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Sample records for corrosion tests performed

  1. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The existing test method to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, mainly : ASTM G109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, and often expensive. : However, corrosion of reinforc...

  2. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The existing test method used to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in : concrete, mainly ASTM G 109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, : and can be expensive. However, with corrosion...

  3. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  4. Accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prošek T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated corrosion testing is indispensable for material selection, quality control and both initial and residual life time prediction for bare and painted metallic, polymeric, adhesive and other materials in atmospheric exposure conditions. The best known Neutral Salt Spray (NSS test provides unrealistic conditions and poor correlation to exposures in atmosphere. Modern cyclic accelerated corrosion tests include intermittent salt spray, wet and dry phases and eventually other technical phases. They are able to predict the material performance in service more correctly as documented on several examples. The use of NSS should thus be restricted for quality control.

  5. Performance Analysis of Retrofitted Tribo-Corrosion Test Rig for Monitoring In Situ Oil Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpith Siddaiah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oils and lubricants, once extracted after use from a mechanical system, can hardly be reused, and should be refurbished or replaced in most applications. New methods of in situ oil and lubricant efficiency monitoring systems have been introduced for a wide variety of mechanical systems, such as automobiles, aerospace aircrafts, ships, offshore wind turbines, and deep sea oil drilling rigs. These methods utilize electronic sensors to monitor the “byproduct effects” in a mechanical system that are not indicative of the actual remaining lifecycle and reliability of the oils. A reliable oil monitoring system should be able to monitor the wear rate and the corrosion rate of the tribo-pairs due to the inclusion of contaminants. The current study addresses this technological gap, and presents a novel design of a tribo-corrosion test rig for oils used in a dynamic system. A pin-on-disk tribometer test rig retrofitted with a three electrode-potentiostat corrosion monitoring system was used to analyze the corrosion and wear rate of a steel tribo-pair in industrial grade transmission oil. The effectiveness of the retrofitted test rig was analyzed by introducing various concentrations of contaminants in an oil medium that usually leads to a corrosive working environment. The results indicate that the retrofitted test rig can effectively monitor the in situ tribological performance of the oil in a controlled dynamic corrosive environment. It is a useful method to understand the wear–corrosion synergies for further experimental work, and to develop accurate predictive lifecycle assessment and prognostic models. The application of this system is expected to have economic benefits and help reduce the ecological oil waste footprint.

  6. Performance Analysis of Retrofitted Tribo-Corrosion Test Rig for Monitoring In Situ Oil Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddaiah, Arpith; Khan, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Ramachandran, Rahul; Menezes, Pradeep L

    2017-09-28

    Oils and lubricants, once extracted after use from a mechanical system, can hardly be reused, and should be refurbished or replaced in most applications. New methods of in situ oil and lubricant efficiency monitoring systems have been introduced for a wide variety of mechanical systems, such as automobiles, aerospace aircrafts, ships, offshore wind turbines, and deep sea oil drilling rigs. These methods utilize electronic sensors to monitor the "byproduct effects" in a mechanical system that are not indicative of the actual remaining lifecycle and reliability of the oils. A reliable oil monitoring system should be able to monitor the wear rate and the corrosion rate of the tribo-pairs due to the inclusion of contaminants. The current study addresses this technological gap, and presents a novel design of a tribo-corrosion test rig for oils used in a dynamic system. A pin-on-disk tribometer test rig retrofitted with a three electrode-potentiostat corrosion monitoring system was used to analyze the corrosion and wear rate of a steel tribo-pair in industrial grade transmission oil. The effectiveness of the retrofitted test rig was analyzed by introducing various concentrations of contaminants in an oil medium that usually leads to a corrosive working environment. The results indicate that the retrofitted test rig can effectively monitor the in situ tribological performance of the oil in a controlled dynamic corrosive environment. It is a useful method to understand the wear-corrosion synergies for further experimental work, and to develop accurate predictive lifecycle assessment and prognostic models. The application of this system is expected to have economic benefits and help reduce the ecological oil waste footprint.

  7. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  8. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as...

  9. Corrosion of several components of the in-situ test performed in a deep geological granite disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madina, Virginia; Azkarate, Inaki; Insausti, Mikel

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion damage experienced by different components in a deep geological disposal in a granite formation has been analysed. This in-situ test is part of the Full-scale Engineered Barriers EXperiment project (FEBEX) carried out in Grimsel (Switzerland). Two heaters, simulating the canister and the heat generated, were installed horizontally inside the guide tubes or liners and surrounded by highly compacted bentonite blocks. Coupons of several candidate metals for manufacturing HLW containers were introduced in these bentonite blocks, as well as sensors in order to monitor different physicochemical parameters during the test. The in- situ test began in July 1996 and in June 2002 one of the heaters, a section of the liner, several corrosion coupons and four sensors were extracted. The studied heater is a carbon steel cylinder with welded lids, with a wall thickness of 100 mm and 4.54 m long. The liner consists of a perforated carbon steel tube, 970 mm in diameter and 15 mm thick. Corrosion coupons were made of carbon steel, stainless steel, titanium, copper and cupronickel alloys. Two extensometer type sensors with an outer protection tube made of austenitic stainless steel were also analysed. Visual inspection of the above mentioned components, optical and scanning electron microscope study, together with EDS and XRD analyses of corrosion products, have been performed in order to analyse the corrosion suffered by these components. This has been complemented with the chemical and microbiological characterisation of bentonite samples. Results obtained in the study indicate a slight generalised corrosion for the heater, liner and corrosion coupons. The low humidity content of the bentonite surrounding the liner and the corrosion coupons, is the responsible of this practical absence of corrosion. The sensors studied show, however, an important corrosion damage. The sulphur rich corrosion products, the presence of Sulphate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) in the bentonite

  10. Corrosion testing facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Subramanian, Venu

    1981-01-01

    Major types of corrosion tests, establishment of specifications on corrosion testing and scope of their application in practice are briefly described. Important organizations in the world which publish specifications/standards are listed. Indian organizations which undertake corrosion testing and test facilities available at them are also listed. Finally in an appendix, a comprehensive list of specifications relevant to corrosion testing is given. It is arranged under the headings: environmental testing, humidity tests, salt spray/fog tests, immersion tests, specification corrosion phenomena, (tests) with respect to special corrosion media, (tests) with respect to specific corrosion prevention methods, and specific corrosion tests using electrical and electrochemical methods (principles). Each entry in the list furnishes information about: nature of the test, standard number, and its specific application. (M.G.B.)

  11. Tests with Inconel 600 to obtain quantitative stress-corrosion cracking data for evaluating service performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1982-09-01

    Inconel 600 tubes in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators form a pressure boundary between radioactive primary water and secondary water which is converted to steam and used for generating electricity. Under operating conditions the performance of alloy 600 has been good, but with some occasional small leaks resulting from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), related to the presence of unusually high residual or operating stresses. The suspected high stresses can result from either the deformation of tubes during manufacture, or distortion during abnormal conditions such as denting. The present experimental program addresses two specific conditions, i.e., (1) where deformation occurs but is no longer active, such as when denting is stopped and (2) where plastic deformation of the metal continues, as would occur during denting. Laboratory media consist of pure water as well as solutions to simulate environments that would apply in service; tubing from actual production is used in carrying out these tests. The environments include both normal and off chemistries for primary and secondary water. The results reported here were obtained in several different tests. The main ones are (1) split tube reverse U-bends, (2) constant extension rate tests (CERT), and (3) constant load. The temperature range covered is 290 to 365 0 C

  12. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  13. Predicting the Performance of Organic Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Winkler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The withdrawal of effective but toxic corrosion inhibitors has provided an impetus for the discovery of new, benign organic compounds to fill that role. Concurrently, developments in the high-throughput synthesis of organic compounds, the establishment of large libraries of available chemicals, accelerated corrosion inhibition testing technologies, and the increased capability of machine learning methods have made discovery of new corrosion inhibitors much faster and cheaper than it used to be. We summarize these technical developments in the corrosion inhibition field and describe how data-driven machine learning methods can generate models linking molecular properties to corrosion inhibition that can be used to predict the performance of materials not yet synthesized or tested. We briefly summarize the literature on quantitative structure–property relationships models of small organic molecule corrosion inhibitors. The success of these models provides a paradigm for rapid discovery of novel, effective corrosion inhibitors for a range of metals and alloys in diverse environments.

  14. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  15. Vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedures for automotive in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Liza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated corrosion test, known as proving ground accelerated test, is commonly performed by automotive manufacturers to evaluate the corrosion performance of a vehicle. The test combines corrosion and durability inputs to detect potential failures that may occur during in-service conditions. Currently, the test is conducted at an external test center overseas. Such test is aimed to simulate the effects of one year accelerated corrosion in severe corrosive environment of the north-east and south east of America. However, the test results obtained do not correlate with the actual corrosion conditions observed in the Malaysian market, which is likely attributed to the different test environment of the tropical climate of vehicles in service. Therefore, a vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedure that suits the Malaysian market is proposed and benchmarked with other global car manufacturers that have their own dedicated corrosion test procedure. In the present work, a test track is used as the corrosion test ground and consists of various types of roads for structural durability exposures. Corrosion related facilities like salt trough, mud trough and gravel road are constructed as addition to the existing facilities. The establishment of accelerated corrosion test facilities has contributed to the development of initial accelerated corrosion test procedure for the national car manufacturer. The corrosion exposure is monitored by fitting test coupons at the underbody of test vehicle using mass loss technique so that the desired corrosion rate capable of simulating the real time corrosion effects for its target market.

  16. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  17. Guided wave testing for touch point corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleyne, David

    2012-01-01

    Guided wave testing (GWT) is established in the petrochemical and related industries, primarily for the detection of corrosion flaws. Touch point corrosion at support positions in pipe-work has become a significant problem within many operating gas, chemical and petro-chemical plants world-wide, particularly as a high proportion of these plants have been operational for many decades. This article demonstrates how GWT using guided waves sent axially along the pipe can be performed for the detection and accurate classification of touchpoint corrosion. The major advantage of GWT methods for the detection of touch point corrosion is its ability to examine several support positions from a single easy to access transducer position. The strategy is then to prioritize or rank the condition of the pipe at the supports by removing those with negligible wall loss from scheduling for further inspection. Guided waves are accurate at detecting and classifying corrosion patches at support positions, but deep pits within such patches are more difficult to accurately identify. Examples using data from routine inspection testing are used to support the development of the methods and testing approaches presented. Recent developments of the interpretation methods, testing procedures and calibration methods have significantly enhanced the capabilities of GWT for this important application.

  18. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Performance demonstration testing at the EPRI NDE center for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pherigo, G.

    1986-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has become a significant concern for the commercial electric utility industry during the past four years. As the IGSCC problem manifested itself, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) responded by issuing Inspection and Enforcement (I and E) Bulletin 82-03 which required that ultrasonic inspection procedures be demonstrated on service- removed samples. The ability to reliably detect and discriminate IGSCC was recognized by the industry as a very difficult task, at best. Concurrent with the NRC bulletin, state-of-the-art yet practical techniques for the detection and discrimination of IGSCC had to be developed, demonstrated, and transferred to the field in a relatively short time. With the release of I and E Bulletin 83-02, procedures as well as personnel had to be qualified on service-removed samples. This paper reports how the EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center developed the necessary technology and a formal training and qualification program to meet these needs on behalf of the industry

  20. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  1. Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation

  2. Corrosion testing of uranium silicide fuel specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourns, W.T.

    1968-09-01

    U 3 Si is the most promising high density natural uranium fuel for water-cooled power reactors. Power reactors fuelled with this material are expected to produce cheaper electricity than those fuelled with uranium dioxide. Corrosion tests in 300 o C water preceded extensive in-reactor performance tests of fuel elements and bundles. Proper heat-treatment of U-3.9 wt% Si gives a U 3 5i specimen which corrodes at less than 2 mg/cm 2 h in 300 o C water. This is an order of magnitude lower than the maximum corrosion rate tolerable in a water-cooled reactor. U 3 Si in a defected unbonded Zircaloy-2 sheath showed only a slow uniform sheath expansion in 300 o C water. All tests were done under isothermal conditions in an out-reactor loop. (author)

  3. Corrosion testing of uranium silicide fuel specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourns, W T

    1968-09-15

    U{sub 3}Si is the most promising high density natural uranium fuel for water-cooled power reactors. Power reactors fuelled with this material are expected to produce cheaper electricity than those fuelled with uranium dioxide. Corrosion tests in 300{sup o}C water preceded extensive in-reactor performance tests of fuel elements and bundles. Proper heat-treatment of U-3.9 wt% Si gives a U{sub 3}5i specimen which corrodes at less than 2 mg/cm{sup 2} h in 300{sup o}C water. This is an order of magnitude lower than the maximum corrosion rate tolerable in a water-cooled reactor. U{sub 3}Si in a defected unbonded Zircaloy-2 sheath showed only a slow uniform sheath expansion in 300{sup o}C water. All tests were done under isothermal conditions in an out-reactor loop. (author)

  4. Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 und M HNO 3 could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test

  5. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys

  6. Research process of nondestructive testing pitting corrosion in metal material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo ZHANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion directly affects the usability and service life of metal material, so the effective nondestructive testing and evaluation on pitting corrosion is of great significance for fatigue life prediction because of data supporting. The features of pitting corrosion are elaborated, and the relation between the pitting corrosion parameters and fatigue performance is pointed out. Through introducing the fundamental principles of pitting corrosion including mainly magnetic flux leakage inspection, pulsed eddy current and guided waves, the research status of nondestructive testing technology for pitting corrosion is summarized, and the key steps of nondestructive testing technologies are compared and analyzed from the theoretical model, signal processing to industrial applications. Based on the analysis of the signal processing specificity of different nondestructive testing technologies in detecting pitting corrosion, the visualization combined with image processing and signal analysis are indicated as the critical problems of accurate extraction of pitting defect information and quantitative characterization for pitting corrosion. The study on non-contact nondestructive testing technologies is important for improving the detection precision and its application in industries.

  7. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  8. Standard Test Method for Sandwich Corrosion Test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method defines the procedure for evaluating the corrosivity of aircraft maintenance chemicals, when present between faying surfaces (sandwich) of aluminum alloys commonly used for aircraft structures. This test method is intended to be used in the qualification and approval of compounds employed in aircraft maintenance operations. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information. 1.3 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements appear in Section 9.

  9. Corrosion performance of new Zircaloy-2-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudling, P.; Mikes-Lindbaeck, M.; Lethinen, B.; Andren, H.O.; Stiller, K.

    1994-01-01

    A material development project was initiated to develop a new zirconium alloy, outside the ASTM specifications for Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4, with optimized hydriding and corrosion properties for both boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. A number of different alloys were manufactured. These alloys were long-term corrosion tested in autoclaves at 400 C in steam. Also, a 520 C/24 h steam test was carried out. The zirconium metal microstructure and the chemistry of precipitates were characterized by analytical electron microscopy. The metal matrix chemistry was determined by atom probe analysis. The paper describes the correlations between corrosion material performance and zirconium alloy microstructure

  10. Corrosion test by low-temperature coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, S; Yamamoto, S

    1952-01-01

    Corrosive actions of various fractions of low-temperature coal tar against mild steel or Cr 13-steel were compared at their boiling states. Corrosions became severe when the boiling points exceeded 240/sup 0/. The acidic fractions were more corrosive. In all instances, corrosion was excessive at the beginning of immersion testing and then gradually became mild; boiling accelerated the corrosion. Cr 13-steel was corrosion-resistant to low-temperature coal-tar fractions.

  11. Wear and corrosion performance of metallurgical coatings in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.; Farwick, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    The friction, wear, and corrosion performance of several metallurgical coatings in 200 to 650 0 C sodium are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on those coatings which have successfully passed the qualification tests necessary for acceptance in breeder reactor environments. Tests include friction, wear, corrosion, thermal cycling, self-welding, and irradiation exposure under as-prototypic-as-possible service conditions. Materials tested were coatings of various refractory metal carbides in metallic binders, nickel-base and cobalt-base alloys and intermetallic compounds such as the aluminides and borides. Coating processes evaluated included plasma spray, detonation gun, sputtering, spark-deposition, and solid-state diffusion

  12. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  13. Plant corrosion: prediction of materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strutt, J.E.; Nicholls, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen papers have been compiled forming a book on computer-based approaches to corrosion prediction in a wide range of industrial sectors, including the chemical, petrochemical and power generation industries. Two papers have been selected and indexed separately. The first describes a system operating within BNFL's Reprocessing Division to predict materials performance in corrosive conditions to aid future plant design. The second describes the truncation of the distribution function of pit depths during high temperature oxidation of a 20Cr austenitic steel in the fuel cladding in AGR systems. (U.K.)

  14. Study on the Synthesis and Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Mannich-Modified Imidazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjun Kong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel Mannich-modified imidazoline (MMI as cationic emulsifier was synthesised for corrosion harm reduction, through three steps — acylation, cyclization, and Mannich reaction. The surface activity was characterized by determination of surface tensions and critical micelle concentration (CMC. The corrosion inhibition performance of five types of steels in the simulated corrosion solution in the presence of the MMI was investigated by static weight loss tests. The results showed that the MMI had good surface activities, with CMC of 19.8 μg g−1 and surface tension of 36.4 mN m−1. The corrosion test results indicated that the corrosion rates of different materials were decreased significantly, and degrees of corrosion inhibition were always higher than 80.0 %. The main inhibition mechanism was most likely due to the adsorption of the corrosion inhibitor on the steel surface, leading to the prevention of corrosion medium from the metal surface.

  15. Testing of intergranular and pitting corrosion in sensitized welded joints of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore V. Jegdic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion resistance and intergranular corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel X5Cr Ni18-10 were tested on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal. Testing of pitting corrosion was performed by the potentiodynamic polarization method, while testing of intergranular corrosion was performed by the method of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation with double loop. The base metal was completely resistant to intergranular corrosion, while the heat affected zone showed a slight susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Indicators of pitting corrosion resistance for the weld metal and the base metal were very similar, but their values are significantly higher than the values for the heat affected zone. This was caused by reduction of the chromium concentration in the grain boundary areas in the heat affected zone, even though the carbon content in the examined stainless steel is low (0.04 wt. % C.

  16. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  17. 16 CFR 1209.5 - Test procedures for corrosiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to eliminate air pockets from forming next to the metal coupons. (5) Do not cover the crystallizing... bristle brush or equivalent to remove loose corrosion products. Remove the remaining corrosion products... Evaluating Corrosion Test Specimens,” published by American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race...

  18. Acceptance Test Report for Fourth-Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation

  19. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled)

  20. Corrosion performance of epoxy-coated reinforcement in aggressive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca Cortes, Enrique

    The objective of this research was to investigate the integrity and corrosion performance of epoxy-coated reinforcement in aggressive environments. A series of experimental studies were conducted: (a) hot water immersion and knife adhesion testing for assessment of coating adhesion; (b) materials and procedures for repairing coating damage; (c) degree of mechanical damage caused during concrete placement when using metal head and rubber head vibrators; (d) accelerated corrosion of coated bars embedded in macrocell and beam specimens placed in a corrosive environment for more than four years. The effects of coating condition and amount of damage, repaired vs. unrepaired damage, bar fabrication, and concrete cracking were studied. Regardless of coating condition, the performance of epoxy-coated bars was better than that of uncoated bars. Unlike black bars, coated bars did not exhibit deep pitting or substantial loss of cross section at crack locations. Damage to epoxy coating was the most significant factor affecting corrosion performance. Bars with coating in good condition, without any visible damage, performed best. The greater the size and frequency of damage, the more severe and extensive the amount of corrosion. The performance of bars that were fabricated or bent after coating was worse than that of coated straight bars. Mixing coated and uncoated bars in the same concrete member led to undesirable performance. Patching damaged coating reduced but did not prevent corrosion, particularly at bar ends. The most important factor in coating repair was the type and properties of the patching material. Surface preparation prior to coating had little effect. The absence of cracks in the concrete delayed, but did not prevent the onset of corrosion of coated bars. During consolidation of concrete, rubber head vibrators caused less damage to epoxy-coated reinforcement than did comparable metal heads. Hot water and adhesion tests were useful and practical for evaluating

  1. Corrosion testing and prediction in SCWO environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriksunov, L.B.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    The authors review recent advances in corrosion monitoring and modeling in SCWO systems. Techniques and results of experimental corrosion measurements at high temperatures are presented. Results of modeling corrosion in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems indicate the primary importance of density of water in corrosion processes. A phenomenological model has been developed to simulate corrosion processes at nearcritical and supercritical temperatures in SCWO systems. They discuss as well the construction of Pourbaix diagrams for metals in SCW

  2. Field test corrosion experiences when co-firing straw and coal: 10 year status within Elsam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Berg; Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, Ole Hede

    2007-01-01

    and straw at the 150 MW pulverized coal fired boiler Studstrup unit 1. Two exposure series lasting 3000 hours each were performed for co-firing 10 and 20% of straw (% energy basis) with coal. Using built in test tubes in the hot end of the actual superheaters and air/water cooled corrosion probes...... to 575 degrees C and for the flue gas from 1025 to 1300 degrees C. All these test tubes have been removed during the last three years at one year intervals for corrosion studies. The corrosion studies performed on all investigated tubes included measurements of the corrosion attack, light optical...

  3. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  4. The WR-1 corrosion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.V.; Simmons, G.R.

    1978-07-01

    This report describes a new Corrosion Test Facility which has recently been installed in the WR-1 organic-cooled research reactor. The irradiation facility is a single insert, installed in a reactor site, which can deliver a fast neutron flux density of 2.65 x 10 17 neutrons/(m 2 .s) to specimens under irradiation. A self-contained controlled-chemistry cooling water circuit removes the gamma- and neutron-heat generated in the insert and specimens. Specimen temperatures typically vary from 245 deg C to 280 deg C across the insert core region. (author)

  5. Characterization of Corrosion Products on Carbon Steel Exposed to Natural Weathering and to Accelerated Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Altobelli Antunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the corrosion products formed on carbon steel plates submitted to atmospheric corrosion in urban and industrial atmospheres with those formed after accelerated corrosion tests. The corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The specimens were exposed to natural weathering in both atmospheres for nine months. The morphologies of the corrosion products were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The main product found was lepidocrocite. Goethite and magnetite were also found on the corroded specimens but in lower concentrations. The results showed that the accelerated test based on the ASTM B117 procedure presented poor correlation with the atmospheric corrosion tests whereas an alternated fog/dry cycle combined with UV radiation exposure provided better correlation.

  6. Corrosion tests of high temperature alloys in impure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Jan; Kalivodova, Jana; Vilemova, Monika; Skoumalova, Zuzana; Brabec, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Czech research organizations take part several projects concerning technologies and materials for advanced gas cooled reactors, as an example international project ARCHER supported by EU within FP7, also several national projects supported by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic are solved in cooperation with industrial and research organization. Within these projects the material testing program is performed. The results presented in these paper concerning high temperature corrosion and degradation of alloys (800 H, SS 316 and P91) in helium containing minor impurities (H_2, CO, CH_4, HZO) at temperatures up to 760°C. After corrosion tests (up to 1500 hours) the specimens was investigated by several methods (gravimetry, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, hardness and micro-hardness testing etc. (author)

  7. Corrosion protection performance of palm and mineral oil media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Nik Sani, W.B.; Ani, F.N.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    In European forest, especially Scandinavian, almost all forest machines are filled with biodegradable fluid. The fluid is of synthetic type. The ratio between the lowest cost of mineral oil and the synthetic fluid is about 1:4. The high cost of this biodegradable fluid can be a major obstacle to be used in developing countries. Malaysia and South East Asia are known for its natural beauties. However, a spill of mineral based oils to their land and seas may result in long term water and soil contamination. Thus crop or agricultural based oil product can provide the solution to this problem. However, considering the demand placed on the oil in service, the service performance such as relation to component compatibility with the crop based oil is crucial to be investigated. The ability of crop based oils to protect and reduce corrosion formation is still unexplored. It is important for each oil to preserve its oxidation stability and remain non-corrosive during service. This paper reports the results of copper corrosion tests. The test includes mass change monitoring, oxide scales and microscopic analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Relative Increase of total acid number and weight loss during copper immersion has proved that metal corrosion in contact with oil was caused by oil degradation that produces acidic compounds. Coppers that were immersed in oil temperature of 60 0 C show that increase of temperature in presence of transition metal induces oil degradation. (Author)

  8. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  9. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  10. Corrosion resistance testing of high-boron-content stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrman, I.; Safek, V.

    1994-01-01

    Boron steels, i.e. stainless steels with boron contents of 0.2 to 2.25 wt.%, are employed in nuclear engineering for the manufacture of baskets or wells in which radioactive fissile materials are stored, mostly spent nuclear fuel elements. The resistance of such steels to intergranular corrosion and uniform corrosion was examined in the Strauss solution and in boric acid; the dependence of the corrosion rate of the steels on their chemical composition was investigated, and their resistance was compared with that of AISI 304 type steel. Corrosion resistance tests in actual conditions of ''wet'' compact storage (demineralized water or a weak boric acid solution) gave evidence that boron steels undergo nearly no uniform corrosion and, as electrochemical measurements indicated, match standard corrosion-resistant steels. Corrosion resistance was confirmed to decrease slightly with increasing boron content and to increase somewhat with increasing molybdenum content. (Z.S.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs

  11. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Sandra Birk; Brent Matteson; Hongbo Tian

    2006-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) has been directed by DOE-RW to develop a new repository waste package design based on the transport, aging, and disposal canister (TAD) system concept. A neutron poison material for fabrication of the internal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) baskets for these canisters needs to be identified. A material that has been used for criticality control in wet and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is borated stainless steel. These stainless products are available as an ingot metallurgy plate product with a molybdenum addition and a powder metallurgy product that meets the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A. A new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy has been developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with its research partners (Sandia National Laboratory and Lehigh University) with DOE-EM funding provided by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). This neutron absorbing alloy will be used to fabricate the SNF baskets in the DOE standardized canister. The INL has designed the DOE Standardized Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister for the handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository of DOE owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A corrosion testing program is required to compare these materials in environmental conditions representative of a breached waste canister. This report will summarize the results of crevice corrosion tests for three alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the waste package should a breech occur. The three alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb 304B4 Grade A (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled)

  12. An evaluation of corrosion resistant alloys by field corrosion test in Japanese refuse incineration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Yuuzou; Nakamura, Masanori; Shibuya, Eiichi; Yukawa, Kenichi

    1995-01-01

    As the first step for development of the corrosion resistant superheater tube materials of 500 C, 100 ata used in high efficient waste-to-energy plants, field corrosion tests of six conventional alloys were carried out at metal temperatures of 450 C and 550 C for 700 and 3,000 hours in four typical Japanese waste incineration plants. The test results indicate that austenitic alloys containing approximately 80 wt% [Cr+Ni] show excellent corrosion resistance. When the corrosive environment is severe, intergranular corrosion of 40∼200 microm depth occurs in stainless steel and high alloyed materials. It is confirmed quantitatively that corrosion behavior is influenced by environmental corrosion factors such as Cl concentration and thickness of deposits on tube surface, metal temperature, and flue gas temperature. The excellent corrosion resistance of high [Cr+Ni+Mo] alloys such as Alloy 625 is explained by the stability of its protective oxide, such that the time dependence of corrosion nearly obeys the parabolic rate law

  13. Study on the correlation between long-term exposure tests and accelerated corrosion tests by the combined damage of salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Min Woo

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the durability assessment and structural performance has increased according to an increase of concrete structures in salt damage environment recent years. Reliable way ensuring the most accelerated corrosion test is a method of performing the rebar corrosion monitoring as exposed directly to the marine test site exposure. However, long-term exposure test has a disadvantage because of a long period of time. Therefore, many studies on reinforced concrete in salt damage environments have been developed as alternatives to replace this. However, accelerated corrosion test is appropriate to evaluate the critical chlorine concentration in the short term, but only accelerated test method, is not easy to get correct answer. Accuracy of correlation acceleration test depends on the period of the degree of exposure environments. Therefore, in this study, depending on the concrete mix material, by the test was performed on the basis of the composite degradation of the salt damage, and investigate the difference of corrosion initiation time of the rebar, and indoor corrosion time of the structure, of the marine environment of the actual environments were investigated. The correlation coefficient was derived in the experiment. Long-term exposure test was actually conducted in consideration of the exposure conditions submerged zone, splash zone and tidal zone. The accelerated corrosion tests were carried out by immersion conditions, and by the combined deterioration due to the carbonation and accelerated corrosion due to wet and dry condition

  14. Corrosion Performance of New Generation Aluminum-Lithium Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James P.; Bovard, Francine S.; Chrzan, James D.; Vandenburgh, Peter

    Over the past several years, a new generation of aluminum-lithium alloys has been developed. These alloys are characterized by excellent strength, low density, and high modulus of elasticity and are therefore of interest for lightweight structural materials applications particularly for construction of current and future aircraft. These new alloys have also demonstrated significant improvements in corrosion resistance when compared with the legacy and incumbent alloys. This paper documents the superior corrosion resistance of the current commercial tempers of these materials and also discusses the corrosion performance as a function of the degree of artificial aging. Results from laboratory corrosion tests are compared with results from exposures in a seacoast atmosphere to assess the predictive capability of the laboratory tests. The correlations that have been developed between the laboratory tests and the seacoast exposures provide confidence that a set of available methods can provide an accurate assessment of the corrosion performance of this new generation of alloys.

  15. Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated Corrosion Testing at ARL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    ARL-TN-0855 ● NOV 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated Corrosion Testing at ARL by... Corrosion Testing at ARL by Thomas A Considine Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Approved for public...November 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Note 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated

  16. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  17. Demonstration through EPR tests of the sensitivity of austeno-ferritic steels to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can be sensitised to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under some conditions (heat treatments, welding). The aim of this work is to contribute to the validation of the EPR (Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation) test in order to determine conditions for normalisation. This method, based on the dissolution of chromium depleted areas due to precipitation of σ-phase, provides a degree of sensitisation to intergranular corrosion. The test is broaden considering the mechanical stress by the way of slow strain rate tests, performed in chloride magnesium and in a solution similar to the EPR solution. A metallurgical study puts on the precipitates and the structural modifications due to welding and heat treatments, in order to make a critical analysis of the EPR test. (author) [fr

  18. In situ corrosion tests on HLW glass as part of a larger approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Iseghem, P.

    1997-01-01

    In-situ corrosion tests were performed on various candidate high-level waste glasses in the underground laboratory in clay underneath SCK x CEN. The tests exposed the glass samples directly to the Boom clay rock, for maximum durations of 7.5 years. We succeeded to interpret the corrosion data at 90 deg C in terms of dissolution mechanisms, and we concluded that the glass composition has a determining effect on the corrosion stability. The data from our in-situ tests were of high relevance for estimating the long-term behaviour of the glasses. The long-term in-situ tests provide corrosion data which show different trends than other corrosion tests, e.g. shorter duration tests in Boom clay, or tests in deionized water. The initial dissolution rate using MCC1 test at 90 deg C is about the same for the three glasses discussed, but the longest duration in Boom clay at 90 deg C shows a difference in mass loss of about 25 times. We finally present some ideas on how the corrosion tests can meet the needs, such as the modelling of the glass corrosion or providing input in the performance assessment. (author)

  19. Corrosion performance of several metals in plutonium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seiichiro; Nagai, Takayuki; Yasu, Shozo; Koizumi, Tsutomu

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of several metals exposed in plutonium nitrate solution was studied. Plutonium nitrate solution with the plutonium concentration ranging from 0.01 to 300 g/l was used as a corrosive medium. Specimens tested were type 304 ULC (304 ULC) stainless steel, type 310 Nb (310 Nb) stainless steel, titanium (Ti), titanium-5% tantalum alloy (Ti-5Ta), and zirconium (Zr). Corrosion behavior of these metals in plutonium nitrate solution was evaluated through examining electrochemical characteristics and corrosion rates obtained by weight loss measurement. From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion rate of stainless steels i.e. 304 ULC and 310 Nb, increases by the presence of plutonium in nitric acid solution. The corrosion potential of the stainless steels shifted linearly towards the noble direction as the concentration of plutonium increases. It is thought that the shifts in corrosion potential of the stainless steels to the noble direction results an increase in anodic current and, hence, corrosion rate. Valve metals, i.e. Ti, Ti-5Ta and Zr, showed good corrosion resistance over the whole range of plutonium concentration examined here. (author)

  20. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  1. Automated corrosion fatigue crack growth testing in pressurized water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschini, L.J.; Liaw, P.K.; Rudd, G.E.; Logsdon, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a novel approach to construct a test facility for developing corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties in aggressive environments. The environment studied is that of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 288 0 C (550 0 F) and 13.8 MPa (200 psig). To expedite data generation, each chamber was designed to accommodate two test specimens. A common water recirculation and pressurization system was employed to service two test chambers. Thus, four fatigue crack propagation rate tests could be conducted simultaneously in the pressurized water environment. The data analysis was automated to minimize the typically high labor costs associated with corrosion fatigue crack propagation testing. Verification FCGR tests conducted on an ASTM A469 rotor steel in a room temperature air environment as well as actual PWR environment FCGR tests performed on an ASTM A533 Grade B Class 2 pressure vessel steel demonstrated that the dual specimen test facility is an excellent system for developing the FCGR properties of materials in adverse environments

  2. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  3. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 μm/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions

  4. Corrosion resistance of high-performance materials titanium, tantalum, zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the property of a material to resist corrosion attack in a particular aggressive environment. Although titanium, tantalum and zirconium are not noble metals, they are the best choice whenever high corrosion resistance is required. The exceptionally good corrosion resistance of these high–performance metals and their alloys results from the formation of a very stable, dense, highly adherent, and self–healing protective oxide film on the metal surface. This naturally occurring oxide layer prevents chemical attack of the underlying metal surface. This behavior also means, however, that high corrosion resistance can be expected only under neutral or oxidizing conditions. Under reducing conditions, a lower resistance must be reckoned with. Only very few inorganic and organic substances are able to attack titanium, tantalum or zirconium at ambient temperature. As the extraordinary corrosion resistance is coupled with an excellent formability and weldability these materials are very valua...

  5. Mechanical Performance versus Corrosion Damage Indicators for Corroded Steel Reinforcing Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caprili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental results of a testing campaign including tensile and low-cycle fatigue tests on different reinforcing steel bar types in the as-delivered and corroded condition are presented. Experimental data were statistically analyzed adopting ANOVA technique; Performance Indicators (PIs, describing the mechanical performance characteristics of reinforcements, and Corrosion Damage Indicators (CDIs, describing the detrimental effects of corrosion phenomena, were determined and correlated in order to evaluate the influence of corrosion on the behaviour of reinforcing steels, providing useful information for designers in addition to what is presented in current standards.

  6. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  7. Corrosion evaluation in insulated pipes by non destructive testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Razak Hamzah; Azali Muhammad; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Sufian Saad; Saharuddin Sayuti; Shukri Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    In engineering plants, detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using radiography method are considered as a very challenging tasks. In General this degradation problem is attributed to water condensation. It causes the formation of deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe in cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the study of corrosion in pipelines, one of the most important parameters to be monitored and measured is the wall thickness. Currently, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is performed using an ultrasonic method. The most common technique is that based on the A-Scan, using either a normal flaw detector or some form of dedicated equipment. However, with recent development of ultrasonic technology, more advance method, namely B-Scan and C-scan techniques are also available. The most notable disadvantage of using this method is that the insulation covering the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason, the possibility of employing other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method were studied. The technique used in this studied are known as tangential technique. In this study it was found that the result found using tangential technique is consistent with the actual thickness of the pipe. Result of this study is presented and discussed in this paper. (Author)

  8. Standard practice for preparing, cleaning, and evaluating corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers suggested procedures for preparing bare, solid metal specimens for tests, for removing corrosion products after the test has been completed, and for evaluating the corrosion damage that has occurred. Emphasis is placed on procedures related to the evaluation of corrosion by mass loss and pitting measurements. (Warning—In many cases the corrosion product on the reactive metals titanium and zirconium is a hard and tightly bonded oxide that defies removal by chemical or ordinary mechanical means. In many such cases, corrosion rates are established by mass gain rather than mass loss.) 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see 1 and 7.2.

  9. Corrosion performance of SiCsubp/6061 Al metal matrix composites in sodium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohmad Soib bin Selamat

    1995-01-01

    The corrosion performance of silicon carbide particle/aluminium metal matrix composites (SiCsubp/Al) were studied in sodium chloride solution by means of electrochemical, microscopic, gravimetric and analytical techniques. The materials under investigation were compocasting processed 6061 Al reinforced with increasing amounts of SiC particles. Potentiostatic polarization tests were done in 0.1M NaCl solutions that were aerated or deaerated to observe overall corrosion behaviour. It was seen that the corrosion potentials did not vary greatly in relation to the amounts of SiCsubp reinforcement. Corrosion tests showed that the degree of corrosion increased with increasing SiCsubp content. SEM analysis technique was used to study the corroded samples and the pitting morphology. By TEM, no intermetallic layer was found at SiC/Al interface. A model for pitting process was proposed

  10. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Corrosion Test Report (Phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W. C.; Fritz, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the corrosion tests that were performed to aid in the selection of the construction materials for multi-function waste tanks to be built in the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Two alloys were tested: 304L and Alloy 20 austenitic stainless steel. The test media were aqueous solutions formulated to represent the extreme of the chemical compositions of waste to be stored in the tanks. The results summerized by alloy are as follows: For 304L the tests showed no stress-corrosion cracking in any of the nine test solutions. The tests showed pitting in on of the solutions. There were no indications of any weld heat-tint corrosion, nor any sign of preferential corrosion in the welded areas. For Alloy 20 the tests showed no general, pitting, or stress-corrosion cracking. One crevice corrosion coupon cracked at the web between a hole and the edge of the coupon in one of the solutions. Mechanical tests showed some possible crack extension in the same solution. Because of the failure of both alloys to meet test acceptance criteria, the tank waste chemistry will have to be restricted or an alternative alloy tested

  11. Electrochemical tests for pitting and crevice corrosion susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postlethwaite, J.

    1983-01-01

    Passive metals are being considered as container materials for the disposal of nuclear waste by deep burial. Localized corrosion is a potential problem and electrochemical techniques have an important role in the assessment of the susceptibility of these container materials to crevice and pitting corrosion. This paper critically reviews both the theoretical background and the experimental details of the electrochemical test methods presently used in both industrial and scientific studies of localized corrosion in both halide and non-halide solutions and identifies those areas where theory and experimental behaviour are in agreement and those areas for which there is neither well established theory nor an experimental test method

  12. Evaluation of annual corrosion tests for aggressive water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubová, V.; Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.

    2011-12-01

    Internal corrosion has a significant effect on the useful life of pipes, the hydraulic conditions of a distribution system and the quality of the water transported. All water is corrosive under some conditions, and the level of this corrosion depends on the physical and chemical properties of the water and properties of the pipe material. Galvanic treatment is an innovation for protecting against corrosion, and this method is also suitable for removal of water stone too. This method consists of the electrogalvanic principle, which is generated by the flowing of water between a zinc anode and the cupro-alloy cover of a column. This article presents experimental corrosion tests at water resource Pernek (This water resource-well marked as HL-1 is close to the Pernek of village), where the device is operating based on this principle.

  13. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  14. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo; Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz

    2012-12-01

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 μm were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  15. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3was a function of the concentration of NO3−ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local......Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation...

  16. [Stress-corrosion test of TIG welded CP-Ti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Wang, Y; Zhou, Z; Meng, X; Liang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, Y

    2000-12-01

    In this study TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welded CP-Ti were subjected to stress-corrosion test under 261 MPa in artificial saliva of 37 degrees C for 3 months. No significant difference was noted on mechanical test (P > 0.05). No color-changed and no micro-crack on the sample's surface yet. These results indicate that TIG welded CP-Ti offers excellent resistance to stress corrosion.

  17. Modification and upgradation of corrosion fatigue testing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Qamar, R.

    2006-08-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion Fatigue (CF) are important tests which are performed to check the integrity of structural materials operating in different environments, such as nuclear power system, steam and gas turbines, aircraft marine structure, pipelines and bridges. To establish the environmental testing facility on laboratory scale, NMD acquired a computerized (286 Based PC) electromechanical testing machine from M/S CorTest, USA. This machine was commissioned at NMD in 1989. Since then it has been utilized to test and qualify the materials provided by different establishments of PAEC for SCC and CF behavior. However, in October 2004, computer attached to the machine was corrupted and became out of order. Users were handicapped because there was no any alternate system i.e. Manual control tower to operate the machine. Then users approached to Computer Division to investigate the malfunctioning at the computer. Therefore, upon complete checkup of system, it was diagnosed that there was a serious problem in the hard disk and mother board of the computer. Much difficulty was faced in retrieving the application software from the obsolete 286 computer system. Then the basic aim was to replace the old computer with Pentium System. But with Pentium system application software was not working. Since we have already recovered full application software package including source programs, so all the seventeen programs has been thoroughly studied. Four programs had to be modified according to the new hardware. Now the new Pentium system with modified software has been interfaced with the machine. Machine was tested for the both types of above mentioned tests and compared with previous results. The performance of machine was confirmed satisfactory on the new setup. (author)

  18. Corrosion performance of some titanium-based hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, B.; Broszeit, E.; Aromaa, J.; Ronkainen, H.; Hannula, S.P.; Leyland, A.; Matthews, A.

    1991-01-01

    Tools and machine parts which could benefit from wear-resistant titanium-based hard films are often subject to corrosive environments. Physically vapour-deposited coatings frequently exhibit porosity and even small defects, which can cause rapid local corrosion of the substrate material; there is therefore a requirement for dense and chemically inert coatings. This paper presents corrosion data for titanium-based hard coatings such as TiN, (Ti, Al)N, Ti(B, N) and TiB 2 and also for multilayered structures where additional aluminium-based insulating surface layers (AlN and Al 2 O 3 ) were deposited. The corrosion resistance and porosity of the films were analysed by electrochemical techniques. The degree of metallic bonding can play a significant role in influencing the corrosion resistance of refractory transition-metal-based ceramic coatings. Here we demonstrate that, under potentiodynamic corrosion test conditions, resistance to corrosive attack was relatively poor for TiB 2 , better for (Ti, Al)N and Ti(B, N) and best for TiN. It is also shown that applying the additional protective aluminium-based insulating surface layers on the coating can further improve corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  19. Effect of flow on corrosion in catenary risers and its corrosion inhibitor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pedro Altoe; Magalhaes, Alvaro Augusto Oliveira; Silva, Jussara de Mello [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kang, Cheolho; More, Parimal P. [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Oslo (Norway)

    2009-07-01

    In oil and gas production, multiphase flow is often encountered and a range of different flow patterns can be experienced in pipelines. The flow regime transition and flow characteristics can be changed with the change of pipeline topography, which affects the corrosion and the performance of corrosion inhibitor in these multiphase pipelines. This paper outlines on the effect of inclination on the flow characteristics and their subsequent effect on corrosion rates. Also, this paper presents on the performance of three candidate corrosion inhibitors under severe slugging conditions at low water cut. For the simulation of offshore flow lines and risers, the experiments were carried out in a 44 m long, 10 cm diameter, three different pipeline inclinations of 0, 3 and 45 degrees. Light condensate oil with a viscosity of 2.5 cP at room temperature was used and water cut was 20%. The results indicated that the baseline corrosion rate in 45 degrees showed higher than other inclinations. Each corrosion inhibitor showed a different inhibitor performance. (author)

  20. Performance evaluation of corrosion-affected reinforced concrete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M B Anoop

    Abstract. A methodology for performance evaluation of reinforced concrete bridge girders in corrosive ... concrete (RC) members of infrastructural systems, espe- ... bility will be useful for making engineering decisions for ...... Water-cement ratio.

