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Sample records for corrosion problems due

  1. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore to combat chloride corrosion problems co-firing of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken....... This results in potassium chloride being converted to potassium sulphate in the combustion chamber and it is sulphate rich deposits that are deposited on the vulnerable metallic surfaces such as high temperature superheaters. Although this removes the problem of chloride corrosion, other corrosion mechanisms...... appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 hours using 0-20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel of 10% straw + coal. After three years exposure in this environment...

  2. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore, to combat chloride corrosion problems cofiring of biomass with a fossil fuel has been...... undertaken. This results in potassium chloride being converted to potassium sulphate in the combustion chamber and it is sulphate rich deposits that are deposited on the vulnerable metallic surfaces such as high temperature superheaters. Although this removes the problem of chloride corrosion, other...... corrosion mechanisms appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 h using 0–20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel mix of 10% strawþcoal. Based on results from a 3 years exposure...

  3. New technologies - new corrosion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.

    1994-01-01

    Adequate resistance of materials to corrosion is equally important for classical and for new technologies. This article considers the economic consequences of corrosion damage and, in addition to the long-known GNP orientation, presents a new approach to the estimation of the costs of corrosion and corrosion protection via maintenance and especially corrosion-related maintenance. The significance of ''high-tech'', ''medium-tech'' and ''low-tech'' material and corrosion problems is assessed. Selected examples taken from new technologies in the areas of power engineering, environmental engineering, chemical engineering, and biotechnology demonstrate the great significance of the problems. It is concluded that corrosion research and corrosion prevention technology will never come to an end but will constantly face new problems. Two technologies are of particular interest since they focus attention on new methods of investigation: microelectronics and final disposal of radioactive wastes. The article closes by considering the importance of the transfer of experience and technology. Since the manufacturs and operators of machines and plant do not generally have access to the very latest knowledge, they should be kept informed through advisory services, experimental studies, databases, and further education. (orig.) [de

  4. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers

  5. East Carnduff Unit: corrosion problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, C D

    1966-07-01

    Waterflooding of the East Carnduff Unit began in late 1962. The first injection line leak was discovered April 29, 1965. The first 6 leaks in the East Carnduff Unit occurred within a period of less than one month--a very startling and serious warning of pending problems. Analysis of the pipe removed showed a deep pit covered by a severe scale in the piping fitting. Several remedial actions were tried in order to develop the present inhibition program. First, the lines were cleaned as well as possible utilizing rubber pig spheres with normal injection pressure. This proved very effective and 2 passes wiped out most of the scale in the lines. Only one line required acid. After the lines had been cleaned, a water treating rate of an organic amine corrosion inhibitor, 10 ppm of the scale inhibitor, and bactericide at the rate of 40 ppm slugs 2 days per month was initiated. The above treating program is in use at the present time and is maintaining a very low leak frequency. This experience has demonstrated 2 important points in waterflood operations: (1) a bare piping system in warm brine service requires constant attention to insure that it is being kept clean; and (2) reliance cannot be placed on any one method of checking corrosion rates.

  6. Molten salt: Corrosion problems and electrometallurgy in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.

    1981-01-01

    A bibliographic survey is given of corrosion problems and electrometallurgical problems of molten salt in nuclear reactor applications. Due to the high potential to be achieved, their high ionic conductivity and the rapidity of reactions in a molten salt atmosphere, molten salts are interesting solvents for various electrometallurgical processes. Another important field of application is in the separation or electrolytical refining of various metals (Be, U, Pu, Th, Hf, Zr). However, these very characteristics of molten salts may also cause serious corrosion problems. Results obtained for the molten-salt reactor and the different causes of corrosion are reviewed an possible countermeasures analyzed. (orig.)

  7. Durable Corrosion Resistance of Copper Due to Multi-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Tiwari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-thin graphene coating has been reported to provide considerable resistance against corrosion during short-term exposures, however, there is great variability in the corrosion resistance due to graphene coating in different studies. It may be possible to overcome the problem of hampered corrosion protection ability of graphene that is caused due to defective single layer graphene by applying multilayer graphene. Systematic electrochemical characterization showed that the multilayer graphene coating developed in the study provided significant corrosion resistance in a chloride solution and the corrosion resistance was sustained for long durations (~400 h, which is attributed to the multilayer graphene.

