WorldWideScience

Sample records for corrosion tests performed

  1. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  2. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohorst, Frederick A.

    1995-12-05

    A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

  3. Corrosion of several components of the in-situ test performed in a deep geological granite disposal site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madina, Virginia; Azkarate, Inaki; Insausti, Mikel [INASMET, Mikeletegi Pasealekua, 2, 20009-San Sebastian (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion damage experienced by different components in a deep geological disposal in a granite formation has been analysed. This in-situ test is part of the Full-scale Engineered Barriers EXperiment project (FEBEX) carried out in Grimsel (Switzerland). Two heaters, simulating the canister and the heat generated, were installed horizontally inside the guide tubes or liners and surrounded by highly compacted bentonite blocks. Coupons of several candidate metals for manufacturing HLW containers were introduced in these bentonite blocks, as well as sensors in order to monitor different physicochemical parameters during the test. The in- situ test began in July 1996 and in June 2002 one of the heaters, a section of the liner, several corrosion coupons and four sensors were extracted. The studied heater is a carbon steel cylinder with welded lids, with a wall thickness of 100 mm and 4.54 m long. The liner consists of a perforated carbon steel tube, 970 mm in diameter and 15 mm thick. Corrosion coupons were made of carbon steel, stainless steel, titanium, copper and cupronickel alloys. Two extensometer type sensors with an outer protection tube made of austenitic stainless steel were also analysed. Visual inspection of the above mentioned components, optical and scanning electron microscope study, together with EDS and XRD analyses of corrosion products, have been performed in order to analyse the corrosion suffered by these components. This has been complemented with the chemical and microbiological characterisation of bentonite samples. Results obtained in the study indicate a slight generalised corrosion for the heater, liner and corrosion coupons. The low humidity content of the bentonite surrounding the liner and the corrosion coupons, is the responsible of this practical absence of corrosion. The sensors studied show, however, an important corrosion damage. The sulphur rich corrosion products, the presence of Sulphate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) in the bentonite

  4. Test study of corrosion performances and wear characteristics of composite guide in vertical shaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, X.; Guo, J.; Xu, W. [Jiaozuo Institute of Technology, Jiaozuo (China)

    2000-10-01

    This paper describes the research of a new composite guide in the light of serious corrosion problem of vertical shaft equipment. Through the experimental study on the corrosion characteristics of the composite guide, it is pointed out that the corrosion resistance of the composite guide which is made of steel and glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP) can meet the needs of mine shaft environment. The minimum thickness of the GFRP material of the guide obtained from wear resistance test is put forward. It is found that the corrosion and wear resistance of the GFRP which protects the steel guide is over 30 years. Therefore, the replacement of shaft equipment will be less often, thereby conserving on capital investment. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Corrosion performance of structural alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1999-07-15

    Component reliability and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential in power-generating and gasification processes that utilize coal as a feedstock. During combustion and conversion of coal, the environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional boilers to air-deficient conditions in 10W-NO{sub x} and gasification systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion and conversion, one concern from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the gaseous/deposit environment toward structural components such as waterwall tubes, steam superheaters, syngas coolers, and hot-gas filters. The corrosion tests in the program described in this paper address the individual and combined effects of oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded structural alloys that were exposed to air-deficient and excess-air environments typical of coal-combustion and gasification processes. Data in this paper address the effects of preoxidation on the subsequent corrosion performance of structural materials such as 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel, Type 347 austenitic stainless steel, Alloys 800, 825, 625, 214, Hastelloy X, and iron aluminide when exposed at 650 C to various mixed-gas environments with and without HCI. Results are presented for scaling kinetics, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, detailed evaluations of near-surface regions of the exposed specimens, gains in our mechanistic understanding of the roles of S and Cl in the corrosion process, and the effect of preoxidation on subsequent corrosion.

  6. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  7. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  8. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe[sub 3]Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000[degrees]C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  9. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  10. Corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    Present study relates to the corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel (SS) as a construction material for the effluent treatment plant (ETP). Accordingly, immersion test and electrochemical polarization tests were performed on SS 304 L, 316 L and duplex 2205 in paper mill effluent and synthetic effluent. This paper presents electrochemical polarization measurements, performed for the first time to the best of the authors' information, to see the influence of chlorophenols on the corrosivity of effluents. The corrosivity of the effluent was observed to increase with the decrease in pH and increase in Cl- content while the addition of SO4- tends to inhibit corrosion. Mill effluent was found to be more corrosive as compared to synthetic effluent and has been attributed to the presence of various chlorophenols. Corrosion performance of SS was observed to govern by the presence of Cr, Mo and N contents.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking tests for low and high alloy steels in sour oilfield service. Tests performed at VTT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, K. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity; Haemaelaeinen, E. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Engineering Materials

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the studies was to validate the usefulness of the proposed NACE slow strain rate testing method and compare it with the EFC document. In the NACE document the testing takes place at a temperature of 177 deg C, the test solution contains 20 wt% NaCl, the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S varies between 14 and 28 bar and the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} between 14 and 55 bar. In the NACE document the strain rate is determined as 4 x 10{sup -6} 1/s and in the EFC document 1 x 10{sup -6} 1/s. The results showed brittle behaviour for the test material in all of the test environments, and in each case the elongation was less than 5%. For comparison purposes the SSRT was conducted with the test material also in an inert environment (N{sub 2} gas), where the fracture was ductile and elongation 65%. The tests conducted with different strain rates gave the same result, which shows that the difference between EFC and NACE documents within the strain rate is not significant in the environments studied. However, since the alloy 654 SMO, which is considered to have a high resistance to corrosion, failed the SSRT test in the environments determined in the NACE document, the NACE document can be considered too severe for testing of austenitic stainless steels. Since contrary to the NACE document the EFC document does not determine levels for hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide, the EFC document can be considered more suitable than the NACE document for testing of austenitic stainless steels for sour service. (author)

  12. Development of modeling tools to describe the corrosion behavior of uncoated EUROFER in flowing Pb-17Li and their validation by performing of corrosion tests at T up to 550 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, W.; Konys, J.; Steiner, H.; Novotny, J.; Voss, Z.; Wedemeyer, O.

    2007-03-15

    Reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels (e.g. EUROFER) are considered for application in future fusion technology as structural material, which is in contact with the breeding material Pb-17Li. Various corrosion experiments have been made in the past, however, evaluation of these tests, which were mostly conducted up to moderate temperatures of up to 480 C, was performed with respect to determine corrosion rates and mechanisms e.g. dissolution of some elements out of the steels and comparison of the results with earlier tested RAFM-steels of type F82H-mod. OPTIFER, and MANET. In the mean time the envisaged operation limits e.g. in temperature increased to roughly 550 C and flow regimes may change. Thus extrapolations of the RAFM steel corrosion behavior determined in the past to the new working conditions may be problematic due to large uncertainties or reliability and, additionally, only low knowledge on transport of dissolved components in the Pb-17Li flow is present. In contrast to earlier investigations, these changes in requirements need the going over from (only) mechanism based corrosion tests to model supported tests. Furthermore, the whole loop has to be considered in the evaluation of the corrosion tests together with other occurring phenomena and mechanisms as transport effects and precipitations. Therefore, under this task the development of modeling tools for describing Pb 17Li corrosion (dissolution, material transport and precipitations) was started. The modular structured tools are based on physical, chemical and thermo-hydraulic parameters and, in the first stage, the development was focused on the dissolution of EUROFER and validation with older test results obtained at 480 C in our PICOLO loop earlier. In the second stage the new 550 C test results - obtained in the part corrosion testing of this task - were used for validation at a second temperature level and transport phenomena were considered. (orig.)

  13. The Corrosion Fatigue Properties of High Performance Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuanfa; ZHENG Mulian; LIAO Weidong; WANG Binggang

    2005-01-01

    With the loading test equipment of corrosion fatigue specially designed, the corrosion fatigue characteristics of high performance concrete (HPC) withstanding the interaction of third point fatigue loading and Na2SO4 solution were investigated and analyzed. The experimental results indicate that water-binder ratio evidently influences the corrosion fatigue characteristics of HPC, and a moderate quantitative fine mineral admixture enhances the corrosion fatigue resistance of HPC. The effect is more significant when fly ash and silica fume are added.

  14. Accelerated corrosion testing results for specimens containing uncoated reinforcing steel and corrosion inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratova, I. L.; Montes, P.; Bremner, T. W. [New Brunswick Univ., Dept, of Civil Engineering, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Concrete mixtures (water-cement ratios of 0.25, 0.40. or 0.60) containing uncoated reinforcing bars with a simulated crack, formed transverse to the axis of the bar, and with three commercial corrosion inhibitors added for corrosion protection (organic corrosion inhibitor,calcium nitrate-based corrosion inhibitor, and migratory corrosion inhibitor), were tested for corrosion damage. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the different corrosion inhibitors in uncracked and cracked concrete slabs in a simulated marine environment. The specimens were placed in an accelerated exposure cabinet with four cycles of wetting and drying per day in simulated seawater, and corrosion rates measured using the linear polarization technique. Water-soluble chloride content in the rebars was analyzed at the end of the exposure period. The three corrosion inhibitors were found to show a wide variation in performance. There was a direct correlation between their effectiveness and addition rate. All three appeared to be more effective in reducing corrosion rate in a higher water-to-cement ratio concrete. Consistent performance was provided only by calcium nitrate at an addition rate of 25 litre/cu m of concrete, with water-to-cement ratios of 0.60 and 0.40. Pitting corrosion was observed in all pre-cracked high performance concrete specimens; the depth of the pit tended to be deeper when a corrosion inhibitor was used. 6 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. OPGW Corrosion Detection Using Nondestructive Test Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, J.K.; Yoon, G.G.; Kang, J.W.; Yang, H.W. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-01

    This paper deals with some characteristics of a nondestructive eddy current detector to measure OPGW(composite overhead ground wire with optical fiber) corrosion. This detector is designed to automatically run on OPGW and to continuously inspect the corrosion of the line. The impedance of the eddy coil changing by any corrosion phenomenon of OPGW is analyzed. Several performances of the detector are described and experimental procedures and test results are also given. As a result, it is shown that the implemented detector can be measured some quantitative data for crack, broken wires or severe deteriorations in OPGW. This nondestructive test method would be applied to improve the reliability and efficiency of transmission lines in service. (author). 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  17. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  18. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-08-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  19. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-02-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  20. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  1. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-12-14

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys.

  2. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  3. Standard Test Method for Sandwich Corrosion Test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method defines the procedure for evaluating the corrosivity of aircraft maintenance chemicals, when present between faying surfaces (sandwich) of aluminum alloys commonly used for aircraft structures. This test method is intended to be used in the qualification and approval of compounds employed in aircraft maintenance operations. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information. 1.3 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements appear in Section 9.

  4. Accelerated corrosion test and corrosion failure distribution model of aircraft structural aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen-lin; MU Zhi-tao; JIN Ping

    2006-01-01

    Based on corrosion damage data of 10 years for a type of aircraft aluminum alloy, the statistical analysis was conducted by Gumbel, Normal and two parameters Weibull distribution function. The results show that aluminum alloy structural member has the corrosion history of pitting corrosion-intergranular corrosion-exfoliation corrosion, and the maximum corrosion depth is in conformity to normal distribution. The accelerated corrosion test was carried out with the complied equivalent airport accelerated environment spectrum. The corrosion damage failure modes of aluminum alloy structural member indicate that the period of validity of the former protective coating is about 2.5 to 3 years, and that of the novel protective coating is about 4.0 to 4.5 years. The corrosion kinetics law of aluminum spar flange was established by fitting corrosion damage test data. The law indicates two apparent corrosion stages of high strength aluminum alloy section material: pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion/exfoliation corrosion.The test results agree with the statistical fit result of corrosion data collected from corrosion member in service. The fractional error is 5.8% at the same calendar year. The accelerated corrosion test validates the corrosion kinetics law of aircraft aluminum alloy in service.

  5. Corrosion Control Test Method for Avionic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-25

    Oelionstration and Corrosion Tests Documnentation Task 1 Task 2k3 3 Tent Methods 3 Test Methods 2 Test Methods FIgure 1program Plan 2 NADC 81174-60 04 L...per 10 cubic foot of uhamber velume every 24 hours. The solution is atomized by compressed air humidified by bubbling through 115*F distilled water

  6. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  7. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  8. Study on the Synthesis and Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Mannich-Modified Imidazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjun Kong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel Mannich-modified imidazoline (MMI as cationic emulsifier was synthesised for corrosion harm reduction, through three steps — acylation, cyclization, and Mannich reaction. The surface activity was characterized by determination of surface tensions and critical micelle concentration (CMC. The corrosion inhibition performance of five types of steels in the simulated corrosion solution in the presence of the MMI was investigated by static weight loss tests. The results showed that the MMI had good surface activities, with CMC of 19.8 μg g−1 and surface tension of 36.4 mN m−1. The corrosion test results indicated that the corrosion rates of different materials were decreased significantly, and degrees of corrosion inhibition were always higher than 80.0 %. The main inhibition mechanism was most likely due to the adsorption of the corrosion inhibitor on the steel surface, leading to the prevention of corrosion medium from the metal surface.

  9. Natural Environment Corrosion Testing at the Kennedy Space Center Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of how NASA has been conducting corrosion testing in the Natural Marine Environment at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S. The following questions will be addressed: What factors should be considered when selecting and constructing a test site? What are the attributes of a good test site? Is more severe always better? What environmental parameters should be monitored? How frequently? What factors should be considered when designing test specimens? Are current test standards sufficient? How do diurnal, annual and other fluctuations in corrosivity influence tests? How are test results interpreted? Can they be quantified?

  10. 16 CFR 1209.5 - Test procedures for corrosiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard § 1209.5 Test procedures for corrosiveness. This section prescribes the procedures for determining the corrosiveness of cellulose insulation. Cellulose insulation shall be tested for corrosiveness using the measured settled density, obtained by...

  11. Assessing corrosion problems in photovoltaic cells via electrochemical stress testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of accelerated electrochemical experiments to study the degradation properties of polyvinylbutyral-encapsulated silicon solar cells has been carried out. The cells' electrical performance with silk screen-silver and nickel-solder contacts was evaluated. The degradation mechanism was shown to be electrochemical corrosion of the cell contacts; metallization elements migrate into the encapsulating material, which acts as an ionic conducting medium. The corrosion products form a conductive path which results in a gradual loss of the insulation characteristics of the encapsulant. The precipitation of corrosion products in the encapsulant also contributes to its discoloration which in turn leads to a reduction in its transparency and the consequent optical loss. Delamination of the encapsulating layers could be attributed to electrochemical gas evolution reactions. The usefulness of the testing technique in qualitatively establishing a reliability difference between metallizations and antireflection coating types is demonstrated.

  12. Corrosion test cell for bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Kirk R.

    2002-01-01

    A corrosion test cell for evaluating corrosion resistance in fuel cell bipolar plates is described. The cell has a transparent or translucent cell body having a pair of identical cell body members that seal against opposite sides of a bipolar plate. The cell includes an anode chamber and an cathode chamber, each on opposite sides of the plate. Each chamber contains a pair of mesh platinum current collectors and a catalyst layer pressed between current collectors and the plate. Each chamber is filled with an electrolyte solution that is replenished with fluid from a much larger electrolyte reservoir. The cell includes gas inlets to each chamber for hydrogen gas and air. As the gases flow into a chamber, they pass along the platinum mesh, through the catalyst layer, and to the bipolar plate. The gas exits the chamber through passageways that provide fluid communication between the anode and cathode chambers and the reservoir, and exits the test cell through an exit port in the reservoir. The flow of gas into the cell produces a constant flow of fresh electrolyte into each chamber. Openings in each cell body is member allow electrodes to enter the cell body and contact the electrolyte in the reservoir therein. During operation, while hydrogen gas is passed into one chamber and air into the other chamber, the cell resistance is measured, which is used to evaluate the corrosion properties of the bipolar plate.

  13. Performance of organic and inorganic substances as inhibitors for chloride-induced corrosion in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Oezlem [Gedik University Vocational High School, Istanbul (Turkey); Cizmeciglu, Zeki [Istanbul Commerce University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-02-01

    Studies have been carried out to investigate the concrete corrosion inhibitor performance of silica fume admixture and an admixture of amino alcohols containing organic and inorganic substances. The concrete specimens with and without admixtures were subjected to accelerated corrosion tests to determine the time to corrosion initiation. The results showed that the specimens admixtured with nitrogen containing organic and inorganic inhibitors performed slightly better than concrete specimens with silica fume admixture.

  14. Testing and analysis of photovoltaic modules for electrochemical corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Michael; Mon, Gordon R.; Whitla, Guy; Ross, Russ, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the testing and evaluation used to characterize the mechanisms of electrochemical corrosion of photovoltaic modules - encapsulated solar cells. Accelerated exposure testing was performed on a sample matrix of cell/encapsulant combinations, and microanalytical failure analysis was performed on selected samples to confirm the correlation between the accelerated test data and the life prediction model. A quantitative correlation between field exposure time and exposure time in the accelerated multistress tests was obtained based upon the observation that equal quantities of interelectrode charge transfer resulted in equivalent degrees of electrochemical charge.

  15. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  16. Field test corrosion experiences when co-firing straw and coal: 10 year status within Elsam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Berg; Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, Ole Hede

    2007-01-01

    to 575 degrees C and for the flue gas from 1025 to 1300 degrees C. All these test tubes have been removed during the last three years at one year intervals for corrosion studies. The corrosion studies performed on all investigated tubes included measurements of the corrosion attack, light optical...... sulphate on superheater tubes resulting in increased corrosion rates. From field experimental results this paper show, that by co-firing straw with coal, corrosion rates can be brought down to an acceptable level. This paper firstly deals with the results from a demonstration program co-firing coal...... and straw at the 150 MW pulverized coal fired boiler Studstrup unit 1. Two exposure series lasting 3000 hours each were performed for co-firing 10 and 20% of straw (% energy basis) with coal. Using built in test tubes in the hot end of the actual superheaters and air/water cooled corrosion probes...

  17. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Current/voltage data was obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consists of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to fully evaluate this approach to corrosion screening. Corrosion test screening of candidates for the oxygen reduction electrode of the alkaline fuel cell was applied to two substances, the pyrochlore Pb2Ru2O6.5 and the spinel NiCo2O4. The substrate gold screen and a sample of the IFC Orbiter Pt-Au performance electrode were included as blanks. The pyrochlore data indicate relative stability, although nothing yet can be said about long term stability. The spinel was plainly unstable. For this type of testing to be validated, comparisons will have to be made with long term performance tests.

  18. Laboratory and field tests of corrosion inhibitors for an offshore application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjerve, Sofie; Fuhr, Geir Gundersen; Haldogaard, Geir

    2006-03-15

    Statoil started a R and D-project in 2002 where the goal was to implement environmental friendly corrosion control at a Statoil operated oil producing field. In this project the following tasks have been addressed: 1) Reduction of the chemical consumption. 2) Documentation of the discharge level of the corrosion inhibitor. 3) Documentation of the environmental impact. 4) Development of new environmentally friendly acceptable corrosion inhibitors. 5) Laboratory and field testing of new corrosion inhibitors. This paper describes laboratory and field tests of corrosion inhibitors for this project. The field tests were carried out on an offshore oil producing installation in the North Sea. Five corrosion inhibitor suppliers with totally eleven products were taking part in this test. All the products were tested in the laboratory. The four most promising products from the laboratory tests were tested in the field during a fourteen days offshore test. Only one of the tested products gave satisfactory results from the corrosion field test. Corrosion measurements were performed both with a Zero Resistance Ammetry (ZRA) probe installed directly into a flow line and with two side streams units. One side stream unit was connected upstream the test separator and the other unit was connected downstream the test separator. (author) (tk)

  19. Status of coal ash corrosion resistant materials test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, D.K.; Meisenhelter, D.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1999-07-01

    In November of 1998, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) began development of a system to permit testing of several advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam conditions of 1100 F and higher in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B and W, and First Energy's Ohio Edison jointly fund the project. CONSOL Energy Company is also participating as an advisor. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. The coal-ash corrosion resistant materials test program will provide full scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater and reheater tube materials. These newer materials may be capable of operating at higher steam temperatures while resisting external/fire-side corrosion. For high sulfur coal applications, this is a key issue for advanced cycle pulverized coal-fired plants. Fireside corrosion is also a critical issue for many existing plants. Previous testing of high temperature materials in the United States has been based primarily on using laboratory test coupons. The test coupons did not operate at conditions representative of a high sulfur coal-fired boiler. Testing outside of the United States has been with low sulfur coal or natural gas firing and has not addressed corrosion issues. This test program takes place in an actual operating boiler and is expected to confirm the performance of these materials with high sulfur coal. The system consists of three identical sections, each containing multiple pieces of twelve different materials. They are cooled by reheater steam, and are located just above the furnace exit in Ohio Edison's Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. After one year of operation, the first section will be removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation. The second and third sections will operate for

  20. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    (perhaps carburized) zone was used as a measure of corrosion rates. The lowest alloyed steel had the highest corrosion rate, and the other austenitic and nickel alloys had much lower corrosion rates. Precipitates in the alloy adjacent the corrosion front were revealed for both Sanicro 28 and C‐276. However...... constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...

  1. Characterization of the Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 Regarding its Lifetime Performance as a Potential Nuclear Waste Container Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; McCright, D

    2002-06-04

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) was proposed for the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container for nuclear waste at the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada (USA). A testing program is underway to characterize and quantify three main modes of corrosion that may occur at the site. Current results show that the containers would perform well under general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). For example, the general corrosion rate is expected to be below 100 nm/year and the container is predicted to be outside the range of potential for localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  2. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  3. Selectable-Tip Corrosion-Testing Electrochemical Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomness, Janice; Hintze, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts aspects of an electrochemical cell for pitting- corrosion tests of material specimens. The cell is designed to generate a region of corrosion having a pit diameter determined by the diameter of a selectable tip. The average depth of corrosion is controlled by controlling the total electric charge passing through the cell in a test. The cell is also designed to produce minimal artifacts associated with crevice corrosion. There are three selectable tips, having diameters of 0.1 in. (0.254 cm), 0.3 in. (0.762 cm), and 0.6 in. (1.524 cm), respectively.

  4. Synthetic seawater as stress-corrosion test medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Seawater minimizes pitting corrosion of aluminum-alloy test samples. Of three corrosion-inhibiting methods evaluated using (a) chromate inhibitors in saltwater, (b) surface treating sample via anodizing or alodine treatment, and (c) synthetic seawater, synthetic seawater was most effective test medium, since it is more uniform than fresh seawater.

  5. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  6. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  7. Corrosion testing of urea-formaldehyde foam insulating material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, R.; Graviano, A.; Sheppard, K.

    1980-09-01

    Two tests of the corrosiveness of urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam insulating materials were compared. One test, the Timm test, had test coupons foamed in place. In the second, the Canadian test, blocks of foam already set were placed in contact with test coupons. The Timm test uses 10 gage thick coupons, while the Canadian test specifies 3 mil thick ones. Two samples of UF foam were tested by the Timm and the Canadian tests. The electrical-resistance probes showed that the corrosion rate against steel was initially quite high, of the order of 12 to 20 mpy (mils per year). After about 20 days, the rate was almost zero. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates of steel coupons were of the order to 0.5 to 2 mpy when averaged over the 28 or 56 day test period. The greater corrosion rate of the thick coupons in the Canadian test as well as poor reproducibility of the corrosion rates was attributed primarily to variations in the contact areas between the sample and the UF foam. The corrosion rates of galvanized steel coupons in the Canadian test in several cases exceeded the failure value. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates averaged over the whole test period were quite low. The corrosion rates of copper and aluminum in both tests were quite low. On the basis of the results of this study the following recommendations for a corrosion-test procedure for UF foam were made: two corrosion tests should be conducted, one for foam while curing and one after it has stabilized; the Timm test for corrosiveness while curing should be used, but for only 1 to 2 days; the test for corrosiveness after stabilizing should be of the accelerated type such as the Canadian one. To insure a constant-contact area, thicker coupons should be used; and the coupons for both tests should have a controlled part of the area not in contact with the foam to simulate field conditions.

  8. A universal alternating immersion simulator for accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassel, A.W.; Bonk, S.; Tsuri, S.; Stratmann, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    A new device for performing accelerated cyclic immersion tests is described. The main achievement is to realise a high cycling rate without a proportional increase in the test duration. The device is also capable of performing tests according to EU ISO 11130 specification. A minimal invasive drying system is used that neither heats air nor sample and the flow rate is still low as to prevent a mechanical delamination of paints or loose corrosion products. A multiple sample set-up is realised that provides individual reference electrodes. The random access through a multiplexer allows individual investigation of the samples even by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy under immersion conditions. The device and its test principle are applicable in both industrial and laboratorial scale applications. Two application examples are given to demonstrate the versatility of the alternating immersion tester. One addresses the corrosion protection performance of different zinc-coated steel sheets; the other quantifies the patina formation kinetics of low-alloyed steels with weathering properties. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Fabrication of Test Tubes for Coal Ash Corrosion Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-05-11

    This paper deals with the fabrication of tube sections of four alloys for incorporating into test sections to be assembled by Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) for installation at Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant. The primary purpose of the installation was to determine the corrosion behavior of ten different alloys for flue gas corrosion. Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant is burning an Ohio coal containing approximately 3.4% S (dry basis) and approximately 0.4% alkali which causes chronic coal ash corrosion of the unit�s superheater tubing. The 2.5-in.-OD x 0.4in.-wall x 6-in-long sections of four alloys {type 304H coated with Fe3Al alloy FAS [developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)], 310 + Ta, modified 800H, and Thermie alloy} were fabricated at ORNL. Each alloy tubing was characterized in terms of chemical analysis and microstructure. The machined tubes of each of the alloys were inspected and shipped on time for incorporation into the test loop fabricated at B&W. Among the alloys fabricated, Thermie was the hardest to extrude and machine.

  10. Mechanical Performance versus Corrosion Damage Indicators for Corroded Steel Reinforcing Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caprili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental results of a testing campaign including tensile and low-cycle fatigue tests on different reinforcing steel bar types in the as-delivered and corroded condition are presented. Experimental data were statistically analyzed adopting ANOVA technique; Performance Indicators (PIs, describing the mechanical performance characteristics of reinforcements, and Corrosion Damage Indicators (CDIs, describing the detrimental effects of corrosion phenomena, were determined and correlated in order to evaluate the influence of corrosion on the behaviour of reinforcing steels, providing useful information for designers in addition to what is presented in current standards.

  11. Corrosion resistance of high-performance materials titanium, tantalum, zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the property of a material to resist corrosion attack in a particular aggressive environment. Although titanium, tantalum and zirconium are not noble metals, they are the best choice whenever high corrosion resistance is required. The exceptionally good corrosion resistance of these high–performance metals and their alloys results from the formation of a very stable, dense, highly adherent, and self–healing protective oxide film on the metal surface. This naturally occurring oxide layer prevents chemical attack of the underlying metal surface. This behavior also means, however, that high corrosion resistance can be expected only under neutral or oxidizing conditions. Under reducing conditions, a lower resistance must be reckoned with. Only very few inorganic and organic substances are able to attack titanium, tantalum or zirconium at ambient temperature. As the extraordinary corrosion resistance is coupled with an excellent formability and weldability these materials are very valua...

  12. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  13. Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

    1998-02-01

    Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

  14. Evaluation of annual corrosion tests for aggressive water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubová, V.; Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.

    2011-12-01

    Internal corrosion has a significant effect on the useful life of pipes, the hydraulic conditions of a distribution system and the quality of the water transported. All water is corrosive under some conditions, and the level of this corrosion depends on the physical and chemical properties of the water and properties of the pipe material. Galvanic treatment is an innovation for protecting against corrosion, and this method is also suitable for removal of water stone too. This method consists of the electrogalvanic principle, which is generated by the flowing of water between a zinc anode and the cupro-alloy cover of a column. This article presents experimental corrosion tests at water resource Pernek (This water resource-well marked as HL-1 is close to the Pernek of village), where the device is operating based on this principle.

  15. An Evaluation of the Corrosion and Mechanical Performance of Interstitially Surface Hardened Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    metallography and microhardness profiling. The corrosion performance of the hardened surface is assessed using electrochemical potentiodynamic testing to...cracking resistance, and galling performance. Metallurgical Evaluation: Microhardness testing was conducted for Processes B1 and B2, which represent...incorporated experimental testing conducted on 316L stainless steel that has been surface hardened using available commercial techniques, using both

  16. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation and standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3 was a function of the concentration of NO3- ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4 showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local coverage of the alloy microstructure resulting from steam containing with KMnO4 and HNO3.

  17. Corrosion test using commercial FMS and developed ARAA in the Experimental loop for liquid breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, E. H.; Jin, H. G.; Lee, D. W.; Jung, Y. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A liquid-type TBM, a Helium Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) TBM, is one of candidate TBM for KO Demos. In this concept, helium (He) and liquid lithium (Li) were used as a coolant and a breeder, respectively. However, according to our strategy for developing the liquid breeder TBM and its more relevant DEMO concept, liquid breeders not only considered liquid lithium but also lead-lithium (PbLi). An Experimental Loop for Liquid breeder (ELLI) was constructed for the purpose of validating the electromagnetic (EM) pump design, which designed and fabricated by ourselves; testing the effects of magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD); and investigating the compatibility of PbLi using structural materials such as ferritic martensitic steel. The picture of the experimental loop is shown in Fig. 1. The performance test on each component such as heaters, the control systems for heating the loop were performed and the characteristic tests with a magnet and the EM pump were carried out. A corrosion tests using ELLI were performed with grade 91 FMS steel and ARAA during 250 hours. The corrosion tests specimens using developed commercial-scale ARAA-1 will be carried out in the ELLI loop using EM pump to investigate the corrosion behavior of ARAA-1, and the test results will be compared the previous corrosion tests of FMS corrosion specimens. A commercial FMS with grade 91 and developed ARAA steel was used for corrosion test-specimens to compare the corrosion characteristics in the flowing Pbli loop. Long term operation performance of the ELLI loop was conformed during 250 h corrosion tests. During the two separate experiments, an EM pump was operated for 250 h with a speed of 0.16 m/s (0.95 Kg/s) for corrosion tests. Mass of samples was decreased about 0.006% for ARAA-sample and 0.009% for Gr.91-sample, which corresponded to 0.22 g/m2 and 0.34 g/m2 of a corrosion attack, respectively. Unfortunately, it was unavailable to compare these weight losses with previous reports because of the

  18. Effect of flow on corrosion in catenary risers and its corrosion inhibitor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pedro Altoe; Magalhaes, Alvaro Augusto Oliveira; Silva, Jussara de Mello [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kang, Cheolho; More, Parimal P. [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Oslo (Norway)

    2009-07-01

    In oil and gas production, multiphase flow is often encountered and a range of different flow patterns can be experienced in pipelines. The flow regime transition and flow characteristics can be changed with the change of pipeline topography, which affects the corrosion and the performance of corrosion inhibitor in these multiphase pipelines. This paper outlines on the effect of inclination on the flow characteristics and their subsequent effect on corrosion rates. Also, this paper presents on the performance of three candidate corrosion inhibitors under severe slugging conditions at low water cut. For the simulation of offshore flow lines and risers, the experiments were carried out in a 44 m long, 10 cm diameter, three different pipeline inclinations of 0, 3 and 45 degrees. Light condensate oil with a viscosity of 2.5 cP at room temperature was used and water cut was 20%. The results indicated that the baseline corrosion rate in 45 degrees showed higher than other inclinations. Each corrosion inhibitor showed a different inhibitor performance. (author)

  19. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  20. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  1. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING OF TANKS 241-AN-102 & 241-AP-107 & 241-AP-108 IN SUPPORT OF ULTRASONIC TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

    2008-11-20

    This report presents the results of the corrosion rates that were measured using electrochemical methods for tanks 241-AN-102 (AN-102), 241-AP-107 (AP 107), and 241-AP-108 (AP-108) performed under test plant RPP-PLAN-38215. The steel used as materials of construction for AN and AP tank farms was A537 Class 1. Test coupons of A537 Class 1 carbon steel were used for corrosion testing in the AN-107, AP-107, and AP-108 tank waste. Supernate will be tested from AN-102, AP-107, and Ap-108. Saltcake testing was performed on AP-108 only.

  2. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  3. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TEST RESULTS FOR TANK 241-SY-102 SUPERNATE GRAB SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-04-09

    This report describes the electrochemical corrosion scans and conditions for testing of SY-102 supernatant samples taken December 2004. The testing was performed because the tank was under a Justification for Continued Operation allowing the supernatant composition to be outside the chemistry limits of Administrative Control 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation program'. A new electrochemical working electrode of A516 Grade 60 carbon steel was used for each scan; all scans were measured against a saturated calomel electrode, with carbon counter electrodes, and all scans were carried out at 50 C. The samples were scanned twice, once as received and once sparged with argon to deoxygenate the sample. For those scans conducted after argon purging, the corrosion rates ranged from 0.012 to 0.019 mpy. A test for stress corrosion cracking was carried out on one sample (2SY-04-07) with negative results.

  4. Corrosion performance of alumina scales in coal gasification environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}s and C1 as HCl. This paper examines the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys during exposure to O/S mixed-gas environments. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The valuable information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the pack-diffusion process, by the electrospark deposition process, or by weld overlay techniques, is also discussed.

  5. Corrosion performance of alumina scales in coal gasification environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1997-02-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S and Cl as HCl. This paper examines the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys during exposure to O/S mixed-gas environments. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the pack-diffusion process, by the electrospark deposition process, or by weld overlay techniques.

  6. From laboratory corrosion tests to a corrosion lifetime for wood fasteners : progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Determining a “corrosion-lifetime” for fasteners embedded in wood treated with recently adopted preservative systems depends upon successfully relating results of laboratory tests to in-service conditions. In contrast to laboratory tests where metal is embedded in wood at constant temperature and moisture content, the in-service temperature and moisture content of wood...

  7. Accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing of electroplated gold mirror coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C.-T.; Alaan, D. R.; Taylor, D. P.

    2010-08-01

    Gold-coated mirrors are widely used in infrared optics for industrial, space, and military applications. These mirrors are often made of aluminum or beryllium substrates with polished nickel plating. Gold is deposited on the nickel layer by either electroplating or vacuum deposition processes. Atmospheric corrosion of gold-coated electrical connectors and contacts was a well-known problem in the electronic industry and studied extensively. However, there is limited literature data that correlates atmospheric corrosion to the optical properties of gold mirror coatings. In this paper, the atmospheric corrosion of different electroplated gold mirror coatings were investigated with an accelerated mixed flowing gas (MFG) test for up to 50 days. The MFG test utilizes a combination of low-level air pollutants, humidity, and temperatures to achieve a simulated indoor environment. Depending on the gold coating thickness, pore corrosion started to appear on samples after about 10 days of the MFG exposure. The corrosion behavior of the gold mirror coatings demonstrated the porous nature of the electroplated gold coatings as well as the variation of porosity to the coating thickness. The changes of optical properties of the gold mirrors were correlated to the morphology of corrosion features on the mirror surface.

  8. Corrosion test for ARAA in the Experimental loop for liquid breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, E. H.; Jim, H. G.; Shin, K. I.; Choi, B. G.; Lee, D. W.; Jung, Y. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the latter one to be tested in the ITER. The liquid-type TBM is one of candidate TBM for KO Demos. In this concept, helium (He) and liquid lithium (Li) were used as a coolant and a breeder, respectively. A ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) was considered as a structural material and the Advanced Reduced Activation Alloy (ARAA) is being developed as a HCCR TBM structural material. However, according to our strategy for developing the liquid breeder TBM and its more relevant DEMO concept, liquid breeders not only considered liquid lithium but also lead-lithium (PbLi). An Experimental Loop for Liquid breeder (ELLI) was constructed for the purpose of validating the electromagnetic (EM) pump design, which designed and fabricated by ourselves; testing the effects of magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD); and investigating the compatibility of PbLi using structural materials such as ferritic martensitic steel. The performance test on each component such as heaters, the control systems for heating the loop were performed and the characteristic tests with a magnet and the EM pump were carried out. The first corrosion tests using ELLI were performed with grade 91 FMS steel during 250 hours in 2011. In this study, the corrosion tests with developed ARAA were carried out in the ELLI loop using EM pump to investigate the corrosion behavior of ARAA, and the test results will be compared the previous corrosion tests of FMS corrosion specimens. Long term operation tests with the EM pump were carried out. During the two separate experiments, an EM pump was operated for 250 h with a speed of 0.16 m/s (0.95 Kg/s) for corrosion tests. The corrosion test for the ARAA was performed to investigate the corrosion behavior of ARAA in flowing PbLi. After micro structural observation on the ARAA surface and elemental analysis were done using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the corrosion results of the ARAA specimens will be compared

  9. Standard Guide for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Field Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for conducting corrosion tests in plant equipment or systems under operating conditions to evaluate the corrosion resistance of engineering materials. It does not cover electrochemical methods for determining corrosion rates. 1.1.1 While intended primarily for immersion tests, general guidelines provided can be applicable for exposure of test specimens in plant atmospheres, provided that placement and orientation of the test specimens is non-restrictive to air circulation. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. See also 10.4.2.

  10. Evaluation of corrosion damage of aluminum alloy using acoustic emission testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Rongsheng; FU Gangqiang

    2004-01-01

    Current studies are aiming at monitoring corrosion damage of aircraft main structures by using acoustic emission (AE) technique and at supplying useful data for determining calendar life of the aircraft. The characteristics of AE signals produced during accelerating corrosion process are described, and methods for evaluating corrosion damages and determining remaining life of main structures of aircraft using AE testing are outlined. Experimental results have shown that AE technique can detect corrosion damage of aluminum alloy much earlier than conventional non-destructive testing means, such as ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. Relationship between corrosion damage and AE parameters was obtained through investigating corrosion damage extent and changes of AE signals during accelerating corrosion test, and showing that AE technique can be used to detect early corrosion, investigating corrosion developing trend, and in monitoring and evaluating corrosion damages.

  11. Adsorption and performance of the 2-mercaptobenzimidazole as a carbon steel corrosion inhibitor in EDTA solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderón, J.A., E-mail: andres.calderon@udea.edu.co [Centro de Investigación, Innovación y Desarrollo de Materiales –CIDEMAT, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Vásquez, F.A. [Centro de Investigación, Innovación y Desarrollo de Materiales –CIDEMAT, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Carreño, J.A. [Laboratório de H2S, CO2 e Corrosividade, Instituto Nacional De Tecnologia (INT), Av. Venezuela, 82 – Térreo, Anexo 01, Sala 101A, Saúde, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a thermodynamic analysis of the adsorption and anti-corrosion performance of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-MBI) on carbon steel in EDTA-Na2 solutions. The adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface was studied as a function of the concentration of the inhibiting species and the temperature of the system. The corrosion inhibition efficiency was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and mass loss tests. The results show that the adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal surface behaves according to the Langmuir model, following an endothermic process. The inhibitor is chemically adsorbed onto the carbon steel surface. The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%, which was confirmed by both mass loss tests and the electrochemical impedance technique. The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h after the inhibitor was added to the corrosive EDTA-Na2 solutions. When the ratio of the volume of solution/exposed area was reduced, a decrease in the area covered by the inhibitor was observed. The best cost/benefit ratio for the corrosion protection of carbon steel was obtained when the number of moles of the inhibitor per surface area was maintained at 2.68 mmol cm{sup −2}. - Highlights: • Adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface is confirmed by thermodynamic data. • Adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal behaves according to the Langmuir model. • Endothermic adsorption process indicates that the inhibitor is chemically adsorbed. • The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%. • The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h.

  12. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  13. Investigation of the cut-edge corrosion of organically-coated galvanized steel after accelerated atmospheric corrosion test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reşit Yıldız

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cut edge corrosion of organically coated (epoxy, polyurethane and polyester galvanized steel was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Measurements were performed on specimens that had been tested in an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test. The samples were subjected to 10 s fogging and 1 h awaiting cycles in an exposure cabinet (120 and 180 days with artificial acid rain solution. According to the investigation, the coatings were damaged from the cut edge into the sheet, this distance was about 0.8 cm. These defects were more pronounced at after 180 days in proportion to after 120 days.

  14. Electrochemical corrosion testing of fasteners in extracts of treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; Donald S. Stone

    2008-01-01

    A recent change in wood preservatives has highlighted the need for a rapid, quantitative test to measure the corrosion rates of metals in contact with treated wood that could be used to evaluate new fasteners or new wood preservatives. A new method was developed where polarisation resistance tests were conducted on fasteners exposed to a water extract of wood treated...

  15. Measuring naphthenic acid corrosion potential with the Fe powder test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hau, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented of experiments performed using a new method to measure the naphthenic acid corrosion potential. The method consists of adding pure iron powder into a small autoclave containing the crude or oil sample. The test is then performed at a given temperature for one hour, after which the oil sample is filtered and the remaining liquid is sent for iron content determination (ppm. The tests are run at 7 different temperature levels, 3 more are run as repeated tests. A best-fitted curve is drawn through these 10 experimental points and the maximum point is thus determined. This becomes the main outcome of the test and it is used to give a measure of the naphthenic acid corrosion potential. The same general trends as observed in the past using the neutralization number or TAN (Total Acid Number is obtained. However, this new test seems capable oí detecting anomalous cases where oil samples having larger values of TAN exhibit less corrosivity than others having much lower values of TAN or where they show completely different corrosivity despite having similar or the same TAN.

    Se presentan los resultados de experimentos realizados con un nuevo método para medir el potencial de corrosión por ácidos nafténicos. El método consiste en añadir hierro puro en polvo a una muestra de crudo o aceite, en un autoclave pequeño. El ensayo se realiza a una temperatura dada durante una hora; luego se filtra la muestra de aceite y el líquido filtrado se envía para medir la concentración de hierro disuelto (ppm. El ensayo se reitera para siete temperaturas diferentes y se repiten tres más para determinar su reproducibilidad. Con estos 10 puntos experimentales se dibuja la mejor curva de ajuste y se determina un máximo de hierro disuelto. Este máximo se convierte en el resultado principal del ensayo y se usa para dar una medida del potencial de corrosión por ácidos nafténicos. Se obtienen las mismas tendencias generales observadas

  16. Corrosion Testing of Ni Alloy HVOF Coatings in High Temperature Environments for Biomass Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the corrosion behavior of Ni alloy coatings deposited by high velocity oxyfuel spraying, and representative boiler substrate alloys in simulated high temperature biomass combustion conditions. Four commercially available oxidation resistant Ni alloy coating materials were selected: NiCrBSiFe, alloy 718, alloy 625, and alloy C-276. These were sprayed onto P91 substrates using a JP5000 spray system. The corrosion performance of the coatings varied when tested at ~525, 625, and 725 °C in K2SO4-KCl mixture and gaseous HCl-H2O-O2 containing environments. Alloy 625, NiCrBSiFe, and alloy 718 coatings performed better than alloy C-276 coating at 725 °C, which had very little corrosion resistance resulting in degradation similar to uncoated P91. Alloy 625 coatings provided good protection from corrosion at 725 °C, with the performance being comparable to wrought alloy 625, with significantly less attack of the substrate than uncoated P91. Alloy 625 performs best of these coating materials, with an overall ranking at 725 °C as follows: alloy 625 > NiCrBSiFe > alloy 718 ≫ alloy C-276. Although alloy C-276 coatings performed poorly in the corrosion test environment at 725 °C, at lower temperatures (i.e., below the eutectic temperature of the salt mixture) it outperformed the other coating types studied.

  17. Letter report on PCT/Monolith glass ceramic corrosion tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-24

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is collaborating with personnel from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to study advanced waste form glass ceramics for immobilization of waste from Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) separations processes. The glass ceramic waste forms take advantage of both crystalline and glassy phases where ‘troublesome’ elements (e.g., low solubility in glass or very long-lived) partition to highly durable ceramic phases with the remainder of elements residing in the glassy phase. The ceramic phases are tailored to create certain minerals or unique crystalline structures that can host the radionuclides by binding them in their specific crystalline network while not adversely impacting the residual glass network (Crum et al., 2011). Glass ceramics have been demonstrated using a scaled melter test performed in a pilot scale (1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) (Crum et al., 2014; Maio et al., 2015). This report summarizes recent results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving crucible fabrication and corrosion testing of glass ceramics using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Preliminary results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving statistically designed matrices have previously been reported (Crawford, 2013; Crawford, 2014).

  18. Corrosion Performance of Laser Posttreated Cold Sprayed Titanium Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, T.; Hussain, T.; McCartney, D. G.; Shipway, P. H.