  1. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  2. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING OF TANKS 241-AN-102 & 241-AP-107 & 241-AP-108 IN SUPPORT OF ULTRASONIC TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

    2008-11-20

    This report presents the results of the corrosion rates that were measured using electrochemical methods for tanks 241-AN-102 (AN-102), 241-AP-107 (AP 107), and 241-AP-108 (AP-108) performed under test plant RPP-PLAN-38215. The steel used as materials of construction for AN and AP tank farms was A537 Class 1. Test coupons of A537 Class 1 carbon steel were used for corrosion testing in the AN-107, AP-107, and AP-108 tank waste. Supernate will be tested from AN-102, AP-107, and Ap-108. Saltcake testing was performed on AP-108 only.

  3. Microstructural characterisation and corrosion performance of old railway girder bridge steel and modern weathering structural steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewary, N.K.; Kundu, A.; Nandi, R.; Saha, J.K.; Ghosh, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructure and corrosion performance are compared for two structural steels. • Microstructure evolution shows primarily ferrite-pearlite in both the steels. • Steels show higher corrosion rate in 1% HCl solution than in 3.5% NaCl solution. • The corrosion products show the presence of oxide, hydroxide and oxy-hydroxides. • The corroded surface reveals morphologies like flowery, cotton balls and rosette. - Abstract: A comparison on microstructure and corrosion performance has been made between the two structural steels used in old railway girder bridge (Sample A) and modern grades of weathering structural steel (Sample B). The microstructures, viewed under optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), show mainly ferrite-pearlite phase constituents in both the steels, A and B. The phase fraction analysis shows higher amount of pearlite in steel A compared to that of steel B. The grain size of steel A is larger than that of steel B under identical processing condition. The immersion corrosion test in 3.5% NaCl shows that the corrosion rate of steel A increases with time, while the same for steel B decreases with time. On the other hand, corrosion test in 1% HCl shows that the corrosion rate of both steel A and B is higher as compared to that of NaCl which always decreases with time. The XRD analysis of corrosion products show the presence of many oxides, hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide like Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), Goethite (α-FeOOH), Akaganeite (β-FeOOH), Magnetite (Fe_3O_4) and Maghemite (γ-Fe_2O_3) in both the steels. The SEM images of corroded surfaces reveal different morphologies like flowery, cotton balls and rosette etc. which indicate that the corrosion products primarily contain Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), Goethite (α-FeOOH) and Akaganeite (β-FeOOH).

  4. Corrosion performance of inorganic coatings in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Buter, S.J.; Ferrari, G.M.; Westing, E. van; Kowalski, L.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic coatings are widely used to protect carbon steel hydraulic cylinder rods from wear and corrosion in aggressive offshore environment. Different types of lay-ers such as Ni/Cr, Al2O3, Cr2O3, TiO2, and Inconel 625 layers were applied to the carbon steels by plasma, High Velocity Oxygen Fuel

  5. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  6. From laboratory corrosion tests to a corrosion lifetime for wood fasteners : progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Determining a “corrosion-lifetime” for fasteners embedded in wood treated with recently adopted preservative systems depends upon successfully relating results of laboratory tests to in-service conditions. In contrast to laboratory tests where metal is embedded in wood at constant temperature and moisture content, the in-service temperature and moisture content of wood...

  7. Water corrosion test of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasushi

    2006-07-01

    As a part of feasibility study of ODS steel cladding, its water corrosion resistance was examined under water pool condition. Although addition of Cr is effective for preventing water corrosion, excessive Cr addition leads to embrittlement due to the Cr-rich α' precipitate formation. In the ODS steel developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Cr content is controlled in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite. In this study, water corrosion test was conducted for these ODS steels, and their results were compared with that of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. Following results were obtained in this study. (1) Corrosion rate of 9Cr-ODS martensitic and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel are significantly small and no pitting was observed. Thus, these ODS steels have superior resistance for water corrosion under the condition of 60degC and pH8-12. (2) It was showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steel and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel have comparable water corrosion resistance to that of PNC316 and PNC-FMS at 60degC for 1,000h under varying pH of 8, 10. Water corrosion resistance of these alloys is slightly larger than that of PNC316 and PNC-FMS at pH12 without significant difference of appearance and uneven condition. (author)

  8. Brief description of out-of-pile test facilities for study in corrosion and fission product behaviour in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, K.; Sekiguchi, N.; Atsumo, H.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental methods to perform tests for study in corrosion and fission products behaviour in flowing sodium are outlined. Flow diagrams for the activated materials and fission products behaviour test loop are given

  9. Corrosion performance of 7075 alloy under laser heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Su, Ruiming; Qu, Yingdong; Li, Rongde

    2018-05-01

    Microstructure, exfoliation corrosion (EXCO), intergranular corrosion (IGC) and potentidynamic polarization test of the 7075 aluminum alloy after retrogression and re-aging (RRA) treatment, and laser retrogression and re-aging (LRRA), respectively, were studied by using scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that after pre-aging, laser treatment (650 W, 2 mm s‑1) and re-aging a lot of matrix precipitates of alloy were precipitated again. The semi-continuous grain boundary precipitates and the wider precipitate-free zones (PFZ) improve the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The corrosion properties of the alloy after LRRA (650 W, 2 mm s‑1) treatment are better than that after RRA treatment.

  10. Standard Guide for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Field Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for conducting corrosion tests in plant equipment or systems under operating conditions to evaluate the corrosion resistance of engineering materials. It does not cover electrochemical methods for determining corrosion rates. 1.1.1 While intended primarily for immersion tests, general guidelines provided can be applicable for exposure of test specimens in plant atmospheres, provided that placement and orientation of the test specimens is non-restrictive to air circulation. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. See also 10.4.2.

  11. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston

  12. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  13. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90 degrees C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys

  14. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  15. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Shen, Dejiu, E-mail: DejiuShen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  16. Investigation of the cut-edge corrosion of organically-coated galvanized steel after accelerated atmospheric corrosion test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reşit Yıldız

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cut edge corrosion of organically coated (epoxy, polyurethane and polyester galvanized steel was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Measurements were performed on specimens that had been tested in an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test. The samples were subjected to 10 s fogging and 1 h awaiting cycles in an exposure cabinet (120 and 180 days with artificial acid rain solution. According to the investigation, the coatings were damaged from the cut edge into the sheet, this distance was about 0.8 cm. These defects were more pronounced at after 180 days in proportion to after 120 days.

  17. Enamel coated steel reinforcement for improved durability and life-cycle performance of concrete structures: microstructure, corrosion, and deterioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fujian

    This study is aimed (a) to statistically characterize the corrosion-induced deterioration process of reinforced concrete structures (concrete cracking, steel mass loss, and rebar-concrete bond degradation), and (b) to develop and apply three types of enamel-coated steel bars for improved corrosion resistance of the structures. Commercially available pure enamel, mixed enamel with 50% calcium silicate, and double enamel with an inner layer of pure enamel and an outer layer of mixed enamel were considered as various steel coatings. Electrochemical tests were respectively conducted on steel plates, smooth bars embedded in concrete, and deformed bars with/without concrete cover in 3.5 wt.% NaCl or saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The effects of enamel microstructure, coating thickness variation, potential damage, mortar protection, and corrosion environment on corrosion resistance of the steel members were investigated. Extensive test results indicated that corrosion-induced concrete cracking can be divided into four stages that gradually become less correlated with corrosion process over time. The coefficient of variation of crack width increases with the increasing level of corrosion. Corrosion changed the cross section area instead of mechanical properties of steel bars. The bond-slip behavior between the corroded bars and concrete depends on the corrosion level and distribution of corrosion pits. Although it can improve the chemical bond with concrete and steel, the mixed enamel coating is the least corrosion resistant. The double enamel coating provides the most consistent corrosion performance and is thus recommended to coat reinforcing steel bars for concrete structures applied in corrosive environments. Corrosion pits in enamel-coated bars are limited around damage locations.

  18. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  19. Alternate immersion stress corrosion testing of 5083 aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Dringman, M.R.; Hausburg, D.E.; Jackson, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of Type 5083 aluminum--magnesium alloy in plate form and press-formed shapes was determined in the short transverse direction. C-ring type specimens were exposed to alternate immersion in a sodium chloride solution. The test equipment and procedure, with several innovative features, are described in detail. Statistical test results are listed for seven thermomechanical conditions. A certain processing scheme was shown to yield a work-strengthened part that is not sensitized with respect to stress corrosion cracking

  20. Model tests for corrosion influence of electrode surface on electroosmosis in marine sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingwei; Li, Jinzhu; Shi, Hanru

    2017-11-01

    The corrosion of metal electrodes is inevitable on electroosmosis in soil. Surface corrosion of electrodes is also one of the reasons for increasing energy consumption in electroosmosis treatment. A series of laboratory tests were conducted employing three kinds of materials, aluminium, steel, and brass. To explore the impact of surface corrosion degree on electroosmosis, metal electrodes were pretreated with durations 0 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 36 h. After the pretreatment, corroded electrodes are used as anodes on electroosmosis. Water discharge, current, voltage potential were measured during the tests; water content was also tested at three points after the electroosmosis. The results showed that aluminium was better than steel in electroosmotic drainage while brass provided the worst dewatering performance. Surface corrosion did not influence the aluminium and steel on electroosmosis in marine sludge, but brass did. In the pretreatment of brass electrodes, corrosion rate had started to slow down at later periods, with the deterioration rate of dewatering reduced afterwards. As the results showed, it is not recommended to employ those easily deteriorated electrode materials from surface corrosion in practical engineering, such as brass; electrode material with higher electroosmosis exchange rate is recommended, such as aluminium.

  1. Adsorption and performance of the 2-mercaptobenzimidazole as a carbon steel corrosion inhibitor in EDTA solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderón, J.A.; Vásquez, F.A.; Carreño, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a thermodynamic analysis of the adsorption and anti-corrosion performance of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-MBI) on carbon steel in EDTA-Na2 solutions. The adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface was studied as a function of the concentration of the inhibiting species and the temperature of the system. The corrosion inhibition efficiency was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and mass loss tests. The results show that the adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal surface behaves according to the Langmuir model, following an endothermic process. The inhibitor is chemically adsorbed onto the carbon steel surface. The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%, which was confirmed by both mass loss tests and the electrochemical impedance technique. The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h after the inhibitor was added to the corrosive EDTA-Na2 solutions. When the ratio of the volume of solution/exposed area was reduced, a decrease in the area covered by the inhibitor was observed. The best cost/benefit ratio for the corrosion protection of carbon steel was obtained when the number of moles of the inhibitor per surface area was maintained at 2.68 mmol cm"−"2. - Highlights: • Adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface is confirmed by thermodynamic data. • Adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal behaves according to the Langmuir model. • Endothermic adsorption process indicates that the inhibitor is chemically adsorbed. • The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%. • The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h.

  2. Adsorption and performance of the 2-mercaptobenzimidazole as a carbon steel corrosion inhibitor in EDTA solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderón, J.A., E-mail: andres.calderon@udea.edu.co [Centro de Investigación, Innovación y Desarrollo de Materiales –CIDEMAT, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Vásquez, F.A. [Centro de Investigación, Innovación y Desarrollo de Materiales –CIDEMAT, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Carreño, J.A. [Laboratório de H2S, CO2 e Corrosividade, Instituto Nacional De Tecnologia (INT), Av. Venezuela, 82 – Térreo, Anexo 01, Sala 101A, Saúde, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a thermodynamic analysis of the adsorption and anti-corrosion performance of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-MBI) on carbon steel in EDTA-Na2 solutions. The adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface was studied as a function of the concentration of the inhibiting species and the temperature of the system. The corrosion inhibition efficiency was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and mass loss tests. The results show that the adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal surface behaves according to the Langmuir model, following an endothermic process. The inhibitor is chemically adsorbed onto the carbon steel surface. The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%, which was confirmed by both mass loss tests and the electrochemical impedance technique. The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h after the inhibitor was added to the corrosive EDTA-Na2 solutions. When the ratio of the volume of solution/exposed area was reduced, a decrease in the area covered by the inhibitor was observed. The best cost/benefit ratio for the corrosion protection of carbon steel was obtained when the number of moles of the inhibitor per surface area was maintained at 2.68 mmol cm{sup −2}. - Highlights: • Adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface is confirmed by thermodynamic data. • Adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal behaves according to the Langmuir model. • Endothermic adsorption process indicates that the inhibitor is chemically adsorbed. • The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%. • The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h.

  3. The correlation between accelerated and field corrosion tests performed in carbon steel and weathering steel coupons, coated and non-coated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2002-01-01

    The performance of four different organic coating systems applied to carbon and weathering steel coupons has been assessed in this investigation. applied on the surface of carbon steel and weathering steel coupons. The coupons have been evaluated using five different tests, three field tests and two accelerated tests. The field tests were carried out at three atmospheric stations, located at COSIPA in Cubatao-SP, at Alto da Serra in Cubatao-SP and at Paula Souza in Sao Paulo city. The accelerated tests consisted of (a) exposure to alternate cycles of ultraviolet radiation/condensation combined with salt spray cycles (UVCON combined with Salt Spray) and of (b) exposure to alternate cycles of ultraviolet radiation/condensation combined with the Prohesion test. The performance of the coatings was assessed by visual observation and photographs, using a method based on ASTM D-610, ASTM D-714 and ASTM-1654 standards to rank them. The oxide phases formed on the surfaces of the non-coated specimens of carbon and weathering steels, exposed to the same tests performed with the coated specimens, were identified using three different techniques: X-ray diffraction, Raman microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the field tests, the specimens have been exposed for 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months. In the accelerated ones, the results were obtained after 1340 hours (4 cycles) test. The main component identified in all the specimens collected from the field tests and from the UVCON combined with the Prohesion test was lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH). Goethite (α-FeOOH ) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) were identified as the other two main phases present in ali the specimens. In the UVCON combined with Salt Spray test, the dominant phase was magnetite, followed by goethite and lepidocrocite. The morphology of the rust formed on the specimens was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structures corresponding to goethite and lepidocrocited were recognized on ali specimens, except those

  4. Corrosion performance of tube support materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malagola, P.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of denting in steam generators leads to change in the conception of the tube support plates. A new material is now used for this component, a 13% Cr steel, which composition has been adjusted for weldability and mechanical resistance criteria. The geometry of trefoil support plate (TSP) has also been improved, using a broached TSP (quadrifoiled holes) instead of a drilled TSP. Tests have been performed on 13% Cr and C-steel broached TSP, and drilled TSP, to confirm the better resistance to denting of this new configuration

  5. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  6. Developing of corrosion and creep property test database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. J.; Jun, I.; Kim, J. S.; Ryu, W. S.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion and creep characteristics database systems were constructed using the data produced from corrosion and creep test and designed to hold in common the data and programs of tensile, impact, fatigue characteristics database that was constructed since 2001 and others characteristics databases that will be constructed in future. We can easily get the basic data from the corrosion and creep characteristics database systems when we prepare the new experiment and can produce high quality result by compare the previous test result. The development part must be analysis and design more specific to construct the database and after that, we can offer the best quality to customers various requirements. In this thesis, we describe the procedure about analysis, design and development of the impact and fatigue characteristics database systems developed by internet method using jsp(Java Server pages) tool

  7. Mechanical Characterization and Corrosion Testing of X608 Al Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Catalini, David; Lavender, Curt A.; Rohatgi, Aashish

    2016-02-07

    This paper describes the mechanical characterization and corrosion testing of X608 Al alloy that is being considered for A-pillar covers for heavy-duty truck applications. Recently, PNNL developed a thermo-mechanical process to stamp A-pillar covers at room temperature using this alloy, and the full-size prototype was successfully stamped by a tier-1 supplier. This study was conducted to obtain additional important information related to the newly developed forming process, and to further improve its mechanical properties. The solutionization temperature, pre-strain and paint-bake heat-treatment were found to influence the alloy’s fabricability and mechanical properties. Natural aging effect on the formability was investigated by limiting dome height (LDH) tests. Preliminary corrosion experiments showed that the employed thermo-mechanical treatments did not significantly affect the corrosion behavior of Al X608.

  8. High performance polypyrrole coating for corrosion protection and biocidal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Amit; Qiao, Mingyu; Cook, Jonathan Edwin; Zhang, Xinyu; Huang, Tung-Shi

    2018-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) coating was electrochemically synthesized on carbon steel using sulfonic acids as dopants: p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA), sulfuric acid (SA), (±) camphor sulfonic acid (CSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS). The effect of acidic dopants (p-TSA, SA, CSA) on passivation of carbon steel was investigated by linear potentiodynamic and compared with morphology and corrosion protection performance of the coating produced. The types of the dopants used were significantly affecting the protection efficiency of the coating against chloride ion attack on the metal surface. The corrosion performance depends on size and alignment of dopant in the polymer backbone. Both p-TSA and SDBS have extra benzene ring that stack together to form a lamellar sheet like barrier to chloride ions thus making them appropriate dopants for PPy coating in suppressing the corrosion at significant level. Further, adhesion performance was enhanced by adding long chain carboxylic acid (decanoic acid) directly in the monomer solution. In addition, PPy coating doped with SDBS displayed excellent biocidal abilities against Staphylococcus aureus. The polypyrrole coatings on carbon steels with dual function of anti-corrosion and excellent biocidal properties shows great potential application in the industry for anti-corrosion/antimicrobial purposes.

  9. Corrosion performance of metals and alloys in a tuff geochemical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Reference and alternate alloy systems have been chosen for use in fabricating waste packages for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository in tuff. The main corrosion concerns have been identified. Testing performed to date indicates that austenitic stainless steels woul perform well as package materials under the expected conditions as well as the less likely extreme conditions so far postulated. Carbon steel appears to be adequate as a material for borehole liners. Copper-based alloys and Zircaloys are also undergoing corrosion testing, the former as alternate package materials, and the latter because of their presence as spent fuel cladding. 17 references, 2 tables

  10. Performance investigation of low-toxic organic corrosion inhibitors in amine treating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veawab, A.; Tanthapanichakoon, W.

    2003-01-01

    Amine treating unit is constantly subject to severe corrosion problems leading to extra expenditure and operational limitations. Heavy-metal vanadium compounds are extensively used as corrosion inhibitors to suppress the severe corrosion to an acceptable level. In recent years, the fact that these vanadium compounds are inherently toxic and can potentially pose adverse impacts on the human health and the environment has brought about environmental awareness that causes their uses costly due to the difficulty in waste disposal. To respond to the environmental concern and reduce cost of waste disposal as well as prepare for more stringent regulations for chemical uses, the development of low-toxic corrosion inhibitors is necessary. This work therefore focuses on an investigation of inhibition performance of a number of organic and inorganic compounds that have relatively low toxicity in comparison with conventional inhibitors. The performance evaluation was carried out through corrosion experiments using carbon steel specimens. The experiments were done in 3 and 5 kmol/m 3 monoethanolamine (MEA) solution saturated with CO 2 at 80 o C. It was found that several tested compounds have potential to be effective low-toxic corrosion inhibitors. The promising compounds provide reasonable and in some cases comparable protection performance to the conventional inhibitor. (author)

  11. Study on corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. Joint research report in JFY2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The evaluation of corrosion behaviors of core and structural materials in lead bismuth eutectic is one of the key issues for the utilization of lead bismuth eutectic as a coolant of the primary loops of lead bismuth cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and the intermediate heat transport media of new-type steam generators of the sodium cooled FBRs. The purpose of the present study is to establish corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. The techniques of steel corrosion test and oxygen control in flowing lead bismuth eutectic, and the technologies of a lead bismuth flow test at high temperature and high velocity were developed through corrosion test using a lead bismuth flow test loop of the Tokyo Institute of Technology in JFY2002. The major results are summarized as follows: (1) Techniques of fabrication, mount and rinse of corrosion specimens, measurement method of weight loss, and SEM/EDX analysis method have been established through lead bismuth corrosion test. (2) Weight losses were measured, corrosion and lead bismuth-adhered layers and eroded parts were observed in two 1000 hr-corrosion tests, and the results were compared with each other for twelve existing steels including ODS, F82H and SUH-3. (3) An oxygen sensor made of zirconia electrolyte structurally resistant to thermal stress and thermal shock was developed and tested in the lead bismuth flow loop. Good performance has been obtained. (4) An oxygen control method by injecting argon and hydrogen mixture gas containing steam into lead bismuth was applied to the lead bismuth flow loop, and technical issues for the development of the oxygen control method were extracted. (5) Technical measures for freezing and leakage of lead bismuth in the flow loop were accumulated. (6) Technical measures for flow rate decrease/blockage due to precipitation of oxide and corrosion products in a low temperature section of the lead bismuth flow loop were accumulated. (7) Electromagnetic flow meters with MI

  12. Performance of HVOF carbide coatings under erosion/corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, S.; Arsenault, B.; Legoux, J.G.; Hawthorne, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Cermet based materials are known to have an excellent performance under several wear conditions. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technology allows the deposition of such hard materials in the form of protective coatings onto different surfaces. Under slurry erosion, the performance of the coatings is influenced by the occurrence of corrosion reactions on the metallic matrix. Indeed, wet conditions promote the dissolution of metallic binder resulting in a potential synergic effect between the corrosion and wear mechanisms. The composition of the metallic matrix plays a key role on the stability of the coatings and their degradation rate. In this work, four coatings based on tungsten carbide embedded in different metallic binders were evaluated with regard to corrosion and wear. (author)

  13. Effect of mixed alloy combinations on fretting corrosion performance of spinal screw and rod implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Sachin A; Singh, Vaneet; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2017-07-01

    Spinal implants are made from a variety of materials to meet the unique mechanical demands of each application. However, the medical device community has raised concern about mixing dissimilar metals in an implant because of fear of inducing corrosion. There is a lack of systematic studies on the effects of mixing metals on performance of spinal implants, especially in fretting corrosion conditions. Hence, the goal was to determine whether mixing stainless steel (SS316L), titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt chromium (CoCrMo) alloy components in a spinal implant leads to any increased risk of corrosion degradation. Spinal constructs consisting of single assembly screw-connector-rod components were tested using a novel short-term cyclic fretting corrosion test method. A total of 17 alloy component combinations (comprised of SS316L, Ti6Al4V-anodized and CoCrMo alloy for rod, screws and connectors) were tested under three anatomic orientations. Spinal constructs having all SS316L were most susceptible to fretting-initiated crevice corrosion attack and showed higher average fretting currents (∼25 - 30 µA), whereas constructs containing all Ti6Al4V components were less susceptible to fretting corrosion with average fretting currents in the range of 1 - 6 µA. Mixed groups showed evidence of fretting corrosion but they were not as severe as all SS316L group. SEM results showed evidence of severe corrosion attack in constructs having SS316L components. There also did not appear to be any galvanic effects of combining alloys together. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1169-1177, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  15. Sodium corrosion tests in the ML 1 circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1977-01-01

    In the ML-1 circuit of the 'Juan Vigon' research centre in Madrid, sodium corrosion tests are being carried out on the austenitic steels DIN 1.4970 (X10NiCrMoTiB1515) and DIN 1.4301 (X5CrNi189) at temperatures between 500 and 700 0 C. The exposure time of the samples amounts to 6,000 h by now. Every 1,000 h, the samples were weighed in order to measure corrosion and deposition effects. After 3,000 and 6,000 h, some selected samples were destroyed for inspection. The results are given. (GSC) [de

  16. Novel Galvanic Corrosion Inhibitors: Synthesis, Characterization, Fabrication and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-30

    Polyimide Insulated Electrical Wire", SAMPE pp.16, Jan/Feb 1984. 11. Brown, S. R.; Deluccia, J.J., " Galvanic Corrosion Fatigue Testing of 7075-T6...Modified Microporous Aluminosilicate" Development of Adsorbents for Air and Water Treatment Conference, 226th American Chemical Society (ACS) National

  17. A Technique for Dynamic Corrosion Testing in Supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewen, Eric P.; Davis, Cliff B.; Shropshire, David E.; Weaver, Kevan

    2004-01-01

    An experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted corrosion of potential fuel cladding and structural materials to be used on a fast reactor cooled by supercritical carbon dioxide has been designed. This experimental project is part of a larger research at the Department of Energy being lead by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to investigate the suitability of supercritical carbon dioxide for cooling a fast reactor designed to produce low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The INEEL once-through corrosion apparatus consists of two syringe pumps, a pre-heat furnace, a 1.3 meter long heated corrosion test section, and a gas measuring system. The gas flow rates, heat input, and operating pressure can be adjusted so that a controlled coolant flow rate, temperature, and oxygen potential are created within each of six test sections. The corrosion cell will test tubing that is commercially available in the U.S. and specialty coupons to temperatures up to 600 deg. C and a pressure of 20 MPa. The ATHENA computer code was used to estimate the fluid conditions in each of the six test sections during normal operation. (authors)

  18. Characterizing Corrosion Effects of Weak Organic Acids Using a Modified Bono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuqin; Turbini, Laura J.; Ramjattan, Deepchand; Christian, Bev; Pritzker, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To meet environmental requirements and achieve benefits of cost-effective manufacturing, no-clean fluxes (NCFs) or low-solids fluxes have become popular in present electronic manufacturing processes. Weak organic acids (WOAs) as the activation ingredients in NCFs play an important role, especially in the current lead-free and halogen-free soldering technology era. However, no standard or uniform method exists to characterize the corrosion effects of WOAs on actual metallic circuits of printed wiring boards (PWBs). Hence, the development of an effective quantitative test method for evaluating the corrosion effects of WOAs on the PWB's metallic circuits is imperative. In this paper, the modified Bono test, which was developed to quantitatively examine the corrosion properties of flux residues, is used to characterize the corrosion effects of five WOAs (i.e., abietic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and malic acid) on PWB metallic circuits. Experiments were performed under three temperature/humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH, 60°C/93% RH, and 40°C/93% RH) using two WOA solution concentrations. The different corrosion effects among the various WOAs were best reflected in the testing results at 40°C and 60°C. Optical microscopy was used to observe the morphology of the corroded copper tracks, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization was performed to determine the dendrite composition.

  19. Performance evaluation of corrosion probes in simulated WVNS tank 8D-2 waste: WVNS tank farm process support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    Five corrosion probes were received from West Valley Nuclear Services for evaluation in simulated tank 8D-2 3rd-stage sludge wash slurry. The same waste slurry simulated was also used in a series of ongoing corrosion studies assessing the effects of in-tank sludge washing on the integrity of tank 8D-2. Two of the corrosion probes were installed in the coupon corrosion test vessels operating at ∼150 degrees F to compare performance of the probes with that observed by coupon tests conducted in the same vessels. Corrosion rate data calculated from electrical resistance measurements of the corrosion probes were evaluated for this study using two slightly different approaches. One approach uses the total length of exposure of the probe to give a ''time-averaged'' value of the corrosion rate. The other approach uses a shorter period of time (relative to the length of the test) in the calculation of corrosion rate, and is referred to as the ''instantaneous'' rate. The interpretation of the probe data and the implications of corrosion rates calculated with either of these methods are discussed in this report

  20. Corrosion tests of 316L and Hastelloy C-22 in simulated tank waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Both the 316L stainless steel and Hastelloy C-22 gave satisfactory corrosion performance in the simulated test environments. They were subjected to 100 day weight loss corrosion tests and electrochemical potentiodynamic evaluation. This activity supports confirmation of the design basis for the materials of construction of process vessels and equipment used to handle the feed to the LAW-melter evaporator. BNFL process and mechanical engineering will use the information derived from this task to select material of construction for process vessels and equipment

  1. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys in Artificial Saliva and Mouthwash Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Casales-Diaz, M.; Salinas-Bravo, V. M.; Martinez-Gomez, L.

    2015-01-01

    Several austenitic stainless steels suitable for high temperature applications because of their high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties were investigated as biomaterials for dental use. The steels were evaluated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization curves, cyclic polarization curves, measurements of open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance. The performance of steels was evaluated in two types of environments: artificial saliva and mouthwash solution at 37°C for 48 hours. In order to compare the behavior of steels, titanium a material commonly used in dental applications was also tested in the same conditions. Results show that tested steels have characteristics that may make them attractive as biomaterials for dental applications. Contents of Cr, Ni, and other minor alloying elements (Mo, Ti, and Nb) determine the performance of stainless steels. In artificial saliva steels show a corrosion rate of the same order of magnitude as titanium and in mouthwash have greater corrosion resistance than titanium. PMID:26064083

  2. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  3. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  4. Preliminary Design of the Liquid Lead Corrosion Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chung Ho; Cha, Jae Eun; Cho, Choon Ho; Song, Tae Yung; Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2005-01-01

    Recently, Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) or Lead has newly attracted considerable attraction as a coolant to get the more inherent safety. Above all, LBE is preferred as the coolant and target material for an Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) due to its high production rate of neutrons, effective heat removal, and good radiation damage properties. But, the LBE or Lead as a coolant has a challenging problem that the LBE or Lead is more corrosive to the construction materials and fuel cladding material than the sodium because the solubility of Ni, Cr and Fe is high. After all, the LBE or Lead corrosion has been considered as an important design limit factor of ADS and Liquid Metal cooled Fast Reactors (LMFR). The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an ADS called HYPER. HYPER is designed to transmute Transuranics (TRU), Tc-99 and I-129 coming from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) and uses an LBE as a coolant and target material. Also, an experimental apparatuses for the compatibility of fuel cladding and structural material with the LBE or Lead are being under the construction or design. The main objective of the present paper is introduction of Lead corrosion test loop which will be built the upside of the LBE corrosion test loop by the end of October of 2005

  5. Synthesis of published and unpublished corrosion data from long term tests of fasteners embedded in wood : calculation of corrosion rates and the effect of corrosion on lateral joint strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2011-01-01

    In the past 5 years, several accelerated test methods have been developed to measure the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. It is desirable to contrast these accelerated results against those of long term exposure tests. While there have been several published long-term exposure tests performed on metals in treated wood, the data from these studies could not be...

  6. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility

  7. Assessment of high performance concrete containing fly ash and calcium nitrite based corrosion inhibitor as a mean to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes-García, P; Jiménez-Quero, V; López-Calvo, H

    2015-01-01

    This research analyses the effectiveness of the water-to-cement ratio (w/c), fly ash and a calcium nitrite based corrosion inhibitor to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in high performance concrete. The interactive effect between the inhibitor and fly ash was evaluated because the occurrence of a negative effect when both ingredients are added together in a concrete mixture has been reported. All the concrete mixtures studied in this investigation had 8.2% of silica fume. Twenty seven prismatic concrete specimens were fabricated with dimensions of 55 × 230 × 300 mm each containing two steel rods embedded for the purpose of corrosion monitoring. The specimens were exposed to a simulated marine environment with two daily cycles of wetting and drying for one year. To evaluate the deterioration of the specimens corrosion potentials and linear polarization resistance tests were carried out. The results indicate that the use of a low w/c, the addition of fly ash and the addition of the corrosion inhibitor contributed to the reduction of the corrosion of steel in the concrete specimens. The results further suggest that the combination of fly ash and corrosion inhibitor does not promote the deterioration of the concrete matrix

  8. Shadow corrosion testing in the INCA facility in the Studsvik R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.; Lassing, A.

    1999-01-01

    Shadow corrosion is a phenomenon which occurs when zirconium alloys are in contact with or in proximity to other metallic objects in a boiling water reactor environment (BWR, RBMK, SGHWR etc.). An enhanced corrosion occurs on the zirconium alloy with the appearance of a 'shadow' of the metallic object. The magnitude of the shadow corrosion can be significant, and is potentially limiting for the lifetime of certain zirconium alloy components in BWRs and other reactors with a similar water chemistry. In order to evaluate the suitability of the In-Core Autoclave (INCA) in the Studsvik R2 materials testing reactor as an experimental facility for studying shadow corrosion, a demonstration test has been performed. A number of test specimens consisting of Zircaloy-2 tubing in contact with Inconel were exposed in an oxidising water chemistry. Some of the specimens were placed within the reactor core and some above the core. The conclusion of this experiment after post irradiation examination is that it is possible to use the INCA facility in the Studsvik R2 reactor to develop a significant level of shadow corrosion after only 800 hours of irradiation. (author)

  9. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    Oxyfuel firing and subsequent capture of CO2 is a way to reduce CO2 emissions from coal‐fired boilers. Literature is summarized highlighting results which may contribute to understanding of the corrosion processes in an oxyfuel boiler.Tests were conducted in a 500 kWth oxyfuel test facility...... constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...... to nickel alloys were exposed at set metal temperatures of 570 and 630 °C for 287 h. The specimens were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and X‐ray diffraction.The deposit on the probe contained predominantly CaSO4 and Fe2O3. Oxide thickness and depth of the precipitated...

  10. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Corrosion inhibition performance of imidazolium ionic liquids and their influence on surface ferrous carbonate layer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongrui

    Corrosion inhibitors as effective anti-corrosion applications were widely studied and drawn much attention in both academe and industrial area. In this work, a systematic work, including inhibitors selection, anti-corrosion property and characterization, influence on scale formation, testing system design and so on, were reported. The corrosion inhibition performance of four imidazolium ionic liquids in carbon dioxide saturated NaCl solution was investigated by using electrochemical and surface analysis technologies. The four compounds are 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (a), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (b), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (c), 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (d). Under the testing conditions, compound d showed the highest inhibition efficiency and selected as the main object of further study. As a selected representative formula, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride was studied in detail about its corrosion inhibition performance on mild steel in carbon dioxide saturated NaCl brine at pH 3.8 and 6.8. Electrochemical and surface analysis techniques were used to characterize the specimen corrosion process during the immersion in the blank and inhibiting solutions. The precorrosion of specimen surface showed significant and different influences on the anti-corrosion property of DMICL at pH 3.8 and 6.8. The corrosion inhibition efficiency (IE) was calculated based on parameters obtained from electrochemical techniques; the achieved IE was higher than 98% at the 25th hour for the steel with a well-polished surface at pH 3.8. The fitting parameters obtained from electrochemical data helped to account for the interfacial changes. As proved in previous research, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride could be used as good corrosion inhibitors under certain conditions. However, under other conditions, such chemicals, as well as other species in oil transporting system, could be a factor influencing the evolution of protective surface

  12. The corrosion performance of microcrystalline titanium-modified 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, N.; Searson, P.C.; Latanision, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The corrosion performance of rapidly solidified (RS), consolidated RS and conventionally processed titanium-modified nuclear grade 316 stainless steel was studied. As-solidified RS foils exhibited general corrosion behavior identical to that of the conventionally processed alloy, but inferior pitting resistance, due to the presence of dendritic microsegregation. The consolidated RS alloy exhibited inferior general and pitting corrosion performance due to the detrimental effect of the prior foil boundary formed during the consolidation process. The results of immersion tests in 6% FeC1 3 .6H 2 O solution showed that pit initiation occured primarily at the prior foil boundaries in the consolidated RS alloy. Studies of sensitization were inconclusive due to preferential attack on prior foil boundaries in the consolidated RS specimens which made the determination of the degree of sensitization difficult. (author)

  13. Laboratory testing of waste glass aqueous corrosion; effects of experimental parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey has been performed to assess the effects of the temperature, glass surface area/leachate volume ratio, leachant composition, leachant flow rate, and glass composition (actual radioactive vs. simulated glass) used in laboratory tests on the measured glass reaction rate. The effects of these parameters must be accounted for in mechanistic models used to project glass durability over long times. Test parameters can also be utilized to highlight particular processes in laboratory tests. Waste glass corrosion results as water diffusion, ion-exchange, and hydrolysis reactions occur simultaneously to devitrify the glass and release soluble glass components into solution. The rates of these processes are interrelated by the affects of the solution chemistry and glass alteration phases on each process, and the dominant (fastest) process may change as the reaction progresses. Transport of components from the release sites into solution may also affect the observed corrosion rate. The reaction temperature will affect the rate of each process, while other parameters will affect the solution chemistry and which processes are observed during the test. The early stages of corrosion will be observed under test conditions which maintain dilute leachates and the later stages will be observed under conditions that generate more concentrated leachate solutions. Typically, water diffusion and ion-exchange reactions dominate the observed glass corrosion in dilute solutions while hydrolysis reactions dominant in more concentrated solutions. Which process(es) controls the long-term glass corrosion is not fully understood, and the long-term corrosion rate may be either transport- or reaction-limited

  14. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-01-01

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The 99 Tc, 129 I, 137 Cs, 97 Mo, and 90 Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the 99 Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup

  15. A comparative study of accelerated tests to simulate atmospheric corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Sergio Luiz de

    2000-01-01

    In this study, specimens coated with five organic coating systems were exposed to accelerated tests for periods up to 2000 hours, and also to weathering for two years and six months. The accelerated tests consisted of the salt spray test, according to ASTM B-117; Prohesion (ASTM G 85-98 annex 5A); Prohesion combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation; 'Prohchuva' a test described by ASTM G 85-98 using a salt spray with composition that simulated the acid rain of Sao Paulo, but one thousand times more concentrated, and 'Prohchuva' combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. The coated specimens were exposed with and without incision to expose the substrate. The onset and progress of corrosion at and of the exposed metallic surface, besides coating degradation, were followed by visual observation, and photographs were taken. The coating systems were classified according to the extent of corrosion protection given to the substrate, using a method based on ASTM standards D-610, D-714, D-1654 and D-3359. The rankings of the coatings obtained from accelerated tests and weathering were compared and contrasted with classification of the same systems obtained from literature, for specimens exposed to an industrial atmosphere. Coating degradation was strongly dependent on the test, and could be attributed to differences in test conditions. The best correlation between accelerated test and weathering was found for the test Prohesion alternated with cycles of exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. (author)

  16. Moessbauer Characterization of Rust Obtained in an Accelerated Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K. E.; Morales, A. L.; Arroyave, C. E.; Barrero, C. A.; Cook, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed drying-humectation cyclical processes (CEBELCOR) on eight A36 low carbon steel coupons in NaCl solutions containing 1x10 -2 M and 1x10 -1 M concentrations. The main purpose of these experiments is to contribute to the understanding of the conditions for akaganeite formation. Additionally, and with the idea to perform a complete characterization of the rust, this work also considers the formation of other iron oxide phases. The corrosion products were characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Gravimetric analysis demonstrates that the coupons presented high corrosion rates. Magnetite/maghemite was common in the rust stuck to the steel surface, whereas akaganeite was present only in traces. In the rust collected from the solutions, i.e., the rust that goes away from the metal surface easily, a magnetite/maghemite was not present and akaganeite showed up in larger quantities. These results support the idea that high concentrations of Cl - ions are required for the akaganeite formation. We concluded that akaganeite is not easily bonded to the rust layer; this may lead to the formation of a less protective rust layer and to higher corrosion rates.

  17. Accelerated SCC Testing of Stainless Steels According to Corrosion Resistance Classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchert, M.; Mori, G. [General Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Bischof, M.; Tomandl, A. [Hilti Corporation, Liechtenstein (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    The German Guidelines for stainless steel in buildings (Z.30.3-6) issued by the German Institute for Building Technology (DIBt) categorize various stainless steel grades into five corrosion resistance classes (CRCs). Only 21 frequently used grades are approved and assigned to these CRCs. To assign new or less commonly used materials, a large program of outdoor exposure tests and laboratory tests is required. The present paper shows the results of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests that can distinguish between different CRCs. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were performed in various media and at different temperatures. CRC IV could be distinguished from CRC II and CRC III with a 31.3 % Cl{sup -} as MgCl{sub 2} solution at 140 .deg. C. CRC II and CRC III could be differentiated by testing in a 30% Cl{sup -} as MgCl{sub 2} solution at 100 .deg. C.

  18. Parametric tests of the effects of water chemistry impurities on corrosion of Zr-alloys under simulated BWR condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, S; Ito, K [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Lin, C C [GE Nucklear Energy (United States); Cheng, B [Electric Power Research Inst. (United States); Ikeda, T [Toshiba Corp. (Japan); Oguma, M [Hitachi, Ltd (Japan); Takei, T [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Vitanza, C; Karlsen, T M [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Halden (Norway). OECD Halden Reaktor Projekt

    1997-02-01

    The Halden BWR corrosion test loop was constructed to evaluate the impact of water chemistry variables, heat flux and boiling condition on corrosion performance of Zr-alloys in a simulated BWR environment. The loop consists of two in-core rigs, one for testing fuel rod segments and the other for evaluating water chemistry variables utilizing four miniautoclaves. Ten coupon specimens are enclosed in each miniautoclave. The Zr-alloys for the test include Zircaloy-2 having different nodular corrosion resistance and five new alloys. The first and second of the six irradiation tests planned in this program were completed. Post-irradiation examination of those test specimens have shown that the test loop is capable of producing nodular corrosion on the fuel rod cladding tested under the reference chemistry condition. The miniautoclave tests showed that nodular corrosion could be formed without flux and boiling under some water chemistry conditions and the new alloys, generally, had higher corrosion resistance than the Zircaloy in high oxygen environments. (author). 5 refs, 4 figs, 5 tabs.

  19. A Technique for Dynamic Corrosion Testing in Liquid Lead Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewen, Eric Paul; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2001-04-01

    An experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials to be used in liquid lead alloy cooled reactors has been designed. This experimental project is part of a larger research effort between Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology to investigate the suitability of lead, lead-bismuth, and other lead alloys for cooling fast reactors designed to produce low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The INEEL forced convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The gas flow rates, heat input, and shroud and vessel dimensions have been adjusted so that a controlled coolant flow rate, temperature, and oxygen potential are created within the downcomer located between the shroud and vessel wall. The ATHENA computer code was used to design the experimental apparatus and estimate the fluid conditions. The corrosion cell will test steel that is commercially available in the U. S. to temperatures above 650oC.

  20. Weld region corrosion during chemical cleaning of PWR [pressurized-water reactor] steam generators: Volume 2, Tests and analyses: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, J.L.; Bozeka, S.A.; Jevec, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The potential for preferential corrosion of steam generator weld regions during chemical cleaning using the generic SGOG solvents was investigated. The investigations included development and use of a corrosion assessment test facility which measured corrosion currents in a realistic model of the steam generator geometry in the vicinity of a specific weld during a simulated chemical dissolution of sludge consisting of essentially pure magnetite. A corrosion monitoring technique was developed and qualified. In this technique free corrosion rates measured by linear polarization techniques are added to corrosion rates calculated from galvanic current measured using a zero resistance ammeter to give an estimate of total corrosion rate for a galvanically corroding material. An analytic modeling technique was developed and proved useful in determining the size requirements for the weld region mockup used in the corrosion assessment test facility. The technique predicted galvanic corrosion rates consistent with that observed in a corrosion assessement test when polarization data used as model input were obtained on-line during the test. The test results obtained during this investigation indicated that chemical cleaning using the SGOG magnetite dissolution solvent can be performed with a small amount of corrosion of secondary side internals and pressure boundary welds. The maximum weld region corrosion measured during a typical chemical cleaning cycle to remove essentially pure magnetite sludge was about 8 mils. However, additional site specific weld region corrosion assessment testing and qualification will be required prior to chemical cleaning steam generators at a specific plant. Recommendations for site specific qualification of chemical cleaning processes and for use of process monitors and on-line corrosion instrumentation are included in this report

  1. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development

  2. Screening of soil corrosivity by field testing: Results and design of an electrochemical soil corrosion probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars vendelbo; Bruun, Niels Kåre

    1996-01-01

    The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed...... on the plates during exposure. An electrochemical soil corrosion probe has been designed and manufactured allowing for simultaneous measurements of several qauntities to predict corrosion. The probe consists of individual sections capable of measuring redox-potential, corrosion potential, soil resistivity...