  8. Corrosion problems in PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Suery, P.

    1976-01-01

    Examinations on pulled steam generator tubes from the Swiss nuclear power plants Beznau I and II, together with some laboratory tests, may be summarized as follows: Corrosion problems in vertical U-tube steam generators with Alloy 600 as tube material are localized towards relatively narrow regions above the tube sheet where thermohydraulic conditions and, as a consequence thereof, chemical conditions are uncontrolled. Within these zones Alloy 600 is not sufficienthy resistent to caustic or phosphate attack (caustic stress corrosion cracking and general corrosion, resp.). The mechanisms of several corrosion phenomena are not fully understood. (orig.) [de

  9. Corrosion problems in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flis, J.; Janik-Czachor, M.

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics were given of steels and alloys used in the PWR nuclear power plants and of water used in the primary and secondary systems. Corrosion damages of materials and installations were described. It was indicated that the damages were due mainly to stress corrosion cracking. Main preventive methods were listed. (author)

  10. Corrosion problems of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbancik, L.; Kostal, M.

    Literature data are assessed on corrosion failures of steam generator tubes made of INCONEL 600 or INCOLOY 800. It was found that both alloys with high nickel content showed good stability in a corrosion environment while being sensitive to carbide formation on grain boundaries. The gradual depletion of chromium results from the material and corrosion resistance deteriorates. INCOLOY 800 whose chromium carbide precipitation on grain boundaries in pure water and steam is negligible up to 75O degC and which is not subject to corrosion attacks in the above media and in an oxidizing environment at a temperature to about 700 degC shows the best corrosion resistance. Its favourable properties were tested in long-term operation in the Peach Bottom 1 nuclear power plant where no failures due to corrosion of this material have been recorded since 1967. In view of oxygenic-acid surface corrosion, it is necessary to work in a neutral or slightly basic environment should any one of the two alloys be used for steam generator construction. The results are summed up of an analysis conducted for the Beznau I NOK reactor. Water treatment with ash-free amines can be used as prevention against chemical corrosion mechanisms, although the treatment itself does not ensure corrosion resistance of steam generator key components. (J.B.)

  11. Study of polarization curves from AlSi12, AlSi5Mg and AlMg5 alloys due to corrosion problems in telecomunication equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.R.A. da

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of three aluminium based alloys (AlSi 12, AlMg5 and AlSi 5Mg) when exposed to aqueous media containing chloride is investigated; these alloys are used in the manufacturing of telecomunication equipment. Accelerated corrosion testing and salt spray tests were carried out. The results include polarization curves obtained with three kinds of aqueous solutions (the first containing only 3% NaCl and the others, 3% NaCl and small amounts of Fe 3+ and Cu 2+ ions). (C.L.B.) [pt

  12. Corrosion problems and solutions in oil refining and petrochemical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses corrosion problems and their solutions at facilities in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, including cooling water and boiler feed water units. Further, it describes and analyzes corrosion control actions, corrosion monitoring, and corrosion management. Corrosion problems are a perennial issue in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, as they lead to a deterioration of the functional properties of metallic equipment and harm the environment – both of which need to be protected for the sake of current and future generations. Accordingly, this book examines and analyzes typical and atypical corrosion failure cases and their prevention at refineries and petrochemical facilities, including problems with: pipelines, tanks, furnaces, distillation columns, absorbers, heat exchangers, and pumps. In addition, it describes naphthenic acid corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen damages, sulfidic corrosion, microbiologically induced corrosion, erosion-corrosion, and corrosion...

  13. Corrosion problems of materials for mechanical, power and chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouska, P.; Cihal, V.; Malik, K.; Vyklicky, M.; Stefec, R.

