickness measurement result obtained as a soundness confirmation of the equipment. (author)

  10. Penetration of corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Brad J.; Peterova, Adela;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current-induced c......This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current......-induced corrosion (10, 50, and 100 mu A/cm(2)). X-ray attenuation measurements and visual investigations provided both qualitative and quantitative information on the penetration of solid corrosion products into the surrounding cementitious matrix. X-ray attenuation measurements provided time- and location......-dependent concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used to measure corrosion-induced deformations including deformations between steel and cementitious matrix as well as formation and propagation of corrosion-induced cracks. Based on experimental...

  11. Corrosion monitoring as an integral component of an effective corrosion management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bich, N.N. [FORCE Technology Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presented 6 case studies of oil and sour gas transmission pipelines where the use of corrosion monitoring devices led to the early identification of ineffective mitigation measures. The field signature method inspection tool (FSM-IT) was used in all 6 cases. FSM-IT is a non-intrusive corrosion monitoring tool that consists of a geometric matrix of sensing pins that are permanently attached to an outer pipe wall. The sensing matrix wiring is coupled to a sensing matrix interface (SMI) to form an interface. With the occurrence of internal corrosion or erosion, the electrical field is changed and compared against the signature. Computer software is used to compare the new measurements against the original signature to produce metal loss values. The software is capable of trending the metal loss over time, calculating corrosion rates and creating 3D plots to illustrate accumulated wall loss over the whole matrix. The orientation of the corrosion can be determined from an evaluation of the plots. Case studies included details of pipeline length, corrosion mechanisms, and repair activities. Mitigation measures in the case studies included batching; continuous injection; and pigging. It was concluded that the FSM-IT corrosion mitigation tool is effective in monitoring mitigation effectiveness. 7 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  12. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  13. Influence of environmental factors on corrosion damage of aircraft structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the important structural integrity concerns of aging aircraft, and it is estimated that a significant portion of airframe maintenance budgets is directed towards corrosion-related problems for both military and commercial aircraft. In order to better understand how environmental factors influence the corrosion damage initiation and propagation on aircraft structure and to predict pre-corrosion test pieces of fatigue life and structural integrity of an effective approach, this paper uses ...

  14. On-line Corrosion Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project....

  15. Aluminum Composites With Small Nanoparticles Additions: Corrosion Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Agureev, L.E.; Kostikov, V.I.; Eremeeva, Zh.V.; Barmin, A.A.; Savushkina, S.V.; Ivanov, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Research of corrosion resistance of the aluminum powder composites containing microadditives (0.01 – 0.15% is executed about.) zirconium oxide nanoparticles. Extreme dependence of speed of corrosion of aluminum composites in 10-% solutions of sulfuric and nitric acid from the maintenance of nanoadditives is shown. It has been shown the dynamics of mass loss of aluminum composites with nanoparticles of ZrO2 during corrosion tests in acids solutions. The lowest corrosion...

  16. Online, real-time corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project....

  17. Corrosion and wear resistant metallic layers produced by electrochemical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion and wear-corrosion properties of novel nickel alloy coatings with promising production characteristics have been compared with conventional bulk materials and hard platings. Corrosion properties in neutral and acidic environments have been investigated with electrochemical methods....... Determination of polarisation resistance during 100 hours followed by stepwise anodic polarisation seems to be a promising technique to obtain steady state data on slowly corroding coatings with transient kinetics. A slurry test enables determination of simultaneous corrosion and abrasive wear. Comparison...

  18. Modeling of Discontinuities in Resistance Structures due to Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Boboş

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion process is a process that produces significant negative effects on the resistance structures by reducing their section and by deterioration of mechanical properties of materials. In this paper are presented some notions about the corrosion process, types of corrosion encountered and types of geometric models that can be used for analytical calculation and for numerical simulation using finite element analysis programs, of the effects produced in the corrosion process on the natural frequency of the structure elements.

  19. Review of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) applied to corrosion monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabbutt, S.; Picton, P.; Shaw, P.; Black, S.

    2012-05-01

    The assessment of corrosion within an engineering system often forms an important aspect of condition monitoring but it is a parameter that is inherently difficult to measure and predict. The electrochemical nature of the corrosion process allows precise measurements to be made. Advances in instruments, techniques and software have resulted in devices that can gather data and perform various analysis routines that provide parameters to identify corrosion type and corrosion rate. Although corrosion rates are important they are only useful where general or uniform corrosion dominates. However, pitting, inter-granular corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (stress corrosion) are examples of corrosion mechanisms that can be dangerous and virtually invisible to the naked eye. Electrochemical noise (EN) monitoring is a very useful technique for detecting these types of corrosion and it is the only non-invasive electrochemical corrosion monitoring technique commonly available. Modern instrumentation is extremely sensitive to changes in the system and new experimental configurations for gathering EN data have been proven. In this paper the identification of localised corrosion by different data analysis routines has been reviewed. In particular the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) analysis to corrosion data is of key interest. In most instances data needs to be used with conventional theory to obtain meaningful information and relies on expert interpretation. Recently work has been carried out using artificial neural networks to investigate various types of corrosion data in attempts to predict corrosion behaviour with some success. This work aims to extend this earlier work to identify reliable electrochemical indicators of localised corrosion onset and propagation stages.

  20. Recent Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Chigondo; Fidelis Chigondo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, reduction of corrosion has been managed by various methods including cathodic protection, process control, reduction of the metal impurity content, and application of surface treatment techniques, as well as incorporation of suitable alloys. However, the use of corrosion inhibitors has proven to be the easiest and cheapest method for corrosion protection and prevention in acidic media. These inhibitors slow down the corrosion rate and thus prevent monetary losses due to metalli...