    2011-06-01

    The recent development of cold spray technology has made possible the deposition of highly reactive, oxygen sensitive materials, such as titanium, without significant chemical reaction of the powder, modification of particle microstructure and with minimal heating of the substrate. However, the presence of interconnected pathways (microscale porosity) within the deposit limits the performance of the metallic coating as an effective barrier to corrosion and substrate attack by corrosive media is usually inevitable. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of processing, including a postspray laser treatment, on the deposit microstructure and corrosion behavior. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) was deposited onto a carbon steel substrate, using a commercial cold spray system (CGTTM Kinetiks® 4000) with preheated nitrogen as both the main process gas and the powder carrier gas. Selected coatings were given a surface melting treatment using a commercial 2 kW CO2 laser (505 Trumpf DMD). The effect of postdeposition laser treatment on corrosion behavior was analyzed in terms of pore structure evolution and microstructural changes. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction were employed to examine the microstructural characteristics of the coatings. Their corrosion performance was investigated using electrochemical methods in 3.5 wt.% NaCl (ASTM G5-94 (2004)). As-sprayed titanium coatings could not provide favorable protection to the carbon steel substrate in the aerated NaCl solution, whereas the coatings with laser-treated surfaces provided barrier-like properties.

  19. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AZ61A Magnesium Alloy Welds under Salt Spray Corrosion Test and Galvanic Corrosion Test Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were butt welded using advanced welding process and friction stir welding (FSW processes. The specimens were exposed to salt spray conditions and immersion conditions to characterize their corrosion rates on the effect of pH value, chloride ion concentration, and corrosion time. In addition, an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of FSW welds in salt spray corrosion test and galvanic corrosion test using design of experiments. The corrosion morphology and the pit morphology were analyzed by optical microscopy, and the corrosion products were examined using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. From this research work, it is found that, in both corrosion tests, the corrosion rate decreases with the increase in pH value, the decrease in chloride ion concentration, and a higher corrosion time. The results show the usage of the magnesium alloy for best environments and suitable applications from the aforementioned conditions. Also, it is found that AZ61A magnesium alloy welds possess low-corrosion rate and higher-corrosion resistance in the galvanic corrosion test than in the salt spray corrosion test.

  1. High-Temperature Performance of Ferritic Steels in Fireside Corrosion Regimes: Temperature and Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, T.; Hussain, T.; Simms, N. J.

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports high temperature resistance of ferritic steels in fireside corrosion regime in terms of temperature and deposits aggressiveness. Four candidate power plant steels: 15Mo3, T22, T23 and T91 were exposed under simulated air-fired combustion environment for 1000 h. The tests were conducted at 600, 650 and 700 °C according to deposit-recoat test method. Post-exposed samples were examined via dimensional metrology (the main route to quantify metal loss), and mass change data were recorded to perform the study of kinetic behavior at elevated temperatures. Microstructural investigations using ESEM-EDX were performed in order to investigate corrosion degradation and thickness of the scales. The ranking of the steels from most to the least damage was 15Mo3 > T22 > T23 > T91 in all three temperatures. The highest rate of corrosion in all temperatures occurred under the screening deposit.

  2. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys in Artificial Saliva and Mouthwash Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Casales-Diaz, M.; Salinas-Bravo, V. M.; Martinez-Gomez, L.

    2015-01-01

    Several austenitic stainless steels suitable for high temperature applications because of their high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties were investigated as biomaterials for dental use. The steels were evaluated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization curves, cyclic polarization curves, measurements of open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance. The performance of steels was evaluated in two types of environments: artificial saliva and mouthwash solution at 37°C for 48 hours. In order to compare the behavior of steels, titanium a material commonly used in dental applications was also tested in the same conditions. Results show that tested steels have characteristics that may make them attractive as biomaterials for dental applications. Contents of Cr, Ni, and other minor alloying elements (Mo, Ti, and Nb) determine the performance of stainless steels. In artificial saliva steels show a corrosion rate of the same order of magnitude as titanium and in mouthwash have greater corrosion resistance than titanium. PMID:26064083

  3. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  4. Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion.

  5. High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Materials Degradation: Preliminary Results of Corrosion Tests on Ceramatec Electrolysis Cell Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; Prateek Sachdev; Kevin DeWall; Pavel Medvedev

    2007-06-01

    Corrosion tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel alloy coupons in H2O/H2 mixtures and dry air to simulate conditions experienced in high temperature steam electrolysis systems. The stainless steel coupons were tested bare and with one of three different proprietary coatings applied. Specimens were corroded at 850°C for 500 h with weight gain data recorded at periodic intervals. Post-test characterization of the samples included surface and cross-section scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and area-specific resistance measurements. The uncoated nickel alloy outperformed the ferritic stainless steel under all test conditions based on weight gain data. Parabolic rate constants for corrosion of these two uncoated alloys were consistent with values presented in the literature under similar conditions. The steel coatings reduced corrosion rates in H2O/H2 mixtures by as much as 50% compared to the untreated steel, but in most cases showed negligible corrosion improvement in air. The use of a rare-earth-based coating on stainless steel did not result in a significantly different area specific resistance values after corrosion compared to the untreated alloy. Characterization of the samples is still in progress and the findings will be revised when the complete data set is available.

  6. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  7. A Probabilistic Performance Assessment Model for General Corrosion of Alloy 22 for High Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. H. Lee; H. A. Elayat

    2003-12-11

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) is the candidate material for the corrosion barrier of the double-wall waste package (WP) for the disposal of high-Gel nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. A probabilistic temperature-dependent general corrosion model for the WP outer barrier (WPOB) was developed based on the 5-year weight-loss measurements of Alloy 22 crevice samples. The 5-year corrosion rate distribution is represented by a Weibull distribution, with scale factors = 8.88, shape factor b = 1.62, and location factor l = 0. The temperature-dependence of the general corrosion rate was modeled using an Arrhenius relation. An activation energy of 25.91 {+-} 2.46 kJ/mol was determined from the corrosion rates obtained from the short-term polarization resistance data for Alloy 22 specimens tested for a wide range of sample configurations, metallurgical conditions, and exposure conditions (temperature and water chemistry). Analysis of the data from the current study and the literature indicates that the activation energies of general corrosion rate of highly corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloys including Alloy 22 are similar and do not change significantly, as the general corrosion rate decreases with the exposure time. The 5-year corrosion rates were conservatively selected for extrapolation over the repository time scale. Because of very low general corrosion rates of the WPOB for the conditions expected in the proposed repository, the WP performance will not be limited by general corrosion for the repository regulatory time period. The current conservative approach for the constant (time-independent) general corrosion rate at a given temperature provides an additional confidence for the general corrosion model.

  8. Performance of Terminalia catappa on mild steel corrosion in HCl medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Obi, Chukwunonso Ezekiel; Sonoiki, Oluwatobi Oluwasegun Oluwagbenga; Oni, Adeoluwa Barnabas; Alabi, Ayomide Samuel; Olarewaju, Abisola Ebunoluwa

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates Terminalia catappa leaf-extract performance on mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl). Electrochemical linear-sweep-voltametry (LSV) and gravimetric techniques were employed for assessing the mild steel corrosion in the HCl test-environment of immersion having different concentrations of the leaf-extract. Results showed that all the concentrations of the Terminalia catappa leaf-extract employed inhibited mild steel corrosion from the electrochemical (potentiodynamic) and the gravimetric considerations. Also, corrosion rate from LSV exhibited excellent correlation (R = 95.77%, Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) = 91.72% and p-value = 0.02383) with linear function of the corrosion rate from gravimetric method, for the leaf-extract concentrations employed. From the experimental model, 6 g/L Terminalia catappa exhibited optimal inhibition efficiency, η = 78.07%, while 8 g/L Terminalia catappa was predicted as optimally effective, η = 75.41%, by the correlation fitting model, at inhibiting mild steel corrosion in the medium. However, adsorption isotherm modelling showed that the experimental gravimetric, experimental potentiodynamic and predicted potentiodynamic data exhibited agreements in following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. All the three data models indicated favourable adsorption and identified physisorption as the prevalent adsorption mechanism of Terminalia catappa leaf-extract on mild steel immersed in the 0.5 M HCl medium.

  9. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in single- and multioxidant environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1998-06-22

    Iron aluminide intermetallics are being developed for use as structural materials and/or as cladding for conventional engineering alloys. In addition to their strength advantages, these materials exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion in single- and multioxidant environments at elevated temperatures through the formation of slow-growing, adherent alumina scales. Even though these intermetallics develop protective oxide scales in single-oxidant environments, the simultaneous presence of several reactants in the environment (typical of practical systems) can lead to development of oxide scales that are nonprotective and that undergo breakaway corrosion, or to nonoxide scales that are detrimental to the performance of the underlying alloy. This paper describes the corrosion performance of Fe-Al intermetallics in environments that contain sulfur, carbon, chlorine, and oxygen and that are typical of fossil energy systems. Emphasis is on mechanisms of scale development and breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, and approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics to improve their corrosion resistance.

  10. Accelerated corrosion testing, evaluation and durability design of bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Pereira, Ruben Mario

    2003-06-01

    In the last few years, the effectiveness of cement grout in galvanized or polyethylene ducts, the most widely used corrosion protection system for multistrand bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons, has been under debate, due to significant tendon corrosion damage, several reported failures of individual tendons as well as a few collapses of non-typical structures. While experience in the USA has been generally good, some foreign experience has been less than satisfactory. This dissertation is part of a comprehensive research program started in 1993, which has the objectives to examine the use of post-tensioning in bridge substructures, identify durability concerns and existing technology, develop and carry out an experimental testing program, and conclude with durability design guidelines. Three experimental programs were developed: A long term macrocell corrosion test series, to investigate corrosion protection for internal tendons in precast segmental construction; a long term beam corrosion test series, to examine the effects of post-tensioning on corrosion protection as affected by crack width; and, a long term column corrosion test series, to examine corrosion protection in vertical elements. Preliminary design guidelines were developed previously in the overall study by the initial researchers, after an extensive literature review. This dissertation scope includes continuation of exposure testing of the macrocell, beam and column specimens, performing comprehensive autopsies of selected specimens and updating the durability design guidelines based on the exposure testing and autopsy results. After autopsies were performed, overall findings indicate negative durability effects due to the use of mixed reinforcement, small concrete covers, galvanized steel ducts, and industry standard or heat-shrink galvanized duct splices. The width of cracks was shown to have a direct negative effect on specimen performance. Grout voids were found to be detrimental to the

  11. Integration of Nanofluids into Commercial Antifreeze Concentrates with ASTM D15 Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Corrosion Tests ASTM D 1384 Corrosion Test for Engine Coolants in Glassware and ASTM D 4340 Corrosion Test of Cast Aluminum Alloys in Engine Coolants...Saint-Gobain provided free nano slurry samples (300 nm, 360 nm, 13 mass% in water). 80 nm powders were purchased from NanoAmor. Diamond: 6 nm nano

  12. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-destructive test method to monitor the development of corrosion products as well as the corrosion-induced formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials. A parametric experimental investigation (utilizing x-ray attenuation measurement technique...

  13. Static Corrosion Test of Porous Iron Material with Polymer Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markušová-Bučková, Lucia; Oriňaková, Renáta; Oriňak, Andrej; Gorejová, Radka; Kupková, Miriam; Hrubovčáková, Monika; Baláž, Matej; Kováľ, Karol

    2016-12-01

    At present biodegradable implants received increased attention due to their use in various fields of medicine. This work is dedicated to testing of biodegradable materials which could be used as bone implants. The samples were prepared from the carbonyl iron powder by replication method and surface polymer film was produced through sol-gel process. Corrosion testing was carried out under static conditions during 12 weeks in Hank's solution. The quantity of corrosion products increased with prolonging time of static test as it can be concluded from the results of EDX analysis. The degradation of open cell materials with polyethylene glycol coating layer was faster compared to uncoated Fe sample. Also the mass losses were higher for samples with PEG coating. The polymer coating brought about the desired increase in degradation rate of porous iron material.

  14. Implication of Atmospheric Wetness Levels on Corrosion at a Coating Defect during Accelerated Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    Outline • Objectives • Atmospheric corrosionTesting Approach • Effect of RH on corrosion of steel • Effect of inhibitor addition on coated steel... inhibitor migration in the coating . For a given test method, wet and dry times will influence inhibitor mobility, and thus corrosion rate Continuous...Implication of Atmospheric Wetness Levels on Corrosion at a Coating Defect during Accelerated Testing James F. Dante Southwest Research Institute

  15. Corrosion test in the Experimental loop for an ITER TBM liquid breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jae Sung; Kim, Suk Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Lee, Seung Jae; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    An Experimental Loop for Liquid breeder (ELLI) was constructed for the purpose of validating the electromagnetic (EM) pump design, which designed and fabricated by ourselves: testing the effects of magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD): and investigating the compatibility of PbLi using structural materials such as ferritic martensitic steel. In the ELLI, Pb-15.7Li, where Li is 15.7 at % (called PbLi hereafter), is used as the breeding material and an EM pump circulates it in the loop with the maximum flow rate of 60 lpm. The operating pressure and temperature in the loop are 0.4 MPa and 300 .deg. C, respectively and the maximum operating pressure and temperature are 0.5 MPa and 550 .deg. C, respectively. After the performance test on each component such as heaters, the control systems for heating the loop and the characteristic tests with a magnet and the EM pump, long-term operational tests of the EM pump were performed during three different corrosion tests. The corrosion tests were performed in the ELLI loop by forced convection circulation using an EM pump to investigate the corrosion behavior of FMS in flowing PbLi. For the corrosion specimens, two samples were fabricated using Grade 91 FMS: tubular-type and cylindrical-type specimens. The specimens were exposed to the flowing PbLi with a speed of 0.16 m/s at 340 .deg. C for the three different experiments. The corrosion tests by forced convection using an EM pump can conveniently vary the speed of a liquid breeder by changing the currents of the EM pump than that of using a thermal convection

  16. Particle capturing performance of South African non corrosive samplers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available samplers (also known as cyclones) Particle-capturing performance of South African non-corrosive samplers © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za Objectives: • To compare the performance of two locally manufactured samplers with one another... = 90% of the sample has a particle size below this value © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za Particle size distribution of sampled dust • Respirable dust is defined as particulate passing through a cyclone with an efficiency...

  17. A review on in vitro corrosion performance test of biodegradable metallic materials%生物可降解金属材料体外腐蚀测试体系综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甄珍; 奚廷斐; 郑玉峰

    2013-01-01

    Extensive in vitro corrosion test systems have been carried out to simulate the in vivo corrosion behavior of biodegradable metallic materials. Various methods have their own unique benefits and limitations. The corrosion mechanism of biodegradable alloys and in vitro corrosion test systems on biodegradable metallic materials are reviewed, to build a reasonable simulated in vitro test system for mimicking the in vivo animal test from the aspects of electrolyte solution selection, surface roughness influence, test methods and evaluation methodology of corrosion rate. Buffered simulated body fluid containing similar components to human blood plasma should be applied as electrolyte solution, such as simulated body fluid (SBF) and culture medium with serum. Surface roughness of samples and ratio of solution volume to sample surface area should be adopted based on the real implant situation, and the dynamic corrosion is preferred. As to the evaluation methodology of corrosion rate, different methods may complement one another.%随着生物可降解金属材料日益受到关注,大量的体外腐蚀测试体系被用来模拟其体内腐蚀行为。不同的测试体系具有其独特的优点和缺点。为建立一个合理的并且更接近体内真实情况的测试体系,对可降解金属材料的腐蚀机理和体外腐蚀测试体系进行总结。从电解质溶液的选择、样品表面粗糙度的影响、测试方法以及腐蚀速度的评价方法等几个方面进行阐述,得到以下初步结论:电解质溶液应该选择与体液成分接近的含有蛋白的缓冲模拟体液,样品表面粗糙度和溶液体积与样品表面积之比应该接近植入部位的实际要求,并且采用动态腐蚀测试方法,同时多种腐蚀速度评价方法应当相互参照。

  18. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  19. Corrosion Tests of Metals and Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1951-01-01

    well as technical judgment, were the factors that limited the number of materials tested. Therefore, it is possible that some materials not included...in fig. 12); depth of penetration was taken as the distance from the original top surface to the dis- cernible limit of penetration of the fluid...II I Moodl ------- ------- ------- 0-oNi 󈧒 Cal, 2 Fe, 1.5 Mni. 1.5(---- 1. IV, V. vI. viI, X, XI, XV , XvI. Moor) K ------------------ b 4’ , MI Cu

  20. Corrosion Testing of Thermal Spray Coatings in a Biomass Co-Firing Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Oksa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale use of biomass and recycled fuel is increasing in energy production due to climate and energy targets. A 40% cut in greenhouse gas emission compared to 1990 levels and at least a 27% share of renewable energy consumption are set in EU Energy Strategy 2030. Burning fuels with high content of corrosive species such as chlorine and heavy metals causes deterioration of boiler components, shortened lifetime, limited availability of a plant and hence higher maintenance and investment costs and lower thermal and economic efficiency. Coatings can be applied to protect the critical boiler components against high temperature corrosion. In this study, five thermal spray coatings were tested in an actual biomass co-firing boiler for 1300 h with a measurement probe. The coatings were analyzed after the exposure by metallographic means and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (SEM/EDX. The deposits formed on the specimens were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence. At 550 °C, the coatings showed excellent corrosion performance compared to reference material ferritic steel T92. At 750 °C, tube material A263 together with NiCr and NiCrTi had the highest corrosion resistance. To conclude, thermal spray coatings can offer substantial corrosion protection in biomass and recycled fuel burning power plants.

  1. Novel accelerated corrosion test for LY12CZ and LC4CS aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Jian-ping; LIU Ming

    2006-01-01

    A new accelerated corrosion test-comprehensive environmental test (CET) was developed in order to estimate the outdoor corrosion of aluminum alloys in marine environment. The environmental characteristics in CET were studied by atmospheric corrosion monitor (ACM), and the morphology of corrosion product was observed by SEM. The correlation between the accelerated corrosion tests and outdoor exposure was discussed. The results show that the anti-corrosion ranking for LY12CZ, LC4CS, clad LY12CZ, and clad LC4CS in CET is the same as that of the alloys exposed outdoor, and ACM study shows that CET demonstrates the same environmental characteristics as that exposed outdoor. CET is a more accurate accelerated corrosion test, and a mathematical relation was obtained to describe the relation between CET and outdoor test.

  2. Simulated heat-exchanger tubes: DOE Geothermal Test Facility, East Mesa, California. Corrosion test report. [Allegheny-Ludlum Alloy 29-4 and Alloy 29-4C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P.F. II; Anliker, D.M.

    1982-11-01

    A 1032-hr corrosion test was made of two geothermal heat exchanger materials, Allegheny-Ludlum Alloy 29-4 and Alloy 29-4C. Coupons of the two metals were exposed under conditions simulating flow in a geothermal heat exchanger tube. Continuous flow and cyclic exposure tests were made. No signs of localized corrosion were observed in either the base metal, tube weld seam, or heat affected zone. Most coupons showed statistically insignificant weight change. A corrosion rate of less than 0.5 mil/yr is indicated. No significant difference in the performance of the two alloys is reported. (LEW)

  3. Corrosion Performance of Zinc and Zinc-cobalt Alloy Compositionally Modulated Multilayer (CMM) Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Jingyin; LIANG Guozheng; XIN Wenli; LIU Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    Varieties of zinc and Zn-Co alloy compositionally modulated multilayer (CMM) coatings were electrodeposited onto steel substrates using dual bath technique. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies of coated samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy ( SEM ). The existence of internal stress in ZnCo alloy deposits was corfirmed by the cross-sectional morphologies for the occurrence of micro-cracks in the thick Zn-Co alloy deposit alone. The corrosion performance was evaluated using neutral salt spray testing, corrosion potential measurement and anodic polarization methods. The experimental results show that the zinc and Zn- Co alloy CMM coatings were more corrosion-resistant than the monolithic coatings of zinc or Zn-Co alloy alone with a similar thickness. The analysis on the micrographic features of zinc and Zn- Co alloy CMM coatings, using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) after corrosion testing, explains the probable reasons why the Zn-Co/ Zn CMM coating system has a better protective performance.

  4. Evaluation of zinc addition on fuel cladding corrosion at the Halden test reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolstad, E.; Symons, W.J.; Bryhn-Integrigtsen, K.; Oberlaender, B.C.

    1996-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that addition of zinc to a PWR environment reduces the general corrosion rates of materials in the primary system and delays the initiation of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in Alloy 600. In order to provide an early warning of any potential adverse effects on the fuel cladding, corrosion studies were initiated at the Halden test reactor. These tests were carried out in a PWR rig inserted in the Halden reactor core. The rig simulated thermal hydraulic and coolant conditions typical of a MR. It had two flow channels where the fuel rod segments were exposed to the coolant under irradiation flux. Selected pre-characterized rodlets with fresh and pre-irradiated standard and low-tin Zircaloy-4 material were irradiated for three cycles. First cycle lasted for 110 effective full power days (EFPDs), the second for 95 EFPDs and the last 62 EFPDs. The cladding corrosion behavior was monitored by initial, interim and final oxide thickness measurements by eddy current lift-off probe. Crud sampling was performed in both channels after cycle 1 and 2. Destructive post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of two rodlets, irradiated during cycle 1 and 2, have also been completed at the conclusion of the in-pile testing. This report presents the results on oxide thickness measurements, irradiation history and water chemistry data, and the PIE.

  5. Burst tests on pipeline with long external corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, A.C. [Rio de Janeiro Univ., (Brazil); Vieira, R.D.; Freire, J.L.F.; Castro, J.T.P. de [PUC, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    Four different methods are available to assess long corrosion defects. They are: ASME B31G, RSTRENG 085dL, RSTRENG Effective Area, and the DNV RP-F101 (Part B). The degree of conservatism in each method varies considerably, making the maintenance and repair costs higher than they could be, since pipes still fit for service are replaced based on the results obtained in evaluating pressure strength. Petrobras initiated a research project aimed at assessing the behavior of pipeline with long corrosion defects. CONFAB S.A., a Brazilian manufacturer of steel tubes, donated 5 longitudinal welded tubes made of API 5L X60 steel. The wall thickness was 9.53 mm and the outside diameter was 323.9 mm. Two tubular specimens 2 m long were cut from each of the tubes, except for one tube where only one 2 m long section was cut. Burst tests were conducted on the specimens, where the corrosion defects were smooth and rectangular, having been fabricated using spark erosion. Material properties were determined on tensile specimens. 10 post-yield strain gages rosettes, one displacement transducer and three pressure transducers were affixed to the corroded specimens. A comparison of the measured burst pressures was made as predicted by the four methods under investigation. 11 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  6. Erosion/corrosion testing of materials for oil sands applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, G.; Wolodko, J.; Alemaskin, K.; Been, J.; Danysh, M. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Erosion and corrosion are common wear mechanisms for components used in oil sands processing facilities. This paper described a slurry jet test apparatus designed to evaluate and assess materials for oil sands service conditions. The jet testing apparatus was designed to mimic the wet erosion phenomena typically found in oil sands applications. Wear- and corrosion-resistant materials tested by the apparatus included carbon steel, tungsten carbide metal matrix composite (WC-MMC) overlays, and a range of polymer and rubber liner materials. Polymeric materials included hydrogenated nitrile rubber (HNBR); polyurethane elastomer; and high density polyethylene (HDPE). Material losses were determined by measuring the mass of the samples before and after testing. Normalized rates of abrasion were calculated by dividing total mass lost in the specimens by the total mass of sand impinged on the sample surface. Samples were also visually assessed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to determine failure modes. Tests were conducted for a 2-hour period at an impingement angle of 90 degrees. Results of the study showed that the average abrasion rates of the polymeric samples are lower than rates seen with the carbon steel and overlay materials. Future work on the apparatus will include testing the materials under varying slurry jet parameters. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  7. Improvement of the linear polarization resistance method for testing steel corrosion inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faritov, A. T.; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu. G.; Yamshchikova, S. A.; Minnikhanova, E. R.; Tyusenkov, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    The linear polarization resistance method is used to improve the technique of corrosion control in liquid conducting according to GOST 9.514-99 (General Corrosion and Aging Protection System. Corrosion Inhibitors for Metals in Water Systems. Electrochemical Method of Determining the Protective Ability). Corrosion monitoring is shown to be performed by electronic devices with real-time data transfer to industrial controllers and SCADA systems.

  8. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasscer, D.S.; Ernst, R.; Morgan, T.O.; Rivera, C.; Scott, A.C.; Summerson, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    In a cooperative research effort between The Puerto Rico Center of Energy and Environment Research, Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation and The Trane Company, a six month study was made of the seawater corrosion performance of various aluminum materials to test their suitability for use in seawater heat exchangers. The materials tested included bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger extrusions from a brazed aluminium, plate-fin heat exchanger developed by The Trane Company. The test materials were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr).

  9. Screening of soil corrosivity by field testing: Results and design of an electrochemical soil corrosion probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars vendelbo; Bruun, Niels Kåre

    1996-01-01

    The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed...... on the plates during exposure. An electrochemical soil corrosion probe has been designed and manufactured allowing for simultaneous measurements of several qauntities to predict corrosion. The probe consists of individual sections capable of measuring redox-potential, corrosion potential, soil resistivity...

  10. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  11. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D' Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  12. Development of corrosion testing equipment under heat transfer and irradiation conditions to evaluate corrosion resistance of materials used in acid recovery evaporator. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Numata, Masami; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    We have been evaluated the safety for corrosion of various metals applied to acid recovery evaporators by the mock-up tests using small scaled equipment and the reference tests in laboratories with small specimens. These tests have been conducted under-radioactive environment. The environment in practical reprocessing plants has many radioactive species. Therefore, the effect of irradiation on corrosion should be evaluated in detail. In this study, we have developed the corrosion testing equipment, which is employed to simulate environments in the acid recovery evaporators. This report describes the specification of corrosion testing equipment and the results of primary, reference and hot tests. Using the equipment, the corrosion test under heat transfer and irradiation conditions have been carried out for 930 hours in safety. It is expectable that useful corrosion test data in radioactive environment are accumulated with this equipment in future, and help the adequate choice of corrosion test condition in laboratories. (author)

  13. Results of short-term corrosion evaluation tests at Raft River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.

    1977-10-01

    Four categories of short-term materials evaluation tests were conducted in geothermal fluid from Raft River Geothermal Experiment, Well No. 1, to obtain corrosion data relevant to the design of the Raft River Thermal Loop Facility. Test programs are described and the testing philosophies are discussed. All materials and configurations which were tested are identified and details of posttest visual examinations are presented. The materials are then assigned to appropriate performance categories on the basis of test behavior, and the possible service limitations are appraised.

  14. Standard guide for corrosion tests in high temperature or high pressure environment, or both

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures, specimens, and equipment for conducting laboratory corrosion tests on metallic materials under conditions of high pressure (HP) or the combination of high temperature and high pressure (HTHP). See for definitions of high pressure and temperature. 1.2 Tests conducted under HP or HTHP by their nature have special requirements. This guide establishes the basic considerations that are necessary when these conditions must be incorporated into laboratory corrosion tests. 1.3 The procedures and methods in this guide are applicable for conducting mass loss corrosion, localized corrosion, and electrochemical tests as well as for use in environmentally induced cracking tests that need to be conducted under HP or HTHP conditions. 1.4 The primary purpose for this guide is to promote consistency of corrosion test results. Furthermore, this guide will aid in the comparison of corrosion data between laboratories or testing organizations that utilize different equipment. 1.5 The values s...

  15. An Evaluation of the Corrosion and Mechanical Performance of Interstitially Surface-Hardened Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer L.; Koul, Michelle G.; Schubbe, Joel J.

    2014-06-01

    A surface hardening technique called "interstitial hardening" is commercially available, whereby interstitial carbon atoms are introduced into stainless steel surfaces without the formation of carbides. Surface hardening of machine elements such as impellors or fasteners would improve performance regarding cavitation and galling resistance, and has intensified interest in this process. However, there remains a need to characterize and validate the specific performance characteristics of the hardened materials. This paper describes experimental testing conducted on 316L stainless steel that has been surface hardened using available commercial techniques, using carbon as the interstitial atom. The corrosion performance of the hardened surface is assessed using electrochemical potentiodynamic testing to determine the breakdown potential in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution to identify the most promising method. The hardness and thickness of the surface-hardened layer is characterized and compared using metallography and microhardness profiling. Corrosion fatigue and slow strain rate testing of untreated, hardened, and damaged, hardened surfaces exposed to ASTM seawater is conducted. Finally, critical galling stresses are determined and compared. Post-test examination of damage attempts to identify mechanisms of material failure and characterize how corrosion-assisted cracks initiate and grow in surface-hardened materials.

  16. Effect of Heat Treatment on Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Performance of Cold-Sprayed Tantalum Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Vidyasagar, V.; Jyothirmayi, A.; Joshi, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The cold-spray technique is of significant interest to deposit refractory metals with relatively high melting point for a variety of demanding applications. In the present study, mechanical properties of cold-sprayed tantalum coatings heat treated at different temperatures were investigated using microtensile testing, scratch testing, and nanoindentation. The corrosion performance of heat-treated coatings was also evaluated in 1 M KOH solution, and potentiodynamic polarization as well as impedance spectroscopy studies were carried out. Assessment of structure-property correlations was attempted based on microstructure, porosity, and intersplat bonding state, together with mechanical and corrosion properties of the heat-treated cold-sprayed tantalum coatings. Coatings annealed at 1500 °C, which is very close to the recrystallization temperature of tantalum, were found to perform almost as bulk tantalum, with exciting implications for various applications.

  17. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reclaru, L., E-mail: lucien.reclaru@pxgroup.com [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Brooks, R.A. [Orthopaedic Research, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Box 180 Hills Road, CB2 0QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zuberbühler, M. [Smith and Nephew Orthopaedics AG, Schachenalle 29, 5001 Aarau (Switzerland); Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F. [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Tomoaia, G. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hateganu of Cluj-Napoca, Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion.

  18. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  19. Long-Term Anti-Corrosion Performance of a Conducting Polymer-Based Coating System for Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tongyan; Yu, Qifeng

    2016-06-01

    The long-term durability of a two-layer coating system was evaluated by two accelerated corrosion tests, i.e., the ASTM B117 Salt spray test and the ASTM D5894 Cyclic salt fog/UV exposure test, and a series of surface analyses. The coating system was developed for protecting structural steels from corrosion, including a functional primer made of intrinsically conducting polymer (ICP) and a protective topcoat. The standard pull-off test per ASTM D4541 was employed for characterizing the adhesion of the coating systems to substrate, aided by visual examination of the surface deterioration of the samples. The ICP-based systems demonstrated superior long-term anti-corrosion capacity when a polyurethane topcoat is used. The ICP-based primer made of a waterborne epoxy gave poorer anti-corrosion performance than the ICP-based primer made of regular non-waterborne epoxy, which can be attributed to the lower adhesion the waterborne epoxy demonstrated to the substrate surface. The zinc-rich control systems showed good anti-corrosion durability; however, they may produce excessive oxidative products of zinc to cause coating delamination. Based on the test results, the two-layer coating system consisting of an ICP-based primer and a polyurethane topcoat outperforms the conventional zinc-rich coating systems for corrosion protection of steels.

  20. Electrode holder useful in a corrosion testing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.; Jamison, Dale E.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for holding one or more test electrodes of precisely known exposed surface area. The present invention is particularly useful in a device for determining the corrosion properties of the materials from which the test electrodes have been formed. The present invention relates to a device and method for holding the described electrodes wherein the exposed surface area of the electrodes is only infinitesimally decreased. Further, in the present invention the exposed, electrically conductive surface area of the contact devices is small relative to the test electrode surface area. The holder of the present invention conveniently comprises a device for contacting and engaging each test electrode at two point contacts infinitesimally small in relation to the exposed surface area of the electrodes.

  1. A rapid stress-corrosion test for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Stressed alloy specimens are immersed in a salt-dichromate solution at 60 degrees C. Because of the minimal general corrosion of these alloys in this solution, stress corrosion failures are detected by low-power microscopic examination.

  2. Anti-corrosion Performance of a New Corrosion Inhibitor for Rebar%一种新型钢筋阻锈剂的阻锈性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阚欣荣; 封孝信; 王晓燕

    2011-01-01

    The anti-corrosion performance of a new rebar inhibitor containing amino group and carboxylic group was evaluated by means of hardened mortar test and half cell potential method. The adsorption of corrosion inhibitor on rebar in concrete was analyzed. The results show that the corrosion inhibitor could delay the corrosion and reduce the corrosion rate of the rebar.%采用硬化砂浆和半电池电位法评价了一种自制的含有氨基和羧基的新型钢筋阻锈剂IH2的阻锈性能,并采用标准工作曲线法分析了混凝土中钢筋对阻锈剂的吸附性能。结果表明,IH2钢筋阻锈剂可以延长钢筋发生锈蚀的时间,降低钢筋的腐蚀速率,具有良好的阻锈性能。

  3. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  4. Engineering Performance of a New Siloxane-Based Corrosion Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Niall; O'Brien, R.; Basheer, P. A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of a new non-toxic corrosion inhibitor on selected engineering properties of concrete mixes with different cementitious materials following a corrosion and durability study on concrete samples. Corrosion inhibitors consist of powders or solutions which are added to concrete when mixed to prevent or delay corrosion of steel by their reaction with ferrous ions to form a stable and passive ferric oxide film on the steel surface. The new inhibitor functions sligh...

  5. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Krawchuk, M.T.; Van Weele, S.F. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A number of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings have previously been exposed in Phase I to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. This program is exposing samples of TP 347, RA-85H, HR-3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF-709, 690 clad, and 671 clad, which showed good corrosion resistance from Phase 1, to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and are being controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The exposure will continue for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. After the three exposure times, the samples will be metallurgically examined to determine the wastage rates and mode of attack. The probes were commissioned November 16, 1994. The temperatures are being recorded every 15 minutes, and the weighted average temperature calculated for each sample. Each of the alloys is being exposed to a temperature in each of two temperature bands-1150 to 1260{degrees}F and 1260 to 1325{degrees}F. After 2000 hours of exposure, one of the corrosion probes was cleaned and the wall thicknesses were ultrasonically measured. The alloy performance from the field probes will be discussed.

  6. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  7. ECVAM's activities in validating alternative tests for skin corrosion and irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentem, Julia H; Botham, Philip A

    2002-12-01

    ECVAM has funded and managed validation studies on in vitro tests for skin corrosion, resulting in the validities of four in vitro tests being endorsed by the ECVAM Scientific Advisory Committee: the rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance (TER) assay, two tests based on the use of commercial reconstituted human skin equivalents, EPISKIN and EpiDerm, and another commercially-produced test, CORROSITEX. In the European Union (EU), a new test method on skin corrosion (B.40), incorporating the rat skin TER and human skin model assays, was included in Annex V of Directive 67/548/EEC in mid-2000, thereby making the use of in vitro alternatives for skin corrosion testing of chemicals mandatory in the EU. At the recommendation of its Skin Irritation Task Force, ECVAM has funded prevalidation studies on five in vitro tests for acute skin irritation: EpiDerm, EPISKIN, PREDISKIN, the pig-ear test, and the mouse-skin integrity function test (SIFT). However, none of the tests met the criteria (set by the Management Team for the studies) for inclusion in a large-scale formal validation study. Thus, to date, there are no validated in vitro tests for predicting the dermal irritancy of chemicals. Following further work on the EPISKIN, EpiDerm and SIFT test protocols and/or prediction models after the completion of the prevalidation studies, it appears that the modified tests could meet the performance criteria defined for progression to a validation study. This will now be assessed independently by the ECVAM Skin Irritation Task Force, with the objective of taking a decision before the end of 2002 on whether to conduct a formal validation study.

  8. RESEARCH ON DEGRADATION CORROSIVE ENVIRONMENT OF SOME STEELS USED IN MANUFACTURING MINING EQUIPMENT. MECHANICAL TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin CIOFU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous action of mechanical stress variables and the corrosive environment leads to the deterioration of structures made of steel or of other metallic materials, a process called fatigue in corrosive environment or corrosion fatigue, which has causes and effects different from degradation under the singular action, either of mechanical strain or of corrosive environment. The aim of this paper is the study of the behavior,under fatigue conditions in corrosive environment of low alloy steels meant for the construction of mining equipment used in various mining operations in Gorj county. Based on experimental research regarding sustainability in fatigue corrosion, analyses of the interaction between the mechanical and the electrochemical factors as well as microscopic analyses of the structures we aim in this paper at deeply studying the performance of degradation processes that occur in the surface layers and lead to destruction by corrosion fatigue of the steels under study.

  9. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  10. Corrosion test on Alloy 690 TT in simulated hideout media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laire, C.; Goffin, C. [Laborelec (Belgium); Mullier, B. [Faculte Polytechnique de Mons (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    Laborelec has shown the detrimental effect of Cu oxides on Alloy 690 TT in acidic sulfate solutions. Although copper condenser's tubes were replaced by titanium, there are other sources of copper in power plants. Furthermore in spite of improved steam generator (SG) design and better monitoring of secondary water chemistry, deposits formation cannot be fully prevented and impurities such as copper may build up over the years. These impurities are hardly detectable in the SG blow down. During hideout returns for new steam generators, tubed in Alloy 690 TT, compounds like sulfate, silica and organics are mainly found (in the order of one to ten gram). Following these hideout return analyses, influences of main species were studied through stress corrosion cracking tests. The focus is on sulfates, silica, alumina, copper oxides and organic species such as acetate, formate and oxalate. Moreover, the influence of pH in those concentrated solutions-set using ammonia-is also studied. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests are carried out on new SG's Alloy 690 TT tubes sections, for about 25 different mixtures of the aforementioned species. These tests are accelerated SCC capsule testing because of the use of concentrated media at 320 C and of a highly stressed condition. Highly stressed Alloy 690 TT resists well in most environments, very fast SCC appears only in acidic sulfate medium polluted by Cu. The initiation of SCC for alloy 690 TT depends of the occurrence of the simultaneous presence of 3 key factors: low pH, oxidizing conditions and high stresses. (authors)

  11. Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Han Byul; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Chen Guang; Paik, Jeom Kee

    2014-09-01

    In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR), Common Structural Rules (CSR), and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH) are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS), and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM). To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures

  12. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  13. An experimental study on cavitation erosion-corrosion performance of ANSI 1020 and ANSI 4135 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Leqin; Qiu, Ning [Institute of Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Hellmann, Dieter-Heinz [KSB Aktiengesellschaft, Frankenthal (Germany); Zhu, Xiaowen [Zhejiang Keer Pump Stock Co., Ltd, Whenzhou (China)

    2016-02-15

    Cavitation erosion is quite complex, containing corrosion-erosion interaction effect. High temperature oxidization may be aroused after bubble collapse, accompanied by hot gas contacting with the pump component surface. The analysis of the erosion pits can be an effective way to know the mechanism of cavitation erosion. In present paper, the cavitation erosion resistance of carbon steel (ANSI 1020) and alloy steel (ANSI 4135) were tested in an ultrasonic vibration apparatus. By using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and three dimensional laser microscope, the chemical composition around erosion pits and the oxidation film structure were analyzed. By using metallographic microscope and scanning electronic microscope, the metallographic structure of specimens (e.g., carbon steel and alloy steel), the nano structured iron oxide and corresponding influence on specimen's anti-erosion performance were discussed. Based on the comparison between the different tests performed in distilled water and tap water respectively, results can be obtained that erosion rate of carbon steel and alloy steel varies with the component of water which had close correlation to the oxidation effect. Erosion rate of alloy steel 4135 was much lower in distilled water compared to tap water while the difference of carbon steel 1020 was not that large. The remarkable different responses of these two materials had close relationship with oxidation effect. The oxidation effect transferred the original structure of alloy steel surface which had high anti-erosion capability, into newly generated iron oxide structure, which was preferentially to be attacked. The pumping of slightly corrosive fluids frequently leads to erosion-corrosion damage on impellers, and corrosion can further amplify the erosion process.

  14. Corrosion test of the ferritic-martensitic steel (Gr. 91) in molten Pb.Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yang Il; Park, Jeong Yong; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Lee, Dong Won [Nuclea Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seung Yon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Design concepts for tritium breeding blankets for DEMO and/or fusion power plants are going to be tested by using various types of TBMs (test blanket modules) in ITER. Two TBM systems are proposed by Korea, i.e. a helium-cooled solid breeder (HCSB) blanket and a helium-cooled molten lithium (HCML) blanket, among several candidates. Both the TBMs consist of a ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as a structural material. In particular, FMS contacts with flowing molten metals (Pb.Li or Li) during the operation in the case of HCML blanket. Since FMS is corrosive in a Pb.Li solution, the compatibility of structural materials with breeder materials should be investigated. The compatibility of EUROFER with Pb.Li was tested at temperatures up to 550 .deg. C with PbLi flowing at up to 0.22 m/s for 5000 h in Europe. China performed corrosion tests of CLAM in experimental loops, such as the thermal convection Pb.Li loop (DRAGON I) at 450.500 .deg. C, the high-temperature thermal convection Pb.Li loop (DRAGON II) with up to 700 .deg. C. Japan also tested JLF alloys in the Li loop operated at up to 700 .deg. C. However, Korea does not have any developed FMS nor an experience of the corrosion test of FMS in a Pb.Li loop. The current study may be a first step to the compatibility test of TBM, although the test includes only a static Pb.Li melt

  15. Non-Destructive Testing of Corrosion Under Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    studies indicate that field produced corrosion should be detectable up to at least 8 mils of Mil-PRF- 23377, epoxy primer and Mil- PFR -85582 TYI...longer in service and was decommissioned due to corrosion around fasteners and other locations on the wing. Early detection could have saved this

  16. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  17. Electrochemical characterisation speeds up prediction of corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, E.W.; Hooijmans, J.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    The contents of this presentation show the following elements: Introduction; Corrosion in real life; Why Electrochemical characterisation of corrosion; Applications (corrosion resistance coatings, corrosion behaviour (brazed) joints); Available electrochemical corrosion techniques; Standards; Conclusions. In the Conclusions the corrosion screening method is summarized: ECN method fast; within 1h -1 week results depending on test method; Fast pre-selection of promising materials/combinations (cost savings); Determining of corrosion initiation; Determination of corrosion mechanisms and propagation; Life time predictions possible; Strong combination with metallographic post-investigation; Ranking materials / constructions for corrosion performance.

  18. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  19. Study on H2S stress corrosion test of welded joint for X65 pipeline steel and numerical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓军; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 白秉仁; 李晓巍; 曹军

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of welded joint for the X65 pipeline steel to H2S stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is investigated. SCC tests on the steel are carried out in the environment based on NACE TM-01-77 solution with saturated gaseous H2S. The threshold stress intensity factor and crack propagation velocity are calculated according to wedge-opening loading (WOL) specimens. The three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of WOL specimens is performed by using the FEM programming package ANSYS. Stress field and concentration of hydrogen distribution property ahead of the crack tip are obtained. This paper surveyed the microstructure of welded joint and studied on the mechanical properties of X65 pipeline steel. It provides experimental basis for studying stress corrosion. The results of numerical analysis are consistent with conclusions of stress corrosion test.

  20. Examples Performance Testing Templates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siple, Bud H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this Performance Testing Program Plan is to identify the process and phased approach that will be implemented at Site XYZ . The purpose of the testing program at Site XYZ is specifically designed to evaluate the effectiveness of systems that are employed at this site. This plan defines tasks to be accomplished to ensure that performance testing is conducted as effectively and efficiently as possible.

  1. Testing Corrosion Inhibitors for the Conservation of Archaeological Copper and Copper Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a synopsis of the Ph.D. research undertaken at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. The aim was to evaluate corrosion inhibitors for use in the conservation of copper and copper alloy archaeological artefacts. The objective of this work was to acquire an insight into the performance of copper corrosion inhibitors, when applied to archaeological copper.

  2. Testing the Corrosion Behaviour of Plated Aluminum Strips for Heat Exchangers Operating in the Automotive Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Marek; Opyrchał, Mieczysław; Kłyszewski, Andrzej; Żelechowski, Janusz

    The automotive industry uses heat exchangers made of aluminum alloys. The radiators for an engine cooling system comprise elements (tubes) in which the coolant flows. These elements are made of AlMn alloys (e.g. AlMn or AlMnCu), while ribs are made from the sheet metal plated with AlSi alloys. While in service, the heat exchangers are exposed to harsh weather conditions, hence the need to ensure that the individual elements of the design are adequately protected from corrosion. One of the ways to obtain this protection is by modification of the chemical composition of aluminum alloys used in the manufacture of radiators. In this study, corrosion tests were carried out to characterise the investigated materials in terms of their corrosive behavior. The experiments included measurements of corrosion potential, testing of corrosion resistance in neutral salt spray, and electrochemical studies of selected plated AlMn alloy strips with different chemical composition.