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain 47 contributions, out of which 8 have been inputted in INIS. These are concerned with various corrosion problems of WWER primary circuit components and their testing. The factors affecting the corrosion resistance are analyzed, the simultaneous corrosion action of decontamination of steels is assessed, and the corrosion cracking of special steels is dealt with. The effects of deformation on the corrosion characteristics are examined for steel to be used in fast reactors. The corrosion potentials were measured for various steels. A testing facility for corrosion-mechanical tests is briefly described. (M.D.). 5 figs., 5 tabs., 25 refs

  14. Concrete cover cracking due to uniform reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2013-01-01

    and reinforcement de-passivation is a frequently used limit state. The present paper investigates an alternative limit state: corrosion-induced cover cracking. Results from numerical simulations of concrete cover cracking due to reinforcement corrosion are presented. The potential additional service life...... is calculated using literature data on corrosion rate and Faraday’s law. The parameters varied comprise reinforcement diameter, concrete cover thickness and concrete material properties, viz. concrete tensile strength and ductility (plain concrete and fibre reinforced concrete). Results obtained from......Service life design (SLD) is an important tool for civil engineers to ensure that the structural integrity and functionality of the structure is not compromised within a given time frame, i.e. the service life. In SLD of reinforced concrete structures, reinforcement corrosion is of major concern...

  15. Analytical model for time to cover cracking in RC structures due to rebar corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Ghosh, A.K.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ramanujam, S.

    2006-01-01

    The structural degradation of concrete structures due to reinforcement corrosion is a major worldwide problem. Reinforcement corrosion causes a volume increase due to the oxidation of metallic iron, which is mainly responsible for exerting the expansive radial pressure at the steel-concrete interface and development of hoop tensile stresses in the surrounding concrete. Cracking occurs, once the maximum hoop tensile stress exceeds the tensile strength of the concrete. The cracking begins at the steel-concrete interface and propagates outwards and eventually results in the thorough cracking of the cover concrete and this would indicate the loss of service life for the corrosion affected structures. An analytical model is proposed to predict the time required for cover cracking and the weight loss of reinforcing bar in corrosion affected reinforced concrete structures. The modelling aspects of the residual strength of cracked concrete and the stiffness contribution from the combination of reinforcement and expansive corrosion products have also been incorporated in the model. The problem is modeled as a boundary value problem and the governing equations are expressed in terms of the radial displacement. The analytical solutions are presented considering a simple two-zone model for the cover concrete, viz. cracked or uncracked. Reasonable estimation of the various parameters in the model related to the composition and properties of expansive corrosion products based on the available published experimental data has also been discussed. The performance of the proposed corrosion cracking model is then investigated through its ability to reproduce available experimental trends. Reasonably good agreement between experimental results and the analytical predictions has been obtained. It has also been found that tensile strength and initial tangent modulus of cover concrete, annual mean corrosion rate and modulus of elasticity of reinforcement plus corrosion products combined

  16. Solutions of corrosion Problems in advanced Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, Asger

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic and ferritic steels were exposed in the superheater area of a straw-fired CHP plant. The specimens were exposed for 1400 hours at 450-600°C. The rate of corrosion was assessed based on unattacked metal remaining. The corrosion products and course of corrosion for the various steel types...

  17. Corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, B.

    1989-01-01

    This article briefly presents current corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies. The problems are different forms of environmentally assisted cracking, and the remedies are divided into material-, environment-, and stress-related remedies. The list of problems comprises: intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld-sensitized stainless steel piping; IGSCC in cold-bent stainless steel piping; irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in stainless alloys; IGSCC in high-strength stainless alloys. A prospective corrosion problem, as judged from literature references, and one which relates to plant life, is corrosion fatigue in pressure vessel steel, since the reactor pressure vessel is the most critical component in the BWR pressure boundary as regards plant safety. (author)

  18. Localized corrosion problems in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, Henri.

    1977-01-01

    Main localized etching on the structure materials of water reactors are studied: stress corrosion on stainless steel 304 (B.W.R), stress corrosion, 'wall thinning' and denting of Inconel 600 vapor generator tubes (P.W.R.). Some mechanisms are examined and practical exemples in reactors are described. Various possible cures are presented [fr

  19. Metallic materials corrosion problems in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, G.; Dixmier, J.; Jarny, P.