  1. U.S. Coast Guard Corrosion Program Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    insides of tubes and crevices. • Improved quality, coverage, and adherence will enhance corrosion protection . • Tank can coat parts up to 36...to corrosive fluids • Coated with PreKote/ E-Coat (Aerocron 2100)/ MIL-PRF-85285 Ty I • Steel hinges and latches removed before electrocoating...gr am O ff ic e USCG Aviation Corrosion Program ASETSDefense November 20, 2014 CWO Randy Langley USCG Aviation Corrosion Program Manager

  2. The Corrosion Fatigue Properties of High Performance Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuanfa; ZHENG Mulian; LIAO Weidong; WANG Binggang

    2005-01-01

    With the loading test equipment of corrosion fatigue specially designed, the corrosion fatigue characteristics of high performance concrete (HPC) withstanding the interaction of third point fatigue loading and Na2SO4 solution were investigated and analyzed. The experimental results indicate that water-binder ratio evidently influences the corrosion fatigue characteristics of HPC, and a moderate quantitative fine mineral admixture enhances the corrosion fatigue resistance of HPC. The effect is more significant when fly ash and silica fume are added.

  3. Engineering Performance of a New Siloxane-Based Corrosion Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Niall; O'Brien, R.; Basheer, P. A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of a new non-toxic corrosion inhibitor on selected engineering properties of concrete mixes with different cementitious materials following a corrosion and durability study on concrete samples. Corrosion inhibitors consist of powders or solutions which are added to concrete when mixed to prevent or delay corrosion of steel by their reaction with ferrous ions to form a stable and passive ferric oxide film on the steel surface. The new inhibitor functions sligh...

  4. Corrosion inhibition of steel in concrete by carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagoe-Crentsil, K.K.; Glasser, F.P. (Univ. of Aberdeen, Old Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry); Yilmaz, V.T. (Ondokuz Mayis Univ., Samsun (Turkey))

    1993-11-01

    Water soluble carboxylic acids have been used as corrosion inhibitors. They remain largely soluble after curing in cement for up to 90d. Corrosion current measurements are presented showing malonic acid, a dicarboxylic acid, to be a very effective corrosion inhibitor even in the presence of 2.5 wt % chloride. Unfortunately, it has an initial retarding effect on the set of Portland cement. The investigation suggests that corrosion inhibitors based on carboxylic acids remain a fruitful field of investigation.

  5. Assessment of the corrosiveness of cellulosic insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, R.; Graviano, A.

    1979-06-01

    A discussion of the information which is available about the corrosiveness of cellulose and other related properties is presented. A survey of the literature dealing with the corrosiveness of wood products other than cellulose and of the corrosiveness in other media by fire-retardant chemicals generally used with cellulosic insulation is included. The types of corrosion which could be caused by cellulosic insulation are briefly discussed.

  6. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  7. Polymer Composites Corrosive Degradation: A Computational Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation of polymer composites corrosive durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured pH factor and is represented by voids, temperature and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  8. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  9. MICROSCOPIC CORROSION STUDIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Leygraf; J.Pan; M.Femenia

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning electrochemical microscopy have been used for in situ monitoring of localized corrosion processes of different Duplex stainless steels (DSS) in acidic chloride solutions. The techniques allow imaging of local dissolution events with micrometer resolution, as opposed to conventional electrochemical techniques, which only give an overall view of the corrosion behavior. In addition, combined scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy were used for mapping the Volta potential variation over the surface of DSSs. A significant difference in Volta potential between the austenite and ferrite phases suggests galvanic interaction between the phases. A compositional gradient appears within 2 micrometers across the phase boundary, as seen with scanning Auger microscopy (SAM). In all, the studies suggest that higher alloyed DSS exhibit a more homogeneous dissolution behavior than lower alloyed DSS, due to higher and more similar corrosion resistance of the two phases, and enhanced resistance of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary regions.

  10. Study on corrosive grinding of gears

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Careful grinding or honing is usually required in machining of gears in order to improvethe machining quality of gear surface. Thus several grinding additives were used to formulate syn-thetic grinding lubricants similar to superior running-in lubricants. Experimental results show thatthe tooth surface of the produced oblique gear and steel worm becomes extremely smooth aftergrinding at a certain load for about a half to one hour. Especially, the gear surface finished withspecially formulated grinding lubricant reaches mirror-like smoothness. The quality of the geartooth can be improved by corrosive grinding, while the corrosive grinding time can be controlled byadjusting the quantity of the corrosive additives and the speed and load of the gears.

  11. Optimising corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Andersen, A.

    2002-01-01

    is to improve the quality control in district heating systems by corrosion monitoring. In Danish systems electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarisation resistance (LPR), high-sensitive electrical resistance (ER) technology, crevice corrosion probes, as well as weight loss coupons......A three-year project - financially supported by the Nordic Industrial Fund - on monitoring of corrosion in district heating systems has been initiated with participation of researchers and industrial partners in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The primary objective of the project...... will be tested. Laboratory studies as well as on-line measurements in district heating systems using probes in a specially designed sidestream unit are included in the practical part of the project....

  12. Corrosion Minimization for Research Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Shaber; Gerard Hofman

    2005-06-01

    Existing university research reactors are being converted to use low-enriched uranium fue to eliminate the use of highly-enriched uranium. These conversions require increases in fuel loading that will result in the use of elements with more fuel plates, resulting in a net decrease in the water annulus between fuel plates. The proposed decrease in the water annulus raises questions about the requirements and stability of the surface hydroxide on the aluminum fuel cladding and the potential for runaway corrosion resulting in fuel over-temperature incidents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as regulator for these university reactors, must ensure that proposed fuel modifications will not result in any increased risk or hazard to the reactor operators or the public. This document reviews the characteristics and behavior of aluminum hydroxides, analyzes the drivers for fuel plate corrosion, reviews relevant historical incidents, and provides recommendations on fuel design, surface treatment, and reactor operational practices to avoid corrosion issues.