  3. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela;

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...

  4. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  5. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, John P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Cavalli, Matthew N. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2016-06-30

    its standard oxidation, spallation, and corrosion testing, which was scheduled for completion in the spring of 2016. However, because of commercial demands, the tests were not completed by the time of this report except some initial spallation tests at 1150°C. In those tests, several of the APMT plates separated from the CM247LC, likely because of the remaining aluminum oxide scale on the surface of the CM247LC. This implies that surface preparation may need to include machining to remove the oxide scale before bonding rather than just sandblasting. In previous tensile testing at 950°C, the breaks in the tensile samples always occurred in the APMT and not at the joints. Gasifier sampling was completed to determine what types of trace contaminants may occur in cleaned and combusted syngas and that could lead to corrosion or deposition in turbines firing coal syngas. The sampling was done from a pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier and a pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. The particles captured on a filter from syngas were typically 0.2 to 0.5 μm in diameter, whereas those captured from the combusted syngas were slightly larger and more spherical. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed that the particles do not contain any metals and have an atomic composition almost identical to that of the polycarbonate filter. This indicates that the particles are primarily soot-based and not formed from volatilization of metals in the gasifiers.

  6. Effect of Microstructure on the Performance of Corrosion Resistant Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Kishan Roodbari, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion by pitting in aluminum alloys is a very complex process that can be affected by various factors such as chemical composition and microstructure of the alloys. The electrochemistry and distribution of second phases populating the alloy are the main factors that significantly influence the corrosion of aluminum alloys. The purpose of the present work is to contribute to a deeper understanding of how the chemical composition and microstructure affect the ability of an al...

  7. High temperature (salt melt) corrosion tests with ceramic-coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, Adelheid [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Günthner, Martin; Motz, Günter [University Bayreuth, Ceramic Materials Engineering, L.-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Greißl, Oliver [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Schelmenwasenstraße 13-15, D-70567 Stuttgart (Germany); Glatzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.glatzel@uni-bayreuth.de [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Thermal recycling of refuse in waste-to-energy plants reduces the problems connected to waste disposal, and is an alternative source of electric energy. However, the combustion process in waste incinerators results in a fast degradation of the steam-carrying superheater steel tubes by corrosive attack and abrasive wear. Higher firing temperatures are used to increase their efficiency but lead to higher corrosion rates. It is more economical to apply protective coatings on the superheater steel tubes than to replace the base material. In-situ tests were conducted in a waste-to-energy plant first in order to identify and quantify all involved corrosive elements. Laboratory scale experiments with salt melts were developed accordingly. The unprotected low-alloyed steel displayed substantial local corrosion. Corrosion was predominant along the grain boundaries of α-ferrite. The corrosion rate was further increased by FeCl{sub 3} and a mixture of HCL and FeCl{sub 3}. Coatings based on pre-ceramic polymers with specific filler particles were engineered to protect superheater tubes. Tests proved their suitability to protect low-alloYed steel tubes from corrosive attack under conditions typical for superheaterS in waste incinerators, rendering higher firing temperatures in waste-to-energy plants possible. - Highlights: • Corrosion wall thickness losses of 400 μm/2 weeks occurred in a waste incinerator. • Abrasion is a major problem on superheater tubes in waste incinerators. • Laboratory salt melt tests can simulate metal corrosion in waste incinerators. • Corrosion protection coatings for steel (temperature: max. 530 °C) were developed. • Higher steam temperatures are possible in WIs with the developed coatings.

  8. Test and Performance Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Test and performance anxiety is not recognized easily in schools, in large part because adolescents rarely refer themselves for emotional concerns. Not wanting to risk teasing or public attention, anxious adolescents suffer in silence and under perform on school-related tasks. In school, anxiety is experienced often by students when being…

  9. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  10. Potential Effects of Corrosion Damage on the Performance of Reinforced Concrete Member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Noh Hamidun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete is one of the most serious issues for the owners. The main consequences of this phenomenon include loss of cross section of steel area, induced the expansive pressure which caused cracking of concrete, spalling and delaminating of the concrete cover. Thus, it reduces the bond strength between steel reinforcing bar and concrete, and deteriorates the strength of whole structure. In this study, a non-linear finite element analysis was conducted to investigate the potential effects of corrosion damage. A series of corroded reinforced concrete cylinder is used in the parametric study to assess the influence of different level of corrosion to the structural performance. As a result, a clear picture of corrosive expansion was investigated and the relationship between the expansive pressure and the degree of corrosion was identified to be the important factors of the structural deterioration.

  11. Corrosion investigations, Tracy Red Bluff, California, and Boulder City, Nevada, ehv direct current tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backstrom, T.E.

    1965-01-01

    Evaluation of corrosion on buried metalwork, by the introduction of large direct currents into the ground, was studied during ehv dc transmission investigations in the Tracy-Red Bluff, California and the Boulder City, Nevada areas. Tests made on two types of electrodes showed that ehv dc ground return at test current levels would: (1) promote serious corrosion of buried metalwork within approximately 1/2-mile radius of the electrode with a ground mat electrode and mild corrosion with a deep-well electrode; (2) promote negligible-to-serious corrosion of buried pipelines within 1/2 to 3 mile radius of either a ground mat or deep-well electrode, depending on (a) distance of the pipelines from the electrode, (b) geometry of the two electrode-pipeline systems, and (c) horizontal extent of the pipelines; (3) impress negligible-to-mild corrosion of buried pipelines beyond a 3-mile radius of the electrode depending upon geometry of the electrode-pipeline system. Results show normal corrosion prevention techniques will be adequate to prevent corrosion of buried metalwork, if electrode is properly located. Use of ground return for only 8 to 24 hours per year on the ehv intertie, although with currents 2 to 3 times higher than test currents, will cause stray current damage of only a fraction of that expected with continuous operations.

  12. A computational study on corrosion inhibition performances of novel quinoline derivatives against the corrosion of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Şaban; Safi, Zaki S.; Kaya, Savaş; Işın, Dilara Özbakır; Guo, Lei; Kaya, Cemal

    2017-04-01

    In this computational study, the adsorption and corrosion inhibition properties of some novel quinoline derivatives namely, 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-phenyl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q1), 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-(p-tolyl)-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q2), 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile) (Q3) and 2-amino-4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-7-hydroxy-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q4) on the corrosion of iron were investigated using quantum chemical and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. Quantum chemical calculations section of the study provides enough calculation and discussion on the relationship between corrosion inhibition and global reactivity descriptors such as EHOMO, ELUMO, HOMO-LUMO energy gap (ΔE), chemical hardness (η), softness (σ), electronegativity (χ), chemical potential (μ), electrophilicity (ω), nucleophilicity (ɛ), electrons transferred from inhibitors to metal surface (ΔN), initial molecule-metal interaction energy (Δψ), total electronic energy (E), the energy change during electronic back-donation process (ΔEb-d). The adsorption behaviors of studied compounds on Fe (110) surface were investigated with the help of molecular dynamics simulation approach. The binding energies calculated on Fe (110) surface of mentioned quinoline derivatives followed the order: Q4 > Q3 > Q2 > Q1. It should be noted that the results obtained in the study are in good agreement with experimental inhibition efficiency results earlier reported.

  13. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Based Alloys in Simulated Oxy-Fuel Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zuotao; Natesan, Ken; Cai, Zhonghou; Rink, David L.

    2017-02-01

    The long-term corrosion of Fe-based alloys in simulated oxy-fuel environment at 1023 K (750 °C) was studied. Detailed results are presented on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of the corrosion products, and the cracking of scales for the alloys after exposure at 1023 K (750 °C) for up to 3600 hours. An incubation period during which the corrosion rate was low was observed for the alloys. After the incubation period, the corrosion accelerated, and the corrosion process followed linear kinetics. Effects of alloy, CaO-containing ash, and gas composition on the corrosion rate were also studied. In addition, synchrotron nanobeam X-ray analysis was employed to determine the phase and chemical composition of the oxide layers on the alloy surface. Results from these studies are being used to address the long-term corrosion performance of Fe-based alloys in various coal-ash combustion environments and to develop methods to mitigate high-temperature ash corrosion.

  14. The performance analysis of distributed Brillouin corrosion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2013-12-27

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage.

  15. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Based Alloys in Simulated Oxy-Fuel Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zuotao; Natesan, Ken; Cai, Zhonghou; Rink, David L.

    2016-09-01

    The long-term corrosion of Fe-based alloys in simulated oxy-fuel environment at 1023 K (750 °C) was studied. Detailed results are presented on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of the corrosion products, and the cracking of scales for the alloys after exposure at 1023 K (750 °C) for up to 3600 hours. An incubation period during which the corrosion rate was low was observed for the alloys. After the incubation period, the corrosion accelerated, and the corrosion process followed linear kinetics. Effects of alloy, CaO-containing ash, and gas composition on the corrosion rate were also studied. In addition, synchrotron nanobeam X-ray analysis was employed to determine the phase and chemical composition of the oxide layers on the alloy surface. Results from these studies are being used to address the long-term corrosion performance of Fe-based alloys in various coal-ash combustion environments and to develop methods to mitigate high-temperature ash corrosion.

  16. Corrosion inhibition performance of a ionic liquid surfactant Br

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing LIU

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the novel green organic mercury-substituting inhibitors, the ionic liquid surfactant 1-methyl-3-dodecyl imidazole bromide ( Br is synthesized with N-methyl imidazole and 1-bromodecane as raw materials. The corrosion inhibition of Br for zinc in zinc-manganese batteries is investigated using electrochemical methods and weight loss methods. The results show that corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with the increase of the concentration of Br, and when the concentration is higher than 8×10-3 mol/L, the inhibition efficiency tends to be stable. The polarization curve shows that Br belongs to mixed-type corrosion inhibitor. The thermodynamic parameters show that Br is spontaneously adsorbed on the zinc surface, forming a monomolecular adsorption layer, which fits with Langmuir adsorption isotherm with physical and chemical adsorption mechanism.

  17. Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation to improve the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Dahye [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Busan 46742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Junghoon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Kim, Yonghwan [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Busan 46742 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wonsub, E-mail: wschung1@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation was performed using dispersed CuO particles in convectional PEO electrolyte. • Thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance were examined by FT-IR spectroscopy and electrochemical methods, respectively. • Deposited copper oxide on the surface of the Al substrate was enhanced the corrosion resistance and the emissivity compared with the conventional PEO. - Abstract: A composite plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed for enhancing the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al alloy by dispersing cupric oxide (CuO) particles in a conventional PEO electrolyte. Cu-based oxides (CuO and Cu{sub 2}O) formed by composite PEO increased the emissivity of the substrate to 0.892, and made the surface being dark color, similar to a black body, i.e., an ideal radiator. In addition, the corrosion resistance was analyzed using potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. An optimum condition of 10 ampere per square decimeter (ASD) current density and 30 min processing time produced appropriate surface morphologies and coating thicknesses, as well as dense Cu- and Al-based oxides that constituted the coating layers.

  18. Corrosion Protection Performance of Nano-SiO2/Epoxy Composite Coatings in Acidic Desulfurized Flue Gas Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Hu, H. X.; Liu, C. B.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-09-01

    Five kinds of nano-SiO2/epoxy composite coatings were prepared on mild steels, and their corrosion protection performance was evaluated at room temperature (RT) and 50 °C (HT) using electrochemical methods combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of preparation and sealing processes on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings were specially focused on. The results showed that it was favorable for the corrosion protection and durable performance to add the modified nano-SiO2 during rather than after the synthesis of epoxy coatings. Furthermore, the employment of sealer varnish also had beneficial effects. The two better coatings still exhibited higher impedance values even after immersion tests for up to 1000 h at RT and 500 h at HT. SEM revealed that the improvement of corrosion protection performance mainly resulted from the enhancement of coating density. Moreover, the evolution of electrochemical behavior of the two better coatings with immersion time was also discussed by means of fitting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using equivalent circuits with different physical meanings.

  19. External corrosion control of northern pipelines : influence of construction conditions on the performance of coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavinasam, S.; Doiron, A.

    2008-09-15

    Risk management is a key consideration in the construction of northern pipelines operating in harsh environments with extreme temperature conditions and ground movement. As such, it is important to acquire information on the properties of construction materials, including the steel itself, the girth welds that are made in the field and the coating and cathodic protection (CP) that will protect the pipes from corrosion and degradation. The use of polymeric coatings and CP are standard procedures for controlling external corrosion on buried or submerged metallic piping systems. When both systems fail, the pipeline is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This paper described methodologies to evaluate both external coatings under conditions anticipated during construction of the pipelines and to simulate the influence of freeze-thaw settlements on coating. The performance of an external pipeline coating depends on the events that occur during the 5 stages of the coating lifetime, notably manufacture, application, transportation, installation and operation. This paper reported on laboratory experiments that were conducted for 0, 4, 8 and 12 months to simulate 4 months of Canadian winter conditions in which samples were exposed to temperatures as low as -45 degrees C. Cathodic disbondment, impact resistance, flexibility, peel resistance, shearing and soil adhesion were tested. Field experiments were also carried out at Devon and Norman Wells for 0, 12, 24 and 36 months to investigate impact resistance and the squeeze test. The studies showed that Canadian Standards Association (CSA) standards CSA Z662, CSA Z245.20 and CSA Z245.21 adequately cover evaluation of coatings for northern pipelines. However, the pipelines specimens should be exposed for at least 4 months in order to evaluate the effects of low temperatures. 21 refs., 10 tabs., 25 figs., 4 appendices.

  20. Testing the permeability and corrosion resistance of micro-mechanically interlocked joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov-Nielsen, Jeppe; Holm, Allan Hjarbæk; Højsholt, Rune;

    2011-01-01

    Micro-mechanical interlocking (MMI) can be applied to create new and interesting composite materials. We have employed laser structuring to achieve MMI between stainless steel and plastic with extremely high joint strength. However, the water permeability and corrosion resistance of the joint must...... is conducted. The permeability seems to be consistent with the Hagen–Poiseuille equation independent of the laser structuring technique and is orders of magnitudes larger than the diffusion rate through the plastic. Two different types of corrosion tests have been undertaken, and we show that care must...... be taken in order not to degrade the corrosion resistance of the sample to an unacceptable level....

  1. Operation corrosion test of austenitic steel bends for supercritical coal boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cizner J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion tests of both annealed and not annealed bends of HR3C and S304H steels in operation conditions of black and brown coal combustion boilers in EPRU and EDE. After a long-term exposure, the samples were assessed gravimetrically and metallographically. The comparison of annealed and unannealed states showed higher corrosion rates in the annealed state; corrosion of the sample surface did not essentially differ for compression and tensile parts of the beams. Detailed assessment of both steels is described in detail in this study.

  2. System Performance and Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frei, U.; Oversloot, H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter compares and contrasts the system performance of two widely used solar thermal systems using testing and simulation programs. Solar thermal systems are used in many countries for heating domestically used water. In addition to the simple thermosiphon systems, better designed pumped syst

  3. Advanced high-pressure bench-scale reactor for testing with hot corrosive gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Bachta, R.P.; Wangerow, J.R. (Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Mojtahedi, W.; Salo, K. (Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland))

    1994-01-01

    A bench-scale, high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) system is described that is capable of operating at a maximum temperature and pressure of 1,000 C and 30 bar in a corrosive atmosphere. The design of the unit is based on a double-shell balanced-pressure system. All the hot parts of the reactor that are wetted by the corrosive (and/or reactive) gases and the entire sampling line are constructed of inert material to prevent corrosion and loss of the reactant gases. The unit has been used for over 200 high-pressure hot coal gas desulfurization tests at 20 bars and up to 750 C without any experimental problem and with excellent sulfur balance, indicating that this reactor system is ideal for testing with reactive and corrosive gases at elevated pressures and temperatures.

  4. Accelerated growth of oxide film on aluminium alloys under steam: Part II: Effects of alloy chemistry and steam vapour pressure on corrosion and adhesion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The steam treatment of aluminium alloys with varying vapour pressure of steamresulted in the growth of aluminium oxyhydroxide films of thickness range between 450 - 825nm. The surface composition, corrosion resistance, and adhesion of the produced films was characterised by XPS, potentiodynamic...... of the vapour pressure of the steam. The accelerated corrosion and adhesion tests on steam generated oxide films with commercial powder coating verified that the performance of the oxide coating is highly dependent on the vapour pressure of the steam....

  5. Accelerated growth of oxide film on aluminium alloys under steam: Part II: Effects of alloy chemistry and steam vapour pressure on corrosion and adhesion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The steam treatment of aluminium alloys with varying vapour pressure of steamresulted in the growth of aluminium oxyhydroxide films of thickness range between 450 - 825nm. The surface composition, corrosion resistance, and adhesion of the produced films was characterised by XPS, potentiodynamic...... of the vapour pressure of the steam. The accelerated corrosion and adhesion tests on steam generated oxide films with commercial powder coating verified that the performance of the oxide coating is highly dependent on the vapour pressure of the steam....

  6. Corrosion models for predictions of performance of high-level radioactive-waste containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gdowski, G.E. [KMI Energy Services, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The present plan for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the US is to seal it in containers before emplacement in a geologic repository. A proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated for its suitability as a geologic repository. The containers will probably be made of either an austenitic or a copper-based alloy. Models of alloy degradation are being used to predict the long-term performance of the containers under repository conditions. The models are of uniform oxidation and corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking, and are applicable to worst-case scenarios of container degradation. This paper reviews several of the models.

  7. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D' Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  8. Corrosion and mechanical performance of AZ91 exposed to simulated inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Emily K; Der, Stephanie; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, including Mg-9%Al-1%Zn (AZ91), are biodegradable metals with potential use as temporary orthopedic implants. Invasive orthopedic procedures can provoke an inflammatory response that produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and an acidic environment near the implant. This study assessed the influence of inflammation on both the corrosion and mechanical properties of AZ91. The AZ91 samples in the inflammatory protocol were immersed for three days in a complex biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM culture media) that contained serum proteins (FBS), 150 mM of H2O2, and was titrated to a pH of 5. The control protocol immersed AZ91 samples in the same biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM & FBS) but without H2O2 and the acid titration. After 3 days all samples were switched into fresh AMEM & FBS for an additional 3-day immersion. During the initial immersion, inflammatory protocol samples showed increased corrosion rate determined by mass loss testing, increased Mg and Al ion released to solution, and a completely corroded surface morphology as compared to the control protocol. Although corrosion in both protocols slowed once the test electrolyte solution was replaced at 3 days, the samples originally exposed to the simulated inflammatory conditions continued to display enhanced corrosion rates as compared to the control protocol. These lingering effects may indicate the initial inflammatory corrosion processes modified components of the surface oxide and corrosion film or initiated aggressive localized processes that subsequently left the interface more vulnerable to continued enhanced corrosion. The electrochemical properties of the interfaces were also evaluated by EIS, which found that the corrosion characteristics of the AZ91 samples were potentially influenced by the role of intermediate adsorption layer processes. The increased corrosion observed for the inflammatory protocol did not affect the flexural mechanical properties of the AZ91

  9. Hot corrosion performance of a NiCr coated Ni-based alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D. [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2006-07-15

    The hot corrosion performance of high velocity oxy-fuel sprayed Ni-20Cr wire coating on a Ni-based superalloy is evaluated for 1000 h at 900{sup o}C under cyclic conditions in a coal-fired boiler. The performance of bare and Ni-20Cr coated Superni 75 is assessed via thermogravimetric data, metal thickness loss corresponding to the corrosion scale formation, scale thickness loss and the depth of internal corrosion attack. The better hot corrosion resistance of the coated alloy is mainly attributed to the formation of a thick band of chromium oxide just above the scale-substrate interface and chromium oxide stringers along the splat boundaries, as well as to the nickel oxide and the dense and uniform fine grain structure of the as sprayed coating.

  10. Preparation and Testing of Corrosion and Spallation-Resistant Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, John

    2015-11-01

    with the Rene 80. One-inch-diameter buttons were machined from each of the bonded blocks and sent to Siemens for standard oxidation, spallation, and corrosion testing, which should be complete in the spring of 2016.

  11. Effect of hot dip galvanized coating on the corrosion resistance of the external surface of reinforcement steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Oezlem; Topuz, Polat [Gedik University Vocational School, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-02-01

    Studies have been carried out to investigate the performance of hot dip galvanized coating on reinforcement corrosion. The coated and uncoated concrete specimens were subjected to accelerated corrosion to determine the time to corrosion initiation. The accelerated corrosion test results clearly showed that the specimens with hot dip galvanized coatings performed very well against reinforcement corrosion and were better than uncoated specimens.

  12. Lithuanian Quarry Aggregates Concrete Effects of Alkaline Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurimas Rutkauskas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate alkaline corrosion of cement in concrete is going to respond in sodium and potassium hydroxide (lye with active SiO2 found in some aggregates. During this reaction, the concrete has resulted in significant internal stresses which cause deformation of the concrete, cracking and disintegration. The reaction is slow and concrete signs of decomposition appear only after a few months or years. The study used two different aggregates quarries. Studies show that Lithuania gravel contaminated with reactive particles having amorphous silicon dioxide reacting with cement in sodium and potassium hydroxide and the resulting alkaline concrete corrosion. It was found that, according to AAR 2 large aggregates include Group II – potentially reactive because of their expansion after 14 days, higher than 0.1%.

  13. Hot-wall corrosion testing of simulated high level nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, G.T.; Zapp, P.E.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    Three materials of construction for steam tubes used in the evaporation of high level radioactive waste were tested under heat flux conditions, referred to as hot-wall tests. The materials were type 304L stainless steel alloy C276, and alloy G3. Non-radioactive acidic and alkaline salt solutions containing halides and mercury simulated different high level waste solutions stored or processed at the United States Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site. Alloy C276 was also tested for corrosion susceptibility under steady-state conditions. The nickel-based alloys C276 and G3 exhibited excellent corrosion resistance under the conditions studied. Alloy C276 was not susceptible to localized corrosion and had a corrosion rate of 0.01 mpy (0.25 {mu}m/y) when exposed to acidic waste sludge and precipitate slurry at a hot-wall temperature of 150{degrees}C. Type 304L was susceptible to localized corrosion under the same conditions. Alloy G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 {mu}m/y) when exposed to caustic high level waste evaporator solution at a hot-wall temperature of 220{degrees}C compared to 1.1 mpy (28.0 {mu}/y) for type 304L. Under extreme caustic conditions (45 weight percent sodium hydroxide) G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 {mu}m/y) at a hot-wall temperature of 180{degrees}C while type 304L had a high corrosion rate of 69.4 mpy (1.8 mm/y).

  14. Failure analysis of corrosion cracking and simulated testing for a fluid catalytic cracking unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Chen; Xiaogang Li; Chaofang Dong; Ming Li; Jinwen Yang

    2005-01-01

    The failure of a fluid catalysis and cracking unit (FCCU) in a Chinese refinery was investigated by using nondestructive detection methods, fracture surface examination, hardness measurement, chemical composition and corrosion products analysis. The results showed that the failure was caused by the dew point nitrate stress corrosion cracking. For a long operation period, the wall temperature of the regenerator in the FCCU was below the fume dew point. As a result, an acid fume NOx-SOx-H2O medium presented on the surface, resulting in stress corrosion cracking of the component with high residual stress. In order to confirm the relative conclusion, simulated testing was conducted in laboratory, and the results showed similar cracking characteristics. Finally, some suggestions have been made to prevent the stress corrosion cracking of an FCCU from re-occurring in the future.

  15. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Alexander, Joshua B.; Cardenas, Henry E.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2008-01-01

    This work examines field performance of nanoscale pozzolan treatments delivered el ctrokinetically to suppress chloride induced corrosion of concrete reinforcement. The particles are 20 nm silica spheres coated with 2 nm alumina particles that carry a net positive charge. Earlier work demonstrated that the alumina particles were stripped from the silica carriers and formed a dense phase with an interparticle spacing that is small enough to inhibit the transport of solvated chlorides. A D.C. field was used to inject the particles into the pores of concrete specimens, directly toward the mild steel bars that were embedded within each 3 inch diameter by 6 inch length concrete specimen. The voltage was held constant at 25 v per inch of concrete cover for a period of 7 days. These voltages permitted current densities as high as 3 A/sq m. During the final 3 days, a 1 molar solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate was used to provide a source of calcium to facilitate stronger and more densified phase formation within the pores. In a departure from prior work the particle treatments were started concurrent with chloride extraction in order to determine if particle delivery would inhibit chloride transport. Following treatment the specimens were immersed in seawater for 4 weeks. After this posttreatment exposure, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and the steel reinforcement was examined for evidence of corrosion. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted to assess impact on microstructure.

  16. The polymer cement of sulfur as an alternative for the recycling of phosphogypsum. Corrosion testing of cements enriched with phosphogypsum; El cemento polimerico de azufre como alternative para el reciclado de fosfoyesos. Pruebas de corrosion de cementos enriquecidos con fosfoyesos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Lopez, F. A.; Navarro, N.; Sanchez, M.; Sanz, B.; Ballesteros, O.; Higueras, E.; Roman, C. P.

    2011-07-01

    The possibility of the use of cement for the recycling of materials is seen today as sustainable solution of the fertilizer industry for production of matches (NORM). In this paper presents some results of corrosion tests performed on these cements modified using buffer solutions of different pH. The analytical determinations in these matrices are new challenges. (Author)

  17. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hicks, K. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  18. FIELD VALIDATION OF CORROSION RATES FOR LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flitton, M.K. Adler; Seitz, R.R.

    2003-02-27

    Research is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to assess corrosion rates of metals in the subsurface environment in direct support of waste management operations and environmental restoration activities. This research addresses a need identified by Department of Energy-Headquarters when reviewing the performance assessment for the low-level waste disposal facility at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Corrosion rates are a key factor determining release rates of long-lived radionuclides from activated metal waste streams. Radionuclide releases from these wastes are key contributors to the projected long-term dose associated with the disposal facility. Short-term results from the corrosion samples buried for one and three years suggest that the corrosion rates assumed for the assessments are conservative. However, the rates appear to be increasing, thus, future retrievals of coupons will be used to identify whether the increasing trend continues.

  19. Corrosion damage evolution and residual strength of corroded aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhong Zhang; Guozhi Lv; Hui Wang; Bomei Si; Yueliang Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The LY12CZ aluminum alloy specimens were eurroded under the conditions of different test temperatures and exposure durations. After corrosion exposure, fatigue tests were performed. Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscope analyses on corrosion damage were carried out. The definition of surface corrosion damage ratio was provided to describe the extent of surface corrosion damage. On the basis of the measured data sets of the corrosion damage ratio, the probabilistic model of corrosion damage evolution was built. The corrosion damage decreased the fatigue life by a factor of about 1.25 to 2.38 and the prediction method of residual strength of the corroded structure was presented.

  20. Corrosion testing of type 304L stainless steel in tuff groundwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Haberman, J.H.

    1987-11-01

    The stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of Type 304L stainless steel (SS) to elevated temperatures in tuff rock and tuff groundwater environments was determined under irradiated and nonirradiated conditions using U-bend specimens and slow-strain-rate tests. The steel was tested both in the solution-annealed condition and after sensitization heat treatments. The material was found to be susceptible to SCC in both the solution-annealed and solution-annealed-and-sensitized conditions when exposed to an irradiated crushed tuff rock environment containing air and water vapor at 90{sup 0}C. A similar exposure at 50{sup 0}C did not result in failure after a 25-month test duration. Specimens of sensitized 304 SS conditioned with a variety of sensitization heat treatments resisted failure during a test of 1-year duration in which a nonirradiated environment of tuff rock and groundwater held at 200{sup 0}C was allowed to boil to dryness on a cyclical basis. All specimens of sensitized 304 SS exposed to this environment failed. Slow-strain-rate studies were performed on 304L, 304, and 316L SS specimens. The 304L SS was tested in J-13 well water at 150{sup 0}C, and the 316L SS at 95{sup 0}C. Neither material showed evidence of SCC in these tests. Sensitized 304 SS did exhibit SCC in J-13 well water in tests conducted at 150{sup 0}C. 12 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Vapor Space Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gray, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hicks, K. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-30

    As part of an integrated program to better understand corrosion in the high level waste tanks, Hanford has been investigating corrosion at the liquid/air interface (LAI) and at higher areas in the tank vapor space. This current research evaluated localized corrosion in the vapor space over Hanford double shell tank simulants to assess the impact of ammonia and new minimum nitrite concentration limits, which are part of the broader corrosion chemistry limits. The findings from this study showed that the presence of ammonia gas (550 ppm) in the vapor space is sufficient to reduce corrosion over the short-term (i.e. four months) for a Hanford waste chemistry (SY102 High Nitrate). These findings are in agreement with previous studies at both Hanford and SRS which showed ammonia gas in the vapor space to be inhibitive. The presence of ammonia in electrochemical test solution, however, was insufficient to inhibit against pitting corrosion. The effect of the ammonia appears to be a function of the waste chemistry and may have more significant effects in waste with low nitrite concentrations. Since high levels of ammonia were found beneficial in previous studies, additional testing is recommended to assess the necessary minimum concentration for protection of carbon steel. The new minimum R value of 0.15 was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion in the vapor space. The pitting that occurred, however, did not progress over the four-month test. Pits appeared to stop growing, which would indicate that pitting might not progress through wall.

  2. Field Testing of Rapid Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Control of Steel in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E.; Alexander, Joshua B.; Kupwade-Patil,Kunal; Calle, Luz Marina

    2009-01-01

    This work field tested the use of electrokinetics for delivery of concrete sealing nanoparticles concurrent with the extraction of chlorides. Several cylinders of concrete were batched and placed in immersion at the Kennedy Space Center Beach Corrosion Test Site. The specimens were batched with steel reinforcement and a 4.5 wt.% (weight percent) content of sodium chloride. Upon arrival at Kennedy Space Center, the specimens were placed in the saltwater immersion pool at the Beach Corrosion Test Site. Following 30 days of saltwater exposure, the specimens were subjected to rapid chloride extraction concurrent with electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment. The treatments were operated at up to eight times the typical current density in order to complete the treatment in 7 days. The findings indicated that the short-term corrosion resistance of the concrete specimens was significantly enhanced as was the strength of the concrete.

  3. Standard test method for initial screening of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for steel in concrete

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effects of chemical admixtures on the corrosion of metals in concrete. This test method can be used to evaluate materials intended to inhibit chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete. It can also be used to evaluate the corrosivity of admixtures by themselves or in a chloride environment. This test is not applicable for emulsions. 1.2 &solely-SI-units; 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. The Long-Term Corrosion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, D V; Rebak, R B

    2007-03-21

    The long-term corrosion test facility (LTCTF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) consisted of 22 vessels that housed more than 7,000 corrosion test specimens from carbon steels to highly corrosion resistant materials such Alloy 22 and Ti Grade 7. The specimens from LTCTF range from standard weight-loss coupons to U-bend specimens for testing susceptibility to environmentally assisted cracking. Each vessel contained approximately 1000 liters of concentrated brines at 60 C or 90 C. The LTCTF started its operations in late 1996. The thousands of specimens from the LTCTF were removed in August-September 2006. The specimens are being catalogued and stored for future characterization. Previously removed specimens (e.g. 1 and 5 years) are also archived for further studies.

  5. A Study on Accelerated Corrosion Test by Combined Deteriorating Action of Salt Damage and Freeze-Thaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Soon; So, Byung-Tak [Sangmyung University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the accelerated corrosion test by combined deteriorating action of salt damage and freeze-thaw was investigated. freeze-thaw cycle is one method for corrosion testing; corrosion initiation time was measured in four types of concrete samples, i.e., two samples mixed with fly ash (FA) and blast furnace slag (BS), and the other two samples having two water/cement ratio (W/C = 0.6, 0.35) without admixture (OPC60 and OPC35). The corrosion of rebar embedded in concrete occurred most quickly at the 30th freeze-thaw cycle. Moreover, a corrosion monitoring method with a half-cell potential measurement and relative dynamic elastic modulus derived from resonant frequency measures was conducted simultaneously. The results indicated that the corrosion of rebar occurred when the relative dynamic elastic modulus was less than 60%. Therefore, dynamic elastic modulus can be used to detect corrosion of steel bar. The results of the accelerated corrosion test exhibited significant difference according to corrosion periods combined with each test condition. Consequently, the OPC60 showed the lowest corrosion resistance among the samples.

  6. Increased Lifetime for Biomass and Waste to Energy Power Plant Boilers with HVOF Coatings: High Temperature Corrosion Testing Under Chlorine-Containing Molten Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksa, Maria; Tuurna, Satu; Varis, Tommi

    2013-06-01

    Heat exchanger surfaces of waste to energy and biomass power plant boilers experience often severe corrosion due to very aggressive components in the used fuels. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) coatings offer excellent protection for boiler tubes against high temperature corrosion due to their high density and good adherence to the substrate material. Several thermal spray coatings with high chromium content were sprayed with HVOF technique. Their mechanical properties and high temperature corrosion resistance were tested and analyzed. The coating materials included NiCr, IN625, Ni-21Cr-10W-9Mo-4Cu, and iron-based partly amorphous alloy SHS9172 (Fe-25Cr-15W-12Nb-6Mo). High temperature corrosion testing was performed in NaCl-KCl-Na2SO4 salt with controlled H2O atmosphere at 575 and 625 °C. The corrosion test results of the coatings were compared to corrosion resistance of tube materials (X20, Alloy 263 and Sanicro 25).

  7. Evaluation of corrosion on the fuel performance of stainless steel cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Gomes Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear reactors, the use of stainless steel (SS as the cladding material offers some advantages such as good mechanical and corrosion resistance. However, its main advantage is the reduction in the amount of the hydrogen released during loss-of-coolant accident, as observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Hence, research aimed at developing accident tolerant fuels should consider SS as an important alternative to existing materials. However, the available computational tools used to analyze fuel rod performance under irradiation are not capable of assessing the effectiveness of SS as the cladding material. This paper addresses the SS corrosion behavior in a modified fuel performance code in order to evaluate its effect on the global fuel performance. Then, data from the literature concerning to SS corrosion are implemented in the specific code subroutines, and the results obtained are compared to those for Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4 under the same power history. The results show that the effects of corrosion on SS are considerably different from those on Zy-4. The thickness of the oxide layer formed on the SS surface is considerably lower than that formed on Zy-4. As a consequence of this, the global fuel performance of SS under irradiation should be less affected by the corrosion.

  8. Corrosion resistance test based on electrochemical noise-limiting the number of long-lasting and costly climate chamber tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aken, B.B.; Veldman, D.; Gouwen, R.J.; Bende, E.E.; Eerenstein, W.

    2013-10-15

    Damp-heat testing of PV modules is a time-consuming process, taking months. The electrochemical noise (EcN) set-up is a fast, direct corrosion measurement of solar cells, whereby results can be obtained within one hour. EcN measurements are presented for several solar cell concepts and different environments. It correlates with damp-heat degradation involving corrosion, which is rather common in EVA-encapsulated crystalline Si modules. Furthermore, the EcN test can be done as an evaluation tool when probing alternative brands, formulations or processing for metallisation pastes and as a screening test for new batches of metallisation paste.

  9. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alcantara, Naasson P; da Silva, Felipe M; Guimarães, Mateus T; Pereira, Matheus D

    2015-12-24

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works.

  10. A new test procedure for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincke; Verstichel; Monteny; Verstraete

    1999-01-01

    A new test method is described for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete, more specifically in sewer conditions. The aim of the new test method is the development of an accelerated and reproducible procedure for monitoring the resistance of different types of concrete with regard to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion. This experimental procedure reflects worst case conditions by providing besides H2S, also an enrichment of thiobacilli and biologically produced sulfur. By simulating the cyclic processes occurring in sewer pipes, significant differences between concrete mixtures could be detected after 51 days. Concrete modified by a styrene-acrylic ester polymer demonstrated a higher resistance against biogenic sulfuric acid attack.

  11. A prediction method for the general corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 steam generator tube using eddy current testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hee-Sang; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng, E-mail: dhhur@kaeri.re.kr

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • A corrosion test for the tubes with different levels of eddy current noise was conducted. • A relationship between the corrosion rate and the eddy current noise of tubes was explored. • Corrosion rate was closely correlated to the tube noise of a rotating pancake probe. • Corrosion rate was not related to the tube noise measured using a bobbin probe. - Abstract: The purpose of this work is to develop an eddy current testing method to predict the general corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 steam generator tubes. A corrosion test was conducted for tubes with different levels of eddy current noise in simulated primary water at 330 °C, and their corrosion behavior was correlated with the tube noise measured using bobbin and rotating probes. The corrosion behavior was closely correlated with the tube noise measured using a rotating probe. However, there was no correlation between the corrosion behavior and the tube noise measured using a bobbin probe. The tube noise value measured using a rotating pancake coil probe is suggested to be a significant parameter in estimating the general corrosion behavior of tubes.

  12. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  13. Surface interactions, corrosion processes and lubricating performance of protic and aprotic ionic liquids with OFHC copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, Tulia; Sanes, José; Jiménez, Ana-Eva [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Departamento de Ingeniería de Materiales y Fabricación, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Campus de la Muralla del Mar. C/Doctor Fleming, s/n. 30202-Cartagena (Spain); Bermúdez, María-Dolores, E-mail: mdolores.bermudez@upct.es [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Departamento de Ingeniería de Materiales y Fabricación, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Campus de la Muralla del Mar. C/Doctor Fleming, s/n. 30202-Cartagena (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    copper surface. [HMIM]PF{sub 6} shows the lowest mass and roughness changes of the four imidazolium ionic liquids due to the formation of a solid layer containing phosphorus and fluorine. The results described in the present study are in agreement with the outstanding good tribological performance of the diprotic ammonium adipate (DAd) ionic liquid for the copper–copper contact, in pin-on-disc tests, preventing wear and giving a very low friction coefficient of 0.01. Under the same conditions, [HMIM]PF{sub 6} gives a friction value of 0.03, while the reactivity of MSu towards copper produces maximum friction peaks of 0.05. In contrast with the absence of surface damage on copper, an abrasive wear mechanism is observed for MSu and [HMIM]PF{sub 6}. The results confirm a better lubricating performance for a lower corrosion rate.

  14. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In Phase I a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase II (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-8511, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4000 hours of exposure.

  15. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing: Part II. Precipitates by in situ aluminum alloy corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, Chi Bum, E-mail: bahn@anl.go [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kasza, Ken E.; Shack, William J.; Natesan, Ken [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Klein, Paul [The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: Sump strainer head loss testing to evaluate chemical effects. Aluminum hydroxide precipitates by in situ Al alloy corrosion caused head loss. Intermetallic particles released from Al alloy can also cause significant head loss. When evaluating Al effect on head loss, intermetallics should be considered. - Abstract: Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 {sup o}C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH){sub 3} precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

  16. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  17. Salt spray corrosion test of micro-plasma oxidation ceramic coatings on Ti alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic coatings were prepared on Ti-6Al-4V alloy in NaAlO2 solution by micro-plasma oxidation (MPO). The salt spray teste of tne coated samples and the substrates were carried out in a salt spray test machine. The phase composition and surface morphology of the coatings were investigated by XRD and SEM. Severe corrosion occurred on the substrate surface, while there were no obvious corrosion phenomena on the coated samples. The coatings were composed of Al2TiO5 and a little α-Al2O3 and rutile TiO2, and the salt spray test did not change the composition of the coatings. The weight loss rate of the coatings decreased with increasing MPO time because of the increase in density and thickness of the coatings. The surface morphology of the coatings was influenced by salt spray corrosion test Among the coated samples, the coating prepared for 2 h has the best corrosion resistance under salt spray test.

  18. Sub-categorisation of skin corrosive chemicals by the EpiSkin™ reconstructed human epidermis skin corrosion test method according to UN GHS: revision of OECD Test Guideline 431.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alépée, N; Grandidier, M H; Cotovio, J

    2014-03-01

    The EpiSkin™ skin corrosion test method was formally validated and adopted within the context of OECD TG 431 for identifying corrosive and non-corrosive chemicals. The EU Classification, Labelling and Packaging Regulation (EU CLP) system requires the sub-categorisation of corrosive chemicals into the three UN GHS optional subcategories 1A, 1B and 1C. The present study was undertaken to investigate the usefulness of the validated EpiSkin™ test method to identify skin corrosive UN GHS Categories 1A, 1B and 1C using the original and validated prediction model and adapted controls for direct MTT reduction. In total, 85 chemicals selected by the OECD expert group on skin corrosion were tested in three independent runs. The results obtained were highly reproducible both within (>80%) and between (>78%) laboratories when compared with historical data. Moreover the results obtained showed that the EpiSkin™ test method is highly sensitive (99%) and specific (80%) in discriminating corrosive from non-corrosive chemicals and allows reliable and relevant identification of the different skin corrosive UN GHS subcategories, with high accuracies being obtained for both UN GHS Categories 1A (83%) and 1B/1C (76%) chemicals. The overall accuracy of the test method to subcategorise corrosive chemicals into three or two UN GHS subcategories ranged from 75% to 79%. Considering those results, the revised OECD Test Guideline 431 permit the use of EpiSkin™ for subcategorising corrosive chemicals into at least two classes (Category 1A and Category 1B/1C).

  19. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  20. In situ corrosion testing of various nickel alloys at Måbjerg waste incineration plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Hansson, A. N.; Jensen, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of waste in Denmark is disposed via waste to energy (WTE) incineration plants which are fabricated from carbon steel. However, due to the increasing corrosiveness of waste over the years, more corrosion resistant alloys are required. In Denmark, Inconel 625 (UNSN06625) is the weld....... The composition of the deposits from the exposed waterwall panels was also analysed each time sections were removed. This paper will compare the various nickel alloys in the two areas and assess the results of the long‐term testing project....

  1. Matching marine corrosion: new accelerated test gives good correlation with outdoor exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeflaak, M.

    2004-01-01

    An extensive study of the corrosion resistance of a large number and a large variety of coatings systems for steel protection has been carried out. With these, three types of accelerated tests have been correlated with observerations from two years of outdoor exposure in a marine environment, and a

  2. Corrosion Performance of Composite Galvanic Coatings with Variable Concentration of Polymeric Nanoaggregates and/or Cr(III) Conversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Taheri, P.; Tsvetkova, N.; Boshkov, N.; Van Breugel, K.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the corrosion performance of composite zinc layers (~ 8µm) on a steel substrate, considering the influence of nano-aggregates and Cr(III) conversion layers, compared to control (only Zn layers) conditions. The main factors, influencing the corrosion performance of Zn in this

  3. Corrosion Performance of Composite Galvanic Coatings with Variable Concentration of Polymeric Nanoaggregates and/or Cr(III) Conversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Taheri, P.; Tsvetkova, N.; Boshkov, N.; Van Breugel, K.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the corrosion performance of composite zinc layers (~ 8µm) on a steel substrate, considering the influence of nano-aggregates and Cr(III) conversion layers, compared to control (only Zn layers) conditions. The main factors, influencing the corrosion performance of Zn in this st

  4. Fatigue performance of blade steel T552 in a corrosive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušek, J.; Hřeben, S.; Špirit, Z.; Strejcius, J.; Kasl, J.

    2017-02-01

    This contribution is based on an experimental programme which deals with the issue of blade steel T552 corrosion fatigue damage. The specimens were taken from a reference material delivered for blade production and tested in a corrosion cell under pre-stress of 300 MPa. A chloride solution of 35 ppm was chosen as the environment at a temperature of 80 °C. Such an environment can be considered as the limit state that should not occur during the operating regime. The results are summarized and compared with experiments conducted at another workplace.

  5. Update on the validation and regulatory acceptance of alternative tests for skin corrosion and irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentem, Julia H; Botham, Philip A

    2004-06-01

    The European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) has supported validation studies on in vitro tests for skin corrosion, resulting in the validities of four alternative tests being endorsed. The US Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) has also evaluated the validity of these alternative methods for skin corrosion testing. In the European Union, a new Test Method on Skin Corrosion (B.40), incorporating the rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance and human skin model assays, was included in Annex V of Directive 67/548/EEC in mid-2000. At an international level, two OECD Test Guidelines (430 and 431) on these alternative methods have been approved as of May 2002. To date, there are no validated in vitro tests for predicting the dermal irritancy of chemicals. ECVAM supported prevalidation studies on five in vitro tests for acute skin irritation during 1999-2001. These tests were based on human, pig and mouse skin. However, none of them met the criteria set for inclusion in a large-scale formal validation study. Following additional work on the test protocols and/or prediction models, it appears that several modified tests could now be ready for validation in 2003.