    1977-01-01

    The USA forecastings concerning the molten salt reactors are reviewed (mixtures of fluorides containing the fuel, operating between 560 and 700 0 C). Corrosion problems are important in these reactors. The effects of certain characteristic factors on corrosion are analyzed: humidity and metallic impurities in the salts, temperature gradients, speed of circulation of salts, tellurium from fission products, coupling. In the molten fluorides and experimental conditions, the materials with high Ni content are particularly corrosion resistant alloys (hastelloy N). The corrosion of this material is about 2.6 mg.cm -2 at 700 0 C [fr

  20. Mechanical damage due to corrosion of parts of pump technology and valves of LWR power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, J.; Krumpl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two types are described of uneven corrosion of austenitic chromium-nickel steel: pitting and slit corrosion. The occurrence of slit corrosion is typical of parts of pumping technology and valves. The corrosion damage of austenitic chromium-nickel steels spreads as intergranular, transgranular or mixed corrosion. In nuclear power facilities with LWR's, intergranular corrosion is due to chlorides and sulphur compounds while transgranular corrosion is due to the presence of dissolved oxygen and chlorides. In mechanically stressed parts, stress corrosion takes place. The recommended procedures are discussed of reducing the corrosion-mechanical damage of pumping equipment of light water reactors during design, production and assembly. During the service of the equipment, corrosion cracks are detected using nondestructive methods and surface cracks are repaired by grinding and welding. (E.S.)

  1. Corrosion problems and its prevention in nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakae, Yukio; Susukida, Hiroshi; Kowaka, Masamichi; Fujikawa, Hisao.

    1979-01-01

    29 nuclear power plants with 2.56 million kW output are expected to be in operation by 1985 in Japan. The main problems of corrosion in the nuclear reactors in operation at present and promising for the future are as follows: corrosion, denting and stress corrosion cracking in the steam generator tubes for PWRs, stress corrosion cracking in SUS pipings for BWRs, sodium corrosion and mass transfer in FBRs, high temperature gas corrosion in HTGRs, and interaction between coolant, blanket material and structural material in nuclear fusion reactors. In LWRs, the countermeasures based on the experiences in actual plants and the results of simulation tests have attained the good results. Various monitoring systems and the techniques for in-service inspection and preservice inspection have accomplished astonishing progress. These contributed largely to establish the reliability of nuclear power plants. The cases of troubles in primary and secondary systems, the experiences of the corrosion of steam generator tubes and the countermeasures, and the denting troubles occurred in USA and the trend of countermeasures in PWRs, the cases of stress corrosion cracking in SUS 304 and 316 pipings for BWRs, and the problems of various future reactors are described. Unexpected troubles often occur in practical plants of large capacity, therefore the method of predicting tests must be established, and the monitoring of safety must be thorough. (Kako, I.)

  2. Failure Modes in Concrete Repair Systems due to Ongoing Corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Šavija, B.; Ye, G.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; van Breugel, K.

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It can result in cracking and spalling of the concrete cover. After the damaged cover is repaired, reinforcement corrosion might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion

  3. Advanced modelling of concrete deterioration due to reinforcement corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isgor, O.B.; Razaqpur, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive model is presented for predicting the rate of steel corrosion in concrete structures and the consequent formation and propagation of cracks around the steel reinforcement. The corrosion model considers both the initiation and the propagation stages of corrosion. Processes commencing in the initiation stage, such as the transport of chloride ions and oxygen within the concrete and variation in temperature and moisture, are assumed to continue in the propagation stage while active corrosion is occurring contemporaneously. This allows the model to include the effects of changes in exposure conditions on the corrosion rate and the effects of the corrosion reactions on the transport properties of concrete. The corrosion rates are calculated by applying the finite-element solution of the Laplace equation for electrochemical potential, with appropriate boundary conditions. Because these boundary conditions are nonlinear, a nonlinear solution algorithm is used. The results of the analysis are compared with available test data, and the comparison is found to be satisfactory. (author)

  4. Problems raised by corrosion in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricot, R.; Boutonnet, G.; Perrot, M.; Blum, J.-M.