  13. Microbiological Corrosion in Low Carbon Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Medina–Custodio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Microbiologically Induced Corrosion affects several industries, such as oil industry where it is estimated that 20% to 30% pipes failures are related with microorganism . The chemical reactions generate ions transfer, this validate the use of electrochemical techniques for its analysis. Coupons submerged in a nutritional medium with presence and absence of three different microorganisms during two periods, 48 hours and 28 days we restudied. Polarization resistance (Rp and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS techniques we re applied to determine the corrosivity of the systems. The results show a greater corrosive effect of abiotic system, this indicates a microorganisms protection effect to the metal, opposite to the first hypothesis. This result was ratified observing surfaces coupons by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM technique. A possible mechanism based on Evans – Tafel graph is proposed to explain inhibitor microorganism effect.

  14. OPGW Corrosion Detection Using Nondestructive Test Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, J.K.; Yoon, G.G.; Kang, J.W.; Yang, H.W. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-01

    This paper deals with some characteristics of a nondestructive eddy current detector to measure OPGW(composite overhead ground wire with optical fiber) corrosion. This detector is designed to automatically run on OPGW and to continuously inspect the corrosion of the line. The impedance of the eddy coil changing by any corrosion phenomenon of OPGW is analyzed. Several performances of the detector are described and experimental procedures and test results are also given. As a result, it is shown that the implemented detector can be measured some quantitative data for crack, broken wires or severe deteriorations in OPGW. This nondestructive test method would be applied to improve the reliability and efficiency of transmission lines in service. (author). 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Microbial Corrosion and Cracking in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1998-01-01

    and for recommendations in regards to electrochemical monitoring of MIC. The work presented here and further studies are also planned to lead to a Ph.D. thesis on "MIC monitoring based on mechanisms of corrosion".The results of laboratory experiments conducted in the period 1995 to 1997 are summarised. Conclusions...... will be based on results from the entire 3 year period, but only selected experimental data primarily from the latest experiments will be presented in detail here.Microbial corrosion of carbon steel under influence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is characterised by the formation of both biofilm...... and corrosion products (ferrous sulphides) on the metal surface. Experiments have been conducted on carbon steel exposed in near neutral (pH 6 to 8.5) saline hydrogen sulphide environment (0 to 100 mg/l total dissolved sulphide) for a period of 14 days. Furthermore coupons have been exposed in a bioreactor...

  16. 16 CFR 1209.5 - Test procedures for corrosiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard § 1209.5 Test procedures for corrosiveness. This section prescribes the procedures for determining the corrosiveness of cellulose insulation. Cellulose insulation shall be tested for corrosiveness using the measured settled density, obtained by...

  17. Deposition and high temperature corrosion in a 10 MW straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Hanne Philbert; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Deposition and corrosion measurements were conducted at a 10 MW wheat straw fired stoker boiler used for combined power and heat production. The plant experiences major problems with deposits on the heat transfer surfaces, and test probes have shown enhanced corrosion due to selective corrosion...

  18. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  19. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete – Thermodynamical Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, Andre; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2004-01-01

    The present understanding of selected corrosion phenomena in reinforced concrete is reviewed. Special emphasis is given to chloride induced corrosion. There is a general acceptance of the basic corrosion mechanism for steel in concrete. However different anodic reactions governing the subsequent...

  20. Self-Healing Corrosion Protective Sol-Gel Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdolah Zadeh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the state of the art and the recent advances in the field of self-healing corrosion protective coatings, the thesis entitled “Self-healing corrosion protective sol-gel coatings” addresses novel routes to self-healing corrosion protective sol-gel coatings via extrinsic and intrinsic

  1. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2017-02-01

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface.

  2. Self-Healing Corrosion Protective Sol-Gel Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdolah Zadeh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the state of the art and the recent advances in the field of self-healing corrosion protective coatings, the thesis entitled “Self-healing corrosion protective sol-gel coatings” addresses novel routes to self-healing corrosion protective sol-gel coatings via extrinsic and intrinsic heali

  3. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  4. Predicting concrete corrosion of sewers using artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is often a major failure mechanism for concrete sewers and under such circumstances the sewer service life is largely determined by the progression of microbially induced concrete corrosion. The modelling of sewer processes has become possible due to the improved understanding of in-sewer transformation. Recent systematic studies about the correlation between the corrosion processes and sewer environment factors should be utilized to improve the prediction capability of service life by sewer models. This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN)-based approach for modelling the concrete corrosion processes in sewers. The approach included predicting the time for the corrosion to initiate and then predicting the corrosion rate after the initiation period. The ANN model was trained and validated with long-term (4.5 years) corrosion data obtained in laboratory corrosion chambers, and further verified with field measurements in real sewers across Australia. The trained model estimated the corrosion initiation time and corrosion rates very close to those measured in Australian sewers. The ANN model performed better than a multiple regression model also developed on the same dataset. Additionally, the ANN model can serve as a prediction framework for sewer service life, which can be progressively improved and expanded by including corrosion rates measured in different sewer conditions. Furthermore, the proposed methodology holds promise to facilitate the construction of analytical models associated with corrosion processes of concrete sewers.

  5. Electrochemical Characterisation of Filiform Corrosion on Aluminium Rolled Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisert, M.

    2001-01-01

    When aluminium is protected by an organic coating a special form of corrosion can occur underneath the organic coating; filiform corrosion. This form of corrosion manifests itself as threadlike filaments under the coating, it causes local delamination of the coating and the coating cannot protect th

  6. On-line Corrosion Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  7. Online, real-time corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  8. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  9. 46 CFR 54.25-5 - Corrosion allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-5 Corrosion allowance. The corrosion allowance must be as required in 46 CFR 54.01-35. ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion allowance. 54.25-5 Section 54.25-5...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved...