  6. Corrosion performance of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe aluminide alloys in complex gas environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Alumina-forming structural alloys can offer superior resistance to corrosion in the presence of sulfur-containing environments, which are prevalent in coal-fired fossil energy systems. Further, Fe aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in these systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. In addition, surface coatings of Fe aluminide are being developed to impart corrosion resistance to structural alloys. This paper describes results from an ongoing program that is evaluating the corrosion performance of alumina-forming structural alloys, Fe-Al and Fe aluminide bulk alloys, and Fe aluminide coatings in environments typical of coal-gasification and combustion atmospheres. Experiments were conducted at 650-1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HCl-containing gases. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales and to determine the modes of corrosion degradation that occur in the materials when they are exposed to S/Cl-containing gaseous environments.

  7. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  8. Corrosion performance of martensitic stainless steel seamless pipe for linepipe application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Mitsuo; Miyata, Yukio; Toyooka, Takaaki; Murase, Fumio [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Handa, Aichi (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion performance of two types of weldable martensitic stainless steel seamless pipe for pipeline application is investigated. 11Cr steel pipe developed for sweet environment gives better resistance to CO{sub 2} corrosion than the 13Cr martensitic stainless steel for OCTG. 12Cr steel pipe developed for light sour environment shows good SSC resistance in a mild sour environment and superior CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance at high temperature and high CO{sub 2} partial pressure condition. The suitable condition for the 11Cr steel pipe and the 12Cr steel pipe in sweet environment, and the critical pH and H{sub 2}S partial pressure for the 12Cr steel pipe welded joint in sour environment are clarified. Both welded joints have superior resistance to hydrogen embrittlement under the cathodic protection condition in sea water.

  9. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation...

  10. Standard Practice for Making and Using U-Bend Stress-Corrosion Test Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for making and using U-bend specimens for the evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in metals. The U-bend specimen is generally a rectangular strip which is bent 180° around a predetermined radius and maintained in this constant strain condition during the stress-corrosion test. Bends slightly less than or greater than 180° are sometimes used. Typical U-bend configurations showing several different methods of maintaining the applied stress are shown in Fig. 1. 1.2 U-bend specimens usually contain both elastic and plastic strain. In some cases (for example, very thin sheet or small diameter wire) it is possible to form a U-bend and produce only elastic strain. However, bent-beam (Practice G 39 or direct tension (Practice G 49)) specimens are normally used to study stress-corrosion cracking of strip or sheet under elastic strain only. 1.3 This practice is concerned only with the test specimen and not the environmental aspects of stress-corrosion testing which are discus...

  11. Use of electrochemical tests for assessment of corrosion-erosion synergism in bare and TiN-coated stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Diana Maria; Congote, Juan Pablo; Cano, Jose Ricardo; Toro, Alejandro [Tribology and Surfaces Group - GTS, National University of Colombia, Cra 80 N 65-223, Medellin (Colombia); Tschiptschin, Andre Paulo [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes 2463 / CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The mechanisms of degradation of TiN -coated stainless steels under static corrosion, liquid impingement and corrosion-erosion were studied as a function of the mean impact velocity and mean impingement angle. Micro-cutting, intergranular corrosion, pitting corrosion and spalling of the TiN layer were observed depending on the test conditions. The response of the coated surfaces changed from ductile to brittle behavior as a function of the mean impact velocity. Adherence between the substrate and the TiN coating, which was evaluated with the aid of electrochemical measurements, played a central role in corrosion-erosion resistance of the surfaces. Low adherence was related to the occurrence of an anodic peak in polarization curves obtained in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 3.5% NaCl solution, either with solids - free solution (liquid impingement) or with addition of 30 wt-% quartz sand particles (corrosion-erosion). Synergism between uniform corrosion and erosive attack was evaluated by measuring the shift in the critical current density for all the materials tested. On the other hand, the pitting potential measured in dynamic corrosion and corrosion-erosion conditions was always higher than that obtained under static corrosion. However, the number of pits increased with the mean impact velocity. This indicates that agitation was beneficial to avoid the acidification and growing of the pit, although a higher amount of preferential locals for pit initiation were created with respect to the static tests. No effect of the mean impact angle was observed on the pitting potential. The electrochemical tests were also used to evaluate the effectiveness of the passivation process under the combined action of the corrosive fluid and impacting particles. In a general way, the increase in impact velocity led to an increase in the passive current density of all the materials tested. (authors)

  12. Investigation of the corrosion performance of different braze fillers fused onto stainless steel type 1.4401 (UNS S31600)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.; Eklund, T.; Persson, O. [Alfa Laval Corporate AB, Tumba (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Corrosion measurements were performed on a new iron based braze filler, AlfaNova{sup 1} developed by Alfa Laval. The braze filler was fused onto stainless steel type EN 1.4401 (UNS S31600). The susceptibility to general corrosion, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion was evaluated by gravimetrical and electrochemical methods as well as metallographical examination of the samples. Different sample configurations were utilised, which simulate the geometry of a braze joint in a plate heat exchange. The results were compared with a selection of commercial nickel-based braze fillers. It was shown that the newly developed iron-based braze filler had similar corrosion resistance as the commercially available nickel-based fillers. It was seen that the precipitation of intermetallic phases due to melting point depressants had a governing effect on the corrosion resistance of the braze joint. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  14. Some important considerations in the development of stress corrosion cracking test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Novak, S. R.; Williams, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of some of the precaution needs the development of fracture-mechanics based test methods for studying stress corrosion cracking involves. Following a review of pertinent analytical fracture mechanics considerations and of basic test methods, the implications for test corrosion cracking studies of the time-to-failure determining kinetics of crack growth and life are examined. It is shown that the basic assumption of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics analyses must be clearly recognized and satisfied in experimentation and that the effects of incubation and nonsteady-state crack growth must also be properly taken into account in determining the crack growth kinetics, if valid data are to be obtained from fracture-mechanics based test methods.

  15. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehm, F., E-mail: frederik.nehm@iapp.de; Müller-Meskamp, L.; Klumbies, H.; Leo, K. [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10{sup −5} g(H{sub 2}O)/m{sup 2}/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  16. Single-Crystal NiAl-X Alloys Tested for Hot Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Single-crystal nickel aluminide (NiAl) has been investigated extensively throughout the last several years as a potential structural material in aero-gas turbine engines. The attractive features of NiAl in comparison to Ni-base superalloys include a higher melting point, lower density, higher thermal conductivity, and excellent oxidation resistance. However, NiAl suffers from a lack of ductility and fracture toughness at low temperatures and a low creep strength at high temperatures. Alloying additions of hafnium (Hf), gallium (Ga), titanium (Ti), and chromium (Cr) have each shown some benefit to the mechanical properties over that of the binary alloy. However, the collective effect of these alloying additions on the environmental resistance of NiAl-X was unclear. Hence, the present study was undertaken to examine the hot corrosion behavior of these alloys. A companion study examined the cyclic oxidation resistance of these alloys. Several single-crystal NiAl-X alloys (where X is Hf, Ti, Cr, or Ga) underwent hot corrosion testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Samples were tested for up to 300 1-hr cycles at a temperature of 900 C. It was found that increasing the Ti content from 1 to 5 at.% degraded the hot corrosion behavior. This decline in the behavior was reflected in high weight gains and large corrosion mound formation during testing (see the figures). However, the addition of 1 to 2 at.% Cr to alloys containing 4 to 5 at.% Ti appeared to greatly reduce the susceptibility of these alloys to hot corrosion attack and negated the deleterious effect of the increased Ti addition.

  17. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  18. H2S Stress Corrosion Tests of Welded Joint for X65 Pipeline Steel and Finite Element Numerical Analysis of Crack Tip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓军; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 白秉仁; 李小巍; 曹军

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure of welded joint is surveyed and the mechanical properties of X65 pipeline steel are studied in this paper, which provides experimental basis of performance effect on stress corrosion. H2S stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests on the steel are carried out in the environment based on NACE TM-01-77 solution. The threshold stress intensity factor and crack propagation velocity for base metal and HAZ are obtained. The susceptibility of welded joint for X65 pipeline steel to H2S stress corrosion cracking is investigated. The programming package ANSYS of finite element model (FEM) is used to perform the three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of WOL specimens. Stress field and concentration of hydrogen distribution property of the crack tip are obtained.

  19. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data: Implications on C6H15NO3 effectiveness on concrete steel-rebar corrosion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joshua Olusegun Okeniyi; Idemudia Joshua Ambrose; Stanley Okechukwu Okpala; Oluwafemi Michael Omoniyi; Isaac Oluwaseun Oladele; Cleophas Akintoye Loto; Patricia Abimbola Idowu Popoola

    2014-06-01

    In this study, corrosion test-data of steel-rebar in concrete were subjected to the fittings of the Normal, Gumbel and the Weibull probability distribution functions. This was done to investigate the suitability of the results of the fitted test-data, by these distributions, for modelling the effectiveness of C6H15NO3, triethanolamine (TEA), admixtures on the corrosion of steel-rebar in concrete in NaCl and in H2SO4 test-media. For this, six different concentrations of TEA were admixed in replicates of steel-reinforced concrete samples which were immersed in the saline/marine and the microbial/industrial simulating test-environments for seventy-five days. From these, distribution fittings of the non-destructive electrochemical measurements were subjected to the Kolmogorov–Smirnov goodness-of-fit statistics and to the analyses of variance modelling for studying test-data compatibility to the fittings and testing significance. Although all fittings of test-data followed similar trends of significant testing, the fittings of the corrosion rate test data followed the Weibull more than the Normal and the Gumbel distribution fittings, thus supporting use of the Weibull fittings for modelling effectiveness. The effectiveness models on rebar corrosion, based on these, identified 0.083% TEA with optimal inhibition efficiency, $\\eta =$ 72.17 ± 10.68%, in NaCl medium while 0.667% TEA was the only admixture with positive effectiveness, $\\eta =$ 56.45±15.85%, in H2SO4 medium. These results bear implications on the concentrations of TEA for effective corrosion protection of concrete steel-rebar in saline/marine and in industrial/microbial environments.

  20. Wear and corrosion performances of new friction materials for automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Samur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, after a NiCr bond layer was deposited on a pearlitic, grey cast iron rotor disc of the kind used in a production passenger car (Toyota Corolla 1600 cc, Cr3C2-NiCr and Al2O3-TiO2powders were sprayed using High Velocity Oxygen Fuel(HVOF and plasma spray processes, respectively. The discs were subjected to cosmetic corrosion test according to SAE J2334 test standard. Additionally, wear tests were carried out using a reciprocating wear tester by rubbing a 10 mm diameter Al2O3 ball on the specimens machined from rotor discs in salt solution. It was found that the Cr3C2-NiCr coating (HSCN sprayed using HVOF method exhibited highest hardness and highest corrosion and wear resistances.

  1. Corrosion fatigue behavior of fastening hole structure and virtual crack propagation tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhong Zhang; Xinlong Chang; Guozhi Lv; Hui Wang; Zhong Li; Yueliang Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of the LY12CZ aluminum alloy fastener involving a central hole in air or in 3.5wt% NaC1 solution was investigated. The experimental results indicated that the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate decreased with the increasing loading frequency, and in a corrosive environment, the crack growth rate was slightly larger than that in air.Based on the experimental results, the virtual corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were investigated and the stochastic process method and the AFGROW simulation method were presented. The normal process and lognormal process were considered for the stochastic process method based on the numerically fitted Paris equation. The distribution of crack size and the corresponding prob-abilistic model of crack length distribution for a given number of cycles can be found by integrating the stochastic process over time.Using the AFGROW software, the virtual simulation was carried out to analyze the corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior and the predicted crack growth curve was in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MEETING ON DOUBLE-SHELL TANK CORROSION MONITORING AND TESTING HELD AUGUST 4-5 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) on Double-Shell Tank Corrosion Monitoring and Testing has been overseeing the Fiscal Year FY 2008 experimental program being performed at CC Technologies (CCT) to optimize the chemistry control for corrosion limits in Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). The EPOC met at the M & D Professional Services Conference Facility on August 4 and 5, 2008 to discuss various aspects of that responsibility including FY 2009 planning. Formal presentations were made to update the EPOC on the these subjects.

  3. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weddings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segarra, J. A.; Calderon, B.; Portoles, A.

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS). The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior. (Author)

  4. Corrosion performances of modified 13Cr for OCTG in oil and gas environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linne, C.P.; Blanchard, F.; Guntz, G.C. [Vallourec Research Center, Aulnoye Aymeries (France); Orlans-Joliet, B.J. [Vallourec Oil and Gas, Aulnoye Aymeries (France)

    1997-08-01

    Martensitic and duplex steels are increasingly used in the oil and gas industries when high CO{sub 2} environments are encountered. Nevertheless, very often the field conditions make traditional 13% Cr steel insufficient due to its limited corrosion resistance and the duplex being too expensive. This paper is aimed at evaluating the performances of new 95 ksi grade and new 110 ksi grade supermartensitic 13Cr-5Ni-2Mo steel for sweet and slightly sour environments. Mechanical properties at room temperature and high temperatures, Sulfide Stress Cracking (SSC) and Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) resistance, and localized and weight loss corrosion resistance have been investigated on both modified 13% Cr, traditional 13% Cr and duplex 22% Cr and 25% Cr. Supermartensitic 13Cr-5Ni-2Mo proved to be an interesting alternative to the traditional CRAs for use as Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) in typical North Sea environments (high chloride, high temperature, high CO{sub 2} wells containing H{sub 2}S) with improved corrosion resistance properties.

  5. Corrosion protection performance of single and dual Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) coating for aerospace applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhan Kumar, A., E-mail: princemadhank@gmail.com; Kwon, Sun Hwan; Jung, Hwa Chul; Shin, Kwang Seon

    2015-01-15

    Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) coatings are known to be one of the most appropriate method for corrosion protection of magnesium (Mg) alloy. The improvement of PEO coatings and the optimization of their surface aspects are of major importance. In this current work, the influence of dual PEO coating on strip-cast AZ31 Mg alloy substrate has been evaluated with the aim of improving the surface and corrosion protection aspects. For this purpose, AZ31 Mg substrates are subjected to single and dual PEO processing in silicate and phosphate electrolyte under similar condition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed that the number of pores in PEO coating processed in silicate electrolyte is higher than others. X-ray diffraction analysis of PEO coatings showed that the surface coating is mainly comprised of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, Mg{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and MgO with different quantity based on PEO processing. Compared with the AZ31 Mg, the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) of both type PEO coatings was positively shifted about 250–400 mV and the corrosion current density (i{sub corr}) was lowered by 3-4 orders of magnitude as result of adequate corrosion protection to the Mg alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution. All of the observation obviously showed that the dual PEO coating provides better corrosion protection performance than their respective single due to its synergistic beneficial effect. - Highlights: • Influence of dual PEO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy substrate was evaluated. • XRD confirmed formation of thin MgO inner, Mg{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} outer layer. • SEM results showed uniform coating with no cracks and relatively less micro pores. • Micro hardness of dual PEO coatings is higher than single PEO coatings. • Dual coating provides superior corrosion performance due to its synergistic effect.

  6. A New Approach of Studying Correlation between Outdoor Exposure and Indoor Accelerated Corrosion Test for High Polymer Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lixia; LI Xiaogang; ZHANG Sanping

    2006-01-01

    The correlation between outdoor exposure and indoor accelerated corrosion test for high polymer materials was investigated according to the variation of the functional group of exposure models aged. Environment aging intensities at different zones ( Wuhan and Lasa with the same latitude ) and the influences of indoor accelerating factors including water and ultraviolet on weathering performance of high polymer materials were also studied by comparing different indoor accelerated corrosion testing results. The experimental results show that: by testing variations of carbonyl exponent of polythene ( which represented the degradation behavior of highpolymer materials due to ultraviolet oxidation of double bond) and ultraviolet absorbance of polycarbonate ( which represented the degradation behavior of high polymer materials due to abevacuation of branched chain), the degradation behavior of high polymer materials could be studied. Carbonyl exponent of polythene exposed in Wuhan and Lasa for 1 year was equal to that exposed in indoor cycle ultraviolet for 128 h and 170 h, respectively, the ultraviolet absorbance of polycarbonate exposed in Wuhan for 1 year was equal to that exposed in indoor cycle ultraviolet for 240 h. The ratio of environment aging intensity of Lasa to Wuhan was around 1.2. With the prolongation of cycle accelerated ultraviolet exposure time, the variations of carbonyl exponent of polythene and the ultraviolet absorbance of polycarbonate were in the same shape of first order exponential decay curve. Accompanied with ultraviolet, the effect of water condensated on the sample on weathering performance of polythene was more significant than that of polycarbonate.

  7. Evaluation of fibrin-based dermal-epidermal organotypic cultures for in vitro skin corrosion and irritation testing of chemicals according to OECD TG 431 and 439.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Mariana; Pérez, David; Correa, Luis; Restrepo, Luz

    2016-10-01

    Reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) models have been used for in vitro testing of the potential harmful effects of exposure to chemical compounds on health. In the past, skin irritation and corrosion were evaluated in animal models; however, in recent years, due to the bioethics implications of the method and, to minimize the use of experimental animals, alternative procedures have been proposed. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in its test guidelines (TG) 431 and 439 indicates the requirements for validating new methods for the evaluation of skin corrosion and irritation, respectively. Here, we present an in-house human dermal-epidermal model, useful for the performance of these tests. Using the methods described in this work, it was possible to obtain human fibrin-based dermal-epidermal organotypic skin cultures (ORGs) displaying similar histological characteristics to native skin and expressing specific differentiation epithelial proteins. The end points to classify a substance as irritant or corrosive were cell viability evaluated by MTT assay, and cytokine release measured by BD CBA for human inflammatory cytokines. According to the MTT test, the ORGs correctly classified irritating and corrosive substances. Moreover, the cytokine release assay was difficult to interpret in the context of testing chemical hazard classification. Further experiments are needed to validate this new model for the evaluation of surfactants because the fibrin matrix was affected in the presence of these substances.

  8. Effects of Corrosion Inhibitors on Lubrication Performance of Rolling Oil for Copper Foil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Sang; Sun Jianlin; Zeng Yingfeng; Xu Yang

    2014-01-01

    The 2,5-bis(ethyldisulfanyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazole (T561), benzotriazole (BTA), 1-N, N-bis (2-ethylhexyl) amino-methyl-4-methyl-1h-benzotriazole (IRGAMET39) and 1-[N, N-bis (2-ethylhexyl) aminomethyl] methyl benzotriazole (TT-LX) have been evaluated as corrosion inhibitors used in rolling oil for cold rolling of copper foil. The MRS-10A four-ball friction and wear tests have been carried out to compare their tribological properties, and the lubricating performance of rolling oils has been studied through rolling experiments. The oil sample containing IRGAMET 39 has the same PB value as that one containing T561, with the coefifcient of friction increased by 35.6%and wear scar diameter decreased by 4%. The minimum rolling gauge has been studied after rolling lubrication, but the results show that inhibitors have no effect on it. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analyses have indicated that the inhibitor is adsorbed on the copper surface to prevent copper from being corroded easily. In addition, the LEXT OLS4000 laser confo-cal microscopy has been used to observe the foil surface which shows that the streaks of foil surface are clear, the scratches are shallow and the surface failure is improved effectively.

  9. Effect of sewage sludge ash (SSA on the mechanical performance and corrosion levels of reinforced Portland cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andión, L. G.ª

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a study conducted to determinecorrosion in reinforcement embedded in Portland cement(PC mortars with different percentages of sewage sludgeash (SSA admixtures. The polarization resistancetechnique was used to determine the steel corrosion rate(Icorr in the test specimens. The samples were subjectedto different environmental conditions and aggressiveagents: 100% relative humidity (RH, accelerated carbonationat 70% RH and seawater immersion. Portlandcement was partially substituted for SSA in the mixes atrates of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 60% (by mass to make thedifferent mortars. The results show that where cementwas replaced by SSA at rates of up to 10% by mass,mortar corrosion performance was comparable to thebehaviour observed in SSA-free mortars (control mortar:0% SSA. Data for higher rates are also shown. From themechanical standpoint, SSA exhibited moderate pozzolanicactivity and the best performance when SSA wasadded at a rate of 10% to mixes with a water/(binder:PC + SSA (w/b ratio of 0.5.Se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosion que presentan lasarmaduras embebidas en morteros fabricados con cementoPortland (CP con diferentes porcentajes de sustitucion deceniza de lodo de depuradora (CLD. Se ha utilizado la tecnicade la Resistencia a la Polarizacion para determinar lavelocidad de corrosion del acero embebido en las muestrasestudiadas. Las muestras se han sometido a diferentes condicionesambientales y agentes agresivos: 100% de humedadrelativa (HR, carbonatacion acelerada al 70% HR einmersion en agua de mar. Para la fabricacion de los distintosmorteros, el cemento Portland ha sido parcialmente sustituidopor CLD en los siguientes porcentajes en masa: 0,10, 20, 30 y 60%. Los resultados muestran que sustitucionesde cemento por CLD de hasta el 10% en masa no alteranel comportamiento frente a la corrosion de los morterosal compararlos con los morteros libres de CLD (morteroscontrol: 0% de sustitucion de cemento por CLD. Se

  10. Corrosion and Deterioration Testing in the Humid Tropic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-21

    Isthmus. TRTC has control over three exposure sites (Table D-2). Two of them ( Cerro Tigre and Horoko) are considered forest exposure sites located...on duty 24 hours a day. TABLE D-2. EXPOSURE SITES ON THE PACIFIC SIDE OF PANAMA EXPOSURE SITE LATITUDE LONGITUDE Cerro Tigre 9° 3󈧻.01"N 79...37󈧯.70"W Horoko 8°57󈧷.98"N 79°36󈧜.23"W Corozal 8°59𔄀.73"N 79°34𔄂.59"W a. The test area in Cerro Tigre has a variety of exposure sites

  11. Demonstration and Validation of Two Coat High Performance Coating System for Steel Structures in Corrosive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    environmental challenges. ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental...have many steel structures in the base infrastructure that encounter problems with atmospheric corro- sion. Maintenance and repair costs due to the...were Mr. Dan- iel J. Dunmire (OUSD (AT&L) Corrosion), Mr. Bernie Rodriguez (IMPW- E), and Ms. Valerie D. Hines (DAIM-ODF). The work was performed by

  12. Standard Practice for Recording Data from Atmospheric Corrosion Tests of Metallic-Coated Steel Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for recording data of atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic-coated steel specimens. Its objective is the assurance of (1) complete identification of materials before testing, (2) objective reporting of material appearance during visual inspections, and (3) adequate photographic, micrographic, and chemical laboratory examinations at specific stages of deterioration, and at the end of the tests. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. The Hot Corrosion Performance of NiCr-Cr3 C2 Cermet Coating to Boiler Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DINGZhang-xiong; TUGuo-fu

    2004-01-01

    Three kinds of NiCr-Cr3 C2 cermet coatings were designed and deposited by the subsonic velocity flame spraying, and their performances of hot corrosion performance were evaluated in comt)arison with 102G,20G boiler tube steel, FeCrAl, NiCrTi, Ni5OCr and NiCrAIMoFe-Cr3 C2 coatings, which are widely used at present for protection of boiler tubes. Meanwhile, the influence of sealer on the hot corrosion resistance of warious coatings and the mechanisms of coating corrosion were explored.

  14. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  15. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-01

    In Phase 1 a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347 RA-85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 Ta modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for approximately 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were assembled on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, the probe was installed in the reheater activity of the boiler and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The results will be presented for the preliminary metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 16,000 hours of exposure. Continued metallurgical and interpretive analysis is still on going.

  16. Standard test method for measurement of corrosion potentials of Aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measurement of the corrosion potential (see Note 1) of an aluminum alloy in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride with enough hydrogen peroxide added to provide an ample supply of cathodic reactant. Note 1—The corrosion potential is sometimes referred to as the open-circuit solution or rest potential. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Middle term immersion corrosion tests on metal-salt hydrate pairs used for latent heat storage in the 32 to 36 C temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabeza, L.F.; Illa, J.; Roca, J.; Badia, F. [Univeritat de Lleida (Spain). Dept. de Matematica; Mehling, H.; Hiebler, S.; Ziegler, F. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, Div. of Energy Conversion and Storage, Garching (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Thermal energy storage is required in order to utilize alternative energy sources, which often are available at times when energy is not needed. The main applications of phase change materials (PCMs) in thermal energy storage are when space restrictions limit larger thermal storage units. To ensure long term stability of recipients and containers in energy storage facilities, corrosion must be avoided. In the present work, we studied corrosion stability of different common metals (aluminum, brass, copper, steel, and stainless steel) and tested their corrosion resistance in contact with salt hydrates that are used as PCMs (zinc nitrate hexahydrate) using the immersion corrosion test method. In a former paper, short term tests were presented. As a consequence of the results from those experiments several combinations of construction material and PCM could be ruled out. In this paper, middle term tests were performed in different conditions, such as the accessibility to oxygen in the sample and contact with graphite. These experiments allowed us to choose the best metal to be used with each salt hydrate, and combinations that should be definitely avoided. (orig.)

  18. Energy Dispersive X-Ray and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies for Performance and Corrosion Analysis of PEMWEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, S. M., Iii; Zhang, F.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolyzers (PEMWEs) are a promising energy storage technology due to their high efficiency, compact design, and ability to be used in a renewable energy system. Before they are able to make a large commercial impact, there are several hurdles facing the technology today. Two powerful techniques for both in-situ and ex- situ characterizations to improve upon their performance and better understand their corrosion are electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively. In this paper, the authors use both methods in order to characterize the anode gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEMWE cell and better understand the corrosion that occurs in the oxygen electrode during electrolysis.

  19. Benchmark Cea - AREVA NP - EDF of the corrosion facilities for VHTR material testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabet, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SCCME), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Terlain, A.; Seran, J.L.; Girardin, G.; Kaczorowski, D. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DMN), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blat, M. [AREVA NP - NTC-F, Technical Center Le Creusot, 71 - Le Creusot (France); Dubiez Le Goff, S. [Electricite de France (EDF R and D), Chemistry and Corrosion group, MMC Dept., 77 - Moret sur Loing (France)

    2007-07-01

    Within the framework of the ANTARES program, the French Cea, AREVA-NP and EDF have launched a joint program on metallic materials for application in innovative Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Since corrosion is highly sensitive to environmental conditions, material studies require dedicated facilities that permit a strict control of the metallic specimen environment throughout the entire exposure. Cea, AREVA-NP and EDF have developed experimental setups respectively under the names CORALLINE and CORINTH, the Chemistry Loop and ESTEREL; these high temperature helium flow systems are fitted with hygrometers and gas analyzers. A benchmarking procedure was defined to inter-validate these lab devices. It is composed of two tests. The joint protocol has set the operating parameters. Process atmospheres are made of helium with 200 {mu}bar H{sub 2}, 20 {mu}bar CH{sub 4}; the CO content reaches 50 {mu}bar for test 1 while it is reduced to 5 {mu}bar CO in test 2. The residual water vapor concentration shall be lower than 3{mu}bar. Corrosion is assessed by mass change associated to observations and analyses of the corroded coupons considering the surface scales (nature, morphology and thickness), the internal oxidation (nature, distribution and depth) and the possible carburization/decarburization (type and depth). For benchmark test 1, Cea, AREVA-NP and EDF produced similar results in terms of operation of the tests as well as about the Inconel 617 corrosion criteria. On the other hand, benchmark test 2 showed a difference in the residual water vapor level between CORALLINE and the Chemistry Loop that was shown to strongly influence the specimen behavior.

  20. Evaluation of hot corrosion resistance of Ni-base alloys using immersion test, coating test and embedding test; Shinseki shiken , tofu shiken , maibotsu shiken ni yoru Ni ki gokin no koon taishoku sei hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, G.; Nishikata, A.; Tsuru, T. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    1997-07-20

    Coating test, immersion test and embedding test are usually employed as the methods for testing high temperature corrosion caused by molten salts. In this study, corrosion-resistant properties of twelve kinds of Ni-based alloys are evaluated systematically by immersion, coating and embedding tests using a sulfate, a chloride and a mixture thereof as the molten salts, and the differences of the results obtained by each testing method are examined. The main results of this study are described herein. The reproducibility of said tests is getting higher in an order of embedding test, coating test and immersion test. Especially an extremely high reproducibility is shown by the immersion test. In all corrosive ashes of sulfate, chloride and the mixture thereof, a good correlation is shown between the results of the immersion test and those of the coating test. The results of embedding test are correlated well with those of other tests in sulfate and sulfate/chloride mixture circumstance, while no such a correlation is indicated in chloride. In chloride corrosive ash and sulfate/chloride mixture corrosive ash, the corrosion amounts in coating and embedding tests are rather bigger than that in immersion test. In particular, a large amount of corrosion more than one digital is shown in the alloys with excellent corrosion-resistance. 33 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Atmospheric corrosion of coated steel; Relationship between laboratory and field testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Severine Marie Noelle

    The lifetime prediction for corrosion-protective coatings on metals is a challenge that has been studied for several decades. Accelerated tests are used in the hope to reproduce in few days the damage that would develop during several years of field exposure. Field exposures are also used because accelerated tests are not always reliable. Several approaches have been taken to reduce the duration of field exposures. One of them is the use of sensitive techniques to assess the coating degradation before visual inspection indicates any damage. Cathodic delamination measured by the scanning Kelvin probe (CD-SKP) was introduced here as a sensitive technique to assess the degradation at the coating/metal interface after weathering exposure. This technique was shown to predict the failure of the coating/steel interface. Several climates were tested in the US continent and on the islands of Hawaii. PVB coated steel environmental degradation was characterized in the field and reproduced in the laboratory. A second approach to shorten coated metal field exposure is to accelerate the degradation using intentionally added through-film scribes. In service, most corrosion mechanism for painted metals, such as filiform corrosion and cathodic delamination, initiate from a mechanical defect. The iron oxides formed under PVB and Eponol were identified with Raman spectroscopy to determine the environment factors that participated in their formation. This investigation was complemented by laboratory exposure. An accelerated test for PVB coated steel was designed to reproduce the environmental degradation observed in the field. The CD-SKP technique to assess interface degradation after weathering exposure was also applied to other coating systems. E-coated, sprayed epoxy primers with a conversion coating or grit blasting treatment, and one full coating system were tested.

  2. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-01

    Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

  3. Analysis of the Long-Term Corrosion Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Acidic Red Soil Using Electrical Resistance Test Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaixing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term corrosion rate of X80 steel in an acidic red soil was monitored in situ by using a precise electrical resistance (ER test system. The corrosion characteristics of X80 steel were examined via SEM, EDS, and XRD. The results indicated that the corrosion rate determined from ER test was very similar to that obtained from the mass loss test. The ER test technique made it possible to predict the long-term corrosion rate of steel in soil in situ. The corrosion rate of X80 steel in acidic red soil was about 0.0902 mm/a at 38 weeks, but the corrosion rate was dropped to 0.0226 mm/a after 5 years. The final corrosion product layer was composed mainly of FeOOH, γ-Fe2O3, and FeCO3.

  4. Performance of plain and galvanized reinforcing steel during the initiation stage of corrosion in concrete with pozzolanic additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, E.I.; Saguees, A.A. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Powers, R.G. [Florida Dept. of Transportation, Gainesville, FL (United States). Materials Office

    1996-11-01

    The pH of the concrete pore solution is expected to be somewhat lower in concretes using pozzolanic additions than in concrete using unblended cements. Variations in pH pore solution may hold the key to explaining conflicting reports on the performance of galvanized rebar. To examine that factor, plain and galvanized rebars have been tested for over two years in concrete specimens made with cement type 2, with various contents of fly ash and silica fume. Electrochemical impedance measurements and sensitive polarization techniques have been used to measure the rate of metal dissolution in the absence of chloride contamination at two different levels of concrete moisture. The plain steel specimens have shown little tendency for passivation in two of the cement compositions with the highest levels of pozzolanic addition. The galvanized steel passivated in all cases and showed apparent corrosion current densities of less than 0.3 {micro}A near the end of the test. Implications of the length of the corrosion initiation period and on current materials selection criteria are presented.

  5. Preparation technology and anti-corrosion performances of black ceramic coatings formed by micro-arc oxidation on aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ling; HAN Jing; YU Shengxue

    2006-01-01

    In order to prepare ornamental and anti-corrosive coating on aluminum alloys, preparation technology of black micro-arc ceramic coatings on Al alloys in silicate based electrolyte was studied.The influence of content of Na2WO4 and combination additive in solution on the performance of black ceramic coatings was studied; the anticorrosion performances of black ceramic coatings were evaluated through whole-immersion test and electrochemical method in 3.5% NaCl solution at different pH value; SEM and XRD were used to analyze the surface morphology and phase constitutes of the black ceramic coatings.Experimental results indicated that, without combination additives, with the increasing of Na2WO4 content in the electrolyte, ceramic coating became darker and thicker, but the color was not black; after adding combination additive, the coating turned to be black; the black ceramic coating was multi-hole form in surface.There was a small quantity of tungsten existing in the black ceramic coating beside α-Al2O3 phase and β-Al2O3 phase.And aluminum alloy with black ceramic coating exhibited excellent anti-corrosion property in acid, basic and neutral 3.5% NaCl solution.

  6. Corrosion performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy under immersion environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. The alumina powders were plasma sprayed on AZ31B magnesium alloy with three different plasma spraying parameters. In the present work, the influence of plasma spray parameters on the corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples was evaluated by immersion corrosion test in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. Empirical relationship was established to predict the corrosion rate of plasma sprayed alumina coatings by incorporating process parameters. The experiments were conducted based on a three factor, five-level, central composite rotatable design matrix. The developed relationship can be effectively used to predict the corrosion rate of alumina coatings at 95% confidence level. The results indicate that the input power has the greatest influence on corrosion rate, followed by stand-off distance and powder feed rate.

  7. DSN system performance test software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M.

    1978-01-01

    The system performance test software is currently being modified to include additional capabilities and enhancements. Additional software programs are currently being developed for the Command Store and Forward System and the Automatic Total Recall System. The test executive is the main program. It controls the input and output of the individual test programs by routing data blocks and operator directives to those programs. It also processes data block dump requests from the operator.

  8. Performance testing With JMeter 29

    CERN Document Server

    Erinle, Bayo

    2013-01-01

    Performance Testing With JMeter 2.9 is a standard tutorial that will help you polish your fundamentals, guide you through various advanced topics, and along the process help you learn new tools and skills.This book is for developers, quality assurance engineers, testers, and test managers new to Apache JMeter, or those who are looking to get a good grounding in how to effectively use and become proficient with it. No prior testing experience is required.

  9. Corrosion Tests of Steel Bar in Concrete under High Temperature by Salt Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, ChangMin; Lee, YoonHee; Lee, KunJai [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, KyungHo; Jang, HyunKie; Kim, JeongMook [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The saturation of South Korea's at-reactor (AR) spent fuel storage pools has created necessity for additional spent fuel storage capacity. The utility company (Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company) is planning to construct a dry storage facility, which offers advantages such as no generation of second time radioactive waste, relatively low operational cost, and a short construction period. Spent nuclear fuel from CANDU will be stored in MACSTOR-400. MACSTOR-400 developed by KHNP and AECL is a new dry storage module to replace Korea's existing concrete silo. This module composed of reinforced concrete has a capacity of 446MgU, twice the MACSTOR 200. Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of two primary properties, its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. The use of concrete in nuclear facilities for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. Corrosion of reinforcing bars deteriorates the concrete structures and reduces their service life. Because spent fuel dry storage will be constructed near seashore, the reinforced concrete components and structures must withstand the damage due to salt attack under high temperature that is emitted by spent fuel. It can be noted that the temperature considerably affects degradation of reinforced concrete structure. However, there are very few examination examples to make clear the influence of the temperature. To obtain the basic material properties at high temperature and evaluate life time of spent fuel dry storage facility, the following test is now in progress.

  10. Effect of Reverse Pulse Current Duration on the Corrosion and Wear Performance of Ni-W Nanolaminate Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreeram, Devesh Dadhich; Bedekar, Vikram; Li, Shengxi; Jagtap, Rohit; Cong, Hongbo; Doll, Gary L.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of varying the reverse pulse current duration (τ = 0 s, 1 s, 5 s, and 10 s) were evaluated on the composition, crystallinity, hardness, corrosion resistance, and tribological performance of nanolaminate Ni-W coatings deposited by pulsed reverse current electrodeposition. With the deposition conditions used in this study, it was found that a reverse current duration of τ = 1 s produced a coating that was both highly corrosion resistant and wear resistant.

  11. The sky is falling: chemical characterization and corrosion evaluation of deposition produced during the static testing of solid rocket motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, William J; McNeill, Laurie S; Mendenhall, Scout; Hancock, Paul V; Wells, Jason E; Thackeray, Kevin J; Gosen, David P

    2013-03-01

    Static tests of horizontally restrained rocket motors at the ATK facility in Promontory UT, USA result in the deposition of entrained soil and fuel combustion products, referred to as Test Fire Soil (TFS), over areas as large as 30-50 mile (80-130 km) and at distances up to 10-12 miles (16-20 km) from the test site. Chloride is the main combustion product generated from the ammonium perchlorate-aluminum based composite propellant. Deposition sampling/characterization and a 6-month field corrosivity study using mild steel coupons were conducted in conjunction with the February 25th 2010 FSM-17 static test. The TFS deposition rates at the three study sites ranged from 1 to 5 g/min/m. TFS contained significantly more chloride than the surface soil collected from the test site. The TFS collected during two subsequent tests had similarly elevated chloride, suggesting that the results obtained in this study are applicable to other tests assuming that the rocket fuel composition remains similar. The field-deployed coupons exposed to the TFS had higher corrosion rates (3.6-5.0 mpy) than paired non-exposed coupons (1.6-1.8 mpy). Corrosion rates for all coupons decreased over time, but coupons exposed to the TFS always had a higher rate than the non-exposed. Differences in corrosion rates between the three study sites were also observed, with sites receiving more TFS deposition having higher corrosion rates.

  12. Standard test method for exfoliation corrosion susceptibility in 2XXX and 7XXX Series Aluminum Alloys (EXCO Test)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for constant immersion exfoliation corrosion (EXCO) testing of high-strength 2XXX and 7XXX series aluminum alloys. Note 1—This test method was originally developed for research and development purposes; however, it is referenced, in specific material specifications, as applicable for evaluating production material (refer to Section 14 on Precision and Bias). 1.2 This test method applies to all wrought products such as sheet, plate, extrusions, and forgings produced from conventional ingot metallurgy process. 1.3 This test method can be used with any form of specimen or part that can be immersed in the test solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. 水泥基迁移型钢筋阻锈涂料性能研究%Performance of Cement-based Migrating Corrosion Inhibitor Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷霜如; 唐军务

    2011-01-01

    The performance of cernent-hased migrating corrosion inhibitors was studied through various tests, such as strength tests, grip between concrete and steel, dry-wet cycle test, chlorine ion resistant test and anode polarization tests. The results show that the corrosion inhabitation coating, when applied to the surface of reinforcement, can resist the corrosion of the steel bars and the bonding between concrete and steel without any adverse influence on the performance of reinforced concrete.%通过强度、握裹力、干湿冷热循环、抗氯离子渗透、阳极极化试验等方法,研究了水泥基迁移型钢筋阻锈涂料各种性能.结果表明该涂料涂刷于钢筋表面可有效抑制钢筋腐蚀,并能提高握裹力,对混凝土性能无不利影响.

  14. Results of steel corrosion tests in flowing liquid Pb/Bi at 420-600 deg. C after 2000 h

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G. E-mail: georg.mueller@ihm.fzk.de; Heinzel, A.; Konys, J.; Schumacher, G.; Weisenburger, A.; Zimmermann, F.; Engelko, V.; Rusanov, A.; Markov, V

    2002-02-01

    Corrosion tests were carried out on austenitic AISI 316L and 1.4970 steels and on MANET steel up to 2000 h of exposure to flowing (up to 2 m/s) Pb/Bi. The concentration of oxygen in the liquid alloy was controlled at 10{sup -6} wt%. Specimens consisted of tube and rod sections in original state and after alloying of Al into the surface. After 2000 h of exposure at 420 and 550 deg. C the specimen surfaces were covered with an intact oxide layer which provided a good protection against corrosion attack of the liquid Pb/Bi alloy. After the same time corrosion attack at 600 deg. C was severe at the original AISI 316L steel specimens. The alloyed specimens containing FeAl on the surface of the alloyed layer still maintained an intact oxide layer with good corrosion protection up to 600 deg. C.

  15. Performance Evaluation of CPCs Using Corrosion Sensors - Laboratory and Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-04

    Testing ( AET ) chamber for 31 days  Temperature: 30 °C  Relative Humidity: 6 hrs @ 50 % and 6 hrs @ 90 %  Salt spray: 15 sec every other day...Results - Summary CPC Threshold % area corroded Recovery during wet part of cycle Recovery during dry part of cycle First visual sign of...CPC G – 4 pins 20 % No No 2 days 5 days February 4, 2009 14 Army Corrosion Summit, 2009 Clearwater Beach, FL Ranking of CPCs – Visual and Impedance

  16. Hydrogen Sulphide Corrosion of Carbon and Stainless Steel Alloys Immersed in Mixtures of Renewable Fuel Sources and Tested Under Co-processing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely András

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with modern regulations and directives, the use of renewable biomass materials as precursors for the production of fuels for transportation purposes is to be strictly followed. Even though, there are problems related to processing, storage and handling in wide range of subsequent uses, since there must be a limit to the ratio of biofuels mixed with mineral raw materials. As a key factor with regards to these biomass sources pose a great risk of causing multiple forms of corrosion both to metallic and non-metallic structural materials. To assess the degree of corrosion risk to a variety of engineering alloys like low-carbon and stainless steels widely used as structural metals, this work is dedicated to investigating corrosion rates of economically reasonable engineering steel alloys in mixtures of raw gas oil and renewable biomass fuel sources under typical co-processing conditions. To model a desulphurising refining process, corrosion tests were carried out with raw mineral gasoline and its mixture with used cooking oil and animal waste lard in relative quantities of 10% (g/g. Co-processing was simulated by batch-reactor laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 200 and 300ºC and a pressure in the gas phase of 90 bar containing 2% (m3/m3 hydrogen sulphide. The time span of individual tests were varied between 1 and 21 days so that we can conclude about changes in the reaction rates against time exposure of and extrapolate for longer periods of exposure. Initial and integral corrosion rates were defined by a weight loss method on standard size of coupons of all sorts of steel alloys. Corrosion rates of carbon steels indicated a linear increase with temperature and little variation with composition of the biomass fuel sources. Apparent activation energies over the first 24-hour period remained moderate, varying between 35.5 and 50.3 kJ mol−1. Scales developed on carbon steels at higher

  17. Magnetic performance and corrosion resistance of electroless plating CoWP film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The CoWP film with good magnetic performance and corrosion resistance was electrolessly plated from alkaline solution. The technical parameters of the electroless plating system were optimized. When the pH value of electroless plating solution was 11.0 and the reducing agent (NaH2PO2) content was 0.4 mol L 1, the target chemical reactions proceeded in the electroless plating solution smoothly with negligible interference and side effects. CoWP film prepared under optimal deposition condition contained more ...

  18. Relationship between Corrosion Level of Rebar Embedded in Concrete, Corrosion Potential and Current Density Measured by Non-destructive Test Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Lan; Cho, Seung Ho; Roh, Young Sook [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joong Koo [Korean Precision Industrial Co., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to identify corrosion mechanism and develop qualitative measurement method of corrosion level. Fist of all, structural behavior of each different level of corrosion states have been evaluated. And mathematical models that can predict corrosion level in terms of electric potential and corrosion intensity are proposed. Corrosion rate in reinforcing bar was investigated in this study using accelerated corrosion method due to electric potential differences based on Faradays law. Total 288 measurement spots were designed in terms of corrosion rates, diameter of reinforcing bars, and concrete cover thickness. Corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials of concrete were measured on these specimens using Gecor device. This study suggested the relationship between corrosion levels, and measured electric current density as follows.

  19. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  20. Performance Testing of Cutting Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter

    within the whole range of operations, materials, cutting fluids, operating conditions, etc. Cutting fluid performance was evaluated in turning, drilling, reaming and tapping, and with respect to tool life, cutting forces, chip formation and product quality (dimensional accuracy and surface integrity......). A number of different work materials were considered, with emphasis on austenitic stainless steel. Cutting fluids from two main groups were investigated, water miscible (reviewed from previous work) and straight oils. Results show that correlation of cutting fluid performance in different operations exists...... within the same group of cutting fluids, for stainless steel. A possible rationalisation of cutting fluid performance tests is suggested. In order to select a set of basic tests and optimise them for use as general and standardised testing methods, an original approach to the evaluation of cutting force...