  3. Performance of epoxy-nanocomposite under corrosive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite materials consisting of polymeric matrix materials and natural or synthetic layered minerals like clay are currently an expanding field of study because these new materials often exhibit a wide range of improved properties over their unmodified starting polymers. Epoxy/organoclay nanocomposites have been prepared by intercalating epoxy into the organoclay via direct mixing process. The clay exfoliation was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Water diffusion and sulfuric acid corrosion resistance of epoxy-based nanocomposites were evaluated. Diffusion was studied through epoxy samples containing up to 6 phr (parts per hundred resin of an organically treated montmorillonite. The diffusion of the environmental solution was measured by noting the increase in weight of the samples as a function of immersion time in these solutions at 80°C. The effect of the degree of exfoliation of the organoclay on water barrier and corrosion resistance was specifically studied. The data have been compared to those obtained from the neat epoxy resin to evaluate the diffusion properties of the nanocomposites. The flexural strength of the epoxy/organoclay nanocomposites samples made was examined to compare their mechanical performance under corrosive conditions as a function of immersion time and temperature. It was found, that the organoclay was mainly intercalated with some exfoliation and that addition of the organoclay yields better flexural strength retention under immersion into sulfuric acid.

  4. Development of corrosion testing equipment under heat transfer and irradiation conditions to evaluate corrosion resistance of materials used in acid recovery evaporator. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Numata, Masami; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    We have been evaluated the safety for corrosion of various metals applied to acid recovery evaporators by the mock-up tests using small scaled equipment and the reference tests in laboratories with small specimens. These tests have been conducted under-radioactive environment. The environment in practical reprocessing plants has many radioactive species. Therefore, the effect of irradiation on corrosion should be evaluated in detail. In this study, we have developed the corrosion testing equipment, which is employed to simulate environments in the acid recovery evaporators. This report describes the specification of corrosion testing equipment and the results of primary, reference and hot tests. Using the equipment, the corrosion test under heat transfer and irradiation conditions have been carried out for 930 hours in safety. It is expectable that useful corrosion test data in radioactive environment are accumulated with this equipment in future, and help the adequate choice of corrosion test condition in laboratories. (author)

  5. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  6. Nondestructive testing diagnosis for corrosion and welding by means of hydrostatic test and gamma ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Alex E.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Nery, Marcelo S.; Barbosa, Jose Maria A.; Rolim, Tiago L.; Melo, Silvio B.; Lima, Emerson A.O.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnoses of light and severe corrosion process in steel tubes are carried out and results are presented. The material discontinuity in metallic pieces was investigated and signals from gamma source detection shown defect present or no defect present. Samples taken from street illumination posts were placed in computerized gamma ray scan to investigate corrosion effect. Scanning at three angles 0 deg, 60 deg and 120 deg degrees with five repetitions provide data set sufficient to a statistical analysis. Samples taken from small diameter steel tubes with light corrosion were analyzed too. Comparing corrosion-free samples detection of transmission gamma ray shows that along with diameter reduction a random density distribution takes place with severe corrosive process. The asymmetry induced in sample density provided to be effective for diagnosis of light corrosion by means of straight-line slope obtained in gamma profile. Structural integrity of steel pipes affected by welding process and defect propagation due to Hydrostatic Testing - HT was simulated by numerical finite element method and data comparison with experimental gamma tomography was carried out. Samples of pipes with preexisting defect on the welding region were submitted to hydrostatic tests over working pressure and a correlation between defect degree and structural resistance was evaluated. (author)

  7. Influence of hydroxyapatite coating thickness and powder particle size on corrosion performance of MA8M magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonmez, S. [Hakkari University, Dept. of Biomedical Eng., 30000 Hakkari (Turkey); Aksakal, B., E-mail: baksakal@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Chemical Metallurgy Faculty, Dept. of Metall and Mater Eng., Istanbul (Turkey); Dikici, B. [Yuzuncu Yil University, Dept. of Mechanical Eng., 65080 Van (Turkey)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is the primary concern in biomedical applications. Micron and nano-scale hydroxyapatite (HA) was coated successfully on MA8M magnesium alloy substrates by using a sol–gel deposition. In this study, the effects of coating thicknesses and HA powder particle sizes on the adhesion strength and corrosion behavior were investigated. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in a Ringer solution. The coatings before and after corrosion tests were characterized by adhesion tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The micro-scale-HA coated Mg substrates were more corrosion resistant than the nano-scale-HA coatings. The anodic activity of the micro-scale-HA coatings increased with increased coating thickness and the corrosion resistance of Mg substrates decreased. Corrosion susceptibilities of the nano-scale-HA coated samples were affected inversely. The coated film provided good barrier characteristics and achieved good corrosion protection for Mg substrates when compared to substrates without coatings. For micro-scale-HA coatings, anodic and cathodic activities were more intense for thicker films. When HA coatings are compared to nano-scale HA coatings, the micro-scale-HA coatings produced better current density values. Overall, as shown in Fig. 1, the best corrosion behavior of the Mg alloys was achieved using micro-scale HA powders at 30 μm coating thickness. - Highlights: • Nano and micro-scale-HA coatings provided good anti-corrosion performance compared to the uncoated ones. • The micro-scale-HA coated Mg substrates were more corrosion resistant than the nano-scale-HA coatings. • The best corrosion behavior was achieved for the micro-scale HA powders at 30 μm coating thickness. • Anodic activity decrease and cathodic activity increase with increasing film thickness. - Abstract: To improve the corrosion resistance of MA8M magnesium alloy, sol

  8. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood: Gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Samuel L., E-mail: szelinka@fs.fed.u [USDA Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sichel, Rebecca J. [College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Stone, Donald S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The composition of the corrosion products was similar for the nail head and shank. {yields} Reduced copper was not detected on any of the fasteners. {yields} Measured corrosion rates were between 1 and 35 {mu}m year{sup -1}. - Abstract: Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27 {sup o}C at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The corrosion rate was determined gravimetrically and the corrosion products were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Although the accepted mechanism of corrosion in treated wood involves the reduction of cupric ions from the wood preservative, no reduced copper was found on the corrosion surfaces. The galvanized corrosion products contained sulfates, whereas the steel corrosion products consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. The possible implications and limitations of this research on fasteners used in building applications are discussed.

  9. Corrosion in nuclear systems. 4. Comparison of the PWR Cladding Corrosion Models for Test IFA-638.1-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Deog; Bae, Seong-Man; Lee, Chang-Sup

    2001-01-01

    The cladding corrosion test (IFA-638) is being performed to investigate the corrosion properties of different modern PWR cladding materials. The experimental results are evaluated by the corrosion models EPRI/KWU/CE, ESCORE, NEPLC, and COCHISE. When comparing the measured and the predicted oxide thickness, the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. Considering the fresh material parts (lower parts) of each rod, the oxide thickness calculations of all models under-predicted the measured values by up to 50% after 118 days of exposure. The NEPLC model, however, showed good agreement for 263 days of exposure, while the COCHISE and EPRI/KWU/CE-ESCORE models over-predicted (about +50%) and under-predicted (about -42%), respectively. 2. The oxide layer thickness on the pre-irradiated parts (upper parts) of each rod is well predicted by the COCHISE model after 118 days of exposure, but the other models over-predicted the thickness. All the models over-predicted the oxide thickness after 263 days of exposure, and the divergency between the measured and calculated oxide thickness became larger. 3. The differences in the calculated oxide thickness between the models at low burnup (fresh parts) are attributed to the different transition point determinations of the models. 4. Comparing the measurements with the calculations from the pre-irradiated parts of each rod, the overall over-prediction could be accounted for by the fact that the post-transition regime of all four models was calibrated for standard Zircaloy-4 materials. The differences between the models were attributed to empirical variables such as the frequency factor (k 2 , B) and the activation energy (Q 2 ) in Tables I, II, and III, which were calibrated with other experimental/plant data. (authors)

  10. Standard test method for measuring pH of soil for use in corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the pH of a soil in corrosion testing. The principle use of the test is to supplement soil resistivity measurements and thereby identify conditions under which the corrosion of metals in soil may be accentuated (see G 57 - 78 (1984)). 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Evaluations of corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe Substrates Using an Electrolytic Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaebong; Kim, Kyungwook; Park, Minwoo; Song, Taejun; Lee, Chaeseung; Lee, Euijong; Kim, Sangyeol

    2013-01-01

    An Eectrolytic Corrosion(EC) test method was evaluated by the comparison with Copper Accelerated Acetic Salt Spray(CASS) and Neutral Salt Spray(SS) tests. Those methods were applied in order to evaluate corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe substrates. The correlations between results obtained by different test methods were investigated. Results showed that the electrochemical method such as the EC test method was superior to the conventional methods such as CASS and SS, in terms of the quantitative accuracy and the test-time span. Furthermore, the EC test method provided the useful means to estimate the initiation of corrosion of each layer by monitoring the rest potentials of the coated layers such as Ni, Cr, and Zn on Fe substrate. With regard to test time spans, the EC test provided the 78 times and 182 times faster results than the CASS test in cases of Fe + 5μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr and Fe + 20 μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr respectively, while the EC test was 85 times faster results than the Salt Spray test in the case of Fe + 20 g/m 2 Zn. Therefore, the EC test can be the better method to evaluate the resistance to corrosion of coated layers than the conventional methods such as the SS test and the CASS

  12. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reclaru, L., E-mail: lucien.reclaru@pxgroup.com [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Brooks, R.A. [Orthopaedic Research, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Box 180 Hills Road, CB2 0QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zuberbühler, M. [Smith and Nephew Orthopaedics AG, Schachenalle 29, 5001 Aarau (Switzerland); Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F. [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Tomoaia, G. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hateganu of Cluj-Napoca, Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion.

  13. Improving corrosion resistance of post-tensioned substructures emphasizing high performance grouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schokker, Andrea Jeanne

    The use of post-tensioning in bridges can provide durability and structural benefits to the system while expediting the construction process. When post-tensioning is combined with precast elements, traffic interference can be greatly reduced through rapid construction. Post-tensioned concrete substructure elements such as bridge piers, hammerhead bents, and straddle bents have become more prevalent in recent years. Chloride induced corrosion of steel in concrete is one of the most costly forms of corrosion each year. Coastal substructure elements are exposed to seawater by immersion or spray, and inland bridges may also be at risk due to the application of deicing salts. Corrosion protection of the post-tensioning system is vital to the integrity of the structure because loss of post-tensioning can result in catastrophic failure. Documentation for durability design of the grout, ducts, and anchorage systems is very limited. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of corrosion protection measures for post-tensioned concrete substructures by designing and testing specimens representative of typical substructure elements using state-of-the-art practices in aggressive chloride exposure environments. This was accomplished through exposure testing of twenty-seven large-scale beam specimens and ten large-scale column specimens. High performance grout for post-tensioning tendon injection was also developed through a series of fresh property tests, accelerated exposure tests, and a large-scale pumping test to simulate field conditions. A high performance fly ash grout was developed for applications with small vertical rises, and a high performance anti-bleed grout was developed for applications involving large vertical rises such as tall bridge piers. Long-term exposure testing of the beam and column specimens is ongoing, but preliminary findings indicate increased corrosion protection with increasing levels of post-tensioning, although traditional

  14. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data: Implications on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Steel-reinforced concrete; probability distribution functions; corrosion ... to be present in the corrosive system at a suitable concentration (Holoway et al 2004; Söylev & ..... voltage, equivalent to voltage drop, across a resistor divided by the ...

  15. System for stress corrosion conditions tests on PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Andre Cesar de Jesus

    2007-01-01

    The study of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) involves the consideration and evaluation of the inherent compatibility between a material and the environment under conditions of either applied or residual stress. EAC is a critical problem because equipment, components and structure are subject to the influence of mechanical stress, water environment of different composition, temperature and different material history. Testing for resistance to EAC is one of the most effective ways to determine the interrelationships among this variables on the process of EAC. Up to now, several experimental techniques have been developed worldwide, which address different aspects of environmental caused damage. Constant loading of CT specimens test is a typical example of test, which is used for the estimation of parameters of stress corrosion cracking. To assess the initiation stages and kinetics of crack growth, the testing facility should allow active loading of specimens in the environment that is close to the actual operation conditions of assessed component. This paper presents a testing facility for stress corrosion cracking to be installed at CDTN, which was designed and developed at CDTN. The facility is used to carry out constant load tests under simulated PWR environment, where temperature, water pressure and chemistry are controlled, which are considered the most important factors in SCC. Also, the equipment operational conditions, its applications, and restrictions are presented. The system was developed to operate at temperature until 380 degree C and pressure until 180 bar. It consists in a autoclave stuck at a mechanical system, responsible of producing load , a water treatment station, and a data acquisition system. This testing facility allows the evaluation of cracking progress, especially at PWR reactor. (author) operational conditions. (author)

  16. Standard practice for conducting atmospheric corrosion tests on metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and defines conditions for exposure of metals and alloys to the weather. It sets forth the general procedures that should be followed in any atmospheric test. It is presented as an aid in conducting atmospheric corrosion tests so that some of the pitfalls of such testing may be avoided. As such, it is concerned mainly with panel exposures to obtain data for comparison purposes. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. The Corrosion of High Performance Steel in Adverse Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Desmond C.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion products that have formed on weathering steel bridges exposed to different weather conditions in the United States have been evaluated. They have been analyzed by spectroscopic techniques to determine the relationship between protective and non-protective rust coatings, and their relationship to the exposure conditions. Bridges constructed recently using High Performance Steel, as well as older bridges built with Type A588B weathering steel, were evaluated for corrosion performance of the rust coatings. In locations where the steel is subjected to regular wet-dry cycling, where the surface is wet for less than about 20% of the time, a protective patina starts to form after a few months exposure, and continues to an adherent, impervious coating after a decade. The protective patina is characterized by the formation of only goethite and lepidocrocite. The goethite makes up about 80% of the rust, and itself consists of a nanophase component, 40%, or infrequent drying cycles (regions close to waterways, fog or having high humidity), the weathering steel forms a rust coating that consists of a large amount of maghemite, and goethite that contains very little of the nanophase component. The rust coating ex-foliates from the steel and is not protective. Under exposure conditions in which chlorides are deposited onto the weathering steel surface (marine or de-icing salt locations), the protective patina also does not form. Instead, the rust coating consists of a large fraction of akaganeite that forms at the expense of the lepidocrocite and nanophase goethite. The bridges exposed to high chloride concentrations, 1.5 wt%, and therefore having no protective patina, have corrosion rates measured to be 6 times larger than expected for weathering steel with the protective patina

  18. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  19. Seawater corrosion tests for low-level radioactive waste drum containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Sho; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1985-11-01

    This report is a part of corrosion tests of drums under various environmental conditions (seawater, river water, coastal sand, inland soil and indoor and outdoor atmosphere) done at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency. The corrosion tests were started in November, 1977 and complated at March, 1984. This report describes the results of the seawater corrosion tests which are part of the final report, ''Corrosion Safety Demonstration Test'' (Japanese), and it is expected to contribute the safety assessment of sea dumping of low-level radioactive waste packages. (author)

  20. Evaluation of corrosive behavior of SAE 5155 by corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening and corrosive condition for corrosion property was investigated on immersed in 3.5% NaCl, 10% HNO 3 + 3% HF, 6% FeCl 3 . The immersion test was performed on two kinds of specimen. The immersion periods was performed 30days. Corrosion potential, weight loss were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  2. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  3. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-16

    Test Facility, and Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of {approx}550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at {approx}1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable

  4. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and

  5. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings was exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy are being exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after approximately 4,400 hours of exposure.

  6. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  7. Effects of laser remelting on microstructures and immersion corrosion performance of arc sprayed Al coating in 3.5% NaCl solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ze; Zhang, Donghui; Yan, Baoxu; Kong, Dejun

    2018-02-01

    An arc sprayed aluminum (Al) coating on S355 steel was processed using a laser remelting (LR). The microstructures, chemical element composition, and phases of the obtained Al coating were analyzed using a field mission scanning electronic microscope (FESEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), respectively, and the residual stresses were measured using an X-ray diffraction stress tester. The immersion corrosion tests and potentiodynamic polarization of Al coating in 3.5% NaCl solution were performed to investigate the effects of LR on its immersion corrosion behaviors, and the corrosion mechanism of Al coating was also discussed. The results show that the arc sprayed Al coating is composed of Al phase, while that by LR is composed of Al-Fe and AlO4FeO6 phases, and the porosities and cracks in the arc sprayed Al coating are eliminated by LR, The residual stress of arc sprayed Al coating is -5.6 ± 18 MPa, while that after LR is 137.9 ± 12 MPa, which deduces the immersion corrosion resistance of Al coating. The corrosion mechanism of arc sprayed Al coating is pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion, while that by LR is uniform corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion potential of arc sprayed Al coating by LR shifts positively, which improves its immersion corrosion resistance.

  8. Dresden 1 Radiation Level Reduction Program. Intergranular corrosion tests of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel in Dow NS-1, and stress corrosion cracking tests of Type-304 stainless steel and carbon and low alloy steels in Dow copper rinse solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1978-09-01

    Corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the extent of intergranular attack on sensitized Type-304 stainless steel by a proprietary Dow Chemical solvent, NS-1, which is to be used in the chemical cleaning of the Dresden 1 primary system. In addition, tests were performed to evaluate stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel and post-weld heat-treated ASTM A336-F1, A302-B, and A106-B carbon and low alloy steels in a solution to be used to remove residual metallic copper from the Dresden 1 primary system surfaces following the chemical cleaning. No evidence of deleterious corrosion was observed in either set of tests

  9. Concrete and corrosion monitoring during the 2nd supercontainer half-scale test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areias, L.; Troullinous, I.; Verstricht, J.; Iliopoulos, S.; Pyl, L.; Voet, E.; Van Ingelgem, Y.; Kursten, B.; Craeye, B.; Coppens, E.; Van Marcke, P.

    2015-01-01

    The Super-container (SC) is a reference design concept for the packaging of spent fuel (SF) and vitrified high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The SC conceptual design is based on a multiple barrier system consisting of an outer stainless steel envelope, a concrete buffer and a water-tight carbon steel overpack containing one or more waste canisters. The experimental test described in this paper uses a so called 'half-scale' model of the SC. A metal container containing an electrical heat source is used to simulate the heat-emitting waste of a real overpack. A total of 182 sensors have been installed to monitor the half-scale model. The majority of the sensors are embedded in the concrete materials, while a limited number of them are installed around the outside of the structure to measure the ambient temperature, relative humidity and air velocity. The instrumentation included the use of fibre optics to measure both distributed as well as semi-distributed temperature and strain in the three orthogonal directions, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and Acoustic Emission (AE) to monitor microcrack initiation and evolution, and a new PermaZEN corrosion sensor to measure the active corrosion of the carbon steel overpack. The combined results of DIC and AE monitoring have enabled the detection and measurement of surface movement, captured the onset of micro crack formation and its propagation, and measured the displacement and strain fields at different levels across the height of the half-scale test as a function of time. In particular, the DIC measurements clearly identified the appearance of the first micro cracks formed on the concrete surface of the buffer with a crack width resolution of approximately 13 microns. The results of a laboratory test performed with the corrosion sensor show a rapid onset of corrosion at the beginning of the test followed by an equally rapid decrease in corrosion after only a few days of testing. The measured corrosion rates

  10. Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by Coatings With Advanced Properties and Enhanced Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bierwagen, Gordon; Croll, Stuart; Webster, Dean; Tallman, Dennis; Huo, Qun; Allahar, Brian; Su, Quan; Bonitz, Verena; Fernando, Dilhan; Wang, Duhua

    2007-01-01

    The report presents research that addresses research performed at NDSU for environmentally compliant corrosion protection in coatings systems of greatly extended lifetimes for present and future aircraft...

  11. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  12. Corrosion testing of a degraded moderator: L-Area Tuff Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    Based on test results, storage of the degraded moderator in 55-gallon 304L drums (0.065 inches thick) would not cause failure by general corrosion for up to 5 plus years storage. Acidic degraded moderator was temporarily stored in Tuff Tanks located in L-area. The moderator characteristics included a D 2 O content of 5.02--5.33%, a pH of 1.25--1.31, a conductivity of 29,300--31,200 m mhos/cm, tritium activity of 114--141 m Ci/mL, and levels of approximately 6,000 ppm for chloride and 500 ppm for chromium. The compatibility of the degraded with AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) was investigated in this study. Following ASTM standard practice, coupon immersion tests were conducted in both treated and untreated moderator. Treatment included the addition of either a 40 wt % NaOH solution, distilled water to serially dilute the chloride, or concentrated nitric acid to increase the nitrate concentration. Type 304L stainless steel exposed to the Tuff Tank moderator was found from these tests to: have a general corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year (mpy) for 304L plate, which bounds that of the 304L storage drum, passivate at chloride concentrations up to 5,000 ppm for 304L sheet, resist corrosion for nitrate/chloride ratios ranging from 0.1 to 1,000, and be susceptible to crevice corrosion. Based on these test results, storage of the degraded moderator in 55-gallon 304L drums (0.065 inch thick) would not cause failure by general corrosion for up to 5+ years storage. The chloride concentration, [Cl], in the degraded moderator has been measured up to 6000 ppm. The potential or risk for aggressive localized attack of 304L increases with [Cl] concentration. A qualitative range is as follows: [Cl minus ] minus ] minus ] < 600 ppm, reasonable resistance, medium risk. The degraded moderator should be treated to reduce the chloride concentration to reduce the potential for localized corrosion and the risk for a leakage failure of the drum. A good practice would be to

  13. Seismic load resistance of reinforcing steels in the as delivered condition and after corrosion - relevant material characteristics for performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moersch, Ing. Joerg [Max Aicher Engineering GmbH, Freilassing (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    This type of accelerated corrosion test was used to study the high number of test samples in due time. The corrosion phenomena obtained in salt spray testing deviate significantly from corrosion phenomena (pitting factor) obtained in practical conditions. Salt spray testing represents practical conditions for the more uniform corrosion as a result of a severe carbonation of the concrete and/or for higher chloride contents at the surface of the rebar. At low corrosion current densities the effect of pit depth on residual mechanical performance might be underestimated. Reinforced concrete (r.c.) buildings in seismic areas shall be designed to guarantee enough ductile resources as for example a sufficient rotational capacity to allow for load re-distribution. The rotational capacity is directly dependent on the ductility of the reinforcing steel which is generally expressed as elongation at maximum load (A+g{sub t}) and the hardening ratio (R{sub m}/R{sub e}). A direct testing of the seismic load resistance of reinforcing steels is not part of the construction product standards. Therefore it was decided by European Commission to introduce this performance requirement in the mandate for the revision of EN 10080:2005. In parallel to the standardization process a research project was carried out to deliver the scientific background.

  14. Test Production of Anti-Corrosive Paint in Laboratory Scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thein Thein Win, Daw; Khin Aye Tint, Daw; Wai Min Than, Daw

    2003-02-01

    The main purpose of this project is to produce the anti-corrosive paint in laboratory scale. In these experiments, local raw materials, natural resin (shellac), pine oil, turpentine and ethyl alcohol wer applied basically. Laboratory trials were undrtaken to determine the suitablity of raw materials ane their composition for anti-corrosive paint manufacture.The results obtained show that the anti-corrosive paint from experiment No.(30) is suitable for steel plate and this is also considered commercially economics

  15. Performance of RC columns with partial length corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaohui; Liang Fayun

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies on the load capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) columns with partial length corrosion are presented, where only a fraction of the column length was corroded. Twelve simply supported columns were eccentrically loaded. The primary variables were partial length corrosion in tensile or compressive zone and the corrosion level within this length. The failure of the corroded column occurs in the partial length, mainly developed from or located nearby or merged with the longitudinal corrosion cracks. For RC column with large eccentricity, load capacity of the column is mainly influenced by the partial length corrosion in tensile zone; while for RC column with small eccentricity, load capacity of the column greatly decreases due to the partial length corrosion in compressive zone. The destruction of the longitudinally mechanical integrality of the column in the partial length leads to this great reduction of the load capacity of the RC column

  16. An acceleration test for stress corrosion cracking using humped specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Fukumura, Takuya; Totsuka, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    By using the humped specimen, which is processed by the humped die, in the slow strain rate technique (SSRT) test, fracture facet due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can be observed in relatively short duration. Although the cold work and concentrated stress and strain caused by the characteristic shape of the specimen accelerate the SCC, to date these acceleration effects have not been examined quantitatively. In the present study, the acceleration effects of the humped specimen were examined through experiments and finite element analyses (FEA). The experiments investigated the SCC of alloy 600 in the primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor. SSRT tests were conducted using two kinds of humped specimen: one was annealed after hump processing in order to eliminate the cold work, and the other was hump processed after the annealing treatment. The work ratio caused by the hump processing and stress/strain conditions during SSRT test were evaluated by FEA. It was found that maximum work ratio of 30% is introduced by the hump processing and that the distribution of the work ratio is not uniform. Furthermore, the work ratio is influenced by the friction between the specimen and dies as well as by the shape of dies. It was revealed that not only the cold work but also the concentrated stress and strain during SSRT test accelerate the crack initiation and growth of the SCC. (author)

  17. Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Do Kyun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR, Common Structural Rules (CSR, and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS, and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM. To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures

  18. Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Kyun Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR, Common Structural Rules (CSR, and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS, and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM. To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures.

  19. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  20. Current practices in corrosion, surface characterization, and nickel leach testing of cardiovascular metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Di Prima, Matthew; Saylor, David; Takai, Erica

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to better understand current test practices and improve nonclinical testing of cardiovascular metallic implants, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) held a public workshop on Cardiovascular Metallic Implants: corrosion, surface characterization, and nickel leaching. The following topics were discussed: (1) methods used for corrosion assessments, surface characterization techniques, and nickel leach testing of metallic cardiovascular implant devices, (2) the limitations of each of these in vitro tests in predicting in vivo performance, (3) the need, utility, and circumstances when each test should be considered, and (4) the potential testing paradigms, including acceptance criteria for each test. In addition to the above topics, best practices for these various tests were discussed, and knowledge gaps were identified. Prior to the workshop, discussants had the option to provide feedback and information on issues relating to each of the topics via a voluntary preworkshop assignment. During the workshop, the pooled responses were presented and a panel of experts discussed the results. This article summarizes the proceedings of this workshop and background information provided by workshop participants. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1330-1341, 2017. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  2. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  3. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  4. The Many Faces of Graphene as Protection Barrier. Performance under Microbial Corrosion and Ni Allergy Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Dana; del Campo, Valeria; Henrique Rodrigues da Cunha, Thiago; Henríquez, Ricardo; Garín, Carolina; Ramírez, Cristian; Flores, Marcos; Seeger, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present a study on the performance of CVD (chemical vapor deposition) graphene coatings grown and transferred on Ni as protection barriers under two scenarios that lead to unwanted metal ion release, microbial corrosion and allergy test conditions. These phenomena have a strong impact in different fields considering nickel (or its alloys) is one of the most widely used metals in industrial and consumer products. Microbial corrosion costs represent fractions of national gross product in different developed countries, whereas Ni allergy is one of the most prevalent allergic conditions in the western world, affecting around 10% of the population. We found that grown graphene coatings act as a protective membrane in biological environments that decreases microbial corrosion of Ni and reduces release of Ni2+ ions (source of Ni allergic contact hypersensitivity) when in contact with sweat. This performance seems not to be connected to the strong orbital hybridization that Ni and graphene interface present, indicating electron transfer might not be playing a main role in the robust response of this nanostructured system. The observed protection from biological environment can be understood in terms of graphene impermeability to transfer Ni2+ ions, which is enhanced for few layers of graphene grown on Ni. We expect our work will provide a new route for application of graphene as a protection coating for metals in biological environments, where current strategies have shown short-term efficiency and have raised health concerns. PMID:29292763

  5. The Many Faces of Graphene as Protection Barrier. Performance under Microbial Corrosion and Ni Allergy Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Parra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a study on the performance of CVD (chemical vapor deposition graphene coatings grown and transferred on Ni as protection barriers under two scenarios that lead to unwanted metal ion release, microbial corrosion and allergy test conditions. These phenomena have a strong impact in different fields considering nickel (or its alloys is one of the most widely used metals in industrial and consumer products. Microbial corrosion costs represent fractions of national gross product in different developed countries, whereas Ni allergy is one of the most prevalent allergic conditions in the western world, affecting around 10% of the population. We found that grown graphene coatings act as a protective membrane in biological environments that decreases microbial corrosion of Ni and reduces release of Ni2+ ions (source of Ni allergic contact hypersensitivity when in contact with sweat. This performance seems not to be connected to the strong orbital hybridization that Ni and graphene interface present, indicating electron transfer might not be playing a main role in the robust response of this nanostructured system. The observed protection from biological environment can be understood in terms of graphene impermeability to transfer Ni2+ ions, which is enhanced for few layers of graphene grown on Ni. We expect our work will provide a new route for application of graphene as a protection coating for metals in biological environments, where current strategies have shown short-term efficiency and have raised health concerns.

  6. The polymer cement of sulfur as an alternative for the recycling of phosphogypsum. Corrosion testing of cements enriched with phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Lopez, F. A.; Navarro, N.; Sanchez, M.; Sanz, B.; Ballesteros, O.; Higueras, E.; Roman, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of the use of cement for the recycling of materials is seen today as sustainable solution of the fertilizer industry for production of matches (NORM). In this paper presents some results of corrosion tests performed on these cements modified using buffer solutions of different pH. The analytical determinations in these matrices are new challenges. (Author)

  7. Proposed Guidelines for Selection of Methods for Erosion-corrosion Testing in Flowing Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Masanobu

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion of metals and alloys in flowing liquids can be classified into uniform corrosion and localized corrosion which may be categorized as follows. (1) Localized corrosion of the erosion-corrosion type: the protective oxide layer is assumed to be removed from the metal surface by shear stress or turbulence of the fluid flow. A macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which the bare surface is the macro-anode and the other surface covered with the oxide layer is the macro-cathode. (2) Localized corrosion of the differential flow-velocity corrosion type: at a location of lower fluid velocity, a thin and coarse oxide layer with poor protective qualities may be produced because of an insufficient supply of oxygen. A macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which this surface is the macro-anode and the other surface covered witha dense and stable oxide layer is the macro-cathode. (3) Localized corrosion of the active/passive-cell type: on a metal surface a macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which a part of it is in a passivation state and another in an active dissolution state. This situation may arise from differences in temperature as well as in the supply of the dissolved oxygen. Compared to uniform corrosion, localized corrosion tends to involve a higher wall thinning rate (corrosion rate) due to the macro-cell current as well as to the ratio of the surface area of the macro-anode to that of the macro-cathode, which may be rationalized using potential vs. current density diagrams. The three types of localized corrosion described above can be reproduced in a Jet-in-slit test by changing the flow direction of the test liquid and arranging environmental conditions in an appropriate manner

  8. Test planning and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, Maurizio

    2001-01-01

    Testing plan should include Safety guide Q4 - Inspection and testing - A testing plan should be prepared including following information: General information (facility name, item or system reference, procurement document reference, document reference number and status, associated procedures and drawings); A sequential listing of all testing activities; Procedure, work instruction, specification or standard to be followed in respect of each operation and test; Acceptance criteria; Identification of who is performing tests; Identification of hold points; Type of records to be prepared for each test; Persons and organizations having authority for final acceptance. Proposed activities sequence is: visual, electrical and mechanical checks; environmental tests (thermal aging, vibrations aging, radioactive aging); performance evaluation in extreme conditions; dynamic tests with functional checks; final electrical and mechanical checks The planning of the tests should always be performed taking into account an interpretative model: a very tight cooperation is advisable between experimental people and numerical people dealing with the analysis of more or less complex models for the seismic assessment of structures and components. Preparatory phase should include the choice of the following items should be agreed upon with the final user of the tests: Excitation points, Excitation types, Excitation amplitude with respect to frequency, Measuring points. Data acquisition, recording and storage, should take into account the characteristics of the successive data processing: to much data can be cumbersome to be processed, but to few data can make unusable the experimental results. The parameters for time history acquisition should be chosen taking into account data processing: for Shock Response Spectrum calculation some special requirements should be met: frequency bounded signal, high frequency sampling, shock noise. For stationary random-like excitation, the sample length

  9. Accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing using a cyclic wet/dry exposure test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, S.B.; Thompson, G.E.; Johnson, J.E.; Wood, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion is important in overhead electrical conductors constructed from aluminum wire centrally reinforced by galvanized steel strands. Inspection of conductor after long service has implicated rubber bushing material, on the outside, and the galvanized strands, on the inside, as providing potential galvanic sites for the initiation of rapid aluminum corrosion. Therefore, the galvanic corrosion of aluminum in contact with graphite-loaded neoprene rubber, hot-dip galvanized steel and steel was assessed in a cyclic wet/dry exposure test using mixed-salts spray solutions containing appropriate ratios of sulfate and chloride ion. Aluminum was found to corrode at between 3 to 6 times its uncoupled rate when associated with the rubber material. While the eta-phase, relatively pure Zn, galvanized layer remained intact, galvanic corrosion of aluminum was slow. However, on exposure of the zeta-phase, Zn/Fe intermetallic layer, aluminum corroded about 35 times faster than expected in a solution with a high level of Cl - ion. The importance of these data to conductor lifetime is discussed

  10. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in the service water system of a test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subba Rao, T.; Venugopalan, V.P.; Nair, K.V.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the biofouling and corrosion problems in the service water system of a test reactor. Results of microbiological, electron microscopic and chemical analyses of water and deposit samples indicate the role of bacteria in the corrosion process. The primary role played by iron oxidising bacteria is emphasised. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Digital speckle correlation for nondestructive testing of corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Raul D., Jr.; Soga, Diogo; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Hogert, Elsa N.; Landau, Monica R.; Ruiz Gale, Maria F.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the use of optical correlation speckle patterns to detect and analyze the metallic corrosion phenomena, and shows the experimental set-up used. We present some new results in the characterization of the corrosion process using a model based in electroerosion phenomena. We also provide valuable information about surface microrelief changes, which is also useful in numerous engineering applications. The results obtained are good enough for showing that our technique is very useful for giving new possibilities to the analysis of the corrosion and oxidation process, particularly in real time.

  12. Development of Improved Accelerated Corrosion Qualification Test Methodology for Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    performance of magnesium -rich primer for aluminum alloys under salt spray test (ASTM B117) and natural exposure”, Corrosion Science 52 (2010) 1453...Center, FL (midnight 12-13-05 to midnight 12-14-05) 19400 19500 19600 19700 19800 19900 20000 20100 0 5 10 15 20 Cu m ul at iv e W ei gh t L os s...13-05 to midnight 12-14-05) 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 Cu m ul at iv e W ei gh t L os s ( µg /c m 2 ) Hours

  13. Test methods for microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, B.; Wagner, P.; Mansfeld, F.

    1992-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques such as measurements of corrosion and redox potentials, polarization curves, polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance and electrochemical noise have been used to evaluate the impact of marine microorganisms on corrosion processes. Surface analytical techniques including microbiological culturing, scanning electron microscopy, microprobes and microelectrodes have been used to characterize metal surfaces after exposure to marine waters. A combination of electrochemical, surface analytical and microbiological techniques is the most promising approach for determining mechanisms of MIC

  14. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, John P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Cavalli, Matthew N. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2016-06-30

    its standard oxidation, spallation, and corrosion testing, which was scheduled for completion in the spring of 2016. However, because of commercial demands, the tests were not completed by the time of this report except some initial spallation tests at 1150°C. In those tests, several of the APMT plates separated from the CM247LC, likely because of the remaining aluminum oxide scale on the surface of the CM247LC. This implies that surface preparation may need to include machining to remove the oxide scale before bonding rather than just sandblasting. In previous tensile testing at 950°C, the breaks in the tensile samples always occurred in the APMT and not at the joints. Gasifier sampling was completed to determine what types of trace contaminants may occur in cleaned and combusted syngas and that could lead to corrosion or deposition in turbines firing coal syngas. The sampling was done from a pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier and a pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. The particles captured on a filter from syngas were typically 0.2 to 0.5 μm in diameter, whereas those captured from the combusted syngas were slightly larger and more spherical. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed that the particles do not contain any metals and have an atomic composition almost identical to that of the polycarbonate filter. This indicates that the particles are primarily soot-based and not formed from volatilization of metals in the gasifiers.

  15. Evaluation of Accelerated Graphitic Corrosion Test of Gray Cast Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hyeon; Hong, Jong Dae; Chang Heui; Na, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Jae Gon

    2011-01-01

    In operating nuclear power plants, gray cast iron is commonly used as materials for various non-safety system components including pipes in fire water system, valve bodies, bonnets, and pump castings. In such locations, operating condition does not require alloy steels with excellent mechanical properties. But, a few corrosion related degradation, or graphitic corrosion is frequently occurred to gray cast iron during the long-term operation in nuclear power plant. Graphitic corrosion is selective leaching of iron from gray cast iron, where iron gets removed and graphite grains remain intact. In U.S.A., one-time visual inspection and hardness measurement are required from regulatory body to detect the graphitic corrosion for the life extension evaluation of the operating nuclear power plant. In this study, experiments were conducted to make accelerated graphitic corrosion of gray cast iron using electrochemical method, and hardness was measured for the specimens to establish the correlation between degree of graphitic corrosion and surface hardness of gray cast iron

  16. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan. Phases 1 and 2: Test plan for gallium corrosion tests. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Morris, R.N.

    1998-05-01

    This test plan is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water-Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. The plan summarizes and updates the projected Phases 1 and 2 Gallium-Cladding compatibility corrosion testing and the following post-test examination. This work will characterize the reactions and changes, if any, in mechanical properties that occur between Zircaloy clad and gallium or gallium oxide in the temperature range 30--700 C

  17. Corrosion performance of prestressing strands in contact with dissimilar grouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To improve the corrosion protection provided to prestressing strands, anti-bleed grouts are used to fill voids in post-tensioning : ducts that result from bleeding and shrinkage of older Portland Cement grouts. Environmental differences caused by exp...

  18. Test installation for studying erosion-corrosion of metals for coal washing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoey, G. R.; Dingley, W.; Wiles, C. T.

    1979-02-15

    A test installation was constructed for investigating erosion-corrosion of metals by coal-water slurries. Erosion-corrosion tests of mild steel panels were conducted using slurries of alundum, quartz, washed coal and coal refuse. Wear rates were found to depend on type of abrasive, particle size and water conductivity and were reduced by cathodic protection and inhibitors. Cathodic protection of mild steel in coal slurries containing sulphate ion reduced wear by 90% and 86% for stationary and rotating panels, respectively. This study has demonstrated that the successful application of corrosion control techniques would reduce metal wastage in coal washing plants. The test installation is considered suitable for developing the techniques.

  19. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  20. System Performance and Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frei, U.; Oversloot, H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter compares and contrasts the system performance of two widely used solar thermal systems using testing and simulation programs. Solar thermal systems are used in many countries for heating domestically used water. In addition to the simple thermosiphon systems, better designed pumped

  1. Electrochemical characterisation speeds up prediction of corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, E.W.; Hooijmans, J.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    The contents of this presentation show the following elements: Introduction; Corrosion in real life; Why Electrochemical characterisation of corrosion; Applications (corrosion resistance coatings, corrosion behaviour (brazed) joints); Available electrochemical corrosion techniques; Standards; Conclusions. In the Conclusions the corrosion screening method is summarized: ECN method fast; within 1h -1 week results depending on test method; Fast pre-selection of promising materials/combinations (cost savings); Determining of corrosion initiation; Determination of corrosion mechanisms and propagation; Life time predictions possible; Strong combination with metallographic post-investigation; Ranking materials / constructions for corrosion performance.

  2. High temperature (salt melt) corrosion tests with ceramic-coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, Adelheid [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Günthner, Martin; Motz, Günter [University Bayreuth, Ceramic Materials Engineering, L.-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Greißl, Oliver [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Schelmenwasenstraße 13-15, D-70567 Stuttgart (Germany); Glatzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.glatzel@uni-bayreuth.de [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Thermal recycling of refuse in waste-to-energy plants reduces the problems connected to waste disposal, and is an alternative source of electric energy. However, the combustion process in waste incinerators results in a fast degradation of the steam-carrying superheater steel tubes by corrosive attack and abrasive wear. Higher firing temperatures are used to increase their efficiency but lead to higher corrosion rates. It is more economical to apply protective coatings on the superheater steel tubes than to replace the base material. In-situ tests were conducted in a waste-to-energy plant first in order to identify and quantify all involved corrosive elements. Laboratory scale experiments with salt melts were developed accordingly. The unprotected low-alloyed steel displayed substantial local corrosion. Corrosion was predominant along the grain boundaries of α-ferrite. The corrosion rate was further increased by FeCl{sub 3} and a mixture of HCL and FeCl{sub 3}. Coatings based on pre-ceramic polymers with specific filler particles were engineered to protect superheater tubes. Tests proved their suitability to protect low-alloYed steel tubes from corrosive attack under conditions typical for superheaterS in waste incinerators, rendering higher firing temperatures in waste-to-energy plants possible. - Highlights: • Corrosion wall thickness losses of 400 μm/2 weeks occurred in a waste incinerator. • Abrasion is a major problem on superheater tubes in waste incinerators. • Laboratory salt melt tests can simulate metal corrosion in waste incinerators. • Corrosion protection coatings for steel (temperature: max. 530 °C) were developed. • Higher steam temperatures are possible in WIs with the developed coatings.

  3. The Hydrogen Pickup Behavior for Zirconium-based Alloys in Various Out-of-pile Corrosion Test Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aomi, M.; Etoh, Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Une, K. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken, 311-1313 (Japan); Ito, K. [Global Nuclear Fuel Japan Co., Ltd., 3-1 Uchikawa 2-chome, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken, 239-0836 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    An acceleration of hydrogen absorption in zirconium alloy claddings at high burnups is one of the most important issues limiting the fuel performance from the viewpoint of cladding integrity. In this context, advanced cladding materials with higher corrosion resistant and lower hydrogen absorption properties have been widely searched in various organizations. In this study, four kinds of zirconium-based alloys, whose in-pile data had been acquired [1,2] were subjected to comprehensive out-of-pile corrosion tests with various temperature and atmosphere conditions in order to investigate the correlation between in-pile and out-of-pile corrosion and hydrogen pick-up behavior, i.e. Zry-2, GNF-Ziron (Zry-2-based alloy with {approx}0.25 wt % of Fe), Hi-FeNi Zircaloy (Zry-2-based alloy with {approx}0.25 wt % of Fe and {approx}0.1 wt% Ni), and VB (Zr-based alloy containing Sn, Cr, and {approx}0.5 wt % of Fe). All the alloys were annealed in RXA condition. The out-of-pile corrosion tests were carried out in three different conditions of 400 deg. C steam, 475 deg. C supercritical water, and 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution. In addition to these alloys, several Zry-2-based alloys with various iron contents were tested in 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution. Among the four corrosion conditions, the 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution test well screened the hydrogen pick-up behavior of the alloys. The hydrogen absorption decreased with higher iron contents in the alloys in both the out-of-pile and in-pile conditions. Especially, the distinct suppression of hydrogen absorption was observed for VB with the highest iron content. The similar dependence of iron content on the hydrogen pick-up fraction was also obtained for the Zry-2-based alloys with different iron contents, which were corroded in the 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution condition. As for the corrosion behavior in the 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution condition, the weight gains of Zry-2, GNF-Ziron and VB followed the 1

  4. The performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, A.

    1975-01-01

    Concerning the time-schedule of reactor performance tests they normally begin when suppliers or constructors have finished construction and made all necessary construction and coordinated tests. If the last-mentioned tests are conducted profoundly, they contribute substantially to a quick and simple carrying-out of the last performance tests and to the general quality of components and systems. At this stage all components of a system should be properly fixed, machinery, instruments and electrical components adjusted and calibrated, all set-points tested, electrical and other supply units in operation or ready to operate and all functions pretested. Just at this stage of the work most of the existing defects and failures of systems can be found. Remembering the fact that the difficulty of operation of complex systems results from detail problems, it is extremely useful to remove all things of this kind as soon as possible, at the latest at this time where it is done easily and normally quickly without influencing start-up-procedures of other systems or even of the total plant. (orig./TK) [de

  5. Towards corrosion testing of unglazed solar absorber surfaces in simulated acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, T.; Pehkonen, A.; Konttinen, P.; Lund, P.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests were utilized for determining corrosion probabilities of unglazed C/Al 2 O 3 /Al solar absorber surfaces in simulated acid rain. Previously, the main degradation mechanism found was exponentially temperature-related hydration of aluminium oxide. In acid rain tests the main corrosion determinant was the pH value of the rain. Results indicate that these methods measure corrosion characteristics of Al substrate instead of the C/Al 2 O 3 /Al surface, probably mainly due to the rough and non-uniform microstructure of the latter. Further analyses of the test methods are required in order to estimate their applicability on Al-based uniform sputtered absorber surfaces. (author) (C/Al 2 O 3 /Al solar absorber; Acid rain; Corrosion; Electrochemical tests)

  6. Design and testing of corrosion damaged prestressed concrete joists: the Pescara Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Evangelista, A; De Leonardis, A; Valente, C; Zuccarino, L

    2011-01-01

    An experimental campaign named the Pescara benchmark and devoted to study the dynamic behaviour of corroded p.c. joists has been conducted. The steel corrosion reduces the area of the reinforcement and causes cracking of concrete so that r/c members are subjected to loss of strength and stiffness. It is of interest to evaluate the corrosion level at which the damage can be detected through signal processing procedures and how close such level is to the r/c member safety limits. Joists of current industrial production having different steel to concrete ratios are tested in different laboratory conditions. Dynamic tests involve either free vibrations and forced vibrations due to a moving mass simulating actual traffic loads in railway bridges. The paper discusses the rationale of the tests including the set up of the artificial corrosion, the static characterization of the joist and the dynamic tests in the different stages of corrosion experienced.