    1977-01-01

    In the uranium ore processing industry, materials which resist both mechanical abrasion and corrosion in an acid medium are required. Different typical cases are examined. For the reprocessing of irradiated fuels, two processes are possible: the conventional wet process, of the Purex type, and the fluoride volatilization process. In the latter case, the problems raised by fluoride corrosion in the presence of fission products is examined. The other parts of the fuel cycle are examined in the same manner [fr

  5. Structural Effects of Reinforced Concrete Beam Due to Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Idris, Nur'ain; Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Sarpin, Norliana; Zainal, Rozlin; Kasim, Narimah

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete is one of the main issues among construction stakeholders. The main consequences of steel corrosion include loss of cross section of steel area, generation of expansive pressure which caused cracking of concrete, spalling and delaminating of the concrete cover. Thus, it reduces the bond strength between the steel reinforcing bar and concrete, and deteriorating the strength of the structure. The objective of this study is to investigate the structural effects of corrosion damage on the performance of reinforced concrete beam. A series of corroded reinforced concrete beam with a corrosion rate of 0%, 20% and 40% of rebar corrosion is used in parametric study to assess the influence of different level of corrosion rate to the structural performance. As a result, the used of interface element in the finite element modelling predicted the worst case of corrosion analysis since cracks is induced and generate at this surface. On the other hand, a positive linear relationship was sketched between the increase of expansive pressure and the corrosion rate. Meanwhile, the gradient of the graph is decreased with the increase of steel bar diameter. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is a significant effect on the load bearing capacity of the structure where the higher corrosion rate generates a higher stress concentration at the mid span of the beam. This study could predict the residual strength of reinforced concrete beam under the corrosion using the finite element analysis. The experimental validation is needed on the next stage to investigate the quantitative relation between the corrosion rate and its influence on the mechanical properties.

  6. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  7. Failure Analysis of a Nickel-Plated Electronic Connector Due to Salt-Induced Corrosion (ENGE 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Ri; Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2015-10-01

    When electronic connectors in mobile devices are miniaturized, the thickness of plating decreases. However, this thin plating is expected to decrease the life of the connector due to problems with corrosion. In this study, salt spray aging tests were performed on miniaturized nickel-plated stainless steel electronic connectors to observe failure mechanisms in realistic environments. The tests were performed three times using a 5% NaCl solution in an atmosphere of 45 °C; each test included several cycles where one cycle was one 24-h period consisting of 8 h of salt spray and 16 h without salt spray. The nickel-plating layers were periodically observed by electron probe X-ray micro-analyzer, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy to analyze and identify the corrosion mechanism. We found that the primary failure mode of the nickel plating is blistering and delamination. The corrosion mechanism is typically a chain reaction of several corrosion mechanisms: pitting corrosion --> stress corrosion cracking --> hydrogen-induced cracking --> blistering and delamination. Finally, we discuss countermeasures to prevent corrosion of the nickel layer based on the corrosion mechanisms identified in this study.

  8. Estimation of Concrete Corrosion Due to Attack of Chloride Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Babitski

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides results of experimental concrete research under conditions of concentrated chloride salt solutions. General principles of forecasting concrete corrosion resistance under salt physical corrosion are given in the paper. Analytical dependences for quantitative estimation of corroded concrete have been obtained.

  9. The ageing of CANDU steam generator due to localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucan, D.; Fulger, M.; Jinescu, Ghe.

    2001-01-01

    The principal types of corrosion are presented which can occur in CANDU steam generator. There are also presented the operation conditions, the specifications referring to the water chemistry and the construction materials of Steam Generator, the factors that have a great influence on the corrosion behaviour during the whole exploitation period of this equipment. The most important elements of CANDU Steam Generator ageing management program are also discussed. (R. P.)

  10. Corrosion resistance of biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on magnesium due to varying pretreatment time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterman, J., E-mail: jay.waterman@pg.canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); Pietak, A. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Birbilis, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University (Australia); Woodfield, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Otago, Christchurch (New Zealand); Dias, G. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Staiger, M.P., E-mail: mark.staiger@canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2011-12-15

    Calcium phosphate coatings were prepared on magnesium substrates via a biomimetic coating process. The effects of a magnesium hydroxide pretreatment on the formation and the ultimate corrosion protection of the coatings were studied. The pretreatment layer was found to affect the amount of defects present in the coatings. Corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied in vitro using two simulated body fluids, 0.8% NaCl and Hanks solution. In NaCl, the resistance to corrosion of all samples decreases with time as corrosion proceeded through cracks and other defects in the coatings. Samples with no pretreatment displayed the highest corrosion resistance as these samples had the fewest defects in the coating. However, in Hanks solution, corrosion resistance increased with time due to additional nucleation of calcium phosphate from the fluid on to the substrate. In this solution, additional pretreatment time was beneficial to the overall corrosion resistance.