  1. Performance Testing of Cutting Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter

    The importance of cutting fluid performance testing has increased with documentation requirements of new cutting fluid formulations based on more sustainable products, as well as cutting with minimum quantity of lubrication and dry cutting. Two sub-problems have to be solved: i) which machining...... tests feature repeatability, reproducibility and sensitivity to cutting fluids, and ii) to what extent results of one test ensure relevance to a wider set of machining situations. The present work is aimed at assessing the range of validity of the different testing methods, investigating correlation...... within the whole range of operations, materials, cutting fluids, operating conditions, etc. Cutting fluid performance was evaluated in turning, drilling, reaming and tapping, and with respect to tool life, cutting forces, chip formation and product quality (dimensional accuracy and surface integrity...

  2. Corrosion Behaviour of A380 Aluminiun Alloy by Semi-Solid Rheocasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forn, A.; Rupérez, E.; Baile, M. T.; Campillo, M.; Menargues, S.; Espinosa, I.

    2007-04-01

    A comparative study was performed on the corrosion behavior of a component of A380 aluminium alloy obtained by Semi-Solid Rheocasting (SSR). The effect of heat treatments T5 and T6 on corrosion resistance was compared with components without heat treatment by SSR processes. Corrosion studies were performed using an acetic acid salt spray test, impedance measurements and polarization curves using a 3,5%Na Cl test solution. The corrosion progress is described by micrographic analysis.

  3. Research on a new type of fiber Bragg grating based corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Song, Shide; Wang, Xiaona; Zhou, Weijie; Zhang, Zuocai

    2015-08-01

    Investigations of the corrosion of rebars in concrete structures are widely studied because of the serious damage to concrete caused by rebar corrosion. The rebar corrosion products in reinforced concrete take up 2~6 times the volume of the rebar. Based on this principle, a new type of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) corrosion sensor is proposed in this paper, which consists of two sensors, an FBG corrosion measurement sensor to measure the expansion strain caused by rebar corrosion, and a temperature compensation sensor to eliminate the cross-sensitivity of FBG corrosion sensor. The corrosion rate is derived by the wavelength shift of FBG corrosion sensor, so rebar corrosion can be monitored and assessed by the FBG wavelength shift. A customized rebar with epoxy fixing groove is designed to install a corrosion sensor on its surface and an embedded temperature compensation sensor. The corrosion sensor is embedded in cement mortar and subsequently casted in concrete. The performance of the corrosion sensor is studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that the new type of corrosion sensor has advantage of relatively large measurement range of corrosion rate. The corrosion sensor is suitable to monitor slightly and moderately corroded rebars.

  4. Corrosion Protection of Electrically Conductive Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic function of the electrically conductive surface of electrical contacts is electrical conduction. The electrical conductivity of contact materials can be largely reduced by corrosion and in order to avoid corrosion, protective coatings must be used. Another phenomenon that leads to increasing contact resistance is fretting corrosion. Fretting corrosion is the degradation mechanism of surface material, which causes increasing contact resistance. Fretting corrosion occurs when there is a relative movement between electrical contacts with surfaces of ignoble metal. Avoiding fretting corrosion is therefore extremely challenging in electronic devices with pluggable electrical connections. Gold is one of the most commonly used noble plating materials for high performance electrical contacts because of its high corrosion resistance and its good and stable electrical behavior. The authors have investigated different ways to minimize the consumption of gold for electrical contacts and to improve the performance of gold plating. Other plating materials often used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces are tin, nickel, silver and palladium. This paper will deal with properties and new research results of different plating materials in addition to other means used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces and the testing of corrosion resistance of electrically conductive surfaces.

  5. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  6. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  7. Performance evaluation of corrosion-affected reinforced concrete bridge girders using Markov chains with fuzzy states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M B ANOOP; K BALAJI RAO

    2016-08-01

    A methodology for performance evaluation of reinforced concrete bridge girders in corrosive environments is proposed. The methodology uses the concept of performability and considers both serviceability- and ultimate-limit states. The serviceability limit states are defined based on the degree of cracking (characterized by crack width) in the girder due to chloride induced corrosion of reinforcement, and the ultimate limit states are defined based on the flexural load carrying capacity of the girder (characterized in terms of rating factor using the load and resistance factor rating method). The condition of the bridge girder is specified by the assignment of a condition state from a set of predefined condition states. Generally, the classification of condition states is linguistic, while the condition states are considered to be mutually exclusive and collectivelyexhaustive. In the present study, the condition states of the bridge girder are also represented by fuzzy sets to consider the ambiguities arising due to the linguistic classification of condition states. A non-homogeneous Markov chain (MC) model is used for modeling the condition state evolution of the bridge girder with time. The usefulness of the proposed methodology is demonstrated through a case study of a severely distressed beam of the Rocky Point Viaduct. The results obtained using the proposed approach are compared with those obtained using conventional MC model. It is noted that the use of MC with fuzzy states leads to conservative decision making for the problem considered in the case study.

  8. Biodegradable Orthopedic Magnesium-Calcium (MgCa Alloys, Processing, and Corrosion Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuebin Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-Calcium (Mg-Ca alloy has received considerable attention as an emerging biodegradable implant material in orthopedic fixation applications. The biodegradable Mg-Ca alloys avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. They also provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers. However, the key issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant is the fast corrosion in the human body environment. The ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys is critical for the successful development of biodegradable orthopedic implants. This paper focuses on the functions and requirements of bone implants and critical issues of current implant biomaterials. Microstructures and mechanical properties of Mg-Ca alloys, and the unique properties of novel magnesium-calcium implant materials have been reviewed. Various manufacturing techniques to process Mg-Ca based alloys have been analyzed regarding their impacts on implant performance. Corrosion performance of Mg-Ca alloys processed by different manufacturing techniques was compared. In addition, the societal and economical impacts of developing biodegradable orthopedic implants have been emphasized.

  9. The effect of cerium-based conversion treatment on the cathodic delamination and corrosion protection performance of carbon steel-fusion-bonded epoxy coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezanzadeh, B.; Rostami, M.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of surface pre-treatment of pipe surface by green cerium compound and phosphoric acid solution on the fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) coating performance was studied. The composition and surface morphology of the steel samples treated by acid and Ce solutions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Also, the surface free energy was evaluated on these samples through contact angle measurements. In addition, the effect of Ce and acid washing procedures on the adhesion properties and corrosion protection performance of the FBE was examined by pull-off, salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. Results showed that compared to acid washing, the chemical treatment by Ce solution noticeably increased the surface free energy of steel, improved the adhesion properties of FBE, decreased the cathodic delamination rate of FBE, and enhanced the coating corrosion resistance compared to the acid washed samples.

  10. Corrosion and Materials Performance in biomass fired and co-fired power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, OH; Biede, O

    2003-01-01

    not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. In woodchip boilers, a similar corrosion rate and corrosion mechanism has on some occasions been observed. Co-firing of straw (10....... Results from 100% straw-firing, woodchip and co-firing of straw with coal will be reported. The corrosion mechanisms observed are summarized and the corrosion rates for 18-8 type stainless steels are compared....

  11. TEST-SYSTEMS FOR MONITORING OF CORROSION-RELEVANT SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA USING REAL-TIME PCR ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of the designing test-systems for specific detection of corrosive-relevant sulfate-reducing bacteria using real-time PCR assay were investigated. This method of the bacteria identification is based on the detection of the functional genes, encoding key enzymes of dissimilatory sulfate-reduction pathway, i.e. dissimilatory sulfitreductase α subunit dsrA. It was established among the six test-systems specificity reveal only three designed on the base of Desulfotomaculum, Desulfovibrio, Desulfobulbus genera sequences. The most corrosive-relevant strain Desulfovibrio sp. UCM B-11503 dsrA gene detected more effectively (threshold cycle was 20,0, than less corrosive-relevant strains Desulfovibrio sp. UCM B-11504 (threshold cycle was 28,1 and for Desulfotomaculum sp. UCM B-11505 and Desulfomicrobium sp. UCМ B-11506 were 24,9 and 23,1 cycles, respectively. Test-systems allowed identifying corrosive-relevant sulfate-reducing bacteria faster and more effective. This approach will serve as a base for monitoring of these bacteria for estimating corrosion sites on the high-level dangerous man-caused objects.

  12. Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

    2008-01-01

    A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and

  13. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  14. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  15. An Intelligent Tap Test as AN Inspection Tool for Corrosion in Chequer Plate Floors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S. M.; Smith, J. W.

    2002-11-01

    The "coin-tap" test has the ability to indicate damage in a structural element due to a localized change of stiffness or damping. The change in vibration signature may be detected by ear or more precisely by measurement of the dynamic contact force. A method for discriminating between measurements made on sound and damaged structures is presented. An unsupervised neural network algorithm is used for recognizing the differences between contact force patterns. The method is used for non-destructive inspection of corrosion damage to steel chequer plate floors in industrial buildings. It is shown that the intelligent tap test is a useful and practical diagnostic tool for detecting localized damage in structures.

  16. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulation study on corrosion inhibition performance of mild steel by mercapto-quinoline Schiff base corrosion inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sourav Kr.; Ghosh, Pritam; Hens, Abhiram; Murmu, Naresh Chandra; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2015-02-01

    Corrosion inhibition mechanism of two mercapto-quinoline Schiff bases, eg., 3-((phenylimino)methyl)quinoline-2-thiol (PMQ) and 3-((5-methylthiazol-2-ylimino)methyl) quinoline-2-thiol (MMQT) on mild steel surface is investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamics simulation. Quantum chemical parameters such as EHOMO, ELUMO, energy gap (ΔE), dipolemoment (μ), electronegativity (χ), global hardness (η) and fraction of electron transfers from the inhibitor molecule to the metallic atom surface (ΔN) have been studied to investigate their relative corrosion inhibition performance. Parameters like local reactive sites of the present molecule have been analyzed through Fukui indices. Moreover, adsorption behavior of the inhibitor molecules on Fe (1 1 0) surface have been analyzed using molecular dynamics simulation. The binding strength of the concerned inhibitor molecules on mild steel surface follows the order MMQT>PMQ, which is in good agreement with the experimentally determined inhibition efficiencies. In view of the above, our approach will be helpful for quick prediction of a potential inhibitor from a lot of similar inhibitors and subsequently in their rational designed synthesis for corrosion inhibition application following a wet chemical synthetic route.

  17. Corrosion behavior of duplex coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raghu Ram Mohan Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The titanium alloys are used in defense, aerospace, automobile, chemical plants and biomedical applications due to their very high strength and lightweight properties. However, corrosion is a life-limiting factor when Ti alloys are exposed to different chemical environments at high temperatures. In the present paper, duplex NiCrAlY/WC–Co coating is coated onto Ti6Al4V substrate to investigate the corrosion behavior of both coated samples and the substrate. The duplex coating was performed with NiCrAlY as the intermediate coat of 200 μm thickness deposited by HVOF process and WC–Co ceramic top coat with varying thicknesses of 250 μm, 350 μm and 450 μm deposited by DS process. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were employed to investigate the corrosion performance of duplex coated samples and substrate in Ringer’s solution at 37 °C and pH value was set to 5.7. Finally the results reveal that 350 μm thick coated samples showed highest corrosion resistance compared to 250 μm thick samples as well as bare substrate. However, the 450 μm thick coated sample showed poor corrosion resistance compared to the substrate. The scale formed on the samples upon corrosion was characterized by using SEM analysis to understand the degree of corrosion behavior.

  18. Coating Prospects in Corrosion Prevention of Aluminized Steel and Its Coupling with Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fuyan

    In this study, a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process was used to form oxide coating on aluminized steel, heated aluminized steel and magnesium. A potentiodynamic polarization corrosion test was employed to investigate the general corrosion properties. Galvanic corrosion of steel samples and magnesium samples was studied by zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) tests and boiling tests. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDS were used to investigate the coating microstructure and the coating/substrate interface. In general, the PEO coatings on all three substrate can help prevent general corrosion. 6-min coated magnesium with unipolar current mode performs best in most galvanic couplings for preventing both general corrosion and galvanic corrosion. Factors which could influence galvanic corrosion behaviors of tested samples were discussed based on area ratios of anode/cathode and cell potential driving force during the ZRA corrosion tests and boiling tests.

  19. Corrosion inhibitors performance for mild steel in CO{sub 2} containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavala Olivares, G.; Hernandez Gayosso, M.J.; Mora Mendoza, J.L. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2007-06-15

    The Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), was used to evaluate and compare the behavior of three different corrosion inhibitors: quaternary amine (QA), oleic imidazoline (OI) and amino coco propionic acid (ACP), on the corrosion of mild steel in 3% NaCl solutions, saturated with CO{sub 2} gas, under static conditions. Two pH values: 3.8 and 5.5 were considered. Under the conditions considered in this work, the results indicated film formation at the metal surface, probable due to the formation of iron carbonate. This condition modified the values of the resistance and double layer capacitance of the system. In general terms, the ACP inhibitor exhibited better performance, compared to the QA and OI. During the impedance measurements with OI and ACP, some deviations were observed at high frequencies, indicating probably that the inhibitors adsorption occurs in different way to the QA inhibitor and the amine adsorption is weaker than the other two inhibitors adsorption. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  1. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffó, Gustavo, E-mail: duffo@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Gerencia Materiales, Depto. Corrosión, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gaillard, Natalia [Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo [Tomografía de Hormigón Armado S.A. (THASA), Reclus 2017, 1609 Boulogne, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  2. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  3. Salt Spray Test to Determine Galvanic Corrosion Levels of Electroless Nickel Connectors Mounted on an Aluminum Bracket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, T. D.; Hodge, R. E.; Torres, P. D.; Jones, D. D.; Laird, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    During preliminary vehicle design reviews, requests were made to change flight termination systems from an electroless nickel (EN) connector coating to a zinc-nickel (ZN) plating. The reason for these changes was due to a new NASA-STD-6012 corrosion requirement where connectors must meet the performance requirement of 168 hr of exposure to salt spray. The specification for class F connectors, MIL-DTL-38999, certifies the EN coating will meet a 48-hr salt spray test, whereas the ZN is certified to meet a 168-hr salt spray test. The ZN finish is a concern because Marshall Space Flight Center has no flight experience with ZN-finished connectors, and MSFC-STD-3012 indicates that zinc and zinc alloys should not be used. The purpose of this test was to run a 168-hr salt spray test to verify the electrical and mechanical integrity of the EN connectors and officially document the results. The salt spray test was conducted per ASTM B117 on several MIL-DTL-38999 flight-like connectors mounted to an aluminum 6061-T6 bracket that was alodined. The configuration, mounting techniques, electrical checks, and materials used were typical of flight and ground support equipment.

  4. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  5. The influence of loading on the corrosion of steel in cracked ordinary Portland cement and high performance concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Shahzma Jafferali

    Most studies that have examined chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete have focused on sound concrete. However, reinforced concrete is seldom uncracked and very few studies have investigated the influence of cracked concrete on rebar corrosion. Furthermore, the studies that have examined the relationship between cracks and corrosion have focused on unloaded or statically loaded cracks. However, in practice, reinforced concrete structures (e.g. bridges) are often dynamically loaded. Hence, the cracks in such structures open and close which could influence the corrosion of the reinforcing steel. Consequently, the objectives of this project were (i) to examine the effect of different types of loading on the corrosion of reinforcing steel, (ii) the influence of concrete mixture design on the corrosion behaviour and (iii) to provide data that can be used in service-life modelling of cracked reinforced concretes. In this project, cracked reinforced concrete beams made with ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPCC) and high performance concrete (HPC) were subjected to no load, static loading and dynamic loading. They were immersed in salt solution to just above the crack level at their mid-point for two weeks out of every four (wet cycle) and, for the remaining two weeks, were left in ambient laboratory conditions to dry (dry cycle). The wet cycle led to three conditions of exposure for each beam: (i) the non-submerged region, (ii) the sound, submerged region and (iii) the cracked mid-section, which was also immersed in the solution. Linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse techniques were used to monitor the corrosion in the three regions. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical current noise and concrete electrical resistance measurements were also performed. These measurements illustrated that (i) rebar corroded faster at cracks than in sound concrete, (ii) HPC was more protective towards the rebar than OPCC even at cracks and (iii) there

  6. Robust Slippery Coating with Superior Corrosion Resistance and Anti-Icing Performance for AZ31B Mg Alloy Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialei; Gu, Changdong; Tu, Jiangping

    2017-03-29

    Biomimetic slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) are developed as a potential alternative to superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) to resolve the issues of poor durability in corrosion protection and susceptibility to frosting. Herein, we fabricated a double-layered SLIPS coating on the AZ31 Mg alloy for corrosion protection and anti-icing application. The porous top layer was infused by lubricant, and the compact underlayer was utilized as a corrosion barrier. The water-repellent SLIPS coating exhibits a small sliding angle and durable corrosion resistance compared with the SHS coating. Moreover, the SLIPS coating delivers durable anti-icing performance for the Mg alloy substrate, which is obviously superior to the SHS coating. Multiple barriers in the SLIPS coating, including the infused water-repellent lubricant, the self-assembled monolayers coated porous top layer, and the compact layered double hydroxide-carbonate composite underlayer, are suggested as being responsible for the enhanced corrosion resistance and anti-icing performance. The robust double-layered SLIPS coating should be of great importance to expanding the potential applications of light metals and their alloys.

  7. The stress-corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys: A comparison of test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    Two powder metallurgy processed (Al-Li-Cu) alloys with and without Mg addition were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution during the alternate immersion testing of tuning fork specimens, slow crack growth tests using fracture mechanics specimens, and the slow strain rate testing of straining electrode specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography were used to demonstrate the character of the interaction between the Al-Li-Cu alloys and the selected environment. Both alloys are susceptible to SC in an aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution under the right electrochemical and microstructural conditions. Each test method yields important information on the character of the SC behavior. Under all conditions investigated, second phase particles strung out in rows along the extrusion direction in the alloys were rapidly attacked, and played principal role in the SC process. With time, larger pits developed from these rows of smaller pits and under certain electrochemical conditions surface cracks initiated from the larger pits and contributed directly to the fracture process. Evidence to support slow crack growth was observed in both the slow strain rate tests and the sustained immersion tests of precracked fracture mechanics specimens. The possible role of H2 in the stress corrosion cracking process is suggested.

  8. Simulation of Mechanical Stress on Stainless Steel for Pb-Bi Corrosion Test by Using ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, D.; Mustari, A. P. A.; Budiman, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Pb-Bi eutectic with its advantageous is proposed to be utilized as a coolant in the GEN IV type of rSeactor. However, high temperature corrosion when contact with stainless steels is one of the issues of Pb-Bi eutectic utilization. It is known that in the environment of high temperature Pb-Bi, mechanical strength of stainless steel may decrease. Thus, simulation of mechanical stress working on stainless steel during in-situ bending test by using ABAQUS was conducted. Several bending degrees were simulated at high temperature to obtain the mechanical stress information. Temperature condition was strongly affect the stress vs. displacement profile. The reported mechanical strength reduction percentage was used to draw predicted mechanical stress under high temperature Pb-Bi environment.

  9. Utilization of coal mining wastes a filling material in reinforced earth structures: reinforcement corrosion tests; Utilizacion de los esteriles del carbon como material de relleno en estructuras de tierra reforzada: pruebas de corrosion de armaduras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Canibano, J.; Pardo, F.; Sopena, L.; Torres, M.; Perez, J.J.; Martinez, C.; Gonzlaez, M.R. [Laboratorio Geotecnia CEDEX (Spain)

    1996-09-01

    In this article are summarized the tests carried out with different types of reinforcing elements and several coal mining wastes in order to determine the occurrence or not of corrosion processes caused by mine stones in the reinforcing elements. (Author)

  10. Non-animal testing strategies for assessment of the skin corrosion and skin irritation potential of ingredients and finished products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M K; Cohen, C; de Fraissinette, A de Brugerolle; Ponec, M; Whittle, E; Fentem, J H

    2002-05-01

    The dermatotoxicologist today is faced with a dilemma. Protection of workers and consumers from skin toxicities (irritation and allergy) associated with exposure to products, and the ingredients they contain, requires toxicological skin testing prior to manufacture, transport, or marketing. Testing for skin corrosion or irritation has traditionally been conducted in animals, particularly in rabbits via the long established Draize test method. However, this procedure, among others, has been subject to criticism, both for its limited predictive capacity for human toxicity, as well as for its use of animals. In fact, legislation is pending in the European Union which would ban the sale of cosmetic products, the ingredients of which have been tested in animals. These considerations, and advancements in both in vitro skin biology and clinical testing, have helped drive an intensive effort among skin scientists to develop alternative test methods based either on in vitro test systems (e.g. using rat, pig or human skin ex vivo, or reconstructed human skin models) or ethical clinical approaches (human volunteer studies). Tools are now in place today to enable a thorough skin corrosion and irritation assessment of new ingredients and products without the need to test in animals. Herein, we describe general testing strategies and new test methods for the assessment of skin corrosion and irritation. The methods described, and utilized within industry today, provide a framework for the practicing toxicologist to support new product development initiatives through the use of reliable skin safety testing and risk assessment tools and strategies.

  11. TEST PLAN AND PROCEDURE FOR THE EXAMINATION OF TANK 241-AY-101 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WYRWAS RB; PAGE JS; COOKE GS

    2012-04-19

    This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

  12. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  13. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  14. Corrosion and mechanical performance of reinforced mortar and concrete made with MSWI bottom ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Ávila

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical monitoring was performed to evaluate the influence of municipal solid waste incineration residues (MSWI made concrete, on reinforcement corrosion, using four different steel reinforce-ments grades, traditional carbon steel B-500-SD and three stainless steels, the austenite AISI 304, duplex AISI 2304, and lean-duplex AISI 2001, embedded in mortars manufactured using bottom ash as aggregates from the incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW, in partial and total substitution of natural aggregate. In addition, it has been studied the mechanical behaviour of the mortar and concrete matrix in the presence of MSWI aggre-gates. The use of MSWI bottom ash as an aggregate, results in a notable improvement of the resistance charac-teristics of conventional mortar and concrete, made out only of natural aggregate. Moreover, electrochemical measures show that the steels remain in passive state throughout all the exposure period (3 years.

  15. Corrosion inhibition performance of different bark extracts on aluminium in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Chaubey

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work shows the effect of stem bark extracts of three trees namely Moringa oleifera (MO, Terminalia arjuna (TA and Mangifera indica (MI on the corrosion behaviour of Aluminium Alloy (AA in 1 M NaOH. The inhibition performance was studied by using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements. Among these extracts, MO exhibited the maximum inhibition efficiency η (% of 85.3% at 0.6 g/L at 303 K. Polarization measurement showed that all the examined extracts are of mixed-type inhibitors. Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm was found to be best fit. Morphology of the surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM which confirmed the existence of a protective film of inhibitor molecule on AA surface.

  16. An effective and novel pore sealing agent to enhance the corrosion resistance performance of Al coating in artificial ocean water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Seung; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    A new technique was accepted to fill the porosity of Al coating applied by arc thermal spray process to enhance corrosion resistance performance in artificial ocean water. The porosity is the inherent property of arc thermal spray coating process. In this study, applied coating was treated with different concentrations of ammonium phosphate mono basic (NH4H2PO4: AP) solution thereafter dried at room temperature and kept in humidity chamber for 7d to deposit uniform film. The corrosion resistance of Al coating and treated samples have been evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic techniques with exposure periods in artificial ocean water. Electrochemical techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that phosphate ion would have been retarding corrosion of Al coating effectively. The formation of AHP (Ammonium Aluminum Hydrogen Phosphate Hydrate: NH4)3Al5H6(PO4)8.18H2O) on Al coating surface after treatment with AP is nano sized, crystalline and uniformly deposited but after exposure them in artificial ocean water, they form AHPH (Aluminum hydroxide phosphate hydrate Al3(PO4)2(OH)3(H2O)5) that is very protective, adherent, uniform and plate like morphology of corrosion products. The AHPH is sparingly soluble and adherent to surface and imparted improved corrosion resistance.

  17. An effective and novel pore sealing agent to enhance the corrosion resistance performance of Al coating in artificial ocean water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Seung; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    A new technique was accepted to fill the porosity of Al coating applied by arc thermal spray process to enhance corrosion resistance performance in artificial ocean water. The porosity is the inherent property of arc thermal spray coating process. In this study, applied coating was treated with different concentrations of ammonium phosphate mono basic (NH4H2PO4: AP) solution thereafter dried at room temperature and kept in humidity chamber for 7d to deposit uniform film. The corrosion resistance of Al coating and treated samples have been evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic techniques with exposure periods in artificial ocean water. Electrochemical techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that phosphate ion would have been retarding corrosion of Al coating effectively. The formation of AHP (Ammonium Aluminum Hydrogen Phosphate Hydrate: NH4)3Al5H6(PO4)8.18H2O) on Al coating surface after treatment with AP is nano sized, crystalline and uniformly deposited but after exposure them in artificial ocean water, they form AHPH (Aluminum hydroxide phosphate hydrate Al3(PO4)2(OH)3(H2O)5) that is very protective, adherent, uniform and plate like morphology of corrosion products. The AHPH is sparingly soluble and adherent to surface and imparted improved corrosion resistance. PMID:28157233

  18. Corrosion of metals in wood : comparing the results of a rapid test method with long-term exposure tests across six wood treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Donald S. Stone

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares two methods of measuring the corrosion of steel and galvanized steel in wood: a long-term exposure test in solid wood and a rapid test method where fasteners are electrochemically polarized in extracts of wood treated with six different treatments. For traditional wood preservatives, the electrochemical extract method correlates with solid wood...

  19. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  20. Is the analysis of molecular electronic structure of corrosion inhibitors sufficient to predict the trend of their inhibition performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokalj, Anton, E-mail: tone.kokalj@ijs.s [Department of Physical and Organic Chemistry, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-12-30

    The often used approach in the corrosion inhibition studies employing quantum chemical calculations that relies on the correlation between molecular electronic structure parameters and inhibition effectiveness is critically examined. It is shown that the inhibition performance of three selected triazole-based corrosion inhibitors for copper - 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATA), benzotriazole (BTAH), and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (BTAOH) - cannot be explained on this basis in a sound manner. As the effectiveness of inhibitors is due to several phenomena, the outcome depends on the interplay between them and although molecular electronic parameters may provide many necessary elements, the involved effects can be estimated only approximately which may not always suffice. This supports the proposition that in general molecular electronic properties cannot be directly related to inhibition effectiveness - the actual relation is more involved - thus emphasizing the importance of a rigorous modeling of the inhibitor-surface interaction in the corrosion inhibition studies.

  1. Evaluation of corrosion protection performance of poly(o-ethyl aniline) coated copper by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, Vandana, E-mail: vda_shinde@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425 001 (India); Patil, Pradip P., E-mail: pnmu@yahoo.co.i [Department of Physics, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425 001 (India)

    2010-04-15

    Poly(o-ethylaniline) coatings were synthesized on copper (Cu) by electrochemical polymerization of o-ethylaniline in an aqueous salicylate solution by using cyclic voltammetry. The performance of poly(o-ethylaniline) as protective coating against corrosion of Cu in aqueous 3% NaCl was assessed by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results of these studies demonstrate that the poly (o-ethylaniline) coating has ability to protect the Cu against corrosion. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of coating is found to be 97%. The evaluation of the impedance parameters with immersion time was studied and water uptake and delamination area were determined. The variation of the water uptake and delamination area with the immersion time provides further evidence to the protective action of the poly(o-ethylaniline).

  2. Standard Practices for Simulated Service Testing for Corrosion of Metallic Containment Materials for Use With Heat-Transfer Fluids in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1980-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover test procedures simulating field service for evaluating the performance under corrosive conditions of metallic containment materials in solar heating and cooling systems. All test results relate to the performance of the metallic containment material only as a part of a metal/fluid pair. Performance in these test procedures, taken by itself, does not necessarily constitute an adequate basis for acceptance or rejection of a particular metal/fluid pair in solar heating and cooling systems, either in general or in a particular design. 1.2 These practices describe test procedures used to evaluate the resistance to deterioration of metallic containment materials in the several conditions that may occur in operation of solar heating and cooling systems. These conditions include: (1) operating full flow; (2) stagnant empty vented; (3) stagnant, closed to atmosphere, non-draindown; and (4) stagnant, closed to atmosphere, draindown. 1.3 The recommended practices cover the following three te...

  3. Pitting Corrosion Characterization of Wrought Stellite Alloys in Green Death Solution with Immersion Test and Extreme Value Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, R.; Chen, K. Y.; Yao, M. X.

    2014-05-01

    This article presents a study of the corrosion behavior of two wrought Stellite alloys, Stellite 6B, and Stellite 6K, in Green Death solution, utilizing the extreme value analysis (EVA) model, which is a statistics tool developed based on the Gumbel distribution. Green Death solution a typical oxidized testing solution used in industry for assessing the corrosion resistance of materials. The data of maximum pit depths are obtained from the immersion tests on these alloys for various exposure periods. The top ten maximum pit depths in each specimen surface after the immersion test are measured using a surface texture and contour measuring instrument. These data are the input parameters of the EVA model and the outcomes of the model are the extreme values (minimum thickness) required for the alloys under a given service condition. It is shown that Stellite 6K, which contains higher carbon content but smaller-size carbides, exhibits better corrosion resistance in regard to the extreme value. The results and mechanisms of Stellite 6B and Stellite 6K in Green Death solution corrosion are discussed.

  4. Test Performance Related Dysfunctional Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep TÜTÜNCÜ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Examinations by using tests are very frequently used in educational settings and successful studying before the examinations is a complex matter to deal with. In order to understand the determinants of success in exams better, we need to take into account not only emotional and motivational, but also cognitive aspects of the participants such as dysfunctional beliefs. Our aim is to present the relationship between candidates’ characteristics and distorted beliefs/schemata just before an examination. Method: The subjects of the study were 30 female and 30 male physicians who were about to take the medical specialization exam (MSE in Turkey. Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS and Young Schema Questionnaire Short Form (YSQ-SF were applied to the subjects. The statistical analysis was done using the F test, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square test and spearman’s correlation test. Results: It was shown that some of the DAS and YSQ-SF scores were significantly higher in female gender, in the group who could not pass the exam, who had repetitive examinations, who had their first try taking an examination and who were unemployed at the time of the examination. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that candidates seeking help before MSE examination could be referred for cognitive therapy or counseling even they do not have any psychiatric diagnosis due to clinically significant cognitive distortion. Measurement and treatment of cognitive distortions that have negative impact on MSE performance may improve the cost-effectiveness and mental well being of the young doctors.

  5. Review of Corrosion Modes for Alloy 22 Regarding Lifetime Expectancy of Nuclear Waste Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; Estill, J C

    2002-11-15

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) was selected to fabricate the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container for nuclear waste at the designated repository site in Yucca Mountain in Nevada (USA). A testing program is underway to characterize and quantify three main modes of corrosion that may occur at the site. Current results show that the containers would perform well under general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). For example, the general corrosion rate is expected to be below 100 nm/year and the container is predicted to be outside the range of potential for localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Fabrication of a nanocrystalline Ni-Co/CoO functionally graded layer with excellent electrochemical corrosion and tribological performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Junyan; Zeng, Zhixiang; Lin, Yiming; Hu, Litian; Xue, Qunji

    2006-09-28

    Nanocrystalline (NC) Ni-Co/CoO functionally graded materials with excellent lubricating, high anti-corrosion and anti-wear performance were fabricated by electrodeposition and subsequent cyclic thermal oxidation and quenching. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy investigations show that bulk Ni-Co gradient deposits with an average grain size in the range of 13-40 nm demonstrated a graded structure transition from face-centred cubic to hexagonal close packed and graded composition changes from Ni-rich to Co-rich regions with the increase in deposit thickness. X-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the surface layer of NC Ni-Co graded materials to be mainly composed of dense and ultrafine CoO with a (111) preferred orientation. The NC Ni-Co/CoO functionally graded materials exhibited significantly enhanced corrosion resistance in both NaOH and NaCl solutions and remarkably improved wear resistance and dry self-lubricating performance when compared with the NC Ni and Ni-Co graded deposits under dry sliding wear conditions. The higher corrosion and tribological performance of NC Ni-Co/CoO graded materials can be attributed to the graded microstructure within the deposits, the anti-corrosion barrier of a dense oxide layer and the solid lubrication effect of CoO-rich tribo-surface films.

  8. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  9. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials.

  10. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Leng; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Jianting; Yang, Mao; Xia, Runchuan

    2016-09-06

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor.

  11. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Leng; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Jianting; Yang, Mao; Xia, Runchuan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor. PMID:27608029

  12. Corrosion Verification Test for the Welds of CEFR Sodium Storage Tank and Sodium Drainage Under the First-Grade Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this test is to observe and analyze the compatibility between the welds and hightemperature sodium at the simulated realistic working conditions of CEFR sodium storage tank andsodium drainage under the first-grade accident. The observation and analysis are focused on theintergranular corrosion at the weld and its heat affection region, in order to provide the test basis for thesafe operation and analysis of CEFR.

  13. Modeling the Effect of Temperature and Potential on the In Vitro Corrosion Performance of Biomedical Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coşkun, M. İbrahim; Karahan, İsmail H.; Yücel, Yasin; Golden, Teresa D.

    2016-10-01

    CoCrMo biomedical alloys were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer to improve biocompatibility and in vitro corrosion performance. A fast electrodeposition process was completed in 5 minutes for the hydroxyapatite coating. Effect of the solution temperature and applied potential on the in vitro corrosion performance of the hydroxyapatite coatings was modeled by response surface methodology (RSM) coupled with central composite design (CCD). A 5-level-2-factor experimental plan designed by CCD was used; the experimental plan contained 13 coating experiments with a temperature range from 283 K to 347 K (10 °C to 74 °C) and potential range from -1.2 to -1.9 V. Corrosion potential ( E corr) of the coatings in a simulated body fluid solution was chosen as response for the model. Predicted and experimental values fitted well with an R 2 value of 0.9481. Response surface plots of the impedance and polarization resistance ( R P) were investigated. Optimized parameters for electrodeposition of hydroxyapatite were determined by RSM as solution temperature of 305.48 K (32.33 °C) and potential of -1.55 V. Hydroxyapatite coatings fabricated at optimized parameters showed excellent crystal formation and high in vitro corrosion resistance.

  14. Reconstruction of stress corrosion cracks using signals of pulsed eddy current testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xie, Shejuan; Chen, Zhenmao; Li, Yong; Wang, Xiaowei; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    A scheme to apply signals of pulsed eddy current testing (PECT) to reconstruct a deep stress corrosion crack (SCC) is proposed on the basis of a multi-layer and multi-frequency reconstruction strategy. First, a numerical method is introduced to extract conventional eddy current testing (ECT) signals of different frequencies from the PECT responses at different scanning points, which are necessary for multi-frequency ECT inversion. Second, the conventional fast forward solver for ECT signal simulation is upgraded to calculate the single-frequency pickup signal of a magnetic field by introducing a strategy that employs a tiny search coil. Using the multiple-frequency ECT signals and the upgraded fast signal simulator, we reconstructed the shape profiles and conductivity of an SCC at different depths layer-by-layer with a hybrid inversion scheme of the conjugate gradient and particle swarm optimisation. Several modelled SCCs of rectangular or stepwise shape in an SUS304 plate are reconstructed from simulated PECT signals with artificial noise. The reconstruction results show better precision in crack depth than the conventional ECT inversion method, which demonstrates the validity and efficiency of the proposed PECT inversion scheme.

  15. Corrosion performance of reinforced mortar in the presence of polymeric nano-aggregates: electrochemical behavior, surface analysis, and properties of the steel/cement paste interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, J.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of admixed polyethylene oxide-b-polystyrene (PEO113-b-PS70)micelles on corrosion behavior of reinforced mortar. The electrochemical measurement shows that the corrosion performance of the reinforcing steel was not significantly improved. However, surface analysis and

  16. 一种环保型阻垢缓蚀剂的性能%Performance of an environmentally friendly scale and corrosion inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈燕敏; 孙彩霞; 吴晋英; 黄长山

    2014-01-01

    A new kind of efficient environmentally-friendly composite scale and corrosion inhibitor consisting of polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA) , polyacrylic acid (PAA) , hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride (HPMA) , benzotriazole (BTA) was developed. The optimal concentrations of such components obtained from orthogonal experiments were PESA(1.0 mg/L)/PAA(1.0 mg/L)/HPMA (0.6 mg/L)/BTA(0.5 mg/L). Its scale inhibition and corrosion inhibition performance was studied with bubble method,electrochemical experiment and rotary weight loss/hanging-piece corrosion experiment. The scale inhibiting rate and corrosion inhibiting rates for A3 carbon steel,copper,stainless steel of the scale and corrosion inhibitor were 92%and 83%,97%,99%,respectively. Further dynamic simulated test also indicated that the scale and corrosion inhibitor meet the demand of circulating cooling water.%以聚环氧琥珀酸(PESA)、聚丙烯酸(PAA)、水解聚马来酸酐(HPMA)、苯并三氮唑(BTA)为原料,研制出一种新型具有环保功能的复合型高效阻垢缓蚀剂。通过正交试验确定该阻垢缓蚀剂中各组分的最佳浓度为:PESA(1.0 mg/L)/PAA(1.0 mg/L)/HPMA (0.6 mg/L)/BTA(0.5 mg/L)。分别采用鼓泡法、电化学试验和旋转挂片腐蚀试验研究了其阻垢缓蚀性能。试验结果表明,该阻垢缓蚀剂的阻垢率为92%,对A3碳钢、铜、不锈钢的缓蚀率分别达到了83%、97%、99%,动态模拟试验结果也显示该阻垢缓蚀剂满足循环冷却水运行要求。

  17. Internal corrosion of carbon steel piping in hot aquifers service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simičić Miloš V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal corrosion of carbon steel pipelines is a major problem encountered in water service. In terms of prediction of the remaining lifetime for water pipelines based on the corrosion allowance, the three main approaches are corrosion modelling, corrosion inhibitor availability, and corrosion monitoring. In this study we used two theoretical corrosion models, CASSANDRA and NORSOK M-506 of quite different origin in order to predict uniform corrosivity of hot aquifers in eight different pipelines. Because of the varying calculation criteria for the different models, these can give very different corrosion rate predictions for the same data input. This is especially true under conditions where the formation of protective films may occur, such as at elevated temperatures. The evaluation of models was conducted by comparison using weight-loss coupons and three corrosion inhibitors were obtained from commercial suppliers. The tests were performed during the 60-day period. Even though inhibitors’ efficiencies of 98% had been achieved in laboratory testing, inhibitors’ availabilities of 85% have been used due to logistics problems and other issues. The results, given in mmpy, i.e. millimeter per year, are very consistent with NORSOK M-506 prediction. This is presumably because the model considers the effect of the formation of a passive iron carbonate film at temperatures above 80 °C and significant reduction in corrosion rate. Corrosion inhibitor A showed a better performance than inhibitors B and C in all cases but the target corrosion rates of less than 0.1 mmpy were achieved for all inhibitors. The chemical type of corrosion inhibitor A is based on quaternary amines mixed with methanol, isopropyl alcohol, xylene and ethylbenzene. Based on the obtained results the carbon steel lifetime of 30 years, provided proper inhibitors are present and 3mm corrosion allowance, can be achieved for hot aquifers service with presented water compositions.

  18. Corrosion Protection Performance of Polyester-Melamine Coating with Natural Wood Fiber Using EIS Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, PyongHwa; Shon, MinYoung [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jo, DuHwan [POSCO, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In the present study, polyester-melamine coating systems with natural wood fiber (NWF) were prepared and the effects of NWF on the corrosion protectiveness of the polyester-melamine coating were examined using EIS analysis. From the results, higher average surface roughness was observed with increase of NWF content. Water diffusivity and water uptake into the polyester-melamine coatings with NWF were much higher than that into the pure polyester-melamine coating. The decrease in the impedance modulus |Z| was associated with the localized corrosion on carbon steel, confirming that corrosion protection of the polyester-melamine coatings with NWF well agrees with its water transport behavior.

  19. Electrochemical methods for corrosion testing of Ce-based coating prepared on AA6060 alloy by dip immersion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dip-immersion is simple and cost-effective method for the preparation of Ce-based conversion coatings (CeCCs, a promising alternative to the toxic chromate coatings, on the metal substrates. In this work CeCCs were prepared on Al-alloy AA6060 from aqueous solution of cerium chloride at room temperature. Effect of immersion time and post-treatment in phosphate solution on the microstructure and corrosion properties of the coatings was studied. The longer immersion time, the thicker but nonhomogeneous and cracked CeCCs. The post-treatment contributed to the sealing of cracks, as proven by an increase in corrosion resistance compared with as-deposited coatings. CeCCs prepared at longer deposition time and post-treated showed much better corrosion protection than those prepared at short deposition time. A detailed EIS study was undertaken to follow the evolution of corrosion behaviour of CeCCs with time of exposure to aggressive chloride environment (3.5 % NaCl. For the sake of comparison, the EIS properties of bare AA6060 were also investigated. A linear voltammetry was performed to complete the study. Results confirmed a formation of protective CeCCs on AA6060 surface. However, even CeCCs prepared at longer deposition time and post-treated provided a short term protection in aggressive environment, due to the small thickness. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019 i br. III 45012

  20. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  1. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 01-1-065 Accelerated Corrosion Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    as a general guide. This procedure is focused on metallic corrosion and does not accelerate Microbial Induced Corrosion (MIC) or degradation of non...metallic materials such as plastics or rubbers due to solar exposure or other causes of degradation besides what is identified in this procedure... concentration salt solutions that are present on roadways, typically from road deicing salts. The application includes exposure to fine mists from elevated

  2. Cyclone reburning retrofit: Corrosion evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarv, H.; Paul, L.D. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Reburning is an emerging NO{sub x} reducing technology which offers cyclone boiler owners a promising alternative to the more expensive flue gas cleanup techniques. Pilot-scale test results have shown that the corrosive H{sub 2}S gas can evolve during reburn. This can pose a potential problem and concern in retrofits burning high-sulfur Illinois coals. This research program is intended to assess tube corrosion under simulated reburning conditions (temperature, stoichiometry, and H{sub 2}S concentration). Performance of existing carbon steel as well as other alloys will be tested and compared. 1 fig.

  3. Cyclone reburning retrofit: Corrosion evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzan, H.; Paul, L.D. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Reburning is an emerging NO{sub x} reducing technology which offers cyclone boiler owners a promising alternative to the more expensive flue gas cleanup techniques. Pilot-scale test results have shown that the corrosive H{sub 2}S gas can evolve during reburn. This can pose a potential problem and concern in retrofits burning high-sulfur Illinois coals. This research program is intended to assess tube corrosion under simulated reburning conditions (temperature, stoichiometry, and H{sub 2}S concentration). Performance of existing carbon steel as well as other alloys will be tested and compared. 1 fig.

  4. Experimental and quantum chemical studies on corrosion inhibition performance of fluconazole in hydrochloric acid solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Malekmohammadi Nouri; M M Attar

    2015-04-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of fluconazole (FLU) was investigated on steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Weight loss measurements and atomic force microscope analysis were utilized to investigate the corrosion inhibition properties and film formation behaviour of FLU. Quantum chemical approach was also used to calculate some electronic properties of the molecule in neutral and protonated form in order to find any correlation between the inhibition effect and molecular structure of FLU molecule. The results showed that FLU can act as a good corrosion inhibitor for steel in hydrochloric acid solution at different temperatures and it can inhibit steel corrosion up to 95%. The adsorption followed the Langmuir isotherm and the thermodynamic parameters were also determined and discussed. Quantum chemical studies showed that in adsorption process of FLU molecules, nitrogen and oxygen atoms and benzene ring act as active centres.

  5. Inhibitive Performance of Benzotriazole for Steel Corrosion Studied by Electrochemical and AFM Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuanchao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the inhibiting effect of benzotriazole (BTA) on corrosion of X65 pipeline steel in bicarbonate solution was investigated by electrochemical measurements, including open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy characterization. It is found that BTA is effective to inhibit the steel corrosion, and the inhibiting efficiency is increased by the increasing inhibitor concentration. The BTA is an anodic inhibitor, which shifts the corrosion potential of the steel less negatively and decreases the anodic current density at individual potential. A layer of inhibitor film is formed on the steel surface to reduce the corrosion rate of the steel. The formed film is quite smooth, with a roughness at the nano-meter scale.

