WorldWideScience

Sample records for corrosion research methods

  1. Application of electrochemical methods in corrosion and battery research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaoli

    Various electrochemical methods have been applied in the development of corrosion protection methods for ammonia/water absorption heat pumps and the evaluation of the stability of metallic materials in Li-ion battery electrolyte. Rare earth metal salts (REMSs) and organic inhibitors have been evaluated for corrosion protection of mild steel in the baseline solution of 5 wt% NH 3 + 0.2 wt% NaOH to replace the conventionally used toxic chromate salt inhibitors. Cerium nitrate provided at least comparable corrosion inhibition efficiency as dichromate in the baseline solution at 100°C. The cerium (IV) oxide formed on mild steel through the cerating process exhibited increasing corrosion protection for mild steel with prolonged exposure time in the hot baseline solution. The optimum cerating process was found to be first cerating in a solution of 2.3 g/L CeCl3 + 4.4 wt% H2O2 + appropriate additives for 20 minutes at pH 2.2 at room temperature with 30 minutes solution aging prior to use, then sealing in 10% sodium (meta) silicate or sodium molybdate at 50°C for 30 minutes. Yttrium salts provided less corrosion protection for mild steel in the baseline solution than cerium salts. Glycerophosphate was found to be a promising chromate-free organic inhibitor for mild steel; however, its thermostability in hot ammonia/water solutions has not been confirmed yet. The stability of six metallic materials used in Li-ion batteries has been evaluated in 1M lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) dissolved in a 1:1 volume mixture of ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate at 37°C in a dry-box. Aluminum is the most stable material, while Copper is active under anodic potentials and susceptible to localized corrosion and galvanic corrosion. The higher the concentration of the alloying elements Al and/or V in a titanium alloy, the higher was the stability of the titanium alloy in the battery electrolyte. 90Pt-10Ir can cause decomposition of the electrolyte resulting in a low stable

  2. Evaluation of local corrosion life by statistical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shunji; Kurosawa, Tatsuo; Takaku, Hiroshi; Kusanagi, Hideo; Hirano, Hideo; Kimura, Hideo; Hide, Koichiro; Kawasaki, Masayuki

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, for the purpose of achievement of life extension of light water reactor, we examined the evaluation of local corrosion by satistical method and its application of nuclear power plant components. There are many evaluation examples of maximum cracking depth of local corrosion by dowbly exponential distribution. This evaluation method has been established. But, it has not been established that we evaluate service lifes of construction materials by satistical method. In order to establish of service life evaluation by satistical method, we must strive to collect local corrosion dates and its analytical researchs. (author)

  3. Filling the gaps in SCWR materials research: advanced nuclear corrosion research facilities in Hamilton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krausher, J.L.; Zheng, W.; Li, J.; Guzonas, D.; Botton, G.

    2011-01-01

    Research efforts on materials selection and development in support of the design of supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) have produced a considerable amount of data on corrosion, creep and other related properties. Summaries of the data on corrosion [1] and stress corrosion cracking [2] have recently been produced. As research on the SCWR advances, gaps and limitations in the published data are being identified. In terms of corrosion properties, these gaps can be seen in several areas, including: 1) the test environment, 2) the physical and chemical severity of the tests conducted as compared with likely reactor service/operating conditions, and 3) the test methods used. While some of these gaps can be filled readily using existing facilities, others require the availability of advanced test facilities for specific tests and assessments. In this paper, highlights of the new materials research facilities jointly established in Hamilton by CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory and McMaster University are presented. (author)

  4. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  5. Research activities at nuclear research institute in water chemistry and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Research activities at Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) are presented. They are based on former heavy water reactor program and now on pressurized reactors VVER types which are operated on Czech republic. There is LVR-15 research reactor operated in NRI. The reactor and its experimental facilities is utilized for water chemistry and corrosion studies. NRI services for power plants involve water chemistry optimalization, radioactivity build-up, fuel corrosion and structural materials corrosion tests. (author)

  6. Available Prediction Methods for Corrosion under Insulation (CUI: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhani Nurul Rawaida Ain

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion under insulation (CUI is an increasingly important issue for the piping in industries especially petrochemical and chemical plants due to its unexpected catastrophic disaster. Therefore, attention towards the maintenance and prediction of CUI occurrence, particularly in the corrosion rates, has grown in recent years. In this study, a literature review in determining the corrosion rates by using various prediction models and method of the corrosion occurrence between the external surface piping and its insulation was carried out. The results, prediction models and methods available were presented for future research references. However, most of the prediction methods available are based on each local industrial data only which might be different based on the plant location, environment, temperature and many other factors which may contribute to the difference and reliability of the model developed. Thus, it is more reliable if those models or method supported by laboratory testing or simulation which includes the factors promoting CUI such as environment temperature, insulation types, operating temperatures, and other factors.

  7. Future and benefits of corrosion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staehle, Roger W.

    2002-01-01

    The subject of corrosion is a design science. The subject of stress analysis is a design science as is the subject of heat transfer. When the subject of corrosion is considered in the framework design a clear framework of the priorities and objectives becomes apparent. Further, corrosion becomes a more explicit and important subject in the overall design, manufacturing, and operation phases of equipment: in this framework, the funding and support of corrosion work is necessary to the designers and users of equipment. The subject of corrosion is usually less important in the early stages of operation of equipment: in these early stages, the subjects. Corrosion becomes important to the longer term reliability and safety of equipment. Corrosion is often a principal determiner of design life. Corrosion is often more important after the manufacturing warranty is expired: therefore the subject is often more important to the user than to the manufacturer. In order that the subject of corrosion is considered and incorporated in the design as well as in user specifications, there must be a language and means of easily understood communication between the design-operation community and the corrosion community. For example, the designers do not understand the language of 'pitting potential': rather, they understand design life and permissible stress. Thus, corrosion must be put into terms that can be understood and utilized by designers and operators. Two methodologies have been developed for communicating effectively between the corrosion and the design communities: these are the 'Corrosion Based Design Approach' and the 'Location for Analysis Matrix.' These provide simple check off lists to designers for asking questions and assuring that credible answers have been obtained on issues that affect reliable and economic performance. Both of these subject are discussed in this presentation. The future of corrosion research is its effective linkage with design and operation of

  8. Electrochemical evaluation of under-deposit corrosion and its inhibition using the wire beam electrode method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Yongjun, E-mail: yj.tan@curtin.edu.a [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia); Fwu, Young; Bhardwaj, Kriti [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: A new experiment method for evaluating under-deposit corrosion and its inhibitors. Under-deposit corrosion did not occur in a CO{sub 2} saturated pure brine solution. Inhibitor imidazoline addition and O{sub 2} contamination initiated under-deposit corrosion. Inhibitor imidazoline reduced general corrosion but enhanced localised corrosion. - Abstract: A new experimental method has been applied to evaluate under-deposit corrosion and its inhibition by means of an electrochemically integrated multi-electrode array, namely the wire beam electrode (WBE). Maps showing galvanic current and corrosion potential distributions were measured from a WBE surface that was partially covered by sand. Under-deposit corrosion did not occur during the exposure of the WBE to carbon dioxide saturated brine under ambient temperature. The introduction of corrosion inhibitor imidazoline and oxygen into the brine was found to significantly affect the patterns and rates of corrosion, leading to the initiation of under-deposit corrosion over the WBE.

  9. A South African corrosion research contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, F.P.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper contains the historical background to the setting up of the S.A. Corrosion Institute. The Metallurgy Department of the University of the Witwatersrand has been a training ground for corrosion scientists and engineers. Most of the research and development carried out has been devoted to stainless steels and more particularly to studying the effects of different alloying elements

  10. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  11. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as...

  12. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  13. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  14. Methods and apparatus for managing corrosion in buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chey, S Jay; Hamann, Hendrik F; Klein, Levente Ioan; Schappert, Michael Alan; Stepanchuk, Andriy

    2015-02-03

    Principles of the invention provide methods and apparatus for providing corrosion management in buildings. In one aspect, an exemplary method includes the step of receiving first data relating corrosion rate to a plurality of environmental conditions. This first data is subsequently utilized to determine a quantitative relationship between corrosion rate and the plurality of environmental conditions. In another step, second data indicative of one or more environmental conditions within a building is received. A corrosion rate in the building is then determined at least in part by applying the determined quantitative relationship to this second data.

  15. Research and development activities at INE concerning corrosion of final repository container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The present work provides a historical overview of the research and development activities carried out at the (Nuclear) Research Center Karlsruhe (today KIT) since the beginning of the 1980s on the corrosion of materials which might be suitable for construction of containers for highly radioactive wastes. The report relates almost exclusively to the work performed by Dr. Emmanuel Smailos, who elaborated the corrosion of various materials at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE). The requirements for the containers and materials, which were subject to changes in time, are presented. The changes were strongly influenced by the changed perception of the use of nuclear energy. The selection of the materials under investigations, the boundary conditions for the corrosion experiments and the analytical methods are described. Results of the corrosion of the materials such as finegrained steel, Hastelloy C4, nodular cast iron, titanium-palladium and copper or copper-nickel alloys in typical salt solutions are summarized. The findings of special investigations, e.g. corrosion under irradiation or the influence of sulfide on the corrosion rates are shown. For construction of disposal canisters, experiments were conducted to determine the contact corrosion, the influence of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ti-Pd and fine-grained steels on the corrosion behavior as well as the corrosion behavior of welding and the influence of different welding processes with the resulting heat-affected zones on the corrosion behavior. The work was contributed to several European research programs and was well recognized in the USA. Investigations on the corrosion of steels in non-saline solutions and corrosion under interim storage conditions as well as under the expected conditions of the Konrad repository for low-level radioactive wastes are also described. In addition, the experiments on ceramic materials are presented and the results of the corrosion of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 ceramics

  16. Corrosion of research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendereskaya, O.S.; De, P.K.; Haddad, R.; Howell, J.P.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Laoharojanaphand, S.; Luo, S.; Ramanathan, L.V.; Ritchie, I.; Hussain, N.; Vidowsky, I.; Yakovlev, V.

    2002-01-01

    A significant amount of aluminium-clad spent nuclear fuel from research and test reactors worldwide is currently being stored in water-filled basins while awaiting final disposition. As a result of corrosion issues, which developed from the long-term wet storage of aluminium-clad fuel, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implemented a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) in 1996 on the 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water'. The investigations undertaken during the CRP involved ten institutes in nine different countries. The IAEA furnished corrosion surveillance racks with aluminium alloys generally used in the manufacture of the nuclear fuel cladding. The individual countries supplemented these racks with additional racks and coupons specific to materials in their storage basins. The racks were immersed in late 1996 in the storage basins with a wide range of water parameters, and the corrosion was monitored at periodic intervals. Results of these early observations were reported after 18 months at the second research co-ordination meeting (RCM) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Pitting and crevice corrosion were the main forms of corrosion observed. Corrosion caused by deposition of iron and other particles on the coupon surfaces was also observed. Galvanic corrosion of stainless steel/aluminium coupled coupons and pitting corrosion caused by particle deposition was observed. Additional corrosion racks were provided to the CRP participants at the second RCM and were immersed in the individual basins by mid-1998. As in the first set of tests, water quality proved to be the key factor in controlling corrosion. The results from the second set of tests were presented at the third and final RCM held in Bangkok, Thailand in October 2000. An IAEA document giving details about this CRP and other guidelines for spent fuel storage is in pres. This paper presents some details about the CRP and the basis for its extension. (author)

  17. Topical problems of corrosion research for nuclear power purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremias, B.

    1978-01-01

    Currently, research is focused on stress corrosion, intergranular corrosion, corrosion in water and steam, hydrogen-induced corrosion and corrosion in liquid sodium. The effort to limit stress corrosion resulted in the application of high nickel content austenitic steels. In these steels, the susceptibility to stress corrosion is mainly affected by previous heat treatment and the presence of chloride ions. Attention is also paid to medium and high-alloy chromium steels and susceptibility is studied to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion. Of low-alloy steels the 21/4Cr-1Mo type steels stabilized with Nb or nonstabilized are studied with respect to decarburization kinetics and changes in mechanical properties in the presence of hydrogen. Of nonferrous metals zirconium alloys are studied used as cladding materials for fuel elements, mainly Zircaloy 2 and 4, with regard to their resistance to high-temperature oxidation, high-pressure steam action, etc. (J.F.)

  18. A finite element modeling method for predicting long term corrosion rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, J.W.; Chan, S.

    1984-01-01

    For the analyses of galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, which have been identified as possible corrosion processes for nuclear waste isolation, a finite element method has been developed for the prediction of corrosion rates. The method uses a finite element mesh to model the corrosive environment and the polarization curves of metals are assigned as the boundary conditions to calculate the corrosion cell current distribution. A subroutine is used to calculate the chemical change with time in the crevice or the pit environments. In this paper, the finite element method is described along with experimental confirmation

  19. RESEARCH OF FRUIT CONSERVES’ CORROSIVE AGGRESSIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kuznecova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of metal canning containers is one of the obstacles in spreading its application for packing of food. Particularly aggressive to the metal container is fruit canned medium, containing organic acids.The basic material for the production of metal canning container is white tinplate. The main advantage of white tinplate is the tin compounds are harmless to human organism. For this reason, a white badge is used widely, usually used for production of canning containers, packaging beverages. Despite the fact that recently often used containers made of aluminum badge (foil, the basic material for manufacturing metal canning containers is steel white tinplate.Now applied for coating paints and varnishes do not provide anti-corrosion protection of inner surface of metal containers during storage. Preserving of canned fruit quality in metal containers is largely defined corrosion resistance of the containers. This is due to the fact that the metal transition to canned fruit in due courses of corrosion processes is lowering the nutritional value and deterioration taste of the product, and while allocation of hydrogen is accompanied by swelling and destruction of metal containers.We have investigated a number of anti-corrosion coatings based on Fe-Cr and Fe-Sn-Ti of their behavior in aggressive mediums canned fruit. For the purpose of modeling such mediums the solutions of most widespread organic acids were used. The research allowed conclude, that in surface solid solutions Fe-Sn-Ti increase the corrosion resistance of carbon steel in aqueous solutions of malic, citric and tartaric acids. This implies that the surface solid solutions’ formation can significantly improve corrosion resistance in aggressive canning mediums.

  20. Corrosion Resistance Evaluation of Welded AISI 316 Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Shin Young; Kim, Kwan Hyu

    1990-01-01

    Electrochemical potentiokinetic polarization technique is known as quantitative, non-destructive and a rapid method for detecting sensitization and is essentially suitable for use in industrial fields and as laboratory research tools. In this study, electrochemical method was tested as a convenient means of the corrosion resistance evaluation for AISI 316L and 316 stainless steel(SS) and their welded sections. The sections were welded by TIG, MIG, CO 2 and ARC in 0.5N HCl as well as 1N H 2 SO 4 electrolyte with or without 0.01N KSCN. The results confirmed that electrochemical method could be used conveniently for corrosion resistance evaluation except reactivation aspect

  1. Relationship between Corrosion Level of Rebar Embedded in Concrete, Corrosion Potential and Current Density Measured by Non-destructive Test Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Lan; Cho, Seung Ho; Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Joong Koo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify corrosion mechanism and develop qualitative measurement method of corrosion level. Fist of all, structural behavior of each different level of corrosion states have been evaluated. And mathematical models that can predict corrosion level in terms of electric potential and corrosion intensity are proposed. Corrosion rate in reinforcing bar was investigated in this study using accelerated corrosion method due to electric potential differences based on Faradays law. Total 288 measurement spots were designed in terms of corrosion rates, diameter of reinforcing bars, and concrete cover thickness. Corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials of concrete were measured on these specimens using Gecor device. This study suggested the relationship between corrosion levels, and measured electric current density as follows

  2. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This report describes research performed in ten laboratories within the framework of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water. The project consisted of exposure of standard racks of corrosion coupons in the spent fuel pools of the participating research reactor laboratories and the evaluation of the coupons after predetermined exposure times, along with periodic monitoring of the storage water. A group of experts in the field contributed a state of the art review and provided technical supervision of the project. Localized corrosion mechanisms are notoriously difficult to understand, and it was clear from the outset that obtaining consistency in the results and their interpretation from laboratory to laboratory would depend on the development of an excellent set of experimental protocols. These experimental protocols are described in the report together with guidelines for the maintenance of optimum water chemistry to minimize the corrosion of aluminium clad research reactor fuel in wet storage. A large database on corrosion of aluminium clad materials has been generated from the CRP and the SRS corrosion surveillance programme. An evaluation of these data indicates that the most important factors contributing to the corrosion of the aluminium are: (1) High water conductivity (100-200 μS/cm); (2) Aggressive impurity ion concentrations (Cl - ); (3) Deposition of cathodic particles on aluminium (Fe, etc.); (4) Sludge (containing Fe, Cl - and other ions in concentrations greater than ten times the concentrations in the water); (5) Galvanic couples between dissimilar metals (stainless steel-aluminium, aluminium-uranium, etc); (6) Scratches and imperfections (in protective oxide coating on cladding); (7) Poor water circulation. These factors operating both independently and synergistically may cause corrosion of the aluminium. The single most important key to preventing corrosion is maintaining good

  3. Simulation of Corrosion Process for Structure with the Cellular Automata Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. C.; Wen, Q. Q.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, from the mesoscopic point of view, under the assumption of metal corrosion damage evolution being a diffusive process, the cellular automata (CA) method was proposed to simulate numerically the uniform corrosion damage evolution of outer steel tube of concrete filled steel tubular columns subjected to corrosive environment, and the effects of corrosive agent concentration, dissolution probability and elapsed etching time on the corrosion damage evolution were also investigated. It was shown that corrosion damage increases nonlinearly with increasing elapsed etching time, and the longer the etching time, the more serious the corrosion damage; different concentration of corrosive agents had different impacts on the corrosion damage degree of the outer steel tube, but the difference between the impacts was very small; the heavier the concentration, the more serious the influence. The greater the dissolution probability, the more serious the corrosion damage of the outer steel tube, but with the increase of dissolution probability, the difference between its impacts on the corrosion damage became smaller and smaller. To validate present method, corrosion damage measurements for concrete filled square steel tubular columns (CFSSTCs) sealed at both their ends and immersed fully in a simulating acid rain solution were conducted, and Faraday’s law was used to predict their theoretical values. Meanwhile, the proposed CA mode was applied for the simulation of corrosion damage evolution of the CFSSTCs. It was shown by the comparisons of results from the three methods aforementioned that they were in good agreement, implying that the proposed method used for the simulation of corrosion damage evolution of concrete filled steel tubular columns is feasible and effective. It will open a new approach to study and evaluate further the corrosion damage, loading capacity and lifetime prediction of concrete filled steel tubular structures.

  4. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  6. Automated methods of corrosion measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    to revise assumptions regarding the basis of the method, which sometimes leads to the discovery of as-yet unnoticed phenomena. The present selection of automated methods for corrosion measurements is not motivated simply by the fact that a certain measurement can be performed automatically. Automation...... is applied to nearly all types of measurements today....

  7. On The Research Of The Materials Corrosion Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotnikov, A.

    1998-01-01

    The contact of chemically active working medium with machine parts results in their corrosion damage. The problem is especially actual when a plant destined to work with another medium is used. Protracted reliable operation of these machines can be guaranteed only by a correct selection of part materials which ensures both their high corrosion stability in the given medium and necessary strength under working conditions. Resistance of materials to corrosion (including that are known as rust-resisting ones) essentially depends on the reagent type. Literature contains limited amount of information about materials behavior in the given medium. Necessity of such information even on the initial stage of design demands an effective method of the fast corrosion stability examination. The low rate of the chemical reaction under normal conditions leads to difficulties while discovering such method. This paper is dedicated to solution of the foregoing problem. Theoretical grounds, descriptions of experimental plant, and results of the test are adduced

  8. Materials and corrosion programs sponsored by the Gas Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals briefly with the Gas Research Institute and its research in materials and corrosion. As a not-for-profit organization, the Gas Research Institute plans, finances, and manages applied and basic research and technological development programs associated with gaseous fuels. These programs are in the general areas of production, transportation, storage, utilization and conservation of natural and manufactured gases and related products. Research results, whether experimental or analytical, are evaluated and publicly disseminated. Materials and corrosion research is concentrated in the SNG from Coal and Non-fossil Hydrogen subprograms

  9. Research on corrosion mechanism of suspension insulator steel foot of direct current system and measures for corrosion inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Yang, Yueguang; Su, Guolei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hourong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fan, Youping

    2017-09-01

    There are increasingly serious electrocorrosion phenomena on insulator hardware caused by direct current transmission due to the wide-range popularization of extra high voltage direct current transmission engineering in our country. Steel foot corrosion is the main corrosion for insulators on positive polarity side of transmission lines. On one hand, the corrosion leads to the tapering off of steel foot diameter, having a direct influence on mechanical property of insulators; on the other hand, in condition of corrosion on steel foot wrapped in porcelain ware, the volume of the corrosion product is at least 50% more than that of the original steel foot, leading to bursting of porcelain ware, threatening safe operation of transmission lines. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct research on the phenomenon and propose feasible measures for corrosion inhibition. Starting with the corrosion mechanism, this article proposes two measures for corrosion inhibition, and verifies the inhibition effect in laboratory conditions, providing reference for application in engineering.

  10. The research on corrosion condition and anticorrosion methods of SEP system pipelines in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Cao Feng; Wang Jianjun

    2010-01-01

    SEP system in Qinshan nuclear power plant phase II provides drinking water and firefight water for nuclear island, conventional island, inner and outer of BOP structures. Many corrosion perforations in the SEP pipeline were found during operation. This article analysis the corrosion reasons and presents some reasonable treatment and surveillance methods. (authors)

  11. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  12. Available Prediction Methods for Corrosion under Insulation (CUI): A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Burhani Nurul Rawaida Ain; Muhammad Masdi; Ismail Mokhtar Che

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is an increasingly important issue for the piping in industries especially petrochemical and chemical plants due to its unexpected catastrophic disaster. Therefore, attention towards the maintenance and prediction of CUI occurrence, particularly in the corrosion rates, has grown in recent years. In this study, a literature review in determining the corrosion rates by using various prediction models and method of the corrosion occurrence between the external su...

  13. Numerical method for time-dependent localized corrosion analysis with moving boundaries by combining the finite volume method and voxel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yuki; Takiyasu, Jumpei; Amaya, Kenji; Yakuwa, Hiroshi; Hayabusa, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel numerical method to analyze time dependent localized corrosion is developed. ► It takes electromigration, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and moving boundaries. ► Our method perfectly satisfies the conservation of mass and electroneutrality. ► The behavior of typical crevice corrosion is successfully simulated. ► Both verification and validation of our method are carried out. - Abstract: A novel numerical method for time-dependent localized corrosion analysis is presented. Electromigration, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and moving boundaries are considered in the numerical simulation of localized corrosion of engineering alloys in an underwater environment. Our method combines the finite volume method (FVM) and the voxel method. The FVM is adopted in the corrosion rate calculation so that the conservation of mass is satisfied. A newly developed decoupled algorithm with a projection method is introduced in the FVM to decouple the multiphysics problem into the electrostatic, mass transport, and chemical reaction analyses with electroneutrality maintained. The polarization curves for the corroding metal are used as boundary conditions for the metal surfaces to calculate the corrosion rates. The voxel method is adopted in updating the moving boundaries of cavities without remeshing and mesh-to-mesh solution mapping. Some modifications of the standard voxel method, which represents the boundaries as zigzag-shaped surfaces, are introduced to generate smooth surfaces. Our method successfully reproduces the numerical and experimental results of a capillary electrophoresis problem. Furthermore, the numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results for several examples of crevice corrosion.

  14. Research process of nondestructive testing pitting corrosion in metal material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo ZHANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion directly affects the usability and service life of metal material, so the effective nondestructive testing and evaluation on pitting corrosion is of great significance for fatigue life prediction because of data supporting. The features of pitting corrosion are elaborated, and the relation between the pitting corrosion parameters and fatigue performance is pointed out. Through introducing the fundamental principles of pitting corrosion including mainly magnetic flux leakage inspection, pulsed eddy current and guided waves, the research status of nondestructive testing technology for pitting corrosion is summarized, and the key steps of nondestructive testing technologies are compared and analyzed from the theoretical model, signal processing to industrial applications. Based on the analysis of the signal processing specificity of different nondestructive testing technologies in detecting pitting corrosion, the visualization combined with image processing and signal analysis are indicated as the critical problems of accurate extraction of pitting defect information and quantitative characterization for pitting corrosion. The study on non-contact nondestructive testing technologies is important for improving the detection precision and its application in industries.

  15. Corrosion surveillance for research reactor spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Foreign and domestic test and research reactor fuel is currently being shipped from locations over the world for storage in water filled basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The fuel was provided to many of the foreign countries as a part of the ''Atoms for Peace'' program in the early 1950's. In support of the wet storage of this fuel at the research reactor sites and at SRS, corrosion surveillance programs have been initiated. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) in 1996 on ''Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water'' and scientists from ten countries worldwide were invited to participate. This paper presents a detailed discussion of the IAEA sponsored CRP and provides the updated results from corrosion surveillance activities at SRS. In May 1998, a number of news articles around the world reported stories that microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) was active on the aluminum-clad spent fuel stored in the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) at SRS. This assessment was found to be in error with details presented in this paper. A biofilm was found on aluminum coupons, but resulted in no corrosion. Cracks seen on the surface were not caused by corrosion, but by stresses from the volume expansion of the oxide formed during pre-conditioning autoclaving. There has been no pitting caused by MIC or any other corrosion mechanism seen in the RBOF basin since initiation of the SRS Corrosion Surveillance Program in 1993

  16. Progress in the Research of Fatigue of Weathering Steel after Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianyu, Liang; Jian, Yao; Youwu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Weathering steel has a good corrosion resistance in the atmosphere, and the application of weathering steel in civil structure also reduces the cost of painting and maintenance. It is also possible for the bare weathering steel to bear the fatigue load with a rust layer. This paper summarizes the fatigue researches after corrosion of weathering steel, including the shape of specimens, failure modes of fatigue and the conclusions obtained through experimental investigations. It is also introduced the fatigue model of weathering steel after corrosion, which can be useful for the engineering application or further researches.

  17. Corrosion analysis of AlMg2 and AlMgSi using electrochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dian A; Maman Kartaman; Rosika K; Yanlinastuti

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion test of cladding materials and structures of research reactor fuel, AlMgSi and AlMg2 have been performed in demineralized water of pH 2 and 6.7 using an electrochemical method. Corrosion phenomenon is affected by several factor such as composition and condition of solution. The purpose of this activity is to investigate the corrosion phenomena through the determination of the parameters of corrosion and polarization curve. The materials used are AlMg2 and AlMgSi alloy in circular dish shape with an area of 1 Cm"2. Preparation of the test sample is performed through several stages polishing, cleaning and drying procedures followed ASTM G3. The electrochemical method is done by measuring the open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance and potentiodynamic in demineralized water of pH 2 and pH 6.7 at temperature of 25°C. The results of the OCP is the corrosion potential (Ecorr) of AlMg2 and AlMgSi each of -906.1 mV and -619.8 mV at pH 2 and -868.6 and -756.7 mV at pH 6.7 mV. The results of measurements by polarization resistance technique showed that the corrosion rate of AlMg2 and AlMgSi in safe category (<2 mpy) at pH 6.7 and at pH 2 corrosion rate increased significantly, but still in the lightweight category (<20 mpy). Potentiodynamic curves showed that the passivation at pH 6.7 is very low while the passivation at pH 2 occurs within a relatively short range potential and followed events corroded. (author)

  18. Corrosion and wear resistant metallic layers produced by electrochemical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion and wear-corrosion properties of novel nickel alloy coatings with promising production characteristics have been compared with conventional bulk materials and hard platings. Corrosion properties in neutral and acidic environments have been investigated with electrochemical methods....... Determination of polarisation resistance during 100 hours followed by stepwise anodic polarisation seems to be a promising technique to obtain steady state data on slowly corroding coatings with transient kinetics. A slurry test enables determination of simultaneous corrosion and abrasive wear. Comparison...... of AISI 316, hard chromium and hardened Ni-P shows that there is no universal correlation between surface hardness and wear-corrosion loss. The possible relation between questionable passivity of Ni-P coatings and their high wear-corrosion loss rate compared to hard chromium is discussed....

  19. Methods to Evaluate Corrosion in Buried Steel Structures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena-de Arriba-Rodriguez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, there are thousands of metal structures completely or partially buried in the soil. The main concern in their design is corrosion. Corrosion is a mechanism that degrades materials and causes structural failures in infrastructures, which can lead to severe effects on the environment and have direct impact on the population health. In addition, corrosion is extremely complex in the underground environment due to the variability of the local conditions. The problem is that there are many methods to its evaluation but none have been clearly established. In order to ensure the useful life of such structures, engineers usually consider an excess thickness that increases the economic cost of manufacturing and does not satisfy the principles of efficiency in the use of resources. In this paper, an extended revision of the existing methods to evaluate corrosion is carried out to optimize the design of buried steel structures according to their service life. Thus, they are classified into two categories depending on the information they provide: qualitative and quantitative methods. As a result, it is concluded that the most exhaustive methodologies for estimating soil corrosion are quantitative methods fed by non-electrochemical data based on experimental studies that measure the mass loss of structures.

  20. Corrosion Screening of EV31A Magnesium and Other Magnesium Alloys using Laboratory-Based Accelerated Corrosion and Electro-Chemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Spray. Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention 2008, 8 (2), 164–175. 34. Aluminium Alloy 5083, Plate and Sheet; SAE-AMS-QQ-A-250/6S; SAE...Corrosion Screening of EV31A Magnesium and Other Magnesium Alloys Using Laboratory-Based Accelerated Corrosion and Electro-chemical Methods...Magnesium and Other Magnesium Alloys Using Laboratory-Based Accelerated Corrosion and Electro-chemical Methods Brian E. Placzankis, Joseph P

  1. Fighting corrosion in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  2. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Lv

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  3. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  4. Simulation of galvanic corrosion using boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamaruddin; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Mohd Saari Ripin; Rusni Rejab; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2011-01-01

    Boundary element method (BEM) is a numerical technique that used for modeling infinite domain as is the case for galvanic corrosion analysis. The use of boundary element analysis system (BEASY) has allowed cathodic protection (CP) interference to be assessed in terms of the normal current density, which is directly proportional to the corrosion rate. This paper was present the analysis of the galvanic corrosion between Aluminium and Carbon Steel in natural sea water. The result of experimental was validated with computer simulation like BEASY program. Finally, it can conclude that the BEASY software is a very helpful tool for future planning before installing any structure, where it gives the possible CP interference on any nearby unprotected metallic structure. (Author)

  5. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: Causative Organisms and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    enviromental composition as a potential method for reversing microbiologically influenced corrosion, Corrosion (NAC’E) International. Houston. Texas...International fellow and associate editor for Biofouling, The Journal of Bioadhesion and Biofilm Research. J. Lee is a Materials and Corrosion Engineer

  6. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: II. Swamp Sludges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henki Ashadi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A polluted environment will influence the building age. The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals within the sludge swamp area with the corrosion rate of steel concrete. Corrosion in steel concrete usually occur in acid area which contain of SO42-, Cl- and NO3-. The research treatment used by emerging ST 37 andST 60 within 60 days in 'polluted' sludge swamp area. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp sludge were made by increasing the concentration a corrosive unsure up to 1X, 5X and 10X. The corrosion rate measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that sulphate had a greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by chloride and nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 was 17.58 mpy and for ST 60 was 12.47 mpy.

  7. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment,

  8. Monitoring corrosion and biofilm formation in nuclear plants using electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licina, G.J.; Nekoksa, G.; Ward, G.L.; Howard, R.L.; Cubicciotti, D.

    1993-01-01

    During the 1980's, degradation of piping, heat exchangers, and other components in raw water cooled systems by a variety of corrosion mechanisms became an important in the reliability and cost effectiveness of U.S. nuclear plants. General and localized corrosion, including pitting and crevice corrosion, have all been shown to be operative in nuclear plant cooling systems. Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) also afflicts nuclear cooling water and service water systems. The prediction of locations to be inspected, selection of mitigation measures, and control of water treatments and maintenance planning rely upon the accuracy and sensitivity of monitoring techniques. Electrochemical methods can provide rapid measurements of corrosion and biological activity on line. The results from a corrosion monitoring study in a service water system at a fresh water cooled nuclear plant are presented. This study utilized determinations of open circuit potential and reversed potentiodynamic scans on carbon steels, Admiralty, and stainless steels (Types 304 and 316 as well as high chromium, high molybdenum ferritic and austenitic grades) to evaluate the rate and form of corrosion to be anticipated in typical service. An electrochemical method that permits the monitoring of biofilm activity on-line has been developed. Results from laboratory and in-plant exposure in a nuclear power plant system are presented

  9. An experimental comparison of three wire beam electrode based methods for determining corrosion rates and patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Y.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to examine the advantages and limitations of three wire beam electrode (WBE) based techniques, including the noise resistance R n -WBE method, the overpotential-galvanic current method, and the galvanic current method, in determining corrosion rates and patterns. These techniques have been applied simultaneously to several selected corrosion systems of different characteristics. It has been found that the R n -WBE method has advantages over other WBE based methods when applying to WBE surfaces under uniform corrosion. However, the R n -WBE method has been found to be unsuitable for low noise level corrosion systems. It has also been found that both R n -WBE and overpotential-galvanic current methods are similarly applicable to WBE surfaces under nonuniform corrosion. However, the galvanic current method has been found to be suitable only for WBE surfaces under highly localised corrosion. Some related issues regarding R n calculation such as trend removal and its effects on corrosion mapping have also been discussed

  10. Recent Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Chigondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, reduction of corrosion has been managed by various methods including cathodic protection, process control, reduction of the metal impurity content, and application of surface treatment techniques, as well as incorporation of suitable alloys. However, the use of corrosion inhibitors has proven to be the easiest and cheapest method for corrosion protection and prevention in acidic media. These inhibitors slow down the corrosion rate and thus prevent monetary losses due to metallic corrosion on industrial vessels, equipment, or surfaces. Inorganic and organic inhibitors are toxic and costly and thus recent focus has been turned to develop environmentally benign methods for corrosion retardation. Many researchers have recently focused on corrosion prevention methods using green inhibitors for mild steel in acidic solutions to mimic industrial processes. This paper provides an overview of types of corrosion, corrosion process, and mainly recent work done on the application of natural plant extracts as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel.

  11. A review of fiber-optic corrosion sensor in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong; Li, Junnan; Li, Yuanyuan

    2018-05-01

    Fiber-optical corrosion sensor (FOCS) is the research hotspot of corrosion monitoring sensor in recent years. It has the advantages of lightness, simplicity, anti-electromagnetic interference and distributed measurement, so it has an attractive application prospect. In this paper, the mechanism of metal corrosion is introduced. Several common methods for detecting optical fiber corrosion sensors are presented, and the latest progress of optical fiber corrosion sensors in recent years is described. We need to design a set of sensor devices that can directly monitor the corrosion of reinforcing steel bars directly, and propose a method of time dependent reliability assessment based on monitoring data, so as to form a complete research path.

  12. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  13. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  14. Activities of the Corrosion and Electrometallurgy Section at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elayaperumal, K.

    1978-01-01

    The Corrosion and Electrometallurgy Section, a part of the Metallurgy Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, carries out research and development activities in the field of corrosion and electrometallurgy on problems connected with the materials of construction in nuclear reactors and also the associated units like heavy water plants, fuel reprocessing plants, desalination plants etc. The Section also renders consultancy services in the form of : (i) advice on materials selection for various applications, (ii) testing of components with respect to corrosion and fracture behaviour, (iii) investigation of specific problems of equipment and component failures in various units to find suitable solutions and (iv) development of protective coatings by electro-deposition on metals and alloys having high corrosion resistance, high hardness, high wear resistance and other special properties. (author)

  15. Corrosion evaluation in insulated pipes by non destructive testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Razak Hamzah; Azali Muhammad; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Sufian Saad; Saharuddin Sayuti; Shukri Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    In engineering plants, detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using radiography method are considered as a very challenging tasks. In General this degradation problem is attributed to water condensation. It causes the formation of deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe in cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the study of corrosion in pipelines, one of the most important parameters to be monitored and measured is the wall thickness. Currently, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is performed using an ultrasonic method. The most common technique is that based on the A-Scan, using either a normal flaw detector or some form of dedicated equipment. However, with recent development of ultrasonic technology, more advance method, namely B-Scan and C-scan techniques are also available. The most notable disadvantage of using this method is that the insulation covering the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason, the possibility of employing other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method were studied. The technique used in this studied are known as tangential technique. In this study it was found that the result found using tangential technique is consistent with the actual thickness of the pipe. Result of this study is presented and discussed in this paper. (Author)

  16. Research on atmospheric corrosion of steel using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M.; Uchida, H.; Konishi, H.; Mizuki, J.

    2004-01-01

    Correlation between local structure around Cr in the protective rust layer on weathering steel and protective performance of the rust layer is presented as an example of corrosion research using synchrotron radiation which has recently been applied in various research fields as a useful tool. In addition, in situ observation of initial process of rust formation on steel is also mentioned. It was pointed out by considering the X-ray absorption fine structure spectra that the nanostructure of the protective rust layer on weathering steel primarily comprises of small Cr-goethite crystals containing surface adsorbed and/or intergranular CrO x 3-2X complex anions. This CrO x 3-2X explains the protective performance of the rust layer originated by dense aggregation of fine crystals with cation selectivity of the Cr-goethite. It is very advantageous to employ white X-rays for in situ observation of rusting process of a carbon steel covered with electrolyte thin films because rust structure might change very quickly. This in situ observation revealed the effect of ion species on the change in rust phase during wet/dry repeating. It can be said that application of synchrotron radiation on corrosion research is so useful to understand the nanostructure of surface oxides which closely relate to corrosion behavior of metals and alloys. (author)

  17. NDT method in determining the rate of corrosion applicable to risk based inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Hairul Hasmoni; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in oil and gas industries, refineries and chemical process plants as the equipment is often exposed to corrosive environments or elevated temperature. Important equipment need to operate safely and reliably to avoid injuries to personnel and the public, and to prevent loss time and cost incurred due to loss of production and shutdown. The paper assess the approach in evaluating the technique of non-destructive testing (NDT) using Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in determining the rate of corrosion and remaining life of equipment applicable to Risk Based Inspection (RBI). Methods in determining the corrosion rate are presented using analytical method. Examples and data from MINT chiller water pipeline are presented to illustrate the application of these methods. (Author)

  18. Mechanism research on coupling effect between dew point corrosion and ash deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yun-Gang; Zhao, Qin-Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the coupling mechanism between ash deposition and dew point corrosion, five kinds of tube materials frequently used as anti-dew point corrosion materials were selected as research objects. Dew point corrosion and ash deposition experiments were performed with a new type experimental device in a Chinese thermal power plant. The microstructures of the materials and the composition of ash deposition were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS). The results showed that the ash deposition layer could be divided into non-condensation zone, the main condensation zone and the secondary condensation zone. The acid vapor condensed in the main condensation zone rather than directly on the tube wall surface. The dew point corrosion mainly is oxygen corrosion under the condition of the viscosity ash deposition, and the corrosion products are composed of the ash and acid reaction products in the outer layer, iron sulfate in the middle layer, and iron oxide in the inner layer. The innermost layer is the main corrosion layer. With the increase of the tube wall temperature, the ash deposition changes from the viscosity ash deposition to the dry loose ash deposition, the ash deposition rate decreases dramatically and dew point corrosion is alleviated efficiently. The sulfuric dew point corrosion resistance of the five test materials is as follows: 316L > ND > Corten>20G > 20 steel. -- Highlights: ► Dew point corrosion and ash deposition tests of five materials were performed. ► Acid vapor condensed in the ash deposit rather than directly on the tube surface. ► Dew point corrosion resistance is as follow: 316L > ND > Corten>20G > 20 steel. ► Dew point corrosion mainly is oxygen corrosion under viscosity ash deposition

  19. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  20. Corrosion research of alloys for use in nuclear waste disposal canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, N.R.; Diegle, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    All tests involving the corrosion behavior of TiCode-12 (Ti-0.3Mo-0.8Ni) indicate that this alloy is a suitable choice for the containment of nuclear wastes. Although cracking was observed under conditions of hydrogen embrittlement, and pitting occurred in aggressive media, the conditions which produce these two failure modes represented severe overtests and are not expected in a repository. Both Mo and Ni increase the degree of corrosion resistance of Ti alloys. Mo changes the nature of the oxide, while Ni forms intermetallic precipitates which, through galvanic coupling, polarize the Ti into the passive region. All alternate alloys tested (including cast iron) exhibit acceptable corrosion behavior relative to their role as backup canister materials. In the case of cast iron, the material provides for a corrosion allowance design in contrast to the corrosion resistant design offered by Ti alloys. The effects of gamma irradiation still need to be adequately characterized. Research on such effects is underway at Sandia and the University of Minnesota. 11 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  1. Recent Corrosion Research Trends in Weld Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol; Hwang, Woon Suk

    2007-01-01

    The increasing interest in the corrosion properties of weld joints in the corrosive environment is placing stringent demands on the manufacturing techniques and performance requirements, and the manufacture employs the high quality and efficiency welding process to produce welds. Welding plays an important role in the fabrication of chemical plants, nuclear power plant, ship construction, and this has led to an increasing attention to the corrosion resistant weld joints. This paper covers recent technical trends of welding technologies for corrosion resistance properties including the COMPENDEX DB analysis of welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrications

  2. Corrosion evaluation of heat recovery steam generator superheater tube in two methods of testing: Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Rio Pudjidarma; Riastuti, Rini

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate the corrosion process which occurs on the water side of Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) superheater tube. The tube was 13CrMo44 and divided into 3 types of specimen: new tube, used tube (with oxide layer on surface), cleaned-used tube (without oxide layer on surface). The evaluation of corrosion parameters wasperformed using deaerated ultra-high purity water (boiler feed water) in two methods of testing: Tafel polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Tafel polarization was excellent as its capability to show the value of corrosion current and the corrosion rate explicitly, on the other hand, EIS was excellent as its capability to explain for corrosion mechanism on metal interface in detail. Both methods showed that the increase of electrolyte temperature from 25°C to 55°C would increase the corrosion rate with the mechanism of decreasing polarization resistance due to thinning out the passive film thickness and enlarge the area of reduction reaction of cathode. Magnetite oxide scale which is laid on the surface of used tube specimen shows protective nature to reduce the corrosion rate, and clear up this oxide would increase the corrosion rate back as new tube.