  11. Damage induced by continued corrosion in concrete repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luckovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. After the repair, corrosion of the steel might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion cell depends on many parameters and is difficult to control, the occurrence of vi

  12. Electrochemical Characterisation of Filiform Corrosion on Aluminium Rolled Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisert, M.

    2001-01-01

    When aluminium is protected by an organic coating a special form of corrosion can occur underneath the organic coating; filiform corrosion. This form of corrosion manifests itself as threadlike filaments under the coating, it causes local delamination of the coating and the coating cannot protect

  13. Measurement of weak magnetic field of corrosion current of isolated corrosion center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Bardin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A very small magnetic field of corrosion current, of the order of 10−4 Oe, generated by isolated zinc inclusion in a copper platelet placed in electrolyte has been measured for the first time with a highly sensitive giant magneto-impedance magnetometer. The total corrosion current of the inclusion is estimated comparing the measured magnetic field distribution with corresponding theoretical calculation. The estimated value of the total corrosion current turns out to be in reasonable agreement with that one obtained in the standard gravimetric measurement.

  14. Copper corrosion experiments under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, Kaija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-06-15

    This report gives results from the corrosion experiments with copper under anoxic conditions. The objective was to study whether hydrogen-evolving corrosion reaction could occur. Copper foil samples were exposed in deaerated deionized water in Erlenmeyer flasks in the glove box with inert atmosphere. Four corrosion experiments (Cu1, Cu2, Cu3 and Cu4) were started, as well as a reference test standing in air. Cu1 and Cu2 had gas tight seals, whereas Cu3 and Cu4 had palladium foils as hydrogen permeable enclosure. The test vessels were stored during the experiments in a closed stainless steel vessel to protect them from the trace oxygen of the gas atmosphere and light. After the reaction time of three and a half years, there were no visible changes in the copper surfaces in any of the tests in the glove box, in contrast the Cu surfaces looked shiny and unaltered. The Cu3 test was terminated after the reaction time of 746 days. The analysis of the Pd-membrane showed the presence of H2 in the test system. If the measured amount of 7.2{center_dot}10{sup 5} mol H{sub 2} was the result of formation of Cu{sub 2}O this would correspond to a 200 nm thick corrosion layer. This was not in agreement with the measured layer thickness with SIMS, which was 6{+-}1 nm. A clear weight loss observed for the Cu3 test vessel throughout the test period suggests the evaporation of water through the epoxy sealing to the closed steel vessel. If this occurred, the anaerobic corrosion of steel surface in humid oxygen-free atmosphere could be a source of hydrogen. A similar weight loss was not observed for the parallel test (Cu4). The reference test standing in air showed visible development of corrosion products.

  15. TRU drum corrosion task team report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooda, K.E.; Lavery, C.A.; Zeek, D.P.

    1996-05-01

    During routine inspections in March 1996, transuranic (TRU) waste drums stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) were found with pinholes and leaking fluid. These drums were overpacked, and further inspection discovered over 200 drums with similar corrosion. A task team was assigned to investigate the problem with four specific objectives: to identify any other drums in RWMC TRU storage with pinhole corrosion; to evaluate the adequacy of the RWMC inspection process; to determine the precise mechanism(s) generating the pinhole drum corrosion; and to assess the implications of this event for WIPP certifiability of waste drums. The task team investigations analyzed the source of the pinholes to be Hcl-induced localized pitting corrosion. Hcl formation is directly related to the polychlorinated hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the waste. Most of the drums showing pinhole corrosion are from Content Code-003 (CC-003) because they contain the highest amounts of polychlorinated VOCs as determined by headspace gas analysis. CC-001 drums represent the only other content code with a significant number of pinhole corrosion drums because their headspace gas VOC content, although significantly less than CC-003, is far greater than that of the other content codes. The exact mechanisms of Hcl formation could not be determined, but radiolytic and reductive dechlorination and direct reduction of halocarbons were analyzed as the likely operable reactions. The team considered the entire range of feasible options, ranked and prioritized the alternatives, and recommended the optimal solution that maximizes protection of worker and public safety while minimizing impacts on RWMC and TRU program operations.

  16. Corrosion des aciers à long terme : propriétés physico-chimiques des hydroxysels ferreux

    OpenAIRE

    Azoulay, Ilanith,

    2013-01-01

    This study deals with various ferrous hydroxysalts formed in carbonated or sulphated environments. These compounds are known to play an important role during the long term corrosion processes of carbon steel in natural media (soils, seawater). Chukanovite, the Fe(II) hydroxycarbonate with composition Fe2(OH)2CO3, was studied more particularly. Its standard Gibbs free energy of formation could be determined via the detailed study of the equilibrium conditions with Fe(II) hydroxide, performed w...

  17. Corrosion of metals and alloys - Corrosion and fouling in industrial cooling water systems - Part 1: Guidelines for conducting pilot-scale evaluation of corrosion and fouling control additives for open recirculating cooling water systems

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion of metals and alloys - Corrosion and fouling in industrial cooling water systems - Part 1: Guidelines for conducting pilot-scale evaluation of corrosion and fouling control additives for open recirculating cooling water systems

  18. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Weiliang Jin; Zhiyuan Li; Chen Xu

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete u...

  19. Corrosion behavior of magnesium and magnesium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.M.Baghni; WU Yin-shun(吴荫顺); LI Jiu-qing(李久青); ZHANG Wei(张巍)

    2004-01-01

    The automotive industry has crossed the threshold from using magnesium alloys in interior applications such as instrument panels and steering wheels to unprotected environment such as oil pan, cylinder head and wheels. The expanding territory of magnesium leads to new challenges: mainly environmental degradation of the alloys used and how they can be protected. The present critical review is aimed at understanding the corrosion behavior of magnesium and magnesium alloys in industrial and marine environments, and the effect of microstructure, additive elements and inhibitors on the corrosion mechanism.