  6. Stifling of Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mon, K G; Gordon, G M; Rebak, R B

    2005-06-08

    Artificially creviced Alloy 22 (N06022) specimens may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in presence of hot chloride containing solutions. The presence of oxyanions in the electrolyte, especially nitrate, may inhibit the nucleation and growth of crevice corrosion. Constant potential tests were performed using tightly creviced specimens of Alloy 22. It was found that crevice corrosion may initiate when a constant potential above the crevice repassivation potential is applied. It was found that as the crevice corrosion nucleated, the current initially increased but later decreased. The net measured current can be converted into penetration following a power law fit of the experimental data. The average power law coefficient ''n'' was found to be 0.439, suggesting that even under constant applied potential crevice corrosion penetration is diffusion controlled.

  7. STIFLING OF CREVICE CORROSION IN ALLOY 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon; G.M. Gordon; R.B. Rebak

    2005-07-01

    Artificially creviced Alloy 22 (N06022) specimens may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in presence of hot chloride containing solutions. The presence of oxyanions in the electrolyte, especially nitrate, may inhibit the nucleation and growth of crevice corrosion. Constant potential tests were performed using tightly creviced specimens of Alloy 22. It was found that crevice corrosion may initiate when a constant potential above the crevice repassivation potential is applied. It was found that as the crevice corrosion nucleated, the current initially increased but later decreased. The net measured current can be converted into penetration following a power law fit of the experimental data. The average power law coefficient ''n'' was found to be 0.439, suggesting that even under constant applied potential, crevice corrosion penetration is diffusion controlled.

  8. Utilizing various test methods to study the stress corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to aluminum-lithium alloys because of rather substantial specific-strength and specific-stiffness advantages offered over commercial 2000and 7000-series aluminum alloys. An obstacle to Al-Li alloy development has been inherent limited ductility. In order to obtain a more refined microstructure, powder metallurgy (P/M) has been employed in alloy development programs. As stress corrosion (SC) of high-strength aluminum alloys has been a major problem in the aircraft industry, the possibility of an employment of Al-Li alloys has been considered, taking into account a use of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Attention is given to a research program concerned with the evaluation of the relative SC resistance of two P/M processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. The behavior of the alloys, with and without an addition of magnesium, was studied with the aid of three test methods. The susceptibility to SC was found to depend on the microstructure of the alloys.

  9. Stereotype Threat, Test Anxiety, and Mathematics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Tobias; Neumann, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of stereotype threat and trait test anxiety on mathematics test performance. Stereotype threat and test anxiety interacted with each other in affecting performance. Trait test anxiety predicted performance only in a diagnostic condition that prevented stereotype threat by stereotype denial. A state measure of…

  10. Stereotype Threat, Test Anxiety, and Mathematics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Tobias; Neumann, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of stereotype threat and trait test anxiety on mathematics test performance. Stereotype threat and test anxiety interacted with each other in affecting performance. Trait test anxiety predicted performance only in a diagnostic condition that prevented stereotype threat by stereotype denial. A state measure of…

  11. Corrosion Performance of Carbon Steel in Micelle-containing Cement Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, J; Koleva, D. A.; Wit, J.H.W. de; Petrov, P; Breugel, K. van

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the results from a preliminary investigation on the corrosion behavior of low carbon steel in cement extract (CE) in the presence of very low concentration polymeric nanoaggregates (PEO113-b-PS70 micelles). The steel electrodes were investigated in Cl--containing CE as corrosion medium, compared to chloride-free CE as a reference case. The results from the electrochemical measurements (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Potentio-dynamic Polarization (PDP)) in...

  12. Preparation and performance of fluorescent sensing coating for monitoring corrosion of Al alloy 2024

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song-mei; ZHANG Hong-rui; LIU Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    A kind of fluorescent sensing coating was prepared for monitoring corrosion of aluminum alloys by incorporating phenylfluorone(PF) into acrylic paint as sensing material. The fluorescent dye PF reacts with aluminum ions on corroded aluminum substrate to occur fluorescence quenching observed in UV light. This paint system is sensitive to underlying corrosion processes through reacting with the Al3+ produced by anodic reaction accompanying corrosion. After a certain time,when the samples of Al alloy 2024 coated with PF-acrylic paint were immersed in 1 mol/L NaCl solution,fluorescence quenching spots can be seen with unaided eyes. With the development of corrosion process,the size of fluorescence quenching spots increases. Active corrosion areas on the sample surface were found under the fluorescence quenching spots by optical microscope. The corrosion areas can be observed more clearly by SEM,and many pits are found. This suggests that the fluorescence quenching spots are the sites of produced Al3+ by the anodic reaction of the local attack of the coated Al alloy substrate in the chloride solution and the corrosion process of the coated Al alloy can be monitored on-line by the sensing coating. The sensitivity of this coating system for detection of anodic reaction associated with corrosion was determined by applying constant charge current and measuring the charge,at which fluorescence quenching is detected in the coating with unaided eyes. Visual observation of coated samples can detect fluorescence change resulting from a charge corresponding to an equivalent hemispherical pit with approximate depth of 50 μm.

  13. Trinity Acceptance Tests Performance Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Mahesh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Ensuring Real Applications perform well on Trinity is key to success. Four components: ASC applications, Sustained System Performance (SSP), Extra-Large MiniApplications problems, and Micro-benchmarks.

  14. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  15. Corrosion processes and field performance of epoxy-coated reinforcing steel in marine substructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saguees, A.A. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Mechanics; Powers, R.G.; Kessler, R. [Florida Department of Transportation, Gainesville, FL (United States). Materials Office

    1994-12-31

    Severe corrosion of epoxy coated rebar in the substructure of marine bridges in the Florida Keys has prompted an investigation of the condition of other bridges in the State. Over thirty bridges were subject to field examination, which included determination of rebar condition, determination of extent of electric continuity between rebars, extraction of concrete cores, determination of chloride diffusivity, concrete resistivity measurements, and related electrochemical measurements. The results indicate that the time for development of external corrosion symptoms in the Florida Keys was dominated by the corrosion propagation stage, which in that case was comparable to that expected for plain rebar. Structures outside the Florida Keys were found to be generally corrosion-free. Extensive metal-coating disbandment was observed in virtually all structures whether or not significant chloride contamination existed at the rebar level. Chloride penetration was very slow in bridges with modem concrete formulations, suggesting that long corrosion-free service times are likely for those structures. It is expected that the corrosion-free service life in those structures will be primarily the result of concrete quality and thick cover, and not necessarily due to the use of epoxy-coated rebar.

  16. The erosion-corrosion performance of SA213-T22 steel in low velocity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Nava, J. G.; Martínez-Villafañe, A.; Almeraya-Calderón, F. M.; Stott, F. H.; González-Rodríguez, J. G.

    2001-12-01

    The erosion-corrosion (E-C) behavior of SA213-T22 steel has been studied in a laboratory fluidized-bed (FB) facility in the temperature range from 100 to 600 °C. Tests were carried out on pin specimens in air using alumina particles of 560 µm average size at impact velocities from 1.5 to 4.5 m/s. The trends of wear with temperature showed small weight gains at velocities up to 1.5 m/s. Erodent deposition was a dominant process at temperatures below about 300 °C and velocities below about 2 m/s. At higher velocities, a peak wastage temperature was observed at about 350 °C. The wastage/temperature curves observed in both cases suggested four temperature regions. In each region, a different E-C regime operates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed various wastage mechanisms, i.e., (a) oxide chipping, (b) development of a compact and adherent oxide scale, (c) oxide and metal removal, and (d) fracture and spalling within the oxide layer and at the scale/metal interface. In the present study, the latter mechanism was responsible for the high wastage rates observed at temperatures above about 450 °C and impact velocities above 3.5 m/s.

  17. 40 CFR 610.63 - Performance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance tests. 610.63 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Special Test Procedures § 610.63 Performance tests... 0 to 60 mph acceleration tests (at normal ambient temperatures) on the baseline...

  18. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  19. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Zhang; Leng Liao; Ruiqiang Zhao; Jianting Zhou; Mao Yang; Runchuan Xia

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obta...

  20. Corrosion of magnesium alloys in commercial engine coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.; StJohn, D.H. [CRC for Cast Metals Manufacturing (CAST), Division of Materials, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2005-01-01

    A number of magnesium alloys show promise as engine block materials. However, a critical issue for the automotive industry is corrosion of the engine block by the coolant and this could limit the use of magnesium engine blocks. This work assesses the corrosion performance of conventional magnesium alloy AZ91D and a recently developed engine block magnesium alloy AM-SC1 in several commercial coolants. Immersion testing, hydrogen evolution measurement, galvanic current monitoring and the standard ASTM D1384 test were employed to reveal the corrosion performance of the magnesium alloys subjected to the coolants. The results show that the tested commercial coolants are corrosive to the magnesium alloys in terms of general and galvanic corrosion. The two magnesium alloys exhibited slightly different corrosion resistance to the coolants with AZ91D being more corrosion resistant than AM-SC1. The corrosivity varied from coolant to coolant. Generally speaking, an organic-acid based long life coolant was less corrosive to the magnesium alloys than a traditional coolant. Among the studied commercial coolants, Toyota long life coolant appeared to be the most promising one. In addition, it was found that potassium fluoride effectively inhibited corrosion of the magnesium alloys in the studied commercial coolants. Both general and galvanic corrosion rates were significantly decreased by addition of KF, and there were no evident side effects on the other engine block materials, such as copper, solder, brass, steel and aluminium alloys, in terms of their corrosion performance. The ASTM D 1384 test further confirmed these results and suggested that Toyota long life coolant with 1%wt KF addition is a promising coolant for magnesium engine blocks. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Properties and Corrosion Performance of Self-reinforced Composite PEEK for Proposed Use as a Modular Taper Gasket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Eric S; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2016-11-01

    Fretting corrosion in medical alloys is a persistent problem, and the need for biomaterials that can effectively suppress mechanically assisted crevice corrosion in modular taper junctions or otherwise insulate metal-on-metal interfaces in mechanically demanding environments is as yet unmet. The purpose of this study is to characterize a novel material, self-reinforced composite polyetheretherketone (SRC-PEEK) and to evaluate its ability to inhibit fretting corrosion in a pin-on-disk metal-on-metal interface test. SRC-PEEK was fabricated by hot compaction of in-house-made PEEK fibers by compacting uniaxial layups at 344°C under a load of 18,000 N for 10 minutes. SRC-PEEK, bulk isotropic PEEK, and the in-house-made PEEK fibers were analyzed for thermal transitions (Tg, Tm) through differential scanning calorimetry, crystallinity, crystal size, crystalline orientation (Hermanns orientation parameter) through wide-angle x-ray scattering, and modulus, tensile strength, yield stress, and strain to failure through monotonic tensile testing. SRC-insulated pin-on-disk samples were compared with metal-on-metal control samples in pin-on-disk fretting corrosion experiments using fretting current and fretting mechanics measurements. Fifty-micron cyclic motion at 2.5 Hz was applied to the interface, first over a range of loads (0.5-35 N) while held at -0.05 V versus Ag/AgCl and then over a range of voltages (-0.5 to 0.5 V) at a constant contact stress of 73 ± 19 MPa for SRC-PEEK and 209 ± 41 MPa for metal-on-metal, which were different for each group as a result of changes in true contact area due to variations in modulus between sample groups. Pins, disks, and SRC samples were imaged for damage (on alloy and SRC surfaces) and evidence of corrosion (on alloy pin and disk surfaces). SRC specimens were analyzed for traces of alloy transferred to the surface using energy dispersive spectroscopy after pin-on-disk testing. SRC-PEEK showed improved mechanical properties to

  2. Encapsulated Multifunction Corrosion Inhibitive Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Tec #19 (alkaline detergent), scrubbed vigorously with cheese cloth, then perform R.I.A. drop test for cleanliness (ASTM 7.1.6.22) (Turco Air Tec...Systems, DOE/NASA TM-78180 (1978). 39. Gouda , V.K. and Shater, M.A., Corrosion Sci. 15 199 (1975). 40. Controlled release, Pesticide Symposium 41

  3. Confidence and Cognitive Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Lazar; Lee, Jihyun

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the nature of confidence in relation to abilities, personality, and metacognition. Confidence scores were collected during the administration of Reading and Listening sections of the Test of English as a Foreign Language Internet-Based Test (TOEFL iBT) to 824 native speakers of English. Those confidence scores were correlated…

  4. Confidence and Cognitive Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Lazar; Lee, Jihyun

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the nature of confidence in relation to abilities, personality, and metacognition. Confidence scores were collected during the administration of Reading and Listening sections of the Test of English as a Foreign Language Internet-Based Test (TOEFL iBT) to 824 native speakers of English. Those confidence scores were correlated…

  5. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  6. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weldings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segarra, José A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS. The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior.En este artículo se ha investigado el comportamiento frente a la corrosión en medios acuosos salinos de chapas soldadas de aleación AZ31 mediante técnicas gravimétricas y ensayo en cámara de niebla salina. Las muestras estudiadas han sido soldadas mediante soldadura TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas y con diferentes materiales de aporte. En el estudio se ha empleado microscopía óptica para analizar la microestructura. Los ensayos de gravimetría y los ensayos de niebla salina indican que el empleo de materiales de aporte más nobles para soldar las muestras evitando la disminución del contenido en aluminio en los cordones, no implica un mejor comportamiento frente a la corrosión.

  7. Bio-testing integral toxicity of corrosion inhibitors, biocides and oil hydrocarbons in oil-and gas-processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugunov, V.A.; Kholodenko, V.P.; Irkhina, I.A.; Fomchenkov, V.M.; Novikov, I.A. [State Research Center for Applied Microbiology, Obolensk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In recent years bioassays have been widely used for assessing levels of contamination of the environment. This is due to the fact that test-organisms provide a general response to toxicants present in samples. Based on microorganisms as test objects, it is possible to develop cheap, sensitive and rapid assays to identify environmental xenobiotics and toxicants. The objective of the research was to develop different microbiological assays for assessing integral toxicity of water environments polluted with corrosion inhibitors, biocides and hydrocarbons in oil- and gas-processing industry. Bio-luminescent, electro-orientational, osmo-optic and microorganism reducing activity assays were used for express evaluation of integral toxicity. They are found to determine promptly integral toxicity of water environments containing various pollutants (oil, oil products, corrosion inhibitors, biocides). Results conclude that the assays may be used for analyzing integral toxicity of water polluted with hydrocarbons, as well as for monitoring of water changes as a result of biodegradation of pollutants by microorganisms and their associations. Using a kit of different assays, it is also possible to evaluate ecological safety of biocides, corrosion inhibitors, and their compositions. Bioassays used as a kit are more effective than each assay individually, allowing one to get complete characterization of a reaction of bacterial test organisms to different environments. (authors)

  8. Applicability of in vitro tests for skin irritation and corrosion to regulatory classification schemes: substantiating test strategies with data from routine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle, Susanne N; Sullivan, Kristie M; Mehling, Annette; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Skin corrosion or irritation refers to the production of irreversible or reversible damage to the skin following the application of a test substance, respectively. Traditionally, hazard assessments are conducted using the in vivo Draize skin test, but recently in vitro tests using reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) models have gained regulatory acceptance. In this study, skin corrosion (SCT) and irritation tests (SIT) using a RhE model were implemented to reduce the number of in vivo tests required by regulatory bodies. One hundred and thirty-four materials were tested from a wide range of substance classes included 46 agrochemical formulations. Results were assessed according to UN GHS, EU-CLP, ANVISA and US EPA classification schemes. There was high correlation between the two in vitro tests. Assessment of the SCT sensitivity was not possible due to the limited number of corrosives in the data set; SCT specificity and accuracy were 89% for all classification systems. Accuracy (63-76%) and sensitivity (53-67%) were low in the SIT. Specificity and concordance for agrochemical formulations alone in both the SCT and SIT were comparable to the values for the complete data set (SCT: 91% vs. 89% specificity, 91% vs. 89% accuracy and SIT: 64-88% vs. 70-85% specificity, 56-75% vs. 63-76% accuracy).

  9. Analysis of electrochemical noise data in both time and frequency domains to evaluate the effect of ZnO nanopowder addition on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ashassi-Sorkhabi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy–ZnO nanocomposite coatings have been developed for corrosion protection of steel. Structural characterization of the prepared nanocomposites was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The anti-corrosive properties of the coatings were evaluated by electrochemical noise (EN. On the basis of the EN results in both time and frequency domains, the nanocomposite material with low ZnO concentration (0.1% wt.% was found to be much superior in corrosion protection when tested in aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Finally, EIS measurements were carried out and the data fitted with suitable equivalent circuit. Resistance parameters obtained by both techniques were found to be in relatively good agreement.

  10. Operator performance in non-destructive testing: A study of operator performance in a performance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkvist, J.; Edland, A.; Svenson, Ola [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology

    2000-05-15

    In the process industries there is a need of inspecting the integrity of critical components without disrupting the process. Such in-service inspections are typically performed with non-destructive testing (NDT). In NDT the task of the operator is to (based on diagnostic information) decide if the component can remain in service or not. The present study looks at the performance in NDT. The aim is to improve performance, in the long run, by exploring the operators' decision strategies and other underlying factors and to this way find out what makes some operators more successful than others. Sixteen operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of four test pieces with the aim to detect (implanted) cracks. In addition to these performance demonstration tests (PDT), the operators performed independent ability tests and filled out questionnaires. The results show that operators who trust their gut feeling more than the procedure (when the two come to different results) and that at the same time have a positive attitude towards the procedure have a higher PDT performance. These results indicate the need for operators to be motivated and confident when performing NDT. It was also found that the operators who performed better rated more decision criteria higher in the detection phase than the operators who performed worse. For characterizing it was the other way around. Also, the operators who performed better used more time, both detecting and characterizing, than the operators who performed worse.

  11. Corrosion behavior of corrosion resistant alloys in stimulation acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheldi, Tiziana [ENI E and P Division, 20097 San Donato Milanese Milano (Italy); Piccolo, Eugenio Lo; Scoppio, Lucrezia [Centro Sviluppo Materiali, via Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    In the oil and gas industry, selection of CRAs for downhole tubulars is generally based on resistance to corrosive species in the production environment containing CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, chloride and in some case elemental sulphur. However, there are non-production environments to which these materials must also be resistant for either short term or prolonged duration; these environments include stimulation acids, brine and completion fluids. This paper reports the main results of a laboratory study performed to evaluate the corrosion and stress corrosion behaviour to the acidizing treatments of the most used CRAs for production tubing and casing. Laboratory tests were performed to simulate both 'active' and 'spent' acids operative phases, selecting various environmental conditions. The selected steel pipes were a low alloyed steel, martensitic, super-martensitic, duplex 22 Cr, superduplex 25 Cr and super-austenitic stainless steels (25 Cr 35 Ni). Results obtained in the 'active' acid environments over the temperature range of 100-140 deg. C, showed that the blend acids with HCl at high concentration and HCl + HF represented too much severe conditions, where preventing high general corrosion and heavy localised corrosion by inhibition package becomes very difficult, especially for duplex steel pipe, where, in some case, the specimens were completely dissolved into the solution. On the contrary, all steels pipes were successfully protected by inhibitor when organic acid solution (HCOOH + CH{sub 3}COOH) were used. Furthermore, different effectiveness on corrosion protection was showed by the tested inhibitors packages: e.g. in the 90% HCl at 12% + 10 CH{sub 3}COOH acid blend. In 'spent' acid environments, all steel pipes showed to be less susceptible to the localised and general corrosion attack. Moreover, no Sulphide Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) was observed. Only one super-austenitic stainless steel U-bend specimen showed

  12. Bond Strength Degradation of Corrosive Reinforced Lightweight Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yueshun; LU Yiyan; LI Houxiang; ZENG Sanhai

    2007-01-01

    The influence of reinforced bar corrosion on the bond degradation in lightweight concrete was studied. Accelerated constant current corrosion tests were performed on lightweight reinforced concrete samples, and the influential factors, such as protective layer thickness, reinforced bar diameter and corrosive level were investigated. The constant current step method was used to measure the electric resistance of the concrete protective cover, which was used to characterize the corrosion level of the rebar. Experimental results indicated that the corrosive resistance increased with increasing the cover dimension and decreasing the reinforced bar diameter, and the rate of decrease in the specimen impedance after cracking depended on the cover dimension. A new medium was offered for the further research on the performance degradation of corrosion lightweight concrete.

  13. Where Lab Tests Are Performed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities ...

  14. Fatigue - corrosion of endoprosthesis titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, A; Muster, D; Jaeger, J H

    1979-01-01

    Commercial total hip prostheses often show certain metallurgical faults (porosities, coarse grains, growth dendrites, carbide networks). In order to investigate more accurately the role played by these different parameters in prostheses failure we performed a large number of systematic corrosion, fatigue and fatigue - corrosion tests on these materials and on commercial total hip prostheses. Ultimate strengthes seem to be reached for cast cobalt alloys, whereas titanium alloys, such as Ta 6 V, present very high fatigue limit under corrosion. Thus, rotative bending fatigue - corrosion tests in biological environment provide values about 50 DaN/mm2. This value, is nevertheless appreciably higher than those obtained with stellites and stainless steel. Titanium alloys, because of their mechanical performances, their weak Young's modulus (11000 DaN/mm2) and their relative lightness (4.5. g/cm3), which are associated with a good biocompatibility, seem very promising for permanent implants realisation.

  15. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Blandford, Edward, E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Howe, Kerry [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  16. Fireside corrosion and steamside oxidation of 9-12% Cr martensitic steels exposed for long term testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Jensen, S. A.; Rasmussen, F.

    2009-01-01

    To obtain long term corrosion and steam oxidation data for the 9-12%Cr ferritic steels, test tube sections have been exposed in Amager 3 and Avedore 1 coal fired power plants in Denmark (formerly run by ENERGI E2). Thus direct comparisons can be made for T91 and T92 for the 9% Cr steels and X20Cr......MoV121 and HCM12 for the 12% Cr steels. The test tubes were welded in as part of the existing final superheaters in actual plants and exposure has been conducted over a ten year period (1994-2005). Compared to the older steel types, T92 and HCM12 utilise tungsten to improve their creep strength. From...... of the corroded layers has been investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The fireside corrosion rate for the T92 and HCM12 steels are comparable to those of T91, however X20CrMoV121 has a higher fireside corrosion rate after the longest exposure time. For steamside oxidation, it was HCM...

  17. An Alternative Corrosion Resistance Test Method for Solar Cells and Interconnection Materials Limiting the Number of Long-lasting and Expensive Damp-Heat Climate Chamber Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aken, B.B.; Gouwen, R.J.; Veldman, D.; Bende, E.E.; Eerenstein, W. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Damp-heat testing of PV modules is a time-consuming process, taking months. We present an alternative test method: electrochemical noise (EcN) measurements. Data acquisition times vary between minutes for direct exposure to several tens of hours for encapsulated samples. EcN measurements are presented for several solar cell concepts and different environments. We have found that the degradation in damp-heat testing is proportional to the electrochemical noise signal. In conclusion, the electrochemical noise measurements are a fast, versatile tool to test the corrosion resistance of solar cells, which can be tested for different environments including encapsulation.

  18. Mechanical, tribological and corrosion performance of WBN composite films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lihua; Zhao, Hongjian; Xu, Junhua, E-mail: jhxu@just.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • WBN composite films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. • The WBN film which exhibited the highest hardness had best wear resistance at room and elevated temperature. • The corrosion resistance of the substrate which coated with W{sub 2}N films or WBN films was superior to the uncoated substrate. • The corrosion resistance of the substrate which coated with W{sub 2}N films was improved slightly by doping some boron content and the corrosion mechanism was discussed in the view of structure. - Abstract: WBN composite films with various boron contents ranging from 25.1 at.% to 46.5 at.% were deposited by a multi-target magnetron sputtering system. The microstructure, mechanical, tribological and corrosion behavior of films were studied using XRD, SEM, FTIR, HRTEM, nano-indentation, Ball-on-disc dry sliding wear tester, Bruker 3D Profiler and compared to W{sub 2}N. All the films exhibited face-centred cubic (fcc) structure W{sub 2}N; bcc α-W phases appeared as the B content was 25.1 at.% and amorphous BN appeared as the B content was 31.9 at.%. The hardness and compressive stress of WBN films first increased and then decreased with increasing the B content. As the B content was 38.1 at.%, they reached the maximum values of 36.1 GPa and 2.6 GPa, respectively. The best wear resistance at room and elevated temperature was found for the film which was shown to exhibit the highest hardness and compressive stress. The corrosion resistance of the substrate which coated with W{sub 2}N films or WBN films was superior to the uncoated substrate. The corrosion resistance of the substrate which coated with W{sub 2}N films was improved slightly by doping some boron content.

  19. DOE-DARPA High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM), Annual HPCRM Team Meeting & Technical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Brown, B; Bayles, B; Lemieux, T; Choi, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Branagan, D; Blue, C; Peter, B; Beardsley, B; Graeve, O; Aprigliano, L; Yang, N; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-21

    The overall goal is to develop high-performance corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous-metal coatings for prolonged trouble-free use in very aggressive environments: seawater & hot geothermal brines. The specific technical objectives are: (1) Synthesize Fe-based amorphous-metal coating with corrosion resistance comparable/superior to Ni-based Alloy C-22; (2) Establish processing parameter windows for applying and controlling coating attributes (porosity, density, bonding); (3) Assess possible cost savings through substitution of Fe-based material for more expensive Ni-based Alloy C-22; (4) Demonstrate practical fabrication processes; (5) Produce quality materials and data with complete traceability for nuclear applications; and (6) Develop, validate and calibrate computational models to enable life prediction and process design.

  20. Anti-Corrosion Performance of 1,3-BENZOTHIAZOLE on 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel in H2SO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loto, Roland Tolulope

    The corrosion inhibition effect of synthesized 1,3-benzothiazole at very low concentrations on 410 martensitic stainless steel in 3MH2SO4 solution was studied through potentiodynamic polarization and weight loss measurements. The observation showed that the organic compound performed effectively with average inhibition efficiencies of 94% and 98% at the concentrations studied from both electrochemical methods due to the inhibition action of protonated inhibitor molecules in the acid solution. The amine and aromatics functional groups of the molecules active in the corrosion inhibition reaction were exposed from Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. Thermodynamic calculations showed cationic adsorption to be chemisorption adsorption, obeying the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Images from optical microscopy showed an improved morphology in comparison to images from corroded stainless steel. Severe surface deterioration and macro-pits were observed in the uninhibited samples.

  1. Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Triazole Derivatives on Copper-Nickel Alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, B.; Jiang, S. L.; Liu, X.; Ma, A. L.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the performance of three triazole derivatives with different molecular structures as corrosion inhibitors for the copper-nickel alloy CuNi 90/10 in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Inhibition behavior was systematically determined through electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In addition, adsorption behavior and the inhibition mechanism were investigated via quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic simulation. Experimental results indicate that the three inhibitors with triazole rings and heteroatoms exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition capabilities on the copper-nickel alloy surface through physisorption and chemisorption. In particular, 3-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole showed the best inhibition capability according to the concentration ranges considered in the experiments. The results of quantum chemical calculation agreed with the experimental findings.

  2. Synthesis of some novel non ionic surfactants based on tolyltriazole and evaluation their performance as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Migahed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Five new synthesized non ionic surfactants (I–V were synthesized and characterized using FTIR and NMR spectroscopic methods. Performance of the synthesized compounds as corrosion inhibitors for X- 65 type carbon steel in oil wells formation water was investigated by various techniques such as weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. It was found that the percentage inhibition efficiency (η% increases by increasing the inhibitor concentration until the critical micelle concentration (CMC is reached. Also, the results showed enhancement in inhibition efficiencies with increasing both molecular size of the surfactant and the degree of ethoxylation. Potentiodynamic polarization curves indicated that the inhibitors under investigation act as mixed type. The data obtained from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS were analyzed to model the corrosion inhibition process through equivalent circuit. Finally, the nature of the protective film formed on carbon steel surface was analyzed by SEM and EDX techniques.

  3. Experimental and quantum chemical studies on corrosion inhibition performance of quinoline derivatives for MS in 1N HCl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B M Mistry; N S Patel; S Sahoo; S Jauhari

    2012-06-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of two quinoline derivatives, viz. 2-chloro quinoline 3-carbaldehyde (CQC) and (2-chloro-quinoline-3ylmethyl)--tolyl-amine (CQA) have been investigated against mild steel (MS) in 1N HCl solution using conventional weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The losses in weights of MS samples have proved that both CQC and CQA are efficient inhibitors of corrosion. The mixed mode of inhibition was confirmed by electrochemical polarizations. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have showed changes in the impedance parameters like charge transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance that confirmed strong adsorption of inhibitors on the MS surface. The inhibition action of these compounds was assumed to occur via adsorption on the steel surface through the active centres contained in the molecules. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculations have been performed at B3LYP/6-31G( , ) level to complement the experimental evidence.

  4. Corrosion, friction and wear performance of diamond – like carbon (DLC coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madej

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The a - C:H:W, TiN/a - C:H:W and the CrN/a - C:H:W coatings were deposited on steel surface by physical vapour deposition methods and studied for corrosion and tribological properties, after elemental and structural analysis. In friction pairs the elements coated with diamond-like carbon showed better tribological properties than the elements without coatings. The presence of interlayers in coatings contributed to an improvement in the tribological properties but decreased corrosion resistance.

  5. Controlling internal corrosion of oil and gas pipelines : the corrosion inhibitor selection software (CISS) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron, A.; Papavinasam, S. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2009-07-01

    The internal pitting corrosion of oil and gas pipelines can be effectively controlled through the addition of inhibitors. However, simulation of field operating conditions is necessary because the performance of corrosion inhibitors is influenced by several interacting parameters. This paper reviewed the Corrosion Inhibitor Selection Software (CISS) program. The materials transported in production pipelines are often multiphase, containing oil, aqueous (brine), and gas phases. The corrosion rate and inhibitor performance are influenced by composition, temperature, flow and pressure. Steel composition and structure also influence both the rate and type of corrosion. Improvements in corrosion test methodologies are aimed at simulating field corrosion conditions in the laboratory in a compressed time-scale. The parameters that influence the types of corrosion must be simulated in order for laboratory methodology to be relevant. The variables controlled should be quantifiable. There should also be a correlation between the influence of variables controlled in the laboratory and of the same variables in the field. The CISS program evaluates inhibitors in the following 4 steps: (1) pipeline operating conditions, (2) selection of laboratory methodology, (3) determination of operating conditions for the laboratory methodologies, and (4) selection of corrosion inhibitors. The 7 objectives of the CISS program are to optimize the strategies of inhibitor selection for pipeline applications; determine the hydrodynamic parameters of the pipe from field operating conditions; select appropriate laboratory methodologies for evaluating inhibitors; determine flow conditions for high-shear laboratory methodologies; develop a qualitative relationship between corrosion rates of non-shear laboratory methodologies and of pipelines; evaluate corrosion inhibitors based on results from different laboratory methodologies; and design cost-effective inhibitors for future applications. 47 refs

  6. Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Laurinavichius, K S

    1998-01-01

    Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

  7. Standard test method for evaluating stress-corrosion cracking of stainless alloys with different nickel content in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in an acidified boiling sodium chloride solution. This test method is performed in 25% (by mass ) sodium chloride acidified to pH 1.5 with phosphoric acid. This test method is concerned primarily with the test solution and glassware, although a specific style of U-bend test specimen is suggested. 1.2 This test method is designed to provide better correlation with chemical process industry experience for stainless steels than the more severe boiling magnesium chloride test of Practice G36. Some stainless steels which have provided satisfactory service in many environments readily crack in Practice G36, but have not cracked during interlaboratory testing using this sodium chloride test method. 1.3 This boiling sodium chloride test method was used in an interlaboratory test program to evaluate wrought stainless steels, including duplex (ferrite-austenite) stainless and an alloy with up to about 33% nickel. It may also b...

  8. Field test corrosion experiments in Denmark with biomass fuels Part I Straw firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, A; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    In Denmark, straw and other types of biomass are used for generating energy in power plants. Straw has the advantage that it is a "carbon dioxide neutral fuel" and therefore environmentally acceptable. Straw combustion is associated with corrosion problems which are not encountered in coal...

  9. Field test corrosion experiments in Denmark with biomass fuels Part I Straw firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, A; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    In Denmark, straw and other types of biomass are used for generating energy in power plants. Straw has the advantage that it is a "carbon dioxide neutral fuel" and therefore environmentally acceptable. Straw combustion is associated with corrosion problems which are not encountered in coal...

  10. Microstructure characterization and corrosion testing of MAG pulsed duplex stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitelea, Ion; Utu, Ion Dragos; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Karancsi, Olimpiu [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    Duplex stainless steels are extremely attractive construction materials for their usage in intense aggressive environments. They offer numerous advantages compared to the austenitic stainless steels having an excellent behavior to pitting and cavernous corrosion, and a high resistance to stress cracking corrosion in chlorides media. However, their corrosion properties are largely dependent on the microstructural factors such as: the quantitative ratio of the two phases ferrite/austenite (F/A), the presence of intermetallic compounds and the distribution of the alloying elements between the ferrite and austenite. As a result of the thermal cycles experienced by the base metal without a post-weld heat treatment, the mechanical properties are significantly different in the heat affected zone and the deposited metal compared with the properties of the base metal. The present paper highlights the effect of the post-weld solution treatment in order to restore the balance between austenite and ferrite in the welded joint areas and also to limit undesirable precipitation of secondary phases with implications for increasing the corrosion resistance.

  11. Tempering effect on corrosion performance of magnesium alloys for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Ferrari, G.M.; Erinc, M.; Sillekens, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion resistances for magnesium alloys AZ80, AE82 and ZM21 treated at 200 and 330°C for 2 hours, and for AZ80 and AE82 at 415°C for 8 hours were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization measurements in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution at 37°C. The morphology and the Volta potential

  12. Corrosion Performance of Carbon Steel in Simulated Pore Solution in the Presence of Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, J.; Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Kolev, H.; Van Breugel, K.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the results on the investigation of the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in model alkaline medium in the presence of very low concentration of polymeric nanoaggregates [0.0024 wt % polyethylene oxide (PEO)113-b-PS70 micelles]. The steel electrodes were investigated in chloride

  13. EFFECT OF CHEMISTRY VARIATIONS IN PLATE AND WELD FILLER METAL ON THE CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF NI-CR-MO ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.V. Fix

    2006-02-07

    The ASTM standard B 575 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys such as Alloy 22 (N06022) and Alloy 686 (N06686). The compositions of each element are given in a range. For example, the content of Mo is specified from 12.5 to 14.5 weight percent for Alloy 22 and from 15.0 to 17.0 weight percent for Alloy 686. It was important to determine how the corrosion rate of welded plates of Alloy 22 using Alloy 686 weld filler metal would change if heats of these alloys were prepared using several variations in the composition of the elements even though still in the range specified in B 575. All the material used in this report were especially prepared at Allegheny Ludlum Co. Seven heats of plate were welded with seven heats of wire. Immersion corrosion tests were conducted in a boiling solution of sulfuric acid plus ferric sulfate (ASTM G 28 A) using both as-welded (ASW) coupons and solution heat-treated (SHT) coupons. Results show that the corrosion rate was not affected by the chemistry of the materials in the range of the standards.

  14. Effect of Chemistry Variations in Plate and Weld Filler Metal on the Corrosion Performance of Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, D V; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    The ASTM standard B 575 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys such as Alloy 22 (N06022) and Alloy 686 (N06686). The compositions of each element are given in a range. For example, the content of Mo is specified from 12.5 to 14.5 weight percent for Alloy 22 and from 15.0 to 17.0 weight percent for Alloy 686. It was important to determine how the corrosion rate of welded plates of Alloy 22 using Alloy 686 weld filler metal would change if heats of these alloys were prepared using several variations in the composition of the elements even though still in the range specified in B 575. All the material used in this report were especially prepared at Allegheny Ludlum Co. Seven heats of plate were welded with seven heats of wire. Immersion corrosion tests were conducted in a boiling solution of sulfuric acid plus ferric sulfate (ASTM G 28 A) using both as-welded (ASW) coupons and solution heat-treated (SHT) coupons. Results show that the corrosion rate was not affected by the chemistry of the materials in the range of the standards.

  15. Astronaut Scott Carpenter tests balance mechanism performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter's balance mechanism performance is tested by his walking on a narrow board in his bare feet. He is performing this test at the School of Aviation Medicine, Pensicola, Florida (04570); Carpenter walks a straight line by putting one foot directly in front of the other to test his balance (04571).

  16. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Zhang, Xuejun; Surma, Jan; Fitzpatrick, Lilly; Montgomery, Eliza; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts are under way to replace current corrosion inhibitors with more environmentally friendly alternatives. However, problems with corrosion inhibition efficiency, coating compatibility and solubility have hindered the use of many of these materials as simple pigment additives.This paper will present technical details on how the Corrosion Technology Lab at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has addressed these issues by encapsulating environmentally friendly inhibitors into organic and inorganic microparticles and microcapsules. The synthetic process for polymer particles was characterized and post-synthesis analysis was performed to determine the interactions between the inhibitors and the encapsulation material. The pH-controlled release of inhibitors from various particle formulations in aqueous base was monitored and compared to both electrochemical and salt immersion accelerated corrosion experiment. Furthermore, synergistic corrosion inhibition effects observed during the corrosion testing of several inhibitor combinations will be presented.

  17. A time-release technique for corrosion prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dry, C.M.; Corsaw, M.J.T. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States). School of Architecture

    1998-08-01

    Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed an anti-corrosion system that is activated automatically where and when it is needed. Porous fibers are filled with calcium nitrite and coated with a salt-sensitive substance to control the response. The release of the corrosion inhibitor chemical is at the portion of the reinforcing bar in danger of corrosion when conditions would allow corrosion to initiate. In a series of tests with concrete samples containing either no protection or the conventional freely mixed calcium nitrite, this system performed well in that it delayed the onset of corrosion by at least three weeks in the laboratory specimens and reduced the amount of total corrosion by more than half.

  18. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  19. Evaluation of the mechanical and corrosion protection performance of electrodeposited hydroxyapatite on the high energy electron beam treated titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopi, D., E-mail: dhanaraj_gopi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamil Nadu (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011,Tamil Nadu (India); Sherif, El-Sayed M. [Center of Excellence for Research in Engineering Materials (CEREM), Advanced Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P.O. Box 800, Al-Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Electrochemistry and Corrosion Laboratory, Department of Physical Chemistry, National Research Centre (NRC), Dokki, 12622 Cairo (Egypt); Rajeswari, D. [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamil Nadu (India); Kavitha, L. [Department of Physics, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Thiruvarur 610 101, Tamil Nadu (India); Pramod, R.; Dwivedi, Jishnu [Industrial Accelerator Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Polaki, S.R. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ti–6Al–4V alloy was surface treated by high energy low current DC electron beam. • Successful electrodeposition of HAP was achieved on surface treated Ti–6Al–4V. • The as-formed coating possessed improved surface wettability and adhesion strength. • Maximum corrosion protection performance was exhibited by the as-formed coating. - Abstract: In our present study, the Ti–6Al–4V alloy surface was modified by irradiating with the high energy low current DC electron beam (HELCDEB) using 700 keV DC accelerator. Following this, the HELCDEB treated surface was coated with hydroxyapatite by adopting electrodeposition method. The microstructure and hardness of HELCDEB treated Ti–6A1–4V alloy with and without electrodeposited hydroxyapatite were investigated. Also, the electrochemical corrosion characteristics of the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) was studied by potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedence techniques (EIS) which showed an enhanced corrosion resistance and revealed an improved life time for the hydroxyapatite coating developed on the HELCDEB treated Ti–6A1–4V alloy than the untreated sample.

  20. Effect of Cr content on the corrosion performance of low-Cr alloy steel in a CO2 environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lining; Wang, Bei; Zhu, Jinyang; Li, Wei; Zheng, Ziyi

    2016-08-01

    Low-Cr alloy steel demonstrates lower corrosion rate than does C steel in a high-temperature and high-pressure CO2-containing environment. This study aimed to clarify the role of the Cr content in mitigating corrosion and reports the performance of 1%Cr, 2%Cr, 3%Cr, 4%Cr, 5%Cr, and 6.5%Cr steels. The results show that low-Cr alloy steel in CO2 at 80 °C and 0.8 MPa possesses spontaneous prepassivation characteristics when the Cr content is 3% or higher. Furthermore, the formation and peel-off of a prepassivation film on 3%Cr-6.5%Cr steels surfaces during polarization demonstrate that adequate amount of Cr in the steel substrate can cause protective layer. The main component of prepassivation film on 3%Cr steel is Cr(OH)3. Thus, the role of Cr is revealed. An adequate amount of Cr in the steel substrate causes the formation of protective Cr(OH)3 layer, which helps low-Cr steel to possess prepassivation characteristics. Prepassivation is the reason why low-Cr steel has a lower corrosion rate than C steel.

  1. Flexural behavior of bonded post-tensioned concrete beams under strand corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuhui [College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Xiangtan University, 411105 Xiangtan (China); School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Wang, Lei, E-mail: leiwlei@hotmail.com [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Zhang, Jianren; Ma, Yafei [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Liu, Yongming [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85281 Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Flexural behavior of bonded PT beams with strand corrosion is experimental tested. • Cracking, stiffness, ultimate strength, failure & ductility of beams are clarified. • A coefficient is proposed to measure incompatible strain between strand & concrete. - Abstract: An experimental test is performed to investigate the flexural behavior of bonded post-tensioned concrete beams under strand corrosion. Eight beams are designed and subjected to accelerated method to different corrosion levels. The initial stiffness of beams is observed by cyclic loading-unloading test during the corrosion procedure. Corrosion effects on concrete cracking, post-cracking stiffness, ultimate strength, failure mode and ductility are then clarified by the flexural test. And, a coefficient is introduced to quantify the incompatible strain between corroded strand and concrete. Results show that the prestress force loss of strand has almost the linear relation with corrosion loss. Strand corrosion affects slightly the initial stiffness of beam before flexural cracking, but degrades significantly the post-cracking stiffness of beam as the corrosion loss exceeds 27.0%. Slight corrosion of strand has little effects on beams flexural behavior. The severe corrosion, however, decreases the number of crack, changes the failure mode form the concrete crushing to strand rupture, degrades the ductility and the ultimate strength of beams, and leads to the incompatible strain between strand and concrete. In the present test, the incompatible strain decreases about 20% of the flexural strength as the corrosion loss exceeds 27.0%.

  2. Severe Environmental Corrosion Erosion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany, OR, allows researchers to safely examine the performance of materials in highly corrosive or erosive...

  3. 混凝土内部钢筋锈蚀监测及黏结滑移性能研究%MONITORING OF REINFORCEMENT CORROSION WITHIN CONCRETE AND RESEARCH ON BOND SLIP PERFORMANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高志玉; 朱劲松

    2016-01-01

    为有效监测钢筋混凝土内部钢筋的锈蚀以及研究其黏结滑移性能,设计了电化学锈蚀试验对钢筋混凝土试件进行模拟锈蚀及其试验研究。首先,设计制作了15个钢筋混凝土试件,在埋入每个试件中的钢筋表面相同位置粘贴有压电智能传感器;然后,对试件进行电化学快速锈蚀,并在试件锈蚀过程中对其进行压电测试,来追踪锈蚀对波传播的影响;最后,对15个试件进行拉拔试验,来分析钢筋锈蚀引起的粘结滑移退化规律。结果表明:钢筋锈蚀严重影响了应力波的传播衰减规律及其极限黏结强度。%In order to effectively monitor the reinforcement corrosion within a reinforced concrete and research its bond slip performance, it was designed the electrochemical corrosion test, then simulation corrosion and experimental study were done for reinforced concrete specimens.Firstly, fifteen reinforced concrete specimens were made, PZT actuators/sensors were attached to the same position of the surface of each reinforcements which was embedded in specimens.Secondly, fast continuous power electrochemical corrosion was applied to these specimens, and the PZT test was carried out in the specimen corrosion process to trace the influence of corrosion on the wave propagation characteristics.At last, pullout tests were conducted on fifteen specimens to analyse the degradation rule of bond slip caused by reinforcement corrosion.The results showed that reinforcement corrosion affected seriously the stress wave propagation attenuation law and the ultimate bond strength.

  4. Erosion-corrosion; Erosionkorrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghili, B

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment 32 refs, 16 figs, tabs

  5. Surface modification for corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-06-01

    The raw gas environments that arise from coal gasification have chemical compositions that are low in pO{sub 2} and moderate-to-high in pS{sub 2}. Metallic materials for service in such an environment undergo predominantly sulfidation attack at temperatures of 400 to 700{degree}C. Modification of alloy compositions in bulk can alter the scaling processes and lead to improvements in corrosion resistance, but the benefits can only be attained at temperatures much higher than the service temperatures of the components. Modification of surfaces of structural components by several of the coating techniques examined in this study showed substantial benefit in corrosion resistance when tested in simulated coal gasification environments. The paper presents several examples of surface modification and their corrosion performance.