  3. Countermeasures for electrolytic corrosion - Part I: Traditional methods and their problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Yoon-Cheol; Kim, Dae-Kyeong; Bae, Jeong-Hyo; Ha, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Hyun-Goo

    2004-01-01

    When an underground pipeline runs parallel with DC-powered railways, it suffers from electrolytic corrosion caused by the stray current leaked from the railway negative returns. Perforation due to the electrolytic corrosion may bring about large-scale accidents even in cathodically protected systems. Traditionally, bonding methods such as direct drainage, polarized drainage and forced drainage have been used in order to mitigate the damage on pipelines. In particular, the forced drainage method is widely adopted in Korea. In this paper, we report the real-time measurement data of the pipe-to-soil potential variation in the presence and absence of the IR compensation. The drainage current variation was also measured using the Stray Current Logger developed. By analysing them, the problems of current countermeasures for electrolytic corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  4. Countermeasures for electrolytic corrosion - Part I: Traditional methods and their problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Yoon-Cheol; Kim, Dae-Kyeong; Bae, Jeong-Hyo; Ha, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Hyun-Goo [Underground Systems Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, 28-1 Sungju-dong, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    When an underground pipeline runs parallel with DC-powered railways, it suffers from electrolytic corrosion caused by the stray current leaked from the railway negative returns. Perforation due to the electrolytic corrosion may bring about large-scale accidents even in cathodically protected systems. Traditionally, bonding methods such as direct drainage, polarized drainage and forced drainage have been used in order to mitigate the damage on pipelines. In particular, the forced drainage method is widely adopted in Korea. In this paper, we report the real-time measurement data of the pipe-to-soil potential variation in the presence and absence of the IR compensation. The drainage current variation was also measured using the Stray Current Logger developed. By analysing them, the problems of current countermeasures for electrolytic corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  5. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M.

    2008-06-01

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants

  6. Full surface inspection methods regarding reinforcement corrosion of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichling, K.; Raupach, M.; Broomfield, J.; Gulikers, J.; L'Hostis, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    For reinforced concrete structures a localisation of all significant critical areas can only be done by a full surface inspection. The economic advantages are obvious: uncritical areas have not to be repaired expensively.The first step of the assessment should always be a visual inspection. The range of deterioration causes can be limited and the degree of deterioration may be estimated roughly. The inspection program can be adjusted to the requirements. By means of a full surface potential mapping areas with a high risk for chloride induced reinforcement corrosion can be localised, although no deteriorations are visually detectable at the concrete surface. In combination with concrete cover depth and resistivity measurements areas with corrosion promoting exposure conditions can be localised even if the reinforcement is not yet de-passivated. The following publication gives an overview about the essential full surface investigation methods to localise critical areas regarding corrosion of steel in concrete. The selection of methods is based on the inspection procedure given in reference 2. (authors)

  7. In situ corrosion measurements by electrochemical method (IC experiment) at Mont Terri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewonck, S.; Bataillon, C.; Crusset, D.; Schwyn, B.; Nakayama, N.; Kwong, G.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The study of the interactions of steel pieces with an argillaceous rock is the aim of the IC experiment carried out in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (Switzerland). More precisely, the IC experiment consists in monitoring the corrosion rate of various steel (Inconel 690, 316L stainless steel, 2 carbon steels one representative of Andra concept and another of Nagra concept) at 80 deg. C, in anaerobic condition, in contact with the Opalinus clay formation. The corrosion rate monitoring is based on Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). This method is not disturbing for the corrosion process i.e. the corrosion rate doesn't change during the electrochemical measurement. The main drawback of this method is that the corrosion process must be in stationary or quasi stationary state: EIS can only measure corrosion rates which do not change quickly with time. This method is well adapted for long term corrosion monitoring because long term corrosion rate evolves slowly. A special design of the experimental setup was developed to allow optimal interactions between rock and steel samples. It consists in mounting the steel samples inside of a bore-core section. This section is then placed at the extremity of the borehole equipment. The equipment is inserted in a vertical descending borehole and sealed by a large packer. Another particularity of the experimental setup is the possibility of heating the experimental section up to 80 deg. C. Finally, the equipment was built in such a way that such that it will be retrievable from the borehole after several years of experiment, in order to perform further analyses on the reacting materials (core and steel samples). A circulation loop links the experimental interval to the sampling, measuring various parameters (pH, Eh, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and hydrogen) and control equipment installed in a cabinet, in the gallery of the underground laboratory. At the

  8. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A REPRODUCIBLE SCREENING METHOD TO DETERMINE THE MECHANISM AND EFFECT OF ORGANIC ACIDS AND OTHER CONTAMINANTS ON THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM-FINNED COPPER-TUBE HEAT EXCHANGE COILS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Corbett; Dave Severance

    2005-02-01

    Formicary corrosion is an insidious form of localized pitting corrosion. Notoya (1997b) wrote, ?In Japan, this type of corrosion is found in approximately 10% of cases of premature failure of copper tubes.? Attack characteristically features very small surface pits which are not visible to the un-aided eye, and random directional changes in the underlying copper metal. Attack is rapid. Failures have occurred before installation, shortly thereafter, or within several years later. Objectives of this Research Project Conduct an in depth literature search on the subject of formicary corrosion. Define the corrosion mechanism. Develop a test method that will reproduce formicary corrosion. Develop a test method for screening candidate materials that could cause formicary corrosion.

  10. Corrosion and deposit evaluation in industrial plants by non destructive testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad; Abd Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohd Pauzi Ismail; S Saad; S Sayuti; S Ahmad

    2000-01-01

    In petrochemical plants, the detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using a radiography method are very challenging tasks. This main degradation problem experienced by pipelines is due to water condensation. It will cause deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe for the cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for the hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the case of corrosion study one of the most important parameters in a piping or pipeline to be monitored and measured is that the wall thickness. In general, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is done by using an ultrasonic method. The most common technique for corrosion is that based on the A-Scan, using either a normal flow detector or some form of dedicated equipment. However, with recent development of ultrasonic technology, more advance method, namely B-Scan and C-scan techniques are also available. The most notable disadvantage of using this current method is that the insulation covered the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method has been studied. The testing technique used in this studied are tangential technique and double wall radiographic technique which involve studying the changing in density of radiographic film. The result found using tangential technique is consistent with real thickness of the pipe. However for the later technique the result is only achieved with a reasonable accuracy when the changing in wall thickness is very small. The result of the studies is discussed in this paper

  11. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  12. Practical assessment of magnetic methods for corrosion detection in an adjacent precast, prestressed concrete box-beam bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Bertrand; Titus, Michael; Nims, Douglas Karl; Ghorbanpoor, Al; Devabhaktuni, Vijay Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic methods are progressing in the detection of corrosion in prestressing strands in adjacent precast, prestressed concrete box-beam bridges. This study is the first field trial of magnetic strand defect detection systems on an adjacent box-beam bridge. A bridge in Fayette County, Ohio, which was scheduled for demolition, was inspected. Damage to prestressed box-beams is often due to corrosion of the prestressing strands. The corroded strands show discontinuities and a reduced cross-sectional area. These changes, due to corrosion, are reflected in the magnetic signatures of the prestressing steel. Corrosion in the prestressing steel was detected using two magnetic methods, namely the 'magnetic flux leakage' (MFL) and the 'induced magnetic field'. The purpose of these tests was to demonstrate the ability of the magnetic methods to detect hidden corrosion in box-beams in the field and tackle the logistic problem of inspecting box-beams from the bottom. The inspections were validated by dissecting the bottom of the box-beams after the inspections. The results showed that the MFL method can detect hidden corrosion and strand breaks. Both magnetic field methods were also able to estimate corrosion by detecting the effective cross-sectional area of the strand in sections of the beams. Thus, it was shown that the magnetic methods can be used to predict hidden corrosion in prestressing strands of box-beams.

  13. A clustering based method to evaluate soil corrosivity for pipeline external integrity management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Ayako; Wang, Hui; Liang, Robert Y.; Castaneda, Homero

    2015-01-01

    One important category of transportation infrastructure is underground pipelines. Corrosion of these buried pipeline systems may cause pipeline failures with the attendant hazards of property loss and fatalities. Therefore, developing the capability to estimate the soil corrosivity is important for designing and preserving materials and for risk assessment. The deterioration rate of metal is highly influenced by the physicochemical characteristics of a material and the environment of its surroundings. In this study, the field data obtained from the southeast region of Mexico was examined using various data mining techniques to determine the usefulness of these techniques for clustering soil corrosivity level. Specifically, the soil was classified into different corrosivity level clusters by k-means and Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In terms of physical space, GMM shows better separability; therefore, the distributions of the material loss of the buried petroleum pipeline walls were estimated via the empirical density within GMM clusters. The soil corrosivity levels of the clusters were determined based on the medians of metal loss. The proposed clustering method was demonstrated to be capable of classifying the soil into different levels of corrosivity severity. - Highlights: • The clustering approach is applied to the data extracted from a real-life pipeline system. • Soil properties in the right-of-way are analyzed via clustering techniques to assess corrosivity. • GMM is selected as the preferred method for detecting the hidden pattern of in-situ data. • K–W test is performed for significant difference of corrosivity level between clusters

  14. Experimental application of design principles in corrosion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyrl, W.H.; Pohlman, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental design criteria for corrosion investigations are based on established principles for systems that have uniform, or nearly uniform, corrosive attack. Scale-up or scale-down may be accomplished by proper use of dimensionless groups that measure the relative importance of interfacial kinetics, solution conductivity, and mass transfer. These principles have been applied to different fields of corrosion which include materials selection testing and protection; and to a specific corrosion problem involving attack of a substrate through holes in a protective overplate

  15. New technologies - new corrosion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.

    1994-01-01

    Adequate resistance of materials to corrosion is equally important for classical and for new technologies. This article considers the economic consequences of corrosion damage and, in addition to the long-known GNP orientation, presents a new approach to the estimation of the costs of corrosion and corrosion protection via maintenance and especially corrosion-related maintenance. The significance of ''high-tech'', ''medium-tech'' and ''low-tech'' material and corrosion problems is assessed. Selected examples taken from new technologies in the areas of power engineering, environmental engineering, chemical engineering, and biotechnology demonstrate the great significance of the problems. It is concluded that corrosion research and corrosion prevention technology will never come to an end but will constantly face new problems. Two technologies are of particular interest since they focus attention on new methods of investigation: microelectronics and final disposal of radioactive wastes. The article closes by considering the importance of the transfer of experience and technology. Since the manufacturs and operators of machines and plant do not generally have access to the very latest knowledge, they should be kept informed through advisory services, experimental studies, databases, and further education. (orig.) [de

  16. Pipeline corrosion prevention by pH stabilization or corrosion inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyborg, Rolf [Institute for Energy Technology, Oslo (Norway)

    2009-07-01

    In many offshore oil and gas projects the pipeline costs are a considerable part of the investment and can become prohibitively high if the corrosivity of the fluid necessitates the use of corrosion resistant alloys instead of carbon steel. Development of more robust and reliable methods for internal corrosion control can increase the application range of carbon steel and therefore have a large economic impact. Corrosion control of carbon steel pipelines has traditionally often been managed by the use of corrosion inhibitors. The pH stabilization technique has been successfully used for corrosion control of several large wet gas pipelines in the last years. This method has advantages over film forming corrosion inhibitors when no or little formation water is produced. The use of corrosion inhibitors in multiphase pipelines implies several challenges which are not fully accounted for in traditional corrosion inhibitor testing procedures. Specialized test procedures have been developed to take account for the presence of emulsions dispersions and sand and clay particles in corrosion inhibitor testing. (author)

  17. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-06-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed

  18. Achievments of corrosion science and corrosion protection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.; Stehjl, R.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of corrosion-mechanical strength of metals, effect of corrosive media on creep characteristics are presented. New concepts of the mechanism of corrosion cracking and its relation to hydrogen embrittlement are described. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement effect on the process of corrosion cracking of different steels and alloys are considered. The dependence of such types of failure on various structural factors is shown. Data on corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminium and titanium alloys, mechanism of the processes and protective methods are given

  19. Corrosion surveillance programme for Latin American research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Haddad, R.; Ritchie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the IAEA sponsored Regional Technical Co-operation Project for Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru) are to provide the basic conditions to define a regional strategy for managing spent fuel and to provide solutions, taking into consideration the economic and technological realities of the countries involved. In particular, to determine the basic conditions for managing research reactor spent fuel during operation and interim storage as well as final disposal, and to establish forms of regional cooperation in the four main areas: spent fuel characterization, safety, regulation and public communication. This paper reports the corrosion surveillance activities of the Regional Project and these are based on the IAEA sponsored co-ordinated research project (CRP) on 'Corrosion of research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water'. The overall test consists of exposing corrosion coupon racks at different spent fuel basins followed by evaluation. (author)

  20. Study on the corrosion assessment of overpack welds-III (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Rieko; Otsuki, Akiyoshi; Asano, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Naoki; Yui, Mikazu

    2006-12-01

    There is some possibility that the corrosion resistance of overpack welds is different from that of base metal due to the differences of material properties. In this study, corrosion behavior of welded joint for carbon steel was compared with base metal using the specimens taken from welded joint model fabricated by TIG, MAG and EBW respectively. The corrosion tests were performed for following four items. Passivation behavior and corrosion type. Propagation of general corrosion, pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion under aerobic condition. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. Propagation of general corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement under anaerobic condition. The results of these corrosion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of welded metal by TIG and MAG was inferior to base metal for general corrosion, pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. It was implied that the filler materials used for welding affected the corrosion resistance. No deterioration of corrosion resistance was observed in any corrosion modes for EBW, which does not need filler material. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of welded metal and heat affected zone was lower than that of base metal. (author)

  1. Corrosion protection method by neutral treatment for boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hisashige

    1978-01-01

    The corrosion protection method by neutral treatment has been applied in Europe mainly for boilers and nuclear reactors instead of existing all volatile treatment. The cause of corrosion of steel and copper in water and the effect of neutral treatment, that is the effect of protection film of magnetite in steel and cuprous oxide in copper alloy, are explained with the characteristic figure of PH, electromotive force and chemical formula. The experience of applying this neutral treatment to the Wedel thermal power plant and the system flow sheet, the water treatment equipment, relating instrumentations and the water examination are described in detail. Hydrogen peroxide is injected in this neutral treatment. The comparison between the existing water treatment and the neutral treatment and their merits and demerits are explained. (Nakai, Y.)

  2. Research and development activities at INE concerning corrosion of final repository container materials; F and E-Arbeiten zur Korrosion von Endlager-Behaelterwerkstoffen im INE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzler, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    The present work provides a historical overview of the research and development activities carried out at the (Nuclear) Research Center Karlsruhe (today KIT) since the beginning of the 1980s on the corrosion of materials which might be suitable for construction of containers for highly radioactive wastes. The report relates almost exclusively to the work performed by Dr. Emmanuel Smailos, who elaborated the corrosion of various materials at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE). The requirements for the containers and materials, which were subject to changes in time, are presented. The changes were strongly influenced by the changed perception of the use of nuclear energy. The selection of the materials under investigations, the boundary conditions for the corrosion experiments and the analytical methods are described. Results of the corrosion of the materials such as finegrained steel, Hastelloy C4, nodular cast iron, titanium-palladium and copper or copper-nickel alloys in typical salt solutions are summarized. The findings of special investigations, e.g. corrosion under irradiation or the influence of sulfide on the corrosion rates are shown. For construction of disposal canisters, experiments were conducted to determine the contact corrosion, the influence of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ti-Pd and fine-grained steels on the corrosion behavior as well as the corrosion behavior of welding and the influence of different welding processes with the resulting heat-affected zones on the corrosion behavior. The work was contributed to several European research programs and was well recognized in the USA. Investigations on the corrosion of steels in non-saline solutions and corrosion under interim storage conditions as well as under the expected conditions of the Konrad repository for low-level radioactive wastes are also described. In addition, the experiments on ceramic materials are presented and the results of the corrosion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Zr

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Three Nanoclay Dispersion Methods of Epoxy/Organoclay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwat Keyoonwong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study, firstly, to obtain high degree of clay exfoliation in the epoxy matrix by three dispersion methods such as normal mixing, shear mixing, and high-speed mixing and, secondly, to investigate corrosion behavior of epoxy/organoclay nanocomposite, immersion test, weight change, and penetration behavior were conducted. From the three mixing methods, the high-speed mixing method showed larger clay interlayer distance, smaller clay aggregate, and more homogeneity and expectedly resulted in high anticorrosive properties. Penetration depths of these nanocomposites showed a small difference; however, the most noticeable improvements in anticorrosion performance for epoxy/organoclay nanocomposites under high-speed mixing method were found to reduce penetration and weight uptake which are described via the model of nanoparticulate-filled structure and discussed in corrosion protection mechanism against environmental liquid penetration.

  4. Study of corrosion behavior of carbon steel under seawater film using the wire beam electrode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zaijian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jia; Peng, Xin; Wang, Yanhua; Zhang, Penghui; Wang, Haijie; Gao, Congjie

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of carbon steel under seawater film with various thickness was investigated by the wire beam electrode (WBE) method. It was found that the corrosion rate of carbon steel increased significantly under thin seawater film than it was immersed in seawater. The current variation under seawater film indicated that the thickness of diffusion layer of oxygen was about 500 μm, and the maximal current appeared around 40 μm, at which corrosion rate transited from cathodic control to anodic control. The results suggest that WBE method is helpful to study the corrosion process under thin electrolyte film

  5. Data book of anti-corrosion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ui Ho

    1997-07-01

    This book deals with cases, influence, cause, standard of corrosion of steel structure, which includes bridges, steel tower, corrosion data, the ocean, ports, and RC structure for civil engineering, exterior materials of construction, building equipment pipes, processing industries such as chemical equipment, oil device, pump and coolant, environment facility like trash incinerator, and sewage process, thermal power generation and nuclear energy generation, and energy industry.

  6. Corrosion resistance of metal materials for HLW canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takashi; Muraoka, Susumu; Tashiro, Shingo

    1982-02-01

    In order to verify the materials as an important artificial barrier for canister of vitrified high-level waste from spent fuel reprocessing, data and reports were researched on corrosion resistance of the materials under conditions from glass form production to final disposal. Then, in this report, investigated subjects, improvement methods and future subjects are reviewed. It has become clear that there would be no problem on the inside and outside corrosion of the canister during glass production, but long term corrosion and radiation effect tests and the vitrification methods would be subjects in future on interim storage and final disposal conditions. (author)

  7. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  8. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors; Metodos aplicados para la mitigacion del dano por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  9. Influence of surface treatments on corrosion resistance of stainless steels. Residual stresses in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, J. Philippe

    1968-05-01

    In a first part, this research thesis proposes presentation of the definition of a surface condition: chemical characteristics such as passivity and contamination, physical characteristics (obtained through micrographic methods, X ray diffusion, magnetic methods), and micro-geometrical characteristics. The author notably discusses the measurement of characteristics either by appropriate conventional methods or by an original method in the case of passivity. In a second part, the author reports the study of the influence of surface condition on different types of corrosion of stainless steels in chemical environments (corrosion in sulphuric acid, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking in magnesium chloride, pitting corrosion) and of high temperature oxidation (corrosion in pressurized water, oxidation in dry vapour or in carbon dioxide)

  10. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...... showed that x-ray attenuation measurements allow determination of the actual concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel measured by x-ray attenuation was found to be in very good agreement with the calculated mass loss obtained by Faraday......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  11. Corrosion Research Center of the University of Minnesota. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriani, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Many of the projects which began with the inception of the Corrosion Research Center in early 1980 have progressed from the stage of acquisition and assembly of apparatus to that of generation of research results. In the area of research on surface reactions, notable progress has been made on the microscopic theory of corrosion, most importantly the recognition that the quantum mechanical depletion layer at the metal layer makes an appreciable contribution to the potential drop across the metal-electrolyte interface and to the capacitance of the interface

  12. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium-clad spent fuel in water-chemical and microbiological influenced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksin, T.N.; Dobrijevic, R.P.; Idjakovic, Z.E.; Pesic, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating research reactor RA at the Vinca Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool. It has been left in the ambient temperature and humidity for more then fifteen years so intensive corrosion processes were notice. We have spent fuel pools under control, after first research coordination meeting (RCM), of the first CRP, by monitoring of physical and chemical parameters of water in the pools, including temperature, pH-factor, electrical conductivity, mass concentration of corrosion products in the water and mud, mass concentration of relevant ions etc. The rack of standard corrosion coupons, was given at that time, has been in poor quality water for six years. We pick up rack assembly from basin and analysed. The results of this investigation are present in this article. (author)

  13. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control. English-German/German-English. Fachwoerterbuch Korrosion und Korrosionsschutz. Englisch-Deutsch/Deutsch-Englisch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods.

  14. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood: Gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Samuel L., E-mail: szelinka@fs.fed.u [USDA Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sichel, Rebecca J. [College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Stone, Donald S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The composition of the corrosion products was similar for the nail head and shank. {yields} Reduced copper was not detected on any of the fasteners. {yields} Measured corrosion rates were between 1 and 35 {mu}m year{sup -1}. - Abstract: Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27 {sup o}C at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The corrosion rate was determined gravimetrically and the corrosion products were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Although the accepted mechanism of corrosion in treated wood involves the reduction of cupric ions from the wood preservative, no reduced copper was found on the corrosion surfaces. The galvanized corrosion products contained sulfates, whereas the steel corrosion products consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. The possible implications and limitations of this research on fasteners used in building applications are discussed.

  15. Corrosion Assessment by Using Risk-Based Inspection Method for Petrochemical Plant - Practical Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Song Chun; Song, Ki Hun

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion assessment has a number of uses but the use considered here is as a precursor to Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) planning. Systematic methods consisting of technical modules of RBI program were used to assess the effect of specific corrosion mechanism on the probability of failure in equipment of petrochemical plants. Especially in part of the damage and corrosion assessment, screening step involved evaluating the combinations of process conditions and construction materials for each equipment item in order to determine which damage mechanisms are potentially active. For general internal corrosion, either API 510 or API 570 was applied as the damage rate in the calculation to determine the remaining life and inspection frequency. In some cases, a measured rate of corrosion may not be available. The technical modules of RBI program employ default values for corrosion, typically derived from published data or from experience with similar processes, for use until inspection results are available. This paper describes the case study of corrosion and damage assessment by using RBI methodology in petrochemical plant. Specifically, this paper reports the methodology and the results of its application to the petrochemical units using the KGS-RBI TM program, developed by the Korea Gas Safety Corporation to suit Korean situation in conformity with API 581 Codes

  16. Quantitative measures of corrosion and prevention: application to corrosion in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.C.; Gellings, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion protection factor (c.p.f.) and the corrosion condition (c.c.) are simple instruments for the study and evaluation of the contribution and efficiency of several methods of corrosion prevention and control. The application of c.p.f. and c.c. to corrosion and prevention in agriculture in

  17. Standard test method for initial screening of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for steel in concrete

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effects of chemical admixtures on the corrosion of metals in concrete. This test method can be used to evaluate materials intended to inhibit chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete. It can also be used to evaluate the corrosivity of admixtures by themselves or in a chloride environment. This test is not applicable for emulsions. 1.2 &solely-SI-units; 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  19. Low corrosive chemical decontamination method using pH control. 1. Basic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Ishida, Kazushige; Uetake, Naohito; Anazawa, Kazumi; Nakamura, Fumito; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Tamagawa, Tadashi; Furukawa, Kiyoharu

    2001-01-01

    A new low corrosive decontamination method was developed which uses both oxalic acid and hydrazine as the reducing agent and potassium permanganate as the oxidizing agent. Less corrosion of structural materials during the decontamination is realized by pH control of the reducing agent. The pH of 2.5, attained by adding hydrazine to oxalic acid, was the optimum pH for maintaining a high decontamination effect and lowering the corrosion at the same time. As this reducing agent can be decomposed into carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water by using a catalyst column with hydrogen peroxide, the amount of secondary radioactive waste is small. These good features were demonstrated through actual plant decontamination tasks. (author)

  20. Some corrosion effects of the aluminum tank surface of Dalat research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Mong Sinh

    1995-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor was reconstructed from the TRIGA-MARK-II reactor installed in 1963 with a nominal power of 250 kW. Reconstruction and upgrading of this reactor to nominal power of 500 kW had been completed in the end of 1983. The reactor was commissioned in the beginning of March 1984. The aluminum reactor tank and some components of the former reactor are more than 30 year old. The good quality of reactor water minimized the total corrosion rate of reactor material surface. But some local corrosion had been found out at the tank bottom especially in water stagnant areas. The corrosion processes could be due to the electrochemical reactions associated with different metals and alloys in the reactor water and keeping in touch with the surface of aluminum reactor tank. (orig.)

  1. Corrosion resistance of plasma-anodized AZ91D magnesium alloy by electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barchiche, C.-E.; Rocca, E.; Juers, C.; Hazan, J.; Steinmetz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Anodic coatings formed on magnesium alloys by plasma anodization process are mainly used as protective coatings against corrosion. The effects of KOH concentration, anodization time and current density on properties of anodic layers formed on AZ91D magnesium alloy were investigated to obtain coatings with improved corrosion behaviour. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The film is porous and cracked, mainly composed of magnesium oxide (MgO), but contains all the elements present in the electrolyte and alloy. The corrosion behaviour of anodized Mg alloy was examined by using stationary and dynamic electrochemical techniques in corrosive water. The best corrosion resistance measured by electrochemical methods is obtained in the more concentrated electrolyte 3 M KOH + 0.5 M KF + 0.25 M Na 3 PO 4 .12 H 2 O, with a long anodization time and a low current density. A double electrochemical effects of the anodized layer on the magnesium corrosion is observed: a large inhibition of the cathodic process and a stabilization of a large passivation plateau

  2. Colorimetric visualization of tin corrosion: A method for early stage corrosion detection on printed circuit boards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    A majority of printed circuit board surfaces are covered with tin, therefore tin corrosion under humid conditions and movement of tin ions under the influence of an electric field plays an important role in the corrosion failure development. Tracking tin corrosion products spread on the printed c...

  3. Evaluation methods for corrosion damage of components in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by coupling analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (1). Major targets and development strategies of the evaluation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Hiranuma, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Nishida, Koji; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration and corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, future problems for structural materials should be predicted based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and they should be mitigated before becoming serious issues for plant operation. Three approaches have been prepared for predicting future problems in structural materials: 1. Computer program packages for predicting future corrosion fatigue on structural materials, 2. Computer program packages for predicting future corrosion damage on structural materials, and 3. Computer program packages for predicting wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion. General features of evaluation methods and their computer packages, technical innovations required for their development, and application plans for the developed approaches for plant operation are introduced in this paper. (author)

  4. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  5. Corrosion and protection of spent Al-clad research reactor fuel during extended wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, Lalgudi V.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of spent research reactor fuel elements with different fuel meats, geometries and 235 U enrichments are presently stored under water in basins throughout the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminum (Al) or its alloy and are susceptible to corrosion. This paper presents an overview of the influence of Al alloy composition, galvanic effects (Al alloy/stainless steel), crevice effects, water parameters and synergism between these parameters as well as settled solids on the corrosion of typical Al alloys used as fuel element cladding. Pitting is the main form of corrosion and is affected by water conductivity, chloride ion content, formation of galvanic couples with rack supports and settled solid particles. The extent to which these parameters influence Al corrosion varies. This paper also presents potential conversion coatings to protect the spent fuel cladding. (author)

  6. Study on corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. Joint research report in JFY2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The evaluation of corrosion behaviors of core and structural materials in lead bismuth eutectic is one of the key issues for the utilization of lead bismuth eutectic as a coolant of the primary loops of lead bismuth cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and the intermediate heat transport media of new-type steam generators of the sodium cooled FBRs. The purpose of the present study is to establish corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. The techniques of steel corrosion test and oxygen control in flowing lead bismuth eutectic, and the technologies of a lead bismuth flow test at high temperature and high velocity were developed through corrosion test using a lead bismuth flow test loop of the Tokyo Institute of Technology in JFY2002. The major results are summarized as follows: (1) Techniques of fabrication, mount and rinse of corrosion specimens, measurement method of weight loss, and SEM/EDX analysis method have been established through lead bismuth corrosion test. (2) Weight losses were measured, corrosion and lead bismuth-adhered layers and eroded parts were observed in two 1000 hr-corrosion tests, and the results were compared with each other for twelve existing steels including ODS, F82H and SUH-3. (3) An oxygen sensor made of zirconia electrolyte structurally resistant to thermal stress and thermal shock was developed and tested in the lead bismuth flow loop. Good performance has been obtained. (4) An oxygen control method by injecting argon and hydrogen mixture gas containing steam into lead bismuth was applied to the lead bismuth flow loop, and technical issues for the development of the oxygen control method were extracted. (5) Technical measures for freezing and leakage of lead bismuth in the flow loop were accumulated. (6) Technical measures for flow rate decrease/blockage due to precipitation of oxide and corrosion products in a low temperature section of the lead bismuth flow loop were accumulated. (7) Electromagnetic flow meters with MI

  7. Research on Performance and Microstructure of Sewage Pipe Mortar Strengthened with Different Anti-Corrosion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Song; Zhou, Huaxin; Shi, Liang; Liu, Jianzhong; Cai, Jingshun; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Mostly urban underground sewage is the acidic corrosion environment with a high concentration of aggressive ions and microbe, which resulted in performance deterioration and service-life decrease of sewage concrete pipe. In order to effectively protect durability of the concrete pipe, the present paper briefly analysed the main degradation mechanism of concrete pipe attacked by urban underground sewage, and proposed that using penetrating and strengthening surface sealer based on inorganic chemistry. In addition, using index of compressive strength, weight loss and appearance level to investigate the influence of the sealer on corrosion resistance of mortar samples after different dry-wet cycles. Besides, comparative research on effect of the sealer, aluminate cement and admixture of corrosion resistance was also addressed. At last, the SEM technology was used to reveal the improvement mechanism of different technologies of corrosion resistance. The results indicated that the sealer and aluminate cement can significantly improve corrosion resistance of mortar. Besides, the improvement effect can be described as the descending order: the penetrating and strengthening surface sealer > aluminate cement > admixture of corrosion resistance. The mortar sample treated with the sealer displayed the condensed and sound microstructure which proved that the sealer can improve the corrosion resistance to urban underground sewage.

  8. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  9. Corrosion testing facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Subramanian, Venu

    1981-01-01

    Major types of corrosion tests, establishment of specifications on corrosion testing and scope of their application in practice are briefly described. Important organizations in the world which publish specifications/standards are listed. Indian organizations which undertake corrosion testing and test facilities available at them are also listed. Finally in an appendix, a comprehensive list of specifications relevant to corrosion testing is given. It is arranged under the headings: environmental testing, humidity tests, salt spray/fog tests, immersion tests, specification corrosion phenomena, (tests) with respect to special corrosion media, (tests) with respect to specific corrosion prevention methods, and specific corrosion tests using electrical and electrochemical methods (principles). Each entry in the list furnishes information about: nature of the test, standard number, and its specific application. (M.G.B.)

  10. The Use of AC-DC-AC Methods in Assessing Corrosion Resistance Performance of Coating Systems for Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Robert C.; Upadhyay, Vinod; Wang, Yar-Ming; Battocchi, Dante

    The potential utility of AC-DC-AC electrochemical methods in comparative measures of corrosion-resisting coating system performance for magnesium alloys under consideration for the USAMP "Magnesium Front End Research and Development" project was previously shown in this forum [1]. Additional studies of this approach using statistically-designed experiments have been conducted with focus on alloy types, pretreatment, topcoat material and topcoat thickness as the variables. Additionally, sample coupons made for these designed experiments were also subjected to a typical automotive cyclic corrosion test cycle (SAE J2334) as well as ASTM B117 for comparison of relative performance. Results of these studies are presented along with advantages and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  11. An Electrochemical Method to Predict Corrosion Rates in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafter, M. R. [Hunter Water Australia Pty Ltd, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Linear polarization resistance (LPR) testing of soils has been used extensively by a number of water utilities across Australia for many years now to determine the condition of buried ferrous water mains. The LPR test itself is a relatively simple, inexpensive test that serves as a substitute for actual exhumation and physical inspection of buried water mains to determine corrosion losses. LPR testing results (and the corresponding pit depth estimates) in combination with proprietary pipe failure algorithms can provide a useful predictive tool in determining the current and future conditions of an asset{sup 1)}. A number of LPR tests have been developed on soil by various researchers over the years{sup 1)}, but few have gained widespread commercial use, partly due to the difficulty in replicating the results. This author developed an electrochemical cell that was suitable for LPR soil testing and utilized this cell to test a series of soil samples obtained through an extensive program of field exhumations. The objective of this testing was to examine the relationship between short-term electrochemical testing and long-term in-situ corrosion of buried water mains, utilizing an LPR test that could be robustly replicated. Forty-one soil samples and related corrosion data were obtained from ad hoc condition assessments of buried water mains located throughout the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia. Each sample was subjected to the electrochemical test developed by the author, and the resulting polarization data were compared with long-term pitting data obtained from each water main. The results of this testing program enabled the author to undertake a comprehensive review of the LPR technique as it is applied to soils and to examine whether correlations can be made between LPR testing results and long-term field corrosion.

  12. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  13. EUROCORR 2007 - The European corrosion congress - Progress by corrosion control. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This book of abstracts contains lectures, workshops and posters which were held on the European Corrosion Congress 2007 in Freiburg (Germany). The main topics of the sessions and posters are: 1. Corrosion and scale inhibition; 2. Corrosion by hot gases and combustion products; 3. Nuclear corrosion; 4. Environment sensitive fracture; 5. Surface Science; 6. Physico-chemical methods of corrosion testing; 7. Marine corrosion; 8. Microbial corrosion; 9. Corrosion of steel in concrete; 10. Corrosion in oil and gas production; 11. Coatings; 12. Corrosion in the refinery industry; 13. Cathodic protection; 14. Automotive Corrosion; 15. Corrosion of polymer materials. The main topics of the workshops are: 1. High temperature corrosion in the chemical, refinery and petrochemical industries; 2. Bio-Tribocorrosion; 3. Stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plants; 4. Corrosion monitoring in nuclear systems; 5. Cathodic protection for marine and offshore environments; 6. Self-healing properties of new surface treatments; 7. Bio-Tribocorrosion - Cost 533/Eureka-ENIWEP-Meeting; 8. Drinking water systems; 9. Heat exchangers for seawater cooling

  14. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry; La Corrosion et l'alteration des materiaux du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-07-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  15. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  16. Design and fabrication of an apparatus to study stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscarlet, Carol

    1977-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first gives a large overview of tests methods of stress corrosion cracking: definition and generalities, stress corrosion cracking in the laboratory (test methods with imposed deformation, load or strain rate, theories of hydrogen embrittlement, of adsorption, of film breaking, and electrochemical theories), stress corrosion cracking in alkaline environment (in light water reactors, of austenitic stainless steels), and conventional tests on polycrystals and monocrystals of stainless steels in sodium hydroxide. The next parts address the core of this research, i.e. the design of an autoclave containing a tensile apparatus, the fabrication of this apparatus, the stress application device, the sample environment, pressurization, control and command, preliminary tests in a melt salt, and the first cracking tests [fr

  17. Corrosion failure analysis as related to prevention of corrosion failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suss, H.

    1977-10-01

    The factors and conditions which have contributed to many of the corrosion related service failures are discussed based on a review of actual case histories. The anti-corrosion devices which developed as a result of these failure analyses are reviewed, and the method which must be adopted and used to take advantage of the available corrosion prevention techniques is discussed

  18. Archaeological analogs and corrosion; Analogues archeologiques et corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, D

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  19. Electrochemical characterisation speeds up prediction of corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, E.W.; Hooijmans, J.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    The contents of this presentation show the following elements: Introduction; Corrosion in real life; Why Electrochemical characterisation of corrosion; Applications (corrosion resistance coatings, corrosion behaviour (brazed) joints); Available electrochemical corrosion techniques; Standards; Conclusions. In the Conclusions the corrosion screening method is summarized: ECN method fast; within 1h -1 week results depending on test method; Fast pre-selection of promising materials/combinations (cost savings); Determining of corrosion initiation; Determination of corrosion mechanisms and propagation; Life time predictions possible; Strong combination with metallographic post-investigation; Ranking materials / constructions for corrosion performance.

  20. Method for inhibiting corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    Nickel-containing alloys are protected against corrosion by contacting the alloy with a molten alkali metal having dissolved therein aluminum, silicon or manganese to cause the formation of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic layer. Components can be protected by applying the coating after an apparatus is assembled.

  1. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  2. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: I. Swamp Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyoweni Widanarko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of infrastructures using steel concrete to reinforce the strength of concrete. Steel concrete is so vulnerable to chemical compounds that can cause corrosion. It can happen due to the presence of chemical compounds in acid environment in low pH level. These chemical compounds are SO42-, Cl-, NO3-. There are many swamp area in Indonesia. The acid contents and the concentration of ion sulphate, chlorides, and nitrate are higher in the swamp water than in the ground water .The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals in the swamp water to the steel concrete corrosion rate. There were two treatment used: (1 emerging ST 37 and ST 60 within 60 days in the 'polluted' swamp water, (2 moving the ST 37 up and down periodically in the ' polluted' swamp water. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp water were made by increasing the concentration of corrosive chemical up to 1X, 5X and 10X respectively. The corrosion rate was measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that chloride had the greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by sulphate and Nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 is 24.29 mpy and for ST 60 is 22.76 mpy. By moving the sample up and down, the corrosion rate of ST 37 increase up to 37.59 mpy, and chloride still having the greatest influence, followed by sulphate and nitrate.

  3. Application Of Fractal Dimension On Atmospheric Corrosion Of Galvanized Iron Roofing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa A.K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Corrosion rates of galvanized iron roofing sheet In yola north eastern part of Nigeria were assessed and determined by weight loss method and scanner fractal analysis method. Scanning electronic machine SEM was used to transform corrosion coupons to electronic form for image j processing and analysing software The result of corrosion rates for these two methods after six months of the samples exposure in industrial. Coastal market and urban areas in the region are 1.51 1.079 1.051 0.779 and 1.9941 1.9585 1.9565 1.9059 for weight loss and scanner fractal dimension methods respectively. and the results from the two methods were in agreement This establish the reliability of fractal dimension in measuring atmospheric corrosion this research also provides alternative method of measuring atmospheric corrosion and overcome the limitation of conventional weight loss technique in its inability to measure corrosion rate which is not significantly change over a long period of time moreover weight loss cannot demonstrate the area of concentration of corrosion on the surface of the coupon it rather gives the weight loss value and this will aid in determining the real level or extent of corrosion damage in the material and this can be obtained when measuring the material through fractal analysis these results clearly indicate that corrosion is heavier on locations close to the industrial areas. This also shows the negative impact of industrial activities on the corrodible materials and consequently on the plants and environment.

  4. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  5. Corrosion behaviors of ceramics against liquid sodium. Sodium corrosion characteristics of sintering additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Yoshiaki; Kano, Shigeki; Hirakawa, Yasushi; Yoshida, Eiichi

    1998-01-01

    It has been progressed as the Frontier Materials Research to research and develop ceramics to apply for several components of fast breeder reactor using liquid sodium as coolant instead of metallic materials. Grain boundary of ceramics has peculiar properties compared with matrix because most of ceramics are produced by hardening and firing their raw powders. Some previous researchers indicated that ceramics were mainly corroded at grain boundaries by liquid sodium, and ceramics could not be used under corrosive environment. Thus, it is the most important for the usage of ceramics in liquid sodium to improve corrosion resistance of grain boundaries. In order to develop the advanced ceramics having good sodium corrosion resistance among fine ceramics, which have recently been progressed in quality and characteristics remarkably, sodium corrosion behaviors of typical sintering additives such as MgO, Y 2 O 3 and AlN etc. have been examined and evaluated. As a result, the followings have been clarified and some useful knowledge about developing advanced ceramics having good corrosion resistance against liquid sodium has been obtained. (1) Sodium corrosion behavior of MgO depended on Si content. Samples containing large amount of Si were corroded severely by liquid sodium, whereas others with low Si contents showed good corrosion resistance. (2) Both Y 2 O 3 and AlN, which contained little Si, showed good sodium corrosion resistance. (3) MgO, Y 2 O 3 and AlN are thought to be corroded by liquid sodium, if they contain some SiO 2 . Therefore, in order to improve sodium corrosion resistance, it is very important for these ceramics to prevent the contamination of matrix with SiO 2 through purity control of their raw powders. (author)

  6. Corrosion of aluminium-clad spent fuel at RA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Maksin, T.; Dobrijevic, R.; Idjakovic, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Almost 95% of all spent fuel elements of the RA research reactor in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro, are stored in 30 aluminium barrels and about 300 stainless steel channel-holders in the temporary spent fuel storage water pool. The first activities of sludge and water samples, taken from the pool, were measured in 1996-1997 and were followed by analysis of chemical composition of samples. Visual inspections of fuel elements in some stainless steel tubes and of the fuel channels stored in the reactor core have shown that some deposits cover aluminium cladding. Stains and surface discoloration are noted on many of the spent fuel elements that were examined visually during the core unloading and inspections carried out in 1979 - 1984. Some of water samples, taken from pool, about a 150 stainless steel tubes and 16 barrels have shown very high 137-Cs activity compared to low activity measured in pool water. It was concluded that aluminium cladding of the fuel elements was penetrated due to corrosion process. Study on influence of water corrosion processes in the RA reactor storage pool was started within the framework of the IAEA CRP 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' in 2002. The first test rack with various aluminium and stainless steel coupons, supplied by the IAEA, was immersed in the pool already in 1996. New racks were immersed in 2002 and 2003. The rack immersed in 1996 was taken out from the pool in 2002 and the rack immersed in 2002 was taken out in 2003. Results of the examination of these racks, carried out according to the strategy and the protocol, proposed by the IAEA, are described in this paper. (author)

  7. Evaluation method for corrosion level of rebar in RC with electrical impedance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Akira

    2018-04-01

    The author reported that the impedance measurement using the 4-terminal method on the RC surface for diagnosing corrosion of internal rebar. The difference between the maximum value at 0.01 Hz and the minimum value around 10 Hz indicates the corrosion level of rebar in that report. This is successive report on a signal processing method for estimating the corrosion level by the measured impedance data to obtain more high accuracy. In the dielectric, a graph of frequency and dielectric constant (Cole-Cole plot diagram by KS Cole and RH Cole article of 1941) draws a shape of circle if the dielectric is independent of frequency but it draws a shape of ellipse in reality due to frequency dependency. Havriliak and Negami have also presented Havriliak-Negami model which introduced parameter into dielectric constant equation which deforms Cole-Cole plot diagram and showed that acquired dielectric data of polymer materials fit to this model with proper parameters. In this report, we first consider electric model connected with resistance and capacitance as a rough model of RC concrete. If the capacitance in this model circuit has some loss of dielectric, it is stated that graph in impedance plot is expected to take as similar deformation in the dielectric Cole-Cole plot. Then a numerical optimization computer code for obtaining parameters in the Cole-Cole plot diagram and Havriliak-Negami model is constructed, and the correlation between the deformation parameter of each model and corrosion is shown by this code. These results are feasibility study for diagnosis of corrosion level of rebar by associated parameters to a shape of impedance graph.