  20. Corrosion of metals in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossen, J.P.T.

    1991-05-15

    Part 1 of this report describes the results of a literature study on the corrosion behavior of metals in molten carbonates. The results form the basis for a doctorate study related to improving the durability of metal separator plates for molten carbonate fuel cells. To gain a better understanding also the literature on corrosion in molten sulfates has been reviewed, the results of which are summarized in Part 2 of this report. For each part a separate abstract has been prepared. 83 figs., 23 tabs., 1 app., 78 refs.

  1. Soil-related geohazard assessment for climate-resilient UK infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, Oliver G.

    2015-01-01

    UK (United Kingdom) infrastructure networks are fundamental for maintaining societal and economic wellbeing. With infrastructure assets predominantly founded in the soil layer (< 1.5m below ground level) they are subject to a range of soil-related geohazards. A literature review identified that geohazards including, clay-related subsidence, sand erosion and soil corrosivity have exerted significant impacts on UK infrastructure to date; often resulting in both long-term degra...

  2. Soil properties, soil functions and soil security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Soil plays a crucial role in the ecosystem functioning such as food production, capture and storage of water, carbon and nutrients and in the realisation of a number of UN Sustainable Developments Goals. In this work we present an approach to spatially and jointly assess the multiple contributions of soil to the delivery of ecosystem services within multiple land-use system. We focussed on the modelling of the impact of soil on sediment retention, carbon storage, storing and filtering of nutrients, habitat for soil organisms and water regulation, taking into account examples of land use and climate scenarios. Simplified models were used for the single components. Spatialised Bayesian Belief networks were used for the jointly assessment and mapping of soil contribution to multiple land use and ecosystem services. We integrated continuous 3D soil information derived from digital soil mapping approaches covering the whole of mainland Scotland, excluding the Northern Islands. Uncertainty was accounted for and propagated across the whole process. The Scottish test case highlights the differences in roles between mineral and organic soils and provides an example of integrated study assessing the contributions of soil. The results show the importance of the multi-functional analysis of the contribution of soils to the ecosystem service delivery and UN SDGs.

  3. Corrosion Mechanism of Buried Oil Pipelines and Protection%埋地油气管道腐蚀机理研究及防护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林新宇; 吴明; 程浩力; 龙世华; 王鹏

    2011-01-01

    埋地油气管道的腐蚀一直是油气储运及集输工程的一个重要问题.分析了埋地油气输送管道腐蚀的各种形式及主要腐蚀机理.针对输油管道的腐蚀问题,从土壤微生物、理化性质以及交流电对管道的腐蚀影响等方面进行了分析.介绍了埋地油气混输管道腐蚀防护的方法:加缓蚀剂、外涂层、内涂层和衬里保护、阴极保护法、杂散电流排流保护等.提出要提高油气输送管道的使用寿命,就应在合理选择防腐护方法的同时,加强防腐管道的维护和保养,这些是管道防腐工作的的重中之重.%The corrosion of buried oil and gas pipeline has always been a problem for oil and gas storage and transportation and oil-gas gathering. In this paper, main corrosion forms of buried pipelines and the corrosion mechamsm were analyzed. Then effects of soil microorganism, soil physical and chemical properties and alternating current on pipeline corrosion were also analyzed. Some methods of corrosion protection were introduced, such as adding inhibitor, external coating, internal coating and lining protection, cathodic protection, stray current protection and so on. To solve the corrosion problem, the methods of corrosion protection must be selected reasonably, and maintenance of the pipeline must be strengthened, which is the key work in pipeline anticorrosion.

  4. Corrosive wear. Evaluation of wear and corrosive resistant materials; Noetningskorrosion. Utvaerdering av noetnings- och korrosionsbestaendiga material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H.; Hjertsen, D.; Waara, P.; Prakash, B.; Hardell, J.

    2007-12-15

    With a new purchase of a waste conveyer screw at hand, for the 'A-warehouse' at the combined power and heating plant at E.ON Norrkoeping, the request for improved construction materials was raised. The previous screw required maintenance with very short intervals due to the difficult operation conditions. With the new screw the expectation is to manage 6 months of operation without interruption. The environment for the screw has two main components that sets the demand on the materials, on one hand the corrosive products that comes along and which forms at digestion of the waste and on the other hand the abrasive content in the waste. The term of the mechanism is wear-corrosion and can give considerably higher material loss than the two mechanisms wear and corrosion separately. Combination of a strong corrosive environment together with extensive wear is something that we today have limited knowledge about. The overall objective of the project has been to establish better wear and corrosive resistant construction materials for a waste conveyer screw that will lead to reduced operational disturbance costs. The evaluation has been performed in both controlled laboratory environments and in field tests, which has given us a better understanding of what materials are more suitable in this tough environment and has given us a tool for future predictions of the wear rate of the different material. The new conveyer screw, installed in February 2007 and with which the field test have been performed, has considerably reduced the wear of the construction and the target of 6 month maintenance-free operation is met with this screw for all the evaluated materials. The wear along the screw varies very much and with a clear trend for all the materials to increase towards the feeding direction of the screw. As an example, the wear plate SS2377 (stainless duplex steel) has a useful life at the most affected areas that is calculated to be 1077 days of operation with the

  5. A Corrosion Sensor for Monitoring the Early-Stage Environmental Corrosion of A36 Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An innovative prototype sensor containing A36 carbon steel as a capacitor was explored to monitor early-stage corrosion. The sensor detected the changes of the surface- rather than the bulk- property and morphology of A36 during corrosion. Thus it was more sensitive than the conventional electrical resistance corrosion sensors. After being soaked in an aerated 0.2 M NaCl solution, the sensor’s normalized electrical resistance (R/R0 decreased continuously from 1.0 to 0.74 with the extent of corrosion. Meanwhile, the sensor’s normalized capacitance (C/C0 increased continuously from 1.0 to 1.46. X-ray diffraction result indicates that the iron rust on A36 had crystals of lepidocrocite and magnetite.