  6. Concentrating solar collector-performance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Report summarizes test results from evaluation of concentrating solar collector thermal performance, from transient behavior, and incident-of-angle behavior. Tests were conducted using National Bureau of Standards recommedations and specifications.

  7. Corrosion inhibitors; Los inhibidores de corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinez, L. A.; Meas, Y.; Ortega-Borges, R.; Corona, A.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we briefly describe the characteristics, cost and electrochemical nature of the corrosion phenomena as well as some of the technologies that are currently employed to minimize its effect. The main subject of the paper however, deals with the description, classification and mechanism of protection of the so-called corrosion inhibitors. Examples of the use of these substances in different aggressive environments are also presented as means to show that these compounds, or their combination, can in fact be used as excellent and relatively cheap technologies to control the corrosion of some metals. In the last part of the paper, the most commonly used techniques to evaluate the efficiency and performance of corrosion inhibitors are presented as well as some criteria to make a careful and proper selection of a corrosion inhibitor technology in a given situation. (Author) 151 refs.

  8. Performance test procedures for thermal collectors - Outdoor testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, W. B.

    A review of outdoor solar collector test methods is presented, based largely on the CEC Recommendations for European Solar Collector Test Methods. Test facility design and instrumentation are discussed, with reference to their influence on measured collector efficiencies. Steady state outdoor testing, mixed indoor/outdoor testing and transient testing are reviewed, and it is concluded that although the testing of simple flat plate water heaters is fairly well understood, more work is now required to develop test methods for the new high performance collectors which are coming onto the market.

  9. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop, Modules 6 - 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

    2012-10-01

    These modules cover performance testing of: Interior Detection Systems; Access Controls; Exterior Detection Systems; Video Assessment Systems; SNM / Contraband Detection Systems; Access Delay Elements

  10. The effect of pranayama on test anxiety and test performance

    OpenAIRE

    Azadeh Nemati

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In an educational setting, anxiety is often experienced by students when taking a test; which is called ′test anxiety′. This study intends to investigate the effect of doing pranayama on test anxiety and test performance. Materials and Methods: The participants consisted of 107 MA students who were randomly assigned to the control and experimental groups. The students of the experimental group practiced pranayama for one full semester. Sarason′s (1980) test anxiety scale was gi...

  11. Corrosion performance of reinforced mortar in the presence of polymeric nano-aggregates: electrochemical behavior, surface analysis, and properties of the steel/cement paste interface

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, J; Koleva, D. A.; Breugel, K. van

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of admixed polyethylene oxide-b-polystyrene (PEO113-b-PS70)micelles on corrosion behavior of reinforced mortar. The electrochemical measurement shows that the corrosion performance of the reinforcing steel was not significantly improved. However, surface analysis and microstructural investigation at the steel/cement paste interface reveal that the admixed micelles lead to a steel surface layer with enhanced barrier properties in terms of morphology and composi...

  12. The structural and bio-corrosion barrier performance of Mg-substituted fluorapatite coating on 316L stainless steel human body implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifnabi, A.; Fathi, M. H.; Eftekhari Yekta, B.; Hossainalipour, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings were deposited on medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel via sol-gel dip coating method. Phase composition, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained coatings were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was also used to evaluate functional groups of the obtained coatings. The surface morphology and cross-section of the final coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy was used to determine elemental chemical composition of the obtained coatings. In order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of uncoated and Mg-substituted fluorapatite coated 316L stainless steel, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in physiological solutions at 37 ± 1 °C. Moreover, the released metallic ions from uncoated and coated substrates were measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) within 2 months of immersing in Ringer's solution at 36.5 ± 1 °C as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed that fluoride and magnesium were successfully incorporated into apatite lattice structure and the prepared coatings were nanostructured with crystallinity of about 70%. Obtained coatings were totally crack-free and uniform and led to decrease in corrosion current densities of 316L stainless steel in physiological solutions. In addition, coated sample released much less ions such as Fe, Cr and Ni in physiological media. Therefore, it was concluded that Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings could improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of 316L stainless steel human body implants.

  13. The structural and bio-corrosion barrier performance of Mg-substituted fluorapatite coating on 316L stainless steel human body implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifnabi, A., E-mail: sharifnabi@yahoo.com [Biomaterials Group, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, M.H. [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eftekhari Yekta, B.; Hossainalipour, M. [Biomaterials Group, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings were deposited on medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel via sol–gel dip coating method. Phase composition, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained coatings were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was also used to evaluate functional groups of the obtained coatings. The surface morphology and cross-section of the final coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy was used to determine elemental chemical composition of the obtained coatings. In order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of uncoated and Mg-substituted fluorapatite coated 316L stainless steel, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in physiological solutions at 37 ± 1 °C. Moreover, the released metallic ions from uncoated and coated substrates were measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) within 2 months of immersing in Ringer's solution at 36.5 ± 1 °C as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed that fluoride and magnesium were successfully incorporated into apatite lattice structure and the prepared coatings were nanostructured with crystallinity of about 70%. Obtained coatings were totally crack-free and uniform and led to decrease in corrosion current densities of 316L stainless steel in physiological solutions. In addition, coated sample released much less ions such as Fe, Cr and Ni in physiological media. Therefore, it was concluded that Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings could improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of 316L stainless steel human body implants.

  14. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  15. SRNL report for the tank waste disposition integrated flowsheet: Corrosion testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) tests were performed in support of the Tank Waste Disposition Integrated Flowsheet (TWDIF). The focus of the testing was to assess the effectiveness of the SRNL model for predicting the amount of nitrite inhibitor needed to prevent pitting induced by increasing halide concentrations. The testing conditions were selected to simulate the dilute process stream that is proposed to be returned to tank farms from treating the off-gas from the low activity waste melter in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant.

  16. Development of Improved Accelerated Corrosion Qualification Test Methodology for Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    polyurethane topcoat observed ( FTIR analysis) • UV and ozone under constant salt fog on coated panels in laboratory was much more damaging than 2 years...irradiation and ozone gas • Cumulative damage model for predicting atmospheric corrosion rates of 1010 steel was developed using inputs from weather...data: – Temperature, – Relative humidity (%RH) – Atmospheric contaminants (chloride, SO2, and ozone ) levels Silver Al Alloy 7075 Al Alloy

  17. Synthesize and characterization of a novel anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed in silica matrix (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2}) to improve the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozlou, M., E-mail: Gharagozlou@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: Rramezanzadeh-bh@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), PO 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baradaran, Z. [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • An anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanopigment dispersed in silica matrix was synthesized. • The nanopigment showed proper inhibition performance in solution study. • The nanopigment significantly improved the corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. - Abstract: This study aimed at studying the effect of an anticorrosive nickel ferrite nanoparticle dispersed in silica matrix (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2}) on the corrosion protection properties of steel substrate. NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2} nanopigments were synthesized and then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then, 1 wt.% of nanopigments was dispersed in an epoxy coating and the resultant nanocomposites were applied on the steel substrates. The corrosion inhibition effects of nanopigments were tested by an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray test. Results revealed that dispersing nickel ferrite nanoparticles in a silica matrix (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2}) resulted in the enhancement of the nanopigment dispersion in the epoxy coating matrix. Inclusion of 1 wt.% of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2} nanopigment into the epoxy coating enhanced its corrosion protection properties before and after scratching.

  18. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of {+-} 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs.

  19. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS.

  20. Effect of Cold Drawing on Microstructure and Corrosion Performance of High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toribio, J.; Ovejero, E.

    1997-09-01

    This paper deals with the effect of cold drawing on a high-strength steel in wire form with pearlitic microstructure. Cold drawing produces a preferential orientation of the pearlite lamellae aligned parallel to the cold drawing direction, resulting in anisotropic properties with regard to fracture behaviour in air and aggressive environments (stress corrosion cracking). While the hot rolled bar has a randomly oriented microstructure in both transverse and longitudinal sections, the fully drawn wire presents a randomly oriented appearance in the transverse cross-section, but a marked orientation in the longitudinal cross-section. These microstructural characteristics affect the time-dependent behaviour of the steels when a crack is present in a corrosive or hydrogen environment and influences both the subcritical crack growth rate, the time to failure and the crack propagation path. It is shown that in the strongly drawn steels the crack changes its propagation path, and a micromechanical model is proposed to explain this behaviour.

  1. Corrosion Performance of Carbon Steel in Simulated Pore Solution in the Presence of Micelles

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, J; Koleva, D. A.; Wit, J.H.W. de; Kolev, H.; Breugel, K. van

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the results on the investigation of the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in model alkaline medium in the presence of very low concentration of polymeric nanoaggregates [0.0024 wt % polyethylene oxide (PEO)113-b-PS70 micelles]. The steel electrodes were investigated in chloride free and chloride-containing cement extracts. The electrochemical measurements (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization) indicate that the presence of micelles alter...

  2. Evaluation of corrosion on the fuel performance of stainless steel cladding

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Gomes Daniel; Abe Alfredo; Silva Antonio Teixeira e; Giovedi Claudia; Martins Marcelo Ramos

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear reactors, the use of stainless steel (SS) as the cladding material offers some advantages such as good mechanical and corrosion resistance. However, its main advantage is the reduction in the amount of the hydrogen released during loss-of-coolant accident, as observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Hence, research aimed at developing accident tolerant fuels should consider SS as an important alternative to existing materials. However, the available computational tools used to a...

  3. PERFORMACE OF MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAROTHERS KD; BOOMER KD; ANDA VS; DAHL MM; EDGEMON GL

    2010-01-14

    Between 2007 and 2009, several different multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems were designed and installed in high-level nuclear waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in WaShington State. The probe systems are being monitored to ensure waste tanks operate in regions that minimize localized corrosion (i.e., pitting) and stress corrosion cracking. The corrosion monitoring systems have been installed in wastes with different chemistry types. An ongoing effort during the same time period has generated non-radioactive simulants that are tested in the laboratory to establish baseline corrosion monitoring system performance and characterize data to allow interpretation of readings from the multiple corrosion monitoring systems. Data collection from these monitoring systems has reached the point where the results allow comparison with the laboratory testing. This paper presents analytical results from the corrosion monitoring system development program.

  4. Laccase Immobilized on Mesoporous Silica Materials and Its Corrosion Inhibition Performance in Circulating Cooling Water System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fang; Lü Yucui; Zhong Huiyun; Zhang Shuang; Fan Fengtao; Zhao Chaocheng

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous SiO2 microspheres were synthesized using the sol-gel method and were characterized byTEM, FT-IR and BET techniques. The diameter of the microspheres is about 100—150 nm, and the average mesopore di-ameter is 2.55 nm, while the speciifc surface area is 1 088.9 m2/g. Mesoporous SiO2 microspheres adsorb glutaraldehyde and immobilize laccase by means of the aldehyde group in glutaral which can react with the amidogen of laccase. The im-mobilization conditions were optimized at a glutaraldehyde concentration of 0.75%, a crosslinking time of 8 h, a laccase concentration of 0.04 L/L and an immobilization time of 10 h. When diesel leakage concentration was 80 mg/L, the highest corrosion inhibition efifciency of immobilized laccase reached 49.23%, which was slightly lower than the corrosion inhibi-tion efifciency of free laccase (59%). The diesel degradation ratio could reach up to 45%. It has been proved that the immo-bilized laccase could degrade diesel to inhibit corrosion.

  5. Effect of inhibitors and coatings on rebar corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saricimen, H.; Ashiru, O.A.; Jarrah, N.R.; Quddus, A.; Shameem, M. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Research Inst.

    1997-12-01

    Chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel is a major cause of deterioration of concrete structures in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Two of the practical ways of preventing or retarding corrosion of reinforcing steel bars in concrete are by using (a) inhibitor in concrete mix, and (b) coating either on the rebars or on external surfaces of concrete structures. The objective of this study has been to evaluate the effect of two inhibitors, three concrete coatings, and two barrier coatings on corrosion of reinforcing steel bars. Reinforced concrete specimens were monitored by AC and DC electrochemical techniques while undergoing free and accelerated corrosion. Accelerated corrosion tests were performed under 4V impressed anodic potential. Corrosion of the steel bars were evaluated by measuring anodic current, time-to-cracking of concrete specimens, and corrosion rates of the steel bars. The results showed that the specimens with the concrete surface coatings did not perform better than the control specimens. Time-to-cracking was shorter and corrosion rate of steel bars was higher in specimens coated with concrete coatings. The inhibitors and rebar surface coatings reduced the corrosion rate of steel bars significantly and improved the time-to-cracking of the specimens in comparison to control specimens.

  6. Solar-heating system performance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Report contains results of performance tests on complete system for solar space and hot-water heating system that uses commercially available components. Results were used to determine system suitability for field installation and to generate performance data base for comparison with future tests on field installed systems.

  7. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

    1992-08-01

    The problems connected with gas side corrosion for the design of the lA4 (POC) channel hardware are explored and results of gas side wear rate tests in the Textron Mark VII facility are presented. It is shown that the proposed designs meet a 2000 hour lifetime criterion based upon these materials tests. Improvement in cathode lifetime is demonstrated with lower voltage intercathode gaps. The corrosion of these materials is discussed and it is shown how lifetimes are dependent upon gap voltage and average metal temperature. The importance of uniformity of slagging to the durability of the anode wall is demonstrated. The wear mechanism of the anodes in the MHD channel is analyzed. In addition to gas-side corrosion, the results of specific water corrosion tests of sidewall materials are discussed. All of the tests reported here were carried out to confirm the gas-side performance and the manufacturability of anode and sidewall designs and to address questions posed about the durability of tungsten-copper on the waterside. the results of water corrosion tests of the tungsten copper alloy sidewall material are presented to show that with proper control of waterside pH and, if necessary, dissolved oxygen, one can obtain reliable performance with no degradation of heat transfer with this material. The final choice of materials was determined primarily by the outcome of these tests and also by the question of the manufacturability of the prospective designs.

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDIES CORE 308 SEGMENTS 14R1 & 14R2 TANK 241-AY-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; COOKE GA

    2003-10-30

    This document reports the results of electrochemical corrosion tests on AS1S Grade 60 carbon steel coupons exposed to tank 241-AY-102 sludge under conditions similar to those near the bottom of the tank. The tests were performed to evaluate the corrosive behavior of the waste in contact with sludge that does not meet the chemistry control limits of Administrative Control (AC) 5.15, Corrosion Mitigation Program.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of thick section high strength low alloy steel.

    OpenAIRE

    Needham, William Donald

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the corrosion performance of weldments of a high strength low alloy(HSLA) steel in a simulated seawater environment. This steel, designated HSLA80, was developed by the United States Navy for use in ship structural applications. Stress corrosion CRACKING(SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement(HEM) were investigated by conducting 42 Wedge-Opening load(WOL) tests as a function of stress intensity and corrosion potential and 33 Slow Strain Rate(SSR) tests...

  10. The influence of the chemical composition and type of alloy on corrosion performances of some medium strength Al-Mg-Si series of alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Delijić

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the chemical composition, i.e. content of silicone (Si and other alloying elements (Zr, Mn, etc on the corrosion behaviour and mechanical properties of Al-Mg-Si (6xxx type alloys was investigated in this paper. Open circuit corrosion potential (OCP measurements, linear polarization and potentiodynamic anodic/cathodic polarization were employed in order to determine the corrosion behaviour of artificially aged Al-Mg-Si samples in the chloride ions containing aqueous corrosion solutions. The difference in OCPs for the tested 6xxx type alloys in relation to the standard AA1020 alloy was observed to be between 1-4%, except for the AlMg0.65Si0.76Zr0.1 alloy when the difference was 14% (about 100 mV. The presence of zirconium and manganese in AlMgSi0.7 base alloy, that contains small excess of Si, shifts the OCPs to more negative values for -15 mV (~2% and -88 mV (~11% in natural water and 0,51 mol NaCl, respectively. All the tested 6xxx type alloys, except AlMg0.7Si1.2Mn0.8, show almost the same corrosion rates and other corrosion characteristics in chloride solution, with mass loss per year between 2.3-3 g/m2 .

  11. Performance Test on Polymer Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se Yup [Korea Nuclear Engineering Co., Ltd, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    Boric acid wastewater and spent ion exchange resins are generated as a low- and medium- level radioactive wastes from pressurized light water reactors. In Korea, boric acid wastewater is concentrated and dried in the form of granules, and finally solidified by using paraffin wax. In this study, polymer solidification was attempted to produce the stable waste form for the boric acid concentrates and the dewatered spent ion exchange resins. The polymer mixture which consists of epoxy resin, amine compounds and antimony trioxide was used to solidify the boric acid concentrates and the dewatered spent ion exchange resins. To evaluate the stability of polymer waste forms, a series of standardized performance tests was conducted. Also, by the requirement of the regulatory institute in Korea, an additional test was performed to estimate fire resistance and gas generation of the waste forms. A series of performance tests was conducted including compressive strength test, thermal stability test, irradiation stability test and biodegradation stability test, water immersion test, leach test, and free standing water for the polymer waste forms. In addition, a fire resistance test and an analysis of gas generation were performed on the waste forms by the requirement of the regulatory institute in Korea. From the results of the performance tests, it is believed that the polymer waste form is very stable and can satisfy the acceptance criteria for permanent disposal.

  12. Performance Testing of Download Services of COSMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Horák

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of performance tests of download services of Czech Office of Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre according to INSPIRE  requirements. Methodology of testing is explained, including monitoring performance  of reference servers. 26 millions of random requests were generated for each monitored operation, layer and coordinate system. The temporal development of performance indicators are analyzed and discussed. Results of performance tests approve the compliance with INSPIRE qualitative requirements for download services. All monitored services satisfy requirements of latency, capacity and availability. The latency and availability requirements are fulfilled with an abundant reserve. No problems in structure and content of responses were detected.

  13. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  14. A comparative study of the corrosion performance of TiN, Ti(B,N) and (Ti,Al)N coatings produced by physical vapour deposition methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aromaa, J.; Ronkainen, H.; Mahiout, A.; Hannula, S.P. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)); Leyland, A.; Matthews, A. (Univ. of Hull (United Kingdom)); Matthes, B.; Broszeit, E. (Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany))

    1991-07-07

    Thin film coatings produced by physical vapour deposition methods often exhibit porosity. Local defects can cause local and rapid corrosion of the base material. The porosity is difficult to estimate and electrochemical methods are most suitable for evaluating the corrosion resistance of the coated material. This paper compares the corrosion resistance of TiN, Ti(B,N), (Ti,Al)N- and TiB{sub 2}-coated ASP 23 high speed steel. For the materials studied here the corrosion performance of TiB{sub 2}-coated samples was poor. Ti(B,N) coatings obtained by two different methods were quite similar even though the calculated porosity of the coating produced by magnetron sputtering was lower than that of coatings produced by the electron beam technique. These coatings had similar or slightly better corrosion resistance than (Ti,Al)N coatings with a high aluminium-to-titanium ratio. (Ti,Al)N coatings with a low aluminium-to-titanium ratio were better than coatings with a high aluminium-to-titanium ratio. TiN coatings were better than other types excluding (Ti,Al)N+AlN layer coatings, which performed best. (Ti,Al)N+AlN coatings have an insulating layer on top of the coating, which increases the polarization resistance and decreases the corrosion current density. (orig.).

  15. Performance testing of thermoelectric generators at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouklove, P.; Truscello, V.

    1974-01-01

    Results of life tests of thermoelectric generators ranging in output power from 800 microwatts to 170 watts. Emphasis is placed on the results obtained from tests of three advanced prototypes - a high-performance generator, a transit-type generator, and a ring converter. In addition, the results of life tests of a number of generators representing Nimbus, Pioneer, and Viking technology are presented.

  16. Perform Ultrasonic Testing on Cs Capsule Overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, S.J.

    2000-04-06

    This procedure provides a safe, uniform method for the performance of the ultrasonic weld inspection of the Cesium capsule overpacks. The inspection system will detect cracks, lack of fusion, and lack of penetration. This computer controlled automated system will perform the examination once the capsule overpack has been placed in the pool cell. Examination of the capsule overpacks will be in accordance with drawing H-283014, REV. 0 ,and a certified NDE examiner will perform the test procedure, provide analysis, and test documentation.

  17. Effect of steel reinforcement with different degree of corrosion on degeneration of mechanical performance of reinforced concrete frame joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam-column joints which shoulders high-level and vertical shearing effect that maintains balance of beam and column end is the major component influencing the performance of the whole framework. Post earthquake investigation suggests that collapse of frame structure is induced by failure of joints in most cases. Thus, beam-column joints must have strong bearing capacity and good ductility, and reinforced concrete structure just meets the above requirement. But corrosion caused by long time use of reinforced concrete framework will lead to degeneration of mechanical performance of joints. To find out the rule of effect of steel reinforcement with different corrosion rate on degeneration of bearing capacity of reinforced concrete framework joints, this study made a nonlinear numerical analysis on fifteen models without stirrup in the core area of reinforced concrete frame joints using displacement method considering axial load ratio of column end and constraint condition. This work aims to find out the key factor that influences mechanical performance of joints, thus to provide a basis for repair and reinforcement of degenerated framework joints.

  18. Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Performance Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    Although the belief has been expressed that performance assessments are intrinsically more fair than multiple-choice measures, some forms of performance assessment may in fact be more likely than conventional tests to tap construct-irrelevant factors. As performance assessment grows in popularity, it will be increasingly important to monitor the…

  19. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasscer, D.S.; Morgan, T.O.; Rivera, C.

    1982-11-01

    Bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes, and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr). Pitting did not occur in bare 3003 and 3004 samples during the six month test. Pitting did occur to varying degrees in the Alclad and zinc diffusion treated material, but did not penetrate to the base metal. Biofouling countermeasures (intermittent chlorination and brushing) did not affect the corrosion rates to any significant extent. Intermittent chlorination at a level of 0.5 ppm for 28 minutes daily controlled microbiofouling of the samples but did not prevent the development of a macrobiofouling community in areas of the plumbing with low flow.

  20. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  1. A written test as an alternative to performance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Vleuten, C P; Van Luyk, S J; Beckers, H J

    1989-01-01

    Performance tests are logistically complex and time consuming. To reach adequate reliability long tests are imperative. Additionally, they are very difficult to adapt to the individual learning paths of students, which is necessary in problem-based learning. This study investigates a written alternative to performance-based tests. A Knowledge Test of Skills (KTS) was developed and administered to 380 subjects of various educational levels, including both first-year students and recently graduated doctors. By comparing KTS scores with scores on performance tests strong convergent validity was demonstrated. The KTS failed discriminant validity when compared with a general medical knowledge test. Also the identification of sub-tests discriminating between behavioural and cognitive aspects was not successful. This was due to the interdependence of the constructs measured. The KTS was able to demonstrate differences in ability level and showed subtle changes in response patterns over items, indicating construct validity. It was concluded that the KTS is a valid instrument for predicting performance scores and could very well be applied as supplementary information to performance testing. The relative ease of construction and efficiency makes the KTS a suitable substitute instrument for research purposes. The study also showed that in higher ability levels the concepts which were meant to be measured were highly related, giving evidence to the general factor theory of competence. However, it appeared that this general factor was originally non-existent in first-year students and that these competencies integrate as the educational process develops.

  2. Corrosion Testing of 304L SS 3013 Inner Container and Teardrop Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokash, Justin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hill, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lillard, Scott [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Joyce, Stephen Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tegtmeier, Eric Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) 3013 Standard specifies a minimum of two containers to be used for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials containing at least 30 wt.% plutonium and uranium. Three nested containers are typically used, the outer, inner, and convenience containers, shown in Figure 1. Both the outer and inner containers are sealed with a weld while the innermost convenience container must not be sealed. Lifetime of the containers is expected to be fifty years. The containers are fabricated of austenitic stainless steels (SS) due to their high corrosion resistance. Potential failure mechanisms of the storage containers have been examined by Kolman and Lillard et al.

  3. Standard Practice for Total Immersion Corrosion Test for Aircraft Maintenance Chemicals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the determination of the corrosiveness of aircraft maintenance chemicals on aircraft metals with time under conditions of total immersion by a combination of weight change measurements and visual qualitative determination of change. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Synthesis of N - Alkyl Benzimidazoles as Corrosion Inhibitors for Acidification in Hydrochloric Acid and Evaluation of Their Inhibition Performance%N-烷基苯并咪唑酸化缓蚀剂的合成及性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鹏辉; 冀生辉

    2013-01-01

    Four kinds of N - alkyl benzimidazole corrosion inhibitors were synthesized by alkylation of 2 - methyl benzimidazole or 2 - ethyl benzimidazole. The corrosion inhibition performance of as - synthesized inhibitors was evaluated by static state weight loss test and dynamic potential scanning polarization curve measurement. It was found that properly extending carbon chain of benzimidazole helped to improve the anticorrosion ability of benzimidazoles, and corrosion inhibitor N - hexadecyl - 2 - ethyl benzimidazole showed the best corrosion inhibition performance. Besides, at 60 ℃ in 15% hydrochloric acid, the corrosion rate of N80 steel decreased with increasing concentration of the corrosion inhibitor; and the corrosion rate of the steel at a corrosion inhibitor concentration of 1.0% was 1.73g/(m2 · h) , which indicated that corrosion inhibitor N-hexadecyl-2-ethyl benzimidazole was advantageous over the first-class corrosion inhibitor for acidification. Moreover, as-synthesized corrosion inhibitors were a class of mixed-type inhibitors dominated by cathode inhibition, but their inhibition performance in HCl with a concentration of above 20 % or at a temperature of above 70 ℃ was undesirable.%苯并咪唑是一类环境友好的缓蚀剂,将其衍生物用作油气田酸化缓蚀剂的报道较少.通过烷基化反应在2-甲基苯并咪唑和2-乙基苯并咪唑的1-氮原子上分别引入十二烷基和十六烷基,合成了4种N-烷基苯并咪唑,并以其为主剂制成缓蚀剂,用静态失重法和动电位扫描极化曲线对4种复配缓蚀剂在盐酸溶液中的缓蚀性能进行了评价.结果表明:适当延长1位烷基碳链,有助于提高苯并咪唑衍生物的缓蚀能力;合成的4种N-烷基苯并咪唑中,以N-十六烷基-2-乙基苯并咪唑为主剂制成缓蚀剂d的缓蚀性能最好;在60℃,15%HCl中,N80钢的腐蚀速率随缓蚀剂d用量的增大而减小,其用量为1.0%时,N80钢腐蚀速率为1.73 g/(m2·h),优于

  5. Research Opportunities in Corrosion Science for Long-Term Prediction of Materials Performance: A Report of the DOE Workshop on “Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository”.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payer, Joe H. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Scully, John R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2003-07-29

    The report summarizes the findings of a U.S. Department of Energy workshop on “Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository”. The workshop was held on July 29-30, 2003 in Bethesda, MD, and was co-sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The workshop focus was corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of materials performance in hostile environments, with special focus on relevance to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The culmination of the workshop is this report that identifies both generic and Yucca Mountain Project-specific research opportunities in basic and applied topic areas. The research opportunities would be realized well after the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s initial construction-authorization licensing process. At the workshop, twenty-three invited scientists deliberated on basic and applied science opportunities in corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of damage accumulation by corrosive processes that affect materials performance.

  6. Investigation of corrosion and ion release from titanium dental implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ektessabi, A.M. (Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)); Mouhyi, J.; Louvette, P.; Sennerby, L.

    1997-01-01

    A thin passive titanium dioxide, in its stoichiometric form, has a very high corrosion resistance, but the same conclusion can not be made on corrosion resistance of a surface which is not stoichiometrically titanium dioxide, or even a surface which is a composition of various elements and oxides. In practice, the implants available on the market have an oxide surface contaminated with other elements. The aim of this paper is to correlate clinical observations that show the deterioration of Ti made implants after certain period of insertion in the patients, and in vitro corrosion resistance of Ti implants with surface passive oxide layer. For this purpose, surface analysis of the retrieved failed implants were performed and in vivo animal experiments with relation to ion release from implants were done. Finally, on the basis of the clinical observation, in vivo animal test, and in vitro electrochemical corrosion test, a model is proposed to explain the corrosion and ion release from the Ti implant. (author)

  7. The effect of Mn and Zr additions on Fe impurities and the corrosion performance of Mg

    OpenAIRE

    Gandel, Darren Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) and zirconium (Zr) are two common alloying additions in magnesium (Mg) alloys. Both of these elements, while having low solubilities in Mg, each serve a specific purpose when added to Mg. Mn is often added to improve the extrudability and formability of Mg alloys and in aluminium (Al) containing Mg alloys to produce the Al8(Mn,Fe)5 phase which is able to remove iron (Fe) impurities to dramatically improve the corrosion resistance. Zr is incorporated in Mg mainly due to its uniq...

  8. High-Performance Laser Peening for Effective Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackel, L; Hao-Lin, C; Wong, F; Hill, M

    2002-10-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the Yucca Mountain waste package closure welds is believed to be the greatest threat to long-term containment. Use of stress mitigation to eliminate tensile stresses resulting from welding can prevent SCC. A laser technology with sufficient average power to achieve high throughput has been developed and commercially deployed with high peak power and sufficiently high average power to be an effective laser peening system. An appropriately applied version of this process could be applied to eliminate SCC in the waste package closure welds.

  9. Treatment Prevents Corrosion in Steel and Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, to protect rebar from corrosion, NASA developed an electromigration technique that sends corrosion-inhibiting ions into rebar to prevent rust, corrosion, and separation from the surrounding concrete. Kennedy Space Center worked with Surtreat Holding LLC, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a company that had developed a chemical option to fight structural corrosion, combining Surtreat's TPS-II anti-corrosive solution and electromigration. Kennedy's materials scientists reviewed the applicability of the chemical treatment to the electromigration process and determined that it was an effective and environmentally friendly match. Ten years later, NASA is still using this approach to fight concrete corrosion, and it has also developed a new technology that will further advance these efforts-a liquid galvanic coating applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete to protect the embedded rebar from corrosion. Surtreat licensed this new coating technology and put it to use at the U.S. Army Naha Port, in Okinawa, Japan. The new coating prevents corrosion of steel in concrete in several applications, including highway and bridge infrastructures, piers and docks, concrete balconies and ceilings, parking garages, cooling towers, and pipelines. A natural compliment to the new coating, Surtreat's Total Performance System provides diagnostic testing and site analysis to identify the scope of problems for each project, manufactures and prescribes site-specific solutions, controls material application, and verifies performance through follow-up testing and analysis.

  10. The effect of buffered solutions in corrosion testing of alloyed 13%Cr martensitic stainless steels for mildly sour applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drugli, J.M.; Rogne, T.; Svenning, M.; Axelsen, S. [SINTEF Materials Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Enerhaug, J. [Statoil, Trondheim (Norway)

    1999-11-01

    13% Cr stainless steels may suffer from sulfide stress corrosion cracking in sour environments if hydrogen enters the material. Hydrogen evolution is caused by the cathodic reaction in the corrosion process. As distinct from solutions without buffer, buffered solutions keep the pH stable at the surface almost independent of the electrochemical reactions. The most common initiation process for corrosion of stainless steels is break-down of the passive oxide by subsequent local acidification, which to a certain extent can be prevented in buffered solutions. For local corrosion the risk of corrosion therefore is higher in solutions without buffer than in buffered solutions at the same bulk pH. Hydrogen evolution may also be caused by general corrosion. For this type of corrosion the effect of buffer in the solution may be, contrary to the effect for local corrosion, that general corrosion of 13 Cr (with risk for cracking of loaded specimens) is more readily initiated in buffered solutions than in solutions without buffer at the same pH. With respect to corrosion on ground alloyed 13Cr base material by coupling to carbon steel, it is shown that general corrosion initiates both in strongly and moderately without buffer at pH 3.5, buffered solutions, but not in solution.

  11. Integrated Performance Testing for Nonproliferation Support Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, Russell; Bultz, Garl Alan; Byers, Kenneth R.; Yaegle, William

    2013-08-20

    The objective of this workshop is to provide participants with training in testing techniques and methodologies for assessment of the performance of: Physical Protection system elements; Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) system elements.

  12. Lawsonialnermis Extract Enhances Performance of Corrosion Protection of Coated Mild Steel in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of coating incorporated with various percentages of henna has been conducted by means of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method. Mild steel has been studied at ambient temperature and 50°C in order to examine the effect of temperature. The potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicate that henna extract acts as a mixed inhibitor while the corrosion rate (CR value decreases as the current density (Icorr decreases in the presence of 10% henna extract for both temperatures. Surface and protective film analysis have been carried out using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.The inhibition activity is mainly correlated with the major active functional groups of lawsone. The main components can be found in lawsone structures are phenols O-H, carboxylic acid C=O and alkenes C=C. The morphology of the uninhibited sample shows a rough surface of mild steel as a result of corrosion process and severe damage can be seen. In the presence of henna, a smooth surface of mild steel anda uniform deposition of henna were observed.

  13. Durability ofAsphalt in Different Corrosion Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuanfa; GUAN Bowen; XIONG Rui; SHENG Yanping; HE Rui

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion to asphalt mixture under different kinds of corrosion solution,such as pH=2 solution,pH=12 solution,pH =12 solution and 10% Na2SO4 solution,was studied.The performance attenuation of asphalt mixture was analyzed under the normal environment and the freeze-thaw environment,and the analysis was given on the sensitivity of the test results to the evaluation index.The experimental results show that the performance of asphalt mixture is attenuated faster under the acidic solution,alkaline solution and sulfate solution.Corrosion factor Kc,freeze-thaw corrosion factor Kf,and freeze-thaw effect factor Kfc are proposed to evaluate asphalt mixture resistance to corrosion in different kinds of corrosion solution.The values of Kc and Kfc decrease with the increasing of corrosion time.The change rule of Kf show that the rate of corrosion is decreased by the action of freeze-thaw in acidic solution and in alkaline solution,but is increased by the action of freeze-thaw in sulfate solution.The microscopic analysis indicates that acid solution reacts with aggregate of asphalt mixture,alkaline solution reacts with asphalt cement of asphalt mixture,the surface tension of sulfate solution and crystallization of sulfate are the main reasons which weak the performance of asphalt mixture.

  14. Investigation on Atmospheric Corrosiveness in Hainan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    According to the results of four-year exposure tests for carbon steel samples in Hainan province, the influences of meteorological factors and Cl- on atmospheric corrosion were investigated. The feature of atmospheric corrosion in this area was summarized. A corrosive map for the area was drawn. The corrosion products on carbon steel at some typical places were analyzed by XRD and XPS.

  15. Dexterity testing and residents' surgical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, T J

    1979-01-01

    1. With some exceptions, those who choose ophthalmology as a career may approximate the general population in innate manual dexterity. 2. Many factors other than manual dexterity influence the development of surgical skills by residents. 3. If dexterity testing is to be used, the addition or inclusion of tests for spatial aptitudes may be more helpful than simple dexterity tests alone. The predictive value of such tests for surgical performance would need vertification. 4. The development of a special test directly related to handling surgical instruments, to cutting, and to sewing (the criteria) may be more practical than the ones used in this study.

  16. Looking Back on Contributions in the Field of Atmospheric Corrosion Offered by the MICAT Ibero-American Testing Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Morcillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ibero-American Map of Atmospheric Corrosiveness (MICAT project was set up in 1988 sponsored by the International Ibero-American programme “Science and Technology for Development (CYTED” and ended in 1994 after six years of activities. Fourteen countries were involved in this project: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Portugal, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Research was conducted both at laboratories and in a network of 75 atmospheric exposure test sites throughout the Ibero-American region, thus considering a broad spectrum of climatological and pollution conditions. Although with its own peculiarities, the project basically followed the outline of the ISOCORRAG and ICP/UNECE projects, with the aim of a desirable link between the three projects. This paper summarizes the results obtained in the MICAT project for mild steel, zinc, copper, and aluminum specimens exposed for one year in different rural, urban, and marine atmospheres in the Ibero-American region. Complementary morphological and chemical studies were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and fourier transform infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR techniques, in order to correlate climatic and atmospheric conditions and properties of the corrosion products.

  17. Predicting edge seal performance from accelerated testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardikar, Kedar; Vitkavage, Dan; Saproo, Ajay; Krajewski, Todd

    2014-10-01

    Degradation in performance of a PV module attributable to moisture ingress has received significant attention in PV reliability research. Assessment of field performance of PV modules against moisture ingress through product-level testing in temperature-humidity control chambers poses challenges. Development of a meaningful acceleration factor model is challenging due to different rates of degradation of components embedded in a PV module, when exposed to moisture. Test results are typically a convolution of moisture barrier performance of the edge seal and degradation of laminated components when exposed to moisture. It is desirable to have an alternate method by which moisture barrier performance of the edge seal in its end product form can be assessed in any given field conditions, independent of particular cell design. In this work, a relatively inexpensive test technique was developed to test the edge seal in its end product form in a manner that is decoupled from other components of the PV module. A theoretical framework was developed to assess moisture barrier performance of edge seal with desiccants subjected to different conditions. This framework enables the analysis of test results from accelerated tests and prediction of the field performance of the edge seal. Results from this study lead to the conclusion that the edge seal on certain Miasole glass-glass modules studied is effective for the most aggressive weather conditions examined, beyond the intended service.

  18. Characterization of Corrosion Product Layers from CO2 Corrosion of 13Cr Stainless Steel in Simulated Oilfield Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Z. F.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, L.; Wu, J. Q.; Zhang, Y. Q.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of temperature and flow rate on the characterization and mechanisms of corrosion product layers from CO2 corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel was carried out in simulated oilfield solution. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method as well as weight loss tests in autoclave were utilized to investigate pitting corrosion behavior at various temperatures. Weight loss tests were performed at 100 and 160 °C under dynamic and static flow conditions. At the same time, the significant pitting parameters such as E corr, E pit, E pp, ∆ E, and I pass in cyclic polarization curves at various temperatures were analyzed and compared for revealing the pitting behavior of 13Cr stainless steel. The surface measurement techniques such as SEM, XRD, and XPS were used to detect the corrosion product layers. The results showed that both temperature and flow rate had significant effects on characterization of corrosion product layers or passive films formed on 13Cr stainless steel in CO2 corrosion system. At high temperature, lots of pits were formed at the localized corrosion areas of metal surfaces. Corrosion rates under the condition of 5 m/s were higher than those under the static condition regardless of the test temperatures.

  19. Thermal performance testing of the Explorer Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, David; Ducas, William; Ousley, Wes

    1993-01-01

    The Explorer Platform (EP) has been designed to accommodate on-orbit payload and bus module changeout via Space Transportation System (STS) servicing. Such a versatile spacecraft platform designed to experience widely different environmental exposures and operational conditions, coupled with program constraints on schedule and budget, presented a challenge to implementing a technically sound thermal vacuum/thermal balance test program. This paper discusses thermal performance tests implemented at the subsystem and system levels, and the risks accepted resulting from test sequence, configuration. and tests omitted from the program. No thermal cycling or thermal balance tests were performed on the integrated spacecraft level, although both the Payload (EUVE) and Platform (EP) received independent testing. The decision to take this approach is discussed with respect to the thermal design and the associated risks taken to maintain budget and schedule.

  20. Design and performance test of spacecraft test and operation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohua; Cui, Yan; Wang, Shuo; Meng, Xiaofeng

    2011-06-01

    Main test processor (MTP) software is the key element of Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) for spacecraft test and operation used in the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) for years without innovation. With the increasing demand for a more efficient and agile MTP software, the new MTP software was developed. It adopts layered and plug-in based software architecture, whose core runtime server provides message queue management, share memory management and process management services and forms the framework for a configurable and open architecture system. To investigate the MTP software's performance, the test case of network response time, test sequence management capability and data-processing capability was introduced in detail. Test results show that the MTP software is common and has higher performance than the legacy one.

  1. Superheater corrosion in biomass boiler - theories and tests in Vaestermalmsverket, Falun; Oeverhettarkorrosion i bioeldad panna - teorier och prov i Vaestermalmsverket, Falun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennquist, Eva-Marie

    2000-10-01

    It has lately been evident that a number of biomass-fired plants are experiencing major problems with corrosion of their superheaters. The major aim with this project is to contribute with increased knowledge in this area. The efforts to build up experience around different materials applicable for superheaters with high steam data is of great importance for future plants in Sweden. The main objective for 'Vaermeforsk' has been to transfer the experiences from this investigation to other boilers or plants with different types of fuel. This investigation has therefore been focused on the verification of SYCON's assumptions regarding the roles of chloride and alkali and the possibility of influencing/minimising superheater corrosion by optimisation of the fuel mix. Another important part was to verify that the boiler design, as such, does not create an unfavourable environment for the superheaters by producing reducing zones due to plume formation. Based on the above, the investigation has been divided into three loosely connected parts. (1) The role and reaction by chlorides in the deposits on a superheater, (2) Reducing environment - plume formation of non-combusted fuel, and (3) Choice of materials in the superheater. Serious corrosion has been detected in the superheater tubes of 'Vaestermalmsverket' in Falun. The material temperature was below 530 deg C. No serious inhomogeneous combustion problems or areas with reducing environments have been detected. The corrosion was therefore judged to be caused by alkali chlorides which condense on the superheater tubes. Tests with minor amounts of sulphur added to the biomass fuel have been shown to suppress the generation of alkali chlorides and their condensation on the superheater surfaces. A good correlation between calculated and measured values have been achieved. Very low corrosion rates have been measured on the test probes, constructed with different superheater material and placed in the

  2. Polydopamine as a promising candidate for the design of high performance and corrosion-tolerant polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hongtao; Del Frari, Doriane; Martin, Arnaud; Didierjean, Joffrey; Ball, Vincent; Michel, Marc; Ahrach, Hicham Ibn El

    2016-03-01

    Carbon materials such as carbon black or nanotubes suffer from degradation when subjected to harsh conditions occurring in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) electrode. Hence, nowadays it is more and more important to search for alternative support materials. The present work shows the results for the incorporation of alternative materials into PEMFCs electrode architectures. Commercially available Multi-Walled NanoTubes (MWNTs) are used as a support for Pt nanoparticles in combination with Polydopamine (PDA). The role of MWNTs is to confer a high electronic conductivity and help to form a porous network. On the other side the role of polydopamine is both to promote the proton conductivity similarly to ionomers such as Nafion and to protect the MWNTs against corrosion. The fuel cell polarization test shows a maximum power density of 780 mW cm-2 and a Pt utilization of 6051 mW mg(Pt)-1. The Pt utilization reached in this work is almost three times higher than for Pt/MWNTs electrodes containing the same Pt loading. Beside this, it is also shown for the first time that PDA serves as protective layer against carbon corrosion.

  3. The Effect of Post-Heat Treatment on Microstructure of 316L Cold-Sprayed Coatings and Their Corrosion Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikici, B.; Yilmazer, H.; Ozdemir, I.; Isik, M.

    2016-04-01

    The combined effects of process gases and post-heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of 316L cold-sprayed coatings on Al5052 substrates have been investigated in this study. The stainless steel coatings were subjected to heat treatment at four different temperatures (250, 500, 750, and 1000 °C) to study the effect of heat treatment. In addition, the corrosion performances of the coatings at different process temperatures have been compared using the potentiodynamic scanning technique. Microstructural characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The results of present study showed that cold-sprayed stainless steel coatings processed with helium exhibited higher corrosion resistance than those of coatings sprayed with nitrogen process gas. This could partially be attributed to the reduction in porosity level (4.9%) and improvement of particle-particle bonding. In addition, evaluation of the mechanical and microstructural properties of the coatings demonstrated that subsequent heat treatment has major influence on the deposited layers sprayed with He process gas.

  4. Experimental and Empirical Time to Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures under Different Curing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abouhussien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures, especially those in marine environments, are commonly subjected to high concentrations of chlorides, which eventually leads to corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel. The total time to corrosion of such structures may be divided into three stages: corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods. This paper evaluates, both empirically and experimentally, the expected time to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures. The tested reinforced concrete samples were subjected to ten alternative curing techniques, including hot, cold, and normal temperatures, prior to testing. The corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods in this investigation were experimentally monitored by an accelerated corrosion test performed on reinforced concrete samples. Alternatively, the corrosion initiation time for counterpart samples was empirically predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion for comparison. The results showed that the corrosion initiation periods obtained experimentally were comparable to those obtained empirically. The corrosion initiation was found to occur at the first jump of the current measurement in the accelerated corrosion test which matched the half-cell potential reading of around −350 mV.