  8. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  9. Corrosion resistance of Cu-Al coatings produced by thermal spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Marcela Dimaté Castellanos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many components in the shipbuilding industry are made of copper-based alloys. These pieces tend to break due to corrosion generated by a marine environment; such components can be salvaged through surface engineering, through deposition of suitable coatings. This paper studied the influence of three surface preparation methods involving phosphor bronze substrates concerning the corrosion resistance of commercial coatings having Al-Cu +11% Fe chemical composition. The surface was prepared using three methods: sand blasting, shot blasting and metal polishing with an abrasive disk (with and without a base layer. The deposited coatings were micro-structurally characterised by x-ray diffraction (XRD, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical test electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Surfaces prepared by sandblasting showed the best resistance to corrosion, so these systems could be a viable alternative for salvaging certain parts in the marine industry. The corrosion mechanisms for the coatings produced are discussed in this research.

  10. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  11. Corrosion investigations of high-alloyed steels carried out in different marine area organized by European Federation of Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Skalski, I.

    1999-01-01

    Research works arranged by EFC Working Party on Marine Corrosion are described. The research was performed in sea areas of Norway, Finland, Sweden, France, Italy, Poland and Netherlands. Subjected to test were three corrosion resistant steel grades; 316, 904 and UNS S 31524. Two corrosion tests were carried out in the years 1993 and 1994 each of min. 6 month duration. The results show that chemical composition of water at salinity level of more than 0.7% has not great effect on corrosion aggressivity in relation to corrosion resistant steels. On the other hand temperature of sea water has great influence on corrosion process. (author)

  12. Simultaneous sound velocity and thickness measurement by the ultrasonic pitch-catch method for corrosion-layer-forming polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Masahiro; Takizawa, Shota; Sakai, Tetsuya; Arao, Yoshihiko; Kubouchi, Masatoshi

    2018-01-01

    Since thermosetting resins have excellent resistance to chemicals, fiber reinforced plastics composed of such resins and reinforcement fibers are widely used as construction materials for equipment in chemical plants. Such equipment is usually used for several decades under severe corrosive conditions so that failure due to degradation may result. One of the degradation behaviors in thermosetting resins under chemical solutions is "corrosion-layer-forming" degradation. In this type of degradation, surface resins in contact with a solution corrode, and some of them remain asa corrosion layer on the pristine part. It is difficult to precisely measure the thickness of the pristine part of such degradation type materials by conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic testing, because the sound velocity depends on the degree of corrosion of the polymeric material. In addition, the ultrasonic reflection interface between the pristine part and the corrosion layer is obscure. Thus, we propose a pitch-catch method using a pair of normal and angle probes to measure four parameters: the thicknesses of the pristine part and the corrosion layer, and their respective sound velocities. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by measuring a two-layer sample and a sample including corroded parts. The results demonstrate that the pitch-catch method can successfully measure the four parameters and evaluate the residual thickness of the pristine part in the corrosion-layer-forming sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Research Opportunities in Corrosion Science for Long-Term Prediction of Materials Performance: A Report of the DOE Workshop on “Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository”.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payer, Joe H. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Scully, John R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2003-07-29

    The report summarizes the findings of a U.S. Department of Energy workshop on “Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository”. The workshop was held on July 29-30, 2003 in Bethesda, MD, and was co-sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The workshop focus was corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of materials performance in hostile environments, with special focus on relevance to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The culmination of the workshop is this report that identifies both generic and Yucca Mountain Project-specific research opportunities in basic and applied topic areas. The research opportunities would be realized well after the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s initial construction-authorization licensing process. At the workshop, twenty-three invited scientists deliberated on basic and applied science opportunities in corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of damage accumulation by corrosive processes that affect materials performance.

  14. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K.; Kim, J. J.; Hwang, W. S.; Park, Y. S.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time

  15. Corrosion of Embedded Metals in Wood: An Overview of Recent Research with Implications for building moisture design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    ASHRAE Standard 160, Criteria for Moisture-Control Design Analysis in Buildings, specifies moisture design criteria in buildings to prevent moisture damage such as fungal activity and corrosion. While there has been much research on mold and decay fungi in wood buildings, it is often overlooked that wet wood is corrosive to the metal screws...

  16. Radiographic evaluation of corrosion and deposits in pipelines: results of an IAEA co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.; Infanzon, S.; Rastkhan, N.; Vaidya, P.R.; Einav, I.; Ekinci, S.

    2006-01-01

    The principle of wall thickness measurement and monitoring of corrosion and deposits by means of film-based tangential projection radiography is known since decades. Nevertheless, there are no international standards and guidelines available. The International Atomic Energy Agency has organized a co-ordinated research programme bringing together participants from twelve member states to study the state of the art. The general scope of the project covered radiographic inspection of corrosion and deposits in steel pipes (diameter >150mm) corroded on the outer or inner surfaces with or without insulation. Two inspection methods have been investigated: 1. tangential radiographic projection technique (TRT) and 2. double wall inspection technique (DWT). The application ranges of both methods were studied depending on pipe diameter, wall thickness, radiation source (X-ray, Ir-192 and Co-60 were used) and screen/film combination. Diagrams for application limits using TRT have been designed and verified by the participating countries. All measurements have been performed on special designed test pieces and also industrial pipes. Corrosion measurements based on DWT are more sophisticated and use effective attenuation coefficients to calculate wall thickness changes from density differences shown on the film. The values of effective attenuation coefficients, established for Ir-192 and Co-60, are stable and independent in a wide range on pipe diameter and insulation. Guidelines were developed and tested in the twelve different countries to determine the reliability of this technology. A testing procedure approved by the project partners has been released and shall be submitted as standard proposal. (orig.)

  17. Research on A3 steel corrosion behavior of basic magnesium sulfate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Sainan; Wu, Chengyou; Yu, Hongfa; Jiang, Ningshan; Zhang, Wuyu

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, Tafel polarization technique is used to study the corrosion behavior of A3 steel basic magnesium sulfate, and then analyzing the ratio of raw materials cement, nitrites rust inhibitor and wet-dry cycle of basic magnesium sulfate corrosion of reinforced influence, and the steel corrosion behavior of basic magnesium sulfate compared with magnesium oxychloride cement and Portland cement. The results show that: the higher MgO/MgSO4 mole ratio will reduce the corrosion rate of steel; Too high and too low H2O/MgSO4 mole ratio may speed up the reinforcement corrosion effect; Adding a small amount of nitrite rust and corrosion inhibitor, not only can obviously reduce the alkali type magnesium sulfate in the early hydration of cement steel bar corrosion rate, but also can significantly reduce dry-wet circulation under the action of alkali type magnesium sulfate cement corrosion of reinforcement effect. Basic magnesium sulfate cement has excellent ability to protect reinforced, its long-term corrosion of reinforcement effect and was equal to that of Portland cement. Basic magnesium sulfate corrosion of reinforced is far below the level in the MOC in the case.

  18. Monitoring corrosion and corrosion control of iron in HCl by non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series - Part II. Temperature effect, activation energies and thermodynamics of adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, M.A.; Arida, H.A.; Arslan, Taner; Saracoglu, Murat; Kandemirli, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → TX-305 exhibits inhibiting properties for iron corrosion more than TX-165 and TX 100. → Inhibition efficiency increases with temperature, suggesting chemical adsorption. → The three tested surfactants act as mixed-type inhibitors with cathodic predominance. → Validation of corrosion rates measured by Tafel extrapolation method is confirmed. - Abstract: The inhibition characteristics of non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series, namely TRITON-X-100 (TX-100), TRITON-X-165 (TX-165) and TRITON-X-305 (TX-305), on the corrosion of iron was studied in 1.0 M HCl solutions as a function of inhibitor concentration (0.005-0.075 g L -1 ) and solution temperature (278-338 K). Measurements were conducted based on Tafel extrapolation method. Electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), a non-destructive corrosion measurement technique that can directly give values of corrosion current without prior knowledge of Tafel constants, is also presented. Experimental corrosion rates determined by the Tafel extrapolation method were compared with corrosion rates obtained by the EFM technique and an independent method of chemical analysis. The chemical method of confirmation of the corrosion rates involved determination of the dissolved cation, using ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). The aim was to confirm validation of corrosion rates measured by the Tafel extrapolation method. Results obtained showed that, in all cases, the inhibition efficiency increased with increase in temperature, suggesting that chemical adsorption occurs. The adsorptive behaviour of the three surfactants followed Temkin-type isotherm. The standard free energies of adsorption decreased with temperature, reflecting better inhibition performance. These findings confirm chemisorption of the tested inhibitors. Thermodynamic activation functions of the dissolution process were also calculated as a function of each inhibitor concentration. All the results

  19. Intelligent Evaluation Method of Tank Bottom Corrosion Status Based on Improved BP Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Dai, Guang; Zhang, Ying

    According to the acoustic emission information and the appearance inspection information of tank bottom online testing, the external factors associated with tank bottom corrosion status are confirmed. Applying artificial neural network intelligent evaluation method, three tank bottom corrosion status evaluation models based on appearance inspection information, acoustic emission information, and online testing information are established. Comparing with the result of acoustic emission online testing through the evaluation of test sample, the accuracy of the evaluation model based on online testing information is 94 %. The evaluation model can evaluate tank bottom corrosion accurately and realize acoustic emission online testing intelligent evaluation of tank bottom.

  20. Corrosion resistance assessment of Co-Cr alloy frameworks fabricated by CAD/CAM milling, laser sintering, and casting methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Süleyman Hakan; Özçiçek Pekmez, Nuran; Kürkçüoğlu, Işin

    2015-11-01

    The effects of fabrication methods on the corrosion resistance of frameworks produced with Co-Cr alloys are not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the electrochemical corrosion resistance of Co-Cr alloy specimens that were fabricated by conventional casting, milling, and laser sintering. The specimens fabricated with 3 different methods were investigated by potentiodynamic tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in an artificial saliva. Ions released into the artificial saliva were estimated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and the results were statistically analyzed. The specimen surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy before and after the tests. In terms of corrosion current and Rct properties, statistically significant differences were found both among the means of the methods and among the means of the material groups (Pcorrosion than those produced by milling and laser sintering. The corrosion resistance of a Co-Cr alloy specimens fabricated by milling or laser sintering was greater than that of the conventionally cast alloy specimens. The Co-Cr specimens produced by the same method also differed from one another in terms of corrosion resistance. These differences may be related to the variations in the alloy compositions. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical passivation as a method of improving the electrochemical corrosion resistance of Co-Cr-based dental alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylska, Dorota; Sokołowski, Grzegorz; Sokołowski, Jerzy; Łukomska-Szymańska, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate corrosion resistance of Wirobond C® alloy after chemical passivation treatment. The alloy surface undergone chemical passivation treatment in four different media. Corrosion studies were carried out by means of electrochemical methods in saline solution. Corrosion effects were determined using SEM. The greatest increase in the alloy polarization resistance was observed for passive layer produced in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. The same layer caused the highest increase in corrosion current. Generally speaking, the alloy passivation in Na2SO4 solution with graphite caused a substantial improvement of the corrosion resistance. The sample after passivation in Na2SO4 solution without graphite, contrary to others, lost its protective properties along with successive anodic polarization cycles. The alloy passivation in Na3PO4 solution with graphite was the only one that caused a decrease in the alloy corrosion properties. The SEM studies of all samples after chemical passivation revealed no pit corrosion - in contrast to the sample without any modification. Every successive polarization cycle in anodic direction of pure Wirobond C® alloy enhances corrosion resistance shifting corrosion potential in the positive direction and decreasing corrosion current value. The chemical passivation in solutions with low pH values decreases susceptibility to electrochemical corrosion of Co-Cr dental alloy. The best protection against corrosion was obtained after chemical passivation of Wirobond C® in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. Passivation with Na2SO4 in solution of high pH does not cause an increase in corrosion resistance of WIROBOND C. Passivation process increases alloy resistance to pit corrosion.

  2. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  3. Study on Mitigation Method of Solder Corrosion for Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hee Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of 62Sn36Pb2Ag solder connections poses serious difficulties for outdoor-exposed photovoltaic (PV modules, as connection degradation contributes to the increase in series resistance (RS of PV modules. In this study, we investigated a corrosion mitigation method based on the corrosion mechanism. The effect of added sacrificial metal on the reliability of PV modules was evaluated using the oxidation-reduction (redox reaction under damp heat (DH conditions. Experimental results after exposure to DH show that the main reason for the decrease in power was a drop in the module’s fill factor. This drop was attributed to the increase of RS. The drop in output power of the PV module without added sacrificial metal is greater than that of the sample with sacrificial metal. Electroluminescence and current-voltage mapping analysis also show that the PV module with sacrificial metal experienced less degradation than the sample without sacrificial metal.

  4. Problems studied within the state research project New Methods of Nondestructive Materials Testing Using Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysak, F.; Strba, J.

    1979-01-01

    A state research project is described divided into ten subprojects, viz.: New trends of ionizing radiation detection using television technology in nondestructive testing; the application of accelerators for thick-walled product testing; the atlas of butt welds of medium thicknesses; the application of radioanalytical methods in testing the wear of gearboxes and other components of instrument parts; multielemental analyses of combustion engine wear using radionuclides; the application of radioisotope methods in research into wear of antifriction bearings of trucks and railway cars; the application of radionuclides in assessing corrosion resistance of steels and corrosion protection systems; the application of radionuclide methods in improving the quality of high-grade steel production; the selection and testing of radionuclide instruments for building production control, intermediate and acceptance checks; and radioisotope methods for building machine and equipment control. (M.S.)

  5. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  6. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  7. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); Edwards, R [Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States); Hayman, A [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France); Hill, D [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); Mehta, S [Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom); Semerad, T [Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia)

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  8. Stainless steel welding method with excellent nitric acid corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Yukinobu; Inazumi, Toru; Hyakubo, Tamako; Masamura, Katsumi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns a welding method for a stainless steel used in a circumstance being in contact with a highly oxidizing nitric acid solution such as nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities, upon welding 316 type austenite steel containing Mo while giving excellent nitric acid resistance. A method of TIG welding using a filler metal having a composition of C, Si, Mn, P, S, Ni, Cr, Mo and Cu somewhat different from a stainless steel mother material in which C, Si, Mn, P, S, Ni, Cr and Mo are specified comprises a step of TIG-welding the surface of the mother material and a step of TIG-welding the rear face of the mother material, in which the welding conditions for the rear face of the mother material are such that the distance between the surface of the outermost welding metal layer on the side of the surface of the mother material and the bottom of the groove is not less than 5mm, and an amount of welding heat is made constant. As a result, even if the method is used in a circumstance being in contact with a highly corrosive solution such as nitric acid, corrosion resistance is not degraded. (N.H.)

  9. Standard Test Method for Sandwich Corrosion Test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method defines the procedure for evaluating the corrosivity of aircraft maintenance chemicals, when present between faying surfaces (sandwich) of aluminum alloys commonly used for aircraft structures. This test method is intended to be used in the qualification and approval of compounds employed in aircraft maintenance operations. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information. 1.3 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements appear in Section 9.

  10. Assessing Level and Effectiveness of Corrosion Education in the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwee Ling Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of corrosion can be minimized by an engineering workforce well trained in corrosion fundamentals and management. Since the United Arab Emirates incurs the second highest cost of corrosion after Saudi Arabia, this paper examined the quality of corrosion education in the UAE. Surveys with academia and industry respondents showed that dedicated corrosion courses and engineering courses that integrated corrosion into the curricula were available in UAE universities, but graduates had insufficient knowledge of corrosion engineering and superficial understanding of corrosion in real-life design contexts. The effectiveness of corrosion education is determined by both competence in corrosion knowledge/skills and availability of resources (faculty and research. Though most departments would not hire new corrosion-specialist faculty, department research efforts and industry partnerships in corrosion research were present. The paper concluded with recommendations for improving knowledge and skills of future engineers in corrosion and enhancing corrosion instruction to better meet industry needs.

  11. Data processing technologies and diagnostics for water chemistry and corrosion control in nuclear power plants (DAWAC). Report of a coordinated research project 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This publication provides information on the current status and development trends in monitoring, diagnostics and control of water chemistry and corrosion of core and primary circuit materials in water cooled power reactors. It summarizes the results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project and focuses on the methods for development, qualification and implementation of water chemistry expert systems at nuclear power plants. These systems are needed to have full benefit from using on-line sensors in real time mode when sensor signals, and other chemistry and operational data, are collected and continuously analysed with data acquisition and evaluation software. Technical knowledge was acquired in water chemistry control techniques (grab sampling, on-line monitoring, data collecting and processing, etc), plant chemistry and corrosion diagnostics, plant monitoring (corrosion, chemistry, activity) and plant chemistry improvement (analytical models and practices). This publication covers contributions from leading experts in water chemistry/corrosion, representing organizations from 16 countries with the largest nuclear capacities

  12. Modern methods of overlay welding for corrosion protection of power generating equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, A.V.; Shul'man, I.E.; Potapov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for overlay welding of inner surfaces of power equipment for corrosion protection are analysed. Various methods of electroslag overlay welding by a band electrode (overlay welding by two-electrode bands by a wide band with magnetic control, by an electrode band with high melting velocity) are marked to be the most perspective for cladding of NPP vessel equipment

  13. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  14. Significance of steel electrical resistance method in the evaluation of reinforcement corrosion in cementitious systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajci, L.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The suitable detection system of steel reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures contributes to the reduction of their maintenance costs. Method of steel electrical resistance represents non-destructive monitoring of steel in cementitious systems. Specially prepared and arranged test specimen of steel as a corrosion sensor is embedded in mortar specimen. Verification tests of this method based on chloride corrosion of steel in mortars as well as its visual inspection are introduced. Significance of steel electrical resistance method lies in the expression of steel corrosion by these quantitative parameters: reduction of cross-section of steel, thickness of corroded layer and loss of weight of steel material. This method is an integral method that allows the indirect determination of mentioned corrosion characteristics. The comparison of verified method with gravimetric evaluation of steel corrosion gives a good correspondence. Test results on mortars with calcium chloride dosages between 0.5% and 4.0% by weight of cement prove high sensitiveness and reliability of steel electrical resistance method.

    La utilización de un sistema de detección de la corrosión de las armaduras en estructuras de hormigón puede contribuir a la reducción de sus costes de mantenimiento. El método de la resistencia eléctrica del acero consiste en la monitorización no-destructiva realizada sobre el acero en sistemas cementantes. Dentro de la muestra de mortero se coloca el sistema de detección, especialmente preparado y fijado, actuando como un sensor de la corrosión. En este trabajo se presentan ensayos de verificación de este método, junto con inspecciones visuales, en morteros sometidos a corrosión de armaduras por efecto de los cloruros. La efectividad de este método de la resistencia eléctrica del acero se expresa, en la corrosión de armaduras, de acuerdo a los siguientes parámetros cuantitativos: reducción de la sección transversal del

  15. Microbiological corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems is considered of development of the microbiological corrosion of the NPP equipment. The main attention is paid to the selective character of microbiological corrosion in zones of welded joints of austenitic steels. It is noted that the presence of technological defects promotes growth of corrosional damages. Methods for microbiological corrosion protection are discussed

  16. Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete : Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete. Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative. The aim of the research project was to study the possibilities for establishing a new or improved electrochemical method for corrosion prevention/protection for reinforced concrete.

  17. Development of a unit suitable for corrosion monitoring in district heating systems. Experiences with the LOCOR-cell test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asbjørn; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    A by-pass unit suitable for placement of a number of different probes for corrosion monitoring has been designed. Also measurements of water parameters are allowed in a side stream from the unit. The project is a part of the Nordic Innovation Fund project KORMOF. The by-pass unit has been installed...... in 6 pressurised circulating heating systems and in one cooling system. 7 different corrosion monitoring methods have been used to study corrosion rates and types in dependency of water chemistry. This paper describes the design of the by-pass unit including water analysis methods. It also describes...... the purpose, background and gained results of one of the used monitoring techniques, the crevice corrosion measurements obtained by the LOCOR-Cell„§. The crevice corrosion cell was developed by FORCE Technology in a previous district heating project financed by Nordic Industrial Fund (1)(2). Results from...

  18. Monitoring reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced cracking using non-destructive x-ray attenuation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2011-01-01

    To test the applicability of the x-ray attenuation method to monitor the movement of corrosion products as well as the formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials reinforced mortar samples were prepared and tested under accelerated corrosion conditions. It is evident from the ex...... of the corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel, obtained by the x-ray attenuation method, was found to be in very good agreement with the mass loss obtained by gravimetric method as well as Faraday's law....

  19. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods.Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed.The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  20. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  1. Detection of Corrosion Resistance of Components in Cyclic Salt Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Álló

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is, to investigate the influence of two types of cyclic salt spray tests on parts surface treated with galvanizing. On the selected components was performed the method Zn-Ni surface treating on the bath line. Subsequently were the components embedded in the corrosion chamber, where was performed two types of cyclic salt test. In the first test was performed 4 hour salt spray, 8 hours drying, 60 hours condensation and 24 hours drying. Once cycle lasted 96 hours, and it was repeated 4 times. During the second test was performed 2 hours salt spray, 2 hours condensation. The cycle was repeated 4 times, that means 96 hours. After the cycle was performed 72 hours free relaxation in the corrosion chamber, on 20–25 °C temperature. As the research showed, after the cyclic salt spray was no red corrosion on the selected components. The white corrosion appeared only slightly.

  2. 基于图像的树木腐蚀区域分割方法研究与仿真%Based on Image Corrosion Trees Segmentation Method Research and Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张渊博

    2012-01-01

    研究对图像的树木腐蚀区域分割问题,提高分割区域大小的准确性.传统方法根据图像中物体与背景像素的颜色区别,利用像素视觉差异大小的方法进行木材腐蚀区域图像的分割.但是在木材图像中,腐蚀区域的颜色和树木的本体颜色极其接近,边缘像素的一致性会造成干扰,像素相减的结果会发生错误,造成不能完整的分割木材腐蚀区域的问题.为提高识别准确性,提出利用高斯一维线性模型的树木腐蚀区域分割方法.通过抑制边沿像素的对称性和单调性,去除边沿像素中的干扰因素,克服了传统方法的缺陷.实验证明,改进方法实现了在与自身颜色相似情况下木材腐蚀区域图像的完整分割,取得了满意的效果.%Research segmentation problem of trees corrosion image and the improvement of the accuracy of seg mented region size. Traditional method uses the color difference between object pixels and background pixels and the visual difference method to segment the wood corrosion area. But in the lumber images, the colors of corrosion region and the colors of trees wre extremely close, the subtraction operation may results in the error. This paper put forward a linear Gauss model for the segmentation of trees corrosion. By inhibiting symmetry and monotonicity of the edge pix els and removing interference factors frin edge pixels to overcome the defects of the traditional method. Experiments show that the method realizes the complete image segmentation under the case that the wood color is similar to the cor rosion area.

  3. Nuclear corrosion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Understanding corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods necessary for accurately measuring their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry for the safe, economic and competitive running of its plants. This book reviews the fundamentals of nuclear corrosion. Corrosion of nuclear materials, i.e. the interaction between these materials and their environments, is a major issue for plant safety as well as for operation and economic competitiveness. Understanding these corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods to accurately measure their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry. Combining assessment techniques and analytical models into this understanding allows operators to predict the service life of corrosion-affected nuclear plant materials, and to apply the most appropriate maintenance and mitigation options to ensure safe long term operation. This book critically reviews the fundamental corrosion mechani...

  4. Standard test method for measurement of corrosion potentials of Aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measurement of the corrosion potential (see Note 1) of an aluminum alloy in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride with enough hydrogen peroxide added to provide an ample supply of cathodic reactant. Note 1—The corrosion potential is sometimes referred to as the open-circuit solution or rest potential. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiliang Jin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  6. A new corrosion sensor to determine the start and development of embedded rebar corrosion process at coastal concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-09-30

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  7. EVALUATION OF CORROSION COST OF CRUDE OIL PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADESANYA A.O.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil production industry as the hub of Nigeria Economy is not immune to the global financial meltdown being experienced world over which have resulted in a continual fall of oil price. This has necessitated the need to reduce cost of production. One of the major costs of production is corrosion cost, hence, its evaluation. This research work outlined the basic principles of corrosion prevention, monitoring and inspection and attempted to describe ways in which these measures may be adopted in the context of oil production. A wide range of facilities are used in crude oil production making it difficult to evaluate precisely the extent of corrosion and its cost implication. In this study, cost of corrosion per barrel was determined and the annualized value of corrosion cost was also determined using the principles of engineering economy and results analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results showed that among the corrosion prevention methods identified, the use of chemical treatment gave the highest cost contribution (81% of the total cost of prevention while coating added 19%. Cleaning pigging and cathodic protection gave no cost. The contribution of corrosion maintenance methods are 60% for repairs and 40% for replacement. Also among the corrosion monitoring and inspection identified, NDT gave the highest cost contribution of 41% of the total cost, followed by coating survey (34%. Cathodic protection survey and crude analysis gives the lowest cost contribution of 19% and 6% respectively. Corrosion control cost per barrel was found to be 77 cent/barrel. The significance of this cost was not much due to high price of crude oil in the international market. But the effect of corrosion in crude oil processing takes its toll on crude oil production (i.e. deferment.

  8. A review on pipeline corrosion, in-line inspection (ILI), and corrosion growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaei, H.R.; Eslami, A.; Egbewande, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines are the very important energy transmission systems. Over time, pipelines can corrode. While corrosion could be detected by in-line inspection (ILI) tools, corrosion growth rate prediction in pipelines is usually done through corrosion rate models. For pipeline integrity management and planning selecting the proper corrosion ILI tool and also corrosion growth rate model is important and can lead to significant savings and safer pipe operation. In this paper common forms of pipeline corrosion, state of the art ILI tools, and also corrosion growth rate models are reviewed. The common forms of pipeline corrosion introduced in this paper are Uniform/General Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Cavitation and Erosion Corrosion, Stray Current Corrosion, Micro-Bacterial Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The ILI corrosion detection tools assessed in this study are Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), Circumferential MFL, Tri-axial MFL, and Ultrasonic Wall Measurement (UT). The corrosion growth rate models considered in this study are single-value corrosion rate model, linear corrosion growth rate model, non-linear corrosion growth rate model, Monte-Carlo method, Markov model, TD-GEVD, TI-GEVD model, Gamma Process, and BMWD model. Strengths and limitations of ILI detection tools, and also corrosion predictive models with some practical examples are discussed. This paper could be useful for those whom are supporting pipeline integrity management and planning. - Highlights: • Different forms of pipeline corrosion are explained. • Common In-Line Inspection (ILI) tools and corrosion growth rate models are introduced. • Strength and limitations of corrosion growth rate models/ILI tools are discussed. • For pipeline integrity management programs using more than one corrosion growth rate model/ILI tool is suggested.

  9. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcillo, M.; Alcantara, J.; Diaz, I.; Chico, B.; Simancas, J.; Fuente, D. de la

    2015-07-01

    Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a) environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b) characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c) corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d) exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e) long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f) behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camarinas, Galicia) in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy. (Author)

  10. Development of methods to control radiation field and corrosion in PHWRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) is the mainstay of Indian Nuclear Power Program. There are 18 PHWRs (220 MWe and 540 MWe) in operation and 4 X 700 MWe PHWRs are under construction. In these reactors, as far as radiation field is concerned, the philosophy of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) is followed. The primary coolant system chemistry control is given due consideration during operation so that corrosion of structural material is minimized which in turn controls the radiation field. Development and application of full system Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) process helped to reduce the radiation field in MAPS-1 and 2, RAPS-1 and 2, NAPS-1 and 2 and KAPS-1. PHWR being a tube type reactor, it enables application of full system decontamination to its heavy water primary coolant system. Significant reduction in radiation field and consequent savings in MANREM could be achieved. Attempts are being made to understand the problem created by the release of antimony activities ( 122 Sb and 124 Sb) during chemical decontamination and during planned shutdown. Passivation as a method to control the radiation field and corrosion is being studied. Magnesium ion as a passivator to the ferrite filmed structural materials of PHWRs is being investigated. In addition, as PHWRs uses carbon steel as structural material, the use of passivation as a method to control flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is also being studied. Magnesium ion gets incorporated in the ferrite film formed over carbon steel structural material and is expected to reduce the solubility of magnetite film thereby the FAC of feeders in PHWRs. (author)

  11. Survey of Water Chemistry and Corrosion of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Sok; Hong, Bong Geon

    2008-06-15

    Status of water chemistry of nuclear power plant and materials corrosion has been surveyed. For PWR, system chemistry of primary coolant and secondary coolant as well as the related corrosion of materials was surveyed. For BWR, system chemistry as whole has been surveyed with its accompanying corrosion problems. Radiolysis of coolant water and activation of corrosion products also was surveyed. Future NPP such as supercritical water cooled reactor and fusion reactor has also been surveyed for their water chemistry and corrosion problems. As a result, proposal for some research items has been suggested. Some related corrosion research techniques and electrochemical fundamentals are also presented.

  12. Survey of Water Chemistry and Corrosion of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ki Sok; Hong, Bong Geon

    2008-06-01

    Status of water chemistry of nuclear power plant and materials corrosion has been surveyed. For PWR, system chemistry of primary coolant and secondary coolant as well as the related corrosion of materials was surveyed. For BWR, system chemistry as whole has been surveyed with its accompanying corrosion problems. Radiolysis of coolant water and activation of corrosion products also was surveyed. Future NPP such as supercritical water cooled reactor and fusion reactor has also been surveyed for their water chemistry and corrosion problems. As a result, proposal for some research items has been suggested. Some related corrosion research techniques and electrochemical fundamentals are also presented

  13. Reactor fuel cladding tube with excellent corrosion resistance and method of manufacturing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takanari; Kanehara, Mitsuo; Abe, Katsuhiro; Nishimura, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a fuel cladding tube having an excellent corrosion resistance and thus a long life, and a suitable manufacturing method therefor. Namely, in the fuel cladding tube, the outer circumference of an inner layer made of a zirconium base alloy is coated with an outer layer made of a metal more corrosion resistant than the zirconium base alloy. Ti or a titanium alloy is suitable for the corrosion resistant metal. In addition, the outer layer can be coated by a method such as vapor deposition or plating, not limited to joining of the inner layer material and the outer layer material. Specifically, a composite material having an inner layer made of a zirconium alloy coated by the outer material made of a titanium alloy is applied with hot fabrication at a temperature within a range of from 500 to 850degC and at a fabrication rate of not less than 5%. The fabrication method includes any of extrusion, rolling, drawing, and casting. As the titanium-base alloy, a Ti-Al alloy or a Ti-Nb alloy containing Al of not more than 20wt%, or Nb of not more than 20wt% is preferred. (I.S.)

  14. Application of Boundary Element Method in Galvanic Corrosion Analysis for Metallic Materials used in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin

    2011-01-01

    Boundary element method (BEM) is a numerical technique that used for modeling infinite domain as is the case for galvanic corrosion analysis. This paper presents the application of boundary element method for galvanic corrosion analysis between two different metallic materials. Aluminium (Al), and zinc (Zn) alloys were used separately coupled with the Carbon Steel (CS) in natural seawater. The measured conductivity of sea water is 30,800 μS/ cm at ambient temperature. Computer software system based on boundary element likes BEASY and ABAQUS can be used to accurately model and simulate the galvanic corrosion. However, the BEM based BEASY program will be used reasonably for predicting the galvanic current density distribution of coupled Al-CS and Zn-CS in this study. (author)

  15. Real time corrosion monitoring in atmosphere using automated battery driven corrosion loggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosek, T.; Kouril, M.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2008-01-01

    diminishes due to corrosion. Zinc, iron, copper and nickel sensors at several thicknesses are available. Sensitivity of the corrosion measurement varies from 1 to 10 nm depending on the type and thickness of the sensor. Changes in the air corrosivity can be thus detected within hours or even tens of minutes......A logger enabling continuous measurement of corrosion rate of selected metals in indoor and outdoor atmospheres has been developed. Principle of the measurement method is based on the increasing electrical resistance of a measuring element made of the material concerned as its cross-sectional area....... The logger lifetime in medium corrosive environments is designed to be 2 years with full autonomy. Data on the sensor corrosion rate are available any time through GPRS connection or by a non-contact inductive reading without the need of retracting the logger from the exposure site....

  16. Shearography: An alternative method of NDE for analysis of corrosion in petroleum pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusnisyam Yusof; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of shearography as an alternative method of NDE for analysis of corrosion in petroleum pipeline. Shearography reveals direct information about defect induced stress which utilized the laser wave front pattern on the inspected object. In this study, the laser shearography technique was used to measure the derivative displacement of 7 mm thickness carbon steel pipe wall surface with simulated corrosion area at internal wall. The wave front pattern of internal wall corrosion in petroleum pipeline will be constructed to 3D image profiles in order to measure the severity and magnitude of material deformation. The process may involve of optical phase stepping procedure and the image processing algorithm for wrapped and unwrapped phase image at the deformation area. The unwrapped phase image can be meshed plot which finally lead to 3D image profiles. The phase stepping procedure in this analysis was selected by utilizing four phase stepping procedure using piezoelectric transducer (PZT) attached with optical mirror. (author)

  17. Corrosion behaviour of stainless steels by internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postnikov, V.S.; Kovalevskij, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion of austenite chromium-nickel stainless steels 12 Kh18N9, 12Kh18N9T, 12Kh18N10 and 12Kh18N10T is investigated. Wire samples 0.7...0.8 mm in diameter before tests were subjected to quenching in water from the temperature of 1050...1100 deg C and part of them - to tempering at 650 deg C for 2 h. Pitting corrosion was brought about by different concentration of iron chloride solutions (C FeCl 3 ). Total corrosion has a slight effect on the character of IF (internal friction) variation that increases without the whole test period up to the moment when mechanical strength of the sample

  18. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  19. Electrochemical noise measurements techniques and the reversing dc potential drop method applied to stress corrosion essays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar Fernandes; Andrade, Arnaldo Paes de; MattarNeto, Miguel; Aoki, Idalina Vieira

    2002-01-01

    This paper aims to collect information and to discuss the electrochemical noise measurements and the reversing dc potential drop method, applied to stress corrosion essays that can be used to evaluate the nucleation and the increase of stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 600 and/or Alloy 182 specimens from Angra I Nuclear Power Plant. Therefore we will pretend to establish a standard procedure to essays to be realized on the new autoclave equipment on the Laboratorio de Eletroquimica e Corrosao do Departamento de Engenharia Quimica da Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo - Electrochemical and Corrosion Laboratory of the Chemical Engineering Department of Polytechnical School of Sao Paulo University, Brazil. (author)

  20. On-line corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    ), Electrochemical Noise (EN) and Zero Resistance Ammetry (ZRA). Electrochemical Resistance (ER) has also been used to measure corrosion. The method traditionally only measures corrosion off-line but with newly developed high-sensitive ER technique developed by MetriCorr in Denmark, on-line monitoring is possible...... complicates the chemistry of the environment. Hydrogen sulphide is present in geothermal systems and can be formed as a by-product of sulphate-reducing-bacteria (SRB). The application of electrochemical methods makes on-line monitoring possible. These methods include: Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR....... In order to assess both general corrosion and localized corrosion, it is necessary to apply more than one monitoring technique simultaneously, ZRA or EN for measuring localized corrosion and LPR or ER for measuring general corrosion rate. The advantage of monitoring localized corrosion is indisputable...

  1. Natural compounds as corrosion inhibitors for highly cycled systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quraishi, M.A.; Farooqi, I.H.; Saini, P.A. [Corrosion Research Lab., Aligarh (India)

    1999-11-01

    Strict environmental legislations have led to the development of green inhibitors in recent years. In continuation of the authors` research work on development of green inhibitors, they have investigated the aqueous extracts of three plants namely: Azadirachta indica, Punica Granatum and Momordica charantia as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 3% NaCl using weight loss and electrochemical methods. All the investigated compounds exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition properties comparable to that of HEDP. Azadirachta showed better scale inhibition effect than HEDP.

  2. Corrosion of X65 Pipeline Steel Under Deposit and Effect of Corrosion Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Yun-ze

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the deposit on the electrochemical parameters of X65 pipeline steel in oxygen contained sodium chloride solution was studied by EIS and PDS methods. The galvanic corrosion behavior under deposit and effect of different concentration of corrosion inhibitor PBTCA were studied by electrical resistance (ER method combined with ZRA. The results show that the corrosion potential of X65 steel shifts negatively as SiO2 covering its surface and the corrosion rate becomes lower. When the galvanic couple specimen with deposit is electrically connected with the specimen without deposit, anodic polarization occurs on X65 steel under deposit and the galvanic current density decreases from 120μA/cm2 to 50μA/cm2 and keeps stable. As 5×10-5, 8×10-5 and 3×10-4 PBTCA were introduced into the solution, the galvanic current density reaches the highest 1300μA/cm2 and then decreases to 610μA/cm2 keeping stable around 610μA/cm2, corrosion rate of X65 steel under deposit reaches 6.11mm/a. PBTCA accelerates the corrosion of X65 steel under deposit in oxygen contained solution. Through the investigation on the surface of the specimens, serious local corrosion occurs on the X65 steel surface under deposit.

  3. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Kusmierek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  4. Study on the corrosion assessment of overpack welds-II (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hiroyuki; Otsuki, Akiyoshi; Asano, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawakami, Susumu; Yui, Mikazu

    2006-06-01

    The corrosion resistance at the overpack welds is possible to be inferior to that at base metal, so that it has been concerned that a short-term failure of overpack may occur due to the corrosion penetration at the welds. In this study, corrosion mechanisms specific to the welds were extracted for carbon steel which is one of the candidate materials for overpacks. And then the corrosion experiments for welded carbon steel were planed to evaluate long-term integrity of overpack welds. Based on this plan, electrochemical tests for welded carbon steel using the samples welded by EBW and TIG were carried out, and the corrosion behavior of welded zone was compared with that of base metal. The results of anodic polarization tests in 0.01M and 0.1M carbonate aqueous solutions for base metal, heat affected zone and welded metal showed that; As for EBW, the anodic polarization curves were not affected by welding although the metallurgical structures vary with base metal, heat affected zone and welded metal. As for TIG, the current density of welded metal was larger than that of base metal and of heat affected zone, and local dissolution with immediate in current density was observed in 0.01M-pH10 carbonate aqueous solution. As shown in these results, it is expected that the corrosion resistance at the welds by EBW will be equal to that at base metal. As for TIG, however, it was indicated that the corrosion resistance is possible to be lower than base metal. (author)

  5. Investigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Magnesium Alloys by Quantitative Fractography Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sozańska M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article shows that the use of quantitative fracture description may lead to significant progress in research on the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking of the WE43 magnesium alloy. Tests were carried out on samples in air, and after hydrogenation in 0.1 M Na2SO4 with cathodic polarization. Fracture surfaces were analyzed after different variants of the Slow Strain Rate Test. It was demonstrated that the parameters for quantitative evaluation of fracture surface microcracks can be closely linked with the susceptibility of the WE43 magnesium alloy operating under complex state of the mechanical load in corrosive environments. The final result of the study was the determination of the quantitative relationship between Slow Strain Rate Test parameters, the mechanical properties, and the parameters of the quantitative evaluation of fracture surface (microcracks.

  6. Bacterial corrosion in low-temperature geothermal. Mechanisms of corrosion by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumas, Sylvie

    1987-01-01

    Within the frame of researches aimed at determining the causes of damages noticed on geothermal equipment, this research thesis aims at assessing the respective importance of physical-chemical processes and bacterial intervention in corrosion phenomena. It proposes an ecological approach of the fluid sampled in the Creil geothermal power station. The aim is to define the adaptation and activity degree of isolated sulphate-reducing bacteria with respect to their environment conditions. The author studied the effect of the development of these bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel used in geothermal. Thus, he proposes a contribution to the understanding of mechanisms related to iron attack by these bacteria. Electrochemical techniques have been adapted to biological processes and used to measure corrosion [fr

  7. The study on intergranular corrosion of sensitized Alloy 600 using DL-EPR and Huey method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. G.; Lee, H. R.; Kim, H. P.; Ryu, W. S.; Rhee, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Intergranular corrosion(IGC) of sensitized Alloy 600 has been studied with double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation(DL-EPR) and Huey tests. Corrosion of solution annealed Ni-XCr-10Fe(X=6∼15) alloys was also evaluated with DL-EPR and Huey methods to simulate corrosion of Cr-depleted grain boundary region of Alloy 600. Cr concentration of Cr-depleted grain boundary region of Alloy 600. Cr concentration profile across grain boundary was measured with TEM. In the range of the Cr concentration from 6 to 8%, corrosion rates of solution annealed Ni-XCr-10Fe(X=6∼15) alloys were much higher in Huey test than those in DL-EPR. But in the range of the Cr concentration from 12 to 15%, the trend was reversed. The width of IGC crack of Alloy 600 was higher in DL-EPR test than in Huey test in agreement with corrosion of solution annealed Ni-XCr-10Fe alloys. Width of IGC produced by DL-EPR test was almost uniform and wide while that produced by Huey test was sharp and marrow. These results suggest that IGC in DL-EPR test conforms to uniform dissolution model and IGC in Huey test conforms to Cr concentration dependent dissolution model

  8. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Svintradze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitting corrosion behavior was derived from solid-state physics and some solutions and simulations are presented and discussed.