  7. Performance test of wet type decontamination device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. P.; Kim, E. G.; Min, D. K.; Jun, Y. B.; Lee, H. K.; Seu, H. S.; Kwon, H. M.; Hong, K.P.

    2003-01-01

    The intervention area located at rear hot cell can be contaminated by hot cell maintenance work. For effective decontamination of the intervention floor a wet type decontamination device was developed. The device was assembled with a brush rotating part, a washing liquid supplying part, an intake part for recovering contaminated liquid and a device moving cart part. The device was made of stainless steel for easy decontamination and corrosion resistance. The function test carried out at intervention area of the PIE facility showed good performance

  8. Corrosion and Deterioration Testing in the Humid Tropic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-21

    specimens while transporting the retrieved specimens back to the laboratories for detailed analysis . Preferably, each specimen should be wrapped...VEGETATION. Some types of vegetation tend to exude tannins , sugars, and other natural plant products which may support microbial growth and corrosion

  9. Promising Hard Carbon Coatings on Cu Substrates: Corrosion and Tribological Performance with Theoretical Aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A. Madhan; Babu, R. Suresh; Obot, I. B.; Adesina, Akeem Yusuf; Ibrahim, Ahmed; de Barros, A. L. F.

    2018-05-01

    Protecting the surface of metals and alloys against corrosion and wear is of abundant importance owing to their widespread applications. In the present work, we report the improved anticorrosion and tribo-mechanical performance of copper (Cu) by a hard carbon (HC) coating synthesized in different pyrolysis temperature. Structural and surface characterization with roughness measurements was systematically investigated using various techniques. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the corrosion behavior of coated Cu substrates in 0.6 M NaCl solution was evaluated via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization. Pin-on-disk wear test of coated Cu substrate showed the influence of the pyrolysis temperature on the wear resistance performance of the HC coatings. According to the obtained results, it could be concluded that the HC coatings synthesized at 1100 °C revealed an enhanced comprehensive performance, revealing their possible utilization as a protective coating for Cu substrates in chloride environment. Monte Carlo simulations have been utilized to elucidate the interaction between the Cu surface and HC coatings.

  10. Friction, adhesion and corrosion performance of metallurgical coatings in HTGR-helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.; Kleemann, W.

    1981-01-01

    The friction-, adhesion-, thermal cycling- and corrosion performance of several metallurgical coating systems have been tested in a simulated HTGR-test atmosphere at elevated temperatures. The coatings were applied to a solid solution strengthened Ni-based superalloy. Component design requires coatings for the protection of mating surfaces, since under reactor operating conditions, contacting surfaces of metallic components under high pressures are prone to friction and wear damage. The coatings will have to protect the metal surface for 30 years up to 950 0 C in HTGR-helium. The materials tested were various refractory carbides with or without metallic binders and intermetallic compounds. The coatings evaluated were applied by plasma spraying-, detonation gun- and chemical vapor deposition techniques. These yielded two types of coatings which employ different mechanisms to improve the tribiological properties and maintain coating integrity. (Auth.)

  11. Understanding protocol performance: impact of test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    This is the second of two articles that examine the factors that determine protocol performance. The objective of these articles is to provide a general understanding of protocol performance that can be used to estimate performance, establish limits on performance, decide if a protocol is justified, and ultimately select a protocol. The first article was concerned with protocol criterion and test correlation. It demonstrated the advantages and disadvantages of different criterion when all tests had the same performance. It also examined the impact of increasing test correlation on protocol performance and the characteristics of the different criteria. To examine the impact on protocol performance when individual tests in a protocol have different performance. This is evaluated for different criteria and test correlations. The results of the two articles are combined and summarized. A mathematical model is used to calculate protocol performance for different protocol criteria and test correlations when there are small to large variations in the performance of individual tests in the protocol. The performance of the individual tests that make up a protocol has a significant impact on the performance of the protocol. As expected, the better the performance of the individual tests, the better the performance of the protocol. Many of the characteristics of the different criteria are relatively independent of the variation in the performance of the individual tests. However, increasing test variation degrades some criteria advantages and causes a new disadvantage to appear. This negative impact increases as test variation increases and as more tests are added to the protocol. Best protocol performance is obtained when individual tests are uncorrelated and have the same performance. In general, the greater the variation in the performance of tests in the protocol, the more detrimental this variation is to protocol performance. Since this negative impact is increased as

  12. Automated-process gas-chromatograph system for use in accelerated corrosion testing of HTGR core-support posts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, R.E.; Herndon, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    An automated-process gas chromatograph is the heart of a gaseous-impurities-analysis system developed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Core Support Performance Test, at which graphite core-support posts for high-temperature gas-cooled fission reactors are being subjected to accelerated corrosion tests under tightly controlled conditions of atmosphere and temperature. Realistic estimation of in-core corrosion rates is critically dependent upon the accurate measurement of low concentrations of CO, CO 2 , CH 4 , H 2 , and O 2 in the predominantly helium atmosphere. In addition, the capital and labor investment associated with each test puts a premium upon the reliability of the analytical system, as excessive downtime or failure to obtain accurate data would result in unacceptable costs and schedule delays. After an extensive survey of available measurement techniques, gas chromatography was chosen for reasons of accuracy, flexibility, good-performance record, and cost

  13. Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation to improve the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Dahye [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Busan 46742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Junghoon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Kim, Yonghwan [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Busan 46742 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wonsub, E-mail: wschung1@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation was performed using dispersed CuO particles in convectional PEO electrolyte. • Thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance were examined by FT-IR spectroscopy and electrochemical methods, respectively. • Deposited copper oxide on the surface of the Al substrate was enhanced the corrosion resistance and the emissivity compared with the conventional PEO. - Abstract: A composite plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed for enhancing the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al alloy by dispersing cupric oxide (CuO) particles in a conventional PEO electrolyte. Cu-based oxides (CuO and Cu{sub 2}O) formed by composite PEO increased the emissivity of the substrate to 0.892, and made the surface being dark color, similar to a black body, i.e., an ideal radiator. In addition, the corrosion resistance was analyzed using potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. An optimum condition of 10 ampere per square decimeter (ASD) current density and 30 min processing time produced appropriate surface morphologies and coating thicknesses, as well as dense Cu- and Al-based oxides that constituted the coating layers.

  14. Operation corrosion test of austenitic steel bends for supercritical coal boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cizner J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion tests of both annealed and not annealed bends of HR3C and S304H steels in operation conditions of black and brown coal combustion boilers in EPRU and EDE. After a long-term exposure, the samples were assessed gravimetrically and metallographically. The comparison of annealed and unannealed states showed higher corrosion rates in the annealed state; corrosion of the sample surface did not essentially differ for compression and tensile parts of the beams. Detailed assessment of both steels is described in detail in this study.

  15. Testing the permeability and corrosion resistance of micro-mechanically interlocked joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov-Nielsen, Jeppe; Holm, Allan Hjarbæk; Højsholt, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Micro-mechanical interlocking (MMI) can be applied to create new and interesting composite materials. We have employed laser structuring to achieve MMI between stainless steel and plastic with extremely high joint strength. However, the water permeability and corrosion resistance of the joint must...... is conducted. The permeability seems to be consistent with the Hagen–Poiseuille equation independent of the laser structuring technique and is orders of magnitudes larger than the diffusion rate through the plastic. Two different types of corrosion tests have been undertaken, and we show that care must...... be taken in order not to degrade the corrosion resistance of the sample to an unacceptable level....

  16. Electrochemical testing of passivity state and corrosion resistance of supermartensitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On low interstitial - supermartensitic stainless steels (X1CrNiMo 12-5-1, X2CrNiMo 13-6-2, X1CrNiMo 12-6-2 the electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out and the passive state stability and localized corrosion resistance were compared and evaluated. The effect of quenching and tempering as well as the changes in microstructure on polarisation curves and corrosion properties at room temperature were established. Small differences in chemical composition of steels were also registered on their corrosion parameters changes and resistance.

  17. Structural performance evaluation on aging underground reinforced concrete structures. Part 6. An estimation method of threshold value in performance verification taking reinforcing steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Miyagawa, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses applicability of material degradation model due to reinforcing steel corrosion for RC box-culverts with corroded reinforcement and an estimation method for threshold value in performance verification reflecting reinforcing steel corrosion. First, in FEM analyses, loss of reinforcement section area and initial tension strain arising from reinforcing steel corrosion, and deteriorated bond characteristics between reinforcement and concrete were considered. The full-scale loading tests using corroded RC box-culverts were numerically analyzed. As a result, the analyzed crack patterns and load-strain relationships were in close agreement with the experimental results within the maximum corrosion ratio 15% of primary reinforcement. Then, we showed that this modeling could estimate the load carrying capacity of corroded RC box-culverts. Second, a parametric study was carried out for corroded RC box culverts with various sizes, reinforcement ratios and levels of steel corrosion, etc. Furthermore, as an application of analytical results and various experimental investigations, we suggested allowable degradation ratios for a modification of the threshold value, which corresponds to the chloride induced deterioration progress that is widely accepted in maintenance practice for civil engineering reinforced concrete structures. Finally, based on these findings, we developed two estimation methods for threshold value in performance verification: 1) a structural analysis method using nonlinear FEM included modeling of material degradation, 2) a practical method using a threshold value, which is determined by structural analyses of RC box-culverts in sound condition, is multiplied by the allowable degradation ratio. (author)

  18. Steam based conversion coating on AA6060 alloy: Effect of sodium silicate chemistry and corrosion performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Tabrizian, Naja; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloy AA6060 using an industrially applicable pilot steam jet system with and without silicate chemistry has been investigated. Treatment using steam alone and steam with silicate, resulted in an oxide layer formation with thickness ∼425 nm and ∼160 nm, respectively. Moreover, the use of sodium silicate resulted in the formation of distinct microstructure and incorporation of silicate into the oxide film. These oxide films reduced the anodic activity 4 times, while the corrosion protection by silicate containing oxide was the function of its concentration. Further, in acid salt spray and filiform corrosion tests, oxide layer containing silicate exhibited two times higher corrosion resistance.

  19. Hot corrosion testing of Ni-based alloys and coatings in a modified Dean rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jason Reid

    Gas turbine blades are designed to withstand a variety of harsh operating conditions. Although material and coating improvements are constantly administered to increase the mean time before turbine refurbishment or replacement, hot corrosion is still considered as the major life-limiting factor in many industrial and marine gas turbines. A modified Dean rig was designed and manufactured at Tennessee Technological University to simulate the accelerated hot corrosion conditions and to conduct screening tests on the new coatings on Ni-based superalloys. Uncoated Ni-based superalloys, Rene 142 and Rene 80, were tested in the modified Dean rig to establish a testing procedure for Type I hot corrosion. The influence of surface treatments on the hot corrosion resistance was then investigated. It was found that grit-blasted specimens showed inferior hot corrosion resistance than that of the polished counterpart. The Dean rig was also used to test model MCrAlY alloys, pack cementation NiAl coatings, and electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings. Furthermore, the hot corrosion attack on the coated-specimens were also assessed using a statistical analysis approach.

  20. Preparation and Testing of Corrosion and Spallation-Resistant Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, John

    2015-11-01

    with the Rene 80. One-inch-diameter buttons were machined from each of the bonded blocks and sent to Siemens for standard oxidation, spallation, and corrosion testing, which should be complete in the spring of 2016.

  1. Corrosion models for predictions of performance of high-level radioactive-waste containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gdowski, G.E. [KMI Energy Services, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The present plan for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the US is to seal it in containers before emplacement in a geologic repository. A proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated for its suitability as a geologic repository. The containers will probably be made of either an austenitic or a copper-based alloy. Models of alloy degradation are being used to predict the long-term performance of the containers under repository conditions. The models are of uniform oxidation and corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking, and are applicable to worst-case scenarios of container degradation. This paper reviews several of the models.

  2. Corrosion performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy under immersion environment

    OpenAIRE

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy; K. Shanmugam; V. Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. The alumina powders were plasma sprayed on AZ31B magnesium alloy with three different plasma spraying parameters. In the present work, the influence of plasma spray parameters on the corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples was evaluated by immersion corrosion test in 3.5 w...

  3. Accelerated growth of oxide film on aluminium alloys under steam: Part II: Effects of alloy chemistry and steam vapour pressure on corrosion and adhesion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The steam treatment of aluminium alloys with varying vapour pressure of steamresulted in the growth of aluminium oxyhydroxide films of thickness range between 450 - 825nm. The surface composition, corrosion resistance, and adhesion of the produced films was characterised by XPS, potentiodynamic p...... of the vapour pressure of the steam. The accelerated corrosion and adhesion tests on steam generated oxide films with commercial powder coating verified that the performance of the oxide coating is highly dependent on the vapour pressure of the steam....... polarization, acetic acid salt spray, filiform corrosion test, and tape test. The oxide films formed by steam treatment showed good corrosion resistance in NaCl solution by significantly reducing anodic and cathodic activities. The pitting potential of the surface treated with steam was a function...

  4. Corrosion and mechanical performance of AZ91 exposed to simulated inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Emily K; Der, Stephanie; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, including Mg-9%Al-1%Zn (AZ91), are biodegradable metals with potential use as temporary orthopedic implants. Invasive orthopedic procedures can provoke an inflammatory response that produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and an acidic environment near the implant. This study assessed the influence of inflammation on both the corrosion and mechanical properties of AZ91. The AZ91 samples in the inflammatory protocol were immersed for three days in a complex biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM culture media) that contained serum proteins (FBS), 150 mM of H2O2, and was titrated to a pH of 5. The control protocol immersed AZ91 samples in the same biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM & FBS) but without H2O2 and the acid titration. After 3 days all samples were switched into fresh AMEM & FBS for an additional 3-day immersion. During the initial immersion, inflammatory protocol samples showed increased corrosion rate determined by mass loss testing, increased Mg and Al ion released to solution, and a completely corroded surface morphology as compared to the control protocol. Although corrosion in both protocols slowed once the test electrolyte solution was replaced at 3 days, the samples originally exposed to the simulated inflammatory conditions continued to display enhanced corrosion rates as compared to the control protocol. These lingering effects may indicate the initial inflammatory corrosion processes modified components of the surface oxide and corrosion film or initiated aggressive localized processes that subsequently left the interface more vulnerable to continued enhanced corrosion. The electrochemical properties of the interfaces were also evaluated by EIS, which found that the corrosion characteristics of the AZ91 samples were potentially influenced by the role of intermediate adsorption layer processes. The increased corrosion observed for the inflammatory protocol did not affect the flexural mechanical properties of the AZ91

  5. Lithuanian Quarry Aggregates Concrete Effects of Alkaline Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurimas Rutkauskas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate alkaline corrosion of cement in concrete is going to respond in sodium and potassium hydroxide (lye with active SiO2 found in some aggregates. During this reaction, the concrete has resulted in significant internal stresses which cause deformation of the concrete, cracking and disintegration. The reaction is slow and concrete signs of decomposition appear only after a few months or years. The study used two different aggregates quarries. Studies show that Lithuania gravel contaminated with reactive particles having amorphous silicon dioxide reacting with cement in sodium and potassium hydroxide and the resulting alkaline concrete corrosion. It was found that, according to AAR 2 large aggregates include Group II – potentially reactive because of their expansion after 14 days, higher than 0.1%.

  6. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  7. Corrosion Test Results for Inconel 600 vs Inconel-Stainless UG Bellows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Conversion Project (CP) of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involves converting slightly less than 40 kg of 233 U to a stable form for safe storage. The operation is performed within a few vessels interconnected by valves and 1/2-in. metal tubing. During this conversion, a particularly toxic and corrosive by-product is formed, namely aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF). The production of HF is a result of the hydrolysis of UF 6 and subsequent steam treatments of UO 2 F 2 . For each mole of UF 6 converted, 6 mol of HF are produced. The HF that forms during conversion combines with water to produce approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt % HF. As this mixture is transferred within the process system, the tubing and valves are exposed to high concentrations of HF in liquid and vapor form. Of particular concern in the system are the almost 30 valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. For these valves, a vendor-supplied UG valve was installed. UG valves consist of an Alloy 400 (Monel) body and stem tip and Alloy 600 (Inconel) bellows. These valves have been used under experimental conditions that simulate the CP. It has been established that they have a finite life when exposed to a HF and air environment. Most failures were seen around the flange at the bottom of the bellows, and it was suspected that this flange and the weld material were not Inconel. In December 2001, the vendor confirmed that this flange was not Inconel but instead was stainless steel 316. After discussions between the vendor and ORNL staff involved with the CP effort, it was decided that the entire wetted area of the bellows would be fabricated from Alloy 600. In March 2002, four newly fabricated bellows assemblies were received from the vendor for the purposes of corrosion testing in HF. This report presents results from the corrosion tests conducted to determine if the new design of the bellows would enhance their corrosion resistance

  8. Corrosion Test Results for Inconel 600 vs Inconel-Stainless UG Bellows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    The Conversion Project (CP) of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involves converting slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U to a stable form for safe storage. The operation is performed within a few vessels interconnected by valves and 1/2-in. metal tubing. During this conversion, a particularly toxic and corrosive by-product is formed, namely aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF). The production of HF is a result of the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6} and subsequent steam treatments of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. For each mole of UF{sub 6} converted, 6 mol of HF are produced. The HF that forms during conversion combines with water to produce approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt % HF. As this mixture is transferred within the process system, the tubing and valves are exposed to high concentrations of HF in liquid and vapor form. Of particular concern in the system are the almost 30 valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. For these valves, a vendor-supplied UG valve was installed. UG valves consist of an Alloy 400 (Monel) body and stem tip and Alloy 600 (Inconel) bellows. These valves have been used under experimental conditions that simulate the CP. It has been established that they have a finite life when exposed to a HF and air environment. Most failures were seen around the flange at the bottom of the bellows, and it was suspected that this flange and the weld material were not Inconel. In December 2001, the vendor confirmed that this flange was not Inconel but instead was stainless steel 316. After discussions between the vendor and ORNL staff involved with the CP effort, it was decided that the entire wetted area of the bellows would be fabricated from Alloy 600. In March 2002, four newly fabricated bellows assemblies were received from the vendor for the purposes of corrosion testing in HF. This report presents results from the corrosion tests conducted to determine if the new design of the bellows would enhance their corrosion resistance.

  9. Atmospheric corrosion tests along the Norwegian-Russian border. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, J.F.; Mikhailov, A.A.

    1997-12-31

    A bilateral exposure programme was carried out along the Norwegian-Russian border in 1990-1991, 1992-1993 and 1993-1994 to evaluate quantitatively the effect of sulphur pollutants on the atmospheric corrosion of important materials in sub-arctic climate. The first part of the programme demonstrated that also in subarctic climate do metals corrode depending on the atmospheric corrosivity, and dose-response functions were derived which combined the effects of SO{sub 2} and time of wetness. The second part of the programme, which is described in this report, involved exposures of carbon steel, zinc and copper at two sites in Norway and three sites in Russia. It is concluded that the accelerated atmospheric corrosion of metals in regions along the border is mainly due to dry deposition of sulphur. At some sites, dry deposition of Cl contributes because of sea-salt aerosols. The corrosivity of acid precipitation is certain but could not be represented as a function because of the small differences observed in the pH values at the different sites. At all test sites the kinetics of corrosion of steel, zinc and copper are characterized by a reduced corrosion rate after one year of exposure. Time of wetness is an important parameter in predicting atmospheric corrosion of metals even on a regional scale. Hence, for monitoring and for trend-effect analysis, it is very important to determine the corrosivity of SO{sub 2} with time of wetness. In accordance with dose-response functions obtained, the yearly corrosion rate for steel and zinc are higher for the areas with higher amounts of dry deposition of Cl than for areas with analogous but only SO{sub 2}-containing atmosphere. 6 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...... showed that x-ray attenuation measurements allow determination of the actual concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel measured by x-ray attenuation was found to be in very good agreement with the calculated mass loss obtained by Faraday......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  11. Research on Performance and Microstructure of Sewage Pipe Mortar Strengthened with Different Anti-Corrosion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Song; Zhou, Huaxin; Shi, Liang; Liu, Jianzhong; Cai, Jingshun; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Mostly urban underground sewage is the acidic corrosion environment with a high concentration of aggressive ions and microbe, which resulted in performance deterioration and service-life decrease of sewage concrete pipe. In order to effectively protect durability of the concrete pipe, the present paper briefly analysed the main degradation mechanism of concrete pipe attacked by urban underground sewage, and proposed that using penetrating and strengthening surface sealer based on inorganic chemistry. In addition, using index of compressive strength, weight loss and appearance level to investigate the influence of the sealer on corrosion resistance of mortar samples after different dry-wet cycles. Besides, comparative research on effect of the sealer, aluminate cement and admixture of corrosion resistance was also addressed. At last, the SEM technology was used to reveal the improvement mechanism of different technologies of corrosion resistance. The results indicated that the sealer and aluminate cement can significantly improve corrosion resistance of mortar. Besides, the improvement effect can be described as the descending order: the penetrating and strengthening surface sealer > aluminate cement > admixture of corrosion resistance. The mortar sample treated with the sealer displayed the condensed and sound microstructure which proved that the sealer can improve the corrosion resistance to urban underground sewage.

  12. Hot-wall corrosion testing of simulated high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.T.; Zapp, P.E.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    Three materials of construction for steam tubes used in the evaporation of high level radioactive waste were tested under heat flux conditions, referred to as hot-wall tests. The materials were type 304L stainless steel alloy C276, and alloy G3. Non-radioactive acidic and alkaline salt solutions containing halides and mercury simulated different high level waste solutions stored or processed at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Alloy C276 was also tested for corrosion susceptibility under steady-state conditions. The nickel-based alloys C276 and G3 exhibited excellent corrosion resistance under the conditions studied. Alloy C276 was not susceptible to localized corrosion and had a corrosion rate of 0.01 mpy (0.25 μm/y) when exposed to acidic waste sludge and precipitate slurry at a hot-wall temperature of 150 degrees C. Type 304L was susceptible to localized corrosion under the same conditions. Alloy G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 μm/y) when exposed to caustic high level waste evaporator solution at a hot-wall temperature of 220 degrees C compared to 1.1 mpy (28.0 μ/y) for type 304L. Under extreme caustic conditions (45 weight percent sodium hydroxide) G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 μm/y) at a hot-wall temperature of 180 degrees C while type 304L had a high corrosion rate of 69.4 mpy (1.8 mm/y)

  13. Active corrosion protection performance of an epoxy coating applied on the mild steel modified with an eco-friendly sol-gel film impregnated with green corrosion inhibitor loaded nanocontainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, M.; Shahrabi, T.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2018-05-01

    In this study the corrosion resistance, active protection, and cathodic disbonding performance of an epoxy coating were improved through surface modification of steel by a hybrid sol-gel system filled with green corrosion inhibitors loaded nanocontainer as intermediate layer on mild steel substrate. The green inhibitor loaded nanocontainers (GIN) were used to induce active inhibition performance in the protective coating system. The corrosion protection performance of the coated panels was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), salt spray, and cathodic disbonding tests. It was observed that the corrosion inhibition performance of the coated mild steel panels was significantly improved by utilization of active multilayer coating system. The inhibitor release from nanocontainers at the epoxy-silane film/steel interface resulted in the anodic and cathodic reactions restriction, leading to the lower coating delamination from the substrate and corrosion products progress. Also, the active inhibition performance of the coating system was approved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analysis on the panels with artificial defects. The inhibitive agents were released to the scratch region and blocked the active sites on the metal surface.

  14. Corrosion of aluminium alloy test coupons in water of spent fuel storage pool at RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Maksin, T.; Jordanov, G.; Dobrijevic, R.

    2004-12-01

    Study on corrosion of aluminium cladding, of the TVR-S type of enriched uranium spent fuel elements of the research reactor RA in the storage water pool is examined in the framework nr the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Clad-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' since 2002. Standard racks with aluminium coupons are exposed to water in the spent fuel pools of the research reactor RA. After predetermined exposure times along with periodic monitoring of the water parameters, the coupons are examined according to the strategy and the protocol supplied by the IAEA. Description of the standard corrosion racks, experimental protocols, test procedures, water quality monitoring and compilation of results of visual examination of corrosion effects are present in this article. (author)

  15. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  16. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Cellier, F. [Framatome, Centre Technique, 71 - Saint Marcel (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tore supra (TS) has used from the beginning of operation in 1989 actively cooled plasma facing components. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be up to 230 deg. C at 40 bars, a special water chemistry of the cooling water plant was suggested in order to avoid eventual water leaks due to corrosion (general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion, etc.) at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, pipes, bellows, water boxes, coils, etc. From the beginning of TS operation, in vessel components (e.g. wall protection panels, limiters, ergodic divertor coils, neutralisers and diagnostics) represented a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit mainly such as stainless steel, Inconel, CuCrZr, Nickel and Copper. These different materials were joined together by welding (St to St, Inconel to Inconel, CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to St-St via a Ni sleeve adapter), brazing (St-St to Cu and Cu-LSTP), friction (CuCrZr and Cu to St-St), explosion (CuCrZr to St-St) and memory metal junction (Cryo-fit to Cu - only test sample). Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralized water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/ 7.0 (25 deg. C/ 200 deg. C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 deg. C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal

  17. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tore supra (TS) has used from the beginning of operation in 1989 actively cooled plasma facing components. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be up to 230 deg. C at 40 bars, a special water chemistry of the cooling water plant was suggested in order to avoid eventual water leaks due to corrosion (general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion, etc.) at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, pipes, bellows, water boxes, coils, etc. From the beginning of TS operation, in vessel components (e.g. wall protection panels, limiters, ergodic divertor coils, neutralisers and diagnostics) represented a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit mainly such as stainless steel, Inconel, CuCrZr, Nickel and Copper. These different materials were joined together by welding (St to St, Inconel to Inconel, CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to St-St via a Ni sleeve adapter), brazing (St-St to Cu and Cu-LSTP), friction (CuCrZr and Cu to St-St), explosion (CuCrZr to St-St) and memory metal junction (Cryo-fit to Cu - only test sample). Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralized water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/ 7.0 (25 deg. C/ 200 deg. C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 deg. C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal

  18. Field test corrosion experiments in Denmark with biomass fuels Part I Straw firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, A; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. A series of field tests have been undertaken in the various straw-fired power plants in Denmark, namely Masnedø, Rudkøbing and Ensted. Three types of exposure were undertaken......In Denmark, straw and other types of biomass are used for generating energy in power plants. Straw has the advantage that it is a "carbon dioxide neutral fuel" and therefore environmentally acceptable. Straw combustion is associated with corrosion problems which are not encountered in coal-fired...... to investigate corrosion: a) the exposure of metal rings on water/air cooled probes, b) the exposure of test tubes in a test superheater, and c) the exposure of test tubes in existing superheaters. Thus both austenitic steels and ferritic steels were exposed in the steam temperature range of 450-600°C...

  19. Solution exchange corrosion testing with the glass-zeolite ceramic waste form in demineralized water at 900C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    A ceramic waste form of glass-bonded zeolite is being developed for the long-term disposition of fission products and transuranic elements in wastes from the U.S. Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. Solution exchange corrosion tests were performed on the ceramic waste form and its potential base constituents of glass, zeolite 5A, and sodalite as part of an effort to qualify the ceramic waste form for acceptance into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. Solution exchange tests were performed at 90 C by replacing 80 to 90% of the leachate with fresh demineralized water after set time intervals. The results from these tests provide information about corrosion mechanisms and the ability of the ceramic waste form and its constituent materials to retain waste components. The results from solution exchange tests indicate that radionuclides will be preferentially retained in the zeolites without the glass matrix and in the ceramic waste form, with respect to cations like Li, K, and Na. Release results have been compared for simulated waste from candidate ceramic waste forms with zeolite 5A and its constituent materials to determine the corrosion behavior of each component

  20. The polymer cement of sulfur as an alternative for the recycling of phosphogypsum. Corrosion testing of cements enriched with phosphogypsum; El cemento polimerico de azufre como alternative para el reciclado de fosfoyesos. Pruebas de corrosion de cementos enriquecidos con fosfoyesos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Lopez, F. A.; Navarro, N.; Sanchez, M.; Sanz, B.; Ballesteros, O.; Higueras, E.; Roman, C. P.

    2011-07-01

    The possibility of the use of cement for the recycling of materials is seen today as sustainable solution of the fertilizer industry for production of matches (NORM). In this paper presents some results of corrosion tests performed on these cements modified using buffer solutions of different pH. The analytical determinations in these matrices are new challenges. (Author)

  1. Corrosion testing of type 304L stainless steel in tuff groundwater environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Haberman, J.H.

    1987-11-01

    The stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of Type 304L stainless steel (SS) to elevated temperatures in tuff rock and tuff groundwater environments was determined under irradiated and nonirradiated conditions using U-bend specimens and slow-strain-rate tests. The steel was tested both in the solution-annealed condition and after sensitization heat treatments. The material was found to be susceptible to SCC in both the solution-annealed and solution-annealed-and-sensitized conditions when exposed to an irradiated crushed tuff rock environment containing air and water vapor at 90 0 C. A similar exposure at 50 0 C did not result in failure after a 25-month test duration. Specimens of sensitized 304 SS conditioned with a variety of sensitization heat treatments resisted failure during a test of 1-year duration in which a nonirradiated environment of tuff rock and groundwater held at 200 0 C was allowed to boil to dryness on a cyclical basis. All specimens of sensitized 304 SS exposed to this environment failed. Slow-strain-rate studies were performed on 304L, 304, and 316L SS specimens. The 304L SS was tested in J-13 well water at 150 0 C, and the 316L SS at 95 0 C. Neither material showed evidence of SCC in these tests. Sensitized 304 SS did exhibit SCC in J-13 well water in tests conducted at 150 0 C. 12 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs

  2. Standard practice for conducting and evaluating laboratory corrosions tests in soils

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for conducting laboratory corrosion tests in soils to evaluate the corrosive attack on engineering materials. 1.2 This practice covers specimen selection and preparation, test environments, and evaluation of test results. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Influence of mechanical stress level in preliminary stress-corrosion testing on fatigue strength of a low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleskerova, S.A.; Pakharyan, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of corrosion and mechanical factors of preliminary stress corrosion of a metal in its fatigue strength, has been investigated. Smooth cylindrical samples of 20 steel have been tested. Preliminary corrosion under stress has been carried out under natural sea conditions. It is shown that mechanical stresses in the case of preliminary corrosion affect fatigue strength of low-carbon steels, decreasing the range of limited durability and fatigue limit. This effect increases with the increase of stress level and agressivity of corrosive medium

  4. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  5. Magnesium alloys: predicting in vivo corrosion with in vitro immersion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jemimah; Shadanbaz, Shaylin; Kirkland, Nicholas T; Stace, Edward; Woodfield, Tim; Staiger, Mark P; Dias, George J

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been proposed as degradable replacements to commonly used orthopedic biomaterials such as titanium alloys and stainless steel. However, the corrosion of Mg in a physiological environment remains a difficult characteristic to accurately assess with in vitro methods. The aim of this study was to identify a simple in vitro immersion test that could provide corrosion rates similar to those observed in vivo. Pure Mg and five alloys (AZ31, Mg-0.8Ca, Mg-1Zn, Mg-1Mn, Mg-1.34Ca-3Zn) were immersed in either Earle's balanced salt solution (EBSS), minimum essential medium (MEM), or MEM-containing 40 g/L bovine serum albumin (MEMp) for 7, 14, or 21 days before removal and assessment of corrosion by weight loss. This in vitro data was compared to in vivo corrosion rates of the same materials implanted in a subcutaneous environment in Lewis rats for equivalent time points. The results suggested that, for the alloys investigated, the EBSS buffered with sodium bicarbonate provides a rate of degradation comparable to those observed in vivo. In contrast, the addition of components such as (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) (HEPES), vitamins, amino acids, and albumin significantly increased corrosion rates. Based on these findings, it is proposed that with this in vitro protocol, immersion of Mg alloys in EBSS can be used as a predictor of in vivo corrosion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Vapor Space Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gray, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hicks, K. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-30

    As part of an integrated program to better understand corrosion in the high level waste tanks, Hanford has been investigating corrosion at the liquid/air interface (LAI) and at higher areas in the tank vapor space. This current research evaluated localized corrosion in the vapor space over Hanford double shell tank simulants to assess the impact of ammonia and new minimum nitrite concentration limits, which are part of the broader corrosion chemistry limits. The findings from this study showed that the presence of ammonia gas (550 ppm) in the vapor space is sufficient to reduce corrosion over the short-term (i.e. four months) for a Hanford waste chemistry (SY102 High Nitrate). These findings are in agreement with previous studies at both Hanford and SRS which showed ammonia gas in the vapor space to be inhibitive. The presence of ammonia in electrochemical test solution, however, was insufficient to inhibit against pitting corrosion. The effect of the ammonia appears to be a function of the waste chemistry and may have more significant effects in waste with low nitrite concentrations. Since high levels of ammonia were found beneficial in previous studies, additional testing is recommended to assess the necessary minimum concentration for protection of carbon steel. The new minimum R value of 0.15 was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion in the vapor space. The pitting that occurred, however, did not progress over the four-month test. Pits appeared to stop growing, which would indicate that pitting might not progress through wall.

  7. Standard test method for initial screening of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for steel in concrete

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effects of chemical admixtures on the corrosion of metals in concrete. This test method can be used to evaluate materials intended to inhibit chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete. It can also be used to evaluate the corrosivity of admixtures by themselves or in a chloride environment. This test is not applicable for emulsions. 1.2 &solely-SI-units; 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Field Testing of Rapid Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Control of Steel in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E.; Alexander, Joshua B.; Kupwade-Patil,Kunal; Calle, Luz Marina

    2009-01-01

    This work field tested the use of electrokinetics for delivery of concrete sealing nanoparticles concurrent with the extraction of chlorides. Several cylinders of concrete were batched and placed in immersion at the Kennedy Space Center Beach Corrosion Test Site. The specimens were batched with steel reinforcement and a 4.5 wt.% (weight percent) content of sodium chloride. Upon arrival at Kennedy Space Center, the specimens were placed in the saltwater immersion pool at the Beach Corrosion Test Site. Following 30 days of saltwater exposure, the specimens were subjected to rapid chloride extraction concurrent with electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment. The treatments were operated at up to eight times the typical current density in order to complete the treatment in 7 days. The findings indicated that the short-term corrosion resistance of the concrete specimens was significantly enhanced as was the strength of the concrete.

  9. Corrosion resistance test based on electrochemical noise-limiting the number of long-lasting and costly climate chamber tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aken, B.B.; Veldman, D.; Gouwen, R.J.; Bende, E.E.; Eerenstein, W.

    2013-10-15

    Damp-heat testing of PV modules is a time-consuming process, taking months. The electrochemical noise (EcN) set-up is a fast, direct corrosion measurement of solar cells, whereby results can be obtained within one hour. EcN measurements are presented for several solar cell concepts and different environments. It correlates with damp-heat degradation involving corrosion, which is rather common in EVA-encapsulated crystalline Si modules. Furthermore, the EcN test can be done as an evaluation tool when probing alternative brands, formulations or processing for metallisation pastes and as a screening test for new batches of metallisation paste.

  10. Electrochemical techniques for practical evaluation of corrosion inhibitor effectiveness. Performance of cerium nitrate as corrosion inhibitor for AA2024T3 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosero-Navarro, N.C.; Curioni, M.; Bingham, R.; Duran, A.; Aparicio, M.; Cottis, R.A.; Thompson, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a split-cell technique and image-assisted electrochemical noise analysis, which provide minimal perturbation of the freely corroding system and good time resolution, are proposed as a tool for simultaneous investigation of the corrosion inhibition mechanism and assessment of performance. The results obtained are compared with results from traditional electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, disclosing the advantages of these techniques in the evaluation of inhibitor performance. Specific attention is also given to the investigation of corrosion inhibition by cerium nitrate.

  11. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  12. A Study on Accelerated Corrosion Test by Combined Deteriorating Action of Salt Damage and Freeze-Thaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Soon; So, Byung-Tak [Sangmyung University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the accelerated corrosion test by combined deteriorating action of salt damage and freeze-thaw was investigated. freeze-thaw cycle is one method for corrosion testing; corrosion initiation time was measured in four types of concrete samples, i.e., two samples mixed with fly ash (FA) and blast furnace slag (BS), and the other two samples having two water/cement ratio (W/C = 0.6, 0.35) without admixture (OPC60 and OPC35). The corrosion of rebar embedded in concrete occurred most quickly at the 30th freeze-thaw cycle. Moreover, a corrosion monitoring method with a half-cell potential measurement and relative dynamic elastic modulus derived from resonant frequency measures was conducted simultaneously. The results indicated that the corrosion of rebar occurred when the relative dynamic elastic modulus was less than 60%. Therefore, dynamic elastic modulus can be used to detect corrosion of steel bar. The results of the accelerated corrosion test exhibited significant difference according to corrosion periods combined with each test condition. Consequently, the OPC60 showed the lowest corrosion resistance among the samples.

  13. Implementation of Localized Corrosion in the Performance Assessment Model for Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivek Jain, S.; David Sevougian; Patrick D. Mattie; Kevin G. Mon; Robert J. Mackinnon

    2006-01-01

    A total system performance assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to analyze the ability of the natural and engineered barriers of the Yucca Mountain repository to isolate nuclear waste over the 10,000-year period following repository closure. The principal features of the engineered barrier system (EBS) are emplacement tunnels (or ''drifts'') containing a two-layer waste package (WP) for waste containment and a titanium drip shield to protect the waste package from seeping water and falling rock, The 20-mm-thick outer shell of the WP is composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The barrier function of the EBS is to isolate the waste from migrating water. The water and its associated chemical conditions eventually lead to degradation of the waste packages and mobilization of the radionuclides within the packages. There are five possible waste package degradation modes of the Alloy 22: general corrosion, microbially influenced corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, early failure due to manufacturing defects, and localized corrosion. This paper specifically examines the incorporation of the Alloy-22 localized corrosion model into the Yucca Mountain TSPA model, particularly the abstraction and modeling methodology, as well as issues dealing with scaling, spatial variability, uncertainty, and coupling to other sub-models that are part of the total system model

  14. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alcantara, Naasson P.; da Silva, Felipe M.; Guimarães, Mateus T.; Pereira, Matheus D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  15. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naasson P. de Alcantara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works.

  16. Evaluation of corrosion on the fuel performance of stainless steel cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Gomes Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear reactors, the use of stainless steel (SS as the cladding material offers some advantages such as good mechanical and corrosion resistance. However, its main advantage is the reduction in the amount of the hydrogen released during loss-of-coolant accident, as observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Hence, research aimed at developing accident tolerant fuels should consider SS as an important alternative to existing materials. However, the available computational tools used to analyze fuel rod performance under irradiation are not capable of assessing the effectiveness of SS as the cladding material. This paper addresses the SS corrosion behavior in a modified fuel performance code in order to evaluate its effect on the global fuel performance. Then, data from the literature concerning to SS corrosion are implemented in the specific code subroutines, and the results obtained are compared to those for Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4 under the same power history. The results show that the effects of corrosion on SS are considerably different from those on Zy-4. The thickness of the oxide layer formed on the SS surface is considerably lower than that formed on Zy-4. As a consequence of this, the global fuel performance of SS under irradiation should be less affected by the corrosion.

  17. The Use of AC-DC-AC Methods in Assessing Corrosion Resistance Performance of Coating Systems for Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Robert C.; Upadhyay, Vinod; Wang, Yar-Ming; Battocchi, Dante

    The potential utility of AC-DC-AC electrochemical methods in comparative measures of corrosion-resisting coating system performance for magnesium alloys under consideration for the USAMP "Magnesium Front End Research and Development" project was previously shown in this forum [1]. Additional studies of this approach using statistically-designed experiments have been conducted with focus on alloy types, pretreatment, topcoat material and topcoat thickness as the variables. Additionally, sample coupons made for these designed experiments were also subjected to a typical automotive cyclic corrosion test cycle (SAE J2334) as well as ASTM B117 for comparison of relative performance. Results of these studies are presented along with advantages and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  18. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M. [CEA/DSM/DRFC Centre de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul lez Durance (France); Blanchet, J.; Cellier, F. [Framatome, 71 - Saint Marcel (France). Centre Technique

    2007-07-01

    Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralised water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/7.0 (25 C/200 C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal combinations survived the test campaign without stress corrosion cracking, with the exception of the memory metal junction (creep in Cu) and the bellows made of St-St 316L and Inconel 625 while 316 Ti bellows survived. In contrary to the vacuum brazed Cu-LSTP to St-St samples, some of flame brazed Cu to St-St samples failed either in the braze joint or in the copper structure itself. For comparison, a spot weld of an inflated 316L panel sample, filled voluntary with a caustic solution of pH 11.5 (25 C), failed after 90 h of testing (intergranular cracking at the spot weld), while an identical sample containing AVT water of pH 9.0 (25 C) survived without damage. The results of these tests, performed during 1986 and 1997, have never been published and therefore are presented more in detail in this paper since corrosion in hydraulic circuits is also an issue of ITER. Up to day, the TS cooling water plant operates with an above mentioned water treatment and no water leaks have been detected on in-vessel components originating from water corrosion at high temperature and high pressure. (orig.)

  19. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J.; Cellier, F.

    2007-01-01

    Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralised water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/7.0 (25 C/200 C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal combinations survived the test campaign without stress corrosion cracking, with the exception of the memory metal junction (creep in Cu) and the bellows made of St-St 316L and Inconel 625 while 316 Ti bellows survived. In contrary to the vacuum brazed Cu-LSTP to St-St samples, some of flame brazed Cu to St-St samples failed either in the braze joint or in the copper structure itself. For comparison, a spot weld of an inflated 316L panel sample, filled voluntary with a caustic solution of pH 11.5 (25 C), failed after 90 h of testing (intergranular cracking at the spot weld), while an identical sample containing AVT water of pH 9.0 (25 C) survived without damage. The results of these tests, performed during 1986 and 1997, have never been published and therefore are presented more in detail in this paper since corrosion in hydraulic circuits is also an issue of ITER. Up to day, the TS cooling water plant operates with an above mentioned water treatment and no water leaks have been detected on in-vessel components originating from water corrosion at high temperature and high pressure. (orig.)