  6. In Situ X-ray Microtomography of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2017-08-01

    Structural materials are subjected to combinations of stress and corrosive environments that work synergistically to cause premature failure. Therefore, studies on the combined effect of stress and corrosive environments on material behavior are required. Existing studies have been performed in two dimensions that are inadequate for full comprehension of the three-dimensional (3D) processes related to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion-fatigue (CF) behavior. Recently, x-ray synchrotron tomography has evolved as an excellent technique to obtain the microstructure in 3D. Moreover, being nondestructive in nature, x-ray synchrotron tomography is well suited to study the evolution of microstructure with time (4D, or fourth dimension in time). This article presents our recent 4D studies on SCC and CF of Al 7075 alloys using x-ray synchrotron tomography.

  7. Copper corrosion originated by volatile organic acid vapours; Corrosion del cobre por acidos organicos volatiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, E.; Polo, J. L.; Kong, D. Y.; Mora, E. M.; Lopez-Caballero, J. A.; Bastidas, J. M.

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion of copper in the presence of volatile organic acids is frequent. Thus, for example, it is known that failures by corrosion of the copper tubes take place in the air conditioning equipment, caused by volatile organic acids emitted by oils used in their manufacturing. Another frequent case is the corrosion of copper objects caused by the acids emitted by the materials used in packing, wood and resins, amongst others. This communication presents the corrosion results of copper exposed to 100% relative humidity and different concentrations (10-300ppm) of formic (HCOOH), acetic (CH{sub 3}COOH), propionic (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}COOH) and butyric (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}COOH) acid vapours, for short exposure times. the techniques used were gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). (Author) 9 refs.

  8. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    (perhaps carburized) zone was used as a measure of corrosion rates. The lowest alloyed steel had the highest corrosion rate, and the other austenitic and nickel alloys had much lower corrosion rates. Precipitates in the alloy adjacent the corrosion front were revealed for both Sanicro 28 and C‐276. However...... constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...

  9. Neural network for prediction of superheater fireside corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkonen, P. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula R and D Center, Karhula (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Superheater corrosion causes vast annual losses to the power companies. If the corrosion could be reliably predicted, new power plants could be designed accordingly, and knowledge of fuel selection and determination of process conditions could be utilized to minimize superheater corrosion. If relations between inputs and the output are poorly known, conventional models depending on corrosion theories will fail. A prediction model based on a neural network is capable of learning from errors and improving its performance as the amount of data increases. The neural network developed during this study predicts superheater corrosion with 80 % accuracy at early stage of the project. (orig.) 10 refs.

  10. Corrosion resistance of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahvash, F.; Eissa, S.; Bordjiba, T.; Tavares, A. C.; Szkopek, T.; Siaj, M.

    2017-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a layered material with high thermal and chemical stability ideal for ultrathin corrosion resistant coatings. Here, we report the corrosion resistance of Cu with hBN grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that hBN layers inhibit Cu corrosion and oxygen reduction. We find that CVD grown hBN reduces the Cu corrosion rate by one order of magnitude compared to bare Cu, suggesting that this ultrathin layer can be employed as an atomically thin corrosion-inhibition coating.

  11. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels; Montgomery, Melanie; Hede Larsen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. To avoid such high corrosion rates, woodchip...... has also been utilised as a fuel. Combustion of woodchip results in a smaller amount of ash, and potassium and chlorine are present in lesser amounts. However, significant corrosion rates were still seen. A case study of a woodchip fired boiler is described. The corrosion mechanisms in both straw...

  12. Improved Corrosion Resistance of Pulse Plated Nickel through Crystallisation Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Watanabe, Tohru; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    1995-01-01

    When electrodeposition of nickel is used for corrosion protection of steel two aspects are important. The porosity of the coating and the resistance against corrosion provided by the coating itself. Using simple pulsed current (PC) plating, the size of the deposited crystals can be significantly...... smaller, thereby reducing porosity correspondingly. This usually also leads to improved hardness of the coating. Introducing pulse reversal (PR) plating, the most active crystals are continuously dissolved during the anodic pulse, providing a coating with improved subsequent corrosion resistance in almost...... any corrosive environment. This correlation between film texture and corrosion resistance will be discussed....

  13. Trends in the automotive paint industry for corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandin, Nathalie; Brunat, William [PPG Industries France, 3 Z.A.E. Les Dix Muids, B.P. 89, F-59583 Marly (France); Neuhaus, Ralf [PPG Industries Lacke GmbH, Stackenbergstrasse 34, D-42329 Wuppertal (Germany); Sibille, Ettore [PPG Industries Italia, Via Serra11, I-15028 Quattordio (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    Since many years ED-paints are protecting car bodies against corrosion. Currently the automotive paint industry is faced with increasing demands of higher levels of corrosion protection and also requests to comply with new environmental regulations and economical pressures. Some key factors that contributed significantly towards the improvement of corrosion protection systems are: - New generations of lead free ED-paints; - Weldable organic thin film for corrosion protection, especially in box cavities and flange areas. The goal of this paper is to show how the various elements of the 'anti-corrosion package' interact. (authors)

  14. The Study on Inner Corrosion Sensor for ACSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Boo; Jeong, Jae Kee; Sim, Eung Bo; Woo, Jeong Wook [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Life time estimations of the ACSR by mechanically analyzing the aluminum and steel strands of the ACSR. Finding corrosion trends of the industrial and marine area. Analyzing mechanical corrosion characteristics in case of artificial corrosion tests(the salt water spraying chamber, the sulphureous acid gas chamber). Defining the sorts of corrosion factors. Mechanical tests of used samples which be collected from the fields. Designing the ECT sensor and studying theoretical basis. Life time estimations of the ACSR over-head lines by means of ECT test. Designing and Implementing the corrosion detector using ECT for the real test in the future. (author). 15 refs., figs.