  9. Image-based corrosion recognition for ship steel structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yucong; Yang, Yang; Yao, Yuan; Li, Shengyuan; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2018-03-01

    Ship structures are subjected to corrosion inevitably in service. Existed image-based methods are influenced by the noises in images because they recognize corrosion by extracting features. In this paper, a novel method of image-based corrosion recognition for ship steel structures is proposed. The method utilizes convolutional neural networks (CNN) and will not be affected by noises in images. A CNN used to recognize corrosion was designed through fine-turning an existing CNN architecture and trained by datasets built using lots of images. Combining the trained CNN classifier with a sliding window technique, the corrosion zone in an image can be recognized.

  10. Cathodic corrosion: Part 2. Properties of nanoparticles synthesized by cathodic corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanson, A.I.; Yanson, Yu.I.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how cathodic corrosion in concentrated aqueous solutions enables one to prepare nanoparticles of various metals and metal alloys. Using various characterization methods we show that the composition of nanoparticles remains that of the starting material, and the resulting size distribution remains rather narrow. For the case of platinum we show how the size and possibly even the shape of the nanoparticles can be easily controlled by the parameters of corrosion. Finally, we discuss the advantages of using the nanoparticles prepared by cathodic corrosion for applications in (electro-)catalysis.

  11. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, B [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Aaltonen, P [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hickling, J [CML GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ``on-line`` and ``in-situ`` characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  13. Corrosion Resistance of Ni/Al2O3 Nanocomposite Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata KUCHARSKA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nickel matrix composite coatings with ceramic disperse phase have been widely investigated due to their enhanced properties, such as higher hardness and wear resistance in comparison to the pure nickel. The main aim of this research was to characterize the structure and corrosion properties of electrochemically produced Ni/Al2O3 nanocomposite coatings. The coatings were produced in a Watts bath modified by nickel grain growth inhibitor, cationic surfactant and the addition of alumina particles (low concentration 5 g/L. The process has been carried out with mechanical and ultrasonic agitation. The Ni/Al2O3 nanocomposite coatings were characterized by SEM, XRD and TEM techniques. In order to evaluate corrosion resistance of produced coatings, the corrosion studies have been carried out by the potentiodynamic method in a 0.5 M NaCl solution. The corrosion current, corrosion potential and corrosion rate were determined. Investigations of the morphology, topography and corrosion damages of the produced surface layers were performed by scanning microscope techniques. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.7407

  14. Approach to corrosion mechanisms for a carbon steel in a solution of sodium chloride at 3 pc and its inhibition by means of organic molecules. Compared benefit of the use of stationary and transient electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprat, Michel

    1981-01-01

    Within the context of an increased use of seawater as coolant in various industrial installations, this research thesis had two main objectives: the search for inhibitor organic compounds with optimal efficiency, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of corrosion inhibition by the best compounds within the considered organic compounds. After having reported a bibliographical study on carbon steel corrosion in seawater or in a sodium chloride solution at 3 pc, and on the inhibition of this corrosion, the author presents the experimental conditions (materials and methods). He reports the use of stationary and un-stationary electrochemical methods for the study of the steel-solution interface without inhibitor in order to get a better knowledge of corrosion electrochemical processes and to determine more precisely the corrosion rate. The last part addresses the study of the same interface but in presence of various inhibitors

  15. Steam generator corrosion 2007; Dampferzeugerkorrosion 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M. (ed.)

    2007-07-01

    Between 8th and 9th November, 2007, SAXONIA Standortentwicklungs- und -verwertungsgesellschaft GmbH (Freiberg, Federal Republic of Germany) performed the 3rd Freiberger discussion conference ''Fireside boiler corrosion''. The topics of the lectures are: (a) Steam generator corrosion - an infinite history (Franz W. Alvert); (b) CFD computations for thermal waste treatment plants - a contribution for the damage recognition and remedy (Klaus Goerner, Thomas Klasen); (c) Experiences with the use of corrosion probes (Siegfried R. Horn, Ferdinand Haider, Barbara Waldmann, Ragnar Warnecke); (d) Use of additives for the limitation of the high temperature chlorine corrosion as an option apart from other measures to the corrosion protection (Wolfgang Spiegel); (e) Current research results and aims of research with respect to chlorine corrosion (Ragnar Warnecke); (f) Systematics of the corrosion phenomena - notes for the enterprise and corrosion protection (Thomas Herzog, Wolfgang Spiegel, Werner Schmidl); (g) Corrosion protection by cladding in steam generators of waste incinerators (Joerg Metschke); (h) Corrosion protection and wear protection by means of thermal spraying in steam generators (Dietmar Bendix); (i) Review of thick film nickelized components as an effective protection against high-temperature corrosion (Johann-Wilhelm Ansey); (j) Fireproof materials for waste incinerators - characteristics and profile of requirement (Johannes Imle); (k) Service life-relevant aspects of fireproof linings in the thermal recycling of waste (Till Osthoevener and Wolfgang Kollenberg); (l) Alternatives to the fireproof material in the heating space (Heino Sinn); (m) Cladding: Inconal 625 contra 686 - Fundamentals / applications in boiler construction and plant construction (Wolfgang Hoffmeister); (n) Thin films as efficient corrosion barriers - thermal spray coating in waste incinerators and biomass firing (Ruediger W. Schuelein, Steffen Hoehne, Friedrich

  16. Microbiologically induced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Biological attack is a problem that can affect all metallic materials in a variety of environments and systems. In the power industry, corrosion studies have focused on condensers and service water systems where slime, barnacles, clams, and other macro-organisms are easily detected. Efforts have been made to eliminate the effect of these organisms through the use of chlorination, backflushing, organic coating, or thermal shock. The objective is to maintain component performance by eliminating biofouling and reducing metallic corrosion. Recently, corrosion of power plant components by micro-organisms (bacteria) has been identified even in very clean systems. A system's first exposure to microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) occurs during its first exposure to an aqueous environment, such as during hydrotest or wet layup. Corrosion of buried pipelines by sulfate-reducing bacteria has been studied by the petrochemical industry for years. This paper discusses various methods of diagnosing, monitoring, and controlling MIC in a variety of systems, as well as indicates areas where further study is needed

  17. Corrosion of aluminium in soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seruga, M; Hasenay, D

    1996-04-01

    The corrosion of aluminium (Al) in several brands of soft drinks (cola- and citrate-based drinks) has been studied, using an electrochemical method, namely potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion of Al in soft drinks is a very slow, time-dependent and complex process, strongly influenced by the passivation, complexation and adsorption processes. The corrosion of Al in these drinks occurs principally due to the presence of acids: citric acid in citrate-based drinks and orthophosphoric acid in cola-based drinks. The corrosion rate of Al rose with an increase in the acidity of soft drinks, i.e. with increase of the content of total acids. The corrosion rates are much higher in the cola-based drinks than those in citrate-based drinks, due to the facts that: (1) orthophosphoric acid is more corrosive to Al than is citric acid, (2) a quite different passive oxide layer (with different properties) is formed on Al, depending on whether the drink is cola or citrate based. The method of potentiodynamic polarization was shown as being very suitable for the study of corrosion of Al in soft drinks, especially if it is combined with some non-electrochemical method, e.g. graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).

  18. Internal corrosion control of northern pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavinasam, S.

    2005-02-01

    The general causes of internal corrosion in pipelines were discussed along with the methods to control them. Efficient methods are needed to determine chemical efficiency for mitigating internal corrosion in transmission pipelines, particularly those used in environmentally sensitive regions in the Arctic where harsh environmental conditions prevail. According to the Office of Pipeline Safety, 15 per cent of pipeline failures in the United States from 1994 to 2000 were caused by internal corrosion. Since pipelines in the United States are slightly older than Canadian pipelines, internal corrosion is a significant issue from a Canadian perspective. There are 306,618 km of energy-related pipelines in western Canada. Between April 2001 and March 2002 there were 808 failures, of which 425 failures resulted from internal corrosion. The approach to control internal corrosion comprises of dehydrating the gases at production facilities; controlling the quality of corrosive gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide; and, using internal coatings. The approaches to control internal corrosion are appropriate, when supplemented by adequate integrity management program to ensure that corrosive liquids do not collect, over the operational lifetime of the pipelines, at localized areas. It was suggested that modeling of pipeline operations may need improvement. This paper described the causes, prediction and control of internal pitting corrosion. It was concluded that carbon steel equipment can continue to be used reliably and safely as pipeline materials for northern pipelines if the causes that lead to internal corrosion are scientifically and accurately predicted, and if corrosion inhibitors are properly evaluated and applied. 5 figs.

  19. Components made of corrosion-resistent zirconium alloy and method for its production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanneman, R.E.; Urquhart, A.W.; Vermilyea, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to increase the resistance of zirconium alloys to blister corrosion which mainly occurs in boiling-water nuclear reactors. According to the method described, the surface of the alloy body is coated with a thin film of a suitable electronically conducting material. Gold, silver, platinum, nickel, chromium, iron and niobium are suitable as coating materials. The invention is more closely explained by means of examples. (GSC) [de

  20. Standard test method for measuring pH of soil for use in corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the pH of a soil in corrosion testing. The principle use of the test is to supplement soil resistivity measurements and thereby identify conditions under which the corrosion of metals in soil may be accentuated (see G 57 - 78 (1984)). 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. Assessment of scale formation and corrosion of drinking water supplies in Ilam city (Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Zabihollah Yousefi; Farzad Kazemi; Reza Ali Mohammadpour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scaling and corrosion are the two most important indexes in water quality evaluation. Pollutants are released in water due to corrosion of pipelines. The aim of this study is to assess the scale formation and corrosion of drinking water supplies in Ilam city (Iran). Methods: This research is a descriptive and cross-sectional study which is based on the 20 drinking water sources in Ilam city. Experiments were carried out in accordance with the Water and Wastewater Co. ...

  2. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  3. Effective flow-accelerated corrosion programs in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselman, Thomas C.; McBrine, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Piping Flow-Accelerated Corrosion Programs in nuclear power generation facilities are classically comprised of the selection of inspection locations with the assistance of a predictive methodology such as the Electric Power Research Institute computer codes CHECMATE or CHECWORKS, performing inspections, conducting structural evaluations on the inspected components, and implementing the appropriate sample expansion and corrective actions. Performing such a sequence of steps can be effective in identifying thinned components and implementing appropriate short term and long term actions necessary to resolve flow-accelerated corrosion related problems. A maximally effective flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) program requires an understanding of many programmatic details. These include the procedural control of the program, effective use of historical information, managing the activities performed during a limited duration outage, allocating resources based on risk allocation, having an acute awareness of how the plant is operated, investigating components removed from the plant, and several others. This paper will describe such details and methods that will lead to a flow-accelerated corrosion program that effectively minimizes the risk of failure due to flow-accelerated corrosion and provide full and complete documentation of the program. (author)

  4. Research Opportunities in Corrosion Science for Long-Term Prediction of Materials Performance: A Report of the DOE Workshop on ''Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payer, Joe H.; Scully, John R.

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the findings of a U.S. Department of Energy workshop on ''Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository''. The workshop was held on July 29-30, 2003 in Bethesda, MD, and was co-sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The workshop focus was corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of materials performance in hostile environments, with special focus on relevance to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The culmination of the workshop is this report that identifies both generic and Yucca Mountain Project-specific research opportunities in basic and applied topic areas. The research opportunities would be realized well after the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's initial construction-authorization licensing process. At the workshop, twenty-three invited scientists deliberated on basic and applied science opportunities in corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of damage accumulation by corrosive processes that affect materials performance.

  5. Proposed Guidelines for Selection of Methods for Erosion-corrosion Testing in Flowing Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Masanobu

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion of metals and alloys in flowing liquids can be classified into uniform corrosion and localized corrosion which may be categorized as follows. (1) Localized corrosion of the erosion-corrosion type: the protective oxide layer is assumed to be removed from the metal surface by shear stress or turbulence of the fluid flow. A macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which the bare surface is the macro-anode and the other surface covered with the oxide layer is the macro-cathode. (2) Localized corrosion of the differential flow-velocity corrosion type: at a location of lower fluid velocity, a thin and coarse oxide layer with poor protective qualities may be produced because of an insufficient supply of oxygen. A macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which this surface is the macro-anode and the other surface covered witha dense and stable oxide layer is the macro-cathode. (3) Localized corrosion of the active/passive-cell type: on a metal surface a macro-cell may be defined as a situation in which a part of it is in a passivation state and another in an active dissolution state. This situation may arise from differences in temperature as well as in the supply of the dissolved oxygen. Compared to uniform corrosion, localized corrosion tends to involve a higher wall thinning rate (corrosion rate) due to the macro-cell current as well as to the ratio of the surface area of the macro-anode to that of the macro-cathode, which may be rationalized using potential vs. current density diagrams. The three types of localized corrosion described above can be reproduced in a Jet-in-slit test by changing the flow direction of the test liquid and arranging environmental conditions in an appropriate manner

  6. Research of formation of deposits in technological devices and corrosion of contact devices from stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATAMANOV Vladimir Leonidovich

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that for majority of technological plants used to process hydrocarbon raw materials when operating a problem of formation of deposits in still-head pipes after the rectifying and stabilization columns, furnaces and other technology devices in oil processing is still of great importance. The structure of still-head deposits of furnace coils and rectifying columns has been studied by the example of small technological plant (STP of JSC Kondensat (Aksay, the Republic of Kazakhstan. It was determined that key components of these deposits are sulfides of iron and copper as well as elementary sulfur. It is shown that the surface of contact devices of STP – grids made of stainless steel of brand 12X18H10T, is substantially subject to corrosion. These samples are the structures which are still keeping geometry of initial grids, but lost their functional properties and characteristics. When mechanical influence is applied such samples easily transform into gray high-disperse powder. During operation period of STP various corrosion inhibitors and deemulgators (for example, TAL-25-13-R have been tested. At the same time practically all tested brands of corrosion inhibitors couldn't decrease corrosion of stainless steel and formation of firm deposits in still-head pipes of technological devices. The existing corrosion inhibitors create protection on the boundary of phases metallic surface – liquid, but they aren't efficient on the boundary of phases metallic surface – liquid – steam-gas phase (at the temperature of 150–250оC. The authors propose the mechanism of formation of these compounds based on result of corrosion of metal gauzes made of stainless steels brand X6CrNiTi18-10in the presence of sulphurous compounds.An active method of corrosion prevention is recommended to apply. The method is based on creation of nanodimensional anticorrosion coatings from binary compounds (such as titanium nitride or pure metals (Ni, Cr, Ti

  7. The Corrosion Inhibition Characteristics of Sodium Nitrite Using an On-line Corrosion Rate Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mal-Yong; Kang, Dae-Jin; Moon, Jeon-Soo

    2015-01-01

    An on-line corrosion rate measurement system was developed using a personal computer, a data acquisition board and program, and a 2-electrode corrosion probe. Reliability of the developed system was confirmed with through comparison test. With this system, the effect of sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) as a corrosion inhibitor were studied on iron and aluminum brass that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Corrosion rate was measured based on the linear polarization resistance method. The corrosion rates of aluminum brass and iron in 1% NaCl solutions were measured to be 0.290 mm per year (mmpy) and 0.2134 mmpy, respectively. With the addition of 200 ppm of NO 2 - , the corrosion rates decreased to 0.0470 mmpy and 0.0254 mmpy. The addition of NO 2 - caused a decrease in corrosion rates of both aluminum brass and iron, yet the NO 2 - acted as a more effective corrosion inhibitor for iron. than aluminum brass

  8. Electrochemical methods for corrosion testing of Ce-based coating prepared on AA6060 alloy by dip immersion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dip-immersion is simple and cost-effective method for the preparation of Ce-based conversion coatings (CeCCs, a promising alternative to the toxic chromate coatings, on the metal substrates. In this work CeCCs were prepared on Al-alloy AA6060 from aqueous solution of cerium chloride at room temperature. Effect of immersion time and post-treatment in phosphate solution on the microstructure and corrosion properties of the coatings was studied. The longer immersion time, the thicker but nonhomogeneous and cracked CeCCs. The post-treatment contributed to the sealing of cracks, as proven by an increase in corrosion resistance compared with as-deposited coatings. CeCCs prepared at longer deposition time and post-treated showed much better corrosion protection than those prepared at short deposition time. A detailed EIS study was undertaken to follow the evolution of corrosion behaviour of CeCCs with time of exposure to aggressive chloride environment (3.5 % NaCl. For the sake of comparison, the EIS properties of bare AA6060 were also investigated. A linear voltammetry was performed to complete the study. Results confirmed a formation of protective CeCCs on AA6060 surface. However, even CeCCs prepared at longer deposition time and post-treated provided a short term protection in aggressive environment, due to the small thickness. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019 i br. III 45012

  9. Astrakhan-Mangyshlak water main (pipeline): corrosion state of the inner surface, and methods for its corrosion protection. Part III. The effects of KW2353 inhibitor. Part IV. Microbiological corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reformatskaya, I.I.; Ashcheulova, I.I.; Barinova, M.A.; Kostin, D.V.; Prutchenko, S.G.; Ivleva, G.A.; Taubaldiev, T.S.; Murinov, K.S.; Tastanov, K.Kh.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the KW2353 corrosion inhibitor, applied on the Astrakhan-Mangyshlak water main (pipeline) since 1997, on the corrosion processes, occurring on the 17G1S steel surface, is considered. The properties of the surface sediments are also considered. The role of the microbiological processes in the corrosion behavior of the water main (pipeline) inner surface is studied. It is shown, that application of the polyphosphate-type inhibitors, including the KW2353 one, for the anticorrosive protection of the inner surface of the extended water main (pipelines) is inadmissible: at the temperature of ∼20 deg C this corrosion inhibitor facilitates the development of the local corrosion processes on the water main (pipeline) inner surface. At the temperature of ∼8 deg C the above inhibitor discontinues to effect the corrosive stability of the 17G1S steel. The optimal way of the anticorrosive protection of the steel equipment, contacting with the water media, is the increase in the oxygen content therein [ru

  10. Super-Hydrophobic Green Corrosion Inhibitor On Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-06-01

    There are many examples of organic coatings used for corrosion protection. In particular, hydrophobic and super-hydrophobic coatings are shown to give good protection because of their enhanced ability to slow down transport of water and ions through the coating. The purpose of this research is to develop water repellent coating to avoid direct contact between metal and environment corrosive and mitigate corrosion attack at pipeline system. This water repellent characteristic on super-hydrophobic coating was coated by electrodeposition method. Wettability of carbon steel with super-hydrophobic coating (cerium chloride and myristic acid) and oxidized surface was investigated through contact angle and inhibitor performance test. The inhibitor performance was studied in 25% tannin acid corrosion test at 30°C and 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl). The water contact angle test was determined by placing a 4-μL water droplet of distilled water. It shows that the wettability of contact angle super-hydrophobic with an angle of 151.60° at zero minute can be classified as super-hydrophobic characteristic. By added tannin acid as inhibitor the corrosion protection on carbon steel becomes more consistent. This reveals that the ability of the coating to withstand with the corrosion attack in the seawater at different period of immersions. The results elucidate that the weight loss increased as the time of exposure increased. However, the corrosion rates for uncoated carbon steel is high compared to coated carbon steel. As a conclusion, from both samples it can be seen that the coated carbon steel has less corrosion rated compared to uncoated carbon steel and addition of inhibitor to the seawater provides more protection to resist corrosion attack on carbon steel.

  11. An overview of erosion corrosion models and reliability assessment for corrosion defects in piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srividya, A.; Suresh, H.N.; Verma, A.K.; Gopika, V.; Santosh

    2006-01-01

    Piping systems are part of passive structural elements in power plants. The analysis of the piping systems and their quantification in terms of failure probability is of utmost importance. The piping systems may fail due to various degradation mechanisms like thermal fatigue, erosion-corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and vibration fatigue. On examination of previous results, erosion corrosion was more prevalent and wall thinning is a time dependent phenomenon. The paper is intended to consolidate the work done by various investigators on erosion corrosion in estimating the erosion corrosion rate and reliability predictions. A comparison of various erosion corrosion models is made. The reliability predictions based on remaining strength of corroded pipelines by wall thinning is also attempted. Variables in the limit state functions are modelled using normal distributions and Reliability assessment is carried out using some of the existing failure pressure models. A steady state corrosion rate is assumed to estimate the corrosion defect and First Order Reliability Method (FORM) is used to find the probability of failure associated with corrosion defects over time using the software for Component Reliability evaluation (COMREL). (author)

  12. Waste Tank Corrosion Program at Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, J.R.; Hsu, T.C.; Hobbs, D.T.; Iyer, N.C.; Marra, J.E.; Zapp, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has approximately 30 million gallons of high level radioactive waste stored in 51 underground tanks. SRS has maintained an active corrosion research and corrosion control and monitoring program throughout the operating history of SRS nuclear waste storage tanks. This program is largely responsible for the successful waste storage experience at SRS. The program has consisted of extensive monitoring of the tanks and surrounding environment for evidence of leaks, extensive research to understand the potential corrosion processes, and development and implementation of corrosion chemistry control. Current issues associated with waste tank corrosion are primarily focused on waste processing operations and are being addressed by a number of active programs and initiatives

  13. Corrosion control in electric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrett, B.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that corrosion of components in power plants costs the US electric power utility industry billions of dollars each year. Through the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) research and development, several approaches have been developed to reduce these huge costs. They include improved materials selection procedures, coatings, cathodic protection, inhibitors, removal of aggressive species from the environment, and on-line corrosion monitoring. In addition, as part of an on-going technology transfer effort, EPRI is developing databases and expert systems that will help utilities obtain corrosion information and guide them in materials selection and failure analysis

  14. Assessing resistance of stabilized corrosion resistant steels to intergranular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karas, A.; Cihal, V. Jr.; Vanek, V.; Herzan, J.; Protiva, K.; Cihal, V.

    1987-01-01

    Resistance to intergranular corrosion was determined for four types of titanium-stabilized steels from the coefficients of stabilization efficiency according to the degree the chemical composition was known. The ATA SUPER steel showed the highest resistance parameter value. The resistance of this type of steel of a specific composition, showing a relatively low value of mean nitrogen content was compared with steel of an optimized chemical composition and with low-carbon niobium stabilized, molybdenum modified steels. The comparison showed guarantees of a sufficient resistance of the steel to intergranular corrosion. The method of assessing the resistance to intergranular corrosion using the calculation of the minimum content of Cr', i.e., the effective chromium content, and the maximum effective carbon content C' giving the resistance parameter k seems to be prospective for practical use in the production of corrosion resistant steels. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 15 refs

  15. Method of evaluation of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of clad fuel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Iwao; Yoshida, Toshimi; Ikeda, Shinzo; Masaoka, Isao; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, by an evaluation in out-pile test, the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of clad fuel tubes in the reactor environment. Method: A plurality of electrodes are mounted in the circumferential direction on the entire surface of cladding tubes. Of the electrodes, electrodes at two adjacent places are used as measuring terminals and electrodes at another two places adjacent thereto are used as constant-current terminals. With a specific current flowing in the constant-current terminals, measurements are made of a potential difference between the terminals to be measured, and from a variation in the potential difference the depth of cracking of the cladding tube surface is presumed to determine the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the cladding tube. To check the entire surface of the cladding tube, the cladding tube is moved by each block in the circumferential direction by a contact changeover system, repeating the measurements of the potential difference. Contact type electrodes are secured with an insulator and held in uniform contact with the cladding tube by a spring. It is detachable by use of a locking system and movable as desired. Thus the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility can be determined without mounting the cladding tube through and also a fuel failure can be prevented. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy's treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation

  17. Biotribocorrosion-an appraisal of the time dependence of wear and corrosion interactions: I. The role of corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y; Neville, A; Dowson, D

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing interest in metal-on-metal (MoM) joint implants, studies have been focused on their wear and corrosion behaviour. Integrated electrochemical tests have been conducted and are reported in this paper. The corrosion, wear and wear-corrosion behaviour for three materials (high carbon CoCrMo, low carbon CoCrMo and UNS S31603) have been discussed. Corrosion effects on the overall performance for the three materials are analysed. Two distinct regimes have been found for the three materials: (a) the running-in regime and (b) the steady state regime, in line with other research. Even in the steady state regime, 20%-30% of the material degradation can be attributed to corrosion-related damage. High carbon CoCrMo showed excellent corrosion, wear and corrosion-wear resistance and therefore it delivered the best overall performance in terms of a lower wear rate, a lower friction coefficient and a higher resistance to corrosion

  18. Archaeological analogs and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  19. Launch Pad Coatings for Smart Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Bucherl, Cori N.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Whitten, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material as a result of its interaction with the environment. The environment at the KSC launch pads has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the US. The 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that are generated by the solid rocket boosters during a launch exacerbate the corrosiveness of the environment at the pads. Numerous failures at the pads are caused by the pitting of stainless steels, rebar corrosion, and the degradation of concrete. Corrosion control of launch pad structures relies on the use of coatings selected from the qualified products list (QPL) of the NASA Standard 5008A for Protective Coating of Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel, and Aluminum on Launch Structures, Facilities, and Ground Support Equipment. This standard was developed to establish uniform engineering practices and methods and to ensure the inclusion of essential criteria in the coating of ground support equipment (GSE) and facilities used by or for NASA. This standard is applicable to GSE and facilities that support space vehicle or payload programs or projects and to critical facilities at all NASA locations worldwide. Environmental regulation changes have dramatically reduced the production, handling, use, and availability of conventional protective coatings for application to KSC launch structures and ground support equipment. Current attrition rate of qualified KSC coatings will drastically limit the number of commercial off the shelf (COTS) products available for the Constellation Program (CxP) ground operations (GO). CxP GO identified corrosion detection and control technologies as a critical, initial capability technology need for ground processing of Ares I and Ares V to meet Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD) CxP 70000 operability requirements for reduced ground processing complexity, streamlined integrated testing, and operations phase affordability

  20. Predicting the Performance of Organic Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Winkler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The withdrawal of effective but toxic corrosion inhibitors has provided an impetus for the discovery of new, benign organic compounds to fill that role. Concurrently, developments in the high-throughput synthesis of organic compounds, the establishment of large libraries of available chemicals, accelerated corrosion inhibition testing technologies, and the increased capability of machine learning methods have made discovery of new corrosion inhibitors much faster and cheaper than it used to be. We summarize these technical developments in the corrosion inhibition field and describe how data-driven machine learning methods can generate models linking molecular properties to corrosion inhibition that can be used to predict the performance of materials not yet synthesized or tested. We briefly summarize the literature on quantitative structure–property relationships models of small organic molecule corrosion inhibitors. The success of these models provides a paradigm for rapid discovery of novel, effective corrosion inhibitors for a range of metals and alloys in diverse environments.

  1. Method of separation of fission and corrosion products and of corresponding isotopes from liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, H.; Stamberg, K.; Jilek, R.; Hulak, P.; Katzer, J.

    1976-01-01

    A method of separating fission and corrosion products and corresponding stable isotopes from liquid waste is described. Mycelia of fungi are used as sorbents for retaining these products on their surface and within their pores. Methods of activation or regeneration of the sorbent are outlined. 11 claims

  2. Electrodeposited Reduced Graphene Oxide Films on Stainless Steel, Copper, and Aluminum for Corrosion Protection Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulkareem Mohammed Ali Al-Sammarraie; Mazin Hasan Raheema

    2017-01-01

    The enhancement of corrosion protection of metals and alloys by coating with simple, low cost, and highly adhered layer is still a main goal of many workers. In this research graphite flakes converted into graphene oxide using modified Hammers method and then reduced graphene oxide was electrodeposited on stainless steel 316, copper, and aluminum for corrosion protection application in seawater at four temperatures, namely, 20, 30, 40, and 50°C. All corrosion measurements, kinetics, and therm...

  3. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellwag, B.; Aaltonen, P.; Hickling, J.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ''on-line'' and ''in-situ'' characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. For confirmation, a complete set of sensors

  4. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister construction. General corrosion of the copper is not expected to be the limiting factor in the waste repository environment when estimating the life-time of the canister construction. However, different forms of localised corrosion, i.e. pitting, stress corrosion cracking, or environmentally assisted creep fracture may cause premature failure of the copper shield. Of the probable constituents in the groundwater, nitrites, chlorides, sulphides and carbonates have been suggested to promote localised corrosion of copper. The main assumption made in planning this research program is that the surface films forming on copper in the repository environment largely determine the susceptibility of copper to the different forms of localised corrosion. The availability of reactants, which also may become corrosion rate limiting, is investigated in several other research programs. This research program consists of a set of successive projects targeted at characterising the properties of surface films on copper in repository environment containing different detrimental anions. A further aim was to assess the significance of the anion-induced changes in the stability of the oxide films with regard to localised corrosion of copper. This report summarises the results from a series of investigations on properties of surface films forming on copper in water of pH = 8.9 at temperature of 80 deg C and pressure of 2 MPa. The main results gained so far in this research program are as follows: The surface films forming on copper in the thermodynamic stability region of monovalent copper at 80 deg C consist of a bulk part (about 1 mm thick) which is a good ionic and electronic conductor, and an outer, interfacial layer (0.001 - 0.005 mm thick) which shows p-type semiconductor

  5. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Research Committee on Water Chemistry Standard; Naitoh, Masanori [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Computational Science and Engineering Div.; Uehara, Yasushi; Okada, Hidetoshi [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Hotta, Koji [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (Japan); Ichikawa, Ryoko [Mizuho Information and Research Inst., Inc. (Japan); Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Hotta, Koji; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  7. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  8. Corrosion tests of high temperature alloys in impure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Jan; Kalivodova, Jana; Vilemova, Monika; Skoumalova, Zuzana; Brabec, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Czech research organizations take part several projects concerning technologies and materials for advanced gas cooled reactors, as an example international project ARCHER supported by EU within FP7, also several national projects supported by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic are solved in cooperation with industrial and research organization. Within these projects the material testing program is performed. The results presented in these paper concerning high temperature corrosion and degradation of alloys (800 H, SS 316 and P91) in helium containing minor impurities (H_2, CO, CH_4, HZO) at temperatures up to 760°C. After corrosion tests (up to 1500 hours) the specimens was investigated by several methods (gravimetry, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, hardness and micro-hardness testing etc. (author)

  9. Corrosion on Mars: An Investigation of Corrosion Mechanisms Under Relevant Simulated Martian Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Johansen, Michael R.; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2017-01-01

    This one-year project was selected by NASA's Science Innovation Fund in FY17 to address Corrosion on Mars which is a problem that has not been addressed before. Corrosion resistance is one of the most important properties in selecting materials for landed spacecraft and structures that will support surface operations for the human exploration of Mars. Currently, the selection of materials is done by assuming that the corrosion behavior of a material on Mars will be the same as that on Earth. This is understandable given that there is no data regarding the corrosion resistance of materials in the Mars environment. However, given that corrosion is defined as the degradation of a metal that results from its chemical interaction with the environment, it cannot be assumed that corrosion is going to be the same in both environments since they are significantly different. The goal of this research is to develop a systematic approach to understand corrosion of spacecraft materials on Mars by conducting a literature search of available data, relevant to corrosion in the Mars environment, and by performing preliminary laboratory experiments under relevant simulated Martian conditions. This project was motivated by the newly found evidence for the presence of transient liquid brines on Mars that coincided with the suggestion, by a team of researchers, that some of the structural degradation observed on Curiosity's wheels may be caused by corrosive interactions with the brines, while the most significant damage was attributed to rock scratching. An extensive literature search on data relevant to Mars corrosion confirmed the need for further investigation of the interaction between materials used for spacecraft and structures designed to support long-term surface operations on Mars. Simple preliminary experiments, designed to look at the interaction between an aerospace aluminum alloy (AA7075-T73) and the gases present in the Mars atmosphere, at 20degC and a pressure of 700 Pa

  10. Influence of Heat Treatments on the Corrosion Resistance of Medium -Carbon Steel using Sulfuric Spring Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas Basheer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion is one of the important problems that may be occur to the parts of machinery and equipment after manufactured and when used as a result of exposure to corrosive media. Plain-carbon steel is considered as one of the most common minerals used in industrial applications. Some of heat treatments can have direct effect on the corrosion rate of steel by building up galvanic corrosion cells between its microscopic phases. Therefore, to adopt one of kinds of the plain-carbon steel and the most commonly used in industry to be study subject, that is medium carbon steel and took samples of this steel has been treated thermally in three methods which the normalising, annealing, and hardening .The corrosive media used in the research is Sulfuric Spring, it contains many chemical compounds to show its influence on the corrosion of steel. The weight loss method is used to determine corrosion rate and to compare between the results obtained, show that the greatest corrosion resistance of the annealed steel and the corrosion resistance of the hardened steel is the lowest while the corrosion  resistance of the normalised steel is in-between them.         Calcium carbonate was formed on the metal surface which acts as an isolating layer which decrease corrosion rate with time

  11. Corrosion rate of steel in concrete - Evaluation of confinement techniques for on-site corrosion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn; Geiker, Mette Rica; Elsener, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Earlier on-site investigations and laboratory studies have shown that varying corrosion rates are obtained when different commercially available instruments are used. The different confinement techniques, rather than the different electrochemical techniques used in the instruments, are considered...... to be the main reason for the discrepancies. This paper presents a method for the quantitative assessment of confinement techniques based on monitoring the operation of the corrosion rate instrument and the current distribution between the electrode assembly on the concrete surface and a segmented reinforcement...... bar embedded in the concrete. The applicability of the method was demonstrated on two commercially available corrosion rate instruments based on different confinement techniques. The method provided an explanation of the differences in performance of the two instruments. Correlated measurements...

  12. Development of corrosion testing equipment under heat transfer and irradiation conditions to evaluate corrosion resistance of materials used in acid recovery evaporator. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Numata, Masami; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    We have been evaluated the safety for corrosion of various metals applied to acid recovery evaporators by the mock-up tests using small scaled equipment and the reference tests in laboratories with small specimens. These tests have been conducted under-radioactive environment. The environment in practical reprocessing plants has many radioactive species. Therefore, the effect of irradiation on corrosion should be evaluated in detail. In this study, we have developed the corrosion testing equipment, which is employed to simulate environments in the acid recovery evaporators. This report describes the specification of corrosion testing equipment and the results of primary, reference and hot tests. Using the equipment, the corrosion test under heat transfer and irradiation conditions have been carried out for 930 hours in safety. It is expectable that useful corrosion test data in radioactive environment are accumulated with this equipment in future, and help the adequate choice of corrosion test condition in laboratories. (author)

  13. Durability evaluation method on rebar corrosion of reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsutaka, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, method on the durability evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures was investigated. In view of the importance of evaluating the degree of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, relationships should be formulated among the number of years elapsed, t, the amount of action of a deteriorative factor, F, the degree of material deterioration, D, and the performance of the structure, P. Evaluation by PDFt diagrams combining these relationships may be effective. A detailed procedure of durability evaluation for a reinforced concrete structure using PDFt concept is presented for the deterioration of rebar corrosion caused by neutralization and penetration of salinity by referring to the recent papers. (author)

  14. Advances in the application of molecular microbiological methods in the oil and gas industry and links to microbiologically influenced corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert, Rickard; Skovhus, Torben Lund

    2018-01-01

    While the oil and gas industry has witnessed increased applications of molecular microbiological methods (MMMs) for diagnosing and managing microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in the past decade, the process for establishing clear links between microbiological conditions and corrosion...... mechanisms is still emerging. Different MMMs provide various types of information about microbial diversity, abundance, activity and function, all of which are quite different from the culture-based results that are familiar to oil and gas industry corrosion professionals. In addition, a multidisciplinary...

  15. Corrosion Resistance of Galvanized Steel in the Environment of a Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šustr Michal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with monitoring the corrosion resistibility of welded materials in the anaerobic fermenter (bioreactor. The main goal of this research is to assess the change of hardness after degradation. The change of hardness occurs in the corrosion environment and it correlates with the corrosion resistibility of material. The purpose of this experiment is to recognize the possibilities of using the CMT welded materials in the defined environment. As an innovative technology the acoustic emission method is used for assessment of surface layer disruption during hardness testing. Aluminium alloy with galvanized steel (AluZinc was used as an experimental material. The basic materials were welded by the filler material AlSi3.

  16. Corrosion Control in the Aerospace Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it..

  17. Thermal spray coating for corrosion under insulation (CUI) prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Mohd Fazril Irfan Ahmad; Razak, Khalil Abdul; Alias, Nur Hashimah; Othman, Nur Hidayati; Lah, Nik Khairul Irfan Nik Ab

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is one of the predominant issues affecting process of Oil and Gas and Petrochemical industries. CUI refers to external corrosion, but it is difficult to be detected as the insulation cover masks the corrosion problem. One of the options to prevent CUI is by utilizing the protective coating systems. Thermal spray coating (TSC) is an advanced coating system and it shows promising performance in harsh environment, which could be used to prevent CUI. However, the application of TSC is not attractive due to the high initial cost. This work evaluates the potential of TSC based on corrosion performance using linear polarization resistance (LPR) method and salt spray test (SST). Prior to the evaluation, the mechanical performance of TSC was first investigated using adhesion test and bend test. Microstructure characterization of the coating was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The LPR test results showed that low corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/years was obtained for TSC in compared to the bare steel especially at high temperature of 80 °C, where usually normal coating would fail. For the salt spray test, there was no sign of corrosion products especially at the center (fully coated region) was observed. From SEM images, no corrosion defects were observed after 336 hours of continuous exposure to salt fog test. This indicates that TSC protected the steel satisfactorily by acting as a barrier from a corrosive environment. In conclusion, TSC can be a possible solution to minimize the CUI in a long term. Further research should be done on corrosion performance and life cycle cost by comparing TSC with other conventional coating technology.

  18. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  19. Corrosion processes of alloyed steels in salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzler, Bernhard [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung

    2018-02-15

    A summary is given of the corrosion experiments with alloyed Cr-Ni steels in salt solutions performed at Research Centre Karlsruhe (today KIT), Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE) in the period between 1980 and 2004. Alloyed steels show significantly lower general corrosion in comparison to carbon steels. However, especially in salt brines the protective Cr oxide layers on the surfaces of these steels are disturbed and localized corrosion takes place. Data on general corrosion rates, and findings of pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking are presented.

  20. Storage of spent fuels: implementation of a research program on the risk of waste container rupture due to stress corrosion induced by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parise, M.; Walle, E.; Foct, J.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: research programm on stress corrosion of spent fuel casks materials due to fission products, such as iodine, chemical interactions with zirconium, chemical aspects of stress corrosion, rupture risk assessment

  1. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  2. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  3. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  4. Investigation of corrosion of materials of the irradiation device in the RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaric, M.; Mance, A.; Vlajic, M.

    1963-12-01

    Devices for sample irradiation in the vertical RA reactor channels will be made of aluminium alloys. According to the regulations concerned with introducing materials into the RA reactor core, corrosion characterisation of these materials is an obligation. Corrosion properties of four aluminium alloys were investigated both in contact with stainless steel and without it. First part of this report deals with the corrosion testing of aluminium alloys in water by gravimetric and electrochemical methods. Bi-distilled water at temperatures less than 100 deg C was used. Second part is related to aluminium alloys corrosion in carbon dioxide gas under experimental conditions. The second part of research was initiated by the design of the head of the independent CO 2 loop for samples cooling [sr

  5. Protecting solar collector systems from corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The main cause of the reduced life of a solar heating system is corrosion of the exterior parts and the internal components. This report outlines ways of reducing the cost of solar heating by reducing the corrosion in solar heating systems, and hence increasing the system's service life. Mechanisms for corrosion are discussed: these include galvanic corrosion and crevice corrosion. Means of minimizing corrosion at the design stage are then described. Such methods, when designing the solar collector, involve ensuring proper drainage of exterior water; eliminating situations where moisture, dirt and pollutants may collect; preventing condensation inside the collector; using proper gaskets and sealants at appropriate places; and selecting optimum materials and coatings. Interior corrosion can be minimized at the design stage by choosing a good heat transfer fluid and corrosion inhibitor, in the case of systems where liquids are used; ensuring a low enough flow rate to avoid erosion; designing the system to avoid crevices; and avoiding situations where galvanic corrosion could occur. Other procedures are given for minimizing corrosion in the construction and operation of solar heating systems. 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Corrosion-Resistant High-Entropy Alloys: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhu Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion destroys more than three percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Therefore, the design of highly corrosion-resistant materials is urgently needed. By breaking the classical alloy-design philosophy, high-entropy alloys (HEAs possess unique microstructures, which are solid solutions with random arrangements of multiple elements. The particular locally-disordered chemical environment is expected to lead to unique corrosion-resistant properties. In this review, the studies of the corrosion-resistant HEAs during the last decade are summarized. The corrosion-resistant properties of HEAs in various aqueous environments and the corrosion behavior of HEA coatings are presented. The effects of environments, alloying elements, and processing methods on the corrosion resistance are analyzed in detail. Furthermore, the possible directions of future work regarding the corrosion behavior of HEAs are suggested.

  7. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures. Betonirakenteiden raudoituksen korroosion tutkiminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuronen, A

    1992-03-01

    Ageing and aggressive enviromental conditions of concrete structures will result in deterioration of concrete and corrosion of steel in concrete. Corrosion of steel will in time result in the end of the service life or expensive renovations, unless corrosion of steel is noticed and renovated in time. Corrosion of steel in concrete can be found out by the present corrosion measurement methods, so that renovation can be started in right time. The report presents mainly on the basis of the literature references the following corrosion measurement methods: polarisation resistance, AC-impedance, electrical resistance probe, electrochemical noice and half-cell potential mapping. The half-cell potential mapping will be presented more precisely than the other corrosion measurement methods, for the potential mapping is the most used method. Concrete and Soils Laboratory of Imatran Voima Oy uses in the measurement of reinforcement corrosion the English, eight channel potential measuring equipment.

  8. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures; Betonirakenteiden raudoituksen korroosion tutkiminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuronen, A

    1992-03-01

    Ageing and aggressive enviromental conditions of concrete structures will result in deterioration of concrete and corrosion of steel in concrete. Corrosion of steel will in time result in the end of the service life or expensive renovations, unless corrosion of steel is noticed and renovated in time. Corrosion of steel in concrete can be found out by the present corrosion measurement methods, so that renovation can be started in right time. The report presents mainly on the basis of the literature references the following corrosion measurement methods: polarisation resistance, AC-impedance, electrical resistance probe, electrochemical noice and half-cell potential mapping. The half-cell potential mapping will be presented more precisely than the other corrosion measurement methods, for the potential mapping is the most used method. Concrete and Soils Laboratory of Imatran Voima Oy uses in the measurement of reinforcement corrosion the English, eight channel potential measuring equipment.