  20. Standard test method for determining susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of 2XXX and 7XXX Aluminum alloy products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for characterizing the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength aluminum alloy wrought products for the guidance of those who perform stress-corrosion tests, for those who prepare stress-corrosion specifications, and for materials engineers. 1.2 This test method covers method of sampling, type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure for determining the susceptibility to SCC of 2XXX (with 1.8 to 7.0 % copper) and 7XXX (with 0.4 to 2.8 % copper) aluminum alloy products, particularly when stressed in the short-transverse direction relative to the grain structure. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The inch-pound units in parentheses are provided for information. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and de...

  1. Development of new corrosion inhibitor tested on mild steel supported by electrochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Jwad Habeeb

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild steel is a metal which is commonly used in industrials and manufacturing of equipment for most industries round the world. It is cheaper cost compared with the other metals and its durable, hard and easy-to-wear physical properties make it a major choice in the manufacture of equipment parts. The main problem through the uses of mild steel in industry is its resistance against corrosion, especially in acidic solutions. This case led to raise the cost of maintenance of equipment that used mild steel and as a result increased costs for the company. Organic corrosive inhibitors that also act as green chemicals, 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol have been synthesized. This inhibitor is tested as corrosion inhibitor on a mild steel sample MS in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution (HCl using electrochemical measurements test includes PD (Potentiodynamic, EIS (Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, OCP (Open circuit potential and EFM (electrochemical frequency modulation. The obtained results indicate that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for mild steel sample in HCl solution with efficiency above 90%. Changes in the impedance parameters postulated adsorption on the mild steel specimens' surfaces of, which it going to the formation of protective coating layer. It also shows that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol corrosion inhibitors are effective in helping to reduce and slow down the corrosion process that occurs on mild steel surface in hydrochloric acid solution. Increase of corrosion inhibitor concentration provides a protective layer of mild steel. However, this protective layer becomes weak when the temperature of the solution increases. Keywords: Hydroxybenzylideneaminomethy, Potentiodynamic, Electrochemical frequency modulation, Impedance

  2. Development of new corrosion inhibitor tested on mild steel supported by electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb, Hussein Jwad; Luaibi, Hasan Mohammed; Dakhil, Rifaat Mohammed; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Gaaz, Tayser Sumer

    2018-03-01

    Mild steel is a metal which is commonly used in industrials and manufacturing of equipment for most industries round the world. It is cheaper cost compared with the other metals and its durable, hard and easy-to-wear physical properties make it a major choice in the manufacture of equipment parts. The main problem through the uses of mild steel in industry is its resistance against corrosion, especially in acidic solutions. This case led to raise the cost of maintenance of equipment that used mild steel and as a result increased costs for the company. Organic corrosive inhibitors that also act as green chemicals, 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol have been synthesized. This inhibitor is tested as corrosion inhibitor on a mild steel sample MS in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution (HCl) using electrochemical measurements test includes PD (Potentiodynamic), EIS (Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy), OCP (Open circuit potential) and EFM (electrochemical frequency modulation). The obtained results indicate that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for mild steel sample in HCl solution with efficiency above 90%. Changes in the impedance parameters postulated adsorption on the mild steel specimens' surfaces of, which it going to the formation of protective coating layer. It also shows that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol corrosion inhibitors are effective in helping to reduce and slow down the corrosion process that occurs on mild steel surface in hydrochloric acid solution. Increase of corrosion inhibitor concentration provides a protective layer of mild steel. However, this protective layer becomes weak when the temperature of the solution increases.

  3. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods

  4. The effect of Sn on autoclave corrosion performance and corrosion mechanisms in Zr–Sn–Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Frankel, P.; Polatidis, E.; Blat, M.; Ambard, A.; Comstock, R.J.; Hallstadius, L.; Hudson, D.; Smith, G.D.W.; Grovenor, C.R.M.; Klaus, M.; Cottis, R.A.; Lyon, S.; Preuss, M.

    2013-01-01

    The desire to improve the corrosion resistance of Zr cladding material for high burn-up has resulted in a general trend among fuel manufacturers to develop alloys with reduced levels of Sn. While commonly accepted, the reason for the improved corrosion performance observed for low-tin zirconium alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments remains unclear. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the oxides formed by autoclave exposure on Zr–Sn–Nb alloys with tin concentration ranging from 0.01 to 0.92 wt.%. The alloys studied included the commercial alloy ZIRLO® (ZIRLO® is a registered trademark of Westinghouse Electric Company LLC in the USA and may be registered in other countries throughout the world. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.) and two variants of ZIRLO with significantly lower tin levels, referred to here as A-0.6Sn and A-0.0Sn. The nature of the oxide grown on tube samples from each alloy was investigated via cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy. Atom probe analysis of ZIRLO demonstrated that the tin present in the alloy passes into the oxide as it forms, with no significant difference in the Sn/Zr ratio between the two. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on the oxides formed on each alloy revealed that the monoclinic and tetragonal oxide phases display highly compressive in-plane residual stresses with the magnitudes dependent on the phase and alloy. The amount of tetragonal phase present and, more importantly, the level of tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation both decrease with decreasing tin levels, suggesting that tin is a tetragonal oxide phase stabilizing element. It is proposed that in Zr–Nb–Sn alloys with low Sn, the tetragonal phase is mainly stabilized by very small grain size and therefore remains stable throughout the corrosion process. In contrast, alloys with higher tin levels can in addition grow larger, stress stabilized, tetragonal grains that

  5. An accurately controllable imitative stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose a method to simulate stress corrosion cracking. ► The method offers nondestructive signals similar to those of actual cracking. ► Visual and eddy current examinations validate the method. - Abstract: This study proposes a simple and cost-effective approach to fabricate an artificial flaw that is identical to stress corrosion cracking especially from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The key idea of the approach is to embed a partially-bonded region inside a material by bonding together surfaces that have grooves. The region is regarded as an area of uniform non-zero conductivity from an electromagnetic nondestructive point of view, and thus simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking. Since the grooves are introduced using electro-discharge machining, one can control the profile of the imitative stress corrosion cracking accurately. After numerical simulation to evaluate the spatial resolution of conventional eddy current testing, six specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel were fabricated on the basis of the results of the simulations. Visual and eddy current examinations were carried out to demonstrate that the artificial flaws well simulated the characteristics of actual stress corrosion cracking. Subsequent destructive test confirmed that the bonding did not change the depth profiles of the artificial flaw.

  6. Corrosion protection performance of single and dual Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) coating for aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhan Kumar, A.; Kwon, Sun Hwan; Jung, Hwa Chul; Shin, Kwang Seon

    2015-01-01

    Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) coatings are known to be one of the most appropriate method for corrosion protection of magnesium (Mg) alloy. The improvement of PEO coatings and the optimization of their surface aspects are of major importance. In this current work, the influence of dual PEO coating on strip-cast AZ31 Mg alloy substrate has been evaluated with the aim of improving the surface and corrosion protection aspects. For this purpose, AZ31 Mg substrates are subjected to single and dual PEO processing in silicate and phosphate electrolyte under similar condition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed that the number of pores in PEO coating processed in silicate electrolyte is higher than others. X-ray diffraction analysis of PEO coatings showed that the surface coating is mainly comprised of Mg 2 SiO 4 , Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and MgO with different quantity based on PEO processing. Compared with the AZ31 Mg, the corrosion potential (E corr ) of both type PEO coatings was positively shifted about 250–400 mV and the corrosion current density (i corr ) was lowered by 3-4 orders of magnitude as result of adequate corrosion protection to the Mg alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution. All of the observation obviously showed that the dual PEO coating provides better corrosion protection performance than their respective single due to its synergistic beneficial effect. - Highlights: • Influence of dual PEO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy substrate was evaluated. • XRD confirmed formation of thin MgO inner, Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and Mg 2 SiO 4 outer layer. • SEM results showed uniform coating with no cracks and relatively less micro pores. • Micro hardness of dual PEO coatings is higher than single PEO coatings. • Dual coating provides superior corrosion performance due to its synergistic effect

  7. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing: Part II. Precipitates by in situ aluminum alloy corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Kasza, Ken E.; Shack, William J.; Natesan, Ken; Klein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → Sump strainer head loss testing to evaluate chemical effects. → Aluminum hydroxide precipitates by in situ Al alloy corrosion caused head loss. → Intermetallic particles released from Al alloy can also cause significant head loss. → When evaluating Al effect on head loss, intermetallics should be considered. - Abstract: Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 o C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH) 3 ) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH) 3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH) 3 when intermetallic particles are present.

  8. Corrosion Performance of Nano-ZrO₂ Modified Coatings in Hot Mixed Acid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Wang, Zhenyu; Han, En-Hou; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Qian

    2018-06-01

    A nano-ZrO₂ modified coating system was prepared by incorporation of nano-ZrO₂ concentrates into phenolic-epoxy resin. The corrosion performance of the coatings was evaluated in hot mixed acid solution, using electrochemical methods combined with surface characterization, and the effects of nano-ZrO₂ content were specially focused on. The results showed that 1% and 3% nano-ZrO₂ addition enhanced the corrosion resistance of the coatings, while 5% nano-ZrO₂ addition declined it. The coating with 3% nano-ZrO₂ presented the minimum amount of species diffusion, the lowest average roughness (5.94 nm), and the highest C/O ratio (4.55) and coating resistance, and it demonstrated the best corrosion performance among the coating specimens.

  9. Aqueous corrosion in static capsule tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuit of Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: manfred.lipa@cea.fr; Blanchet, J.; Feron, D. [CEA/DEN/SCCME, Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Cellier, F. [AREVA ANP, Centre Technique, 71380 Saint Marcel (France)

    2008-12-15

    Tore supra (TS) in vessel components represent a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit. Different materials, e.g. stainless steel, copper alloys, nickel, etc., were joined together by fusion welding, brazing and friction. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be set at 230 deg. C/40 bars a special water chemistry of the cooling water loop was suggested in order to prevent eventual water leaks due to corrosion at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, bellows, coils and coolant plant ancillary equipments. Following experiences with water chemistry in Pressurised Water Reactors, an all volatile chemical treatment (AVT) has been defined for the cooling water quality of TS. Since then, a simplified static (no fluid circulation) corrosion test program at relatively high temperature and pressure has been performed using capsule-type samples made of above mentioned multi-metal assemblies.

  10. Bridge maintenance to enhance corrosion resistance and performance of steel girder bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran Yanez, Luis M.

    The integrity and efficiency of any national highway system relies on the condition of the various components. Bridges are fundamental elements of a highway system, representing an important investment and a strategic link that facilitates the transport of persons and goods. The cost to rehabilitate or replace a highway bridge represents an important expenditure to the owner, who needs to evaluate the correct time to assume that cost. Among the several factors that affect the condition of steel highway bridges, corrosion is identified as the main problem. In the USA corrosion is the primary cause of structurally deficient steel bridges. The benefit of regular high-pressure superstructure washing and spot painting were evaluated as effective maintenance activities to reduce the corrosion process. The effectiveness of steel girder washing was assessed by developing models of corrosion deterioration of composite steel girders and analyzing steel coupons at the laboratory under atmospheric corrosion for two alternatives: when high-pressure washing was performed and when washing was not considered. The effectiveness of spot painting was assessed by analyzing the corrosion on steel coupons, with small damages, unprotected and protected by spot painting. A parametric analysis of corroded steel girder bridges was considered. The emphasis was focused on the parametric analyses of corroded steel girder bridges under two alternatives: (a) when steel bridge girder washing is performed according to a particular frequency, and (b) when no bridge washing is performed to the girders. The reduction of structural capacity was observed for both alternatives along the structure service life, estimated at 100 years. An economic analysis, using the Life-Cycle Cost Analysis method, demonstrated that it is more cost-effective to perform steel girder washing as a scheduled maintenance activity in contrast to the no washing alternative.

  11. Corrosion Characteristics of Inconel-600 at the NP(Cu)-HYBRID Decontamination Demonstration Test with HANARO FTL Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jun Young; Park, Sang Yoon; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Seon Byeong; Choi, Wang Kyu; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    An alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP) oxidative phase has been generally used to dissolve the chromium-rich oxide. AP is advantageous for the corrosion resistance, but increases the volume of secondary waste during the decontamination procedure. On the other hand, NP has a high corrosion rate but reduces secondary waste. For the safe use of an oxidative decontamination solution with high corrosive resistance and less amount of secondary waste are required. In this study, we modified NP oxidative decontamination solution by adding Cu{sup 2+} to reduce the corrosion rate. To evaluate the general corrosion characteristics, we measured the weight losses of selected specimens in an NP(Cu) and other solutions. The localized corrosion was observed using an optical microscope (OM). To compare the decontamination performance, we measured the contact dose rate of specimens treated in NP-HYBRID and NP(Cu)-HYBRID systems. The reduced corrosion characteristics of the Inconel-600 specimen in a NP(Cu) oxidative solution was observed in terms of generalized corrosion as well as localized corrosion. Less corrosion characteristics do not affect the performance of the overall decontamination compared to the NP-HYBRID process. Therefore, our results support that the NP(Cu)-HYBRID decontamination process is appropriate for the decontamination of the primary coolant system in a nuclear reactor.

  12. Investigation of structure, adhesion strength, wear performance and corrosion behavior of platinum/ruthenium/nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon thin films with respect to film thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khun, N.W.; Liu, E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sputtered PtRuN-DLC thin films were fabricated with different film thicknesses. → The graphitization of the films increased with increased film thickness. → The wear resistance of the films increased though their adhesion strength decreased. → The corrosion potentials of the films shifted to more negative values. → However, the corrosion currents of the films decreased. - Abstract: In this study, the corrosion performance of platinum/ruthenium/nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (PtRuN-DLC) thin films deposited on p-Si substrates using a DC magnetron sputtering deposition system in a 0.1 M NaCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization test in terms of film thickness. The effect of the film thickness on the chemical composition, bonding structure, surface morphology, adhesion strength and wear resistance of the PtRuN-DLC films was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-scratch test and ball-on-disc tribotest, respectively. It was found that the wear resistance of the PtRuN-DLC films apparently increased with increased film thickness though the adhesion strength of the films decreased. The corrosion results revealed that the increased concentration of sp 2 bonds in the PtRuN-DLC films with increased film thickness shifted the corrosion potentials of the films to more negative values but the decreased porosity density in the films significantly decreased the corrosion currents of the films.

  13. Diagnostic of corrosion defects in steam generator tubes using advanced signal processing from Eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formigoni, Andre L.; Lopez, Luiz A.N.M.; Ting, Daniel K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the Brazilian Angra I PWR nuclear power plant went into a programmed shutdown for substitution of its Steam Generator (SG) which life was shortened due to stress corrosion in its tubes. The total cost of investment were around R$724 million. The signals generated during an Eddy-current Testing (ECT) inspection in SG tubes of nuclear plant allows for the localization and dimensioning of defects in the tubes. The defects related with corrosion generate complex signals that are difficult to analyze and are the most common cause in SG replacement in nuclear power plants around the world. The objective of this paper is the development of a methodology that allows for the characterization of corrosion signals by ECT inspections applied in the heat exchangers tubes of SG of a nuclear power plant. In this present work, the aim is to investigate distributed type defects by inducing controlled corrosion in sample tubes of different materials The ECT signals obtained from these samples tubes with corrosion implanted, will be analyzed using Zetec ECT equipment, the MIZ-17ET and its probes. The data acquisition will use a NI PC A/D CARD 700 card and the LabVIEW program. Subsequently, we will apply mathematical tools for signal processing like time windowed Fast Fourier transforms and Wavelets transforms, in MATLAB platform, which will allow effectiveness to remove the noises and to extract representative characteristics for the defect being analyzed. Previously obtained results as well as the proposal for the future work will be presented. (author)

  14. In situ corrosion testing of various nickel alloys at Måbjerg waste incineration plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Hansson, A. N.; Jensen, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    overlay material currently being used to give improved corrosion resistance. In order to assess the use of alternative nickel alloys, test panels have been manufactured and inserted into Måbjerg waste incineration plant. Inconel 625 as a 50% weld overlay, two layered weld overlay and as a spiral weld......The majority of waste in Denmark is disposed via waste to energy (WTE) incineration plants which are fabricated from carbon steel. However, due to the increasing corrosiveness of waste over the years, more corrosion resistant alloys are required. In Denmark, Inconel 625 (UNSN06625) is the weld...... overlay was exposed. Other nickel materials exposed were weld overlay Alloy 686, Alloy 50 and Sumitomo Super 625 coextruded tube. Exposure has been undertaken from 2003 to 2009 in the first pass and 2005–2009 in the second pass, and sections have been removed and investigated during this period...

  15. Corrosion performance of Al-Si-Cu hypereutectic alloys in a synthetic condensed automotive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilta de Oliveira Santos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation the corrosion resistance of four Al-Si hypereutectic alloys in a solution typical of condensate from automotive fuel combustion products, and referred to here as synthetic condensed automotive solution, has been studied. Three commercial alloys that are used for cylinder liners, and a laboratory made alloy, were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and measurements were taken after increasing times of immersion in this solution. Comparison of the electrochemical response of the four alloys in the corrosive solution was carried out. Although the mechanisms by which the four alloys corroded were similar, the results indicated differences in corrosion resistances of these alloys, and these differences could be related to their microstructures. The laboratory prepared alloy showed increased susceptibility to pitting corrosion compared to the commercial alloys. The surfaces of the alloys were examined, before and after the corrosion test, by scanning electron microscopy and analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results indicated preferential attack of the aluminium matrix phase in all the alloys. The alloy with higher copper content and prepared by spray forming was more susceptible to pitting compared to the other alloys. The EIS response at low frequencies indicated a diffusion-controlled process, probably that of oxygen to the alloy interface.

  16. Statistical evaluation of unobserved nonuniform corrosion in A216 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsipher, B.A.

    1988-07-01

    Tests designed to promote nonuniform corrosion have been conducted at PNL on A216 steel. In all of the tests performed to date, there have been no manifestations of significant nonuniform corrosion. Although this may suggest that nonuniform corrosion in A216 steel may not be a significant problem in the nuclear waste repository, a question arises as to whether enough tests have been conducted for a sufficient length of time to rule out nonuniform corrosion of A216 steel. In this report, a method for determining the required number of tests is examined for two of the mechanisms of nonuniform corrosion: pitting and crevice corrosion

  17. Steam based conversion coating on AA6060 alloy: Effect of sodium silicate chemistry and corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Tabrizian, Naja

    2017-01-01

    . Moreover, the use of sodium silicate resulted in the formation of distinct microstructure and incorporation of silicate into the oxide film. These oxide films reduced the anodic activity 4 times, while the corrosion protection by silicate containing oxide was the function of its concentration. Further......Surface treatment of aluminium alloy AA6060 using an industrially applicable pilot steam jet system with and without silicate chemistry has been investigated. Treatment using steam alone and steam with silicate, resulted in an oxide layer formation with thickness ∼425 nm and ∼160 nm, respectively......, in acid salt spray and filiform corrosion tests, oxide layer containing silicate exhibited two times higher corrosion resistance....

  18. The influence of current collector corrosion on the performance of electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Jarosław; Kolanowski, Łukasz; Bund, Andreas; Lota, Grzegorz

    2017-11-01

    This paper discusses the effect of current collector (stainless steel 316L) corrosion on the performance of electrochemical capacitors operated in aqueous electrolytes. This topic seems to be often neglected in scientific research. The studied electrolytes were 1 M H2SO4, 1 M KI, 1 M Na2SO4, 1 M KOH and 6 M KOH. The corrosion process was investigated by means of selected direct and alternating current techniques. The surface of the current collectors as well as the corrosion products were characterised using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Stainless steel 316L in alkaline solutions is characterised by the lowest values of corrosion potentials whereas the potentials in acidic media become the most noble. Our studies show that corrosion potentials increase with decreasing pH value. This phenomenon can be explained with the formation of passive oxide films on the stainless steel current collectors. The passive oxide films are usually thicker and more porous in alkaline solutions than that in the other electrolytes. The processes occurring at the electrode/electrolyte interfaces strongly influence the working parameters of electrochemical capacitors such as voltage, working potentials of single electrodes, self-discharge as well as the internal resistance and cycling stability.

  19. Corrosion protection performance of waterborne epoxy coatings containing self-doped polyaniline nanofiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Shihui; Chen, Cheng; Cui, Mingjun; Li, Wei; Zhao, Haichao; Wang, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Self-dopedpolyaniline (SPANi) with good conductivity and dispersibility in water was copolymerized by aniline and its derivative. • Environmental friendly SPANi/epoxy composite coating with remarkable anti-corrosion performance was prepared. • The corrosion product of pure epoxy or composite coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern and scanning electron microscope (SEM). - Abstract: Self-doped sulfonated polyaniline (SPANi) nanofiber was synthesized by the copolymerization of 2-aminobenzenesulfonic acid (ASA) and aniline via a rapid mixing polymerization approach. The chemical structure of SPANi was investigated by the Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. The as-prepared SPANi nanofibers had 45 nm average diameter and length up to 750 nm as measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The self-doped SPANi nanofiber possessed excellent aqueous solubility, good conductivity (0.11 S/cm) and reversible redox activity, making it suitable as a corrosion inhibitor for waterborne coatings. The prepared SPANi/waterborne epoxy composite coatings exhibited remarkably improved corrosion protection compared with pure waterborne epoxy coating as proved by the polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The passivation effect of SPANi nanofiber and the corrosion products beneath the epoxy coatings immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution as a function of time were also investigated in this study.

  20. Corrosion protection performance of waterborne epoxy coatings containing self-doped polyaniline nanofiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Shihui [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, 315201 (China); Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo, 315211 (China); Chen, Cheng; Cui, Mingjun [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, 315201 (China); Li, Wei [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo, 315211 (China); Zhao, Haichao, E-mail: zhaohaichao@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, 315201 (China); Wang, Liping, E-mail: wangliping@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, 315201 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Self-dopedpolyaniline (SPANi) with good conductivity and dispersibility in water was copolymerized by aniline and its derivative. • Environmental friendly SPANi/epoxy composite coating with remarkable anti-corrosion performance was prepared. • The corrosion product of pure epoxy or composite coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern and scanning electron microscope (SEM). - Abstract: Self-doped sulfonated polyaniline (SPANi) nanofiber was synthesized by the copolymerization of 2-aminobenzenesulfonic acid (ASA) and aniline via a rapid mixing polymerization approach. The chemical structure of SPANi was investigated by the Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. The as-prepared SPANi nanofibers had 45 nm average diameter and length up to 750 nm as measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The self-doped SPANi nanofiber possessed excellent aqueous solubility, good conductivity (0.11 S/cm) and reversible redox activity, making it suitable as a corrosion inhibitor for waterborne coatings. The prepared SPANi/waterborne epoxy composite coatings exhibited remarkably improved corrosion protection compared with pure waterborne epoxy coating as proved by the polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The passivation effect of SPANi nanofiber and the corrosion products beneath the epoxy coatings immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution as a function of time were also investigated in this study.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  2. Corrosion resistance of high performance stainless steels in cooling water and other refinery environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, C.W.; Redmerski, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The recent successful introduction of high performance stainless steels as tubing for seawater cooled electric utility condensers suggests that these alloys can also provide useful service in refinery heat exchanger applications. Since many of these applications involve higher temperature exposure than steam condensers, a study was conducted to evaluate crevice corrsion resistance over a range of cooling water temperature and chloride concentrations, and also to evaluate general corrosion resistance in some strong chemical and refinery environments. These stainless steels display excellent crevice corrosion resistance as well as good resistance to a variety of chemical environments that may be encountered in refinery, petrochemical and chemical plant service

  3. Corrosion Performance of Composite Galvanic Coatings with Variable Concentration of Polymeric Nanoaggregates and/or Cr(III) Conversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Taheri, P.; Tsvetkova, N.; Boshkov, N.; Van Breugel, K.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the corrosion performance of composite zinc layers (~ 8µm) on a steel substrate, considering the influence of nano-aggregates and Cr(III) conversion layers, compared to control (only Zn layers) conditions. The main factors, influencing the corrosion performance of Zn in this

  4. Corrosion performance of MAO coatings on AZ31 Mg alloy in simulated body fluid vs. Earle's Balance Salt Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Benjamin M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PO Box 755905, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Zhang, Lei, E-mail: lzhang14@alaska.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PO Box 755905, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Li, Weiping; Ning, Chengyun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Chen, Cheng-fu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PO Box 755905, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Gu, Yanhong [College of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MAO coating is deposited on AZ31 Mg alloy by microarc oxidation. • Corrosion performance of MAO-coated AZ31 in EBSS vs. c-SBF is studied. • MAO-coated AZ31 exhibits enhanced corrosion resistance compared to bare AZ31. • Samples in EBSS show slower corrosion progression than the samples in c-SBF. • CO{sub 2} buffer and less chloride in EBSS cause corrosion rate gap in c-SBF and EBSS. - Abstract: Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) provides an alternative to the conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) and has been shown to better simulate the corrosion conditions in vivo. In this work, a series of tests were conducted to explore the corrosion performance of MAO-coated AZ31 samples in EBSS vs. c-SBF. Samples were produced by varying MAO process parameters and then immersed up to 21 days in both EBSS and c-SBF. The corrosion rates were evaluated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic scanning. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to compare the progression of microcracks across the surface of the coatings. The evaluation of cross-sectional thickness showed an increase in MAO coating thickness with the process voltage. MAO samples with a thicker coating generally have higher impedance and lower current density at the initial immersion time point of 0.5 h. Samples in EBSS showed higher initial impedance and lower current density values as compared to c-SBF counterparts for all process groups. Samples in EBSS demonstrated a much slower corrosion rate than c-SBF samples because of the decreased chloride content and CO{sub 2} buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  5. Corrosion performance of MAO coatings on AZ31 Mg alloy in simulated body fluid vs. Earle's Balance Salt Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Lei; Li, Weiping; Ning, Chengyun; Chen, Cheng-fu; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MAO coating is deposited on AZ31 Mg alloy by microarc oxidation. • Corrosion performance of MAO-coated AZ31 in EBSS vs. c-SBF is studied. • MAO-coated AZ31 exhibits enhanced corrosion resistance compared to bare AZ31. • Samples in EBSS show slower corrosion progression than the samples in c-SBF. • CO 2 buffer and less chloride in EBSS cause corrosion rate gap in c-SBF and EBSS. - Abstract: Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) provides an alternative to the conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) and has been shown to better simulate the corrosion conditions in vivo. In this work, a series of tests were conducted to explore the corrosion performance of MAO-coated AZ31 samples in EBSS vs. c-SBF. Samples were produced by varying MAO process parameters and then immersed up to 21 days in both EBSS and c-SBF. The corrosion rates were evaluated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic scanning. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to compare the progression of microcracks across the surface of the coatings. The evaluation of cross-sectional thickness showed an increase in MAO coating thickness with the process voltage. MAO samples with a thicker coating generally have higher impedance and lower current density at the initial immersion time point of 0.5 h. Samples in EBSS showed higher initial impedance and lower current density values as compared to c-SBF counterparts for all process groups. Samples in EBSS demonstrated a much slower corrosion rate than c-SBF samples because of the decreased chloride content and CO 2 buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  6. Factors affecting the silver corrosion performance of jet fuel from the Merox process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viljoen, C.L. [Sasol Oil R& D (South Africa); Hietkamp, S. [CSIR, Pretoria (South Africa); Marais, B.; Venter, J.J. [National Petroleum Refineries of South Africa, Sasolburg (South Africa)

    1995-05-01

    The Natref refinery at Sasolburg, South Africa, which is 63,6% owned by Sasol and 36,5% by Total, is producing Jet A-1 fuel at a rate of 80 m{sup 3}/h by means of a UOP Merox process. A substantial part of the crude oil slate is made up from crudes which have been stored for considerable times in underground mines. Since the 1970`s, Natref has experienced sporadic non-conformance of its treated jet fuel to the silver corrosion (IP 227) test. Various causes and explanations for the sporadic silver corrosion occurrence have been put forward but a direct causal link has remained obscure. The paper addresses these possible causes for silver corrosion and some of the process changes which have been made to alleviate the problem. Emphasis is placed on the most recent approaches which were taken to identify the origin of the sporadic silver corrosion. An inventory of all the potential causes was made, such a bacterial action, elemental sulphur formation in storage, etc. and experiments designed to test the validity of these causes, are discussed. A statistical evaluation which was done of the historical process data over a 2 year period, failed to link the use of mine crudes directly to Ag-corrosion occurrence. However, a correlation between elemental sulphur and H{sub 2}S levels in the feed to the Merox reactor and Ag-corrosion was observed. Finally, the outcome of the experiments are discussed, as well as the conclusions which were reached from the observed results.

  7. Analysis of Barrier Performance: Modelling of Copper corrosion scenarios with and without buffer erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benbow, Steven J.; Robinson, Peter C.; Watson, Sarah P.

    2011-02-01

    SKB have identified buffer erosion as a process that could potentially lead to increased corrosion of the copper canister. Buffer erosion can be caused by: the formation of bentonite (i.e., montmorillonite) colloids and their transport away from deposition holes in intersecting fractures containing dilute groundwaters (such as subglacial meltwaters); steep hydraulic gradients during buffer resaturation; or shearing of solid bentonite particles by rapidly flowing groundwater. Only colloidal removal of bentonite (the first of the processes listed) is considered in this study. The erosion of the bentonite leads to a reduction in density and swelling potential, and hence a lowering of transport resistances in the buffer that can make it easier for corrosive agents to transported to be the canister surface, resulting in increased levels of corrosion of the canister surface compared with those predicted in 'normal evolution' conditions. The reduction in bentonite density that follows as a consequence of erosion also leads to the possibility of breaching other safety functions of the buffer, for example prevention of canister sinking and resistance to shear deformation. These are not considered in this study. This report describes the modelling of copper corrosion processes in the SKB KBS-3 design concept. The modelling includes an initial representation of all relevant physical processes, but with some processes represented in more detail than others. This allows investigation of the impacts of the processes that are modelled on canister corrosion, allowing identification of the processes that impact most on the key performance measures for the EBS, which will help to focus modelling developments in future work. This work could be taken as the starting point in a longer-term modelling study in which the interactions between processes that affect canister corrosion are further investigated. Two high-level scenarios are considered in this work: a base case scenario in

  8. Analysis of Barrier Performance: Modelling of Copper corrosion scenarios with and without buffer erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benbow, Steven J.; Robinson, Peter C.; Watson, Sarah P. (Quintessa Limited, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom))

    2011-02-15

    SKB have identified buffer erosion as a process that could potentially lead to increased corrosion of the copper canister. Buffer erosion can be caused by: the formation of bentonite (i.e., montmorillonite) colloids and their transport away from deposition holes in intersecting fractures containing dilute groundwaters (such as subglacial meltwaters); steep hydraulic gradients during buffer resaturation; or shearing of solid bentonite particles by rapidly flowing groundwater. Only colloidal removal of bentonite (the first of the processes listed) is considered in this study. The erosion of the bentonite leads to a reduction in density and swelling potential, and hence a lowering of transport resistances in the buffer that can make it easier for corrosive agents to transported to be the canister surface, resulting in increased levels of corrosion of the canister surface compared with those predicted in 'normal evolution' conditions. The reduction in bentonite density that follows as a consequence of erosion also leads to the possibility of breaching other safety functions of the buffer, for example prevention of canister sinking and resistance to shear deformation. These are not considered in this study. This report describes the modelling of copper corrosion processes in the SKB KBS-3 design concept. The modelling includes an initial representation of all relevant physical processes, but with some processes represented in more detail than others. This allows investigation of the impacts of the processes that are modelled on canister corrosion, allowing identification of the processes that impact most on the key performance measures for the EBS, which will help to focus modelling developments in future work. This work could be taken as the starting point in a longer-term modelling study in which the interactions between processes that affect canister corrosion are further investigated. Two high-level scenarios are considered in this work: a base case

  9. Note: Inhibiting bottleneck corrosion in electrical calcium tests for ultra-barrier measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehm, F., E-mail: frederik.nehm@iapp.de; Müller-Meskamp, L.; Klumbies, H.; Leo, K. [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A major failure mechanism is identified in electrical calcium corrosion tests for quality assessment of high-end application moisture barriers. Accelerated calcium corrosion is found at the calcium/electrode junction, leading to an electrical bottleneck. This causes test failure not related to overall calcium loss. The likely cause is a difference in electrochemical potential between the aluminum electrodes and the calcium sensor, resulting in a corrosion element. As a solution, a thin, full-area copper layer is introduced below the calcium, shifting the corrosion element to the calcium/copper junction and inhibiting bottleneck degradation. Using the copper layer improves the level of sensitivity for the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) by over one order of magnitude. Thin-film encapsulated samples with 20 nm of atomic layer deposited alumina barriers this way exhibit WVTRs of 6 × 10{sup −5} g(H{sub 2}O)/m{sup 2}/d at 38 °C, 90% relative humidity.

  10. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  11. Accelerated corrosion test for metal drainage pipes : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    This study represents an attempt to develop an accelerated test which would assist the highway engineer in evaluating the usefulness of a new type of coated steel culvert. The test method was to be short in duration (in the order of days), and the re...

  12. The SKB spent fuel corrosion programme. An evaluation of results from the experimental programme performed in the Studsvik Hot Cell Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, R. [Forsyth Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    During the last few years, many of the specimens in the SKB programme on the corrosion of spent fuel have been analysed by the ICP-MS technique, shortly after conclusion of the corrosion tests, or by the analysis of archive samples. Together with the previous results, this has made available a much more extended analytical data base than that available before, and this has been used in a new evaluation which complements those published earlier. Some of the new analytical data is for tests performed on fuel specimens (from two reference fuel rods, one BWR and one PWR) which have been corrosion tested for over ten years. Most of the data refers to 16 fuel/clad specimens from a short BWR fuel rod, which had burnups over a range of 27.0 to 48.8 MWd/kg U. Detailed examination and characterisation of three other fuel specimens from the rod had shown that the specimens with the higher burnups in this series would have a fuel microstructure and alpha activity content and distribution which, theoretically, may promote enhanced corrosion. These specimens had been exposed to over 5 years of corrosion during nine water contact periods. The corrodants used were a simulated bicarbonate groundwater and de-ionised water, and both oxic and nominally anoxic conditions were included in the test matrix. Most of the emphasis in the evaluation has, therefore, been on the possible effects on corrosion behaviour of the linear heat rating and burnup of the fuels. However, examination of the variation with water contact time of the fractional release rates of selected fission products and their total release over the five years of corrosion, have shown that the corrosion rates during the first few weeks of corrosion of the specimens with the higher burnups were lower than those for specimens with slightly lower burnup. Later, the corrosion rates converged for all specimens. This has been interpreted to be due to burnup-related differences in the fuel microstructure, particularly in the

  13. Revitalisation of Control and Data Acquisition Systems for Corrosion Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul Handono; Kiswanta; Edy Sumarno

    2008-01-01

    The replacement of control and data acquisition systems for Corrosion Test Loop (CTL) has been conducted. The aim of revitalisation for CTL is to increase controller system performance Kent 4000 which is based on PLC. On the other side revitalisation of acquisition data system is done to build computer based data retrieval system for transformation gauging of parameters in thermalhydraulic experiment of CTL. Previously, data collector system used indicator recorder analog, while data recording is done manually, which caused causing very slow response and the result is less accurate. To increase the user quality of data collector system, the data acquisition system is developed with application program Visual Basic and acquisition apparatus card of data. Result of the activity of revitalisation CTL is to obtain of control systems based on PLC and data acquisition system capable to present information in the form of temperature, pressure and cooling water level interactively, namely easy to read, quickly, realtime and accurate. This results give the improvement of control systems performance and data acquisition system which data storage of acquisition into hard disk in the form of file and further processed in the form of tables or graph to facilitate the analysis. (author)

  14. Standard guide for conducting exfoliation corrosion tests in aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 This guide differs from the usual ASTM standard in that it does not address a specific test. Rather, it is an introductory guide for new users of other standard exfoliation test methods, (see Terminology G 15 for definition of exfoliation). 1.2 This guide covers aspects of specimen preparation, exposure, inspection, and evaluation for conducting exfoliation tests on aluminum alloys in both laboratory accelerated environments and in natural, outdoor atmospheres. The intent is to clarify any gaps in existent test methods. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Uniform peanut performance test 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, 2 controls and 14 entries were evaluated at 8 locations....

  16. Effect of Surface Contaminants Remained on the Blasted Surface on Epoxy Coating Performance and Corrosion Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Kwang Ki; Park, Chung Seo; Kim, Ki Hong; Chung, Mong Kyu; Park, Jin Hwan

    2006-01-01

    One of the critical issues in the coating specification is the allowable limit of surface contaminant(s) - such as soluble salt(s), grit dust, and rust - after grit blasting. Yet, there is no universally accepted data supporting the relationship between the long-term coating performance and the amount of various surface contaminants allowed after grit blasting. In this study, it was attempted to prepare epoxy coatings applied on grit-blasted steel substrate dosed with controlled amount of surface contaminants - such as soluble salt(s), grit dust, and rust. Then, coating samples were subjected to 4,200 hours of cyclic test(NORSOK M-501), which were then evaluated in terms of resistance to rust creepage, blistering, chalking, rusting, cracking and adhesion strength. Additional investigations on the possible damage at the paint/steel interface were carried out using an Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy(EIS) and observations of under-film-corrosion. Test results suggested that the current industrial specifications were well matched with the allowable degree of rust, whereas the allowable amount of soluble salt and grit dust after grit blasting showed a certain deviation from the specifications currently employed for fabrication of marine vessels and offshore facilities

  17. Standard practice for preparation and use of direct tension stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using ASTM standard tension test specimens for investigating susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking. Axially loaded specimens may be stressed quantitatively with equipment for application of either a constant load, constant strain, or with a continuously increasing strain. 1.2 Tension test specimens are adaptable for testing a wide variety of product forms as well as parts joined by welding, riveting, or various other methods. 1.3 The exposure of specimens in a corrosive environment is treated only briefly because other standards are being prepared to deal with this aspect. Meanwhile, the investigator is referred to Practices G35, G36, G37, and G44, and to ASTM Special Technical Publication 425 (1).

  18. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented

  19. Inspection system performance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure establishes requirements to administer a performance demonstration test. The test is to demonstrate that the double-shell tank inspection system (DSTIS) supplied by the contractor performs in accordance with the WHC-S-4108, Double-Shell Tank Ultrasonic Inspection Performance Specification, Rev. 2-A, January, 1995. The inspection system is intended to provide ultrasonic (UT) and visual data to determine integrity of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) site underground waste tanks. The robotic inspection system consists of the following major sub-systems (modules) and components: Mobile control center; Deployment module; Cable management assembly; Robot mechanism; Ultrasonic testing system; Visual testing system; Pneumatic system; Electrical system; and Control system

  20. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  1. Corrosion and deposit evaluation in industrial plants by non destructive testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad; Abd Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohd Pauzi Ismail; S Saad; S Sayuti; S Ahmad

    2000-01-01

    In petrochemical plants, the detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using a radiography method are very challenging tasks. This main degradation problem experienced by pipelines is due to water condensation. It will cause deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe for the cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for the hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the case of corrosion study one of the most important parameters in a piping or pipeline to be monitored and measured is that the wall thickness. In general, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is done by using an ultrasonic method. The most common technique for corrosion is that based on the A-Scan, using either a normal flow detector or some form of dedicated equipment. However, with recent development of ultrasonic technology, more advance method, namely B-Scan and C-scan techniques are also available. The most notable disadvantage of using this current method is that the insulation covered the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method has been studied. The testing technique used in this studied are tangential technique and double wall radiographic technique which involve studying the changing in density of radiographic film. The result found using tangential technique is consistent with real thickness of the pipe. However for the later technique the result is only achieved with a reasonable accuracy when the changing in wall thickness is very small. The result of the studies is discussed in this paper

  2. Summary of INCO corrosion tests in power plant flue gas scrubbing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoxie, E.C.; Tuffnell, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion tests in a number of flue-gas desulfurization units have shown that carbon steel, low alloy steels, and Type 304L stainless steel are inadequate in the wet portions of the scrubbers. Type 316L stainless steel is sometimes subject to localized corrosive attack in scrubber environments with certain combinations of pH and chloride content. A corollary is that corrosion of Type 316L stainless steel might be controlled by control of scrubbing media pH and chloride content. Although an attempt was made to correlate the pitting and crevice corrosion obtained on the Type 316 stainless steel test samples with chloride and pH measurements, relatively wide scatter in the data indicated only a modest correlation. This is attributed to variations in local conditions, especially beneath deposits, that differ from the liquor samples obtained for analysis, to processing upsets, to temperature differences, and to some extent to inaccuracies in measurement of pH and chloride levels. The data do show, however, that molybdenum as an alloying element in stainless steels and high nickel alloys was very beneficial in conferring resistance to localized attack in scrubber environments. High nickel alloys containing appreciable amounts of molybdenum such as Hastelloy alloy C-276 and Inconel alloy 625 can be used for critical components. Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steels has generally not been a problem in FGD scrubbers, apparently because operating temperatures are comparatively low. An exception is reheater tubing where some failures have occurred because of elevated temperatures in conjunction with condensate that forms during shut-down periods or carryover of chloride laden mist from the scrubber. This problem can be overcome by proper alloy selection or maintaining dry conditions

  3. Effect of areal power density and relative humidity on corrosion resistant container performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    The impact of the rewetting process on the performance of waste containers at the Yucca Mountain repository is analyzed. This paper explores the impact of the temperature-humidity relationships on pitting corrosion failure of stainless steel containers for different areal power densities (APDs)in the repository. It compares the likely performance of containers in a repository with a low APD, 55 Kw/acre, and a high APD, 110 kW/acre

  4. Open site tests on corrosion of carbon steel containers for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barinov, A.S.; Ojovan, M.I.; Ojovan, N.V.; Startceva, I.V.; Chujkova, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    Testing of waste containers under open field conditions is a component part of the research program that is being carried out at SIA Radon for more than 20 years to understand the long-term behavior of radioactive waste forms and waste packages. This paper presents the preliminary results of these ongoing studies. The authors used a typical NPP operational waste, containing 137 Cs, 134 Cs, and 60 Co as the dominant radioactive constituents. Bituminized and vitrified waste samples with 30--50 wt.% waste loading were prepared. Combined effects of climatic factors on corrosion behavior of carbon steel containers were estimated using gravimetric and chemical analyses. The observations suggest that uniform corrosion of containers prevails under open field conditions. The upper limits for the lifetime of containers were derived from calculations based on the model of atmospheric steel corrosion. Estimated lifetime values range from 300 to 600 years for carbon steel containers with the wall thickness of 2 mm containing vitrified waste, and from 450 to 500 years for containers with the wall thickness of 2.5 mm that were used for bituminized waste. However, following the most conservative method, pitting corrosion may cause container integrity failure after 60 to 90 years of exposure

  5. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  6. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weddings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segarra, J. A.; Calderon, B.; Portoles, A.

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS). The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior. (Author)

  7. A new corrosion resistant, martensitic stainless steel for improved performance in miniature bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasello, C.M.; Maloney, J.L.; Materkowski, J.P. [Latrobe Steel Co., Latrobe, PA (United States); Ward, P.C. [MPB Corp., Keene, NH (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A new alloy, 440 N-DUR{trademark} has been developed which will provide the corrosion resistance of 440C with improved carbide size and distribution for noiseless miniature precision bearing operation. The alloy may be through hardened to achieve a minimum hardness of 60 HRC. Its nominal composition is 0.65 wt.% C, 14.5 wt.% Cr, 0.30 wt.% Si, 0.45 wt.% Mn and 0.10 wt.% N{sub 2}. The development of the alloy is a result of a factorial experimental design including 17 alloy variants. The optimum alloy provides a combination of the best carbide structure, corrosion resistance and heat treat response. The addition of nitrogen combined with this carbon and chromium content improves the alloy`s hardenability and corrosion resistance. The alloy successfully withstands copper sulfate exposure and is currently being tested in several bearing applications. It also has great potential to outperform 440C and other corrosion resistant alloys for other ambient and low temperature applications because of its improved microstructure and heat treat response.