  15. Improved Corrosion Resistance of Pulse Plated Nickel through Crystallisation Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Watanabe, Tohru; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    1995-01-01

    When electrodeposition of nickel is used for corrosion protection of steel two aspects are important. The porosity of the coating and the resistance against corrosion provided by the coating itself. Using simple pulsed current (PC) plating, the size of the deposited crystals can be significantly...... smaller, thereby reducing porosity correspondingly. This usually also leads to improved hardness of the coating. Introducing pulse reversal (PR) plating, the most active crystals are continuously dissolved during the anodic pulse, providing a coating with improved subsequent corrosion resistance in almost...... any corrosive environment. This correlation between film texture and corrosion resistance will be discussed....

  16. Corrosion Control in the US Navy: Ships & USMC Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Mr. Matthew Koch Corrosion Control & Prevention Executive Presented by E. Dail Thomas II, Consultant 18 November 2014 Corrosion Control in...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 18 NOV 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Corrosion Control in...Cost of Corrosion : $21.9B 2 DoD $21.9B $7.5B $5.1B $5.1B $0.3B $4.2B Other DoD U.S. Department of Defense Corrosion Organization 3 ASD

  17. CORIS[sup (TM)]: Corrosion data base. CORIS trademark : Korrosionsdatenbank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervens, T. (AV-IM Angewandte Mathematik, Leverkusen - Bayerwerk (Germany)); Krohn-Huppertz, R. (AV-IM Angewandte Mathematik, Leverkusen - Bayerwerk (Germany)); Schlagner, W. (IN-ATUE Werkstofftechnik, Leverkusen - Bayerwerk (Germany))

    1993-10-01

    In this paper the main component of the CORIS system, the corrosion database, is presented. The database contains corrosion facts for metallic materials with respect to all important corrosion parameters. E/R-Models (Entity-Relationship-models) were used for structuring the corrosion knowledge, and the functionality of the system is described in detail from the conceptual and the practical point of view. The system offers the possibility to enter own corrosion data as well as to evaluate stored data. The graphical interactive user interface was designed for simple use. (orig.)

  18. Assessing and controlling corrosion in air-cooled condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, R. Barry [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States); Preez, Francois du [Eskom (South Africa); Aspden, J. Denis; Howell, Andrew G.

    2009-05-15

    An increasing number of air-cooled condensers (ACC) are being installed and operated on conventional and combined cycle plants worldwide. Unless understood and corrected, the corrosion associated with the ACC ducts and tube entries can become a major problem for operators of plant. Up to just a few years ago very little was known about the corrosion/ flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) process. This paper starts to rectify the situation with a description of the corrosion/FAC process, a corrosion index and a relationship between the operating pH and the level of iron at the condensate pump discharge. (orig.)

  19. Recent Developments on Microencapsulation for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Jolley, Scott T.; Surma, Jan M.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition through corrosion controlled release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release when mechanical damage occurs.While proof-of-concept results have been reported previously, more recent efforts have been concentrated in technical developments to improve coating compatibility, synthesis procedure scalability, as well as fine tuning the release property of encapsulated active agents.

  20. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete, Part I – Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2006-01-01

    prematurely. Reinforcement corrosion is identified to be the foremost cause of deterioration. Steel in concrete is normally protected by a passive layer due the high alkalinity of the concrete pore solution; corrosion is initiated by neutralization through atmospheric carbon dioxide and by ingress...... of depassivation ions, especially chloride ions. The background and consequences of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures caused by steel corrosion are summarized. Selected corrosion mechanisms postulated in the literature are briefly discussed and related to observations. The key factors controlling...... initiation and propagation of corrosion of steel in concrete are outlined....

  1. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.H. Payer

    2005-03-10

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective.

  2. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  3. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete – Thermodynamical Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, Andre; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2004-01-01

    The present understanding of selected corrosion phenomena in reinforced concrete is reviewed. Special emphasis is given to chloride induced corrosion. There is a general acceptance of the basic corrosion mechanism for steel in concrete. However different anodic reactions governing the subsequent...... formation and composition of corrosion products have been proposed. Suggested reactions, except half-cell reactions, are verified or rejected based on their Gibbs free energy, while the electrode potential is calculated for half-cell reactions. Corrosion products postulated to form are related...

  4. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  5. C10H18N2Na2O10 inhibition and adsorption mechanism on concrete steel-reinforcement corrosion in corrosive environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun

    2016-01-01

    C10H18N2Na2O10 (ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid disodium salt) inhibition and adsorption mechanism on the corrosion of steel-reinforcement corrosion in concrete immersed in corrosive environments were investigated in this paper...