  9. Standard test method for determining susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of 2XXX and 7XXX Aluminum alloy products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for characterizing the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength aluminum alloy wrought products for the guidance of those who perform stress-corrosion tests, for those who prepare stress-corrosion specifications, and for materials engineers. 1.2 This test method covers method of sampling, type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure for determining the susceptibility to SCC of 2XXX (with 1.8 to 7.0 % copper) and 7XXX (with 0.4 to 2.8 % copper) aluminum alloy products, particularly when stressed in the short-transverse direction relative to the grain structure. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The inch-pound units in parentheses are provided for information. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and de...

  10. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the s...

  11. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  12. Corrosion management in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a major degradation mechanism of metals and alloys which significantly affects the global economy with an average loss of 3.5% of GDP of several countries in many important industrial sectors including chemical, petrochemical, power, oil, refinery, fertilizer etc. The demand for higher efficiency and achieving name plate capacity, in addition to ever increasing temperatures, pressures and complexities in equipment geometry of industrial processes, necessitate utmost care in adopting appropriate corrosion management strategies in selecting, designing, fabricating and utilising various materials and coatings for engineering applications in industries. Corrosion control and prevention is an important focus area as the savings achieved from practicing corrosion control and prevention would bring significant benefits to the industry. Towards this, advanced corrosion management strategies starting from design, manufacturing, operation, maintenance, in-service inspection and online monitoring are essential. At the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) strategic corrosion management efforts have been pursued in order to provide solutions to practical problems emerging in the plants, in addition to innovative efforts to provide insight into mechanism and understanding of corrosion of various engineering materials and coatings. In this presentation the author highlights how the nuclear industry benefited from the practical approach to successful corrosion management, particularly with respect to fast breeder reactor programme involving both reactor and associated reprocessing plants. (author)

  13. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  14. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete u...

  15. Corrosion of Magnesium in Multimaterial System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Agnew, Sean

    2017-08-16

    The TMS Magnesium Committee has been actively involved in presenting cutting-edge research and development and the latest trends related to magnesium and its alloys to industry and academia. Topics including magnesium alloy development, applications, mechanism of deformation and corrosion, thermomechanical processing, modelling, etc. have been captured year after year through the Magnesium Technology symposium and conference proceedings at TMS and through special topics in JOM. Every year, based on the unanimous endorsement from the industry and academia, a topic is selected to address the latest developments within this subject in JOM. In continuation with last year’s coverage of Advances and Achievements in In-Situ Analysis of Corrosions and Structure–Property Relationship in Mg Alloys,[1] this year’s topic focuses on the Corrosion of Magnesium in Multimaterial Systems. Magnesium, the lightest of all the structural materials, has garnered much interest in the transportation, electronics packaging, defense equipments and industries alike and are more commonly being incorporated in multimaterial design concepts.[2-4] However, the application of the same is limited due to its highly corrosive nature, and understanding and mitigating the corrosion of magnesium has been a major research challenge.

  16. Effect of epoxy resin sealing on corrosion resistance of arc spraying aluminium coating using cathode electrophoresis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xuming; Wang, Runqiu; Wei, Qian; Zhou, Jianxin

    2018-01-01

    Arc-sprayed Al coating was sealed with epoxy resin using the cathode electrophoresis method. The anti-corrosion performance of the coatings sealed with epoxy resin was studied by means of a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution test at 40 °C. For comparison, the anti-corrosion performance of Al coating sealed with boiling water was also performed under the same conditions. The results show that epoxy resin with a thickness of about 20 microns can entirely cover open pores and decreases the surface roughness of the as-sprayed Al coating, and the epoxy resin even permeates into the gaps among lamellar splats from open pores. After corrosion, the thickness of the epoxy resin layer is unchanged and can still cover the as-sprayed Al coating entirely. However, the thickness of Al coating sealed with boiling water decreases from 100 to 40 microns, which indicates that the arc-sprayed Al coating has much better corrosion resistance than the Al coating sealed with boiling water. Meanwhile, the content of substituted benzene ring in the epoxy resin increases, but aromatic ring decreases according to the fourier transform infrared spectra, which will cause the rigidity of the epoxy resin to increase, but the toughness slightly decreases after corrosion.

  17. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  18. Corrosion in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danko, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the major corrosion problems in light water reactors, the research on the corrosion mechanism(s), and the development of engineering solutions and their implementation. To understand the occurrence of corrosion problems, a brief historical perspective of the corrosion design basis of commercial light water reactors, boiling water, and pressurized water reactors is necessary. Although corrosion was considered in the plant designs, it was not viewed as a serious problem. This was based on the results of laboratory experiments and in-reactor tests that did not indicate any major corrosion problems with the materials selected for the plant construction. However, the laboratory tests did not necessarily reproduce the reactor operating conditions and the early in-reactor test did not fully represent the commercial reactor conditions in all cases, and, finally, the test times were indeed of short duration relative to the plant design lifetime of 40 years. Thus, the design basis for the materials selection was determined on the favorable but limited test data that were available, and corrosion limitations on component integrity were therefore not anticipated

  19. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  20. Effect of Sonification Time on Synthesisi and Corrosion Resistance of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar Bahrami Panah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years many research works have been carried out on anti-corrosive nanocomposites coatings containing mineral reinforcements. The most important criteria in these attempts are polymerization method and the type of matrix and reinforcement of nanocomposites. In this regard, the physical and mechanical properties of the polymers in which a small amount of filler is used can be improved. In this research, an epoxy-clay nanocomposite was synthesized by in-situ polymerization method using a resin matrix based on bisphenol-A type epoxy and montmorillonite clay (Closite 15A. The treatment was used at different ultrasonic stirring times to disperse 1-4 weight percentages of clay particles into the matrix. The structure of synthesized epoxy-clay nanocomposite was studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The average size of clay particles was determined by X-ray diffraction measurement. Then, anti-corrosion properties of epoxy-clay coatings, prepared under different ultrasonic durations and applied on carbon steel panels, were investigated by Tafel and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. For this purpose, the carbon steel panels coated with these coatings were immersed in 3.5% sodium chloride solution and tested at different immersion times. The results indicated that a nanocomposite containing 1% clay, synthesized, stirred 60 min ultrasonically, produced smaller particle size, lower corrosion current density and higher coating corrosion resistance than the other composite formulations. This nanocomposite provided superior protection against corrosion in sodium chloride solution.

  1. Development of experimental method to simulate the corrosion products in the primary system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, In Sup; Jang, Chang Heui

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion products are recognized as one of the major sources of occupational radiation exposure for nuclear power plant workers. Numerous studies have been conducted on the primary water chemistry to reduce the amount of crud in the primary circuit to avoid the radioactivity build-up in the plant. However, experiments with crud are restricted in laboratory because the crud is highly radioactive material. The objective of this study is to develop the simulating method of corrosion product in nuclear power plant

  2. Test methods for microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, B.; Wagner, P.; Mansfeld, F.

    1992-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques such as measurements of corrosion and redox potentials, polarization curves, polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance and electrochemical noise have been used to evaluate the impact of marine microorganisms on corrosion processes. Surface analytical techniques including microbiological culturing, scanning electron microscopy, microprobes and microelectrodes have been used to characterize metal surfaces after exposure to marine waters. A combination of electrochemical, surface analytical and microbiological techniques is the most promising approach for determining mechanisms of MIC

  3. Effect of grain size on corrosion of nanocrystalline copper in NaOH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Wei; Xu Yimin; Wang Qiming; Shi Peizhen; Yan Mi

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Coppers display an active-passive-transpassive behaviour with duplex passive film. → Grain size variation has little effect on the overall corrosion behaviour of Cu. → Little effect on corrosion may be due to duplex passivation in NaOH solution. → Bulk nanocrystalline Cu show bamboo-like flake corrosion structure. - Abstract: Effect of grain size on corrosion of bulk nanocrystalline copper was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization measurements in 0.1 M NaOH solution. Bulk nanocrystalline copper was prepared by inert gas condensation and in situ warm compress (IGCWC) method. The grain sizes of all bulk nanocrystalline samples were determined to be 48, 68 and 92 nm using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that bulk coppers displayed an active-passive-transpassive behaviour with duplex passive films. From polycrystalline to nanocrystalline, grain size variation showed little effect on the overall corrosion resistance of copper samples.

  4. Corrosion mechanism applicable to biodegradable magnesium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atrens, Andrej, E-mail: Andrejs.Atrens@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Liu Ming; Zainal Abidin, Nor Ishida [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Much of our understanding of the Mg corrosion mechanism is based on research using aggressive chloride based solutions like 3% NaCl, which are appropriate for understand the corrosion for applications such as auto construction. The chloride ions tend to cause break down of the partly protective surface film on the Mg alloy surface. The corrosion rate increases with exposure time until steady state is reached, which may take several weeks. An overview is provided of the aspects which determine the corrosion of Mg alloys: (i) measurement details; (ii) impurity elements Fe, Ni, Cu and Co; (iii) second phases; (iv) surface films and surface condition and (v) stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This understanding is used to help understand Mg corrosion for Mg as a biodegradable implant for medical applications. Solutions that elucidate these applications tend to form surface films and the corrosion rate tends to decrease with immersion time.

  5. Shadow Corrosion Mechanism of Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullberg, Mats; Lysell, Gunnar; Nystrand, Ann-Charlotte

    2004-02-01

    Local corrosion enhancement appears on zirconium-base alloys in-core in boiling water reactors when the zirconium alloy is in close proximity to another metal. The visual appearance often resembles a shadow of the other component. The phenomenon is therefore referred to as 'shadow corrosion'. Shadow corrosion has been known for more than 25 years. Mechanisms based on either galvanic corrosion or local radiolysis effects have been proposed as explanations. Both types of mechanism have seemed to explain some facets of the phenomenon. Normally, shadow corrosion is of no practical significance. However, an enhanced and potentially serious form of shadow corrosion was discovered in 1996. This discovery stimulated new experiments that fully supported neither of the longstanding theories. Thus, there is till now no generally accepted understanding of the shadow corrosion phenomenon. The aim of the present investigation was to analyse the available data and to identify, if possible, a plausible mechanism of shadow corrosion. It was found that the experimental evidence is, with a few exceptions, remarkably consistent with a galvanic mechanism. The main exception is that shadow corrosion may occur also when the two metals are nominally electrically insulated. One way to account for the main exception could be to invoke the effect of photoconductivity. Photoconductivity results when a semiconductor or an insulator is irradiated with photons of UV or higher energy. The photons elevate electrons from the valence band to the conduction band, thereby raising the electron conductivity of the solid. In particular, photoconductivity lowers the electrical resistance of the normally insulating oxide on zirconium base alloys. Photoconductivity therefore also has the potential to explain why shadow corrosion is only seen in, or in proximity to, a nuclear reactor core. The suggested mechanism of shadow corrosion can be tested in a reasonably simple experiment in a research reactor

  6. THE EFFECT OF HIGH OVERVOLTAGES AT ELECTROCRYSTALLIZATION ON THE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF THE FILMS CO-P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Zabludovskyi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical and gravimetric methods are used in order to research the influence of high overvoltages during electroplating on corrosive and electrochemical behavior of amorphous Co-P films, which were made using deposition from water solution of an electrolyte. It is obtained that alloys, which were plated using higher overvoltages on cathode, are more corrosion-resistant.

  7. Influence of silica nanospheres on corrosion behavior of magnesium matrix syntactic foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, W.; Kannan, S.; Vincent, S.; Eddine, N. N.; Muhammed, A.; Gupta, M.; Karthikeyan, R.; Badari, V.

    2018-04-01

    Over the years, the development of Magnesium alloys as biodegradable implants has seen significant advancements. Magnesium based materials tend to provide numerous advantages in the field of biomedical implants over existing materials such as titanium or stainless steel. The present research focuses on corrosive behavior of Magnesium reinforced with different volume percentages of Hollow Silica Nano Spheres (HSNS). These behaviors were tested in two different simulated body fluids (SBF) namely, Hank’s Buffered Saline Solution (HBSS) and Phosphate Buffered Solution (PBS). This corrosion study was done using the method of electrochemical polarization with a three-electrode configuration. Comparative studies were established by testing pure Mg which provided critical information on the effects of the reinforcing material. The HSNS reinforced Mg displayed desirable characteristics after corrosion experiments; increased corrosion resistance was witnessed with higher volume percentage of HSNS.

  8. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  9. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  10. A study on corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between Monel 400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Cherish; Karthikeyan, R.; Vincent, S.

    2018-04-01

    An attempt has been made to study the corrosion resistance of bi-metal weld joints of Monel 400 tube to stainless steel 316 tube by GTAW process. The present research paper contributes to the ongoing research work on the use of Monel400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel in industrial environments. Potentiodynamic method is used to investigate the corrosion behavior of Monel 400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel welded joints. The analysis has been performed on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld zone after post weld heat treatment. Optical microscopy was also performed to correlate the results. The heat affected zone of Monel 400 alloy seems to have the lowest corrosion resistance whereas 316L stainless steel base metal has the highest corrosion resistance.

  11. Corrosion and Environmental Degradation, 2 Volume Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Michael; Cahn, Robert W.; Haasen, Peter; Kramer, E. J.

    2001-06-01

    Corrosion and corrosion protection is one of most important topics in applied materials science. Corrosion science is not only important from an economic point of view, but, due to its interdisciplinary nature combining metallurgy, materials physics and electrochemistry, it is also of high scientific interest. Nowadays corrosion science even gets new impetus from surface science and polymer chemistry. This two-volume reference work belonging to the well renown series Materials Science and Tehcnology provides the reader with a sound and broad survey on the whole subject - from the fundamentals to the latest research results. Written by a team of international top-experts it will become an indispensable reference for any materials scientist, physicist or chemist involved in corrosion science.

  12. Study of biofuels corrosiveness; Estudo da corrosividade de biocombustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Rafaela da Conceicao; Branco, Lucas da Paz Nogueira; Guimaraes, Maria Jose de Oliveria Cavalcanti; Seidl, Peter Rudolf [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    The replacement of crude oil derivatives with biofuels is part of an energy strategy, in which efficiency and conservation should play a leading role. The renewable nature of biodiesel is based in the fact that it is derived from raw materials from agricultural activities, instead of petroleum. Thinking about the increasingly production of biodiesel and its storage to make the proper mixtures, the corrosion of biodiesel tanks can occur over time. The copper corrosion test is used as the standard method for biodiesel corrosivity, however it is designed for diesel fuel from petroleum. Petrodiesel contains sulfur, which attacks the copper alloys. Since biodiesel is free of this element, it should be characterized in a different way. This work intends to analyze existing methodologies in order to evaluate the corrosivity of biodiesel. A literature search was performed in Web of Science database, selecting keywords for a comprehensive search. For the final analysis, a selection of papers classified according to publication year, country and main subject covered was used. Research on biofuels corrosivity is recent and major countries where published (USA, Malaysia and Brazil) which have advantages in terms of size and production of oil seeds. Biodiesel is more corrosive than petroleum diesel, but there is no sufficient evidences as to verify if the level of corrosion found in biodiesel is within acceptable limits for automotive components. Ferrous alloys are more resistant to biodiesel attack than non-ferrous alloys. Among non-ferrous alloys, copper and lead alloys are the most vulnerable, followed by aluminum. It is necessary to develop appropriate methodologies to determine and characterize the corrosivity of biodiesel on engine parts and alloys used in its manufacture and storage. (author)

  13. Corrosion problem in the CRENK Triga Mark II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalenga, M.

    1990-01-01

    In August 1987, a routine underwater optical inspection of the aluminum tank housing the core of the CRENK Triga Mark II reactor, carried out to update safety condition of the reactor, revealed pitting corrosion attacks on the 8 mm thick aluminum tank bottom. The paper discuss the work carried out by the reactor staff to dismantle the reactor in order to allow a more precise investigation of the corrosion problem, to repair the aluminum tank bottom, and to enhance the reactor overall safety condition

  14. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  15. Laboratory Assessment of Select Methods of Corrosion Control and Repair in Reinforced Concrete Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Pritzl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen reinforced concrete laboratory test specimens were used to evaluate a number of corrosion control (CoC procedures to prolong the life of patch repairs in corrosion-damaged reinforced concrete. These specimens included layered mixed-in chlorides to represent chloride contamination due to deicing salts. All specimens were exposed to accelerated corrosion testing for three months, subjected to patch repairs with various treatments, and further subjected to additional three months of exposure to accelerated corrosion. The use of thermal sprayed zinc, galvanic embedded anodes, epoxy/polyurethane coating, acrylic coating, and an epoxy patch repair material was evaluated individually or in combination. The specimens were assessed with respect to corrosion currents (estimated mass loss, chloride ingress, surface rust staining, and corrosion of the reinforcing steel observed after dissection. Results indicated that when used in patch repair applications, the embedded galvanic anode with top surface coating, galvanic thermal sprayed zinc, and galvanic thermal sprayed zinc with surface coating were more effective in controlling corrosion than the other treatments tested.

  16. Aqueous corrosion study on U-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Titas; Venkatesan, V.; Kumar, Pradeep; Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun

    2009-01-01

    In low power or research reactor, U-Zr alloy is a potential candidate for dispersion fuel. Moreover, Zirconium has a low thermal-neutron cross section and uranium alloyed with Zr has excellent corrosion resistance and dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In the present study aqueous corrosion behavior of U-Zr alloy samples was studied in autoclave at 200 deg C temperature. Corrosion rate was determined from weight loss with time. (author)

  17. Recent Developments on Autonomous Corrosion Protection Through Encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Gillis, M.; Blanton, M.; Hanna, J.; Rawlins, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating, based on microencapsulation, for the autonomous detection and control of corrosion. Microencapsulation has been validated and optimized to incorporate desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition, through corrosion-initiated release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release triggered by mechanical damage. While proof-of-concept results have been previously reported, more recent research and development efforts have concentrated on improving coating compatibility and synthesis procedure scalability, with a targeted goal of obtaining easily dispersible pigment-grade type microencapsulated materials. The recent progress has resulted in the development of pH-sensitive microparticles as a corrosion-triggered delivery system for corrosion indicators and inhibitors. The synthesis and early corrosion indication results obtained with coating formulations that incorporate these microparticles are reported. The early corrosion indicating results were obtained with color changing and with fluorescent indicators.

  18. Erosion-corrosion synergistics in the low erosion regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, R.G.; Sethi, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Many engineering alloys display good high temperature corrosion resistance. However, when they are used in corrosive environments where they are subjected to erosion also, the corrosion resistance has been adversely affected. The phenomenon known as erosion-corrosion is complex and requires detailed investigation of how the erosion and corrosion kinetics interact and compete. At the Kentucky Center for Energy Research Laboratory, an erosion-corrosion tester was used to perform erosion-oxidation tests on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel at 500-600 0 C using alumina abrasive at low velocities. The erosion-oxidation rate data and morphology of exposed surfaces are consistent with oxide chipping and fracturing being the mode of material loss

  19. Design considerations of fission and corrosion product in primary system of MONJU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Akagane, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    General influence of fission and corrosion products in primary system on MONJU plant design is reviewed. Various research and development works are now in progress to decrease the generation rate, to remove the products more effectively and to develop the methods of evaluation the behaviour of radioactive products. The inventory and distribution of fission and corrosion products in the primary circuit of MONJU are given. The radiation levels on the primary components are estimated to be several roentgens per hour. (author)

  20. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liang, Shuaishuai; Liu, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion

  1. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  2. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  3. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  4. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing atmosphere by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel. Corrosion research under chlorine gas condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Masayuki; Hanada, Keiji; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Aose, Shinichi; Kato, Toshihiro

    2002-12-01

    Pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts (RIAR process) has been recently developed for spent nuclear oxide fuel and discussed in feasibility study. It is required to improve the corrosion resistance of equipments such as electrolyzer because the process is operated in severe corrosion environment. In this study, the corrosion resistance of ceramic materials was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas condition. And further consideration about the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides were evaluated in molten salt. The result of thermodynamic calculation shows most of ceramic oxides have good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride, however the standard Gibb's free energies with carbon have negative value. On the other hand, eleven kinds of ceramic materials were examined by corrosion test, then silicon nitride, mullite and cordierite have a good corrosion resistance less than 0.1 mm/y. Cracks were not observed on the materials and flexural strength did not reduce remarkably after 480 hours test in molten salt with Cl 2 -O 2 bubbling. In conclusion, these three ceramic materials are most applicable materials for the pyrochemical reprocessing process with chlorine gas condition. (author)

  5. Research of state of metal welded joint by deformation and corrosion surface projection parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demchenko Maria Vyacheslavovna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available At industrial enterprises in building structures and equipment one can see corrosion damage, as well as damage accumulated during operation period. The areas of stress concentration are welded joints as their structure is heterogeneous. From the point of view of the scale hierarchy, the welded joint represents the welded and base metal zones at the meso-macrolevel, the weld zone, the thermal zone, the base metal at the micro-mesolevel, the grain constituents at the nano-microlevel. Borders are the stress concentrators at different scale levels, thus they becomes the most dangerous places of metal structure. Modeling by the molecular dynamics method at the atomic level has shown nanocracks initiation in triple junctions of grain boundaries and on the ledges of the grain boundaries. Due to active development of nanotechnology, it became possible to evaluate the state of the weld metal at the nanoscale, where irreversible changes take place from the very beginning. Existing methods of nondestructive testing can detect damage only at the meso- and macrolevel. Modern equipment makes it possible to use other methods of control and approaches. For example, according to GOST R55046-2012 and R57223-2016, the analysis of the parameters of the surface projection deformation performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy should be taken into account when the evaluation of state of metal pipelines is carried out. However, there is a problem to monitore it due to various factors affecting the surface during operation. The paper proposes an additional method to estimate the state of weld metal at any stage of deformation that uses 3D analysis of the parameters of the «artificial» corrosion relief of surface. During the operation period changes in the stress-strain state and structure of the metal take place, as the result the character and depth of etching of the grains of the structural components and their boundaries change too. Evaluation of the

  6. Novel corrosion experiments using the wire beam electrode: (III) Measuring electrochemical corrosion parameters from both the metallic and electrolytic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yong-Jun; Liu, Tie; Aung, Naing Naing

    2006-01-01

    The wire beam electrode (WBE) and the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) have been applied in a novel combination to measure, for the first time, electrochemical parameters simultaneously from both the metallic and electrolytic phases of a corroding metal surface. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the application of this combined WBE-SRET method in obtaining unique information on localised corrosion mechanism, by investigating typical corrosion processes occurring over a mild steel WBE surface exposed to the classic Evans solution. The WBE method was used to map current and potential distributions in the metallic phase, and the SRET was used to map current or potential distribution in the electrolytic phase. It has been found that the combined WBE-SRET method is able to gain useful information on macro-cell electrochemical corrosion processes that involve macro-scale separation of anodes and cathodes. In such macro-cell corrosion systems, maps measured using WBE and SRET were found to correlate with each other and both methods were able to detect the locations of anodic sites. However the movement of the scanning probe during SRET measurements was found to affect the SRET detection of cathodic sites. In micro-cell corrosion systems where the separation of anodic and cathodic sites were less distinct, SRET measurement was found to be insensitive in detecting anodic and cathodic sites, while the WBE method was still able to produce results that correlated well with observed corrosion behaviour. Results obtained from this work suggest that the WBE-SRET method is applicable for understanding the initiation, propagation and electrochemical behaviour of localised corrosion anodes and cathodes, and also their dependence on externally controllable variables, such as solution pH changes and the existence of surface coatings

  7. Research on probabilistic assessment method based on the corroded pipeline assessment criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangli; Luo, Jinheng; Zhao Xinwei; Zhang Hua; Zhang Liang; Zhang Yi

    2012-01-01

    Pipeline integrity assessments are performed using conventional deterministic approaches, even though there are many uncertainties about the parameters in the pipeline integrity assessment. In this paper, a probabilistic assessment method is provided for the gas pipeline with corrosion defects based on the current corroded pipe evaluation criteria, and the failure probability of corroded pipelines due to the uncertainties of loadings, material property and measurement accuracy is estimated using Monte-Carlo technique. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis approach is introduced to rank the influence of various random variables to the safety of pipeline. And the method to determine the critical defect size based on acceptable failure probability is proposed. Highlights: ► The folias factor in pipeline corrosion assessment methods was analyzed. ► The probabilistic method was applied in corrosion assessment methods. ► The influence of assessment variables to the reliability of pipeline was ranked. ► The acceptable failure probability was used to determine the critical defect size.

  8. Research and development on is process components for hydrogen production. (2) Corrosion resistance of glass lining in high temperature sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Iwatsuki, Jin; Kubo, Shinji; Terada, Atsuhiko; Onuki, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting a research and development on hydrogen production system using High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. As a part of this effort, thermochemical water-splitting cycle featuring iodine- and sulfur-compounds (IS process) is under development considering its potential of large-scale economical hydrogen production. The IS process constitutes very severe environments on the materials of construction because of the corrosive nature of process chemicals, especially of the high temperature acidic solution of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid dissolving iodine. Therefore, selection of the corrosion-resistant materials and development of the components has been studied as a crucial subject of the process development. This paper discusses corrosion resistance of commercially available glass-lining material in high temperature sulfuric acid. Corrosion resistance of a soda glass used for glass-lining was examined by immersion tests. The experiments were performed in 47-90wt% sulfuric acids at temperatures of up to 400degC and for the maximum immersion time of 100 hours using an autoclave designed for the concerned tests. In every condition tested, no indication of localized corrosion such as defect formation or pitting corrosion was observed. Also, the corrosion rates decreased with the progress of immersion, and were low enough (≅0.1 mm/year) after 60-90 hours of immersion probably due to formation of a silica rich surface. (author)

  9. Corrosion and Durability Research | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    . Peregrine runs the Linux Operating System and has a dedicated Lustre file system with about 1 petabyte of a high-performance computing (HPC) system that can handle and analyze integrated data. The fundamentals of corrosion mechanisms are studied by several techniques, including cyclic voltammetry, linear

  10. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  11. Proceedings of the sixteenth national congress on corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The congress was a forum for presenting the industrial problems and ideas derived from current research and various topics on corrosion. The conference thereon was focussed on corrosion degradation phenomena in various industries and mitigative actions or solutions to the issues of corrosion. The corrosion problems in ports, petroleum, chemical and fertilizer, power, steel, nuclear, shipping, defence, construction, and refinery industries are discussed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  13. Standard test method for determining effects of chemical admixtures on corrosion of embedded steel reinforcement in concrete exposed to chloride environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effects of chemical admixtures on the corrosion of metals in concrete. This test method can be used to evaluate materials intended to inhibit chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete. It can also be used to evaluate the corrosivity of admixtures in a chloride environment. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Prediction of corrosion rates of water distribution pipelines according to aggressive corrosive water in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, W S; Yu, M J; Lee, H D

    2004-01-01

    The drinking water network serving Korea has been used for almost 100 years. Therefore, pipelines have suffered various degrees of deterioration due to aggressive environments. The pipe breaks were caused by in-external corrosion, water hammer, surface loading, etc. In this paper, we focused on describing corrosion status in water distribution pipes in Korea and reviewing some methods to predict corrosion rates. Results indicate that corrosive water of lakes was more aggressive than river water and the winter was more aggressive compared to other seasons. The roughness growth rates of Dongbok lake showed 0.23 mm/year. The high variation of corrosion rates is controlled by the aging pipes and smaller diameter. Also the phenolphthalein test on a cementitious core of cement mortar lined ductile cast iron pipe indicated the pipes over 15 years old had lost 50-100% of their lime active cross sectional area.

  15. Guided wave testing for touch point corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleyne, David

    2012-01-01

    Guided wave testing (GWT) is established in the petrochemical and related industries, primarily for the detection of corrosion flaws. Touch point corrosion at support positions in pipe-work has become a significant problem within many operating gas, chemical and petro-chemical plants world-wide, particularly as a high proportion of these plants have been operational for many decades. This article demonstrates how GWT using guided waves sent axially along the pipe can be performed for the detection and accurate classification of touchpoint corrosion. The major advantage of GWT methods for the detection of touch point corrosion is its ability to examine several support positions from a single easy to access transducer position. The strategy is then to prioritize or rank the condition of the pipe at the supports by removing those with negligible wall loss from scheduling for further inspection. Guided waves are accurate at detecting and classifying corrosion patches at support positions, but deep pits within such patches are more difficult to accurately identify. Examples using data from routine inspection testing are used to support the development of the methods and testing approaches presented. Recent developments of the interpretation methods, testing procedures and calibration methods have significantly enhanced the capabilities of GWT for this important application.

  16. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  17. General corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical evaluation of nuclear-waste-package structural-barrier materials. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Nelson, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying the general corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmentally enhanced crack propagation of five candidate materials in high-temperature aqueous environments simulating those expected in basalt and tuff repositories. The materials include three cast ferrous materials (ductile cast iron and two low-alloy Cr-Mo cast steels) and two titanium alloys, titanium Grade 2 (commercial purity) and Grade 12 (a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy). The general corrosion results are being obtained by autoclave exposure of specimens to slowly replenished simulated ground water flowing upward through a bed of the appropriate crushed rock (basalt or tuff), which is maintained at the desired test temperature (usually 250 0 C). In addition, tests are being performed in deionized water. Metal penetration rates of iron-base alloys are being derived by stripping off the corrosion product film and weighing the specimen after the appropriate exposure time. The corrosion of titanium alloy specimens is being determined by weight gain methods. The irradiation-corrosion studies are similar to the general corrosion tests, except that the specimen-bearing autoclaves are held in a 60 Co gamma radiation field at dose rates up to 2 x 10 6 rad/h. For evaluating the resistance of the candidate materials to environmentally enhanced crack propagation, three methods are being used: U-bend and fracture toughness specimens exposed in autoclaves; slow strain rate studies in repository-relevant environments to 300 0 C; and fatigue crack growth rate studies at ambient pressure and 90 0 C. The preliminary data suggest a 1-in. corrosion allowance for iron-base barrier elements intended for 1000-yr service in basalt or tuff repositories. No evidence has yet been found that titanium Grade 2 or Grade 12 is susceptible to environmentally induced crack propagation or, by extension, to stress corrosion cracking

  18. Application of the method of thermo-power in diagnosing fatigue strength and intergrain corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorenko V.J.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In area of flat defect, predefined a gradient tireless - corrosive tensions, a double electric layer, conditioned the spatial redistribution of electronic closeness, is formed. It shows up a local rejection mikro-thermo-power at use of heating edge of tungsten thermocouple. Test approbation of method is conducted on the deformed chromel.

  19. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  20. Cases of corrosion in power plant components at NTPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Bhakta, U.C.; Sinha, Ashwini

    2000-01-01

    Power plants are one of the major industries suffering from severe corrosion problems resulting in substantial losses. The problem is becoming more prominent as the plants are getting older. NTPC as the leading power utility with very good performance track record, had been conscious of the menace of corrosion prevailing in the industry and had established a Research and Development Centre to cater to applied O and M needs of the plants. A specialized group has been involved in studying the corrosion related problems and recommending suitable cost effective solutions to such problems. The present paper aims at discussing various corrosion related analysis carried out at the Research and Development Centre of NTPC and the remedial measures suggested. The paper also describes some of the case studies of corrosion related failures with recommendations given for preventing such failures in future. (author)

  1. Corrosion potential detection method, potential characteristic simulation method for reaction rate and plant monitoring system using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masanori; Onaka, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    In a calculation controlling device for a plant monitoring system, concentrations of materials concerning reaction materials in a certain state of a reaction process, and an actually measured value for the potential of a material in this state are substituted into a reaction rate equation obtained in accordance with a reaction process model. With such procedures, a relation between the reaction rate (current value) and the potential of the material can be obtained. A potential at which the reaction rates of an anode reaction and a cathode reaction contained in a corrosion reaction are made equal is determined by a numerical value calculation, based on an electrochemical hybrid potential logic by using the reaction rate equation, the reaction rate information relative to the corrosion reaction of the material and the concentration of the material concerning the corrosion reaction is obtained by a numerical value calculation. Then, simulation for the corrosion potential is enabled based on the handling corresponding to the actual reaction. Further, even for a portion which can not be measured actually, the corrosion potential can be recognized by simulation. (N.H.)

  2. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  3. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnoş, Bihter; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Çotuk, Ayşın; Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Cansever, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor was investigated over a 10-month period in a hotel. Planktonic and sessile numbers of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic bacteria were monitored. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method. The corrosion products were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A mineralized, heterogeneous biofilm was observed on the coupons. Although a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor were regularly added to the cooling water, the results showed that microorganisms, such as SRB in the mixed species biofilm, caused corrosion of galvanized steel. It was observed that Zn layers on the test coupons were completely depleted after 3 months. The Fe concentrations in the biofilm showed significant correlations with the weight loss and carbohydrate concentration (respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01).

  4. Current status of studies on nodular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Takayoshi; Kawasaki, Satoru; Echigoya, Hironori; Kinoshita, Yutaka; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takao; Yamanaka, Tuneyasu.

    1993-01-01

    The studies on nodular corrosion formed on the outer surface of BWR fuel cladding tubes were reviewed. Main factors affecting the corrosion behavior were material and environmental conditions and combined effect. The effects of such material conditions as fabrication process, alloy elements, texture and surface treatment and environmental factors as neutron irradiation, thermo-hydrodynamic, water chemistry, purity of the coolant and contact with foreign metals on the corrosion phenomena were surveyed. Out-of-reactor corrosion test methods and models for the corrosion mechanism were also reviewed. Suppression of the accumulated annealing temperature during tube reduction process improved the nodular corrosion resistance of Zircaloys. Improved resistance for the nodular corrosion was reported for the unirradiated Zircaloys with some additives. Detailed irradiation test under the BWR conditions is needed to confirm the trend. Concerning the environmental factors, boiling on the cladding surface due to heat flux reduces the nodular corrosion susceptibility, while oxidizing radical generated from dissolved oxygen accelerates the corrosion. Concerning corrosion mechanisms, importance of such phenomena as the depleted zone of alloying elements in zirconium matrix, reduction of H + to H 2 in oxide layer, electrochemical property of precipitates, crystallographic anisotropy of oxidation rates were revealed. (author) 59 refs

  5. Evaluations of corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe Substrates Using an Electrolytic Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaebong; Kim, Kyungwook; Park, Minwoo; Song, Taejun; Lee, Chaeseung; Lee, Euijong; Kim, Sangyeol

    2013-01-01

    An Eectrolytic Corrosion(EC) test method was evaluated by the comparison with Copper Accelerated Acetic Salt Spray(CASS) and Neutral Salt Spray(SS) tests. Those methods were applied in order to evaluate corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe substrates. The correlations between results obtained by different test methods were investigated. Results showed that the electrochemical method such as the EC test method was superior to the conventional methods such as CASS and SS, in terms of the quantitative accuracy and the test-time span. Furthermore, the EC test method provided the useful means to estimate the initiation of corrosion of each layer by monitoring the rest potentials of the coated layers such as Ni, Cr, and Zn on Fe substrate. With regard to test time spans, the EC test provided the 78 times and 182 times faster results than the CASS test in cases of Fe + 5μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr and Fe + 20 μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr respectively, while the EC test was 85 times faster results than the Salt Spray test in the case of Fe + 20 g/m 2 Zn. Therefore, the EC test can be the better method to evaluate the resistance to corrosion of coated layers than the conventional methods such as the SS test and the CASS

  6. Achievement report on research and development in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1980. Research on a hydrogen manufacturing technology by using thermo-chemical method. (Research on equipment materials for iodine system cycle); 1980 nendo netsukagakuho ni yoru suiso seizo gijutsu no kenkyu seika hokokusho. Yosokei cycle no sochi zairyo no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    This paper describes research on materials of equipment for the second stage reaction in relation with development on a hydrogen manufacturing technology by using the iodine system cycle in the thermo-chemical method. The second stage reaction produces MgO, I{sub 2} and O{sub 2} by decomposition of Mg(IO{sub 3}){sub 2} at 600 to 650 degrees C. Corrosion tests were carried out by using 25Cr-20Ni steel and Ni-50Cr alloy having shown relatively high corrosion resistance in the researches to date, which were added with trace amount of different alloy elements. The tests were performed in gas mixture of I{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at 600 to 700 degrees C for 48 to 192 hours. The average corrosion rate of 25Cr-20Ni steel was reduced by adding Y(0.2%), Ca (0.2%) or Si+Al (1%Si+1%Al), by which relatively uniform corrosion pattern was shown, and the corrosion resistance was improved remarkably. The average corrosion rate of 25Cr-20Ni steel showed a trend of increasing by adding Si and Nb, and non-uniform corrosion like pitting has occurred, revealing that it is not preferable from the aspect of corrosion resistance. The average corrosion rates of the tested materials tended to become somewhat greater under heat insulated condition than under continuously heating condition. Effect of Mg(IO{sub 3}){sub 2} deposition is very small. (NEDO)

  7. The FSM technology -- Operational experience and improvements in local corrosion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemmen, R.; Horn, H.; Gartland, P.O.; Wold, K.

    1996-01-01

    FSM (Field Signature Method) is a non-intrusive monitoring technique based on a patented principle, developed for the purpose of detection and monitoring of both general and localized corrosion, erosion and cracking in steel and metal structures, piping systems and vessels. Since 1991 FSM has been used for a wide range of applications e.g. for buried and open pipelines, process piping offshore, subsea pipelines and flowlines, applications in the nuclear power industry and in materials research in general. This paper describes typical applications of the FSM technology, and presents operational experience from some of the landbased and subsea installations. The paper also describes recent enhancements in the FSM technology and in the analysis of FSM readings, allowing for monitoring and detailed quantification of pitting and mesa corrosion, and of corrosion in welds

  8. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in the marine environment is an important issue because the costs causes by marine corrosion increased year upon year. It is necessary a correctly approach to materials selection, protection and corrosion control to reduce this burden of wasted materials, wasted energy and wasted money. Many different types of corrosion attack can be observed to structures, ships and other equipment used in sea water service. Shipping containers are exposed to various corrosive mediums like as airborne salt, industrial pollutants, rain and saltwater. Transport damage during loading onto and unloading off trucks, train beds and ships breaches the paint coating which further contributes to corrosion. The result is shortened container life and high costs for container repair or replacement. The paper intends to evaluate, by gravimetric method, the corrosion rate and corrosion penetration rate of two types of carbon steel DX51D and S220GD. Carbon steel DX51D and hot-dip galvanized steel S220GD are used in marine and industrial applications for buildings cargo vessels, container ships and oil tankers. For testing it was used different corrosive environments: 5% NaOH solution; 5% HCL solution and 0.5M NaCl solution. The samples were immersed in 400mL of testing solution for exposure period of 28 days. Periodically at 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days was measured de mass loss and evaluate the corrosion rate and corrosion stability coefficient. The steel DX51D was stable in 5% NaOH solution for 28 days, the values of corrosion stability coefficient was 7 after 3 days and 6 after 28 days of immersion in corrosive medium. In 5% HCL solution steels DX51D and S220GD was completely corroded in 21 days with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 9 for 7 days and 8 for 21 days of immersion in corrosive solution. It was observed a good resistance for 3 days in 0.5M NaCl solution with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 5, but after that

  9. On researching erosion-corrosion wear in pipelines: the rate and residual lifetime estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranenko, V.I.; Yanchenko, Yu.A.; Gulina, O.M.; Dokukin, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    To base the normative document on calculation of pipelines erosive-corrosive wear (ECW) rate and residual lifetime this research of ECW regularities for pearlitic steel NPP pipelines was performed. The estimates of control data treatment statistical procedures efficiency were presented. The influence of the scheme of piping control on the ECW rate and residual lifetime estimation results was demonstrated. The simplified scheme is valid only in case of complete information. It's usage under data uncertainties leads to essential residual lifetime overstating [ru

  10. Recent Research and Development in Solving Atmospheric Corrosion Problems of Steel Industries in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M.; Uchida, H.

    2002-01-01

    A rust layer, so called 'protective' rust layer, on a weathering low-alloy steel has strong protective ability for atmospheric corrosion of the steel. We have recently found through a large number of spectroscopic studies including Moessbauer spectroscopy that the protective rust layer forms after long-term phase transformation. The phase and structure of the rust definitely control the protective ability of the rust layer. From this recent knowledge, some new technologies have been developed. One is the surface-treatment technique that provides a possibility for obtaining the protective rust layer in a relatively short period even in the severe environments such as in marine and chloride (de-icing salts) containing environments. Others are based on selection of effective alloying elements for steel materials. These are particularly important for application in areas where protective rust layer formation may be hindered or prevented. In this paper, we mention recent progress in research and development on rusting protection by rust for atmospheric corrosion of steels in Japan.

  11. Erosion–corrosion and corrosion properties of DLC coated low temperature Erosion–corrosion and corrosion properties of DLC coated low temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    of AISI 316 as substrate for DLC coatings are investigated. Corrosion and erosion–corrosion measurements were carried out on low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 and on low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 with a top layer of DLC. The combination of DLC and low temperature...... nitriding dramatically reduces the amount of erosion–corrosion of stainless steel under impingement of particles in a corrosive medium....

  12. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

  13. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development

  14. On-line Corrosion Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  15. Corrosion behavior of Cu during graphene growth by CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yuhua; Liu, Qingqing; Zhou, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene films were deposited on the Cu by chemical vapor deposition method. • Annealing affects the corrosion property of Cu. • Graphene films improve corrosion performance of Cu for a short period of time. - Abstract: The corrosion performance of Cu samples may be affected by annealing at high temperatures during graphene growth via the chemical vapor deposition method. In this study, multiple graphene films were deposited on Cu and characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion behavior of Cu immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The Cu morphology was observed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicated that annealing affects the corrosion process of Cu. The presence of graphene films on the Cu substrate improved the corrosion performance of the material for a short period of time

  16. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  17. Corrosion and Protection of Metal in the Seawater Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiangyu; Gao, Lili; Cui, Zhendong; Yin, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    Seawater desalination develops rapid for it can solve water scarcity efficiently. However, corrosion problem in the seawater desalination system is more serious than that in normal water. So, it is important to pay attention to the corrosion and protection of metal in seawater desalination. The corrosion characteristics and corrosion types of metal in the seawater desalination system are introduced in this paper; In addition, corrosion protect methods and main influencing factors are stated, the latest new technologies about anti-corrosion with quantum energy assisted and magnetic inhibitor are presented.

  18. Evaluation of annual corrosion tests for aggressive water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubová, V.; Ilavský, J.; Barloková, D.