  5. Cognitive test performance and background music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockerton, T; Moore, S; Norman, D

    1997-12-01

    This study examined the effects of background music on test performance. In a repeated-measures design 30 undergraduates completed two cognitive tests, one in silence and the other with background music. Analysis suggested that music facilitated cognitive performance compared with the control condition of no music: more questions were completed and more answers were correct. There was no difference in heart rate under the two conditions. The improved performance under the music condition might be directly related to the type of music used.

  6. Standard test method for determining effects of chemical admixtures on corrosion of embedded steel reinforcement in concrete exposed to chloride environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effects of chemical admixtures on the corrosion of metals in concrete. This test method can be used to evaluate materials intended to inhibit chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete. It can also be used to evaluate the corrosivity of admixtures in a chloride environment. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Recent Developments for Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welding: Joining, Testing, Corrosion - an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Conrad, C.; Wolter, B.; Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the steadily increasing demand on innovative manufacturing processes, modern lightweight construction concepts become more and more important. Especially joints of dissimilar metals offer a variety of advantages due to their high potential for lightweight construction. The focus of the investigations was Al/Mg-joints. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an efficient process to realize high strength joints between these materials in ductile condition. Furthermore, for a simultaneous transmission of power ultrasound during the FSW-process (US-FSW) a positive effect on the achievable tensile strength of the Al/Mg-joints was proven. In the present work the industrial used die cast alloys EN AC-48000 (AlSi12CuNiMg) and AZ80 (MgAl8Zn) were joined by a machining center modified especially for Ultrasound Supported Friction Stir Welding. The appearing welding zone and the formation of intermetallic phases under the influence of power ultrasound were examined in particular. In order to identify optimal process parameters extensive preliminary process analyzes have been carried out. Following this, an ultrasound-induced more intensive stirring of the joining zone and as a result of this a considerably modified intermetallic zone was detected. At the same time an increase of the tensile strength of about 25% for US-FSW-joints and for fatigue an up to three times higher number of cycles to failure in comparison to a conventional welding process was observed. Moreover, detailed corrosion analyzes have shown that especially the welding zone was influenced by the corrosive attack. To expand and deepen the knowledge of the US-FSW-process further material combinations such as Ti/Steel and Al/Steel will be considered in future.

  8. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  9. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-09-19

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  10. Effect of test solution compositions on corrosion resistance of {sup 13}Cr materials in a little amount of H{sub 2}S environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, Hisashi [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Amagasaki (Japan). Corporate R and D Labs.; Ueda, Masakatsu [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Wakayama (Japan). Wakayama Steel Works

    1999-11-01

    The effect of the buffer solution composition on the corrosion resistance of super 13Cr martensitic stainless steels is studied. It is widely recognized that the SSC susceptibility of 13Cr stainless steels depends on the H{sub 2}S partial pressure and pH in the solution. To control the pH value, buffered solutions are defined in NACE TM0177-96 (solution B) and EFC publications to simulate the actual field conditions in the laboratory tests under normal pressure. However, with some modifications of the buffer agents, there were some cases that the discoloring of the specimen was observed and the pitting occurred with the larger corrosion rate in some test conditions. Therefore, the corrosion resistance of super 13Cr stainless steels are considered to be influenced by the composition of the buffer solution. That is, the corrosion resistance of the steel depend on the concentration of CH{sub 3}COONa/CH{sub 3}COOH included in the test solution as the buffer agent, even in the same pH. The super 13Cr steel was not passivated in the buffer solution including 0.4 wt% CH{sub 3}COONa adjusted pH 3.5 with CH{sub 3}COOH recommended in NACE TM0177. Cr was detected in the solution, and it is considered that the CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} ion enhanced the dissolution of the steel since it can form the complex ion with Cr and therefore it prevents the surface of the steels from passivation. It is suggested that the buffer solution with 0.04 wt% CH{sub 3}COONa with CH{sub 3}COOH is appropriate solution for evaluating the corrosion resistance of super 13Cr steels because it has enough buffer power during the corrosion test, and has no effect on forming of the passivation film.

  11. Austenitic Stainless Steel AISI 316L Corrosion Test Research%奥氏体不锈钢AISI 316L腐蚀试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金刚; 刘江涛; 程珊珊

    2014-01-01

    在精对苯二甲酸(PTA)生产中,选取干燥机BM302壳体常用材料奥氏体不锈钢AISI 316L为研究对象,在醋酸环境中,对AISI 316L 受Br-及Cl-作用的电化学极化试验和电化学阻抗试验进行腐蚀性试验研究。试验结果表明,Br-或Cl-浓度的增加都会导致AISI 316L不锈钢腐蚀速率增加、击穿电位降低、腐蚀反应电阻减小,导致其耐腐蚀性能下降,腐蚀加剧。为PTA设备腐蚀的现场监测和设备维护提供参考依据。%In purified terephthalic acid (PTA) production, selected the drying machine BM302 shell commonly use material austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L as the research object. In the acetic acid environment, for corrosive test research of AISI 316L, through Br-and Cl-the role of electrochemical polarization test and electrochemical impedance test. The test results show that Br-or Cl-will lead to the increasing of the concentration of seawater AISI 316L stainless steel corrosion rate increase, breakdown voltage is reduced, and the corrosion reaction resistance decreases, and lead to its corrosion resistance drop, corrosion intensifies. That will provide reference for PTA equipment corrosion field monitoring and equipment maintenance.

  12. The correlation between accelerated and field corrosion tests performed in carbon steel and weathering steel coupons, coated and non-coated; Correlacao entre ensaios acelerados e ensaios de campo em corpos-de-provas de aco carbono e aco patinavel, sem e com revestimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2002-07-01

    The performance of four different organic coating systems applied to carbon and weathering steel coupons has been assessed in this investigation. applied on the surface of carbon steel and weathering steel coupons. The coupons have been evaluated using five different tests, three field tests and two accelerated tests. The field tests were carried out at three atmospheric stations, located at COSIPA in Cubatao-SP, at Alto da Serra in Cubatao-SP and at Paula Souza in Sao Paulo city. The accelerated tests consisted of (a) exposure to alternate cycles of ultraviolet radiation/condensation combined with salt spray cycles (UVCON combined with Salt Spray) and of (b) exposure to alternate cycles of ultraviolet radiation/condensation combined with the Prohesion test. The performance of the coatings was assessed by visual observation and photographs, using a method based on ASTM D-610, ASTM D-714 and ASTM-1654 standards to rank them. The oxide phases formed on the surfaces of the non-coated specimens of carbon and weathering steels, exposed to the same tests performed with the coated specimens, were identified using three different techniques: X-ray diffraction, Raman microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the field tests, the specimens have been exposed for 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months. In the accelerated ones, the results were obtained after 1340 hours (4 cycles) test. The main component identified in all the specimens collected from the field tests and from the UVCON combined with the Prohesion test was lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH). Goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH ) and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were identified as the other two main phases present in ali the specimens. In the UVCON combined with Salt Spray test, the dominant phase was magnetite, followed by goethite and lepidocrocite. The morphology of the rust formed on the specimens was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structures corresponding to goethite and lepidocrocited were recognized on ali specimens

  13. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  14. Adsorption of alginate and albumin on aluminum coatings inhibits adhesion of Escherichia coli and enhances the anti-corrosion performances of the coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yi; Huang, Jing; Chen, Xiuyong; Ren, Kun; Li, Hua, E-mail: lihua@nimte.ac.cn

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption behaviors of alginate and albumin on Al coatings were investigated at molecular level. • The adsorption inhibits effectively the colonization of Escherichia coli bacteria. • The adsorption alters the wettability of the Al coatings. • The conditioning layer enhances anti-corrosion performances of the Al coatings. - Abstract: Thermal-sprayed aluminum coatings have been extensively used as protective layers against corrosion for steel structures in the marine environment. The corrosion usually deteriorates from marine biofouling, yet the mechanism of accelerated corrosion of the coatings remains elusive. As the first stage participating in biofouling process, adsorption of molecules plays critical roles in mediating formation of biofilm. Here, we report at molecular level the adsorption behaviors of albumin and marine polysaccharide on arc-sprayed aluminum coatings and their influence on adhesion of Escherichia coli. The adsorption of alginate and albumin was characterized by infrared spectra analyses and atomic force microscopic observation. The adsorption inhibits effectively adhesion of the bacteria. Further investigation indicates that alginate/albumin altered the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the coatings instead of impacting the survival of the bacteria to decline their adhesion. The conditioning layer composed of the molecules enhances anti-corrosion performances of the coatings.

  15. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Gharavi; Khamirul Amin Matori; Robiah Yunus; Norinsan Kamil Othman; Firouz Fadaeifard

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the par...

  16. Prévision de la corrosion des coussinets et corrélation avec l'essai sur moteur Petter W1 L Predicting Bearing Wear and Correlation with the Petter W1 L Engine Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desvard A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Parmi les essais exigés par les spécifications européennes et américaines pour huiles de moteurs, il existe un essai de résistance à la corrosion des coussinets de bielles en cuivre-plomb (tableau 1. Ces essais sont effectués sur moteurs monocylindre Petter W1 L ou Labeco CLR (tableau 2. Des résultats de corrosion obtenus sur le moteur Petter W1 L, avec des huiles de calibrage, sont donnés (tableau 4 et les courbes de corrosion en fonction du temps d'essai sont représentées figure 1. En utilisant ces mêmes huiles, un groupe de travail du GFC*, chargé de développer des méthodes d'essai laboratoire de présélection, a mis au point un test basé sur le suivi de la corrosion d'une éprouvette de plomb, en présence de cuivre, immergée dans le lubrifiant à évaluer, lorsque celui-ci est soumis à des conditions d'oxydation sévères, en présence d'air, à haute température (fig. 2. Les résultats obtenus sont en parfaite concordance avec les résultats sur moteurs (tableau 5 et fig. 3. Par ailleurs, ces essais mettent en évidence une excellente répétabilité (fig. 4,et une excellente reproductibilité (fig. 5 et 6 de la méthode de laboratoire. * GFC : Groupement Français de Coordination, pour le développement des essais de performance des combustibles, des lubrifiants pour moteurs et autres fluides utilisés dans les transports. Among the tests required by European and American specifications for motor oils, there is a test of the corrosion resistance of copper-lead bearings (Table 1. These tests are performed in single-cylinder Petter W1 L engines or Labeco CLR engines (Table 2. The corrosion results obtained with the Petter W1 L engine, for calibration oils, are given (Table 4, and the corrosion curves as a function of time are shown in Fig. 1. By using the same oils, a GFC working group responsible for developing laboratory preselection test methods has developed a test based on the determining of the corrosion of a lead

  17. Development of a unit suitable for corrosion monitoring in district heating systems. Experiences with the LOCOR-cell test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asbjørn; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    the purpose, background and gained results of one of the used monitoring techniques, the crevice corrosion measurements obtained by the LOCOR-Cell„§. The crevice corrosion cell was developed by FORCE Technology in a previous district heating project financed by Nordic Industrial Fund (1)(2). Results from...... in 6 pressurised circulating heating systems and in one cooling system. 7 different corrosion monitoring methods have been used to study corrosion rates and types in dependency of water chemistry. This paper describes the design of the by-pass unit including water analysis methods. It also describes...... other used corrosion monitoring methods in the project are described elsewhere (3) and (4). For future district heating corrosion monitoring the by-pass unit can be recommended for permanent installation and the two methods high sensitive ER-technique (Metricorr) and the LOCOR-Cell„§ (FORCE Technology...

  18. Development of a unit suitable for corrosion monitoring in district heating systems. Experiences with the LOCOR-cell test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asbjørn; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    the purpose, background and gained results of one of the used monitoring techniques, the crevice corrosion measurements obtained by the LOCOR-Cell„§. The crevice corrosion cell was developed by FORCE Technology in a previous district heating project financed by Nordic Industrial Fund (1)(2). Results from...... in 6 pressurised circulating heating systems and in one cooling system. 7 different corrosion monitoring methods have been used to study corrosion rates and types in dependency of water chemistry. This paper describes the design of the by-pass unit including water analysis methods. It also describes...... other used corrosion monitoring methods in the project are described elsewhere (3) and (4). For future district heating corrosion monitoring the by-pass unit can be recommended for permanent installation and the two methods high sensitive ER-technique (Metricorr) and the LOCOR-Cell„§ (FORCE Technology...

  19. Field test of low-pressure turbine blading with improved resistance against corrosion fatigue; Faeltprovning av laagtrycksturbinskovlar med foerbaettrad haerdighet mot korrosionsutmattning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavast, Jueri [Alstom Power Sweden AB, Finspong (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Corrosion fatigue of turbine blades in low-pressure turbines is one of the most common reasons for reduced availability and reliability in fossil fueled as well as in nuclear steam turbine plants. The problem is almost exclusively localized to the area where the first condensation takes place. There is therefore a need for materials with improved resistance towards corrosion fatigue for blades in stages in the transition zone between dry and wet steam. The phase hardening stainless steel 15/5 PH is such an alternative material. This material has shown a significantly better resistance towards corrosion and corrosion fatigue in laboratory tests. The lack of field experience of this material in real plants has, however, made it difficult to introduce this relatively new and untried material. Corrosion fatigue has caused problems in the some of the nuclear units in Forsmark. Forsmark 2 was therefore regarded as a suitable plant for a field test. The result of the field test is applicable to conventional as well as to nuclear units. A total of 10 blades of 15/5 PH were installed to replace blades of conventional blade material in a stage with a ar and 40 previous history of corrosion fatigue. The field test was interrupted after 5 years and 40,000 hours of operation. The main objective of the field test was to demonstrate that blades of 15/5 PH could be successfully machined, tested, installed and of course also used in a real plant. The field test also enabled a comparison of the corrosion resistance of the two alloys. It should be underlined that demonstration of the improved resistance towards corrosion fatigue has not been an objective during this field test as this has already been evidenced by various laboratory investigations. The properties of the parent material as well as of the finished blades were controlled and documented as carefully as possible before the field test to enable evaluation of the field test. The condition of the 10 blades of 15/5 PH

  20. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  1. Job Performance Tests for U/AH-1 Helicopter Mechanics. Volume 1: Hands- On Performance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Hands-on performance tests and job knowledge tests were developed for MOS 6114 (U/AH-1 helicopter mechanic) as part of the Marine Corps Job ... Performance Measurement Project. The purpose of this information memorandum is to disseminate these performance measures to Marine Corps personnel managers

  2. Performance, requirements and testing in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julius, H.W.; Christensen, P.; Marshall, T.O.

    1990-01-01

    monitoring, and in particular of those related to the energy and angular dependences of the dosemeters. These data are important for the testing of the dosimetry systems. Finally testing programmes in individual monitoring are discussed and four categories of testing are proposed.......For implementation of the ICRP requirements in practical routine monitoring, a specification is needed with respect to specific performance criteria of the dosimetry system. This includes the dosemeters, and procedures for initial and on-going testing of the dosimetry systems to ensure...... that the specified criteria are continuously met. Methods are here specified for establishing performance criteria, and satisfying the ICRP overall accuracy requirements for individual monitoring. Furthermore, procedures are given for obtaining numerical values of the uncertainties connected with individual...

  3. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors Containing Microparticles for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Calle, Luz M.

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents the results obtained from experiments designed to evaluate the release properties, as well as the corrosion inhibition effectiveness, of several encapsulated corrosion inhibitors. Microencapsulation has been used in the development of environmentally friendly multifunctional smart coatings. This technique enables the incorporation of autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition and self-healing functionalities into many commercially available coating systems. Select environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic and inorganic pH-sensitive microparticles and their release in basic solutions was studied. The release rate results showed that the encapsulation can be tailored from fast, for immediate corrosion protection, to slow, which will provide continued long-term corrosion protection. The incorporation of several corrosion inhibitor release profiles into a coating provides effective corrosion protection properties. To investigate the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the encapsulated inhibitors, electrochemical techniques were used to obtain corrosion potential, polarization curve and polarization resistance data. These measurements were performed using the free as well as the encapsulated inhibitors singly or in combinations. Results from these electrochemical tests will be compared to those obtained from weight loss and other accelerated corrosion experiments.

  4. Neuropsychological test performance in illiterate subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Solis, F; Ardila, A; Rosselli, M; Lopez-Arango, G; Uriel-Mendoza, V

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to further analyze the effects of education across different age ranges on neuropsychological test performance. Two different analyses were performed. The first analysis was conducted in order to pinpoint the impact of school attendance on neuropsychological testing. A group of 64 illiterate normal subjects was selected in the Mexican Republic. Their performance was compared with two barely schooled control groups (1-2 and 3-4 years of schooling). The subjects' ages ranged from 16 to 85 years. In the second analysis, the illiterate subjects were further matched by age and sex with individuals with 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10 to 19 years of formal education. The Spanish version of the NEUROPSI neuropsychological test battery (Ostrosky, Ardila, & Rosselli, 1997) was used. Results indicated a significant educational effect on most of the tests. Largest educational effect was noted in constructional abilities (copying of a figure), language (comprehension), phonological verbal fluency, and conceptual functions (similarities, calculation abilities, and sequences). Aging effect was noted in visuoperceptual (visual detection) and memory scores. In the first subject sample, it was evident that, despite using such limited educational range (from 0-4 years of formal education), and such a wide age range (from 16-85 years), schooling represented a stronger variable than age. It is proposed that education effect on neuropsychological test performance represents a negatively accelerated curve, tending to a plateau.

  5. Characterisation of Al corrosion and its impact on the mechanical performance of composite cement wasteforms by the acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasova, L. M.; Ojovan, M. I.

    2008-04-01

    In this study acoustic emission (AE) non-destructive method was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious wasteforms with encapsulated Al waste. AE waves generated as a result of Al corrosion in small-size blast furnace slag/ordinary Portland cement wasteforms were recorded and analysed. The basic principles of the conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis were combined to establish a relationship between recorded AE signals and different interactions between the Al and the encapsulating cement matrix. The AE technique was shown as a potential and valuable tool for a new area of application related to monitoring and inspection of the mechanical stability of cementitious wasteforms with encapsulated metallic wastes such as Al.

  6. Passivation and corrosion of the high performance materials alloy 33, alloy 31 and nickel in LiBr solution at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igual Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of Lithium Bromide are employed as absorbent solutions for almost all types of heating and refrigerating absorption systems that use natural gas or steam as energy sources. LiBr solutions can cause serious corrosion problems in common metallic components. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of new high alloyed materials in commercial LiBr heavy brine solution (which contains chromate as inhibitor), at different temperatures (25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 deg. C). The materials tested were stainless steels Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant austenitic material alloyed with nominally (wt%) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni; Nicrofer 3127 hMo-alloy 31 (UNS N08031), an iron-nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with nitrogen; and pure Nickel. Corrosion resistance was estimated from the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves, comparing OCP values, calculating corrosion potentials and current rates from Tafel analysis; in order to characterize the passivating behaviour of the alloys the study was completed with the analysis of the pitting potentials, passivating current and re-passivating properties at the temperatures under study. Passivating properties are well observed in all the samples in commercial LiBr solution at all temperatures. In these cases, passivation properties decrease with temperature. (authors)

  7. SAS molecular tests Salmonella detection kit. Performance tested method 021202.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapanpally, Chandra; Montier, Laura; Khan, Shah; Kasra, Akif; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    The SAS Molecular tests Salmonella Detection method, a Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification method, performed as well as or better than the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference methods for ground beef, beef trim, ground turkey, chicken carcass rinses, bagged mixed lettuce, and fresh spinach. The ground beef (30% fat, 25 g test portion), poultry matrixes and leafy greens were validated in a 6-7 h enrichment, and ground beef (30% fat, 375 g composite test portion) and beef trim (375 g composite test portion) were validated in a 16-20 h enrichment. The method performance for meat and leafy green matrixes was shown to be acceptable under conditions of co-enrichment with Escherichia coli 0157. Thus, after a short 6-7 h co-enrichment step, ground beef, beef trim, lettuce, and spinach can be tested for both Salmonella and E. coli O157. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 100 Salmonella serovars and 30 non-Salmonella species examined. The method was shown to be robust when enrichment time, DNA extract hold time, and DNA volume were varied.

  8. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials. In support of this research, efforts are currently underway to arrange shipment of “free” high fluence austenitic alloys available through Électricité de France (EDF) for post irradiation testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and IASCC testing at the University of Michigan. These high fluence materials range in damage values from 45 to 125 displacements per atom (dpa). The samples identified for transport to the United States, which include nine, no-cost, 304, 308 and 316 tensile bars, were relocated from the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia, and received at the Halden Reactor in Halden, Norway, on August 23, 2016. ORNL has been notified that a significant amount of work is required to prepare the samples for further shipment to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The

  9. REPORT ON ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING FOR TANK 241-AN-106 USING 2009 SAMPLING CAMPAIGN GRAB SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WYRWAS RB

    2010-05-11

    Based on an ENRAF waste surface measurement taken February 1, 2009, double-shell tank (DST) 24l-AN-l06 (AN-106) contained approximately 278.98 inches (793 kgal) of waste. A zip cord measurement from the tank on February 1, 2009, indicated a settled solids layer of 9l.7 inches in height (280 kgal). The supernatant layer in February 2009, by difference, was approximately 187 inches deep (514 kgal). Laboratory results from AN-l06 February 1, 2009 (see Table 2) grab samples indicated the supernatant was below the chemistry limit that applied at the time as identified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, 'Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements', Administrative Control (AC) 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation Controls.' The limits have since been removed from the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) and are captured in OSD-T-15l-00007, 'Operating Specifications for the Double-Shell Storage Tanks.' Problem evaluation request WRPS-PER-2009-0218 was submitted February 9,2009, to document the finding that the supernatant chemistry for grab samples taken from the middle and upper regions of the supernatant was noncompliant with the chemistry control limits. The lab results for the samples taken from the bottom region of the supernatant met AC 5.16 limits.

  10. High temperature solution-nitriding and low-temperature nitriding of AISI 316: Effect on pitting potential and crevice corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2017-01-01

    in a 0.1M NaCl solution and crevice corrosion immersion tests in 3wt% FeCl3 solution were studied before and after the bulk and surface treatments.Nitrogen addition in the bulk proved to have a beneficial effect on the pitting resistance of the alloy. The formation of a zone of expanded austenite...

  11. Testing for Distortions in Performance Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloof, Randolph; Van Praag, Mirjam

    Distorted performance measures in compensation contracts elicit suboptimal behavioral responses that may even prove to be dysfunctional (gaming). This paper applies the empirical test developed by Courty and Marschke (2008) to detect whether the widely used class of Residual Income based...... performance measures —such as Economic Value Added (EVA)— is distorted, leading to unintended agent behavior. The paper uses a difference-in-differences approach to account for changes in economic circumstances and the self-selection of firms using EVA. Our findings indicate that EVA is a distorted...... performance measure that elicits the gaming response....

  12. Testing for Distortions in Performance Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloof, Randolph; Van Praag, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    used class of residual income-based performance measures-such as economic value added (EVA)-is distorted, leading to unintended agent behavior. The paper uses a difference-in-differences approach to account for changes in economic circumstances and the self-selection of firms using EVA. Our findings......Distorted performance measures in compensation contracts elicit suboptimal behavioral responses that may even prove to be dysfunctional (gaming). This paper applies the empirical test developed by Courty and Marschke (Review of Economics and Statistics, 90, 428-441) to detect whether the widely...... indicate that EVA is a distorted performance measure that elicits the gaming response....

  13. Effect of biologically relevant ions on the corrosion products formed on alloy AZ31B: an improved understanding of magnesium corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongseok; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2013-11-01

    Simulated physiological solutions mimicking human plasma have been utilized to study the in vitro corrosion of biodegradable metals. However, corrosion and corrosion product formation are different for different solutions with varied responses and, hence, the prediction of in vivo degradation behavior is not feasible based on these studies alone. This paper reports the role of physiologically relevant salts and their concentrations on the corrosion behavior of a magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and subsequent corrosion production formation. Immersion tests were performed for three different concentrations of Ca(2+), HPO4(2-), HCO3(-) to identify the effect of each ion on the corrosion of AZ31B assessed at 1, 3 and 10 days. Time-lapse morphological characterization of the samples was performed using X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface corrosion products was determined by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that: (1) calcium is not present in the corrosion product layer when only Cl(-) and OH(-) anions are available; (2) the presence of phosphate induces formation of a densely packed amorphous magnesium phosphate corrosion product layer when HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) are present in solution; (3) octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are deposited on the surface of the magnesium alloy when HPO4(2-) and Ca(2+) are present together in NaCl solution (this coating limits localized corrosion and increases general corrosion resistance); (4) addition of HCO3(-) accelerates the overall corrosion rate, which increases with increasing bicarbonate concentration; (5) the corrosion rate decreases due to the formation of insoluble HAp on the surface when HCO3(-), Ca(2+), and HPO4(2-) are present together.

  14. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES ON THE CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-10-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will disperse or dissolve precipitated metal oxides as part of radioactive waste tank closure operations. Previously SRS has utilized oxalic acid to accomplish this task. Since the waste tanks are constructed of carbon steel, a significant amount of corrosion may occur. Although the total amount of corrosion may be insignificant for a short contact time, a significant amount of hydrogen may be generated due to the corrosion reaction. Linear polarization resistance and anodic/cathodic polarization tests were performed to investigate the corrosion behavior during the process. The effect of process variables such as temperature, agitation, aeration, sample orientation, light as well as surface finish on the corrosion behavior were evaluated. The results of the tests provided insight into the corrosion mechanism for the iron-oxalic acid system.

  15. Hanford Double Shell Waste Tank Corrosion Studies - Final Report FY2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, R. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    During FY15, SRNL performed corrosion testing that supported Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) with their double shell tank (DST) integrity program. The testing investigated six concerns including, 1) the possibility of corrosion of the exterior of the secondary tank wall; 2) the effect of ammonia on vapor space corrosion (VSC) above waste simulants; 3) the determination of the minimum required nitrite and hydroxide concentrations that prevent pitting in concentrated nitrate solutions (i.e., waste buffering); 4) the susceptibility to liquid air interface (LAI) corrosion at proposed stress corrosion cracking (SCC) inhibitor concentrations; 5) the susceptibility of carbon steel to pitting in dilute solutions that contain significant quantities of chloride and sulfate; and 6) the effect of different heats of A537 carbon steel on the corrosion response. For task 1, 2, and 4, the effect of heat treating and/ or welding of the materials was also investigated.

  16. Preparation and Investigation Performance of Water- Based Epoxy Coating Containing Supercritical CO2 Synthesized SelfDoped Polyaniline-Expanded Graphite Nanohybrids As A Anti Corrosion Pigment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R.Baghezadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, self- doped polyaniline- expanded graphite nanohybrid (SPEG was synthesized by supercritical CO2 method and the anti-corrosion performance of SPEG in water- based epoxy coatings was considered. For this purpose, SPEG was introduced into water- based hardener and epoxy resin, separately via direct mixing under an ultrasonic homogenizer. The distribution of SPEG in both matrices was studied by zeta sizer, XRD and TEM characterization methods. The corrosion behavior of coatings was characterized salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS in 3.5 % NaCl solution. The results showed that coatings prepared by using SPEG in water-based hardener had the best corrosion resistance.

  17. Environmental Friendly Coatings and Corrosion Prevention For Flight Hardware Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz

    2014-01-01

    Identify, test and develop qualification criteria for environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and corrosion preventative compounds (CPC's) for flight hardware an ground support equipment.

  18. Drop Performance Test of CRDMs for JRTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Chung, Jong-Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hyun [POSCO Plandtec Co. Ltd, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwan-Hee [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The drop test results of CRDMs with AC-type electromagnet show that the initial delay times are not satisfied with the requirement, 0.15 seconds. After the replacement of the electromagnet from AC-type to DCtype, the drop times of CARs and accelerations due to the impact of moving parts are satisfied with all requirements. As a result, it is found that four CRDMs to be installed at site have a good drop performance, and meet all performance requirements. A control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) is a device to control the position of a control absorber rod (CAR) in the core by using a stepping motor which is commanded by the reactor regulating system (RRS) to control the reactivity during the normal operation of the reactor. The top-mounted CRDM driven by the stepping motor for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) has been developed in KAERI. The CRDM for JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement based on that of the HANARO. It is necessary to verify the performances such as the stepping, drop, endurance, vibration, seismic and structural integrity for active components. Especially, the CAR drop curves are important data for the safety analysis. This paper describes the test results to demonstrate the drop performances of a prototype and 4 CRDMs to be installed at site. The tests are carried out at a test rig simulating the actual reactor's conditions.

  19. NetBench. Automated Network Performance Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Cadeddu, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the operation of high performance routers, CERN has developed the NetBench software to run benchmarking tests by injecting various traffic patterns and observing the network devices behaviour in real-time. The tool features a modular design with a Python based console used to inject traffic and collect the results in a database, and a web user

  20. Performance tests for integral reactor nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong-Seong; Yim, Jeong-Sik; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Han-Soo; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Oh, Je-Yong

    2006-02-15

    An integral type reactor SMART plans to utilize metallic Zr-U fuel which is Zr-based alloy with 34{approx}38 wt% U. In order to verify the technologies for the design and manufacturing of the fuel and get a license, performance tests were carried out. Experimental Fuel Assembly (EFA) manufactured in KAERI is being successfully irradiated in the MIR reactor of RIAR from September 4 2004, and it has achieved burnup of 0.21 g/cc as of January 25 2006. Thermal properties of irradiated Zr-U fuel were measured. Up to the phase transformation temperature, thermal diffusivity increased linearly in proportion to temperature. However its dependence on the burnup was not significant. RIA tests with 4 unirradiated Zr-U fuel rods were performed in Kurchatov Institute to establish a safety criterion. In the case of the un-irradiated Zr-U fuel, the energy deposition during the control rod ejection accident should be less than 172 cal/g to prevent the failure accompanying fuel fragmentation and dispersal. Finally the irradiation tests of fuel rods have been performed at HANARO. The HITE-2 test was successfully completed up to a burnup of 0.31 g/cc. The HITE-3 test began in February 2004 and will be continued up to a target burnup of 0.6 g/cc.

  1. Motivation and Test Anxiety in Test Performance across Three Testing Contexts: The CAEL, CET, and GEPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liying; Klinger, Don; Fox, Janna; Doe, Christine; Jin, Yan; Wu, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This study examined test-takers' motivation, test anxiety, and test performance across a range of social and educational contexts in three high-stakes language tests: the Canadian Academic English Language (CAEL) Assessment in Canada, the College English Test (CET) in the People's Republic of China, and the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT)…

  2. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  3. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  4. Corrosive wear. Evaluation of wear and corrosive resistant materials; Noetningskorrosion. Utvaerdering av noetnings- och korrosionsbestaendiga material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H.; Hjertsen, D.; Waara, P.; Prakash, B.; Hardell, J.

    2007-12-15

    With a new purchase of a waste conveyer screw at hand, for the 'A-warehouse' at the combined power and heating plant at E.ON Norrkoeping, the request for improved construction materials was raised. The previous screw required maintenance with very short intervals due to the difficult operation conditions. With the new screw the expectation is to manage 6 months of operation without interruption. The environment for the screw has two main components that sets the demand on the materials, on one hand the corrosive products that comes along and which forms at digestion of the waste and on the other hand the abrasive content in the waste. The term of the mechanism is wear-corrosion and can give considerably higher material loss than the two mechanisms wear and corrosion separately. Combination of a strong corrosive environment together with extensive wear is something that we today have limited knowledge about. The overall objective of the project has been to establish better wear and corrosive resistant construction materials for a waste conveyer screw that will lead to reduced operational disturbance costs. The evaluation has been performed in both controlled laboratory environments and in field tests, which has given us a better understanding of what materials are more suitable in this tough environment and has given us a tool for future predictions of the wear rate of the different material. The new conveyer screw, installed in February 2007 and with which the field test have been performed, has considerably reduced the wear of the construction and the target of 6 month maintenance-free operation is met with this screw for all the evaluated materials. The wear along the screw varies very much and with a clear trend for all the materials to increase towards the feeding direction of the screw. As an example, the wear plate SS2377 (stainless duplex steel) has a useful life at the most affected areas that is calculated to be 1077 days of operation with the

  5. ANTI-CORROSION PROPERTIES OF CARBOXYLIC ACID IN WATER-GLYCOL SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASHKIRCEVA N.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium salts of carboxylic acids were investigated to evaluate the corrosion properties of the water-glycol solutions. Corrosion tests were performed by methods of gravimetry and galvanostatic dissolution with metals used in cooling systems. The compositions of anticorrosion systems and their concentration that provide the most effective inhibition of metals were determined.

  6. Analysis of radioactive corrosion test specimens by means of ICP-MS. Comparison with earlier methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, Roy [Forsyth Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-07-01

    In June 1992, an ICP-MS instrument (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry) was commissioned for use with radioactive sample solutions at Studsvik Nuclear`s Hot Cell Laboratory. For conventional environmental samples the instrument permits the simultaneous analysis of many trace elements, but the software used in evaluation of the mass spectra is based on a library of isotopic compositions relevant only for elements in the lithosphere. Fission products and actinides, however, have isotopic compositions which are significantly different from the natural elements, and which also vary with the burnup of the nuclear fuel specimen. Consequently, a spread-sheet had to be developed which could evaluate the mass spectra with these isotopic compositions. Following these preparations, a large number of samples (about 200) from SKB`s experimental programme for the study of spent fuel corrosion have been analyzed by the ICP-MS technique. Many of these samples were archive solutions of samples which had been taken earlier in the programme. This report presents a comparison of the analytical results for uranium, plutonium, cesium, strontium and technetium by both the ICP-MS technique, and the previously used analytical methods. For three products, a satisfactory agreement between the results from the various methods was obtained, but for uranium and plutonium the ICP-MS method gave results which were 10-20% higher than the conventional methods. The comparison programme has also shown, not unexpectedly, that significant losses of plutonium from solution had occurred, by precipitation and/or absorption, in the archive solutions during storage. It can be expected that such losses also occur for the other actinides, and consequently, all the analytical results for actinides in older archive solutions must be treated with great caution. 9 refs.

  7. Field test corrosion experiments in Denmark with biomass fuels Part II Co-firing of straw and coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    superheaters. A range of austenitic and ferritic steels was exposed in the steam temperature range of 520-580°C. The flue gas temperature ranged from 925-1100°C. The rate of corrosion was assessed by precision measurement of material loss and measurement of oxide thickness. Corrosion rates are lower than...... and potassium sulphate. These components give rise to varying degrees of accelerated corrosion. This paper concerns co-firing of straw with coal to reduce the corrosion rate from straw to an acceptable level. A field investigation at Midtkraft Studstrup suspension-fired power plant in Denmark has been...... undertaken where coal has been co-fired with 10% straw and 20% straw (% energy basis) for up to approx. 3000 hours. Two types of exposure were undertaken to investigate corrosion: a) the exposure of metal rings on water/air cooled probes, and b) the exposure of a range of materials built into the existing...

  8. Flow-accelerated-corrosion Performance of Three Pressure Piping Steels%三种压力管道金属材料的流动加速腐蚀性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓磊; 陆晓峰; 凌祥

    2012-01-01

    建立一套温度、压力、流速可控的流动加速腐蚀试验装置,模拟某蒸汽冷凝水管线工况,对20钢、Q345R钢、304不锈钢三种材料进行了流动加速腐蚀试验,采用电化学测量方法得到三种钢的Tafel曲线.应用扫描电镜(SEM)和能谱仪(EDS)对腐蚀产物膜的厚度、形貌与组分进行了分析.结果表明,相同工况条件下,腐蚀速度从大到小依次为20钢、Q345R钢、304不锈钢;20钢的腐蚀产物膜结构为球状;Q345R钢存在两种腐蚀产物膜结构,即网状结构和片状结构;304不锈钢腐蚀产物膜的结构为片状,有效的保护了基体材料.%The flow-accelerated-corrosion performance of 20 steel, Q345R steel and 304 stainless steel was investigated in condensed water by using a flow accelerated corrosion test apparatus with three electrodes measurement. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) were employed to investigate the thickness, microstructure of corrosion scale. The results showed that the corrosion rates of the test steels were different with a decrease ranking as 20 steel〉Q345R steel〉304 stainless steel. Their microstructure of corrosion scale had different morphologies. The corrosion scale of Q345R steel was thicker than that of 20steel, but much better of compactness of the former ones.

  9. MFTF test coil construction and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornish, D.N.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hirzel, D.G.; Johnston, J.E.; Rosdahl, A.R.

    1978-09-25

    A solenoid coil, 105 cm inside the 167 cm outside diameter, has been constructed and tested to study the performance of the stabilized Nb--Ti conductor to be used in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) being built at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The insulation system of the test coil is identical to that envisioned for MFTF. Cold-weld joints were made in the conductor at the start and finish of each layer; heaters were fitted to some of these joints and also to the conductor at various locations in the winding. This paper gives details of the construction of the coil and the results of the tests carried out to determine its propagation and recovery characteristics.

  10. Intergranular Corrosion of Low Cr Ferritic Stainless Steel 429 Evaluated by the Optimized Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-lei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergranular corrosion (IGC of Nb-Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel (FSS 429 was investigated using the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR test combined with the microstructure observation. The results indicated that the optimized DL-EPR test condition for FSS 429 was the solution of 0.5 M H2SO4 + 0.0001 M KSCN with a scanning rate of 100 mV/min at 30°C. Based on this condition, the specimens aging at 400–700°C for different duration were tested and a time-temperature-sensitization (TTS curve for FSS 429 was obtained, which reveals the sensitization nose was located around 550°C. The critical Ir/Ia value was determined to be about 3% above which IGC occurred. After aging treatment, Cr depletion zone was detected using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, most possibly due to Cr segregation around intergranular TiC and NbC.

  11. Designing validation studies more efficiently according to the modular approach: retrospective analysis of the EPISKIN test for skin corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    It is claimed that the modular approach to validation, which involves seven independent modules, will make the assessment of test validity more flexible and more efficient. In particular, the aspects of between-laboratory variability and predictive capacity are formally separated. Here, the main advantage of the approach is to offer the opportunity for reduced labour, and thus to allow study designs to be more time efficient and cost effective. The impact of this separation was analysed by taking the ECVAM validation study on in vitro methods for skin corrosivity as an example of a successful validation study - two of its methods triggered new OECD test guidelines. Lean study designs, which reduced the number of tests required by up to 60%, were simulated with the original validation data for the EPISKIN model. By using resampling techniques, we were able to demonstrate the effects of the lean designs on three between-laboratory variability measures and on the predictive capacity in terms of sensitivity and specificity, in comparison with the original study. Overall, the study results, especially the levels of confidence, were only slightly affected by the lean designs that were modelled. It is concluded that the separation of the two modules is a promising way to speed-up prospective validation studies and to substantially reduce costs, without compromising study quality.

  12. Performance evaluation of pectin as ecofriendly corrosion inhibitor for X60 pipeline steel in acid medium: experimental and theoretical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoren, Saviour A; Obot, Ime B; Madhankumar, A; Gasem, Zuhair M

    2015-06-25

    The corrosion inhibition effect of pectin (a biopolymer) for X60 pipeline steel in HCl medium was investigated using weight loss, electrochemical, water contact angle measurements, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results obtained show that pectin acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for X60 steel. Inhibition efficiency increased with increase in pectin concentration and temperature. Potentiodynamic polarization results reveal that pectin could be classified as a mixed-type corrosion inhibitor with predominant control of the cathodic reaction. The effective corrosion inhibition potential of pectin could be related to the adsorption of pectin molecules at the metal/solution interface which is found to accord with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and a protective film formation. Quantum chemical calculations provided insights into the active sites and reactivity parameters governing pectin activity as a good corrosion inhibitor for X60 steel.

  13. Study of the Effect of Sol pH and Nanoclay Incorporation on the Corrosion Protection Performance of a Silane Sol-Gel Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Asadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is aimed to evaluate the role of nanoclay in the protective performance of an eco-friendly silane sol-gel layer applied on mild steel substrate in 0.1M sodium chloride solution. At the first step, the effect of pH of the silane solution, consisting of a mixture of γ-glycidoxypropiltrimethoxysilane and methyltriethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane, on the coating performance was evaluated through electrochemical noise measurements. The values of characteristic charge as a parameter extracted from shot noise theory revealed that the sol pH determining the rate of hydrolysis can play an important role in the corrosion protection behavior of silane coatings. Then, the influence of clay nanoparticles on the corrosion protective performance of the hybrid silane film was studied through taking advantage of electrochemical techniques, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization curves, as well as surface analysis methods. The obtained electrochemical data including the values of charge transfer resistance, coating resistance, low frequency impedance and corrosion current density showed that the silane sol gel film in the presence of clay nanoparticles can present an improved corrosion protection. The behavior was connected to an enhancement in the coating barrier properties. Moreover, FESEM and water contact angle confirmed the higher reticulation in case of the coating incorporating nanoclay.

  14. Corrosion inhibition of a hygroscopic inorganic dust-depressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longzhe Jin; Lu Wang; Dongke Chen

    2006-01-01

    Metallic corrosion is a serious problem in the application of a hygroscopic inorganic dust-depressor. The basic characteristics of a hygroscopic inorganic dust-depressor and its corrosivity, corrosion mechanism, as well as the principle of corrosion inhibition were analyzed. The static mass-loss test was carried out to investigate the corrosion behavior and the effect of the dustdepressor. The static corrosion rates of steel specimens were measured in six different corrosion inhibitor solutions of the dustdepressor, and the suitable corrosion inhibitors for the dust-depressor to reduce the corrosivity were found out.

  15. Eurados trial performance test for photon dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadtmann, H.; Bordy, J.M.; Ambrosi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the EURADOS Action entitled Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation, trial performance tests for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters were carried out. Photon, beta and neutron dosemeters were considered....... This paper summarises the results of the whole-body photon dosemeter test. Twenty-six dosimetry services from all EU Member States and Switzerland participated. Twelve different radiation fields were used to simulate various workplace irradiation fields. Dose values from 0.4 mSv to 80 mSv were chosen. From...

  16. Performance Test of CCTV in a Test Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyung Min [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    On April 12-13, 2010, US President Obama hosted a Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, DC, to enhance international cooperation to prevent nuclear terrorism, an issue which he has identified as the most immediate and extreme threat to global security. The Summit focused on the security of nuclear materials, nonproliferation, disarmament, and peaceful nuclear energy. At the summit, the Republic of Korea was chosen as the host of the next Summit in 2012. This series of events reflects the growing global interest on 'Nuclear Security' and as the host country of the next Nuclear Summit it is the time for Korea to strengthen the physical protection regime for nuclear facilities as a first step of securing its nuclear security capability. KINAC has been operating Test field as a mean of preparing solid backup data for reviewing and revising DBT (Design Basis Threat) and to test components of the conventional physical protection system. CCTV is a key component which is used worldwide for the assessment measure of alarms. In terms of performance test of CCTV, there are several elements such as image quality, coverage and mechanical features (speed of zoom-in-out, capture, angle shift etc.). Speaking of image quality acquired by the CCTV, the quality is subject to resolution, monitor specification, camera housing, camera mounting and lightening. Thus it is clear that performance tests on image quality should consider those factors and vary the factors respectively in order to verify the influence and the interaction among those. Nevertheless due to the restrictions of the current Test field, this paper focuses on the image quality through resolution test under the various lightening conditions

  17. Some Thoughts on the Characteristic Performance Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>As an approach to the interpretation of the closest connection doctrine used for years in the European continent for the choice of the law appliable to contractual relations as well as non-contractual ones,the characteristic performance test evolves with the development of international economic and trade activities.Despite criticisms on this approach as embodied in the Rome Convention,the RomeⅠRegulation retains it.This article will focus on the development of the characteristic performance theory and try to explain that this theory,as one of the interpretations and solutions to the closest connection doctrine universally accepted nowadays,has its strengths and weaknesses.

  18. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias to

  19. Long-term high-velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of several NiCrAl and FeCrAl base oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys have been tested for cyclic, long-term, high gas-velocity resistance to oxidation at 1100 C and hot corrosion at 900 C. Both nominally Ni-16Cr-4Al and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al ODS alloys were subjected up to about 2500 cycles, where each cycle consisted of 1 hr in a hot, Mach 0.3 combusted gas stream followed by a 3-min quench in an ambient temperature, Mach 0.3 air blast. For comparison to existing technology, a coated superalloy was simultaneously tested. The ODS iron alloy exhibited clearly superior behavior, surviving 3800 oxidation and 2300 hot corrosion cycles essentially unscathed. While the ODS nickel alloys exhibited adequate oxidation resistance, the long-term hot corrosion resistance could be marginal, since the best life for such alloys under these conditions was only about 1100 cycles. However, the hot corrosion resistance of the ODS Ni-base alloys is excellent in comparison to that of traditional superalloys.

  20. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.