  8. Standard guide for conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1981-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests to characterize the behavior of two dissimilar metals in electrical contact in an electrolyte under low-flow conditions. It can be adapted to wrought or cast metals and alloys. 1.2 This guide covers the selection of materials, specimen preparation, test environment, method of exposure, and method for evaluating the results to characterize the behavior of galvanic couples in an electrolyte. Note 1—Additional information on galvanic corrosion testing and examples of the conduct and evaluation of galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes are given in Refs (1) through (7). 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicabil...

  9. Comparative study on Ti/Zr/V and chromate conversion treated aluminum alloys: Anti-corrosion performance and epoxy coating adhesion properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Wenfang, E-mail: mewfli@163.com; Mu, Songlin; Fu, Nianqing; Liao, Zhongmiao

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • The surface roughness and surface free energy of the AA6063 are significantly increased after TZVCC treatment. • The anti-corrosion performance of the AA6063 is effectively enhanced after TZVCC treatment. • Both the corrosion resistance and wet adhesion properties of the epoxy coating on the AA6063 are noticeably improved after TZVCC treatment. - Abstract: In this study, a Ti/Zr/V conversion coating (TZVCC) was deposited on the surface of aluminum alloy 6063 (AA6063) as an alternative of the chromate conversion coating (CCC). Both the TZVCC treated AA6063 (TZVCC/AA6063) and CCC treated AA6063 (CCC/AA6063) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM) and contact angle measuring device. The anti-corrosion performance of the TZVCC/AA6063 and CCC/AA6063 was evaluated by electrochemical measurements and neutral salt spray tests. It showed that both the surface roughness and surface free energy of the AA6063 were significantly increased after TZVCC treatment. The anti-corrosion performance of TZVCC/AA6063 was superior to that of CCC/AA6063. In addition, the effects of the TZVCC and CCC on the adhesion properties and anti-corrosion performance of epoxy coating applied on samples were examined by pull-off tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The dry, wet and recovery adhesive strengths of the epoxy coating on TZVCC treated samples (epoxy coated TZVCC/AA6063) were very close to those of epoxy coating on CCC treated ones (epoxy coated CCC/AA6063). The epoxy coated TZVCC/AA6063 showed better corrosion resistance than the epoxy coated CCC/AA6063 and epoxy coated AA6063.

  10. Corrosion Performance of Friction Stir Linear Lap Welded AM60B Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, J. R.; Birbilis, N.; McNally, E. M.; Glover, C. F.; Zhang, X.; McDermid, J. R.; Williams, G.

    2017-11-01

    A corrosion investigation of friction stir linear lap welded AM60B joints used to fabricate an Mg alloy-intensive automotive front end sub-assembly was performed. The stir zone exhibited a slightly refined grain size and significant break-up and re-distribution of the divorced Mg17Al12 (β-phase) relative to the base material. Exposures in NaCl (aq) environments revealed that the stir zone was more susceptible to localized corrosion than the base material. Scanning vibrating electrode technique measurements revealed differential galvanic activity across the joint. Anodic activity was confined to the stir zone surface and involved initiation and lateral propagation of localized filaments. Cathodic activity was initially confined to the base material surface, but was rapidly modified to include the cathodically-activated corrosion products in the filament wake. Site-specific surface analyses revealed that the corrosion observed across the welded joint was likely linked to variations in Al distribution across the surface film/metal interface.

  11. Short-term static corrosion tests in lead-bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler Crespo, L.; Martín Muñoz, F. J.; Gómez Briceño, D.

    2001-07-01

    Martensitic steels have been proposed to be used as structural materials and as spallation target window in hybrid systems devoted to the transmutation of radioactive waste of long life and high activity. However, their compatibility with lead-bismuth in the operating conditions of these systems depends on the existence of a protective layer such as an oxide film. The feasibility of forming and maintaining an oxide layer or maintaining a pre-oxidised one has been studied. Martensitic steel F82Hmod. (8% Cr) has been tested in lead-bismuth under static and isothermal conditions at 400°C and 600°C. In order to study the first stages of the interaction between the steel and the eutectic, short-term tests (100 and 665 h) have been carried out. Pre-oxidised and as-received samples have been tested in atmospheres with different oxidant potential. For low oxygen concentration in lead-bismuth due to unexpected oxygen consumption in the experimental device, dissolution of as-received F82Hmod. occurs and pre-oxidation does not prevent the material dissolution. For high oxygen concentration, the pre-oxidation layer seems to improve the feasibility of protecting stainless steels controlling the oxygen potential of lead-bismuth with a gas phase.

  12. Short-term static corrosion tests in lead-bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler Crespo, L.; Martin Munoz, F.J.; Gomez Briceno, D.

    2001-01-01

    Martensitic steels have been proposed to be used as structural materials and as spallation target window in hybrid systems devoted to the transmutation of radioactive waste of long life and high activity. However, their compatibility with lead-bismuth in the operating conditions of these systems depends on the existence of a protective layer such as an oxide film. The feasibility of forming and maintaining an oxide layer or maintaining a pre-oxidised one has been studied. Martensitic steel F82Hmod. (8% Cr) has been tested in lead-bismuth under static and isothermal conditions at 400 o C and 600 o C. In order to study the first stages of the interaction between the steel and the eutectic, short-term tests (100 and 665 h) have been carried out. Pre-oxidised and as-received samples have been tested in atmospheres with different oxidant potential. For low oxygen concentration in lead-bismuth due to unexpected oxygen consumption in the experimental device, dissolution of as-received F82Hmod. occurs and pre-oxidation does not prevent the material dissolution. For high oxygen concentration, the pre-oxidation layer seems to improve the feasibility of protecting stainless steels controlling the oxygen potential of lead-bismuth with a gas phase

  13. Zircaloy-4 corrosion in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyfitch, S.; Smalley, W.R.; Roberts, E.

    1985-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion has been studied extensively in the nuclear industry for a number of years. Following the early crud-related corrosion failures in the Saxton test reactor, Westinghouse undertook numerous programs to minimize crud deposition on fuel rods in power reactors through primary coolant chemistry control. Modern plants today are operating with improved coolant chemistry guidelines, and crud deposition levels are very low in proportion to earlier experience. Zircaloy-4 corrosion under a variety of coolant chemistry, heat flux and exposure conditions has been studied extensively. Experience to date, even in relatively high coolant temperature plants, has indicated that -for both fuel cladding and structural components- Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion performance has been excellent. Recognizing future industry trends, however, which will result in Zircaloy-4 being subjected to ever increasing corrosion duties, Westinghouse will continue accumulating Zircaloy-4 corrosion experience in large power plants. 13 refs.

  14. Hot Corrosion Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The Hot Corrosion Test Facility (HCTF) at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory (SPL) is a high-velocity, pressurized burner rig currently used to evaluate the environmental durability of advanced ceramic materials such as SiC and Si3N4. The HCTF uses laboratory service air which is preheated, mixed with jet fuel, and ignited to simulate the conditions of a gas turbine engine. Air, fuel, and water systems are computer-controlled to maintain test conditions which include maximum air flows of 250 kg/hr (550 lbm/hr), pressures of 100-600 kPa (1-6 atm), and gas temperatures exceeding 1500 C (2732 F). The HCTF provides a relatively inexpensive, yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials, and the injection of a salt solution provides the added capability of conducting hot corrosion studies.

  15. High temperature solution-nitriding and low-temperature nitriding of AISI 316: Effect on pitting potential and crevice corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2018-01-01

    in a 0.1M NaCl solution and crevice corrosion immersion tests in 3wt% FeCl3 solution were studied before and after the bulk and surface treatments.Nitrogen addition in the bulk proved to have a beneficial effect on the pitting resistance of the alloy. The formation of a zone of expanded austenite...... at the material surface through low-temperature nitriding resulted in a considerable improvement of the pitting potential and the crevice corrosion performance of the steels....

  16. Corrosion testing on crude oil tankers and other product carriers by means of acoustic emission (AE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Gerald [TUV Austria, Deutschstrasse 10, 1230 Wien (Austria); Tscheliesnig, Peter [TUV Austria, Deutschstrasse 10, 1230 Wien (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    In the last decades a lot of maritime disasters with crude oil tankers occurred (e.g. Exxon- Valdez, Erika, Prestige). Every accident led to extreme pollution with horrible consequences not only for the environment but also for the life of the inhabitants of the affected coasts. Although most of these accidents were caused by human errors, the material degradation of the ship hull due to corrosion played an important role. Acoustic emission (AE) is already used to detect and discriminate the stage of corrosion of structures located on land. A consortium consisting of experienced partners from the fields of ship building and classification as well as from AE testing and equipment manufacturing started to investigate the feasibility of this testing technique for its application on oil tankers. The aim of the research project funded by the European Commission is to develop an on-line corrosion monitoring technique based on a permanent installation of AE sensors as well as a spot testing technique during stops in harbors or at anchorages using mobile equipment. Since the project was started, a lot of lab tests as well as background measurements were done on different types of tankers up to a size of 35.000 dead weight tons (DWT). The gathered data were evaluated with a frequency domain based pattern recognition system and it was possible to distinguish the AE signals related to corrosion from those signals, which were emitted by the structure due to the harsh environment on sea (background noise). Together with the oncoming developments of the AE equipment and the improvement of the data base, this project will lead to an important breakthrough for the safe shipping of hazardous products like crude oil. (authors)

  17. Simulation of natural corrosion by vapor hydration test: seven-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, J.S.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the alteration behavior of synthetic basalt and SRL 165 borosilicate waste glasses that had been reacted in water vapor at 70 degrees C for time periods up to seven years. The nature and extent of corrosion of glasses have been determined by characterizing the reacted glass surface with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Alteration in 70 degrees C laboratory tests was compared to that which occurs at 150-200 degrees C and also with Hawaiian basaltic glasses of 480 to 750 year old subaerially altered in nature. Synthetic basalt and waste glasses, both containing about 50 percent wt SiO 2 were found to react with water vapor to form an amorphous hydrated gel that contained small amounts of clay, nearly identical to palagonite layers formed on naturally altered basaltic glass. This result implies that the corrosion reaction in nature can be simulated with a vapor hydration test. These tests also provide a means for measuring the corrosion kinetics, which are difficult to determine by studying natural samples because alteration layers have often spelled off the samples and we have only limited knowledge of the conditions under which alteration occurred

  18. Corrosion Modeling and Testing of Riveted Aluminum Alloy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    Curve Measurement • V-I measurement using rotating disk electrode ( RDE ) captures mass transport contribution • Mass transport can be important for...curve measurement needed Rotating Disk Electrode ( RDE ) y = 0.0353x + 0.1796 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0 5 10 15 B ou nd...ar y la ye r t hi ck ne ss , um D iff us io n Li m ite d C ur re nt ( m A /c m 2 ) Rotation Rate, w1/2 (radian s-1)1/2 Cu RDE Tests IL, mA

  19. Compressible Fluid Suspension Performance Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoogterp, Francis

    2003-01-01

    ... compressible fluid suspension system that was designed and installed on the vehicle by DTI. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate the possible performance benefits of the compressible fluid suspension system...

  20. Where Lab Tests Are Performed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... example, there may be sections that focus on microbiology, hematology, chemistry, and blood banking . Other units may perform highly specialized tests using electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and still others ...

  1. Makeup water system performance and impact on PWR steam generator corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Sawocha, S.G.; Smith, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The object of this EPRI-funded project was to assess the possible relation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator corrosion at fresh water sites to makeup water impurity ingress. Makeup water system design, operation and performance reviews were based on site visits, plant design documents, performance records and grab sample analyses. Design features were assessed in terms of their effect on makeup system performance. Attempts were made to correlate the makeup plant source water, system design characteristics, and typical makeup water qualities to steam generator corrosion observations, particularly intergranular attack (IGA). Direct correlations were not made since many variables are involved in the corrosion process and in the case of IGA, the variables have not been clearly established. However, the study did demonstrate that makeup systems can be a significant source of contaminants that are suspected to lead to both IGA and denting. Additionally, it was noted that typical makeup system performance with respect to organic removal was not good. The role of organics in steam generator damage has not been quantified and may deserve further study

  2. Corrosion behavior of environmental assessment glass in product consistency tests of extended duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Tam, S.W.

    1998-01-01

    We have conducted static dissolution tests to study the corrosion behavior of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass, which is the benchmark glass for high-level waste glasses being produced at US Department of Energy facilities. These tests were conducted to evaluate the behavior of the EA glass under the same long-term and accelerated test conditions that are being used to evaluate the corrosion of waste glasses. Tests were conducted at 90 C in a tuff groundwater solution at glass surface area/solution volume (WV) ratios of about 2000 and 20,000 m -1 . The glass dissolved at three distinct dissolution rates in tests conducted at 2000 m -1 . Based on the release of boron, dissolution within the first seven days occurred at a rate of about 0.65 g/(m 2 · d). The rate between seven and 70 days decreased to 0.009 g/(m 2 · d). An increase in the dissolution rate occurred at longer times after the precipitation of zeolite phases analcime, gmelinite, and an aluminum silicate base. The dissolution rate after phase formation was about 0.18 g/(m 2 · d). The formation of the same zeolite alteration phases occurred after about 20 days in tests at 20,000 m - . The average dissolution rate over the first 20 days was 0.5 g/(m 2 · d) and the rate after phase formation was about 0.20 g/(m 2 · d). An intermediate stage with a lower rate was not observed in tests at 20,000 m -1 . The corrosion behavior of EA glass is similar to that observed for other high-level waste glasses reacted under the same test conditions. The dissolution rate of EA glass is higher than that of other high-level waste glasses both in 7-day tests and after alteration phases form

  3. Corrosion investigations of high-alloyed steels carried out in different marine area organized by European Federation of Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Skalski, I.

    1999-01-01

    Research works arranged by EFC Working Party on Marine Corrosion are described. The research was performed in sea areas of Norway, Finland, Sweden, France, Italy, Poland and Netherlands. Subjected to test were three corrosion resistant steel grades; 316, 904 and UNS S 31524. Two corrosion tests were carried out in the years 1993 and 1994 each of min. 6 month duration. The results show that chemical composition of water at salinity level of more than 0.7% has not great effect on corrosion aggressivity in relation to corrosion resistant steels. On the other hand temperature of sea water has great influence on corrosion process. (author)

  4. Standard Practice for Recording Data from Atmospheric Corrosion Tests of Metallic-Coated Steel Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for recording data of atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic-coated steel specimens. Its objective is the assurance of (1) complete identification of materials before testing, (2) objective reporting of material appearance during visual inspections, and (3) adequate photographic, micrographic, and chemical laboratory examinations at specific stages of deterioration, and at the end of the tests. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Stress corrosion test of Al- Zn- Mg alloys with and without Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.C.; Garlipp, W.

    1982-01-01

    Two aluminium alloys 1 and 2 with the respectives compositions 6,10 wt% Zn; 1,58 wt% Mg; 0,24 wt% Cu and 6,25 wt% Zn; 2,03 wt% Mg; 0,24 wt% Cu; 0,078 wt% Nb, was cast, annealed, extruded and cold rolled to 10% of the initial area. Samples was made for tensile testing and stress corrosion cracking in accord with the recommended standard test. After quench from 460 0 C they was preaged at 100 0 C, 6 hours and aged again at 160 0 C in different times. The tests revealed better properties for the alloys 2. (Author) [pt

  6. Effect of sewage sludge ash (SSA on the mechanical performance and corrosion levels of reinforced Portland cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andión, L. G.ª

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a study conducted to determinecorrosion in reinforcement embedded in Portland cement(PC mortars with different percentages of sewage sludgeash (SSA admixtures. The polarization resistancetechnique was used to determine the steel corrosion rate(Icorr in the test specimens. The samples were subjectedto different environmental conditions and aggressiveagents: 100% relative humidity (RH, accelerated carbonationat 70% RH and seawater immersion. Portlandcement was partially substituted for SSA in the mixes atrates of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 60% (by mass to make thedifferent mortars. The results show that where cementwas replaced by SSA at rates of up to 10% by mass,mortar corrosion performance was comparable to thebehaviour observed in SSA-free mortars (control mortar:0% SSA. Data for higher rates are also shown. From themechanical standpoint, SSA exhibited moderate pozzolanicactivity and the best performance when SSA wasadded at a rate of 10% to mixes with a water/(binder:PC + SSA (w/b ratio of 0.5.Se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosion que presentan lasarmaduras embebidas en morteros fabricados con cementoPortland (CP con diferentes porcentajes de sustitucion deceniza de lodo de depuradora (CLD. Se ha utilizado la tecnicade la Resistencia a la Polarizacion para determinar lavelocidad de corrosion del acero embebido en las muestrasestudiadas. Las muestras se han sometido a diferentes condicionesambientales y agentes agresivos: 100% de humedadrelativa (HR, carbonatacion acelerada al 70% HR einmersion en agua de mar. Para la fabricacion de los distintosmorteros, el cemento Portland ha sido parcialmente sustituidopor CLD en los siguientes porcentajes en masa: 0,10, 20, 30 y 60%. Los resultados muestran que sustitucionesde cemento por CLD de hasta el 10% en masa no alteranel comportamiento frente a la corrosion de los morterosal compararlos con los morteros libres de CLD (morteroscontrol: 0% de sustitucion de cemento por CLD. Se

  7. A High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal - The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.; Haslam, J.; Day, D.; Lian, T.; Saw, C.; Hailey, P.; Choi, J.S.; Rebak, R.; Yang, N.; Bayles, R.; Aprigliano, L.; Payer, J.; Perepezko, J.; Hildal, K.; Lavernia, E.; Ajdelsztajn, L.; Branagan, D.; Beardsley, B.

    2007-01-01

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of high-performance Ni-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal also makes it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications, as discussed in companion publications. Corrosion data for SAM2X5 (Fe 49.7 Cr 17.7 Mn 1.9 Mo 7.4 W 1.6 B 15.2 C 3.8 Si 2.4 ) is discussed here. (authors)

  8. Performance testing With JMeter 29

    CERN Document Server

    Erinle, Bayo

    2013-01-01

    Performance Testing With JMeter 2.9 is a standard tutorial that will help you polish your fundamentals, guide you through various advanced topics, and along the process help you learn new tools and skills.This book is for developers, quality assurance engineers, testers, and test managers new to Apache JMeter, or those who are looking to get a good grounding in how to effectively use and become proficient with it. No prior testing experience is required.

  9. Comparison of the long-time corrosion behavior of certain Zr alloys in PWR, BWR, and laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzarolli, F.; Broy, Y.; Busch, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests have always been an important tool for Zr alloy development and optimization. However, it must be known whether a test is representative for the application in-reactor. To shed more light on this question, coupons of several Zr alloys were exposed under isothermal conditions in BWR and PWR type environments. For evaluation of the in-PWR tests and for comparison of out-of-pile and in-pile tests, the different temperatures and times were normalized to a temperature-independent normalized time by assuming an activation temperature (Q/R) of 14,200 K. Comparison of in-PWR and out-of-pile corrosion behavior of Zircaloy shows that corrosion deviates to higher values in PWR if a weight gain of about 50 mg/dm 2 is exceeded. In the case of the Zr2.5Nb alloy, a slight deviation of corrosion as compared to laboratory results starts in PWR only above a weight gain of 100 mg/dm 2 . In BWR, corrosion of Zircaloy is enhanced early in time if compared with out-of-pile. Zr2.5Nb exhibits higher corrosion results in BWR than Zircaloy-4. Alloying chemistry and material condition affect corrosion of Zr alloys. However, several of the material parameters have shown a different ranking in the different environments. Nevertheless, several material parameters influencing in-reactor corrosion like the second phase particle (SPP) size of in-PWR behavior as the Sn and Fe content can be optimized by out-of-pile corrosion tests

  10. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-01

    In Phase 1 a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347 RA-85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 Ta modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for approximately 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were assembled on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, the probe was installed in the reheater activity of the boiler and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The results will be presented for the preliminary metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 16,000 hours of exposure. Continued metallurgical and interpretive analysis is still on going.

  11. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  12. Standard test method for measurement of corrosion potentials of Aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measurement of the corrosion potential (see Note 1) of an aluminum alloy in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride with enough hydrogen peroxide added to provide an ample supply of cathodic reactant. Note 1—The corrosion potential is sometimes referred to as the open-circuit solution or rest potential. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Corrosion performance of optimised and advanced fuel rod cladding in PWRs at high burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdain, P.; Hallstadius, L.; Pati, S.R.; Smith, G.P.; Garde, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour both in-pile and out-of-pile for a number of cladding alloys developed by ABB to meet the current and future needs for fuel rod cladding with improved corrosion resistance is presented. The cladding materials include: 1) Zircaloy-4 (OPTIN) with optimised composition and processing and Zircaloy-2 optimised for Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR), (Zircaloy-2P), and 2) several alternative zirconium-based alloys with compositions outside the composition range for Zircaloys. The data presented originate from fuel rods irradiated in six PWRs to burnups up to about 66 MWd/kgU and from tests conducted in 360 o water autoclave. Also included are in-pile fuel rod growth measurements on some of the alloys. (UK)

  14. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  15. Self-cleaning performance of superhydrophobic hybrid nanocomposite coatings on Al with excellent corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, V.; Mohan Raj, R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) coatings were formed on Al by anodization and electro-polymerisation techniques. • The superhydrophobic coating was fabricated on copolymer by electrodeposition of zinc stearate. • The superhydrophobicity mechanism relies on morphologies and chemical components on surface is the key factor. • Ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate coated Al has excellent corrosion resistance and good self-cleaning performance. - Abstract: Protective ceramic-PANI, ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) and ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coatings were formed on Al surface by the processes involving anodization, electropolymerisation and electrodeposition under optimum conditions. The prepared nanocomposite coatings were evaluated by ATR-IR and XRD studies. SEM studies performed on nanocomposite coatings reveal that ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coating shows a cauliflower-like cluster with crack-free morphology compared to ceramic-PANI and ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) nanocomposite coatings. The mechanical properties of different nanocomposite coatings were measured using Vicker microhardness tester and Taber Abrasion tester. The ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite has higher mechanical stability. The corrosion resistance of the coatings measured by Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, shows that ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coated aluminum has higher corrosion resistance than other coatings and bare Al. Wettability studies prove that superhydrophobic nature of ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coating with contact angle of 155.8° is responsible for good self-cleaning property and excellent corrosion resistance of aluminum.

  16. Self-cleaning performance of superhydrophobic hybrid nanocomposite coatings on Al with excellent corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, V., E-mail: alaguraj2@rediffmail.com; Mohan Raj, R., E-mail: chem_mohan@rediffmail.com

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) coatings were formed on Al by anodization and electro-polymerisation techniques. • The superhydrophobic coating was fabricated on copolymer by electrodeposition of zinc stearate. • The superhydrophobicity mechanism relies on morphologies and chemical components on surface is the key factor. • Ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate coated Al has excellent corrosion resistance and good self-cleaning performance. - Abstract: Protective ceramic-PANI, ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) and ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coatings were formed on Al surface by the processes involving anodization, electropolymerisation and electrodeposition under optimum conditions. The prepared nanocomposite coatings were evaluated by ATR-IR and XRD studies. SEM studies performed on nanocomposite coatings reveal that ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coating shows a cauliflower-like cluster with crack-free morphology compared to ceramic-PANI and ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) nanocomposite coatings. The mechanical properties of different nanocomposite coatings were measured using Vicker microhardness tester and Taber Abrasion tester. The ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite has higher mechanical stability. The corrosion resistance of the coatings measured by Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, shows that ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coated aluminum has higher corrosion resistance than other coatings and bare Al. Wettability studies prove that superhydrophobic nature of ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coating with contact angle of 155.8° is responsible for good self-cleaning property and excellent corrosion resistance of aluminum.

  17. Performance Testing of Cutting Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter

    The importance of cutting fluid performance testing has increased with documentation requirements of new cutting fluid formulations based on more sustainable products, as well as cutting with minimum quantity of lubrication and dry cutting. Two sub-problems have to be solved: i) which machining...... tests feature repeatability, reproducibility and sensitivity to cutting fluids, and ii) to what extent results of one test ensure relevance to a wider set of machining situations. The present work is aimed at assessing the range of validity of the different testing methods, investigating correlation...... within the whole range of operations, materials, cutting fluids, operating conditions, etc. Cutting fluid performance was evaluated in turning, drilling, reaming and tapping, and with respect to tool life, cutting forces, chip formation and product quality (dimensional accuracy and surface integrity...

  18. Pressurized water reactor fuel performance problems connected with fuel cladding corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, Pressurized Water Reactor (WWER, PWR) Fuel Element Performance is connected with fuel cladding corrosion and crud deposition processes. By transient to extended fuel cycles in nuclear power reactors, aiming to achieve higher burnup and better fuel utilization, the role of these processes increases significantly. This evolution modifies the chemical and electrochemical conditions in the reactor primary system, including change of fuel claddings' environment. The higher duty cores are always attended with increased boiling (sub-cooled nucleate boiling) mainly on the feed fuel assemblies. This boiling process on fuel cladding surfaces can cause different consequences on fuel element cladding's environment characteristics. In the case of boiling at the cladding surfaces without or with some cover of corrosion product deposition, the behavior of gases dissolved in water phase is strongly influenced by the vapor generation. The increase of vapor partial pressure will reduce the partial pressures of dissolved gases and will cause their stripping out. By these circumstances the concentrations of dissolved gases in cladding wall water layer can dramatically decrease, including also the case by which all dissolved gases to be stripped out. On the other hand it is known that the hydrogen is added to primary coolant in order to avoid the production of oxidants by radiolysis of water. It is clear that if boiling strips out dissolved hydrogen, the creation of oxidizing conditions at the cladding surfaces will be favored. In this case the local production of oxidants will be a result from local processes of water radiolysis, by which not only both oxygen (O 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) but also hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) will be produced. While these hydrogen and oxygen will be stripped out preferentially by boiling, the bigger part of hydrogen peroxide will remain in wall water phase and will act as the most important factor for creation of oxidizing conditions in fuel

  19. Corrosion test by alternated immersion. Evaluation of the real meaning of the values of electrode potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rend M, J.L.; Valencia, G.

    1996-01-01

    In the rehearsal of alternate immersion, type CEBELCOR, is usually carried out the pursuit of the variation of the potential of the electrode of the sample of interest. With the time, the obtained data become an important tool in the analysis of the evolution of the answer of the material it attacks corrosive of the means, with the time of material exhibition, with the advance of the exhibition that in it finishes instance it refers to different superficial conditions. In this work the chemical and thermodynamic aspects of the system potential the layout of the diagrams of electrode potential and the differences are revised in the capacity protector versus pH, or Pourbaix diagrams, the analysis is revised usually accepted in the determination of the biggest or smaller capacity protector in a quantity of energy required for the removal of a rust, starting from the difference in the potential in the electron of the atomic structure of the element or moment in that the test tube enters in the composed solution that is oxidized and the inclusion of the electron in the simulator and the value in the moment of the exit. With base in the first approach to the thermodynamic relationships and the corrosion phenomena, the investigation is analyzed by the GROUP OF CORROSION AND PROTECTION of the Antioquia University. It is shown as, for studies in similar materials and in means with small differences, the use of the potentials, loses validity like tool for comparative evaluations

  20. Manufacturing method for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced test specimen for stainless steel pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futagawa, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a manufacturing step for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced for stainless steel pipelines, pipe are abutted against with each other and welded, and a heat affected portion is applied with a sensitizing heat treatment. Further, a crevice jig is attached near the heat affected portion at the inner surface of the pipe and kept in a chlorine ion added water under high temperature and high pressure at a predetermined period of time. If tap water is used instead of purified water for C.P.T. test in a step of forming sample of IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking), since the chlorine ion concentration in the tap water is relatively high, TGSCC (intragranular stress corrosion crackings caused in all of the samples. A heat input and an interlayer temperature are determined for the material of stainless pipe having a carbon content of more than 0.05% so that the welding residual stress on the inner surface is applied as tension. The condition for the heat treatment is determined as, for example, 500degC x 24hr, and the samples are kept under water at high temperature and high pressure applied with chlorine ions for 500 to 200hours. As a result, since samples of TGSCC can be formed by utilizing the manufacturing step for IGSCC, there is no requirement for providing devices for applying environmental factors separately. (N.H.)

  1. LFK, FORTRAN Application Performance Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, F.H.

    1991-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: LFK, the Livermore FORTRAN Kernels, is a computer performance test that measures a realistic floating-point performance range for FORTRAN applications. Informally known as the Livermore Loops test, the LFK test may be used as a computer performance test, as a test of compiler accuracy (via checksums) and efficiency, or as a hardware endurance test. The LFK test, which focuses on FORTRAN as used in computational physics, measures the joint performance of the computer CPU, the compiler, and the computational structures in units of Mega-flops/sec or Mflops. A C language version of subroutine KERNEL is also included which executes 24 samples of C numerical computation. The 24 kernels are a hydrodynamics code fragment, a fragment from an incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient code, the standard inner product function of linear algebra, a fragment from a banded linear equations routine, a segment of a tridiagonal elimination routine, an example of a general linear recurrence equation, an equation of state fragment, part of an alternating direction implicit integration code, an integrate predictor code, a difference predictor code, a first sum, a first difference, a fragment from a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code, a part of a one-dimensional particle-in-cell code, an example of how casually FORTRAN can be written, a Monte Carlo search loop, an example of an implicit conditional computation, a fragment of a two-dimensional explicit hydrodynamics code, a general linear recurrence equation, part of a discrete ordinates transport program, a simple matrix calculation, a segment of a Planck distribution procedure, a two-dimensional implicit hydrodynamics fragment, and determination of the location of the first minimum in an array. 2 - Method of solution: CPU performance rates depend strongly on the maturity of FORTRAN compiler machine code optimization. The LFK test-bed executes the set of 24 kernels three times, resetting the DO

  2. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.; Cruse, J.M.

    1991-02-01

    To provide uniform packaging of hazardous materials on an international level, the United Nations has developed packaging recommendations that have been implemented worldwide. The United Nations packaging recommendations are performance oriented, allowing for a wide variety of package materials and systems. As a result of this international standard, efforts in the United States are being directed toward use of performance-oriented packaging and elimination of specification (designed) packaging. This presentation will focus on trends, design evaluation, and performance testing of radioactive material packaging. The impacts of US Department of Transportation Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A on specification and low-specific activity radioactive material packaging requirements are briefly discussed. The US Department of Energy's program for evaluating radioactive material packings per US Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A requirements, is used as the basis for discussing low-activity packaging performance test requirements. High-activity package testing requirements are presented with examples of testing performed at the Hanford Site that is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  3. Long-term corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1998-01-01

    The scope of this activity is to assess the long-term corrosion properties of metallic materials under consideration for fabricating waste package containers. Three classes of metals are to be assessed: corrosion resistant, intermediate corrosion resistant, and corrosion allowance. Corrosion properties to be evaluated are general, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, and galvanic corrosion. The performance of these materials will be investigated under conditions that are considered relevant to the potential emplacement site. Testing in four aqueous solutions, and vapor phases above them, and at two temperatures are planned for this activity. (The environmental conditions, test metals, and matrix are described in detail in Section 3.0.) The purpose and objective of this activity is to obtain the kinetic and mechanistic information on degradation of metallic alloys currently being considered for waste package containers. This information will be used to provide assistance to (1) waste package design (metal barrier selection) (E-20-90 to E-20-92), (2) waste package performance assessment activities (SIP-PA-2), (3) model development (E-20-75 to E-20-89). and (4) repository license application

  4. Selection of dissolution process for spent fuels and preparation of corrosion test solution simulated to dissolver (contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Terakado, Shogo; Koya, Toshio; Hamada, Shozo; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2001-03-01

    In order to evaluate the reliability of reprocessing equipment materials used in the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant, we have proceeded a mock-up test and laboratory tests for getting corrosion parameters. In a dissolver made of zirconium, the simulation of test solutions to the practical solution which includes the high concentration of radioactive elements such as FP and TRU is one of the important issues with respect to the life prediction. On this experiment, the dissolution process of spent fuels and the preparation of test solution for evaluating the corrosion resistance of dissolver materials were selected. These processes were tested in the No.3 cell of WASTEF. The test solution for corrosion tests was prepared by adjusting the uranium and nitric acid concentrations. (author)

  5. Study on the corrosion assessment of overpack welds-III (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Rieko; Otsuki, Akiyoshi; Asano, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Naoki; Yui, Mikazu

    2006-12-01

    There is some possibility that the corrosion resistance of overpack welds is different from that of base metal due to the differences of material properties. In this study, corrosion behavior of welded joint for carbon steel was compared with base metal using the specimens taken from welded joint model fabricated by TIG, MAG and EBW respectively. The corrosion tests were performed for following four items. Passivation behavior and corrosion type. Propagation of general corrosion, pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion under aerobic condition. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. Propagation of general corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement under anaerobic condition. The results of these corrosion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of welded metal by TIG and MAG was inferior to base metal for general corrosion, pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. It was implied that the filler materials used for welding affected the corrosion resistance. No deterioration of corrosion resistance was observed in any corrosion modes for EBW, which does not need filler material. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of welded metal and heat affected zone was lower than that of base metal. (author)

  6. GEM: Performance and aging tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, H.S.; Kadyk, J.; Han, S.H.; Hong, W.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Wenzel, W.; Pitts, K.; Martin, M.D.; Hutchins, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Performance and aging tests have been done to characterize Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs), including further design improvements such as a thicker GEM and a closed GEM. Since the effective GEM gain is typically smaller than the absolute GEM gain, due to trapping of avalanche electrons at the bottom GEM electrode, the authors performed field simulations and measurements for better understanding, and discuss methods to eliminate this effect. Other performance parameters of the GEMs are also presented, including absolute GEM gain, short-term and long-term gain stabilities

  7. Development of Electrodeposited Zn/nano-TiO2 Composite Coatings with Enhanced Corrosion Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benea, L.; Dănăilă, E.

    2017-06-01

    Pure zinc coatings have been found ineffective when are used in aggressive environments such as those which contain chlorides or industrial pollutants [1]. In this paper, Zn/nano-TiO2 composite coatings with various contents of TiO2 nanoparticles (diameter size of 10 nm) were prepared on low-carbon steel by electro-codeposition technique. The deposition was carried out at different cathodic potentials ranging from -1600 mV to -2100 mV for different deposition times between 5-15 min. Pure Zn coatings were also produced under the same experimental conditions for comparison. Present work aims to investigate the effects of selected electrodeposition parameters (cathodic potential, TiO2 nanoparticle concentration in the plating bath and electrodeposition time) on the corrosion behavior of electrodeposited Zn/nano-TiO2 composite obtained. The corrosion experiments were performed in natural seawater, using electrochemical methods such as open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance. The results showed that the inclusion of TiO2 nanoparticles into zinc matrix lead to an improved corrosion resistance comparatively with pure zinc coatings obtained under similar conditions.

  8. Investigation of structure, adhesion strength, wear performance and corrosion behavior of platinum/ruthenium/nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon thin films with respect to film thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khun, N.W. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, E., E-mail: MEJLiu@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Sputtered PtRuN-DLC thin films were fabricated with different film thicknesses. {yields} The graphitization of the films increased with increased film thickness. {yields} The wear resistance of the films increased though their adhesion strength decreased. {yields} The corrosion potentials of the films shifted to more negative values. {yields} However, the corrosion currents of the films decreased. - Abstract: In this study, the corrosion performance of platinum/ruthenium/nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (PtRuN-DLC) thin films deposited on p-Si substrates using a DC magnetron sputtering deposition system in a 0.1 M NaCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization test in terms of film thickness. The effect of the film thickness on the chemical composition, bonding structure, surface morphology, adhesion strength and wear resistance of the PtRuN-DLC films was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-scratch test and ball-on-disc tribotest, respectively. It was found that the wear resistance of the PtRuN-DLC films apparently increased with increased film thickness though the adhesion strength of the films decreased. The corrosion results revealed that the increased concentration of sp{sup 2} bonds in the PtRuN-DLC films with increased film thickness shifted the corrosion potentials of the films to more negative values but the decreased porosity density in the films significantly decreased the corrosion currents of the films.

  9. Fuel performance analysis for the HAMP-1 mini plate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Byoung Jin; Tahka, Y. W.; Yim, J. S.; Lee, B. H. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    U-7wt%Mo/Al- 5wt%Si dispersion fuel with 8gU/cm{sup 3} is chosen to achieve more efficiency and higher performance than the conventional U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel. As part of the fuel qualification program for the KiJang research reactor (KJRR), three irradiation tests with mini-plates are on the way at the High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor (HANARO). The first test among three HANARO Mini-Plate Irradiation tests (HAMP-1, 2, 3) has completed. PLATE code has been initially developed to analyze the thermal performance of high density U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel plates during irradiation [1]. We upgraded the PLATE code with the latest irradiation results which were implemented by corrosion, thermal conductivity and swelling model. Fuel performance analysis for HAMP-1 was conducted with updated PLATE. This paper presents results of performance evaluation of the HAMP-1. Maximum fuel temperature was obtained 136 .deg., which is far below the preset limit of 200 .deg. for the irradiation test. The meat swelling and corrosion thickness was also confirmed that the developed fuel would behave as anticipated.

  10. On the corrosion testing of weldments of high alloyed CrNiMo-stainless steels and NiCrMo-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, G.; Voigt, C.; Werner, H.

    1997-01-01

    Weldments of high-alloyed CrNiMo stainless steels and NiCrMo alloys can be more susceptible to localized corrosion than the solution annealed basic material owing to segregations and precipitations in the heat affected zone, the high temperature zone and/or in the weld. To investigate these differences the FeCl 3 -test (10% FeCl 3 . 6aq), the test ''green death'' (11.5% H 2 SO 4 , 1.2% HCl, 1% CuCl 2 , 1% FeCl 3 ) as well as chronopotentiostatic tests in artificial sea water or in 3% NaCl-solution are used. In particular for testing the highest alloyed materials a CaCl 2 -test was developed (4.5 M CaCl 2 , chronopotentiostatic test in duration of 8 to 10 hours at + 200 mV (SCE)), which can be carried out to a temperature of 115 C at atmospheric pressure. The aggressivity increases in the range FeCl 3 -test, ''green death''-test, CaCl 2 -test. Matching and graduated over-alloyed weldments (TIG, heat input of 7 and 15.5 kJ/cm) of materials 1.4529, 1.4562, 2.4856, 2.4819 (german materials No.) are comparingly examined in various tests, of materials 1.4406, 1.4539, 1.4439 and 1.4563 (german materials No.) only matching weldments in the FeCl 3 -test. In strongly oxidizing media only a highly over-alloyed performed weldment (filler material 2.4607, german material No.) produces the best corrosion behaviour, measured as the critical temperatures of localized corrosion. Measurements of critical current densities of passivation can be used for investigations of corrosion behaviour of weldments, too. Critical current densities of passivation are showing a tendency to inverse proportion to the critical temperatures of localized corrosion. Suitable electrolytes are among others 0.2 M H 2 SO 4 + 1 M NaCl + 10 -3 % KSCN, N 2 -bubbled, 25 to 60 C and xM H 2 SO 4 + 4 M NaCl + 10 -3 % KSCN (x = 0.05 to 1), 25 C, in contact with air. An influence of heat input at the welding is indicated in the test of localized corrosion, but it is only small. It is sometimes more clearly shown at

  11. Standard test method for exfoliation corrosion susceptibility in 2XXX and 7XXX Series Aluminum Alloys (EXCO Test)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for constant immersion exfoliation corrosion (EXCO) testing of high-strength 2XXX and 7XXX series aluminum alloys. Note 1—This test method was originally developed for research and development purposes; however, it is referenced, in specific material specifications, as applicable for evaluating production material (refer to Section 14 on Precision and Bias). 1.2 This test method applies to all wrought products such as sheet, plate, extrusions, and forgings produced from conventional ingot metallurgy process. 1.3 This test method can be used with any form of specimen or part that can be immersed in the test solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Effects of combined organic and inorganic corrosion inhibitors on the nanostructure cerium based conversion coating performance on AZ31 magnesium alloy: Morphological and corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saei, E.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Amini, R.; Kalajahi, M. Salami

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Cn-Mn-polyvinyl alcohol conversion coating led to more uniform and crack free film deposition. •The corrosion resistance of Ce film was noticeably improved by using combination of polyvinyl alchol and Mn2+ cations. •A synergistic effect between polyvinyl alchol-Mn2+ resulted in Ce film with enhanced morphology and corrosion resistance. -- Abstract: Magnesium (Mg) AZ31 samples were chemically treated by a series of room temperature nanostructure cerium based conversion coatings containing Mn(NO 3 ) 2 ·4H 2 O, Co(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The microstructure and corrosion protection properties of different samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Results demonstrated that the AZ31 Mg alloy sample treated by Ce-Mn-PVA showed the highest corrosion resistance. A denser Ce film with lower crack was precipitated on the sample treated by Ce-Mn-PVA conversion coating.

  13. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Wong, F; Ji, X; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Marshall, M C; Meacham, B E; Buffa, E J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Beardsley, M B; Weaver, D T; Aprigliano, L F; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E J; Wolejsza, T M; Martin, F J; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A H; Ernst, F; Michal, G M; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E J

    2004-01-01

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an ''integral drip shield'' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent

  14. Corrosion performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy under immersion environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. The alumina powders were plasma sprayed on AZ31B magnesium alloy with three different plasma spraying parameters. In the present work, the influence of plasma spray parameters on the corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples was evaluated by immersion corrosion test in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. Empirical relationship was established to predict the corrosion rate of plasma sprayed alumina coatings by incorporating process parameters. The experiments were conducted based on a three factor, five-level, central composite rotatable design matrix. The developed relationship can be effectively used to predict the corrosion rate of alumina coatings at 95% confidence level. The results indicate that the input power has the greatest influence on corrosion rate, followed by stand-off distance and powder feed rate.

  15. Test Driven Development: Performing Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bache, Emily

    The art of Test Driven Development (TDD) is a skill that needs to be learnt, and which needs time and practice to master. In this workshop a select number of conference participants with considerable skill and experience are invited to perform code katas [1]. The aim is for them to demonstrate excellence and the use of Test Driven Development, and result in some high quality code. This would be for the benefit of the many programmers attending the conference, who could come along and witness high quality code being written using TDD, and get a chance to ask questions and provide feedback.

  16. Developing Field Test Procedures for Chloride Stress Corrosion Cracking in the Arabian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Farhat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil and gas production and petrochemical plants in the Arabian Gulf are exposed to severe environmental conditions of high temperature and humidity. This makes these plants susceptible to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (CSCC. The laboratory testing fails to provide the exact field environmental conditions. A cost efficient field test setup for CSCC was designed and developed for the Arabian Gulf. The setup included designing self-sustained loading devices, samples, and sample racks. The samples were exposed to a stress equivalent to 80% and 100% of their yield strength. This paper describes the developed test procedures to establish testing with high level of accuracy and repeatability. It also discusses the design aspects and the challenges that were met.