    2011-12-01

    Internal corrosion has a significant effect on the useful life of pipes, the hydraulic conditions of a distribution system and the quality of the water transported. All water is corrosive under some conditions, and the level of this corrosion depends on the physical and chemical properties of the water and properties of the pipe material. Galvanic treatment is an innovation for protecting against corrosion, and this method is also suitable for removal of water stone too. This method consists of the electrogalvanic principle, which is generated by the flowing of water between a zinc anode and the cupro-alloy cover of a column. This article presents experimental corrosion tests at water resource Pernek (This water resource-well marked as HL-1 is close to the Pernek of village), where the device is operating based on this principle.

  19. Resistance to Corrosion of Reinforcement of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. O.; Bae, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, K. M.; Jung, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing of interest about the eco-friendly concrete, it is increased to use concretes containing by-products of industry such as fly ash(FA), ground granulated blast furnace slag(GGBFS), silica fume(SF), and etc. Especially, these are well known for improving the resistances to reinforcement corrosion in concrete and decreasing chloride ion penetration. The purpose of this experimental research is to evaluate the resistance against corrosion of reinforcement of high volume fly ash(HVFA) concrete which is replaced with high volume fly ash for cement volume. For this purpose, the concrete test specimens were made for various strength level and replacement ratio of FA, and then the compressive strength and diffusion coefficient for chloride ion of them were measured for 28, 91, and 182 days, respectively. Also, corrosion monitoring by half cell potential method was carried out for the made lollypop concrete test specimens to detect the time of corrosion initiation for reinforcement in concrete. As a result, it was observed from the test results that the compressive strength of HVFA concrete was decreased with increasing replacement ratio of FA but long-term resistances against reinforcement corrosion and chloride ion penetration of that were increased

  20. The Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Mitchell, M. L.; Torres, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion rates for bare and coated Magnesium alloy AZ31B have been measured. Two coatings, Dow-23(Trademark) and Tagnite(Trademark), have been tested by electrochemical methods and their effectiveness determined. Electrochemical methods employed were the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR) and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS). In addition, general corrosion and stress corrosion methods were employed to examine the effectiveness of the above coatings in 90 percent humidity. Results from these studies are presented.

  1. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of chromizing coating and P110 steel for corrosion resistance estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Naiming; Guo, Junwen; Xie, Faqin; Zou, Jiaojuan; Tian, Wei; Yao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Hongyan; Tang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Continuous chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel by pack cementation. • The chromizing coating showed better corrosion resistance. • Comparison of surface fractal dimensions can estimate corrosion resistance. - Abstract: In the field of corrosion research, mass gain/loss, electrochemical tests and comparing the surface elemental distributions, phase constitutions as well as surface morphologies before and after corrosion are extensively applied to investigate the corrosion behavior or estimate the corrosion resistance of materials that operated in various environments. Most of the above methods are problem oriented, complex and longer-period time-consuming. However from an object oriented point of view, the corroded surfaces of materials often have self-similar characterization: fractal property which can be employed to efficiently achieve damaged surface analysis. The present work describes a strategy of comparison of the surface fractal dimensions for corrosion resistance estimation: chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel surface to improve its performance via pack cementation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the original and corroded samples. Surface fractal dimensions of the detected samples were calculated by binary images related to SEM images of surface morphologies with box counting algorithm method. The results showed that both surface morphologies and surface fractal dimensions of P110 steel varied greatly before and after corrosion test, but the chromizing coating changed slightly. The chromizing coating indicated better corrosion resistance than P110 steel. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of original and corroded samples can rapidly and exactly realize the estimation of corrosion resistance

  2. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of chromizing coating and P110 steel for corrosion resistance estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Naiming, E-mail: lnmlz33@163.com [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Junwen [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Xie, Faqin [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Zou, Jiaojuan; Tian, Wei [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yao, Xiaofei [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Xi’an Technological University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Zhang, Hongyan; Tang, Bin [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Continuous chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel by pack cementation. • The chromizing coating showed better corrosion resistance. • Comparison of surface fractal dimensions can estimate corrosion resistance. - Abstract: In the field of corrosion research, mass gain/loss, electrochemical tests and comparing the surface elemental distributions, phase constitutions as well as surface morphologies before and after corrosion are extensively applied to investigate the corrosion behavior or estimate the corrosion resistance of materials that operated in various environments. Most of the above methods are problem oriented, complex and longer-period time-consuming. However from an object oriented point of view, the corroded surfaces of materials often have self-similar characterization: fractal property which can be employed to efficiently achieve damaged surface analysis. The present work describes a strategy of comparison of the surface fractal dimensions for corrosion resistance estimation: chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel surface to improve its performance via pack cementation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the original and corroded samples. Surface fractal dimensions of the detected samples were calculated by binary images related to SEM images of surface morphologies with box counting algorithm method. The results showed that both surface morphologies and surface fractal dimensions of P110 steel varied greatly before and after corrosion test, but the chromizing coating changed slightly. The chromizing coating indicated better corrosion resistance than P110 steel. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of original and corroded samples can rapidly and exactly realize the estimation of corrosion resistance.

  3. The effect of recasting on corrosion of DUCINOX prosthetic alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Klimek

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of recasting, up to two times, Ni-Cr (DUCINOX prosthetic alloy on its corrosion properties was carried out. The corrosion measurements were done in deoxygenated Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva solution at temperature of 37°C. In the study following electrochemical methods were used: measurement of free corrosion potential Ecor in open circuit, measurement of polarization resistance according to Stern-Geary's method and measurement of potentiodynamic characteristic in wide range of anodic polarization. In general, it can be stated that casting number weakly influence on corrosion properties of investigated alloy. At free corrosion potential there is no monotonic dependence of corrosion parameters versus casting number. However, at extreme anodic potentials monotonic changes of corrosion parameters with increasing casting number is observed. Obtained results and drawn conclusions are partially compatible with literature data.

  4. Electrochemical study of galvanic corrosion inhibitors in water-based and ethylene glycol-based heat transfer circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netter, Pierre

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis reports the search for and the efficiency assessment of mixes of inhibitors for coolant circuits of motor cars. After a discussion of the general properties of water-alcohol solvents (chemical properties, acid-base equilibriums) and of parameters affecting corrosion in coolant circuits, the author proposes an overview of the main inhibitors which are used to protect these circuits against corrosion, and discusses their action mechanism and efficiency. The different methods used to study the corrosion of these circuits are described, and the advantages and drawbacks of test methods are commented. The second part proposes a synthesis of the different corrosion electromechanical mechanisms which may occur with respect to the used metallic materials and to possible galvanic couplings. The next part describes the experimental installations. The last part focuses on the different protections obtained with the different used inhibitor class in terms of results obtained by gravimetric tests and visual examination of samples, current-voltage curves in hydrodynamic regime, and galvanic corrosion tests performed in laboratory or in situ in motor cars [fr

  5. Understanding and managing corrosion in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Jarrell, D.B.; Sinha, U.P.; Shah, V.N.

    1991-03-01

    The main theme of this paper is a concept: understanding and managing corrosion in nuclear power plants. The concept is not new--in various forms the concept has been applied throughout the development and maturing of nuclear technology. However, the concept has frequently not been well conceived and applied. Too often, understanding corrosion has been based on reaction rather than on anticipation. Regulatory and utility industry initiatives are creating a climate and framework for more effective application of the concept. This paper characterizes the framework and provides some illustrations of how the concept is being applied, drawing from work conducted under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRCs) Office of Research. Nuclear plants are becoming an increasingly important factor in the national electrical grid. Initiatives are currently underway to extend the operating licenses beyond the current 40-year period and to evaluate advanced reactor designs the feature higher safety factors. Corrosion has not caused a major nuclear accident, but numerous corrosion mechanisms, have degraded nuclear systems and components. New corrosion phenomena continue to appear, and occasionally corrosion phenomena cause reactor shutdowns. Effective application of understanding and managing corrosion is important to safe and economic operation of the nuclear plants and also to public perception of a soundly operated technology. 53 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Standard test method for exfoliation corrosion susceptibility in 2XXX and 7XXX Series Aluminum Alloys (EXCO Test)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for constant immersion exfoliation corrosion (EXCO) testing of high-strength 2XXX and 7XXX series aluminum alloys. Note 1—This test method was originally developed for research and development purposes; however, it is referenced, in specific material specifications, as applicable for evaluating production material (refer to Section 14 on Precision and Bias). 1.2 This test method applies to all wrought products such as sheet, plate, extrusions, and forgings produced from conventional ingot metallurgy process. 1.3 This test method can be used with any form of specimen or part that can be immersed in the test solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Boric Acid Corrosion of Concrete Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure and compromise the integrity of the structure. Because corrosion rate of carbon steel in concrete in the presence of boric acid is lacking in published literature and available data are equivocal on the effect of boric acid on rebar corrosion, corrosion rate measurements were conducted in this study using several test methods. Rebar corrosion rates were measured in (i borated water flowing in a simulated concrete crack, (ii borated water flowing over a concrete surface, (iii borated water that has reacted with concrete, and (iv 2,400 ppm boric acid solutions with pH adjusted to a range of 6.0 to 7.7. The corrosion rates were measured using coupled multielectrode array sensor (CMAS and linear polarization resistance (LPR probes, both made using carbon steel. The results indicate that rebar corrosion rates are low (~1 μm/yr or lesswhen the solution pH is ~7.1 or higher. Below pH ~7.1, the corrosion rate increases with decreasing pH and can reach ~100 μm/yr in solutions with pH less than ~6.7. The threshold pH for carbon steel corrosion in borated solution is between 6.8 and 7.3.

  8. Optimising corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Andersen, A.

    2002-01-01

    A three-year project - financially supported by the Nordic Industrial Fund - on monitoring of corrosion in district heating systems has been initiated with participation of researchers and industrial partners in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The primary objective of the project...... is to improve the quality control in district heating systems by corrosion monitoring. In Danish systems electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarisation resistance (LPR), high-sensitive electrical resistance (ER) technology, crevice corrosion probes, as well as weight loss coupons...

  9. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Jenifer; Fuente, Daniel de la; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; Díaz, Iván; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-04-13

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter's great importance to human society. About half of the world's population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production plants close to the sea. Until the start of the 21st century, research on the basic mechanisms of rust formation in Cl - -rich atmospheres was limited to just a small number of studies. However, in recent years, scientific understanding of marine atmospheric corrosion has advanced greatly, and in the authors' opinion a sufficient body of knowledge has been built up in published scientific papers to warrant an up-to-date review of the current state-of-the-art and to assess what issues still need to be addressed. That is the purpose of the present review. After a preliminary section devoted to basic concepts on atmospheric corrosion, the marine atmosphere, and experimentation on marine atmospheric corrosion, the paper addresses key aspects such as the most significant corrosion products, the characteristics of the rust layers formed, and the mechanisms of steel corrosion in marine atmospheres. Special attention is then paid to important matters such as coastal-industrial atmospheres and long-term behaviour of carbon steel exposed to marine atmospheres. The work ends with a section dedicated to issues pending, noting a series of questions in relation with which greater research efforts would seem to be necessary.

  10. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Jenifer; de la Fuente, Daniel; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; Díaz, Iván; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter’s great importance to human society. About half of the world’s population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production plants close to the sea. Until the start of the 21st century, research on the basic mechanisms of rust formation in Cl−-rich atmospheres was limited to just a small number of studies. However, in recent years, scientific understanding of marine atmospheric corrosion has advanced greatly, and in the authors’ opinion a sufficient body of knowledge has been built up in published scientific papers to warrant an up-to-date review of the current state-of-the-art and to assess what issues still need to be addressed. That is the purpose of the present review. After a preliminary section devoted to basic concepts on atmospheric corrosion, the marine atmosphere, and experimentation on marine atmospheric corrosion, the paper addresses key aspects such as the most significant corrosion products, the characteristics of the rust layers formed, and the mechanisms of steel corrosion in marine atmospheres. Special attention is then paid to important matters such as coastal-industrial atmospheres and long-term behaviour of carbon steel exposed to marine atmospheres. The work ends with a section dedicated to issues pending, noting a series of questions in relation with which greater research efforts would seem to be necessary. PMID:28772766

  11. Study on the fabrication of the Stress Corrosion Crack by vapor pressure in the Alloy 600 Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seong; An, Ju Seon; Hwang, Woong Ki; Lee, Bo Young

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion crack is one of the life-limiting mechanisms in nuclear power plant conditions. During the operation of a power plant stress corrosion cracks can initiate and grow in dissimilar metal weld pipe joints of primary loop components. In particular, stress corrosion cracking usually occurs when the following three factors exist at the same time; susceptible material, corrosive environment, and tensile stress (including residual stress). Thus, residual stress becomes very critical for stress-corrosion cracking when it is difficult to improve the material corrosivity of the components and their environment under operating conditions. Since the research conducted by Coriou et al., it is well known that Ni-based alloy is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking(SCC) in deaerated pure water at high temperature and the SCC is difficult to be reproduced in laboratory. The aim of this study was to fulfill the need by developing an artificial SCC manufacturing method, which would produce realistic SCC in the Alloy 600 pipe

  12. Rail Base Corrosion and Cracking Prevention: Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-09

    EWI was engaged by the Federal Railroad Administration to research rail treatments to prevent rail base corrosion in corrosive environments. A coating system was selected in Phase 1 and recommended for field trials. In Phase 2, four railroads sponsor...

  13. Fatigue strength degradation of metals in corrosive environments

    OpenAIRE

    Adasooriya, Mudiyan Nirosha Damayanthi; Hemmingsen, Tor; Pavlou, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Structures exposed to aggressive environmental conditions are often subjected to time-dependent loss of coating and loss of material due to corrosion; this causes reduction in the cross-sectional properties of the members, increased surface roughness, surface irregularities and corrosion pits, and degradation of material strengths. These effects have been identified and simulated in different research studies. However, time and corrosive media dependent fatigue strength curves for materials h...

  14. FY17 Status Report: Research on Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindelholz, Eric John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alexander, Christopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This progress report describes work done in FY17 at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. Work in FY17 refined our understanding of the chemical and physical environment on canister surfaces, and evaluated the relationship between chemical and physical environment and the form and extent of corrosion that occurs. The SNL corrosion work focused predominantly on pitting corrosion, a necessary precursor for SCC, and process of pit-to-crack transition; it has been carried out in collaboration with university partners. SNL is collaborating with several university partners to investigate SCC crack growth experimentally, providing guidance for design and interpretation of experiments.

  15. Review of hot corrosion of thermal barrier coatings of gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yongbao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The review was done in order to make clear the problem of the hot corrosion of the Thermal Barrier Coatings(TBCsduring gas turbine serving. This paper summarizes the factors resulting from the hot corrosion of TBCs during turbine service and classifies methods for enhancing the corrosive resistance of TBCs. A prospective methodology for improving corrosion resistance is also formulated. The main types of corrosion coating include phase reaction, oxidizing of the bond coating, salt-fog corrosion, CMAS corrosion and fuel impurity corrosion. So far, methods for improving the corrosion resistance of TBCs include developing new coating materials, anticorrosive treatment on the surface of TBCs, modifying the stacking configuration and improving the cleansing functions of the gas turbines. In the future, developing new materials with excellent performance will still be the main direction for boosting the improvement of the hot corrosion resistance of TBCs. Simultaneously, improving the tacking configuration and nanotechnology of TBC coatings are potential approaches for improving corrosion resistance. With the development of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC, the focus of the hot corrosion of TBCs may turn to that of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs.

  16. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  17. Stainless steel corrosion in conditions simulating WWER-1000 primary coolant. Corrosion behaviour in mixed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Gritsina, V.M.; Zuek, V.A.; Tret'yakov, M.V.; Rud', R.A.; Svichkar', N.V.; Slabospitskaya, E.A.; Ishchenko, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    Research into corrosion kinetics of austenitic stainless steels (06Cr18Ni10Ti, 08Cr18Ni10Ti, 12Cr18Ni10Ti) in medium which corresponds to composition and parameters of WWER-1000 primary coolant with different pH values in autoclave out-pile conditions during 14000 hours is given. Surface of oxide films on stainless steels is investigated. Visual inspection of Westinghouse and TVEL fuel was carried out after 4 cycles in WWER-1000 primary water chemistry conditions at South Ukraine NPP. Westinghouse and TVEL fuel cladding materials possess high corrosion resistance. Blushing of weldments was observed. No visual corrosion defects or deposits were observed on fuel rods.

  18. Corrosion characterization of in-situ titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced aluminium-copper (Al-Cu) alloy by two methods: Salts spray fog and linear polarization resistance (LPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmamuhamadani, R.; Talari, M. K.; Yahaya, Sabrina M.; Sulaiman, S.; Ismail, M. I. S.; Hanim, M. A. Azmah

    2018-05-01

    Aluminium-copper (Al-Cu) alloys is the one of most Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have important high-strength Al alloys. The aluminium (Al) casting alloys, based on the Al-Cu system are widely used in light-weight constructions and transport applications requiring a combination of high strength and ductility. In this research, Al-Cu master alloy was reinforced with 3 and 6wt.% titanium diboride (TiB2) that obtained from salts route reactions. The salts used were were potassium hexafluorotitanate (K2TiF6) and potassium tetrafluoroborate (KBF4). The salts route reaction process were done at 800 °C. The Al-Cu alloy then has characterized on the mechanical properties and microstructure characterization. Salts spray fog test and Gamry-electrode potentiometer instruments were used to determine the corrosion rate of this alloys. From results obtained, the increasement of 3wt.%TiB2 contents will decrease the value of the corrosion rate. In corrosion test that conducted both of salt spray fog and Gamry-electrode potentiometer, the addition of 3wt.%TiB2 gave the good properties in corrosion characterization compare to Al-Cu-6wt.%TiB2 and Al-Cu cast alloy itself. As a comparison, Al-Cu with 3wt.%TiB2 gave the lowest value of corrosion rate, which means alloy has good properties in corrosion characterization. The results obtained show that in-situ Al-Cu alloy composites containing the different weight of TiB2 phase were synthesized successfully by the salt-metal reaction method.

  19. Electrochemical investigations for understanding and controlling corrosion in nuclear reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanamoorthy, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization have been used at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research at Kalpakkam for understanding and controlling the corrosion of nuclear reactor materials such as austenitic stainless steels and chrome-moly steels. Results on the measurements of critical potentials for pitting and crevice corrosion of stainless steels and their weldments and of laser surface modified stainless steels in aqueous chloride solutions are discussed. Investigations carried out to correlate the degree of sensitization in types 304 and 316 stainless steels, measured by the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation technique, with the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion and intergranular stress corrosion cracking have been discussed. The stress corrosion cracking behaviour of weldments of type 316 stainless steel was studied in a boiling solution of a mixture of 5 M NaCl and 0.15 M Na 2 SO 4 acidified to give a pH of 1.3 by monitoring of the open circuit potential with time as well as by anodic polarization. Interesting information could also been obtained on the microbiologically influenced corrosion of type 304 stainless steels in a fresh water system by carrying out cyclic potentiodynamic polarization measurements as well as by monitoring the open circuit potential measurements with exposure time. Since secondary phases present (or developed during thermal ageing) in stainless steels have a significant influence on their corrosion behaviour, the estimation of these secondary phases by electrochemical methods has also been discussed. (author)

  20. Corrosion of Fasteners in Wood Treated with Newer Wood Preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    This document compiles recent research findings related to corrosion of metals in preservative treated wood into a single report on corrosion of metals in wood. The research was conducted as part of the Research, Technology and Education portion of the National Historic Covered Bridge Preservation (NHCBP) Program administered by the Federal Highway Administration. The...

  1. Anodizing of aluminum with improved corrosion properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, P.; Khan, I.U.

    2010-01-01

    Anodizing of aluminum was studied in sulphuric/oxalic/boric acid electroiyte system. The corrosion resistance of the anodic oxide coating of aluminum was determined by potentiodynamic polarization test and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology before and after corrosion test. It was found that the oxide coating obtained by this method showed better corrosion resistance with no significant difference in surface morphology. (author)

  2. Proceedings: On-line monitoring of corrosion an water chemistry for the electric power utility industry: An EPRI workshop held during the 12th International Corrosion Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licina, G.

    1994-03-01

    A two-day EPRI workshop on On-line Monitoring of Corrosion and Water Chemistry for the Electric Power Utility Industry included discussions on a variety of methods for the online monitoring of corrosion and water chemistry in a power plant environment. The workshop was held September 22 and 23, 1993 in Houston, Texas, as a part of the 12th International Corrosion Congress sponsored by NACE International. Methods in various stages of development, from laboratory demonstrations to in-plant monitoring, were presented by authors from all over the world. Recent developments in corrosion monitoring and the detection of specific chemical species in power plant environments have utilized a variety of electrochemical methods (both AC and DC), electrical resistance techniques, and potential drop techniques to evaluate crack extension. Other approaches, such as Raman spectroscopy of corroding surfaces, Specific ion detectors, and X-ray fluorescence and ion chromatography to analyze corrosion products have been demonstrated in the laboratory. Techniques that were described in the twenty-three technical papers included: Electrochemical noise, Electrical resistance, Field signature method, Linear polarization resistance, Neutron activation, Corrosion potential monitoring, Electrochemical detection of biofilm activity, Analysis of corrosion products by X-ray fluorescence, Potential drop method for assessing environmentally assisted crack growth, Harmonic impedance spectroscopy, Contact electric resistance, Conductivity and hydrogen sensors, Solid state methods for tracking oxygen and pH, and Raman spectroscopy. Individual papers are indexed separately

  3. Review of current research and understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Concerns for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of reactor internals are increasing, especially for components that are not readily replaceable. Both laboratory and field data show that intergranular stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys can result from long term exposure to the high energy neutron and gamma radiation that exists in the core of light water reactors (LWR's). Radiation affects cracking susceptibility via changes in material micro-chemistry (radiation induced segregation, or RIS), water chemistry (radiolysis) and material properties/stress (e.g., radiation induced creep and hardening). Based on many common dependencies, e.g., to solution purity, corrosion potential, crevicing and stress, IASCC falls within the continuum of environmental cracking phenomenon in high temperature water

  4. Assessing corrosion in oil refining and petrochemical processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy C. John

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the development of an information system used to manage corrosion of metals and alloys by high temperature gases found in many different oil refining, petrochemical, power generation, and chemical processes. The database currently represents about 7.9 million h of exposure time for about 5,500 tests with 89 commercial alloys for a temperature range of 200 - 1,200°C. The system manages corrosion data from well-defined exposures and determines corrosion product stabilities. New models used in the analysis of thermochemical data for the Fe-Ni-Cr-Co-C-O-S-N-H system are being compiled. All known phases based upon combinations of the elements have been analyzed to allow complete assessments of corrosion product stabilities. Use of these data allows prediction of stable corrosion products and hence identification of the possible dominant corrosion mechanisms. The system has the potential to be used in corrosion research, alloy development, failure analysis, lifetime prediction, and process operations evaluations. The corrosion mechanisms emphasized are oxidation, sulfidation, sulfidation/oxidation, and carburization.

  5. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  6. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program

  7. JAEA's research on the effects of seawater and radiation on corrosion of Zircaloy and PCV/RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Takashi; Motooka, Takafumi; Nakano, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In order to implement successfully a lot of work for the extraction of fuel assemblies from spent fuel pool (SFP) and also for the removal of fuel debris from reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and primary containment vessel (PCV) at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) of Tokyo Electric Power Co., it is necessary to investigate and to prevent the degradation of structural materials of the fuel assemblies and PCV/RPV which are exposed to the gamma radiation and water containing seawater ingredient, because those factors are influencing and possibly accelerating corrosion of the materials. Therefore, at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), we are carrying out the research related to the corrosion issues which may affect the integrity of fuel assemblies and reactor vessels, i.e. PCV and reactor pressure vessel (RPV), from a viewpoint of the effect of gamma radiation and diluted seawater on corrosion behavior as described in this review. In SFP, hydrazine (N_2H_4) was added to salt-containing water in order to reduce dissolved oxygen (DO). Therefore, deoxygenation behavior by N_2H_4 addition was investigated at the ambient temperature. To evaluate the effects of radiolysis on the initiation of pitting corrosion on Zircaloy-2 in water containing sea salt, the pitting potentials of Zircaloy-2 were evaluated. The experimental results showed that the pitting potential under irradiation was slightly higher than that under conditions in which no radiation was present. Corrosion tests of PCV/RPV steels were conducted in diluted seawater at 50degC under gamma-ray irradiation of dose rates of 4.4 and 0.2 kGy/h. To assess the effect of N_2H_4 as an oxygen scavenger under gamma-ray irradiation in PCV condition, 10 and 100 mg/L N_2H_4 were added to the diluted seawater. When gas phase in test flask was replaced with N_2, corrosion weight loss of the steels decreased remarkably. (author)

  8. Management and control of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in the oil and gas industry-Overview and a North Sea case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovhus, Torben Lund; Eckert, Richard B; Rodrigues, Edgar

    2017-08-20

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is the terminology applied where the actions of microorganisms influence the corrosion process. In literature, terms such as microbial corrosion, biocorrosion, microbially influenced/induced corrosion, and biodegradation are often applied. MIC research in the oil and gas industry has seen a revolution over the past decade, with the introduction of molecular microbiological methods: (MMM) as well as new industry standards and procedures of sampling biofilm and corrosion products from the process system. This review aims to capture the most important trends the oil and gas industry has seen regarding MIC research over the past decade. The paper starts out with an overview of where in the process stream MIC occurs - from the oil reservoir to the consumer. Both biotic and abiotic corrosion mechanisms are explained in the context of managing MIC using a structured corrosion management (CM) approach. The corrosion management approach employs the elements of a management system to ensure that essential corrosion control activities are carried out in an effective, sustainable, well-planned and properly executed manner. The 3-phase corrosion management approach covering of both biotic and abiotic internal corrosion mechanisms consists of 1) corrosion assessment, 2) corrosion mitigation and 3) corrosion monitoring. Each of the three phases are described in detail with links to recent field cases, methods, industry standards and sampling protocols. In order to manage the corrosion threat, operators commonly use models to support decision making. The models use qualitative, semi-quantitative or quantitative measures to help assess the rate of degradation caused by MIC. The paper reviews four existing models for MIC Threat Assessment and describe a new model that links the threat of MIC in the oil processing system located on an offshore platform with a Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach. A recent field case highlights and explains

  9. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  10. Corrosion problems in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flis, J.; Janik-Czachor, M.

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics were given of steels and alloys used in the PWR nuclear power plants and of water used in the primary and secondary systems. Corrosion damages of materials and installations were described. It was indicated that the damages were due mainly to stress corrosion cracking. Main preventive methods were listed. (author)

  11. Method for preparing corrosion-resistant ceramic shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, R.M.; Dusek, J.T.

    1979-12-07

    Ceramic shapes having impermeable tungsten coatings can be used for containing highly corrosive molten alloys and salts. The shapes are prepared by coating damp green ceramic shapes containing a small amount of yttria with a tungsten coating slip which has been adjusted to match the shrinkage rate of the green ceramic and which will fire to a theoretical density of at least 80% to provide an impermeable coating.

  12. Development of the mitigation method for carbon steel corrosion with ceramics in PWR secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Masato; Shibasaki, Osamu; Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji

    2012-09-01

    To verify the effect of depositing ceramic (TiO 2 , La 2 O 3 , and Y 2 O 3 ) on carbon steel to mitigate corrosion, corrosion tests were conducted under simulated chemistry conditions in a PWR secondary system. Test specimens (STPT410) were prepared with and without deposited ceramics. The ceramics were deposited on the specimens under high-temperature and high-pressure water conditions. Corrosion tests were conducted under high pH conditions (9.8) with a flow rate of 1.0-4.7 m/s at 185 deg. C for 200 hours. At a flow rate of 1.0 m/s, the amount of corrosion of the specimens with the ceramics was less than half of that of the specimens without the ceramics. As the flow rate increased, the amount of corrosion increased. However, even at a flow rate of 4.7 m/s, the amount of corrosion was reduced by approximately 30% by depositing the ceramics. After the corrosion tests, the surfaces of the specimens were analyzed with SEM and XRD. When the deposited ceramic was TiO 2 , the surface was densely covered with fine particles (less than 1 μm). From XRD analysis, these particles were identified as ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ). We consider that ilmenite may play an important role in mitigating the corrosion of carbon steel. (authors)

  13. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...

  14. Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated Corrosion Testing at ARL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    ARL-TN-0855 ● NOV 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated Corrosion Testing at ARL by... Corrosion Testing at ARL by Thomas A Considine Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Approved for public...November 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Note 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated

  15. Surface Corrosion Resistance in Turning of Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the issues associated with implant surface modification. We propose a method to form the oxide film on implant surfaces by dry turning to generate heat and injecting oxygen-rich gas at the turning-tool flank. The morphology, roughness, composition, and thickness of the oxide films in an oxygen-rich atmosphere were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical profiling, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods were used to study the corrosion resistance of the modified surfaces. The corrosion resistance trends, analyzed relative to the oxide film thickness, indicate that the oxide film thickness is the major factor affecting the corrosion resistance of titanium alloys in a simulated body fluid (SBF. Turning in an oxygen-rich atmosphere can form a thick oxide film on the implant surface. The thickness of surface oxide films processed at an oxygen concentration of 80% was improved to 4.6 times that of films processed at an oxygen concentration of 21%; the free corrosion potential shifted positively by 0.357 V, which significantly improved the corrosion resistance of titanium alloys in the SBF. Therefore, the proposed method may (partially replace the subsequent surface oxidation. This method is significant for biomedical development because it shortens the process flow, improves the efficiency, and lowers the cost.

  16. Corrosion mapping in pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zscherpel, U.; Alekseychuk, O.; Bellon, C.; Ewert, U.; Rost, P.; Schmid, M.

    2002-01-01

    In a joint research project, BASF AG and BAM analyzed the state of the art of tangential radiography of pipes and developed more efficient methods of evaluation. Various PC applications were developed and tested: 1. A program for routine evaluation of digital radiographic images. 2. 3D simulation of the tangential projection of pipes for common radiation sources and various different detectors. 3. Preliminary work on combined evaluation of digital projections and wall thickness changes in radiation direction resulted in a new manner of image display, i.e. the so-called 'corrosion mapping', in which the wall thickness is displayed as a 2D picture above the pipe surface [de

  17. Microstructure characterization and corrosion resistance properties of Pb-Sb alloys for lead acid battery spine produced by different casting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Muneer; Alam, Mohammad Asif; Alharthi, Nabeel

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the microstructure, hardness, and corrosion resistance of Pb-5%Sb spine alloy. The alloy has been produced by high pressure die casting (HPDC), medium pressure die casting (AS) and low pressure die casting (GS) methods, respectively. The microstructure was characterized by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The hardness was also reported. The corrosion resistance of the spines in 0.5M H2SO4 solution has been analyzed by measuring the weight loss, impedance spectroscopy and the potentiodynamic polarization techniques. It has been found that the spine produced by HPDC has defect-free fine grain structure resulting improvement in hardness and excellent corrosion resistance. PMID:29668709

  18. Study of the formation and transport of corrosion products in PWR primary circuit simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Camp, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The formation, migration and deposition of corrosion products in PWR primary circuits are studied in out-of-reactor loops. The aim of these studies is to limit the build-up of the radiation fields impinging on out-of-flux walls and to reduce the danger of rapid corrosion of fuel cans, taking into account the tougher conditions imposed on current trends in the operation of such industrial plants. Four simulator loops and their respective possibilities and research methods are described. (author)

  19. Corrosion behaviours of the dental magnetic keeper complexes made by different alloys and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Ke; Song, Ning; Liu, Fei; Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Min; Wang, Hang; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2016-09-29

    The keeper and cast dowel-coping, as a primary component for a magnetic attachment, is easily subjected to corrosion in a wet environment, such as the oral cavity, which contains electrolyte-rich saliva, complex microflora and chewing behaviour and so on. The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the corrosion resistance of a dowel and coping-keeper complex fabricated by finish keeper and three alloys (cobalt-chromium, CoCr; silver-palladium-gold, PdAu; gold-platinum, AuPt) using a laser-welding process and a casting technique. The surface morphology characteristics and microstructures of the samples were examined by means of metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) with SEM provided elements analysis information for the test samples after 10% oxalic acid solution etching test. Tafel polarization curve recordings demonstrated parameter values indicating corrosion of the samples when subjected to electrochemical testing. This study has suggested that massive oxides are attached to the surface of the CoCr-keeper complex but not to the AuPt-keeper complex. Only the keeper area of cast CoCr-keeper complex displayed obvious intergranular corrosion and changes in the Fe and Co elements. Both cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes had the highest free corrosion potential, followed by the PdAu-keeper complex. We concluded that although the corrosion resistance of the CoCr-keeper complex was worst, the keeper surface passive film was actually preserved to its maximum extent. The laser-welded CoCr- and PdAu-keeper complexes possessed superior corrosion resistance as compared with their cast specimens, but no significant difference was found between the cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes. The Fe-poor and Cr-rich band, appearing on the edge of the keeper when casting, has been proven to be a corrosion-prone area.

  20. Repassivation potentials determination of crevice corrosion of alloy in Chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon Ortiz, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) belongs to the Ni-Cr-Mo family and it is highly resistant to general and localized corrosion, but it may suffer crevice corrosion in aggressive environmental conditions, such as high chloride concentration, high applied potential and high temperature. Alloy 22 is one of the candidates to be considered for the outer corrosion-resistant shell of high-level nuclear waste containers. It is assumed that localized corrosion will only occur when the corrosion potential (E CORR ) is equal or higher than the crevice corrosion repassivation potential (E R,CREV ). This parameter is obtained by different electrochemical techniques using artificially creviced specimens. These techniques include cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) curves, Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu electrochemical (THE) method or other non-standardized methods. Recently, as a variation of THE method, the PD-GS-PD technique was introduced. The aim of the present work was to determine reliable critical potentials for crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in pure chloride solutions at 90 C degrees. Conservative methodologies (which include extended potentiostatic steps) were applied for determining protection potentials below which crevice corrosion cannot initiate and propagate. Results from PD-GS-PD technique were compared with those from these methodologies in order to assess their reliability. Results from the CPP and the THE methods were also considered for comparison. The repassivation potentials from the PD-GS-PD technique were conservative and reproducible, and they did not depend on the amount of previous crevice corrosion propagation in the studied conditions. (author)

  1. A Course in Electrochemical and Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zee, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes a course designed to show similarities between electrochemistry and corrosion engineering and to show graduate students that electrochemical and corrosion engineering can be accomplished by extending their knowledge of chemical engineering models. Includes course outline, textbooks selected, and teaching methods used. (JN)

  2. Exfoliation Corrosion and Pitting Corrosion and Their Role in Fatigue Predictive Modeling: State-of-the-Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Hoeppner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergranular attack (IG and exfoliation corrosion (EC have a detrimental impact on the structural integrity of aircraft structures of all types. Understanding the mechanisms and methods for dealing with these processes and with corrosion in general has been and is critical to the safety of critical components of aircraft. Discussion of cases where IG attack and exfoliation caused issues in structural integrity in aircraft in operational fleets is presented herein along with a much more detailed presentation of the issues involved in dealing with corrosion of aircraft. Issues of corrosion and fatigue related to the structural integrity of aging aircraft are introduced herein. Mechanisms of pitting nucleation are discussed which include adsorption-induced, ion migration-penetration, and chemicomechanical film breakdown theories. In addition, pitting corrosion (PC fatigue models are presented as well as a critical assessment of their application to aircraft structures and materials. Finally environmental effects on short crack behavior of materials are discussed, and a compilation of definitions related to corrosion and fatigue are presented.

  3. Crevice Corrosion on Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Jakupi; D. Zagidulin; J.J. Noel; D.W. Shoesmith

    2006-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys were developed for their exceptional corrosion resistance in a variety of extreme corrosive environments. An alloy from this series, Alloy-22, has been selected as the reference material for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository located in Nevada (US). A possible localized corrosion process under the anticipated conditions at this location is crevice corrosion. therefore, it is necessary to assess how this process may, or may not, propagate if the use of this alloy is to be justified. Consequently, the primary objective is the development of a crevice corrosion damage function that can be used to assess the evolution of material penetration rates. They have been using various electrochemical methods such as potentiostatic, galvanostatic and galvanic coupling techniques. Corrosion damage patterns have been investigated using surface analysis techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. All crevice corrosion experiments were performed at 120 C in 5M NaCl solution. Initiating crevice corrosion on these alloys has proven to be difficult; therefore, they have forced it to occur under either potentiostatic or galvanostatic conditions

  4. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  5. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M H; Pickering, S; Whitlow, W H [EURATOM (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  6. Online, real-time corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  7. Structural performance evaluation on aging underground reinforced concrete structures. Part 6. An estimation method of threshold value in performance verification taking reinforcing steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Miyagawa, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses applicability of material degradation model due to reinforcing steel corrosion for RC box-culverts with corroded reinforcement and an estimation method for threshold value in performance verification reflecting reinforcing steel corrosion. First, in FEM analyses, loss of reinforcement section area and initial tension strain arising from reinforcing steel corrosion, and deteriorated bond characteristics between reinforcement and concrete were considered. The full-scale loading tests using corroded RC box-culverts were numerically analyzed. As a result, the analyzed crack patterns and load-strain relationships were in close agreement with the experimental results within the maximum corrosion ratio 15% of primary reinforcement. Then, we showed that this modeling could estimate the load carrying capacity of corroded RC box-culverts. Second, a parametric study was carried out for corroded RC box culverts with various sizes, reinforcement ratios and levels of steel corrosion, etc. Furthermore, as an application of analytical results and various experimental investigations, we suggested allowable degradation ratios for a modification of the threshold value, which corresponds to the chloride induced deterioration progress that is widely accepted in maintenance practice for civil engineering reinforced concrete structures. Finally, based on these findings, we developed two estimation methods for threshold value in performance verification: 1) a structural analysis method using nonlinear FEM included modeling of material degradation, 2) a practical method using a threshold value, which is determined by structural analyses of RC box-culverts in sound condition, is multiplied by the allowable degradation ratio. (author)

  8. Investigations of corrosion phenomena on gold coins with SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhofer, K.E.; Piplits, K.; Traum, R.; Griesser, M.; Hutter, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to establish a new handling procedure for contaminated coins, the Coin Cabinet and the Conservation Science Department of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, initiated a research project on corrosion effects of gold coins. By now, investigations on historic and contemporary coins included optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron microscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS), and electrochemical methods showing the distribution of pollutants. This work focuses on secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) investigations merely showing the distribution of electronegative elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and chlorine on the surface. Sulfur is highly suspected of causing the observed corrosion phenomena, and is indeed enriched near polluting splints. Since SIMS is a destructive method, the investigated samples are test coins with intentionally added impurities. These coins were manufactured in cooperation with the Austrian Mint. They were treated with potassium polysulfide (K 2 S x ) for 8 h gaining a rapid corrosion of the surface. SIMS mass spectra, depth profiles, and images were done (a) at non-polluted areas (b) near polluted areas with slight coloring, and (c) directly at polluting stains showing enrichments of sulfur and chlorine. Due to the success of these investigations further studies on historic coins are intended

  9. Corrosion resistance and development length of steel reinforcement with cementitious coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaofei

    This research program focused on the corrosion resistance and development length of reinforcing steel coated with Cementitious Capillary Crystalline Waterproofing (CCCW) materials. The first part of this research program involved using the half-cell potential method to evaluate the corrosion resistance of CCCW coating materials. One hundred and two steel bars were embedded in concrete cylinders and monitored. In total, 64 steel reinforcing bars were coated with CCCW prior to embedment, 16 mortar cylinders were externally coated with CCCW, and 22 control (uncoated) samples were tested. All the samples were immersed in a 3.5% concentration chloride solution for a period of one year. Three coating types were studied: CCCW-B, CCCW-B+ C and CCCW-C+D. The test results showed that the CCCW coating materials delayed the corrosion activity to varying degrees. In particular, CCCW-C+D applied on the reinforcing steel surface dramatically delayed the corrosion activity when compared to the control samples. After being exposed to the chloride solution for a period of one year, no sign of corrosion was observed for the cylinders where the concrete surface was coated. The second part of this research evaluated the bond strength and development length of reinforcing steel coated with two types of CCCW coating materials (CCCW-B+C and CCCW-C+D) using a modified pull-out test method. A self-reacting inverted T-shaped beam was designed to avoid compression in the concrete surrounding the reinforcing steel. Steel reinforcing bars were embedded along the web portion of the T-beam with various embedded lengths and were staggered side by side. In total, six T-beams were fabricated and each beam contained 8 samples. Both short-term (7 days) and long-term (3 months) effects of water curing were evaluated. The reinforcing steel bars coated with CCCW-B+C demonstrated a higher bond strength than did samples coated with CCCW-C+D. However, the bond strengths of samples with coating materials

  10. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  11. Synergistic Effect of Potassium Iodide on Corrosion Inhibition of Mild ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    fruticans' wurmb extract on corrosion of mild steel in 0.1M and 0.5M HCl have been investigated using weight loss methods. ... efficient ways of combating the corrosion of metals. Among other ..... chloride ion on cold rolled steel corrosion.

  12. Corrosion protection of ENIG surface finishing using electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, Q.V.; Nam, N.D.; Choi, D.H.; Lee, J.B.; Lee, C.Y.; Kar, A.; Kim, J.G.; Jung, S.B.

    2010-01-01

    Four types of thin film coating were carried out on copper for electronic materials by the electroless plating method at a pH range from 3 to 9. The coating performance was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization testing in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. In addition, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction were also used to analyze the coating surfaces. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings was improved using the electroless nickel plating solution of pH 5. The electroless nickel/immersion gold on the copper substrate exhibited high protective efficiency, charge transfer resistance and very low porosity, indicating an increase in corrosion resistance. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the surface uniformity and the formation of the crystalline-refined NiP {1 2 2} phase at pH 5.