  6. Microclimates and Corrosion: A Mathematical Model of Corrosion for Gando AFB, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    certain points); pitting (highly localized corrosion resulting in deep penetration at only a few spots); parting (the selective attack of one or more... Exposicion Ambiental(1987-1988). Unpublished Report No. 15. INTA, Madrid, Spain, 1989. 16. Schlotzhauer, D. Sandra and Littell, C. Ramon. SAS System for...LIME: An Environmental Corrosion Severity Classification System: Final Report Part I. Sep 1978 - Dec 1979. Contract F33615-78-C-5224. East Lansing MI

  7. Wastewater-Enhanced Microbial Corrosion of Concrete Sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangming; Zhou, Mi; Chiu, Tsz Ho; Sun, Xiaoyan; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L

    2016-08-02

    Microbial corrosion of concrete in sewers is known to be caused by hydrogen sulfide, although the role of wastewater in regulating the corrosion processes is poorly understood. Flooding and splashing of wastewater in sewers periodically inoculates the concrete surface in sewer pipes. No study has systematically investigated the impacts of wastewater inoculation on the corrosion of concrete in sewers. This study investigated the development of the microbial community, sulfide uptake activity, and the change of the concrete properties for coupons subjected to periodic wastewater inoculation. The concrete coupons were exposed to different levels of hydrogen sulfide under well-controlled conditions in laboratory-scale corrosion chambers simulating real sewers. It was evident that the periodic inoculation induced higher corrosion losses of the concrete in comparison to noninoculated coupons. Instantaneous measurements such as surface pH did not reflect the cumulative corrosion losses caused by long-term microbial activity. Analysis of the long-term profiles of the sulfide uptake rate using a Gompertz model supported the enhanced corrosion activity and greater corrosion loss. The enhanced corrosion rate was due to the higher sulfide uptake rates induced by wastewater inoculation, although the increasing trend of sulfide uptake rates was slower with wastewater. Increased diversity in the corrosion-layer microbial communities was detected when the corrosion rates were higher. This coincided with the environmental conditions of increased levels of gaseous H2S and the concrete type.

  8. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  9. Corrosion Control Test Method for Avionic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-25

    Oelionstration and Corrosion Tests Documnentation Task 1 Task 2k3 3 Tent Methods 3 Test Methods 2 Test Methods FIgure 1program Plan 2 NADC 81174-60 04 L...per 10 cubic foot of uhamber velume every 24 hours. The solution is atomized by compressed air humidified by bubbling through 115*F distilled water

  10. INVESTIGATIONS ON THE CORROSION OF CONSTRUCTIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BCSE

    2Laboratory of Organic Physical Chemistry and Environmental Analyses, ... environments results from the metal oxidation, but is not necessarily due to the ... corrosion can only be led within the framework of an electrochemical ..... hydroxides including α-FeOOH, β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, Fe3O4 and large amounts of amorphous.

  11. Detecting Corrosion Under Paint and Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion is a major concern at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida due to the proximity of the center to the Atlantic Ocean and to salt water lagoons. High humidity, salt fogs, and ocean breezes, provide an ideal environment in which painted steel structures become corroded. Maintenance of painted steel structures is a never-ending process.

  12. Prevention of corrosion in prestressing steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion of prestressing steel may lead to sudden, so called brittle failure, due to the special microstructure of the steel and the high tensile forces. Such brittle failure may seriously reduce the load capacity of a prestressed concrete structure. In principle all stressed high strength steel is

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the differences between high pH and near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking ofpipeline steels, influencing factors, and mechanisms. The characteristics and historical information on both forms ofSCC are discussed. The prospect for research in the future is also presented.

  14. Thin Metal Films as Corrosion Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-03-01

    used during the preceding two years were replaced by quart glass jars with gasket sealed lids. All electric lead- in entrances were sealed with beeswax ...rinse, and the excess lanolin could be seen to dissolve quite rapidly. Apparently, however, a corrosion inhibiting layer of lanolin remained. At the 40

  15. Army Aviation Corrosion Engineering Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    Support Rod 7 Yourfilename.ppt H-47 FRIES Bar Support Rod Corrosion • Resolution • ASAM H-47-09- ASAM -04 is issued • Requires inspection and grading...Analysis • Failure Analysis • Risk Analysis 12 Yourfilename.ppt H-60 SAS Link SCC Failure • The Resolution • Issue a message H060-10- ASAM -04 • Inspect all

  16. High-temperature corrosion of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Cho, W.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. This paper describes results from an ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne involves thermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and coal combustion. Corrosion experiments were conducted to determine the effect of gas flow rate and different levels of HCl at a gas temperature of 650 C on three heats of aluminide material, namely, FA 61, FA 129, and FAX. In addition, specimens of Type 316 stainless steel with an overlay alloying of iron aluminide were prepared by electrospark deposition and tested for their corrosion resistance. Detailed microstructural evaluations of tested specimens were performed. Results are used to assess the corrosion resistance of various iron aluminides for service in fossil energy systems that utilize coal as a feedstock.

  17. A Mathematical model of copper corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Clarelli, Fabrizio; Natalini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    A new partial differential model for monitoring and detecting copper corrosion products (mainly brochantite and cuprite) is proposed to provide predictive tools suitable for describing the evolution of damage induced on bronze specimens by sulfur dioxide (SO_2) pollution. This model is characterized by the movement of a double free boundary. Numerical simulations show a nice agreement with experimental result.

  18. Corrosion studies: geopressured aquifer gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, A.N. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA); Weekes, M.C.; Schoepflin, F.; Sharer, J.C.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L. (eds.)

    1981-01-01

    Analytical data, obtained on brine from three geopressured wells in Louisiana and one in Texas are presented. The chloride ion concentration of each brine is plotted against the total dissolved solids. Sulfate and bicarbonate ion concentrations are plotted against total dissolved solids. Experience with geothermal power plants, alternatives for corrosion prevention, and monitoring and test techniques are discussed. (MHR)

  19. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  20. Corrosion free phosphoric acid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Maynard K.

    1990-01-01

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell with an electrolyte fuel system which supplies electrolyte via a wick disposed adjacent a cathode to an absorbent matrix which transports the electrolyte to portions of the cathode and an anode which overlaps the cathode on all sides to prevent corrosion within the cell.