  17. Thermal reliability test of Al-34%Mg-6%Zn alloy as latent heat storage material and corrosion of metal with respect to thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.Q.; Zhang, R.Y.; Liu, Z.P.; Lu, G.H.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the thermal reliability and corrosion of the Al-34%Mg-6%Zn alloy as a latent heat energy storage material with respect to various numbers of thermal cycles. The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis technique was applied to the alloy after 0, 50, 500 and 1000 melting/solidification cycles in order to measure the melting temperatures and the latent heats of fusion of the alloy. The containment materials were stainless steel (SS304L), carbon steel (steel C20) in the corrosion tests. The DSC results indicated that the change in melting temperature for the alloy was in the range of 3.06-5.3 K, and the latent heat of fusion decreased 10.98% after 1000 thermal cycles. The results show that the investigated Al-34%Mg-6%Zn alloy has a good thermal reliability as a latent heat energy storage material with respect to thermal cycling for thermal energy storage applications in the long term in view of the small changes in the latent heat of fusion and melting temperature. Gravimetric analysis as mass loss (mg/cm 2 ), corrosion rate (mg/day) and a microscopic or metallographic investigation were performed for corrosion tests and showed that SS304L may be considered a more suitable alloy than C20 in long term thermal storage applications

  18. Hydrogen Sulphide Corrosion of Carbon and Stainless Steel Alloys Immersed in Mixtures of Renewable Fuel Sources and Tested Under Co-processing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely András

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with modern regulations and directives, the use of renewable biomass materials as precursors for the production of fuels for transportation purposes is to be strictly followed. Even though, there are problems related to processing, storage and handling in wide range of subsequent uses, since there must be a limit to the ratio of biofuels mixed with mineral raw materials. As a key factor with regards to these biomass sources pose a great risk of causing multiple forms of corrosion both to metallic and non-metallic structural materials. To assess the degree of corrosion risk to a variety of engineering alloys like low-carbon and stainless steels widely used as structural metals, this work is dedicated to investigating corrosion rates of economically reasonable engineering steel alloys in mixtures of raw gas oil and renewable biomass fuel sources under typical co-processing conditions. To model a desulphurising refining process, corrosion tests were carried out with raw mineral gasoline and its mixture with used cooking oil and animal waste lard in relative quantities of 10% (g/g. Co-processing was simulated by batch-reactor laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 200 and 300ºC and a pressure in the gas phase of 90 bar containing 2% (m3/m3 hydrogen sulphide. The time span of individual tests were varied between 1 and 21 days so that we can conclude about changes in the reaction rates against time exposure of and extrapolate for longer periods of exposure. Initial and integral corrosion rates were defined by a weight loss method on standard size of coupons of all sorts of steel alloys. Corrosion rates of carbon steels indicated a linear increase with temperature and little variation with composition of the biomass fuel sources. Apparent activation energies over the first 24-hour period remained moderate, varying between 35.5 and 50.3 kJ mol−1. Scales developed on carbon steels at higher

  19. Relationship between Corrosion Level of Rebar Embedded in Concrete, Corrosion Potential and Current Density Measured by Non-destructive Test Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Lan; Cho, Seung Ho; Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Joong Koo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify corrosion mechanism and develop qualitative measurement method of corrosion level. Fist of all, structural behavior of each different level of corrosion states have been evaluated. And mathematical models that can predict corrosion level in terms of electric potential and corrosion intensity are proposed. Corrosion rate in reinforcing bar was investigated in this study using accelerated corrosion method due to electric potential differences based on Faradays law. Total 288 measurement spots were designed in terms of corrosion rates, diameter of reinforcing bars, and concrete cover thickness. Corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials of concrete were measured on these specimens using Gecor device. This study suggested the relationship between corrosion levels, and measured electric current density as follows

  20. Electrosynthesis of Polyaniline-TiO2 Nanocomposite Films on Aluminum Alloy 3004 Surface and its Corrosion Protection Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shabani-Nooshabadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct synthesis of polyaniline-TiO2 nanocomposite coatings on aluminum alloy 3004 (AA3004 surface has been investigated by using the galvanostatic method. The synthesized coatings were characterized by FT-IR, SEM-EDX, SEM and AFM. Optical absorption spectroscopy reveals the formation of the emeraldine oxidation state form of polyaniline-TiO2 nanocomposite. The corrosion performances of polyaniline-TiO2 nanocomposite coatings were investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution by Tafel polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS methods. The corrosion rate of polyaniline-TiO2 nanocomposite coating on AA3004 was found ∼260 times lower than bare AA3004 and corrosion potentials of these coatings have shifted to more positive potentials (105 mV. The results of this study clearly ascertain that the polyaniline-TiO2 nanocomposite coating has outstanding potential to protect the AA3004 against corrosion in a chloride environment.

  1. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  2. Electrochemical behavior and pH stability of artificial salivas for corrosion tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Gláucia Maria Oliveira de; Silva, Leandro Freitas; Ferreira, José Tarcísio Lima; Gomes, José Antônio da Cunha P; Sathler, Lúcio

    2007-01-01

    It is assumed that the compositions of artificial salivas are similar to that of human saliva. However, the use of solutions with different compositions in in vitro corrosion studies can lead dissimilar electrolytes to exhibit dissimilar corrosivity and electrochemical stability. This study evaluated four artificial salivas as regards pH stability with time, redox potentials and the polarization response of an inert platinum electrode. The tested solutions were: SAGF medium, Mondelli artificial saliva, UFRJ artificial saliva (prepared at the School of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil) and USP-RP artificial saliva (prepared at the School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, SP, Brazil). It was observed that pH variations were less than 1 unit during a 50-hour test. The SAGF medium, and the UFRJ and USP-RP solutions exhibited more oxidizing characteristics, whereas the Mondelli solution presented reducing properties. Anodic polarization revealed oxidation of the evaluated electrolytes at potentials below +600 mV SCE. It was observed that the UFRJ and USP-RP solutions presented more intense oxidation and reduction processes as compared to the Mondelli and SAGF solutions.

  3. Corrosion tests in Baltic sea water on heat exchanger tubes of various metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.; Knutsson, L.

    1975-05-01

    Seventeen different tube materials have been exposed to continuous and intermittent flow in Baltic Sea water (0.4 % Cl - ) at 50 deg C for a maximum of 15 000 hours. During testing the specimens have been examined at certain intervals. After testing the specimens have been examined visually and metallographically. The following materials were completely resistant: titanium, CuNi30Mn1Fe, Alloy 825 and the austenitic steels Cr18Ni24Mo4.5, Cr20Ni25Mo4.5Cu and Cr24Ni24Mo2Ti. The ferritic-austenitic steels Cr18Ni5Mo2Si and Cr25Ni5Mo1.5 on the other hand, seem to be attacked by local intercrystalline corrosion in the vicinity of the welds. The same type of attack occurs, against expectations, even in the entirely ferritic steels, especially in Cr21Mo3Ti; this attack was however shown to be caused by surface carburization. Admiralty brass (2.5 m/s), aluminium brass (3.0 m/s) and CuNi10Fe1Mn (3.5 m/s) have been attacked by erosion corrosion. The same type of attack, although to a considerably smaller extent, has also been observed for the three aluminium materials (2.5 m/s). (author)

  4. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasscer, D. S.; Morgan, T. O.; Rivera, C.; Ernst, R.; Scott, A. C.; Summerson, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes, and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr). Pitting did not occur in bare 3003 and 3004 samples during the six month test. Pitting did occur to varying degrees in the Alclad and zinc diffusion treated material, but did not penetrate to the base metal. Biofouling countermeasures (intermittent chlorination and brushing) did not affect the corrosion rates to any significant extent. Intermittent chlorination at a level of 0.5 ppm for 28 minutes daily controlled microbiofouling of the samples but did not prevent the development of a macrobiofouling community in areas of the plumbing with low flow.

  5. Corrosion and Materials Performance in biomass fired and co-fired power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, OH; Biede, O

    2003-01-01

    not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. In woodchip boilers, a similar corrosion rate and corrosion mechanism has on some occasions been observed. Co-firing of straw (10...... and 20% energy basis) with coal has shown corrosion rates lower than those in straw-fired plants. With both 10 and 20% straw, no chlorine corrosion was seen. This paper will describe the results from in situ investigations undertaken in Denmark on high temperature corrosion in biomass fired plants....... Results from 100% straw-firing, woodchip and co-firing of straw with coal will be reported. The corrosion mechanisms observed are summarized and the corrosion rates for 18-8 type stainless steels are compared....

  6. Reinforcement corrosion in alkaline chloride media with reduced oxygen concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Fullea, J.; Toro, L.; Martinez, I.; Rebolledo, N.

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly considered that the corrosion of steel in concrete is controlled by the oxygen content of the pore solution and there are service life models that relate the corrosion rate to the amount of oxygen. It is also commonly believed that in water saturated conditions the oxygen content in the pores is negligible and that underwater there is no risk of depassivation and the corrosion rate is very low. However, the available data on corrosion rates in immersed conditions do not indicate such performance; on the contrary corrosion develops when sufficient chloride reaches the reinforcement. In the present paper, results are presented for tests performed in alkaline chloride solutions that were purged with nitrogen to reduce the oxygen content. The results indicate that at very low oxygen concentrations, corrosion may develop in the presence of chlorides. The presence or absence of corrosion is influenced by the amount of chloride, the corrosion potential and the steel surface condition. (authors)

  7. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  8. Biodegradable Orthopedic Magnesium-Calcium (MgCa Alloys, Processing, and Corrosion Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuebin Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-Calcium (Mg-Ca alloy has received considerable attention as an emerging biodegradable implant material in orthopedic fixation applications. The biodegradable Mg-Ca alloys avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. They also provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers. However, the key issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant is the fast corrosion in the human body environment. The ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys is critical for the successful development of biodegradable orthopedic implants. This paper focuses on the functions and requirements of bone implants and critical issues of current implant biomaterials. Microstructures and mechanical properties of Mg-Ca alloys, and the unique properties of novel magnesium-calcium implant materials have been reviewed. Various manufacturing techniques to process Mg-Ca based alloys have been analyzed regarding their impacts on implant performance. Corrosion performance of Mg-Ca alloys processed by different manufacturing techniques was compared. In addition, the societal and economical impacts of developing biodegradable orthopedic implants have been emphasized.

  9. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.

    1992-06-01

    In an effort to provide uniform packaging of hazardous material on an international level, recommendations for the transport of dangerous goods have been developed by the United Nations. These recommendations are performance oriented and contrast with a large number of packaging specifications in the US Department of Transportation's hazard materials regulations. This dual system presents problems when international shipments enter the US Department of Transportation's system. Faced with the question of continuing a dual system or aligning with the international system, the Research and Special Programs Administration of the US Department of Transportation responded with Docket HM-181. This began the transition toward the international transportation system. Following close behind is Docket HM-169A, which addressed low specific activity radioactive material packaging. This paper will discuss the differences between performance-oriented and specification packaging, the transition toward performance-oriented packaging by the US Department of Transportation, and performance-oriented testing of radioactive material packaging by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A will be discussed along with Type A (low activity) and Type B (high activity) radioactive material packaging evaluations

  10. Long-time leaching and corrosion tests on full-scale cemented waste forms in the Asse salt mine. Sampling and analyses 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, B.; Schlieker, M.; Bauer, A.; Metz, V.; Meyer, H.

    2004-10-01

    The paper presents the follow-up of experimental findings from full-scale leach tests performed on simulated cemented waste forms for more than 20 years in salt brines and water. Measurements cover pH, density, and the composition of leachates as well as the release of radionuclides such as Cs, U and Np. Indicators for waste form corrosion and radionuclide release is Cs and NO 3 . Corrosion of cemented waste forms depends on the pore volume of the hardened cement which is correlated to the water/cement ratio. The release of radionuclides is evaluated and compared to small-scale laboratory tests. Excellent interpretation of observed concentrations is obtained for uranium and neptunium by comparison with model calculations. (orig.)

  11. Electrochemical Corrosion Investigations on Anaerobic Treated Distillery Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    Present study is focused on the corrosivity of anaerobic treated distillery effluent and corrosion performance of mild steel and stainless steels. Accordingly, electrochemical polarization tests were performed in both treated distillery and synthetic effluents. Polarization tests were also performed in synthetic solutions and it was observed that Cl- and K+ increase whereas SO4 -, PO4 -, NO3 -, and NO2 - decrease the corrosivity of effluent at alkaline pH. Further, comparison in corrosivity of distillery and synthetic effluents shows the former to be less corrosive and this is assigned due to the presence of amino acids and melanoidins. Mild steel experienced to have the highest corrosion rate followed by stainless steels—304L and 316L and lowest in case of SAF 2205. Relative corrosion resistance of stainless steels is observed to depend upon Cr, Mo, and N content.

  12. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  13. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwas, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  14. Critical study of test methods in stress corrosion cracking. Application to stainless steels in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajana, Lotfi

    1985-01-01

    The transposition of results obtained in laboratory to the prediction of in-service material resistance is a crucial problem in the case of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The search for a SCC test which allows a reliable and realistic classification of stainless steels in chloride environments requires a choice of adequate electrolytes and of mechanical solicitation mode. In this research, the author first justifies the choice of an environment which could be representative of actual service conditions in the case of 5 grades of austenitic steels and 1 grade of austeno-ferric steel. Using a computerized data acquisition and processing system, the author compares the information obtained with two types of test: under constant load and under slow strain rate [fr

  15. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  16. Atmospheric corrosion performance of different steels in early exposure in the coastal area region West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraini, Lutviasari; Prifiharni, Siska; Priyotomo, Gadang; Sundjono, Gunawan, Hadi; Purawiardi, Ibrahim

    2018-05-01

    The performance of carbon steel, galvanized steel and aluminium after one month exposed in the atmospheric coastal area, which is in Limbangan and Karangsong Beach, West Java, Indonesia was evaluated. The corrosion rate was determined by weight loss method and the morphology of the steel after exposed was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy(SEM)/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis(EDX). The site was monitored to determine the chloride content in the marine atmosphere. Then, the corrosion products formed at carbon steel were characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The result showed the aggressively corrosion in Karangsong beach, indicated from the corrosion rate of carbon steel, galvanized steel and aluminium were 38.514 mpy; 4.7860 mpy and 0.5181 mpy, respectively. While in Limbangan Beach the corrosion rate of specimen carbon steel, galvanized steel and aluminium were 3.339; 0.219 and 0.166 mpy, respectively. The chloride content was found to be the main factor that influences in the atmospheric corrosion process in this area. Chloride content accumulated in Karangsong and Limbangan was 497 mg/m2.day and 117 mg/m2.day, respectively. The XRD Analysis on each carbon steel led to the characterization of a complex mixture of iron oxides phases.

  17. Investigation into the cause of leak in the pipe of the corrosion test apparatus of IS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Suwa, Hirokazu

    2008-12-01

    The thermochemical water-splitting hydrogen production IS process utilizes corrosive chemicals such as sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid. Corrosion tests in IS process environments have been carried out to get the corrosion data of materials. In the corrosion test in 90wt% sulfuric acid at 400degC, the leak of sulfuric acid was observed in a pipe connected with a reflux condenser. The cause of the leakage is a significant knowledge for the operation of the test apparatus. Therefore the cause was investigated. A 1mm wide through hole was detected in the pipe around the welding bead. By visual observation after cutting the pipe, the wall thickness of the pipe became thin at the inside welding bead around the through hole. In addition, EMPA showed that the inhomogeneous distribution of the constituent elements of the pipe was observed around the through hole. For these reasons, it is estimated that the lowering of the corrosion resistance by the sensitization at the welding caused the leakage. (author)

  18. Corrosion characteristics of K-claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Choi, B. K.; Jung, Y. H.; Jung, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Improvement of the corrosion resistance of nuclear fuel claddings is the critical issue for the successful development of the high burn-up fuel. KAERI have developed the K-claddings having a superior corrosion resistance by controlling the alloying element addition and optimizing the manufacturing process. The comparative evaluation of the corrosion resistance for K-claddings and the foreign claddings was performed and the effect of the heat treatment on the corrosion behavior of K-claddings was also examined. Corrosion tests were carried out in the conditions of 360 .deg. C pure water, PWR-simulating loop and 400 .deg. C steam, From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion resistance of K-claddings is superior to those of Zry4 and A claddings and K6 showed a better corrosion resistance than K3. The corrosion behavior of K-cladding was strongly influenced by the final annealing rather than the intermediate annealing, and the corrosion resistance increased with decreasing the final annealing temperature

  19. Influence of cold worked layer on susceptibility to stress corrosion of duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labanowski, J.; Ossowska, A.; Cwiek, J.

    2001-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking resistance of cold worked layers on duplex stainless steel was investigated. The surface layers were performed through burnishing treatment. Corrosion tests were performed with the use of Slow Strain Rate Test technique in boiling 35% MgCl 2 solution. It has been shown that burnishing treatment increases corrosion resistance of steel. The factor that improves stress corrosion cracking resistance is crack incubation time. (author)

  20. Test Performance Related Dysfunctional Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep TÜTÜNCÜ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Examinations by using tests are very frequently used in educational settings and successful studying before the examinations is a complex matter to deal with. In order to understand the determinants of success in exams better, we need to take into account not only emotional and motivational, but also cognitive aspects of the participants such as dysfunctional beliefs. Our aim is to present the relationship between candidates’ characteristics and distorted beliefs/schemata just before an examination. Method: The subjects of the study were 30 female and 30 male physicians who were about to take the medical specialization exam (MSE in Turkey. Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS and Young Schema Questionnaire Short Form (YSQ-SF were applied to the subjects. The statistical analysis was done using the F test, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square test and spearman’s correlation test. Results: It was shown that some of the DAS and YSQ-SF scores were significantly higher in female gender, in the group who could not pass the exam, who had repetitive examinations, who had their first try taking an examination and who were unemployed at the time of the examination. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that candidates seeking help before MSE examination could be referred for cognitive therapy or counseling even they do not have any psychiatric diagnosis due to clinically significant cognitive distortion. Measurement and treatment of cognitive distortions that have negative impact on MSE performance may improve the cost-effectiveness and mental well being of the young doctors.

  1. Salt Spray Test to Determine Galvanic Corrosion Levels of Electroless Nickel Connectors Mounted on an Aluminum Bracket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, T. D.; Hodge, R. E.; Torres, P. D.; Jones, D. D.; Laird, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    During preliminary vehicle design reviews, requests were made to change flight termination systems from an electroless nickel (EN) connector coating to a zinc-nickel (ZN) plating. The reason for these changes was due to a new NASA-STD-6012 corrosion requirement where connectors must meet the performance requirement of 168 hr of exposure to salt spray. The specification for class F connectors, MIL-DTL-38999, certifies the EN coating will meet a 48-hr salt spray test, whereas the ZN is certified to meet a 168-hr salt spray test. The ZN finish is a concern because Marshall Space Flight Center has no flight experience with ZN-finished connectors, and MSFC-STD-3012 indicates that zinc and zinc alloys should not be used. The purpose of this test was to run a 168-hr salt spray test to verify the electrical and mechanical integrity of the EN connectors and officially document the results. The salt spray test was conducted per ASTM B117 on several MIL-DTL-38999 flight-like connectors mounted to an aluminum 6061-T6 bracket that was alodined. The configuration, mounting techniques, electrical checks, and materials used were typical of flight and ground support equipment.

  2. A study on the corrosion test of equipment material handling hot molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Jeong, M.S.; Hong, S.S.; Cho, S.H.; Shin, Y.J.; Park, H.S.; Zhang, J.S.

    1999-02-01

    On this technical report, corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels of SUS 316L and SUS 304L in molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O has been investigated in the temperature range of 650 - 850 dg C. Corrosion products of SUS 316L in molten salt consisted of two layers, an outer layer of LiCrO 2 and inner layer of Cr 2 O 3 .The corrosion layer was uniform in molten salt of LiCl, but the intergranular corrosion occurred in addition to the uniform corrosion in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O. The corrosion rate increased slowly with the increase of temperature up to 750 dg C, but above 750 dg C rapid increase in corrosion rate observed. SUS 316L stainless steel showed slower corrosion rate and higher activation energy for corrosion than SUS 304L, exhibiting higher corrosion resistance in the molten salt. In heat-resistant alloy, dense protective oxide scale of LiCrO 2 was formed in molten salt of LiCl. Whereas in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O, porous non-protective scale of Li(Cr, Ni, Fe)O 2 was formed. (Author). 44 refs., 4 tabs., 16 figs

  3. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffó, Gustavo, E-mail: duffo@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Gerencia Materiales, Depto. Corrosión, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gaillard, Natalia [Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo [Tomografía de Hormigón Armado S.A. (THASA), Reclus 2017, 1609 Boulogne, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  4. Fabrication of imitative stress corrosion cracking using diffusion bonding for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study reports a method to fabricate imitative stress corrosion cracking suitable for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluation methods. The method is to embed a partially-bonded region, which simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking, inside a material by bonding together surfaces having artificial grooves. Since the sizes of the grooves are smaller than the spatial resolution of nondestructive testing method applied, the material property realized can be regarded as uniform as the actual stress corrosion cracking. The grooves are introduced using mechanical machining, which enables one to control the characteristics of the simulated flaw. Four specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel are fabricated. The method is demonstrated by visual and eddy current examinations. (author)

  5. Corrosion testing of a plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate glass made with Frit B.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-09-30

    Laboratory tests were conducted with a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass made with Frit B and added PuO2 (the glass is referred to herein as Pu LaBS-B glass) to measure the dependence of the glass dissolution rate on pH and temperature. These results are compared with the dependencies used in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model that was developed to account for HLW glasses in total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations for the Yucca Mountain repository to determine if that model can also be used to represent the release of radionuclides from disposed Pu LaBS glass by using either the same parameter values that are used for HLW glasses or parameter values specific for Pu LaBS glass. Tests were conducted by immersing monolithic specimens of Pu LaBS-B glass in six solutions that imposed pH values between about pH 3.5 and pH 11, and then measuring the amounts of glass components released into solution. Tests were conducted at 40, 70, and 90 C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days at low glass-surface-area-to-solution volume ratios. As intended, these test conditions maintained sufficiently dilute solutions that the impacts of solution feedback effects on the dissolution rates were negligible in most tests. The glass dissolution rates were determined from the concentrations of Si and B measured in the test solutions. The dissolution rates determined from the releases of Si and B were consistent with the 'V' shaped pH dependence that is commonly seen for borosilicate glasses and is included in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model. The rate equation in that model (using the coefficients determined for HLW glasses) provides values that are higher than the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution rates that were measured over the range of pH and temperature values that were studied (i.e., an upper bound). Separate coefficients for the rate expression in acidic and alkaline solutions were also determined from the test results to model Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution

  6. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  7. Development of corrosion models to ensure reliable performance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritzky, V.G.; Stjazhkin, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    The safety and reliability of the coolant circuits in nuclear power plants depend much on corrosion and corrosion products transfer processes. Various empirical models have been developed which are applicable to particular sets of operational conditions. In our laboratory a corrosion model has been worked out, which is based on the thermodynamic properties of the compounds, participating in corrosion process and on the assumption, that the corrosion process is controlled by the solubilities of the corrosion products forming the surface oxide layer. The validity of the model has been verified by use of retrospective experimental data, which have been obtained for a series of structural materials such as e.g., carbon and stainless steels, Cu-, Al-, and Zr alloys. With regard for hydriding the model satisfactorily describes stress corrosion cracking process in water-salt environments. This report describes a model based on the thermodynamic properties of the compounds participating in the corrosion process, and on the assumption that the corrosion process is controlled by the solubilities of the corrosion products forming the surface oxide layer

  8. Corrosion testing of selected packaging materials for disposal of high-level waste glass in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.; Fiehn, B.; Halm, G.

    1990-05-01

    In previous corrosion studies performed in salt brines, unalloyed steels, Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 have proved to be the most promising materials for long-term resistant packagings to be used in heat-generating waste (vitrified HLW, spent fuel) disposal in rock-salt formations. To characterise the corrosion behaviour of these materials in more detail, further in-depth laboratory-scale and in-situ corrosion studies have been performed in the present study. Besides the above-mentioned materials, also some in-situ investigations of the iron-base materials Ni-Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron have been carried out in order to complete the results available to date. (orig.) [de

  9. Corrosion test plan to guide canister material selection and design for a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.; van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ballou, L.B.

    1983-11-01

    Corrosion rates and the mode of corrosion attack form a most important basis for selection of canister materials and design of a nuclear waste package. Type 304L stainless steel was selected as the reference material for canister fabrication because of its generally excellent corrosion resistance in water, steam and air. However, 304L may be susceptible to localized and stress-assisted forms of corrosion under certain conditions. Alternative alloys are also investigated; these alloys were chosen because of their improved resistance to these forms of corrosion. The fabrication and welding processes, as well as the glass pouring operation for defense and commercial high-level wastes, may influence the susceptibility of the canister to localized and stress forms of corrosion. 12 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  10. The influence of loading on the corrosion of steel in cracked ordinary Portland cement and high performance concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Shahzma Jafferali

    Most studies that have examined chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete have focused on sound concrete. However, reinforced concrete is seldom uncracked and very few studies have investigated the influence of cracked concrete on rebar corrosion. Furthermore, the studies that have examined the relationship between cracks and corrosion have focused on unloaded or statically loaded cracks. However, in practice, reinforced concrete structures (e.g. bridges) are often dynamically loaded. Hence, the cracks in such structures open and close which could influence the corrosion of the reinforcing steel. Consequently, the objectives of this project were (i) to examine the effect of different types of loading on the corrosion of reinforcing steel, (ii) the influence of concrete mixture design on the corrosion behaviour and (iii) to provide data that can be used in service-life modelling of cracked reinforced concretes. In this project, cracked reinforced concrete beams made with ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPCC) and high performance concrete (HPC) were subjected to no load, static loading and dynamic loading. They were immersed in salt solution to just above the crack level at their mid-point for two weeks out of every four (wet cycle) and, for the remaining two weeks, were left in ambient laboratory conditions to dry (dry cycle). The wet cycle led to three conditions of exposure for each beam: (i) the non-submerged region, (ii) the sound, submerged region and (iii) the cracked mid-section, which was also immersed in the solution. Linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse techniques were used to monitor the corrosion in the three regions. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical current noise and concrete electrical resistance measurements were also performed. These measurements illustrated that (i) rebar corroded faster at cracks than in sound concrete, (ii) HPC was more protective towards the rebar than OPCC even at cracks and (iii) there

  11. 40 CFR 60.8 - Performance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance tests. 60.8 Section 60.8... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.8 Performance tests. (a) Except as specified in... conduct performance test(s) and furnish the Administrator a written report of the results of such...

  12. Test Plan And Procedure For The Examination Of Tank 241-AY-101 Multi-Probe Corrosion Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwas, R.B.; Page, J.S.; Cooke, G.S.

    2012-01-01

    This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

  13. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  14. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  15. Corrosion of metals in wood : comparing the results of a rapid test method with long-term exposure tests across six wood treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Donald S. Stone

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares two methods of measuring the corrosion of steel and galvanized steel in wood: a long-term exposure test in solid wood and a rapid test method where fasteners are electrochemically polarized in extracts of wood treated with six different treatments. For traditional wood preservatives, the electrochemical extract method correlates with solid wood...

  16. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  17. Influence of nanoclay particles modification by polyester-amide hyperbranched polymer on the corrosion protective performance of the epoxy nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganjaee Sari, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Shahbazi, M.; Pakdel, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoclay particles were modified with polyester-amide hyperbranched polymer. • Epoxy/clay nanocomposites were prepared using modified clay particles. • Surface modification enhanced the clay particles exfoliation properties. • Surface modified clay particles enhanced corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. - Abstract: Surface modification of nanoclay particles was carried out by various amounts of polyester-amide hyperbranched polymer (HBP). Thermal gravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to estimate the efficiency of the HPB grafting on the clay particles. Epoxy/clay nanocomposites were prepared by addition of 1 wt.% unmodified and modified clays. The corrosion protection properties of the nanocomposites were evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results revealed that surface modification of the clay particles by HBP caused significant enhancement of the epoxy coating corrosion resistance especially when the ‘polymer/clay’ ratios were 10/1 and 5/1

  18. Inspection of piping wall loss with flow accelerated corrosion accelerated simulation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) has become a hot issue for aging of passive components. Ultrasonic Technique (UT) has been adopted to inspect the secondary piping of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). UT, however, uses point detection method, which results in numerous detecting points and thus takes time. We developed an Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method to monitor the thickness of piping that covers wide range of piping at once time. Since the ES-DCPD method covers area, not a point, it needs less monitoring time. This can be a good approach to broad carbon steel piping system such as secondary piping of NPPs. In this paper, FAC accelerated simulation test results is described. We realized accelerated FAC phenomenon by 2 times test: 23.7% thinning in 216.7 hours and 51% thinning in 795 hours. These were monitored by ES-DCPD and traditional UT. Some parameters of water chemistry are monitored and controlled to accelerate FAC process. As sensitive factors on FAC, temperature and pH was changed during the test. The wall loss monitored results reflected these changes of water chemistry successfully. Developed electrodes are also applied to simulation loop to monitor water chemistry. (author)

  19. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly

  20. Corrosion behavior of duplex and reference cladding in NPP Grohnde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besch, O.A.; Yagnik, S.K.; Eucken, C.M.; Bradley, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) Group undertook a lead test assembly (LTA) program in NPP Grohnde PWR in Germany to assess the corrosion performance of duplex and reference cladding. Two identical 16 by 16 LTAs, each containing 32 peripheral test rods, completed four reactor cycles, reaching a peak rod burnup of 46 MWd/kgU. The results from poolside examinations performed at the end of each cycle, together with power histories and coolant chemistry, are reported. Five different cladding materials were characterized during fabrication. The corrosion performance of the cladding materials was tracked in long-term tests in high-pressure, high-temperature autoclaves. The relative ranking of corrosion behavior in such tests corresponded well with the in-reactor corrosion performance. The extent and distribution of hydriding in duplex and reference specimens during the autoclave testing has been characterized. The in-reactor corrosion data indicate that the low-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R2, had an improved corrosion resistance compared to high-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R1. Two types of duplex cladding, D1 (Zr-2.5% Nb) and D2 (Zr-0.4% Fe-0.5% Sn), showed an even further improvement in corrosion resistance compared to R2 cladding. The third duplex cladding, D3 (Zr-4 + 1.0% Nb), had significantly less corrosion resistance, which was inferior to R1. The in-reactor and out-reactor corrosion performances have been ranked

  1. Stereotype Threat, Test Anxiety, and Mathematics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Tobias; Neumann, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of stereotype threat and trait test anxiety on mathematics test performance. Stereotype threat and test anxiety interacted with each other in affecting performance. Trait test anxiety predicted performance only in a diagnostic condition that prevented stereotype threat by stereotype denial. A state measure of…

  2. The effect of cerium-based conversion treatment on the cathodic delamination and corrosion protection performance of carbon steel-fusion-bonded epoxy coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rostami, M. [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Steel surface was treated by Ce and acid phosphoric solutions. • Ce treatment considerably enhanced the surface energy and produce nanoscale roughness. • Ce treated samples showed enhanced adhesion to FBE coating. • Ce treatment of steel significantly reduced the FBE cathodic delamination rate. • Ce treated sample showed enhanced corrosion resistance. - Abstract: The effect of surface pre-treatment of pipe surface by green cerium compound and phosphoric acid solution on the fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) coating performance was studied. The composition and surface morphology of the steel samples treated by acid and Ce solutions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Also, the surface free energy was evaluated on these samples through contact angle measurements. In addition, the effect of Ce and acid washing procedures on the adhesion properties and corrosion protection performance of the FBE was examined by pull-off, salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. Results showed that compared to acid washing, the chemical treatment by Ce solution noticeably increased the surface free energy of steel, improved the adhesion properties of FBE, decreased the cathodic delamination rate of FBE, and enhanced the coating corrosion resistance compared to the acid washed samples.

  3. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  4. Modeling of atmospheric corrosion environments and its application to constant dew-point corrosion test; Yagai taiki fushoku kankyo no modeling to sore ni motozuku teirotengata saikuru fushoku shikenho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, I. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)] Sugimoto, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-08-15

    Recently, stainless steel is increasing its demand for corrosion resistant building materials. Then, as it is necessary to develop and accelerating testing method capable of accurately estimating weatherability at sea side area, such testing method has no been developed yet because of difficulty to quantify corrosive environment relating to atmospheric corrosion phenomenon. As air temperature and relative humidity in outdoor change in complex, specific temperature and relative humidity cannot be used for their representative values. And, construction of corrosive factors such as sea salt particles, and so on are also much different at each area. However, at coastal area, a dew water dissolving the sea salt particles, so called droplets of chlorides aqueous solution is formed onto material surface. Then, in this study, on a base of drying and humidity absorption behavior and daily change behavior of temperature and humidity in outdoor, modeling of atmospheric corrosion environment was tried. An accelerating testing method according to this modeling was developed, long-term weathering test was compared with the corrosion behavior of the same steel, and validity of a new accelerating testing method was evaluated. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Corrosion performance of Cr3C2-NiCr+0.2%Zr coated super alloys under actual medical waste incinerator environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Lalit; Mudgal, Deepa; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya

    2018-03-01

    Incineration techniques are widely used to dispose of various types of waste which lead to formation of very corrosive environment. Such corrosive environment leads to the degradation of the alloys used in these areas. To obviate this problem, zirconium modified Cr3C2-(NiCr) coating powder has been deposited on three superalloys namely Superni 718, Superni 600 and Superco 605 using Detonation gun technique. Corrosion test was conducted in actual medical waste incinerator environment. The samples were hung inside the secondary chamber operated at 1050°C for 1000h under cyclic condition. Corrosion kinetics was monitored using the weight gain measurements and thickness loss. Corrosion products were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. It was observed that coating is found to be successful in impeding the corrosion problem in superalloys.

  6. Enhancement of the glass corrosion in the presence of clay minerals: testing experimental results with an integrated glass dissolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.; Vernaz, E.Y.

    1992-01-01

    Recent glass dissolution experiments, conducted at 90 deg C in the presence of potential backfill materials, indicate remarkably faster glass corrosion in the presence of clay, compared to tests where the glass is leached either alone or with alternative backfill materials. This effect correlates with the clay content in the backfill, and may be attributed to the removal of silica from solution. Scorpion, or dissolution with reprecipitation of a silica-rich clay, have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the silica consumption. The results of some experiments have been tested against a glass dissolution model, in which a widely used kinetic equation for glass corrosion is coupled with diffusive silica transport through a single porosity, linearly sorbing medium, which represents the backfilling. Because the glass corrosion rates imposed by the kinetic equation are inversely proportional to the silicic acid concentration of the leachant contacting the glass, the model predicts enhanced glass dissolution if silica is sorbed by the porous medium. The experimental data proved to be consistent with the predicted enhancement of the glass dissolution. Moreover, the model-estimated distribution coefficients for silica sorption (K d ) fall within the range of values extracted from available literature data, thus supporting the hypothesis that the observed high corrosion rates are due to sorption of silica on the clay mineral surfaces. (author)

  7. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor.

  8. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses

  9. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels in Fuel Grade Ethanol and Blends - Study to Evaluate Alternate Standard Tests and Phenomenological Understanding of SCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-30

    Main aim of this project was to evaluate alternate standard test methods for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and compare them with the results from slow strain rate test (SSRT) results under equivalent environmental conditions. Other important aim of...

  11. Stands for testing the strength of welded pipe materials under the action of a corrosive medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Kolodyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the features of the destruction of materials of pipelines for the transportation of oil, gas, products of processing of oil, water and other substances in the laboratory of the department of development of minerals named by prof. Bakka N.T. the complex of installations is invented, for which Ukrainian patents were obtained as utility models No. 30794, No. 52493, for the study of the working capacity of the elements of the listed pipeline systems in conditions that are as close as possible to the operational under the influence of the corrosive medium. Rotary vacuum devices were used as the basic elements of the proposed installations for testing the materials of the welded tubes for durability at single tensile and under flat stress conditions. The article presents the design of research stands for testing the durability of pipe materials and welds of pipelines using samples of materials and natural pipes (shortened under the influence of static, low cyclic and dynamic loads, and analyzes the influence of aggressive media.

  12. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  13. Electrochemical synthesis of bilayer coatings of poly(N-methylaniline) and polypyrrole on mild steel and their corrosion protection performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeybek, Buelent [Ankara University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Dumlupinar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Kuetahya (Turkey); Ozcicek Pekmez, Nuran, E-mail: npekmez@hacettepe.edu.t [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Kilic, Esma [Ankara University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: > The bilayers of poly(N-methylaniline) and polypyrrole-dodecylsulfate were synthesized. > These films on mild steel were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, FTIR and FESEM. > DS dopant allows permeation to cations and decreases the ingress of chloride ions. > The PNMA/PPy-DS bilayer coating exhibited the best corrosion resistance in 0.5 M HCl. > The protective properties of polymers was developed by preparing their bilayer coatings. - Abstract: Homopolymer and bilayer coatings of poly(N-methylaniline) (PNMA) and polypyrrole-dodecylsulfate (PPy-DS) have been electropolymerized on a mild steel (MS) surface by the potentiodynamic method in aqueous oxalic acid solutions. In order to include dodecylsulfate ion as dopant in the polypyrrole, sodium dodecylsulfate was also added to the polymerization solution of pyrrole. Characterization of coatings was carried out by the cyclic voltammetry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Corrosion behavior of the polymer coated MS electrodes was investigated in highly aggressive 0.5 M HCl solution by the Tafel test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Corrosion test revealed that among the protective coatings obtained, the PNMA/PPy-DS bilayer exhibited the best corrosion resistance at all immersion times.

  14. Operator performance in non-destructive testing: A study of operator performance in a performance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkvist, J.; Edland, A.; Svenson, Ola [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology

    2000-05-15

    In the process industries there is a need of inspecting the integrity of critical components without disrupting the process. Such in-service inspections are typically performed with non-destructive testing (NDT). In NDT the task of the operator is to (based on diagnostic information) decide if the component can remain in service or not. The present study looks at the performance in NDT. The aim is to improve performance, in the long run, by exploring the operators' decision strategies and other underlying factors and to this way find out what makes some operators more successful than others. Sixteen operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of four test pieces with the aim to detect (implanted) cracks. In addition to these performance demonstration tests (PDT), the operators performed independent ability tests and filled out questionnaires. The results show that operators who trust their gut feeling more than the procedure (when the two come to different results) and that at the same time have a positive attitude towards the procedure have a higher PDT performance. These results indicate the need for operators to be motivated and confident when performing NDT. It was also found that the operators who performed better rated more decision criteria higher in the detection phase than the operators who performed worse. For characterizing it was the other way around. Also, the operators who performed better used more time, both detecting and characterizing, than the operators who performed worse.

  15. Operator performance in non-destructive testing: A study of operator performance in a performance test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enkvist, J.; Edland, A.; Svenson, Ola

    2000-05-01

    In the process industries there is a need of inspecting the integrity of critical components without disrupting the process. Such in-service inspections are typically performed with non-destructive testing (NDT). In NDT the task of the operator is to (based on diagnostic information) decide if the component can remain in service or not. The present study looks at the performance in NDT. The aim is to improve performance, in the long run, by exploring the operators' decision strategies and other underlying factors and to this way find out what makes some operators more successful than others. Sixteen operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of four test pieces with the aim to detect (implanted) cracks. In addition to these performance demonstration tests (PDT), the operators performed independent ability tests and filled out questionnaires. The results show that operators who trust their gut feeling more than the procedure (when the two come to different results) and that at the same time have a positive attitude towards the procedure have a higher PDT performance. These results indicate the need for operators to be motivated and confident when performing NDT. It was also found that the operators who performed better rated more decision criteria higher in the detection phase than the operators who performed worse. For characterizing it was the other way around. Also, the operators who performed better used more time, both detecting and characterizing, than the operators who performed worse

  16. Ecotoxicological testing of performance fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallqvist, T.

    1990-05-01

    The report deals with a project comprising the testing of drilling fluids concerning ecotoxicology, biological degradation, and toxicity. Two types of drilling fluids were tested for toxic effects on marine algae and biological degradability. A fluid based on mineral oil was readily degradable (98% DOC removal in 28 days) while an ether based oil degraded more slowly (56% DOC removal in 28 days). The toxicity of both fluids was tested after emulsification of the oils in water and separating the oil and water phase after equilibration. The EC 50 values obtained with this approach were 8.15 g/l for the oil based fluid and 116 g/l for the ether fluid. 9 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is ∼ 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was put initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status

  18. Corrosion Protection Performance of Polyester-Melamine Coating with Natural Wood Fiber Using EIS Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, PyongHwa; Shon, MinYoung [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jo, DuHwan [POSCO, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In the present study, polyester-melamine coating systems with natural wood fiber (NWF) were prepared and the effects of NWF on the corrosion protectiveness of the polyester-melamine coating were examined using EIS analysis. From the results, higher average surface roughness was observed with increase of NWF content. Water diffusivity and water uptake into the polyester-melamine coatings with NWF were much higher than that into the pure polyester-melamine coating. The decrease in the impedance modulus |Z| was associated with the localized corrosion on carbon steel, confirming that corrosion protection of the polyester-melamine coatings with NWF well agrees with its water transport behavior.

  19. Salt Repository Project: Data report on corrosion results obtained from excess-salt corrosion test Matrix 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, J.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    The test discussed in this data report was directed at determining the response of the reference A216 grade WCA steel when it is exposed to anoxic excess-salt conditions at 150 0 C. The environment used in the test was intended to duplicate the intrusion brine scenario (i.e., the formation of brine by the intrusion of water from an outside source into the repository, with the formation of brine through dissolution of salt from the repository horizon). The salt-brine environment used in the test therefore reflected the expected gross salt composition of the repository horizon

  20. Fretting corrosion tests on orthopedic plates and screws made of ASTM F138 stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Claudio Teodoro dos; Barbosa,Cássio; Monteiro,Maurício de Jesus; Abud,Ibrahim de Cerqueira; Caminha,Ieda Maria Vieira; Roesler,Carlos Rodrigo de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although there has been significant progress in the design of implants for osteosynthesis, the occurrence of failures in these medical devices are still frequent. These implants are prone to suffer from fretting corrosion due to micromotion that takes place between the screw heads and plate holes. Consequently, fretting corrosion has been the subject of research in order to understand its influence on the structural integrity of osteosynthesis implants. The aim of this paper is t...

  1. Electrochemical methods for corrosion testing of Ce-based coating prepared on AA6060 alloy by dip immersion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dip-immersion is simple and cost-effective method for the preparation of Ce-based conversion coatings (CeCCs, a promising alternative to the toxic chromate coatings, on the metal substrates. In this work CeCCs were prepared on Al-alloy AA6060 from aqueous solution of cerium chloride at room temperature. Effect of immersion time and post-treatment in phosphate solution on the microstructure and corrosion properties of the coatings was studied. The longer immersion time, the thicker but nonhomogeneous and cracked CeCCs. The post-treatment contributed to the sealing of cracks, as proven by an increase in corrosion resistance compared with as-deposited coatings. CeCCs prepared at longer deposition time and post-treated showed much better corrosion protection than those prepared at short deposition time. A detailed EIS study was undertaken to follow the evolution of corrosion behaviour of CeCCs with time of exposure to aggressive chloride environment (3.5 % NaCl. For the sake of comparison, the EIS properties of bare AA6060 were also investigated. A linear voltammetry was performed to complete the study. Results confirmed a formation of protective CeCCs on AA6060 surface. However, even CeCCs prepared at longer deposition time and post-treated provided a short term protection in aggressive environment, due to the small thickness. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019 i br. III 45012

  2. The inhibition performance of long-chain alkyl-substituted benzimidazole derivatives for corrosion of mild steel in HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dongqin; Tang, Yongming; Qi, Sijun; Dong, Dawei; Cang, Hui; Lu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Inhibition performance of long-chain alkyl-substituted benzimidazole. • Benzimidazole segment donating electrons to metal surface. • Non-polar long chain enhancing inhibition by the barrier effect. • Molecular form of DBI more tightly adsorbs on the steel than its protonated form. - Abstract: The corrosion inhibition of a new benzimidazole derivative, 6-(dodecyloxy)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole (DBI), for mild steel in 1 M HCl was investigated in this paper. Computational chemistry was performed to explore the adsorption of DBI on metal surface. Inhibition performance of DBI is attributed to both the direct interaction of benzimidazole segment with iron surface and the barrier effect of the non-polar long chain against aggressive solution. Compared to the protonated form, the molecular form of DBI could more tightly interact with iron surface. These results show that the long-chain alkyl-substituted benzimidazole derivative is of great potential application as corrosion inhibitor.