  13. Fighting corrosion in air pollution control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenhouse, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that materials is the name of the game for corrosion prevention in air pollution control equipment. Whether the system is already in place, a retrofit, are specified for a new power pant, preventing corrosion is critical, because such deterioration easily undermines reliability. Hence, materials can heavily influence power plant compliance to the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, perhaps the most vulnerable area to corrosion, are expected to be the method of choice for sulfur removal in many power plants in the near term. Components of these systems have various degrees of susceptibility to corrosion and related problems

  14. Corrosion-Mitigating, Bondable, Fluorinated Barrier Coating for Anodized Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TR-7669 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Corrosion -Mitigating, Bondable, Fluorinated Barrier Coating for Anodized...ARL-TR-7669 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Corrosion -Mitigating, Bondable, Fluorinated Barrier Coating for Anodized...TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) May 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January–December 2015 4. TITLE

  15. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Corrosion and Tribological Properties of Pulse-Electrodeposited Co-W Composite Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward Anand, E.; Natarajan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-Tungsten (Co-W) alloy coatings possessing high hardness and wear/corrosion resistance, due to their ecofriendly processing, have been of interest to the researchers owing to its various industrial applications in automobile, aerospace, and machine parts. This technical paper reports Co-W alloy coatings dispersed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced by pulse electrodeposition from aqueous bath involving cobalt sulfate, sodium tungstate, and citric acid on stainless steel substrate (SS316). Studies on surface morphology through SEM, microhardness by Vickers method, microwear by pin-on-disk method, and corrosion behavior through potentiodynamic polarization method for the Co-W-CNT coatings were reported. Characterization studies were done by SEM and EDX analysis. The results showed that the corrosion and tribological properties of the pulse-electrodeposited Co-W-CNT alloy coatings were greatly influenced by its morphology, microhardness, %W, and MWCNT content in the coatings.

  16. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...

  17. System for corrosion monitoring in pipeline applying fuzzy logic mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, O. N.; Kolosova, A. L.; Andreeva, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    A list of factors influencing corrosion rate on the external side of underground pipeline is determined. Principles of constructing a corrosion monitoring system are described; the system performance algorithm and program are elaborated. A comparative analysis of methods for calculating corrosion rate is undertaken. Fuzzy logic mathematics is applied to reduce calculations while considering a wider range of corrosion factors.

  18. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was, G. S.; Ampornrat, P.; Gupta, G.; Teysseyre, S.; West, E. A.; Allen, T. R.; Sridharan, K.; Tan, L.; Chen, Y.; Ren, X.; Pister, C.

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has attracted increasing attention since SCW boiler power plants were implemented to increase the efficiency of fossil-based power plants. The SCW reactor (SCWR) design has been selected as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts because of its higher thermal efficiency and plant simplification as compared to current light water reactors (LWRs). Reactor operating conditions call for a core coolant temperature between 280 °C and 620 °C at a pressure of 25 MPa and maximum expected neutron damage levels to any replaceable or permanent core component of 15 dpa (thermal reactor design) and 100 dpa (fast reactor design). Irradiation-induced changes in microstructure (swelling, radiation-induced segregation (RIS), hardening, phase stability) and mechanical properties (strength, thermal and irradiation-induced creep, fatigue) are also major concerns. Throughout the core, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and the effect of irradiation on these degradation modes are critical issues. This paper reviews the current understanding of the response of candidate materials for SCWR systems, focusing on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking response, and highlights the design trade-offs associated with certain alloy systems. Ferritic-martensitic steels generally have the best resistance to stress corrosion cracking, but suffer from the worst oxidation. Austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys have better oxidation resistance but are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The promise of grain boundary engineering and surface modification in addressing corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance is discussed.

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Basalt/Epoxy Composites under Bending Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrieh, Mahmood M.; Memar, Mahdi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the stress corrosion behavior of basalt/epoxy composites under bending loading and submerged in 5% sulfuric acid corrosive medium. There are limited numbers of research in durability of fiber reinforced polymer composites. Moreover, studies on basalt fibers and its composites are very limited. In this research, mechanical property degradation of basalt/epoxy composites under bending loading and submerged in acidic corrosive medium is investigated. Three states of stress, equal to 30%, 50% and 70% of the ultimate strength of composites, are applied on samples. High stress states are applied to the samples to accelerate the testing procedure. Mechanical properties degradation consists of bending strength, bending modulus of elasticity and fracture energy of samples are examined. Also, a normalized strength degradation model for stress corrosion condition is presented. Finally, microscopic images of broken cross sections of samples are examined.

  20. Understanding the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel and copper in sulphuric acid medium by amino acids using electrochemical techniques allied to molecular modelling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonça, Glaydson L.F.; Costa, Stefane N.; Freire, Valder N.; Casciano, Paulo N.S.; Correia, Adriana N.; Lima-Neto, Pedro de

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion inhibition of carbon steel and of copper by the amino acids was studied. • Inhibition efficiencies were experimentally achieved by electrochemical impedance. • DFT and Monte Carlo methods allowed correlating molecular properties with inhibition efficiency. • The corrosion inhibition followed the electron donation the electron-back donations process. - Abstract: Six amino acids were evaluated as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel and copper in 0.5 mol L"−"1 H_2SO_4 solution by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance techniques allied to Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo computations The corrosion inhibitor rankings were: Arg > Gln > Asn > Met > Cys > Ser, for copper, and Met > Cys > Ser > Arg > Gln > Asn, for carbon steel. The DFT approach failed to explain the corrosion inhibition rating based on the HOMO and LUMO energies of the isolated amino acid molecules, while the simpler classical Monte Carlo approach, performed considering the interaction energies between the corrosion inhibitor and the metallic substrate, was successful.

  1. Corrosion penetration monitoring of advanced ceramics in hot aqueous fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G. Nickel

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramics are considered as components in energy related systems, because they are known to be strong, wear and corrosion resistant in many environments, even at temperatures well exceeding 1000 °C. However, the presence of additives or impurities in important ceramics, for example those based on Silicon Nitride (Si3N4 or Al2O3 makes them vulnerable to the corrosion by hot aqueous fluids. The temperatures in this type of corrosion range from several tens of centigrade to hydrothermal conditions above 100 °C. The corrosion processes in such media depend on both pH and temperature and include often partial leaching of the ceramics, which cannot be monitored easily by classical gravimetric or electrochemical methods. Successful corrosion penetration depth monitoring by polarized reflected light optical microscopy (color changes, Micro Raman Spectroscopy (luminescence changes and SEM (porosity changes will be outlined. The corrosion process and its kinetics are monitored best by microanalysis of cross sections, Raman spectroscopy and eluate chemistry changes in addition to mass changes. Direct cross-calibrations between corrosion penetration and mechanical strength is only possible for severe corrosion. The methods outlined should be applicable to any ceramics corrosion process with partial leaching by fluids, melts or slags.

  2. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  3. Corrosion monitoring using FSM technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strommen, R.; Horn, H.; Gartland, P.O.; Wold, K.; Haroun, M.

    1995-01-01

    FSM is a non-intrusive monitoring technique based on a patented principle, developed for the purpose of detection and monitoring of both general and localized corrosion, erosion, and cracking in steel and metal structures, piping systems, and vessels. Since 1991, FSM has been used for a wide range of applications, including for buried and open pipelines, process piping offshore, subsea pipelines and flowlines, applications in the nuclear power industry, and in materials, research in general. This paper describes typical applications of the FSM technology, and presents operational experience from some of the land-based and subsea installations. The paper also describes recent enhancements in the FSM technology and in the analysis of FSM readings, allowing for monitoring and detailed quantification of pitting and mesa corrosion, and of corrosion in welds

  4. The impact of corrosion on oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermani, M.B.; Harrop, D.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of corrosion on the oil industry has been viewed in terms of its effect on both capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX) and health, safety and the environment (HSE). To fight against the high cost and the impact of corrosion within the oil industry, an overview of topical research and engineering activities is presented. This covers corrosion and metallurgy issues related to drilling, production, transportation and refinery activities

  5. Effects of Alloyed Carbon on the General Corrosion and the Pitting Corrosion Behavior of FeCrMnN Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Sung-Joon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The effects of alloyed carbon on the pitting corrosion, the general corrosion, and the passivity behavior of Fe{sub 1}8Cr{sub 1}0Mn{sub 0}.4Nx{sub C} (x=0 ⁓ 0.38 wt%) alloys were investigated by various electrochemical methods and XPS analysis. The alloyed carbon increased the general corrosion resistance of the FeCrMnN matrix. Carbon enhanced the corrosion potential, reduced the metal dissolution rate, and accelerated the hydrogen evolution reaction rate in various acidic solutions. In addition, carbon promoted the pitting corrosion resistance of the matrix in a chloride solution. The alloyed carbon in the matrix increased the chromium content in the passive film, and thus the passive film became more protective.

  6. Corrosion Studies of Wrought and Cast NASA-23 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion studies were carried out for wrought and cast NASA-23 alloy using electrochemical methods. The scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR), and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed. These studies corroborate the findings of stress corrosion studies performed earlier, in that the material is highly resistant to corrosion.

  7. Risk based service life prediction of underground cast iron pipes subjected to corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.Q.; Mahmoodian, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aging and deterioration of underground cast iron pipes is inevitable after their long time in service, with corrosion being the most predominant mechanism for pipe failures. Although considerable research has been undertaken in the past few decades, more is on the effects of corrosion on structural capacity of pipes than that on the prediction of their service life. This paper presents a methodology to quantitatively assess the risk of pipe collapse and predict its remaining service life using a time-dependent reliability theory. The concept of stress intensity in fracture mechanics is employed to establish the failure criterion of pipe collapse. An empirical model is derived for maximum pit growth of corrosion from the available data based on mathematical regressions. An example is provided to illustrate the application of the proposed method. It is found in the paper that the risk of pipe collapse increases with an increase in the diameter of the pipe for both external and internal corrosion. It is also found that the tougher the pipe is, the smaller the risk of its collapse. The paper concludes that a time-dependent reliability method is a very useful tool to predict the risk of pipe collapse and its remaining service life. The proposed method can help the water industry develop rehabilitation or replacement strategy for existing pipe networks with a view for better management of the pipe asset

  8. Study on electrochemical corrosion mechanism of steel foot of insulators for HVDC lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weihua; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fan, Youping

    2017-09-01

    The main content of this paper is the mechanism of electrochemical corrosion of insulator steel foot in HVDC transmission line, and summarizes five commonly used artificial electrochemical corrosion accelerated test methods in the world. Various methods are analyzed and compared, and the simulation test of electrochemical corrosion of insulator steel feet is carried out by water jet method. The experimental results show that the experimental environment simulated by water jet method is close to the real environment. And the three suspension modes of insulators in the actual operation, the most serious corrosion of the V type suspension hardware, followed by the tension string suspension, and the linear string corrosion rate is the slowest.

  9. Failure prediction for Crack-in-Corrosion defects in natural gas transmission pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedairi, B.; Cronin, D.; Hosseini, A.; Plumtree, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cracks occurring coincidentally with corrosion (Crack-in-Corrosion or CIC), represent a new hybrid defect in pipelines that are not directly addressed in the current codes or assessment methods. To understand the failure response of these defects, the finite element method using an elastic–plastic fracture mechanics approach was applied to predict the failure pressures of comparable crack, corrosion and CIC defects in 508 mm diameter pipe with 5.7 mm wall thickness. Failure pressure predictions were made based on measured tensile, Charpy impact and J testing data, and validated using experimental rupture tests. Plastic collapse was predicted for corrosion and crack defects using the critical strength based on the material tensile strength, whereas fracture was predicted using the measured J 0.2 value. The model predictions were found to be conservative for the CIC defects (17.4% on average), 12.4% conservative for crack-only defects, and 3.2% conservative for corrosion defects compared to the experimental tests, demonstrating the applicability of the material-based failure criteria. For the defects considered in this study, all were predicted to fail by plastic collapse. The finite element method provided less conservative predictions than existing corrosion or crack-based analytical methods. Highlights: ► Cracks occurring coincidentally with corrosion represent a new hybrid defect in pipelines. ► Existing methods for prediction corrosion and crack defect failure pressures are conservative. ► The FE method can provide improved prediction of rupture pressure using actual material properties. ► Failure was predicted using FE with a critical stress for plastic collapse and J value for fracture. ► FE failure pressure predictions for crack in corrosion defects were 17% conservative on average.

  10. Effects of slag and fly ash on reinforcement corrosion in concrete in chloride environment : Research from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    A review is given of research on the durability performance of concrete made with blast furnace slag and fly ash related to chloride induced reinforcement corrosion, carried out in the Netherlands, where slag has been used in cement for almost a century. Results are presented from field studies on

  11. Effects of slag and fly ash on reinforcement corrosion in concrete in chloride environment. Research from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    A review is given of research on the durability performance of concrete made with blast furnace slag and fly ash related to chloride induced reinforcement corrosion, carried out in the Netherlands, where slag has been used in cement for almost a century. Results are presented from field studies on

  12. Comparison Of Metal Corrosion Inhibition By Gravimetric And Linear Polarization Resistance Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Banerji, Shankha

    1992-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various dosages of the selected silicate and phosphate compounds applied for corrosion inhibition of cast iron, copper, lead, and galvanized steel specimens. The compounds selected for study were zinc polyphosphate (Calgon C-39), zinc orthophosphate (Virchem V-931), sodium metasilicate and glassy silicate. The effectiveness of these compounds for corrosion inhibition were studied under differing water quality conditions using gravimetric...

  13. Electrodeposited Reduced Graphene Oxide Films on Stainless Steel, Copper, and Aluminum for Corrosion Protection Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkareem Mohammed Ali Al-Sammarraie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The enhancement of corrosion protection of metals and alloys by coating with simple, low cost, and highly adhered layer is still a main goal of many workers. In this research graphite flakes converted into graphene oxide using modified Hammers method and then reduced graphene oxide was electrodeposited on stainless steel 316, copper, and aluminum for corrosion protection application in seawater at four temperatures, namely, 20, 30, 40, and 50°C. All corrosion measurements, kinetics, and thermodynamics parameters were established from Tafel plots using three-electrode potentiostat. The deposited films were examined by FTIR, Raman, XRD, SEM, and AFM techniques; they revealed high percentages of conversion to the few layers of graphene with confirmed defects.

  14. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigates the inhibition of corrosive behavior of SAE1010 steel by bacterial exopolysaccharides. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of diffe...

  15. Synergistic Effect on Corrosion Inhibition Efficiency of Ginger Affinale Extract in Controlling Corrosion of Mild Steel in Acid Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Ananth Kumar; Arumugam, Sankar; Mallaiya, Kumaravel; Subramaniam, Rameshkumar

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition nature of Ginger affinale extract for the corrosion of mild steel in 0.5N H 2 SO 4 was investigated using weight loss, electrochemical impedance and potentiodynamic polarization methods. The results revealed that Ginger affinale extract acts as a good corrosion inhibitor in 0.5N H 2 SO 4 medium. The inhibition efficiency increased with an increase in inhibitor concentration. The inhibition could be attributed to the adsorption of the inhibitor on the steel surface

  16. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  17. Research on corrosion aspects of the advanced cold process canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, D.J.; Hoch, A.R.; Naish, C.C.; Rance, A.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Cold Process Canister (ACPC) is a waste canister being developed jointly by SKB and TVO for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. It comprises an outer copper canister, with a carbon steel canister inside. A concern regarding the use of the ACPC is that, in the unlikely event that the outer copper canister is penetrated, the anaerobic corrosion of the carbon steel container may result in the formation of hydrogen gas bubbles. These bubbles could disrupt the backfill, and thus increase water flow through the near field and the flux of radionuclides to the host geology. A number of factors that influence the rate at which hydrogen evolves as a result of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in artificial granitic groundwaters have been investigated. A previously observed, time-dependent decline in the hydrogen evolution rate has been confirmed as being due to the production of magnetite film. Once the magnetite film is about 0.7-1.0 μm thick, the rate of hydrogen evolution reaches a steady state value. The pH and the ionic strength of the groundwater were both found to influence the long-term hydrogen evolution rate. The results of the experimental programme were used to update a model of the corrosion behaviour and hydrogen production from the Advanced Cold Process Canister. 36 figs, 5 tabs, 13 refs

  18. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  19. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3-2 and NO-3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10-4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  20. Numerical simulation of the detection of crack in reinforced concrete structures of NPP due to expansion of reinforcing corrosive products using Impact-Echo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morávka Š.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy boom is starting nowadays. But also current nuclear power plants (NPP are duty to certify their security for regular renewal of their operating licenses. NPP security can be significantly affected by defects of large amount of ageing reinforced concrete structures. Advanced Impact-Echo method seams to be very hopeful to cooperate at performing in-service inspections such structures. Just these in-service inspections are included in the first priority group of specific technical issues according to the recommendations of OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency, Commission on Safety of Nuclear Installation in the field of ageing management.This paper continues of extensive project dealing with Impact-Echo method application. It will present method description and main results of numerical modeling of detection and localization of crack caused by corrosive product expansion. Steel reinforcing rods are subjected to corrosion due to diffusion of corrosive agents from structure surface. Corrosive products have up to 7-times larger volume than pure steel. Raised strain can cad lead up to concrete failure and crack development. We investigate whether it is possible to detect these growing cracks by Impact-Echo method in time.Experimental verification of our numerical predictions is prepared on Civil Faculty in Brno.

  1. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  2. Corrosion of aluminium-clad spent fuel in LVR-15 research reactor storage facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splichal, K.; Berka, J.; Keilova, E.

    2006-03-01

    The corrosion of the research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water was investigated in two storage facilities. The standard racks were delivered by the IAEA and consisted of two aluminium alloys AA 6061 and Szav-1 coupons. Bimetallic couples create aluminium alloy and stainless steel 304 coupons. Rolled and extruded AA 6061 material was also tested. Single coupons, bimetallic and crevice couples were exposed in the at-reactor basin (ARB) and the high-level wastage pool (HLW). The water chemistry parameters were monitored and sedimentation of impurities was measured. The content of impurities of mainly Cl and SO 4 was in the range of 2 to 15 μg/l in the HLW pool; it was about one order higher in ARB. The Fe content was below 2 μg/l for both facilities. After two years of exposure the pitting was evaluated as local corrosion damage. The occurrence of pits was evaluated predominantly on the surfaces of single coupons and on the outer and inner surfaces of bimetallic and crevices coupons. No correlation was found between the pitting initiation and the type of aluminium alloys and rolled and extruded materials. In bimetallic couples the presence of stainless coupons did not have any effect on local corrosion. The depth of pits was lower than 50 μm for considerable areas of coupons and should be compared with the results of other participating institutes. (author)

  3. A mathematical model of crevice and pitting corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharland, S.M.; Tasker, P.W.

    1985-09-01

    A predictive and self-consistent mathematical model incorporating the electrochemical, chemical and ionic migration processes characterising crevice and pitting corrosion is described. The model predicts full details of the steady-state solution chemistry and electrode kinetics (and hence metal penetration rates) within the corrosion cavities as functions of the many parameters on which these depend such as external electrode potential and crevice dimensions. The crevice is modelled as a parallel-sided slot filled with a dilute sodium chloride solution. Corrosion in both one and two directions is considered. The model includes a solid hydroxide precipitation reaction and assesses the effect on the corrosion rates of consequent changes in the chemical and physical environment within the crevice. A time stepping method is developed for the study of the progression of the corrosion with a precipitation reaction included and is applied to a restricted range of parameters. The applicability of this method is justified in relation to the physical and mathematical approximations made during the construction of the model. (author)

  4. Experimental Investigation on Corrosion of Cast Iron Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mohebbi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that corrosion is the predominant mechanism for the deterioration of cast iron pipes, leading to the reduction of pipe capacity and ultimate collapse of the pipes. In order to assess the remaining service life of corroded cast iron pipes, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms of corrosion over a long term and to develop models for pipe deterioration. Although many studies have been carried out to determine the corrosion behavior of cast iron, little research has been undertaken to understand how cast iron pipes behave over a longer time scale than hours, days, or weeks. The present paper intends to fill the gap regarding the long-term corrosion behaviour of cast iron pipes in the absence of historical data. In this paper, a comprehensive experimental program is presented in which the corrosion behaviour of three exservice pipes was thoroughly examined in three simulated service environments. It has been found in the paper that localised corrosion is the primary form of corrosion of cast iron water pipes. It has also been found that the microstructure of cast irons is a key factor that affects the corrosion behaviour of cast iron pipes. The paper concludes that long-term tests on corrosion behaviour of cast iron pipes can help develop models for corrosion-induced deterioration of the pipes for use in predicting the remaining service life of the pipes.

  5. The application of image processing to the detection of corrosion by radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, M.E.

    1979-02-01

    The computer processing of digitised radiographs has been investigated with a view to improving x-radiography as a method for detecting corrosion. Linearisation of the image-density distribution in a radiograph has been used to enhance information which can be attributed to corrosion, making the detection of corrosion by radiography both easier and more reliable. However, conclusive evidence has yet to be obtained that image processing can result in the detection of corrosion which was not already faintly apparent on an unprocessed radiograph. A potential method has also been discovered for analysing the history of a corrosion site

  6. Corrosion and Fatigue of Aluminum Alloys: Chemistry, Micro-Mechanics and Reliability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Lehigh University undertook a multidisciplinary program of research to develop a basic mechanistic understanding of localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth in aluminum...

  7. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haiya; Tian, Yimei; Wan, Jianmei; Zhao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Compared to sterile water, biofilm in reclaimed water promoted corrosion process significantly. • Corrosion rate was accelerated by the biofilm in the first 7 days but was inhibited afterwards. • There was an inverse correlation between the biofilm thickness and general corrosion rate. • Corrosion process was influenced by bacteria, EPS and corrosion products comprehensively. • The corrosion process can be divided into three different stages in our study. - Abstract: Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  8. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haiya, E-mail: flying850612@126.com; Tian, Yimei, E-mail: ymtian_2000@126.com; Wan, Jianmei, E-mail: 563926510@qq.com; Zhao, Peng, E-mail: zhpeng@tju.edu.cn

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Compared to sterile water, biofilm in reclaimed water promoted corrosion process significantly. • Corrosion rate was accelerated by the biofilm in the first 7 days but was inhibited afterwards. • There was an inverse correlation between the biofilm thickness and general corrosion rate. • Corrosion process was influenced by bacteria, EPS and corrosion products comprehensively. • The corrosion process can be divided into three different stages in our study. - Abstract: Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  9. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  10. New water guidelines developed to battle nuclear corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses methods of preventing degradation of nuclear steam generators due to a combination of impurities and corrosion products in the secondary system. Explains that tube and support-plate corrosion has been the main concern, manifesting itself primarily in the recirculating units used in PWR systems. Points out that the battle against corrosion is closely linked to control of ionic impurities, alkalinity, oxidants, and sludge-copper and iron corrosion products, primarily-in condensate and feedwater systems. Examines a set of secondary-water-chemistry guidelines developed by the Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG). Presents diagram showing changes at Salem 1 to arrest corrosion, including condenser retubing, addition of condensate polisher and recirculation loop. Table indicates how preventive measures at Salem 1, affected secondary-water chemistry

  11. Collaborative University Research on Corrosion OSD Education Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Coatings for Corrosion Cracking Resistance include: Under Evaluation of the Performance of A Magnesium Rich, Non- Chrome Primer and Discrepancies...the Performance of a Magnesium Rich, Non- Chrome Primer that was first reported in September 30th, 2012. In the first task report in this final report...steel and 2 series aluminum alloys, among others. Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is the main protective component in CCCs. However, it has been

  12. Corrosion monitoring in insulated pipes using x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad; Abd Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Suffian Saad; Shaharuddin Sayuti; Shukri Ahmad

    2000-01-01

    In engineering plants, detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using radiography method are considered as very challenging tasks. In general, this degradation problem is attributed to water condensation. It causes the formation of deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe in cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the study of corrosion in pipelines, one of the most important parameters to be monitored and measured is the wall thickness. Currently, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is performed using an ultrasonic method. The most notable disadvantage of using this method is that the insulation covering the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason, the possibility of employing other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method was studied. The technique used in this studied are known as tangential technique. In this study it was found that the result found using tangential technique is consistent with the actual thickness of the pipe. Besides the thickness, types of corrosion can also be identified easily. Result of this study is presented and discussed in this paper. (Author)

  13. Electrochemical methods for the inspection of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures - field experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsener, B.; Boehni, H.

    1992-01-01

    Maintenance and planning of the restoration work on reinforced concrete structures need a rapid, non-destructive inspection technique that detects corrosion at an early stage. In this paper the field experience with electrochemical techniques are reported. The results of potential surveys on bridge decks of the Swiss highways, realized with a new computer controlled eight-wheel measurement system, clearly show that a fixed potential value (as proposed in ASTM C 876-87) for the identification and location of active corrosion of steel in concrete does not exist. A statistical elaboration of the potential data allows to identify the potential value for corroding and passive rebar for each structure individually. A rapid new technique using galvanostatic pulse measurements was tested successfully on site. It gives clear, unambiguous results on the corrosion state of the rebars when half-cell potentials are uncertain. In addition, the ohmic resistance and the apparent polarization resistance are determined from the evaluation of the transients. From these values the concrete resistivity and the actual corrosion rate of the rebars may be estimated

  14. Optimization of the method for determining the corrosion-crevice repassivation potential of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuichi; Akashi, Masatsune; Sasaki, Hidetsugu; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the resistance of a candidate overpack material for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste to the crevice corrosion, the optimized test method for determining the corrosion-crevice repassivation potential, E R,CREV , of a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (Alloy 22) was developed based on that of stainless steels (JIS G0592). It was found that two restrictions shall be satisfied for determining the valid value of E R,CREV for Alloy 22. Restriction (a) was to avoid transpassive dissolution, and (b) was to obtain a penetration depth of 65 μm or more in creviced areas. The recommended procedure in JIS G 0592 at the corrosion-crevice initiation stage, which involved the potentiodynamic anodic polarization at a scan rate of 30 mV min -1 , could not satisfy the restriction (a). Consequently, we adopted the potentiostatic holding at the potential below the critical potential for transpassive dissolution. The recommended procedure in JIS G 0592 at the corrosion-crevice propagation stage, which involved the galvanostatic holding at an applied current of 200 μA for 2 hours, could not always satisfy the restriction (b), and the applied current of 1600 μA or more could not satisfy the restriction (a). Therefore, we adopted the galvanostatic holding at a current of 800 μA for 2 hours. The limits of safety usage of Alloy 22 were evaluated by values of E R,CREV which were measured with the optimized procedure in 0.1 to 4 mol dm -3 sodium chloride solutions at 90degC. (author)

  15. Electrochemical tests for pitting and crevice corrosion susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postlethwaite, J.

    1983-01-01

    Passive metals are being considered as container materials for the disposal of nuclear waste by deep burial. Localized corrosion is a potential problem and electrochemical techniques have an important role in the assessment of the susceptibility of these container materials to crevice and pitting corrosion. This paper critically reviews both the theoretical background and the experimental details of the electrochemical test methods presently used in both industrial and scientific studies of localized corrosion in both halide and non-halide solutions and identifies those areas where theory and experimental behaviour are in agreement and those areas for which there is neither well established theory nor an experimental test method

  16. Corrosion control of carbon steel using inhibitor of banana peel extract in acid diluted solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komalasari; Utami, S. P.; Fermi, M. I.; Aziz, Y.; Irianti, R. S.

    2018-04-01

    Issues of corrosion happened in pipes, it was used as fluid transportation in the chemical industry. Corrosion cannot be preventing, however it could be controlled or blocked. Inhibitor addition is one of the method to control the corrosion inside the pipe. Corrosion inhibitors consisted of inorganic and organic compound inhibitors. Organic inhibitor is composed from synthetic and natural material. This study focused to evaluate the inhibition’s efficiency from banana peel to carbon steel in different concentration of inhibitor and immersing time in acid solution variation. The research employed inhibitor concentration of 0 gram/liter, 2 gram/liter, 4 gram/liter and 6 gram/liter, immersed time of carbon steel for 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours. It was immersed in chloride acid solution of 0.5 M and 1.5 M. Carbon Steel AISI 4041 was used as specimen steel. Results were analyzed using corrosion rate evaluation for each specimens and inhibitor efficiencies determination. It was found that the specimen without inhibitor yielded fast corrosion rate in long immersing time and high concentration of HCl. However, the specimens with inhibitor gave lowest corrosion rate which was 78.59% for 6 gram/litre and 10 hours in 0.5 M HCl.

  17. Terahertz NDE application for corrosion detection and evaluation under Shuttle tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Madaras, Eric I.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Smith, Stephen W.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Winfree, William P.; Russell, Richard W.

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed Terahertz NDE is being examined as a method to inspect for possible corrosion under Space Shuttle Tiles. Other methods such as ultrasonics, infrared, eddy current and microwave technologies have demonstrable shortcomings for tile NDE. This work applies Terahertz NDE, in the frequency range between 50 GHz and 1 THz, for the inspection of manufactured corrosion samples. The samples consist of induced corrosion spots that range in diameter (2.54 to 15.2 mm) and depth (0.036 to 0.787 mm) in an aluminum substrate material covered with tiles. Results of these measurements are presented for known corrosion flaws both covered and uncovered and for blind tests with unknown corrosion flaws covered with attached tiles. The Terahertz NDE system is shown to detect all artificially manufactured corrosion regions under a Shuttle tile with a depth greater than 0.13 mm.

  18. Synergistic Effect on Corrosion Inhibition Efficiency of Ginger Affinale Extract in Controlling Corrosion of Mild Steel in Acid Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Ananth Kumar; Arumugam, Sankar [Kandaswami Kandar' s College, Namakkal (India); Mallaiya, Kumaravel; Subramaniam, Rameshkumar [PSG College of Technology Peelamedu, Coimbatore (India)

    2013-12-15

    The corrosion inhibition nature of Ginger affinale extract for the corrosion of mild steel in 0.5N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was investigated using weight loss, electrochemical impedance and potentiodynamic polarization methods. The results revealed that Ginger affinale extract acts as a good corrosion inhibitor in 0.5N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} medium. The inhibition efficiency increased with an increase in inhibitor concentration. The inhibition could be attributed to the adsorption of the inhibitor on the steel surface.

  19. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  20. Statistical evaluation of unobserved nonuniform corrosion in A216 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsipher, B.A.

    1988-07-01

    Tests designed to promote nonuniform corrosion have been conducted at PNL on A216 steel. In all of the tests performed to date, there have been no manifestations of significant nonuniform corrosion. Although this may suggest that nonuniform corrosion in A216 steel may not be a significant problem in the nuclear waste repository, a question arises as to whether enough tests have been conducted for a sufficient length of time to rule out nonuniform corrosion of A216 steel. In this report, a method for determining the required number of tests is examined for two of the mechanisms of nonuniform corrosion: pitting and crevice corrosion

  1. Integrated modelling of corrosion-induced deterioration in rein-forced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, M.R.; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    at the reinforcement surface, a FEM based me-chanical model was used to simulate corrosion-induced concrete damage. Both FEM models were fully coupled, i.e. information, such as corrosion current density, dam-age state of concrete cover, etc., were constantly exchanged between the models. To demonstrate the potential......An integrated finite element based modelling approach is presented, which allows for fully coupled simulation of reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced concrete damage. While a finite element method (FEM) based corrosion model was used to describe electrochemical processes...... use of the modelling approach, a numerical example is presented which illustrates full coupling of formation of corrosion cells, propagation of corrosion, and subsequent development of corrosion-induced concrete damage....

  2. Protection of welded joints against corrosion degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Welded joints form an integral part of steel constructions. Welded joints are undetachable joints, which are however subjects of corrosion processes. The internal energy increases during the fusion welding especially in the heat affected places around the welded joint, which become initiating spot of corrosion degradation.The aim of the experiment is to put a welded joint produced by the MAG method to a test of corrosion degradation under the conditions of the norm ČSN ISO 9227 (salt-spray test. Organic and inorganic anticorrosion protections were applied on welded beads. First of all, there were prepared welded beads using the method MAG; secondly, metallographical analyses of welded metal, heat affected places and base material were processed. Further, microhardness as well as analysis of chemical composition using the EDS microscope were analysed. Based on a current trend in anticorrosion protections, there were chosen three types of protective coatings. First protective system was a double-layer synthetic system, where the base layer is formed by paint Pragroprimer S2000 and the upper layer by finishing paint Industrol S 2013. Second protective system is a duplex system formed by a combination of a base zinc coating with Zinorex paint. The last protective system was formed by zinc dipping only. Corrosion resistance of the individual tested samples was evaluated based on degradation of protective coating. The corrosion origin as well as the corrosion process were observed, the main criteria was the observation of welded bead.

  3. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  4. The use of morinda citrifolia as a green corrosion inhibitor for low carbon steel in 3.5% NaCl solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, Rahayu; Pramana, Rakhmad Indra; Soedarsono, Johny W.

    2017-03-01

    The effect and mechanism of green corrosion inhibitor of Morinda Citrifolia (Noni) toward low carbon steel material has been researched. The general background is to develop the cheap and eco-friendly corrosion inhibitor based on components taken from tropical plants that grow +in Indonesia. This research aims to determine the effectiveness of the use of the extracts of noni as green corrosion inhibitor of carbon steel material in aggressive environment. The medium applied for this experiment is 3.5% natrium chloride solution. The variation of the concentration and immersion time duration has been applied as the experimental parameters. All the work was done at room temperature. The corrosion rate was measured by electrochemical polarization method with CMS 600-Gamry instruments and weight loss. The adsorption of inhibitor into the metal surface, which induced bonding formation after immersion was observed by using FTIR method. Inhibition mechanism was observed by polarization curves and fitted by the Langmuir adsorption models. The experimental results show that the higher concentration of inhibitor increasing the inhibition effect. The optimum inhibition is obtained at 3 ppm noni fruit extract, after immersion for about 288 hours. The corrosion rates obtained was 1.385 mpy, with the inhibitor efficiency of 76.92%. The monolayer film is formed coating the surface material as a result of mixed type corrosion inhibitor behavior of Noni. It can be concluded that this green inhibitor is effective to be used for low carbon steel material.

  5. Chemical treatment of zinc surface and its corrosion inhibition studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Department of PG Studies and Research in Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Kuvempu University, ... cations and is mainly used for the corrosion protection of ... provide a greater resistance to corrosion, but when exposed to humid ...

  6. Concrete cover cracking with reinforcement corrosion of RC beam during chloride-induced corrosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruijin; Castel, Arnaud; Francois, Raoul

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the evolution of the corrosion pattern based on two beams corroded by 14 years (beam B1CL1) and 23 years (beam B2CL1) of conservation in a chloride environment. The experimental results indicate that, at the cracking initiation stage and the first stage of cracking propagation, localized corrosion due to chloride ingress is the predominant corrosion pattern and pitting corrosion is the main factor that influences the cracking process. As corrosion cracking increases, general corrosion develops rapidly and gradually becomes predominant in the second stage of cracking propagation. A comparison between existing models and experimental results illustrates that, although Vidal et al.'s model can better predict the reinforcement corrosion of beam B1CL1 under localized corrosion, it cannot predict the corrosion of beam B2CL1 under general corrosion. Also, Rodriguez's model, derived from the general corrosion due to electrically accelerated corrosion experiments, cannot match natural chloride corrosion irrespective of whether corrosion is localized or general. Thus, for natural general corrosion in the second stage of cracking propagation, a new model based on the parameter of average steel cross-section loss is put forward to predict steel corrosion from corrosion cracking.

  7. On-line electrochemical monitoring of microbially influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, N.J.E.; Stansbury, E.E.; White, D.C.; Borenstein, S.W.; Danko, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Newly emerging electrochemical measurement techniques can provide on-line, non-destructive monitoring of the average corrosion rate and indications of localized pitting corrosion together with insight into fundamental electrochemical mechanisms responsible for the corrosion process. This information is relevant to evaluating, monitoring, understanding and controlling microbially influenced corrosion (MIC). MIC of coupons exposed in sidestream devices on site or in laboratory-based experiments, where the corrosion response is accelerated by exposure to active consortia of microbes recovered from specific sites, can be utilized to evaluate mitigation strategies. The average corrosion rates can be determined by small amplitude cyclic voltametry (SACV), and AC impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS can also give insight into the mechanisms of the MIC and indications of localized corrosion. Pitting corrosion can be detected non-destructively with open circuit potential monitoring (OCP). OCP also responds to bacterial biofilm activities such as oxygen depletion and other electrochemical activities. Utilizing these methods, accelerated tests can be designed to direct the selection of materials, surface treatments of materials, and welding filler materials, as well as the optimization of chemical and mechanical countermeasures with the microbial consortia recovered and characterized from the specific sites of interest

  8. Alloy SCR-3 resistant to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowaka, Masamichi; Fujikawa, Hisao; Kobayashi, Taiki

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is used widely because the corrosion resistance, workability and weldability are excellent, but the main fault is the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in the environment containing chlorides. Inconel 600, most resistant to stress corrosion cracking, is not necessarily safe under some severe condition. In the heat-affected zone of SUS 304 tubes for BWRs, the cases of stress corrosion cracking have occurred. The conventional testing method of stress corrosion cracking using boiling magnesium chloride solution has been problematical because it is widely different from actual environment. The effects of alloying elements on stress corrosion cracking are remarkably different according to the environment. These effects were investigated systematically in high temperature, high pressure water, and as the result, Alloy SCR-3 with excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance was found. The physical constants and the mechanical properties of the SCR-3 are shown. The states of stress corrosion cracking in high temperature, high pressure water containing chlorides and pure water, polythionic acid, sodium phosphate solution and caustic soda of the SCR-3, SUS 304, Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 are compared and reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Seawater corrosion tests for low-level radioactive waste drum containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Sho; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1985-11-01

    This report is a part of corrosion tests of drums under various environmental conditions (seawater, river water, coastal sand, inland soil and indoor and outdoor atmosphere) done at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency. The corrosion tests were started in November, 1977 and complated at March, 1984. This report describes the results of the seawater corrosion tests which are part of the final report, ''Corrosion Safety Demonstration Test'' (Japanese), and it is expected to contribute the safety assessment of sea dumping of low-level radioactive waste packages. (author)

  10. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete. PMID:27618054

  11. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunze Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS and stainless steel (SS galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH2 solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete.

  12. Humid-air and aqueous corrosion models for corrosion-allowance barrier material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; Andrews, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Humid-air and aqueous general and pitting corrosion models (including their uncertainties) for the carbon steel outer containment barrier were developed using the corrosion data from literature for a suite of cast irons and carbon steels which have similar corrosion behaviors to the outer barrier material. The corrosion data include the potential effects of various chemical species present in the testing environments. The atmospheric corrosion data also embed any effects of cyclic wetting and drying and salts that may form on the corroding specimen surface. The humid-air and aqueous general corrosion models are consistent in that the predicted humid-air general corrosion rates at relative humidities between 85 and 100% RH are close to the predicted aqueous general corrosion rates. Using the expected values of the model parameters, the model predicts that aqueous pitting corrosion is the most likely failure mode for the carbon steel outer barrier, and an earliest failure (or initial pit penetration) of the 100-mm thick barrier may occur as early as about 500 years if it is exposed continuously to an aqueous condition at between 60 and 70 degrees C

  13. Evaluation of aluminum pit corrosion in oak ridge research reactor pool by quantitative imaging and thermodynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ping-Rey; Arunkumar, Rangaswami; Lindner, Jeffrey S.; Long, Zhiling; Mott, Melissa A.; Okhuysen, Walter P.; Monts, David L.; Su, Yi; Kirk, Paula G.; Ettien, John

    2007-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORRR) was operated as an isotope production and irradiation facility from March 1958 until March 1987. The US Department of Energy permanently shut down and removed the fuel from the ORRR in 1987. The water level must be maintained in the ORRR pool as shielding for radioactive components still located in the pool. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) needs to decontaminate and demolish the ORRR as part of the Oak Ridge cleanup program. In February 2004, increased pit corrosion was noted in the pool's 6 mm (1/4'')-thick aluminum liner in the section nearest where the radioactive components are stored. If pit corrosion has significantly penetrated the aluminum liner, then DOE EM must accelerate its decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D) efforts or look for alternatives for shielding the irradiated components. The goal of Mississippi State University's Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) was to provide a determination of the extent and depth of corrosion and to conduct thermodynamic modeling to determine how further corrosion can be inhibited. Results from the work will facilitate ORNL in making reliable disposition decisions. ICET's inspection approach was to quantitatively estimate the amount of corrosion by using Fourier - transform profilometry (FTP). FTP is a non-contact 3- D shape measurement technique. By projecting a fringe pattern onto a target surface and observing its deformation due to surface irregularities from a different view angle, the system is capable of determining the height (depth) distribution of the target surface, thus reproducing the profile of the target accurately. ICET has previously demonstrated that its FTP system can quantitatively estimate the volume and depth of removed and residual material to high accuracy. The results of our successful initial deployment of a submergible FTP system into the ORRR pool are reported here as are initial thermodynamic

  14. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorek, Jolanta; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Jones, Walis; Krzak, Justyna

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented. PMID:29373540

  15. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorek, Jolanta; Szczurek, Anna; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Jones, Walis; Krzak, Justyna

    2018-01-26

    Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented.

  16. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures.

  17. Evaluation of corrosive behavior of SAE 5155 by corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening and corrosive condition for corrosion property was investigated on immersed in 3.5% NaCl, 10% HNO 3 + 3% HF, 6% FeCl 3 . The immersion test was performed on two kinds of specimen. The immersion periods was performed 30days. Corrosion potential, weight loss were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated

  18. Furnace Brazing Parameters Optimized by Taguchi Method and Corrosion Behavior of Tube-Fin System of Automotive Condensers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guía-Tello, J. C.; Pech-Canul, M. A.; Trujillo-Vázquez, E.; Pech-Canul, M. I.

    2017-08-01

    Controlled atmosphere brazing has a widespread industrial use in the production of aluminum automotive heat exchangers. Good-quality joints between the components depend on the initial condition of materials as well as on the brazing process parameters. In this work, the Taguchi method was used to optimize the brazing parameters with respect to corrosion performance for tube-fin mini-assemblies of an automotive condenser. The experimental design consisted of five factors (micro-channel tube type, flux type, peak temperature, heating rate and dwell time), with two levels each. The corrosion behavior in acidified seawater solution pH 2.8 was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to analyze the microstructural features in the joint zone. The results showed that the parameters that most significantly affect the corrosion rate are the type of flux and the peak temperature. The optimal conditions were: micro-channel tube with 4.2 g/m2 of zinc coating, standard flux, 610 °C peak temperature, 5 °C/min heating rate and 4 min dwell time. The corrosion current density value of the confirmation experiment is in excellent agreement with the predicted value. The electrochemical characterization for selected samples gave indication that the brazing conditions had a more significant effect on the kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction than on the kinetics of the metal dissolution reaction.

  19. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  20. Metallic Corrosion. Vol. 1, 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The three volumes of the Congress Proceedings form the basis for the discussion of the prevailing problems in all areas of applied and basic research and their application in evera-day life and industry. The sequence of the contents of the three volumes corresponds to the scientific and technical Congress topics. Volume I contains basic and applied research on corrosion processes, testing and prevention Volume II starts with corrosion protection techniques, covers solutions to problems in specific industrial fields, and collects papers on economics, education, information and R and D programmes. Volume III contains all plenary lectures held on various topics. (orig.)