  3. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  4. The applicability of alkaline-resistant glass fiber in cement mortar of road pavement: Corrosion mechanism and performance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xiaochun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main technical requirements of road pavement concrete are high flexural strength and fatigue durability. Adding glass fiber into concrete could greatly increase flexural strength and wearing resistance of concrete. However, glass fiber has the great potential of corrosion during the cement hydration, which will directly affect the long-term performance and strength stability. In this paper, accelerated corrosion experiments have been done to find out the corrosion mechanism and property of alkali-resistant glass fiber in cement mortar. The applicability and practicability of alkaline-resistant glass fiber in road concrete have been illustrated in the analysis of flexural strength changing trend of cement mortar mixed with different proportions of activated additives to protect the corrosion of glass fiber by cement mortar. The results have shown that a 30% addition of fly ash or 10% addition of silica fume to cement matrix could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of alkali-resistant glass fiber. The optimal mixing amount of alkali-resistant glass fiber should be about 1.0 kg/m3 in consideration of ensuring the compressive strength of reinforced concrete in road pavement. The closest-packing method has been adopted in the mixture ratio design of alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced concrete, not only to reduce the alkalinity of the cement matrix through large amount addition of activated additives but also to greatly enhance the flexural performance of concrete with the split pressure ratio improvement of 12.5–16.7%. The results suggested a prosperous application prospect for alkaline-resistant glass fiber reinforced concrete in road pavement.

  5. Performance test of a ceramic turbo-viscous pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tetsuya; Hiroki, Seiji; Murakami, Yoshio; Shiraishi, Shigeyuki; Totoura, Sadayuki; Ohtaki, Takashi.

    1994-01-01

    In the special fields of nuclear fusion facilities and semiconductor production installation, the development of new vacuum pumps which can cope with strong magnetic fields, high temperature gas and corrosive gas is demanded. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. has advanced the development of ceramic turbo-molecular pumps and ceramic turbo-viscous pumps, which use ceramic rotors and gas bearings since 1985. The evaluation test of the ceramic turbo-viscous vacuum pump CT-3000H which can evacuate from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum with one pump was carried out, and the experimental results on the performance and the reliability were obtained, therefore, those are reported in this paper. The structure, specification and features of the CT-3000H are shown. The exhaust performance test of the pump was carried out in conformity with the standard of the Vacuum Society of Japan, JVIS 005 'Method of performance test for turbo-molecular pumps'. The gases used were nitrogen and helium. The results are shown. The exhaust test from atmospheric pressure was carried out by two methods, and the results are shown. (K.I.)

  6. Implementation of Localized Corrosion in the Performance Assessment Model for Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.; SEVOUGIAN, D.S.; MATTIE, P.D.; MACKINNON, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    A total system performance assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to analyze the ability of the natural and engineered barriers of the Yucca Mountain repository to isolate nuclear waste for the 10,000-year period following repository closure. The principal features of the engineered barrier system (EBS) are emplacement tunnels (or ''drifts'') containing a two-layer waste package (WP) for waste containment and a titanium drip shield to protect the waste package from seeping water and falling rock. The 20-mm-thick outer shell of the WP is composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy, while the 50-mm inner shell is composed of 316 stainless steel (modified with lower carbon and nitrogen compositions), whose primary purpose is to provide structural strength. The barrier function of the EBS is to isolate the waste from the migrating water with its associated chemical conditions that eventually lead to degradation of the waste packages and mobilization of the radionuclides within the packages

  7. Effect of substrate temperature on corrosion performance of nitrogen doped amorphous carbon thin films in NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khun, N.W. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, E., E-mail: MEJLiu@ntu.edu.s [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen doped amorphous carbon (a-C:N) thin films were deposited on p-Si substrates by DC magnetron sputtering at varying substrate temperature from room temperature (RT) to 300 {sup o}C. The bonding structure, surface morphology and adhesion strength of the a-C:N films were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and micro-scratch testing. The corrosion behavior of the a-C:N films was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization test in a 0.6 M NaCl solution. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of the films depended on the sp{sup 3}-bonded cross-link structure that was significantly affected by the substrate temperature.

  8. Effect of substrate temperature on corrosion performance of nitrogen doped amorphous carbon thin films in NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khun, N.W.; Liu, E.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen doped amorphous carbon (a-C:N) thin films were deposited on p-Si substrates by DC magnetron sputtering at varying substrate temperature from room temperature (RT) to 300 o C. The bonding structure, surface morphology and adhesion strength of the a-C:N films were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and micro-scratch testing. The corrosion behavior of the a-C:N films was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization test in a 0.6 M NaCl solution. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of the films depended on the sp 3 -bonded cross-link structure that was significantly affected by the substrate temperature.

  9. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-01-01

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  10. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  11. Properties and Corrosion Performance of Self-reinforced Composite PEEK for Proposed Use as a Modular Taper Gasket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Eric S; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2016-11-01

    Fretting corrosion in medical alloys is a persistent problem, and the need for biomaterials that can effectively suppress mechanically assisted crevice corrosion in modular taper junctions or otherwise insulate metal-on-metal interfaces in mechanically demanding environments is as yet unmet. The purpose of this study is to characterize a novel material, self-reinforced composite polyetheretherketone (SRC-PEEK) and to evaluate its ability to inhibit fretting corrosion in a pin-on-disk metal-on-metal interface test. SRC-PEEK was fabricated by hot compaction of in-house-made PEEK fibers by compacting uniaxial layups at 344°C under a load of 18,000 N for 10 minutes. SRC-PEEK, bulk isotropic PEEK, and the in-house-made PEEK fibers were analyzed for thermal transitions (T g , T m ) through differential scanning calorimetry, crystallinity, crystal size, crystalline orientation (Hermanns orientation parameter) through wide-angle x-ray scattering, and modulus, tensile strength, yield stress, and strain to failure through monotonic tensile testing. SRC-insulated pin-on-disk samples were compared with metal-on-metal control samples in pin-on-disk fretting corrosion experiments using fretting current and fretting mechanics measurements. Fifty-micron cyclic motion at 2.5 Hz was applied to the interface, first over a range of loads (0.5-35 N) while held at -0.05 V versus Ag/AgCl and then over a range of voltages (-0.5 to 0.5 V) at a constant contact stress of 73 ± 19 MPa for SRC-PEEK and 209 ± 41 MPa for metal-on-metal, which were different for each group as a result of changes in true contact area due to variations in modulus between sample groups. Pins, disks, and SRC samples were imaged for damage (on alloy and SRC surfaces) and evidence of corrosion (on alloy pin and disk surfaces). SRC specimens were analyzed for traces of alloy transferred to the surface using energy dispersive spectroscopy after pin-on-disk testing. SRC-PEEK showed improved mechanical properties to

  12. Comparison of Refractory Performance in Black Liquor Gasifiers and a Smelt Test System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peascoe, RA

    2001-01-01

    Prior laboratory corrosion studies along with experience at the black liquor gasifier in New Bern, North Carolina, clearly demonstrate that serious material problems exist with the gasifier's refractory lining. Mullite-based and alumina-based refractories used at the New Bern facility suffered significant degradation even though they reportedly performed adequately in smaller scale systems. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's involvement in the failure analysis, and the initial exploration of suitable replacement materials, led to the realization that a simple and reliable, complementary method for refractory screening was needed. The development of a laboratory test system and its suitability for simulating the environment of black liquor gasifiers was undertaken. Identification and characterization of corrosion products were used to evaluate the test system as a rapid screening tool for refractory performance and as a predictor of refractory lifetime. Results from the test systems and pl ants were qualitatively similar

  13. Bio-testing integral toxicity of corrosion inhibitors, biocides and oil hydrocarbons in oil-and gas-processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugunov, V.A.; Kholodenko, V.P.; Irkhina, I.A.; Fomchenkov, V.M.; Novikov, I.A. [State Research Center for Applied Microbiology, Obolensk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In recent years bioassays have been widely used for assessing levels of contamination of the environment. This is due to the fact that test-organisms provide a general response to toxicants present in samples. Based on microorganisms as test objects, it is possible to develop cheap, sensitive and rapid assays to identify environmental xenobiotics and toxicants. The objective of the research was to develop different microbiological assays for assessing integral toxicity of water environments polluted with corrosion inhibitors, biocides and hydrocarbons in oil- and gas-processing industry. Bio-luminescent, electro-orientational, osmo-optic and microorganism reducing activity assays were used for express evaluation of integral toxicity. They are found to determine promptly integral toxicity of water environments containing various pollutants (oil, oil products, corrosion inhibitors, biocides). Results conclude that the assays may be used for analyzing integral toxicity of water polluted with hydrocarbons, as well as for monitoring of water changes as a result of biodegradation of pollutants by microorganisms and their associations. Using a kit of different assays, it is also possible to evaluate ecological safety of biocides, corrosion inhibitors, and their compositions. Bioassays used as a kit are more effective than each assay individually, allowing one to get complete characterization of a reaction of bacterial test organisms to different environments. (authors)

  14. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weldings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segarra, José A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS. The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior.En este artículo se ha investigado el comportamiento frente a la corrosión en medios acuosos salinos de chapas soldadas de aleación AZ31 mediante técnicas gravimétricas y ensayo en cámara de niebla salina. Las muestras estudiadas han sido soldadas mediante soldadura TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas y con diferentes materiales de aporte. En el estudio se ha empleado microscopía óptica para analizar la microestructura. Los ensayos de gravimetría y los ensayos de niebla salina indican que el empleo de materiales de aporte más nobles para soldar las muestras evitando la disminución del contenido en aluminio en los cordones, no implica un mejor comportamiento frente a la corrosión.

  15. Corrosion testing of NiCrAl(Y) coating alloys in high-temperature and supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljan, S.; Huang, X.; Qian, Y.; Guzonas, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear power reactors, materials capable of operating in high-temperature and supercritical water environment are essential. This study focuses on the corrosion behavior of five alloys with compositions of Ni20Cr, Ni5Al, Ni50Cr, Ni20Cr5Al and Ni20Cr10AlY above and below the critical point of water. Corrosion tests were conducted at three different pressures, while the temperature was maintained at 460 o C, in order to examine the effects of water density on the corrosion. From the preliminary test results, it was found that the binary alloys Ni20Cr and Ni50Cr showed weight loss above the critical point (23.7 MPa and 460 o C). The higher Cr content alloy Ni50Cr suffered more weight loss than Ni-20Cr under the same conditions. Accelerated weight gain was observed above the critical point for the binary alloy Ni5Al. The combination of Cr, Al and Y in Ni20Cr10AlY provides stable scale formation under all testing conditions employed in this study. (author)

  16. Corrosion Resistance of Some Stainless Steels in Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasprzyk D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work compares corrosion behaviour of four types of S30403, S31603, S32615 austenitic and S32404 austenitic-ferritic stainless steels in chloride solutions (1%, 3% NaCl and in Ringer solution, at 37°C temperature. Corrosion resistance was determined by potentiodynamic polarization measurements and a thirty day immersion test conducted in Ringer solution. The immersion test was performed in term of biomedical application. These alloy were spontaneously passivated in all electrolytes, wherein S30403, S31603 and S32404 undergo pitting corrosion. Only S32615 containing 5.5% Si shows resistance to pitting corrosion.

  17. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  18. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  19. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Blandford, Edward, E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Howe, Kerry [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  20. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel; Blandford, Edward; Howe, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  1. Evaluation of Test Methodologies for Dissolution and Corrosion of Al-SNF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.J.; Mickalonis, J.I.; Louthan, M.R.

    1998-09-01

    The performance of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) in the repository will differ from that of the commercial nuclear fuels and the high level waste glasses. The program consists of evaluating three test methods

  2. An Alternative Corrosion Resistance Test Method for Solar Cells and Interconnection Materials Limiting the Number of Long-lasting and Expensive Damp-Heat Climate Chamber Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aken, B.B.; Gouwen, R.J.; Veldman, D.; Bende, E.E.; Eerenstein, W. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Damp-heat testing of PV modules is a time-consuming process, taking months. We present an alternative test method: electrochemical noise (EcN) measurements. Data acquisition times vary between minutes for direct exposure to several tens of hours for encapsulated samples. EcN measurements are presented for several solar cell concepts and different environments. We have found that the degradation in damp-heat testing is proportional to the electrochemical noise signal. In conclusion, the electrochemical noise measurements are a fast, versatile tool to test the corrosion resistance of solar cells, which can be tested for different environments including encapsulation.

  3. Corrosion evaluation of heat recovery steam generator superheater tube in two methods of testing: Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Rio Pudjidarma; Riastuti, Rini

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate the corrosion process which occurs on the water side of Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) superheater tube. The tube was 13CrMo44 and divided into 3 types of specimen: new tube, used tube (with oxide layer on surface), cleaned-used tube (without oxide layer on surface). The evaluation of corrosion parameters wasperformed using deaerated ultra-high purity water (boiler feed water) in two methods of testing: Tafel polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Tafel polarization was excellent as its capability to show the value of corrosion current and the corrosion rate explicitly, on the other hand, EIS was excellent as its capability to explain for corrosion mechanism on metal interface in detail. Both methods showed that the increase of electrolyte temperature from 25°C to 55°C would increase the corrosion rate with the mechanism of decreasing polarization resistance due to thinning out the passive film thickness and enlarge the area of reduction reaction of cathode. Magnetite oxide scale which is laid on the surface of used tube specimen shows protective nature to reduce the corrosion rate, and clear up this oxide would increase the corrosion rate back as new tube.

  4. In vitro assessments on bacterial adhesion and corrosion performance of TiN coating on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy synthesized by multi-arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Naiming; Huang Xiaobo; Zhang Xiangyu; Fan Ailan; Qin Lin; Tang Bin

    2012-01-01

    TiN coating was synthesized on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy surface by multi-arc ion plating (MIP) technique. Surface morphology, cross sectional microstructure, elemental distributions and phase compositions of the obtained coating were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical microscope (OM), glow discharge optical emission spectroscope (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Bacterial adhesion and corrosion performance of Ti6Al4V and the TiN coating were assessed via in vitro bacterial adhesion tests and corrosion experiments, respectively. The results indicated that continuous and compact coating which was built up by pure TiN with a typical columnar crystal structure has reached a thickness of 1.5 μm. This TiN coating could significantly reduce the bacterial adhesion and enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V substrate.

  5. Analysis of electrochemical noise data in both time and frequency domains to evaluate the effect of ZnO nanopowder addition on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ashassi-Sorkhabi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy–ZnO nanocomposite coatings have been developed for corrosion protection of steel. Structural characterization of the prepared nanocomposites was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The anti-corrosive properties of the coatings were evaluated by electrochemical noise (EN. On the basis of the EN results in both time and frequency domains, the nanocomposite material with low ZnO concentration (0.1% wt.% was found to be much superior in corrosion protection when tested in aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Finally, EIS measurements were carried out and the data fitted with suitable equivalent circuit. Resistance parameters obtained by both techniques were found to be in relatively good agreement.

  6. Quantification of Applied Stresses of C-Ring Specimens for Stress Corrosion Cracking Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Sun Jae; Rhee, Chang Kyu; Kuk, Il Hiun; Choi, Jong Ho

    1997-01-01

    For comparing their resistances for stress-corrosion cracking(SCC) in the K600-MA, K690-MA, and K600-TT tubes, C-ring specimens were fabricated with the various thermal-treatments to control the distributions of the precipitates like Cr-carbides. The bending stresses were analyzed to determine the amounts to make the stress quantitatively to all the C-ring samples, and then the stresses were calculated with the relation to the outer diameter(O.D) deflection(δ) of the C-rings. To measure accurately the bending strains of the C-ring specimens, the strain gauges were used and the compression test was also carried out. In the elastic region, the stresses in both the transverse and the circumferential directions were different with the locations of the strain gauges as attached at α= 30 .deg., 45 .deg., and 90 .deg. to the principal stress direction, but those in the longitudinal direction were independent of their attached locations. Calculated stresses from the strains obtained using the strain gauges were well agreed with the theoretical. In the plastic region over δ=1.0mm, the stresses for the TT tubes showed lower values of about 400MPa than those for the MA tubes. However, the stresses among the TT tubes showed almost the similar values in this region. Therefore, the states of the stresses applied to the C-ring specimens would be different with the material conditions, i.e, the chemical compositions, the thermal treatments such as MA and TT

  7. Laboratory corrosion tests on candidate high-level waste container materials: Results from the Belgian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Kursten, B.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    The Belgian SAFIR-2 concept foresees the geological disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste in stainless steel containers and overpacks placed in a concrete gallery backfilled with Boom clay or a bentonite-type backfill. In addition to earlier in situ experiments, we used a laboratory approach to investigate the corrosion properties of selected stainless steels in Boom clay and bentonite environments. In the SAFIR-2 concept, AISI 316L hMo is the main candidate overpack material. As an alternative, we also investigated the higher alloyed stainless steel UHB 904L. Our study focused on localised corrosion and in particular pitting. We used cyclic potentiodynamic polarisation measurements to determine the pit nucleation potential E NP and the protection potential E PP . The evolution of the corrosion potential with time was determined by monitoring the open circuit potential in synthetic clay-water over extended periods. In this paper we present and discuss some results from our laboratory programme, focusing on long-term interactions between the stainless steel overpack and the backfill materials. We describe in particular the influence of chloride and thio-sulphate ions on the pitting corrosion behaviour. The results show that, under geochemical conditions typical for geological disposal, i.e. [Cl-] ∼ 30 mg/L for a Boom clay backfill and [Cl-] ∼ 90 mg/L for a bentonite backfill, neither AISI 316L hMo nor UHB 904L is expected to present pitting problems. An important factor in the long-term prediction of the corrosion behaviour however, is the robustness of the model for the evolution of the geochemistry of the backfill. Indeed, at chloride levels higher than 1000 mg/L, we predict pitting corrosion for AISI 316L hMo. (authors)

  8. Experimental study on dew point corrosion characteristics of the heating surface in a 65 t/h biomass-fired circulating fluidized bed boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yungang; Ma, Haidong; Liang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Heng; Zhao, Qinxin; Jin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dew point corrosion and ash deposit tests in a biomass-fired boiler were performed. • The XRD, XRF and SEM methods were used to analyze corrosion samples. • The deposits were made up of ash deposit layer, coupling layer and corrosion layer. • The metal matrix simultaneously confronted chlorine corrosion and oxygen corrosion. - Abstract: The dew point corrosion characteristics of the heating surface in a 65 t/h biomass-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler were experimentally studied. The cross-sectional morphology and composition of the ash deposition were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence spectrum (XRF), respectively. The results showed that the test tube surface was covered by ash deposit layer, coupling layer and corrosion layer. The ash deposit layer and the coupling layer were prone to spall off together. The coupling layer consists of partial ash and corrosion products. The corrosion layer was mainly composed of chlorides (FeCl_3, FeCl_2, and FeOCl) and oxides (FeOOH, Fe_2O_3). With the increase of the tube wall temperature, the corrosion depth decreased dramatically and the dew point corrosion was alleviated efficiently. The metal matrix simultaneously suffered from chlorine corrosion and oxygen corrosion. As the tube wall temperature was above water dew point, the main corrosion mode was oxygen corrosion. As the tube wall temperature was below water dew point, the main corrosion mode was chlorine corrosion.

  9. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  10. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop, Modules 6 - 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

    2012-10-01

    These modules cover performance testing of: Interior Detection Systems; Access Controls; Exterior Detection Systems; Video Assessment Systems; SNM / Contraband Detection Systems; Access Delay Elements

  11. The jet impingement cell: A valuable device for investigating CO{sub 2} corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsella, Brian; John, Douglas; Bailey, Stuart; De Marco, Roland [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, School of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA, 6845 (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    The jet impingement cell (JIC) is a valuable technique for the investigation of carbon dioxide corrosion of steel and its inhibition under high flow conditions or high wall shear stress. Despite the use of the JIC in corrosion testing laboratories not a great deal has been published on the design and calibration of these cells. In the evaluation of corrosion inhibitors, the type of corrosion and relative performance of the inhibitors depends on the metallurgy of the steel used to manufacture electrodes and measure the corrosion rate. This paper covers aspects of cell design and the determination of mass transfer and wall shear stress at electrodes used in the cell. The performance of different generic type corrosion inhibitors and their affect on the type of corrosion (i.e, uniform, pitting and crevice corrosion) is shown and discussed. (authors)

  12. Corrosion behavior of corrosion resistant alloys in stimulation acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheldi, Tiziana [ENI E and P Division, 20097 San Donato Milanese Milano (Italy); Piccolo, Eugenio Lo; Scoppio, Lucrezia [Centro Sviluppo Materiali, via Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    In the oil and gas industry, selection of CRAs for downhole tubulars is generally based on resistance to corrosive species in the production environment containing CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, chloride and in some case elemental sulphur. However, there are non-production environments to which these materials must also be resistant for either short term or prolonged duration; these environments include stimulation acids, brine and completion fluids. This paper reports the main results of a laboratory study performed to evaluate the corrosion and stress corrosion behaviour to the acidizing treatments of the most used CRAs for production tubing and casing. Laboratory tests were performed to simulate both 'active' and 'spent' acids operative phases, selecting various environmental conditions. The selected steel pipes were a low alloyed steel, martensitic, super-martensitic, duplex 22 Cr, superduplex 25 Cr and super-austenitic stainless steels (25 Cr 35 Ni). Results obtained in the 'active' acid environments over the temperature range of 100-140 deg. C, showed that the blend acids with HCl at high concentration and HCl + HF represented too much severe conditions, where preventing high general corrosion and heavy localised corrosion by inhibition package becomes very difficult, especially for duplex steel pipe, where, in some case, the specimens were completely dissolved into the solution. On the contrary, all steels pipes were successfully protected by inhibitor when organic acid solution (HCOOH + CH{sub 3}COOH) were used. Furthermore, different effectiveness on corrosion protection was showed by the tested inhibitors packages: e.g. in the 90% HCl at 12% + 10 CH{sub 3}COOH acid blend. In 'spent' acid environments, all steel pipes showed to be less susceptible to the localised and general corrosion attack. Moreover, no Sulphide Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) was observed. Only one super-austenitic stainless steel U-bend specimen showed

  13. Fighting corrosion in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  14. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  15. Standard test method for evaluating stress-corrosion cracking of stainless alloys with different nickel content in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in an acidified boiling sodium chloride solution. This test method is performed in 25% (by mass ) sodium chloride acidified to pH 1.5 with phosphoric acid. This test method is concerned primarily with the test solution and glassware, although a specific style of U-bend test specimen is suggested. 1.2 This test method is designed to provide better correlation with chemical process industry experience for stainless steels than the more severe boiling magnesium chloride test of Practice G36. Some stainless steels which have provided satisfactory service in many environments readily crack in Practice G36, but have not cracked during interlaboratory testing using this sodium chloride test method. 1.3 This boiling sodium chloride test method was used in an interlaboratory test program to evaluate wrought stainless steels, including duplex (ferrite-austenite) stainless and an alloy with up to about 33% nickel. It may also b...

  16. DOE-DARPA High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM), Annual HPCRM Team Meeting & Technical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Brown, B; Bayles, B; Lemieux, T; Choi, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Branagan, D; Blue, C; Peter, B; Beardsley, B; Graeve, O; Aprigliano, L; Yang, N; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-21

    The overall goal is to develop high-performance corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous-metal coatings for prolonged trouble-free use in very aggressive environments: seawater & hot geothermal brines. The specific technical objectives are: (1) Synthesize Fe-based amorphous-metal coating with corrosion resistance comparable/superior to Ni-based Alloy C-22; (2) Establish processing parameter windows for applying and controlling coating attributes (porosity, density, bonding); (3) Assess possible cost savings through substitution of Fe-based material for more expensive Ni-based Alloy C-22; (4) Demonstrate practical fabrication processes; (5) Produce quality materials and data with complete traceability for nuclear applications; and (6) Develop, validate and calibrate computational models to enable life prediction and process design.

  17. Anti-Corrosion Performance of 1,3-BENZOTHIAZOLE on 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel in H2SO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loto, Roland Tolulope

    The corrosion inhibition effect of synthesized 1,3-benzothiazole at very low concentrations on 410 martensitic stainless steel in 3MH2SO4 solution was studied through potentiodynamic polarization and weight loss measurements. The observation showed that the organic compound performed effectively with average inhibition efficiencies of 94% and 98% at the concentrations studied from both electrochemical methods due to the inhibition action of protonated inhibitor molecules in the acid solution. The amine and aromatics functional groups of the molecules active in the corrosion inhibition reaction were exposed from Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. Thermodynamic calculations showed cationic adsorption to be chemisorption adsorption, obeying the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Images from optical microscopy showed an improved morphology in comparison to images from corroded stainless steel. Severe surface deterioration and macro-pits were observed in the uninhibited samples.

  18. Properties and performance of spin-on-glass coatings for the corrosion protection of stainless steels in chloride media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampert, Felix; Jensen, Annemette H.; Din, Rameez U.

    2018-01-01

    Spin-on-glass deposition was investigated as viable alternative to increase the durability and performance of 316L steel in chloride environment. The buildup of a detrimental interface oxide was prevented by non-oxidative thermal curing of the coatings, which leads to a transformation...... silica. Electrochemical analysis by cyclic polarization indicated that the coatings behave as imperfect barrier coatings, which may enhance the passive properties of the substrates; however, there is still some statistical scatter in the quality of the coatings. While there is a tendency for an increase...... of the upper limit of the breakdown potential, there is also a decrease of the lower limit. It was found that such lower quality coatings showed, in association with substrate defects, unevenly distributed coating flaws, which may act as initiation points of pitting corrosion and decrease the corrosion...

  19. Microstructure characterization and corrosion testing of MAG pulsed duplex stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitelea, Ion; Utu, Ion Dragos; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Karancsi, Olimpiu [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    Duplex stainless steels are extremely attractive construction materials for their usage in intense aggressive environments. They offer numerous advantages compared to the austenitic stainless steels having an excellent behavior to pitting and cavernous corrosion, and a high resistance to stress cracking corrosion in chlorides media. However, their corrosion properties are largely dependent on the microstructural factors such as: the quantitative ratio of the two phases ferrite/austenite (F/A), the presence of intermetallic compounds and the distribution of the alloying elements between the ferrite and austenite. As a result of the thermal cycles experienced by the base metal without a post-weld heat treatment, the mechanical properties are significantly different in the heat affected zone and the deposited metal compared with the properties of the base metal. The present paper highlights the effect of the post-weld solution treatment in order to restore the balance between austenite and ferrite in the welded joint areas and also to limit undesirable precipitation of secondary phases with implications for increasing the corrosion resistance.

  20. Microstructure characterization and corrosion testing of MAG pulsed duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Utu, Ion Dragos; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Karancsi, Olimpiu

    2017-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are extremely attractive construction materials for their usage in intense aggressive environments. They offer numerous advantages compared to the austenitic stainless steels having an excellent behavior to pitting and cavernous corrosion, and a high resistance to stress cracking corrosion in chlorides media. However, their corrosion properties are largely dependent on the microstructural factors such as: the quantitative ratio of the two phases ferrite/austenite (F/A), the presence of intermetallic compounds and the distribution of the alloying elements between the ferrite and austenite. As a result of the thermal cycles experienced by the base metal without a post-weld heat treatment, the mechanical properties are significantly different in the heat affected zone and the deposited metal compared with the properties of the base metal. The present paper highlights the effect of the post-weld solution treatment in order to restore the balance between austenite and ferrite in the welded joint areas and also to limit undesirable precipitation of secondary phases with implications for increasing the corrosion resistance.

  1. Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Laurinavichius, K S

    1998-01-01

    Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

  2. Performance test for a solar water heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Two reports describe procedures and results of performance tests on domestic solar powered hot water system. Performance tests determine amount of energy collected by system, amount of energy delivered to solar source, power required to operate system and maintain proper tank temperature, overall system efficiency, and temperature distribution in tank.

  3. A study on corrosive behavior of spring steel by shot-peening process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening on the corrosion was investigated on spring steel immersed in 3.5% NaCl. The immersion test was performed on the two kinds of specimens. Corrosion potential, polarization curve, residual stress and etc. were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated. In case of corrosion potential, shot peened specimen shows more activated negative direction as compared with parent metal. Surface of specimen, which is treated with the shot peened, is placed as more activated state against inner base metal. It can cause the anti-corrosion effect on the base metal

  4. Effect of sulfur on the SCC and corrosion fatigue performance of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, E.; Nolan, T.; Lucente, A.; Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Morris, R.; Mullen, J.; Newsome, G.

    2015-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted on model heats of 304/304L stainless steel with systematically controlled sulfur content to isolate the influence of sulfur on crack growth behavior. The results of the SCC experiments conducted in 338 C. degrees deaerated water on 20% cold worked model heats with 0.006 and 0.012 wt% sulfur showed an order of magnitude or more reduction in the crack growth rate relative to a model heat with <0.001 wt% sulfur. Corrosion fatigue crack growth rates revealed a reduction in the crack growth rates of the elevated sulfur heats relative to model predicted steady state crack growth rates with increasing rise time for nominal loading conditions of a stress ratio of 0.7 and a stress intensity factor range of 6.6 MPa√m. At the longest rise time of 5.330 sec, the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the 0.006 wt% sulfur model heat was only 13% of model predictions and the crack growth of the 0.012 wt% sulfur heat completely stalled. Experiments conducted in anion faulted aerated water on stainless steel heats with moderate to high sulfur and variable carbon and boron contents showed that any detrimental effect of sulfur in this environment was secondary to the effect of sensitization in promoting SCC growth. (authors)

  5. Anti-corrosion performance of oxidized and oxygen plasma-implanted NiTi alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, Ray W.Y.; Ho, Joan P.Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, C.Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W.K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys are useful orthopedic biomaterials on account of its super-elastic and shape memory properties. However, the problem associated with out-diffusion of harmful nickel ions in prolonged use inside the human body raises a critical safety concern. Titanium oxide films are deemed to be chemically inert and biocompatible and hence suitable to be the barrier layers to impede the leaching of Ni from the NiTi substrate to biological tissues and fluids. In the work reported in this paper, we compare the anti-corrosion efficacy of oxide films produced by atmospheric-pressure oxidation and oxygen plasma ion implantation. Our results show that the oxidized samples do not possess improved corrosion resistance and may even fare worse than the untreated samples. On the other hand, the plasma-implanted surfaces exhibit much improved corrosion resistance. Our work also shows that post-implantation annealing can further promote the anti-corrosion capability of the samples

  6. Corrosion Performance of Carbon Steel in Simulated Pore Solution in the Presence of Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, J.; Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Kolev, H.; Van Breugel, K.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the results on the investigation of the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in model alkaline medium in the presence of very low concentration of polymeric nanoaggregates [0.0024 wt % polyethylene oxide (PEO)113-b-PS70 micelles]. The steel electrodes were investigated in chloride

  7. Tempering effect on corrosion performance of magnesium alloys for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Ferrari, G.M.; Erinc, M.; Sillekens, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion resistances for magnesium alloys AZ80, AE82 and ZM21 treated at 200 and 330°C for 2 hours, and for AZ80 and AE82 at 415°C for 8 hours were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization measurements in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution at 37°C. The morphology and the Volta potential

  8. Performance Testing of Download Services of COSMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Horák

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of performance tests of download services of Czech Office of Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre according to INSPIRE  requirements. Methodology of testing is explained, including monitoring performance  of reference servers. 26 millions of random requests were generated for each monitored operation, layer and coordinate system. The temporal development of performance indicators are analyzed and discussed. Results of performance tests approve the compliance with INSPIRE qualitative requirements for download services. All monitored services satisfy requirements of latency, capacity and availability. The latency and availability requirements are fulfilled with an abundant reserve. No problems in structure and content of responses were detected.

  9. Predicting the Oxidation/Corrosion Performance of Structural Alloys in Supercritical CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Ian [Wright HT Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Kung, Steven [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States); Shingledecker, John [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2017-12-22

    This project was the first research to address oxidation of alloys under supercritical CO2 conditions relevant to a semi-open Allam Cycle system. The levels of impurities expected in the CO2 for typical operation were determined by thermodynamic and mass balance calculations, and a test rig was assembled and used to run corrosion tests at temperatures from 650 to 750°C in CO2 at 200 bar for up to 5,000h, with and without impurities. Oxidation rates were measured for seven alloys representing high-strength ferritic steels, standard austenitic steels, and Ni-based alloys with higher-temperature capabilities. The very thin, protective scales formed on the high-temperature alloys provided significant challenges in characterization and thickness measurement. The rates of mass gain and scale thickening were possibly slower when oxidizing impurities were present in the sCO2, and the scale morphologies formed on the ferritic and austenitic steels were consistent with expectations, and similar to those formed in high-pressure steam, with some potential influences of C. Some surface hardening (possibly due to carbon uptake) was identified in ferritic steels Grade 91 and VM12, and appeared more severe in commercially-pure CO2. Hardening was also observed in austenitic steel TP304H, but that in HR3C appeared anomalous, probably the result of work-hardening from specimen preparation. No hardening was found in Ni-base alloys IN617 and IN740H. An existing EPRI Oxide Exfoliation Model was modified for this application and used to evaluate the potential impact of the scales grown in sCO2 on service lifetimes in compact heat exchanger designs. Results suggested that reduction in flow area by simple oxide growth as well as by accumulation of exfoliated scale may have a major effect on the design of small-channel heat exchangers. In addition, the specific oxidation behavior of each alloy strongly influences the

  10. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  11. Round robin test for zirconium alloys in 400 deg C steam: results from EDF; Essais interlaboratoires de corrosion generalisee en milieu vapeur a 400 deg C d`alliages de zirconium: resultats d`EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blat, M.

    1994-01-01

    The EDF Material Studies Branch has participated in the Round Robin program of uniform corrosion on zirconium alloys. The objectives of these Round Robin corrosion tests are to generate new uniform corrosion weight gain date utilizing modern zirconium alloy products and to improve the International and ASTM standards. (author). 2 tabs., 7 appendix., 2 refs.

  12. New approach to the elucidation of corrosion mechanism of ceramics by the ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, J.; Hayashi, K.; Tachi, Y.; Kano, S.

    1998-08-01

    Ceramics possessing high temperature strength are promising materials for the structural application in severe environment. The development of ceramics has been carried out in order to use them in FBR environment such as liquid sodium. In particular, corrosion behavior of ceramics has been investigated to improve the corrosion resistance in liquid sodium. However, the corrosion mechanism of ceramics was not comprehended in detail even now. Because corrosion products which were deposited on the surface of test pieces during corrosion test and played an important role in corrosion behavior, were not detected distinctly after thr corrosion test. In this study, an ion implantation technique was applied to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics in stead of the conventional corrosion test. Sodium ions were implanted in ceramics (100 keV, 1.9 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 ) and then heat treatment was performed at either 923 K or 823 K for 36 ks in argon atmosphere. After that, products on the surface were analyzed using SEM and TEM observation and X-ray diffraction. Consequently, the corrosion products were not identified exactly, but their presence was confirmed on the surface. It was caused by the minute amount of corrosion products. In future, it is necessary to carry systematically out the implantation and heat treatment under various conditions. Therefore, it seems that the beneficial information will be obtained to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics. (author)

  13. Improved mechanical performance and delayed corrosion phenomena in biodegradable Mg-Zn-Ca alloys through Pd-alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S; Pellicer, E; Fornell, J; Blanquer, A; Barrios, L; Ibáñez, E; Solsona, P; Suriñach, S; Baró, M D; Nogués, C; Sort, J

    2012-02-01

    The influence of partial substitution of Mg by Pd on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of Mg(72-x)Zn(23)Ca(5)Pd(x) (x=0, 2 and 6 at.%) alloys, synthesized by copper mould casting, is investigated. While the Mg(72)Zn(23)Ca(5) alloy is mainly amorphous, the addition of Pd decreases the glass-forming ability, thus favouring the formation of crystalline phases. From a mechanical viewpoint, the hardness increases with the addition of Pd, from 2.71 GPa for x=0 to 3.9 GPa for x=6, mainly due to the formation of high-strength phases. In turn, the wear resistance is maximized for an intermediate Pd content (i.e., Mg(70)Zn(23)Ca(5)Pd(2)). Corrosion tests in a simulated body fluid (Hank's solution) indicate that Pd causes a shift in the corrosion potential towards more positive values, thus delaying the biodegradability of this alloy. Moreover, since the cytotoxic studies with mouse preosteoblasts do not show dead cells after culturing for 27 h, these alloys are potential candidates to be used as biomaterials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control. English-German/German-English. Fachwoerterbuch Korrosion und Korrosionsschutz. Englisch-Deutsch/Deutsch-Englisch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods.

  15. Evaluation of the mechanical and corrosion protection performance of electrodeposited hydroxyapatite on the high energy electron beam treated titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopi, D.; Sherif, El-Sayed M.; Rajeswari, D.; Kavitha, L.; Pramod, R.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Polaki, S.R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ti–6Al–4V alloy was surface treated by high energy low current DC electron beam. • Successful electrodeposition of HAP was achieved on surface treated Ti–6Al–4V. • The as-formed coating possessed improved surface wettability and adhesion strength. • Maximum corrosion protection performance was exhibited by the as-formed coating. - Abstract: In our present study, the Ti–6Al–4V alloy surface was modified by irradiating with the high energy low current DC electron beam (HELCDEB) using 700 keV DC accelerator. Following this, the HELCDEB treated surface was coated with hydroxyapatite by adopting electrodeposition method. The microstructure and hardness of HELCDEB treated Ti–6A1–4V alloy with and without electrodeposited hydroxyapatite were investigated. Also, the electrochemical corrosion characteristics of the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) was studied by potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedence techniques (EIS) which showed an enhanced corrosion resistance and revealed an improved life time for the hydroxyapatite coating developed on the HELCDEB treated Ti–6A1–4V alloy than the untreated sample

  16. Integration of Nanofluids into Commercial Antifreeze Concentrates with ASTM D15 Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Lockwood1 1 Valvoline New Product Development Laboratory, Ashland Consumer Markets , Lexington, Kentucky. 2 Tank Automotive Research, Development...Development Laboratory,Ashland Consumer Markets ,P.O. Box 14000,Lexington,KY,40512 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ; #23826 9. SPONSORING...Technology, Performance, and Life for Light-Duty Applications, Engine Coolant Testing: Fourth Volume, ASTM STP 1335, R.E. Beale ed., ASTM, Philadelphia

  17. Detection of Corrosion Resistance of Components in Cyclic Salt Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Álló

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is, to investigate the influence of two types of cyclic salt spray tests on parts surface treated with galvanizing. On the selected components was performed the method Zn-Ni surface treating on the bath line. Subsequently were the components embedded in the corrosion chamber, where was performed two types of cyclic salt test. In the first test was performed 4 hour salt spray, 8 hours drying, 60 hours condensation and 24 hours drying. Once cycle lasted 96 hours, and it was repeated 4 times. During the second test was performed 2 hours salt spray, 2 hours condensation. The cycle was repeated 4 times, that means 96 hours. After the cycle was performed 72 hours free relaxation in the corrosion chamber, on 20–25 °C temperature. As the research showed, after the cyclic salt spray was no red corrosion on the selected components. The white corrosion appeared only slightly.

  18. Corrosion resistance and durability of superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Masuda, Yoshitake; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-04-19

    The corrosion resistant performance and durability of the superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution were investigated using electrochemical and contact angle measurements. The durability of the superhydrophobic surface in corrosive 5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution was elucidated. The corrosion resistant performance of the superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The EIS measurements and appropriate equivalent circuit models revealed that the superhydrophobic surface considerably improved the corrosion resistant performance of magnesium alloy AZ31. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test was performed to investigate the adhesion of the superhydrophobic film to the magnesium alloy surface. The corrosion formation mechanism of the superhydrophobic surface formed on the magnesium alloy was also proposed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process

  20. Tungsten ion implantation of aluminum for improved resistance to pitting corrosion -- electrochemical testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.P.; Buchanan, R.A.; Williams, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The greatly accelerated localized corrosion of aluminum in salt solutions has been observed and combated for many years. The susceptibility to pitting attack has been linked to the presence of chloride ions in the solution. Alloying additions to aluminum for improved corrosion resistance are restricted due to its limited solubility for passivating species such as chromium and molybdenum. However, many recent attempts to produce non-equilibrium alloys with these and other species, both through sputtering techniques and by rapid solidification, have met with very promising pitting resistance enhancements. The most dramatic increase in passivity is demonstrated by a thin co-sputtered film of Al and 9 atomic percent W, in which the pitting potential is increased by 2600 m V relative to pure Al. Recent efforts to extrapolate the promising W-Al thin film results to a bulk aluminum alloy using tungsten ion implantation are discussed here

  1. The Effects of Humor on Test Anxiety and Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    Testing in an academic setting provokes anxiety in all students in higher education, particularly nursing students. When students experience high levels of anxiety, the resulting decline in test performance often does not represent an accurate assessment of students' academic achievement. This quantitative, experimental study examined the effects…

  2. The effect of thermal treatment on corrosion properties of 0Kh15N16M3B stainless steel tested in the N2O4 boiling medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenev, A.Ya.; Kopets, Z.V.; Mel'nikova, N.N.; Dergaj, A.M.; Fedyushin, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental data on the effect of thermal treatment on corrosion properties of stainless steel 00Kh16n15m3b tested in the N 2 O 4 boiling medium at 8.0 MPa and 433 K are presented. The electron microscope data on steel microstructure after different heat treatments and phase composition of oxide films emerging at corrosion test are given. It is shown, that the rise of the heat treatment temperature from 823 up to 1023 K increases total corrosion of 00Kh16n15m3b steel under given test conditions and practically does't affect intercrystalline corrosion. Developed oxide layers are of deposited nature and doesn't affect markedly the rate of progress of the corrosive processes. Taking into account high chromium volatility in vacuum one can assume that at the initial stages of the coolant effect, the process of depletion of steel surface by chromium durng heat treatment affects markedly steel corrosion stability

  3. Integrated Performance Testing for Nonproliferation Support Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, Russell; Bultz, Garl Alan; Byers, Kenneth R.; Yaegle, William

    2013-08-20

    The objective of this workshop is to provide participants with training in testing techniques and methodologies for assessment of the performance of: Physical Protection system elements; Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) system elements.

  4. Erosion-corrosion synergistics in the low erosion regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, R.G.; Sethi, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Many engineering alloys display good high temperature corrosion resistance. However, when they are used in corrosive environments where they are subjected to erosion also, the corrosion resistance has been adversely affected. The phenomenon known as erosion-corrosion is complex and requires detailed investigation of how the erosion and corrosion kinetics interact and compete. At the Kentucky Center for Energy Research Laboratory, an erosion-corrosion tester was used to perform erosion-oxidation tests on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel at 500-600 0 C using alumina abrasive at low velocities. The erosion-oxidation rate data and morphology of exposed surfaces are consistent with oxide chipping and fracturing being the mode of material loss

  5. Summary of functional and performance test procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitzel, Jens; Gülzow, Erich; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    Different Test Modules (TM) are defined for the functional and performance characterization of a PEMFC stack. The master document TM2.00 defines requirements and methodology for parameter variation, stability and data acquisition.......Different Test Modules (TM) are defined for the functional and performance characterization of a PEMFC stack. The master document TM2.00 defines requirements and methodology for parameter variation, stability and data acquisition....

  6. NRI experimental facility for the testing of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Zamboch, M.

    1998-01-01

    IASCC influencing reactor internals of both BWR and PWR reactors is a complex phenomenon covering influences of material structure, neutron fluence, neutron flux, chemistry of environment, gamma radiation and mechanical stress. To evaluate such degradation, tests should be performed under conditions similar to those in real structure. Nuclear Research Institute has built several experimental facilities in order to be able to test IASCC degradation of materials. Basically, reactor water loops, both PWR and BWR, could be used to model environmental conditions including gamma and neutron irradiation. Pre-irradiation can be done in irradiation channels under well controlled temperature conditions. During the experiment, in-pile conditions can be compa