  1. Understanding the corrosion phenomena to organize the nondestructive evaluation programs in the nuclear power plants; Connaitre les phenomenes de corrosion pour organiser les programmes d'end dans les centrales nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, J.Ph. [Federation Europeenne de Corrosion, 75 - Paris (France); Samman, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. du Production Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    The french nuclear power plants used PWR which components revealed many corrosion defects of different shapes as stress corrosion cracks or pits. Understanding the corrosion processes will help the inspection of in service power plants. The following examples describe some corrosion cases and present the corresponding developed control methods: corrosion on condenser, secondary circuit pipes and corrosion-erosion, steam generator pipes, vessels head penetration. (A.L.B.)

  2. The aluminum chemistry and corrosion in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinsuo; Klasky, Marc; Letellier, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum-alkaline solution systems are very common in engineering applications including nuclear engineering. Consequently, a thorough knowledge of the chemistry of aluminum and susceptibility to corrosion in alkaline solutions is reviewed. The aluminum corrosion mechanism and corrosion rate are examined based on current experimental data. A review of the phase transitions with aging time and change of environment is also performed. Particular attention is given to effect of organic and inorganic ions. As an example, the effect of boron is examined in detail because of the application in nuclear reactor power systems. Methods on how to reduce the corrosion rate of aluminum in alkaline solutions are also highlighted

  3. Degradation of aged plants by corrosion: 'Long cell action' in unresolved corrosion issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Genn

    2009-01-01

    In a series of previously published papers the author has identified that 'long cell action' corrosion plays a pivotal role in practically all unresolved corrosion issues for all types of nuclear power plants (e.g. PWR/VVER, BWR/RBMK and CANDU). Some of these unresolved issues are IGSCC, PWSCC, AOA and FAC (erosion-corrosion). In conventional corrosion science it is well established that 'long cell action' can seriously accelerate or suppress the local cell corrosion activities. Although long cell action is another fundamental mechanism of corrosion, especially in a 'soil corrosion' arena, potential involvement of this corrosion process has never been studied in nuclear and fossil power plants as far as the author has been able to establish. The author believes that the omission of this basic corrosion mechanism is the root cause of practically all un-resolved corrosion issues. In this paper, the author further elaborated on his assessment to other key corrosion issues, e.g. steam generator and turbine corrosion issues, while briefly summarizing previous discussions for completeness purposes, as well as introducing additional experimental and theoretical evidence of this basic corrosion mechanism. Due to the importance of this potential mechanism the author is calling for institutional review activities and further verification experiments in the form of a joint international project.

  4. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  5. Corrosion surveillance program of aluminum spent fuel elements in wet storage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linardi, E; Haddad, R

    2012-01-01

    Due to different degradation issues observed in aluminum-clad spent fuel during long term storage in water, the IAEA implemented in 1996 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and a Regional Project for Latin America, on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum Clad Spent Fuel in Water. Argentine has been among the participant countries of these projects, carrying out spent fuel corrosion surveillance activities in its storage facilities. As a result of the research a large database on corrosion of aluminum-clad fuel has been generated. It was determined that the main types of corrosion affecting the spent fuel are pitting and galvanic corrosion due to contact with stainless steel. It was concluded that the quality of the water is the critical factor to control in a spent fuel storage facility. Another phase of the program is being conducted currently, which began in 2011 with the immersion of test racks in the RA1 reactor pool, and in the Research Reactor Spent Fuel Storage Facility (FACIRI), located in Ezeiza Atomic Center. This paper presents the results of the chemical analysis of the water performed so far, and its relationship with the examination of the coupons extracted from the sites (author)

  6. Corrosion Monitoring of Flexible Metallic Substrates for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trystan Watson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two techniques for monitoring corrosion within a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC system are presented, which enable continuous, high sensitivity, in situ measurement of electrolyte breakdown associated with DSCs fabricated on metals. The first method uses UV/Vis reflectance spectrophotometry in conjunction with encapsulation cells, which incorporate a 25 μm thick electrolyte layer, to provide highly resolved triiodide absorption data. The second method uses digital image capture to extract colour intensity data. Whilst the two methods provide very similar kinetic data on corrosion, the photographic method has the advantage that it can be used to image multiple samples in large arrays for rapid screening and is also relatively low cost. This work shows that the triiodide electrolyte attacks most metals that might be used for structural applications. Even a corrosion resistant metal, such as aluminium, can be induced to corrode through surface abrasion. This result should be set in the context with the finding reported here that certain nitrogen containing heterocyclics used in the electrolyte to enhance performance also act as corrosion inhibitors with significant stabilization for metals such as iron. These new techniques will be important tools to help develop corrosion resistant metal surfaces and corrosion inhibiting electrolytes for use in industrial scale devices.

  7. A technique for predicting steel corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V. F.; Sokolov, R. A.; Neradovskiy, D. F.; Muratov, K. R.

    2018-01-01

    Research works were carried out to develop a technique with the aim to increase the lifetime of steel items used in corrosive media. The possibility to monitor corrosion parameters of steel samples is analyzed on the basis of magnetic properties obtained by means of a magnetic structuroscope DIUS-1.15M designed by the Institute of Metal Physics of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMP UB RAS).

  8. Marine corrosion of mild steel at Lumut, Perak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Ong Shiou; Potty, Narayanan Sambu; Liew, Mohd. Shahir

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion rate of structural steels in the adverse marine and offshore environments affects the economic interest of offshore structures since the loss of steel may have significant impact on structural safety and performance. With more emphasis to maintain existing structures in service for longer time and hence to defer replacement costs, there is increasing interest in predicting corrosion rate at a given location for a given period of exposure once the protection coating or cathodic protection is lost. The immersion depth, salinity, steel composition and water pollution will be taken into account. Various corrosion allowances are prescribed for structural members by different standards. There are no studies to determine the appropriate corrosion allowance for steel structures in marine environment in Malaysia. The objectives of the research are to determine the nature and rate of corrosion in mm/year for steel structures in marine environment. It also tries to identify whether the corrosion rate is affected by differences in the chemical composition of the steels, and microalgae. Two sets of corrosion coupons of Type 3 Steel consisting of mild steel were fabricated and immersed in seawater using steel frames. The corrosion rate of the coupon in mm/ per year is estimated based on the material weight loss with time in service. The results are compared with recommendations of the code.

  9. Corrosion and indices of operating reliability of steam-water circuits of foreign NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynova, O.I.

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion failures in circuits of foreign NPPs are considered. According to American statistics there are more corrosion failures in two-circuit NPPs than in NPPs with one circuit. Steam generators mostly suffer from ''corrosion denting''. Lately pitting corrosion becomes a potentially serious problem. Steam generator vertical tubes are maiply subjected to this corrosion type. Attention is drawn to intercrystalline corrosion. The causes of corrosion are described. The problem of optimization of structural materials is discussed to reduce corrosion failures as well as other methods of decreasing corrosion failures. Organization of nondestructive testing, increased requirements to water and steam purity are of great importance

  10. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.S., E-mail: yinwenfeng2010@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Yin, W.F. [College of Mechatronic Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Sang, D.H. [Sheng Li Construction Group International Engineering Department, Shandong, Dongying, 257000 (China); Jiang, Z.Y. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion of a carbon-manganese steel and a stainless steel in sulfur and/or naphthenic acid media was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion rate of the carbon-manganese steel increased with the increase of the acid value and sulfur content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical values of the concentration of sulfur and acid for corrosion rate of the stainless steel were ascertained respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stainless steel is superior to the carbon-manganese steel in corrosion resistance because of the presence of stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases. - Abstract: The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 Degree-Sign C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  11. Glove corrosive liquid immersion and permeability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's requirement for protective equipment for personnel working with chemical hazards resulted in a study of gloves used in work with corrosive liquids. Gloves of different materials and weights were tested using ASTM methods, in various corrosive liquids. Results show the best material for gloves used for different lengths of time in the liquids

  12. Standard test methods for pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels and related alloys by use of ferric Chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the determination of the resistance of stainless steels and related alloys to pitting and crevice corrosion (see Terminology G 15) when exposed to oxidizing chloride environments. Six procedures are described and identified as Methods A, B, C, D, E, and F. 1.1.1 Method A—Ferric chloride pitting test. 1.1.2 Method B—Ferric chloride crevice test. 1.1.3 Method C—Critical pitting temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.4 Method D—Critical crevice temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.5 Method E—Critical pitting temperature test for stainless steels. 1.1.6 Method F—Critical crevice temperature test for stainless steels. 1.2 Method A is designed to determine the relative pitting resistance of stainless steels and nickel-base, chromium-bearing alloys, whereas Method B can be used for determining both the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of these alloys. Methods C, D, E and F allow for a rankin...

  13. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  14. Study of the corrosion of metallic coatings and alloys containing aluminum in a mixed atmosphere - sulphur, oxygen - at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellmann, Daniel

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is the development of materials for a sulphur experimental loop allowing the thermodynamic properties of such an energy cycle to be checked. As solutions must comply with industrial methods, rare materials are excluded as they are too expensive or difficult to implement. Iron-based materials have been tested but could not have at the same time a good corrosion resistance and high temperature forming and mechanical toughness properties. Therefore, metallic coatings have been chosen, specifically alumina. After having reported a bibliographical study on corrosion by sulphur vapour and by oxygen and by sulphur-oxygen, the author presents the experimental materials and methods. Then, the author reports the study of mixed corrosion (by sulphur and oxygen together) of metallic alloys (ferritic and austeno-ferritic alloys, aluminium and titanium alloys), and of the corrosion of FeAlx coatings, of AlTix alloys [fr

  15. Application of electrochemical frequency modulation for monitoring corrosion and corrosion inhibition of iron by some indole derivatives in molar hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, K.F.

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of four indole derivatives, namely indole (IND), benzotriazole (BTA), benzothiazole (BSA) and benzoimidazole (BIA), have been used as possible corrosion inhibitors for pure iron in 1 M HCl. In this study, electrochemical frequency modulation, EFM was used as an effective method for corrosion rate determination in corrosion inhibition studies. By using EFM measurements, corrosion current density was determined without prior knowledge of Tafel slopes. Corrosion rates obtained using EFM, were compared to that obtained from other chemical and electrochemical techniques. The results obtained from EFM, EIS, Tafel and weight loss measurements were in good agreement. Tafel polarization measurements show that indole derivatives are cathodic-type inhibitors. Molecular simulation studies were applied to optimize the adsorption structures of indole derivatives. The inhibitor/iron/solvent interfaces were simulated and the adsorption energies of these inhibitors were calculated. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed and several quantum chemical indices were calculated and correlated with the corresponding inhibition efficiencies

  16. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  17. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Shen, Dejiu, E-mail: DejiuShen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  18. Minimizing corrosive action in timber bridges treated with waterborne preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; James P. Wacker

    2007-01-01

    This work will briefly review published literature and current research activities on the corrosion of metals in contact with wood treated with waterborne alternatives to CCA. In addition, recommendations to minimize these corrosive effects in timber bridges will be discussed.

  19. An assessment of corrosion life of copper overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, A.; Taniguchi, N.

    1999-08-01

    Corrosion life of copper overpack is estimated on the basis of current understandings of copper corrosion processes. The assessment is based on the mass balance. Oxygen and sulfide were taken into account as corrosive species. The sulfate existing in bentonite is assumed to be reduced to sulfide by sulfate reducing bacteria and corrodes copper overpacks. Pitting is involved in the assesment using two methods. One method is use of pitting factor acquired from analysis of archeological artifacts. The other is use of extreme value statistical technique. The time evolution of parameters for cumulative probability distribution function, Gumbel distribution, was estimated using the data from copper specimens buried in various soil and archeological artifacts of the bronze age. The pitting depth for 1000 years is estimated using the parameters for probability distribution function. The result of estimation shows 39-mm is the maximum penetration for 1000 years. Natural analogue data suggest the corrosion rate of 3 mm/1000 years. Therefore the estimation is considered to be conservative. (author)

  20. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  1. Electrochemical investigation of the properties of Co doped ZnO nanoparticle as a corrosion inhibitive pigment for modifying corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostami, M.; Rasouli, S.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Askari, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion inhibitive pigment based on ZnOCo was synthesized through combustion method. • Doping ZnO nanoparticle with Co enhanced its inhibition properties considerably. • ZnOCo nanoparticle could enhance corrosion protective performance of epoxy coating. • Co doped ZnO nanoparticles behaved as efficient barrier and inhibitive pigment. - Abstract: Co doped ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by combustion method. Then, the epoxy nanocomposites were prepared using various amounts of nanoparticles. Salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used in order to investigate the corrosion inhibition effects of nanoparticles on the steel substrate. The morphology and composition of the films precipitated on the steel surface were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Results revealed that the corrosion inhibition properties of ZnO nanoparticle were significantly enhanced after doping with Co. Moreover, Co doped ZnO nanoparticles enhanced the corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating effectively

  2. Contribution to the study of the influence of zinc bath composition on corrosion resistance of coatings obtained by galvanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillac, Claude

    1969-01-01

    This research thesis deals with the influence of zinc purity on the corrosion resistance of a coating obtained by galvanization, and on its effect on cathodic protection. This study therefore addresses methods and tests processes (notably salt spray test) aiming at assessing the efficiency of steel protection by hot galvanization, and aims at highlighting the influence of galvanization bath purity or composition on corrosion resistance of galvanized layers

  3. Resistance to pitting corrosion in ferritic and austenitic/ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bouvier, O.

    1995-01-01

    Stainless steel tubes carrying raw water are potentially vulnerable to pitting corrosion. With a view to minimizing the corrosion risk in the river-water-cooled condensers at PWR power plant, a study was conducted to determine initiation conditions and incubation durations for pitting corrosion in stagnant water. As a result, condenser tubes in Z2 CI 18 (439) or Z2 CT 18-10 (304L) steels were phased out in favour of Z2 CND 16-32 (316L) stainless steel. The same question can be yield for other applications and especially for all types of exchangers for use in electrical applications. This study sought to assess alternative methods for estimating pitting corrosion, and to check the results of these methods against the actual behaviour of studied steels. The study covered ferritic steels (439, 444, 290Mo), austenitic steel (316L) and austenitic/ferritic steels (Uranus 35N, 45N, 47N, 52N). Two approaches were adopted: laboratory tests to compare pitting corrosion risks on different materials, and tests for characterizing the behaviour of steels exposed to river water. The study begins with a laboratory tests that yield an arbitrary parameter for quantifying pitting corrosion resistance. One method involves measuring the pitting temperature in an aggressive ferric chloride solution. Other methods measure the pitting potential, either statistically (Multipit method) or deterministically (polarization curve). We then go on to discuss tests under simulated life-like conditions, involving repeated immersions in water from the Seine. (author). 9 refs., 13 figs, 9 tabs

  4. Emerging surface characterization techniques for carbon steel corrosion: a critical brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Lepkova, K.; Becker, T.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon steel is a preferred construction material in many industrial and domestic applications, including oil and gas pipelines, where corrosion mitigation using film-forming corrosion inhibitor formulations is a widely accepted method. This review identifies surface analytical techniques that are considered suitable for analysis of thin films at metallic substrates, but are yet to be applied to analysis of carbon steel surfaces in corrosive media or treated with corrosion inhibitors. The reviewed methods include time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy methods, particle-induced X-ray emission, Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectometry, and conversion electron Moessbauer spectrometry. Advantages and limitations of the analytical methods in thin-film surface investigations are discussed. Technical parameters of nominated analytical methods are provided to assist in the selection of suitable methods for analysis of metallic substrates deposited with surface films. The challenges associated with the applications of the emerging analytical methods in corrosion science are also addressed.

  5. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  6. Role and efforts of T3C in corrosion economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Appleman, B.R.; Pamer, R.I.; Thompson, J.L.

    1979-11-01

    The basic purpose of T3C activity is to show how to acquire specific corrosion cost information so that overall costs for doing business can be reduced. The scope of T3C is to accumulate data, appraise methods, develop recommended practices, promote knowledge and communicate relative to the economic evaluation of corrosion and counter corrosion techniques

  7. Fabrication of Aluminum-based Superhydrophobic Coating by Anodization and Research on Stability and Corrosion Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Shun-li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al can be easily contaminated or damaged after exposure in damp environments, which can adversely affect its aesthetic appearance and desired functionalities. To improve its corrosion resistance, a superhydrophobic coating was fabricated on Al by electrochemical anodization followed by modification with myristic acid. The surface morphology and chemical composition were characterized by using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM with attached energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS. The surface wettability, mechanical stability as well as corrosion resistance were also investigated by contact angle measuring system, sandblasting test and electrochemical measurements. The results show that the optimal Al-based superhydrophobic coating with a static water contact angle of (155.2±0.5° and a sliding angle of (3.5±1.3° is obtained at the anodization voltage of 20V. The corresponding corrosion current density (Icorr is reduced by 2 orders of magnitude and the corrosion potential (Ecorr shifts from -0.629V to -0.570V compared to the bare Al substrate, indicating excellent corrosion resistance. Besides, the as-prepared optimal Al-based superhydrophobic coating also suggests good mechanical stability.

  8. Electrodeposition and Corrosion Resistance of Ni-Graphene Composite Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeptycka, Benigna; Gajewska-Midzialek, Anna; Babul, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    The research on the graphene application for the electrodeposition of nickel composite coatings was conducted. The study assessed an important role of graphene in an increased corrosion resistance of these coatings. Watts-type nickel plating bath with low concentration of nickel ions, organic addition agents, and graphene as dispersed particles were used for deposition of the composite coatings nickel-graphene. The results of investigations of composite coatings nickel-graphene deposited from the bath containing 0.33, 0.5, and 1 g/dm3 graphene and one surface-active substance were shown. The contents of particles in coatings, the surface morphology, the cross-sectional structures of the coated samples, and their thickness and the internal stresses were studied. Voltammetric method was used for examination of the corrosion resistance of samples of composite coatings in 0.5 M NaCl. The obtained results suggest that the content of incorporated graphene particles increases with an increasing amount of graphene in plating bath. The application of organic compounds was advantageous because it caused compressive stresses in the deposited coatings. All of the nickel-graphene composite layers had better corrosion resistance than the nickel coating.

  9. Crevice corrosion of biomedical alloys: a novel method of assessing the effects of bone cement and its chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Michael; Hu, Xinming; Farrar, Richard; Brummitt, Ken; Freeman, Robert; Neville, Anne

    2013-07-01

    In this study, five commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA bone cements were tested to investigate the effects of antibiotics on the severity of crevice corrosion. Bone cements with varying chemistry were also tested. A test method was developed in part reference to ASTM F746-04. Cylindrical specimens were fitted with a bone cement tapered collar, creating consistent crevice conditions. Crevice corrosion was then studied using potentiodynamic polarization techniques in 0.9% NaCl solution (pH7.4) at 37°C. Surface analyses using a light microscope and scanning electron microscopy were also conducted to investigate the surface morphology after accelerated electrochemical testing. Initial testing of commercially available bone cements indicated that different PMMA bone cements can affect the initiation and propagation mechanism of crevice corrosion. Further studies, utilising electrochemical and mass spectroscopy techniques, have identified that the addition of radiopaque agent and antibiotics affect the initiation mechanisms of 316L stainless steel, whilst significantly increasing the extent of propagation in CoCrMo alloys. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Analysis of corrosion in petroleum pipeline by laser shearography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusnisyam Yusof; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Ahmad Nasruddin Ahmad Puad

    2008-08-01

    This paper aims at assessing of the corrosion defects in standard petroleum pipelines by using shearography method. Shearography technique reveals the stress-affected zone due to additional loading which utilized the laser speckle correlation on the subject inspected. In this study, the artificial corroded pipeline is modeled by different of corrosion depth and width. The pressure was subjected into the 7 mm thickness pipe wall to form an internal air pressure as the loading mechanism. The study shows that change of internal pressure is very effective mechanism to reveal corrosion activity in the pipe. The speckle correlation for corrosion of more than 3 mm depth with ΔP≤0.24 MPa can clearly be observed. For comparison the Radiography Technique is used to correlate the depth, size and shape of the corrosion and finally the location of corrosion area. (Author)

  11. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in marine structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Ismail; Nordin Yahaya

    1999-01-01

    The marine environment is known to be aggressive. Structures constructed on this belt need to undergo periodic assessment in order to ensure no defects or signs of deterioration had occurred. One of the most common deterioration that occurs on marine structures is corrosion of the reinforcement. Corrosion is an electrochemical process. The product of corrosion can increase the reinforcement volume, hence causing cracking on concrete cover. If no action is taken, delamination and spalling of concrete will follow and this will affect the structures integrity. It is therefore important to know the state of the structures condition by monitoring them periodically. NDT techniques that can detect the occurrence of corrosion of reinforcement in concrete uses half cell and resistivity meter. The method of application and interpretation of results are discussed. (author)

  12. Corrosion of cermet cores of fuel plates for nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, M.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    1984-01-01

    Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) type fuel plates containing U 3 O 8 -Al cores and clad with Al are used in various research reactor. Preliminary investigations, where in the cladding of samples was drilled to simulate conditions of rupture due to pitting attack, revealed that considerable quantities of H 2 was evolved upon exposure of the core to water. The corrosion of cermets cores of different densities was characterized as a function of H 2 evolution that revealed 3 stages. A first stage consisting of an incubation period followed by initiation of H 2 evolution, a second stage with a constant rate of H 2 evolution and a third stage with a low rate of H 2 evolution. All 3 stages were found to vary as a function of cermet density and water temperature. (Author) [pt

  13. Self-Powered Wireless Sensor Network for Automated Corrosion Prediction of Steel Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Su

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is one of the key issues that affect the service life and hinders wide application of steel reinforcement. Moreover, corrosion is a long-term process and not visible for embedded reinforcement. Thus, this research aims at developing a self-powered smart sensor system with integrated innovative prediction module for forecasting corrosion process of embedded steel reinforcement. Vibration-based energy harvester is used to harvest energy for continuous corrosion data collection. Spatial interpolation module was developed to interpolate corrosion data at unmonitored locations. Dynamic prediction module is used to predict the long-term corrosion based on collected data. Utilizing this new sensor network, the corrosion process can be automated predicted and appropriate mitigation actions will be recommended accordingly.

  14. Inhibition Effect of 1-Butyl-4-Methylpyridinium Tetrafluoroborate on the Corrosion of Copper in Phosphate Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Scendo, M.; Uznanska, J.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the concentration of 1-Butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (4MBPBF4) as ionic liquid (IL) on the corrosion of copper in 0.5 M P O 4 3 − solutions of pH 2 and 4 was studied. The research involved electrochemical polarization method, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results obtained showed that the inhibition efficiency of corrosion of copper increases with an increase in the concentration of 4MBPBF4 but decreases with increasing temperature. The the...

  15. Corrosion and anticorrosion. Industrial practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, G.; Mazille, H.

    2002-01-01

    This book comprises 14 chapters written with the collaboration of about 50 French experts of corrosion. It is complementary to another volume entitled 'corrosion of metals and alloys' and published by the same editor. This volume comprises two parts: part 1 presents the basic notions of corrosion phenomena, the properties of surfaces, the electrochemical properties of corrosion etc.. Part 2 describes the most frequent forms of corrosion encountered in industrial environments and corresponding to specific problems of protection: marine environment, atmospheric corrosion, galvanic corrosion, tribo-corrosion, stress corrosion etc.. The first 8 chapters (part 1) treat of the corrosion problems encountered in different industries and processes: oil and gas production, chemical industry, phosphoric acid industry, PWR-type power plants, corrosion of automobile vehicles, civil engineering and buildings, corrosion of biomaterials, non-destructive testing for the monitoring of corrosion. The other chapters (part 2) deal with anticorrosion and protective coatings and means: choice of materials, coatings and surface treatments, thick organic coatings and enamels, paints, corrosion inhibitors and cathodic protection. (J.S.)

  16. Corrosion principles and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter examines the important strategies provided by the newer ideas of corrosion science and engineering that surface modification techniques must utilize to help prevent corrosion, especially the most damaging kind of aqueous corrosion, localized corrosion. Provides a brief introduction to the principles underlying the phenomenon of corrosion in order to use them to discuss surface modification strategies to combat corrosion. Discusses the electrochemistry of corrosion; the thermodynamics of corrosion; the kinetics of corrosion; thermodynamic strategies; and kinetic strategies (formation of more protective passive films; resistance to breakdown; ductility; repassivation)

  17. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  18. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  19. Intergranular corrosion protective of austenitic stainless steel chemical equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzyukov, A.N.

    1994-01-01

    A complex of protective measures was developed for each concrete case of intergranular fracture of equipment, i.e.: decrease in the level of strains, surfacing with materials resistant to intergranular fracture under the conditions; permissible correction of process parameters, permitting a shift in corrosion potential towards decrease in the rate of intergranular corrosion. It is shown that even if the eguipment was subject to interfranular corrosion, but the fracture is not of catastrophic character, it proved possible to develop and apply complex methods of protection from the above types of corrosion fracture and to elongate the service life by 5-15 years

  20. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Gąsiorek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented.

  1. Electrochemical and weight-loss study of carbon steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.J.; Olive, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) will undergo an 18 month refurbishment project beginning in April, 2008. During this time, most of the carbon steel piping in the primary loop will be drained of water and dried. However, some water will remain during the shutdown due to the lack of drains in some lower points in the piping system. As a result, it is necessary to examine the effect of corrosion during the refurbishment. This study examined the effect of several variables on the corrosion rate of clean carbon steel. Specifically, the effect of oxygen in the system and the presence of chloride ions were evaluated. Corrosion rates were determined using both a weight-loss technique and electrochemical methods. The experiment was conducted at room temperature. The corrosion products from the experiment were analyzed using a Raman microscope. The results of the weight-loss measurements show that the corrosion rate of polished carbon steel is independent of both the presence of oxygen and chloride ions. The electrochemical method failed to yield meaningful results due to the lack of clearly interpretable data and the inherent subjectivity in the analysis. Lepidocricite was found to be the main corrosion product using the Raman microscope. (author)

  2. Lamb-Wave-Based Tomographic Imaging Techniques for Hole-Edge Corrosion Monitoring in Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengjiang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel monitoring method for hole-edge corrosion damage in plate structures based on Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques. An experimental procedure with a cross-hole layout using 16 piezoelectric transducers (PZTs was designed. The A0 mode of the Lamb wave was selected, which is sensitive to thickness-loss damage. The iterative algebraic reconstruction technique (ART method was used to locate and quantify the corrosion damage at the edge of the hole. Hydrofluoric acid with a concentration of 20% was used to corrode the specimen artificially. To estimate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the real corrosion damage was compared with the predicted corrosion damage based on the tomographic method. The results show that the Lamb-wave-based tomographic method can be used to monitor the hole-edge corrosion damage accurately.

  3. Application Of Fractal Dimension On Atmospheric Corrosion Of Galvanized Iron Roofing Material

    OpenAIRE

    Issa A.K; Abba. M. Aji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Corrosion rates of galvanized iron roofing sheet In yola north eastern part of Nigeria were assessed and determined by weight loss method and scanner fractal analysis method. Scanning electronic machine SEM was used to transform corrosion coupons to electronic form for image j processing and analysing software The result of corrosion rates for these two methods after six months of the samples exposure in industrial. Coastal market and urban areas in the region are 1.51 1.079 1.051 0....

  4. Fatigue strength degradation of metals in corrosive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adasooriya, N. D.; Hemmingsen, T.; Pavlou, D.

    2017-12-01

    Structures exposed to aggressive environmental conditions are often subjected to time-dependent loss of coating and loss of material due to corrosion; this causes reduction in the cross-sectional properties of the members, increased surface roughness, surface irregularities and corrosion pits, and degradation of material strengths. These effects have been identified and simulated in different research studies. However, time and corrosive media dependent fatigue strength curves for materials have not been discussed in the design or assessment guidelines for structures. This paper attempts to review the corrosion degradation process and available approaches/models used to determine the fatigue strength of corroded materials and to interpolate corrosion deterioration data. High cycle fatigue and full range fatigue life formulae for fatigue strength of corroded materials are proposed. The above formulae depend on the endurance limit of corroded material, in addition to the stress-life fatigue curve parameters of the uncorroded material. The endurance limit of corroded material can either be determined by a limited number of tests in the very high-cycle fatigue region or predicted by an analytical approach. Comparison with experimentally measured corrosion fatigue behavior of several materials is provided and discussed.

  5. From first discoveries in the late 1800s to atomistic simulation and life prediction in the early 2000s: 130 years of stress corrosion cracking research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Scientific interest in the effects of environment on the mechanical properties and integrity of materials began in the late 1800s. This means that the history of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) research exceeds a hundred years and is a part of the history of engineering of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. The EAC problem may have had humble beginnings in observations made of 'season cracking' in the thin-wall necks of brass cartridge cases during the Indian campaigns of the British army, but today EAC is acknowledged as one of the most important areas of engineering research. Since the early 1960s, EAC (specifically stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue and hydrogen embrittlement) has been responsible for many, if not most, service failures in numerous applications where components and structures come into contact with natural or technological environment-whether aqueous solution, gas, elevated temperature, or irradiation. The economic and humanitarian aspects of EAC failures have led to considerable scientific and engineering efforts directed at understanding and preventing such failures. Despite the progress that has been made, especially in the last three decades, researchers are still far from solving many problems related to EAC. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review and evaluate experimental results and mechanistic models for stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue and hydrogen embrittlement of metals over the last 130 years. (author)

  6. A method for measuring the corrosion rate of materials in spallation neutron source target/blanket cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ongoing evaluation of the susceptibility of materials in accelerator target/blanket cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the exposure environment in a target/blanket cooling loop, samples were irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). To accomplish this, a cooling water loop capable of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop allowed control and evaluation hydrogen water chemistry, water conductivity, and solution pH. Specially designed ceramic sealed samples were used to measure the real-time corrosion rates of materials placed directly in the proton beam using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS was also used to measure real-time corrosion rates of samples that were out of the proton beam and downstream from the in-beam samples. These out-of-beam probes primarily examined the effects of long lived water radiolysis products from proton irradiation on corrosion rates. An overview of the LANSCE corrosion loop, the corrosion probes, and data from an in-beam alloy 718 probe are presented

  7. Detection of corrosion by radiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Ashraf, M.M.; Khurshid, U.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation processing technologies are playing an increasing role during manufacturing and subsequent use of everyday products. These technologies are now well established and are extensively practiced in industries, to ensure quality and safety of machinery. Corrosion reduces the operational life of the component, its efficiency and helps generate waste. There is an increasing need to detect and characterize the formation of corrosion in industrial components and assemblies at an early stage. Radiation methods and techniques are applied worldwide to examine defects and corrosion-formation in industrial components. For safety and economic reason, appropriate monitoring of the machinery and industrial components would help reduce accidental risks during operation and avoid production-losses. In the present study, X-ray and neutron-radiography techniques were applied for the inspection and evaluation of corrosion in metallic samples for thickness values of the order of 5 mm or less. Relative contrast at various degrees of metal corrosion product loss was computed theoretical and also measured experimentally by applying radiographic techniques. The relative contrast-sensitivity was also measured in two different ways by X-ray and neutron radiography, to compare the visibility of coarse and fine features. Thick metallic areas, free from sealant and variable paint thickness, were imaged with thermal neutrons beam. Low KV X-rays were also applied for imaging corrosion in metallic components. To optimize exposure-time at low KV in X-ray radiography, a medical film/screen combination was used. X-ray radiography approved to be the more promising technique for imaging of corrosion, as compared to neutron radiography. (author)

  8. Assessment of scale formation and corrosion of drinking water supplies in Ilam city (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Yousefi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scaling and corrosion are the two most important indexes in water quality evaluation. Pollutants are released in water due to corrosion of pipelines. The aim of this study is to assess the scale formation and corrosion of drinking water supplies in Ilam city (Iran. Methods: This research is a descriptive and cross-sectional study which is based on the 20 drinking water sources in Ilam city. Experiments were carried out in accordance with the Water and Wastewater Co. standard methods for water and wastewater experiment. The data were analyzed by using Microsoft Excel and GraphPad Prism 5. The results were compared with national and international standards. Results: The mean and standard deviation (SD values of Ryznar, Langelier, Aggressive, Puckorius and Larson-Skold indices in year 2009 were equal to 7.833 (±0.28, -0.102 (±0.35, 11.88 (±0.34, 7.481 (±0.22 and 0.801 (±0.44, respectively, and were 7.861 (±0.28, -0.175 (±0.34, 11.84 (±0.37, 7.298(±0.32 and 0.633 (±0.47, for year 2013 respectively. The average of Langelier, Ryznar, Aggression, and Puckorius indices indicate that potable water resources in Ilam city have the tendency to be corrosive. Statistical analysis and figures carried out by GraphPad Prism version 5.04. Conclusion: The results of different indices for water resources of Ilam city revealed that water supplies of Ilam city were corrosive. Water quality control and replacement of distribution pipes in development of water network should be carried out. Moreover, water pipelines should be preserved with several modes of corrosion inhibition.

  9. Formation of a hydrophobic and corrosion resistant coating on magnesium alloy via a one-step hydrothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianxu; Hu, Yaobo; Zhang, Yuxin; Pan, Fusheng

    2017-11-01

    A hydrophobic coating was fabricated on the surface of magnesium alloy using a simple one-step hydrothermal method with the use of environmentally friendly agent. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle test were used to characterize the surfaces. Corrosion behavior in a 3.5wt.% NaCl solution was evaluated using OCP time curves test, potentiodynamic polarization test and EIS analysis. The findings show that the substrate is covered by the coating of magnesium hydroxide and magnesium stearate, reaching a contact angle of around 146°. Corrosion behavior show huge improvement, the progress with increase of treatment time could be related to the increased growth rate of coating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Corrosion monitoring along infrastructures using distributed fiber optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhandawi, Khalil B.; Vahdati, Nader; Shiryayev, Oleg; Lawand, Lydia

    2016-04-01

    Pipeline Inspection Gauges (PIGs) are used for internal corrosion inspection of oil pipelines every 3-5 years. However, between inspection intervals, rapid corrosion may occur, potentially resulting in major accidents. The motivation behind this research project was to develop a safe distributed corrosion sensor placed inside oil pipelines continuously monitoring corrosion. The intrinsically safe nature of light provided motivation for researching fiber optic sensors as a solution. The sensing fiber's cladding features polymer plastic that is chemically sensitive to hydrocarbons within crude oil mixtures. A layer of metal, used in the oil pipeline's construction, is deposited on the polymer cladding, which upon corrosion, exposes the cladding to surrounding hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon's interaction with the cladding locally increases the cladding's refractive index in the radial direction. Light intensity of a traveling pulse is reduced due to local reduction in the modal capacity which is interrogated by Optical Time Domain Reflectometery. Backscattered light is captured in real-time while using time delay to resolve location, allowing real-time spatial monitoring of environmental internal corrosion within pipelines spanning large distances. Step index theoretical solutions were used to calculate the power loss due changes in the intensity profile. The power loss is translated into an attenuation coefficient characterizing the expected OTDR trace which was verified against similar experimental results from the literature. A laboratory scale experiment is being developed to assess the validity of the model and the practicality of the solution.

  11. Estimation of Concrete Corrosion Due to Attack of Chloride Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Babitski

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides results of experimental concrete research under conditions of concentrated chloride salt solutions. General principles of forecasting concrete corrosion resistance under salt physical corrosion are given in the paper. Analytical dependences for quantitative estimation of corroded concrete have been obtained.

  12. Corrosion behavior of Ti-39Nb alloy for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus-high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti-39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tru, Nguyen Nhi; Yoshino, Tsujino; Yasuki, Maeda

    2008-01-01

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time

  14. Morphological kinetics and localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological modeling is proposed for physicochemical systems that evolve by initiation and growth of well distinct defects. It consists in a mathematical treatment of data on the evolution of defect distribution, which leads to the knowledge of evolution parameters ultimately usable for behaviour predictions. A method is given for calculating a validity parameter which quantifies the pertinence of the choice for analytical representations. An example of application to localized corrosion is given with the intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water. (Author). 6 refs

  15. Deposition and incorporation of corrosion product to primary coolant suppressing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Naoyoshi; Fujioka, Tsunaaki.

    1992-01-01

    In a PWR type nuclear power plant, the concentration of dissolved nitrogen in primary coolants is increased by controlling the nitrogen partial pressure in a volume controlling tank gas phase portion or addition of water in a primary system water supply tank containing dissolved nitrogen to a primary system. Then ammonium is formed by a reaction with hydrogen dissolved in the primary coolants in the field of radiation rays, to control the concentration of ammonium in the coolants within a range from 0.5 to 3.5 ppm, and operate the power plant. As a result, deposition and incorporation of corrosion products to the structural materials of the primary system equipments during plant operation (pH 6.8 to 8.0) are suppressed. In other words, deposition of particulate corrosion products on the surface of fuel cladding tubes and the inner surface of pipelines in the primary system main equipments is prevented and incorporation of ionic radioactive corrosion products to the oxide membranes on the inner surface of the pipelines of the primary system main equipments is suppressed, to greatly reduce the radiation dose rate of the primary system pipelines. Thus, operator's radiation exposure can be decreased upon shut down of the plant. (N.H.)

  16. Investigations of the magnetic fields from ships due to corrosion and its countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Peter J.

    Point Successive Over-relaxation Method (PSOM) to solve the BEM equations, the electric potential and its flux are calculated for each discrete element on the boundary. These potentials are then used to evaluate the CRM field within the domain. Rather than use the Biot-Savart Law for this purpose, a new method is presented which removes the requirement for an internal volume mesh of the domain, allowing the CRM field to be calculated directly from the electric potentials of the surface elements. To test this method, results are presented for a tank of sea water with a hull located on the top surface and an appropriately placed propeller. Calculations were performed for an unprotected propeller and the hull with various degrees of protection from corrosion offered by paint coatings and an ICCP system. Results from the "exact" method are in good agreement with those from the simple dipole model and although there were no published results of the kind produced by this research available for comparison, published results from similar studies of related topics appear to further support the results presented. These results indicate that the method developed is capable of modelling all the key characteristics required for a detailed analysis of an actual corroding ship, with protective paint coatings and ICCP system, in a physical environment.

  17. Statistical characterization of pitting corrosion process and life prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.K.; Younas, M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to prevent corrosion failures of machines and structures, it is desirable to know in advance when the corrosion damage will take place, and appropriate measures are needed to mitigate the damage. The corrosion predictions are needed both at development as well as operational stage of machines and structures. There are several forms of corrosion process through which varying degrees of damage can occur. Under certain conditions these corrosion processes at alone and in other set of conditions, several of these processes may occur simultaneously. For a certain type of machine elements and structures, such as gears, bearing, tubes, pipelines, containers, storage tanks etc., are particularly prone to pitting corrosion which is an insidious form of corrosion. The corrosion predictions are usually based on experimental results obtained from test coupons and/or field experiences of similar machines or parts of a structure. Considerable scatter is observed in corrosion processes. The probabilities nature and kinetics of pitting process makes in necessary to use statistical method to forecast the residual life of machine of structures. The focus of this paper is to characterization pitting as a time-dependent random process, and using this characterization the prediction of life to reach a critical level of pitting damage can be made. Using several data sets from literature on pitting corrosion, the extreme value modeling of pitting corrosion process, the evolution of the extreme value distribution in time, and their relationship to the reliability of machines and structure are explained. (author)

  18. Corrosion of pure OFHC-copper in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1990-04-01

    The research program 'Corrosion of pure OFHC-copper in simulated repository conditions' was planned to provide an experimental evaluation with respect to the theoretical calculations and forecasts made for the corrosion behaviour of pure copper in bentonite groundwater environments at temperatures between 20-80 deg C. The aim of this study in the first place is to evaluate the effects of groundwater composition, bentonite and temperature on the equilibrium and possible corrosion reactions between pure copper and the simulated repository environment. The progress report includes the results obtained after 36 months exposure time

  19. Complementary Methods for the Characterization of Corrosion Products on a Plant-Exposed Superheater Tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    In this work, complex corrosion products on a superheater tube exposed to biomass firing were characterized by the complementary use of energy-dispersive synchrotron diffraction, electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Non-destructive synchrotron diffraction in transmission......-rich austenite phase to selective removal of Fe and Cr from the alloy, via a KCl-induced corrosion mechanism. Compositional variations were related to diffraction results and revealed a qualitative influence of the spinel cation concentration on the observed diffraction lines.......In this work, complex corrosion products on a superheater tube exposed to biomass firing were characterized by the complementary use of energy-dispersive synchrotron diffraction, electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Non-destructive synchrotron diffraction in transmission...... geometry measuring with a small gauge volume from the sample surface through the corrosion product allowed depth-resolved phase identification and revealed the presence of (Fe,Cr)2O3 and FeCr2O4. This was supplemented by microstructural and elemental analysis correlating the additional presence of a Ni...

  20. Corrosion behavior of TiO{sub 2}-NiO nanocomposite thin films on AISI 316L stainless steel prepared by sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheraghi, H., E-mail: hoch2020@yahoo.com [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), P.O. Box: 16765163, Narrmak Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahmiri, M., E-mail: mshahmiri@iust.ac.ir [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), P.O. Box: 16765163, Narrmak Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghian, Z. [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box: 14857-3311, West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-01

    TiO{sub 2}-NiO nanocomposite thin films were deposited on the 316L stainless steel using sol-gel method by a dip coating technique. Different techniques such as differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy were carried out in order to characterize the structure of the coatings. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by using Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests of uncoated and coated specimens in a 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature. It was found that to obtain desirable structure in coatings, the coatings should be calcined at 600 Degree-Sign C for one and half hour. NiTiO{sub 3}, anatase and rutile were the phases obtained in different calcination conditions in air atmosphere. The results of corrosion tests indicated that with increasing the dipping times from 2 to 4, the corrosion current density first decreases but when increasing the dipping times to 6, it increases. Also the corrosion current density decreased from 186.7 nA.cm{sup -2} (uncoated steel) to 34.21 nA.cm{sup -2} (80%TiO{sub 2}-20%NiO) and corrosion potential increased from - 150.2 mV (uncoated steel) to - 107.3 mV (67%TiO{sub 2}-33%NiO). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2}-NiO thin films were deposited on the 316L stainless steel using sol-gel method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different compositions, annealing times and temperatures resulted in various phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films having different compositions showed various surface morphologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films having a composition of 80%TiO{sub 2}-20%NiO showed a good corrosion protection.