  11. Failure Modes in Concrete Repair Systems due to Ongoing Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladena Luković

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It can result in cracking and spalling of the concrete cover. After the damaged cover is repaired, reinforcement corrosion might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion cell is difficult to control, the damage can be possibly delayed and controlled by use of a suitable repair material. The lattice fracture model is used in this paper to investigate the performance of strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC in concrete repair systems exposed to ongoing corrosion. Numerical results were verified by experimental tests when SHCC, nonreinforced material (repair mortar, and commercial repair mortar are used as repair materials. In experiments, reinforcement bars (surrounded by a repair material were exposed to accelerated corrosion tests. The influence of the substrate surface preparation, the type of repair material, the interface, and the substrate strength on the resulting damage and failure mode of repair systems are discussed. In general, SHCC repair enables distributed cracking with small crack widths, up to several times smaller compared to repair mortar. Furthermore, more warning signs prior to the final failure are present in the SHCC repair system.

  12. Corrosion problem in the CRENK Triga Mark II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalenga, M.

    1990-01-01

    In August 1987, a routine underwater optical inspection of the aluminum tank housing the core of the CRENK Triga Mark II reactor, carried out to update safety condition of the reactor, revealed pitting corrosion attacks on the 8 mm thick aluminum tank bottom. The paper discuss the work carried out by the reactor staff to dismantle the reactor in order to allow a more precise investigation of the corrosion problem, to repair the aluminum tank bottom, and to enhance the reactor overall safety condition

  13. Corrosion, inspection and other problems associated with Heat exchangers in the heavy water industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twigg, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion, fabrication and inspection problems encountered in the heavy water industry Heat exchangers are discussed. Among the problems examined are erosion/corrosion of two pass exchangers, rolling of tubes, pitting, fretting and protection for long term storage. (auth)

  14. Expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.; Fennell, P.A.H. [Serco Assurance, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in vertical storage holes drilled in a series of caverns excavated from the granite bedrock at a depth of about 500 m and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container, designed to provide mechanical strength and to keep individual fuel bundles at a safe distance from one another, thereby minimising the risk of criticality. The container is fitted inside an inherently corrosion resistant copper overpack that is designed to provide containment over the long timescales required. As part of the safety case for the repository, one of the scenarios being addressed by SKB involves the early mechanical failure of the outer copper overpack, allowing water to enter the outer container and corrode the inner one. One consequence of this failure would be the long-term build up of corrosion product, which could induce stresses in the spent fuel canister. A programme of experimental work was undertaken to investigate the effect of corrosion product formation on the generation of stresses in the outer copper container. This report describes the construction of an apparatus to directly measure the expansion caused by the anaerobic corrosion of ferrous material in a simulated repository environment whilst under representative compressive loads. This apparatus, known as the 'stress cell' consisted of a stack of interleaved carbon steel and copper discs that was subjected to a compressive load simulating the loads expected in a repository and immersed in simulated anoxic groundwater at 69 deg C. The stack was mounted in a rigid frame and a system of levers was used to amplify any expansion caused by corrosion; the expansion of the stack was measured using sensitive displacement transducers

  15. Expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.; Fennell, P.A.H.

    2006-12-01

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in vertical storage holes drilled in a series of caverns excavated from the granite bedrock at a depth of about 500 m and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container, designed to provide mechanical strength and to keep individual fuel bundles at a safe distance from one another, thereby minimising the risk of criticality. The container is fitted inside an inherently corrosion resistant copper overpack that is designed to provide containment over the long timescales required. As part of the safety case for the repository, one of the scenarios being addressed by SKB involves the early mechanical failure of the outer copper overpack, allowing water to enter the outer container and corrode the inner one. One consequence of this failure would be the long-term build up of corrosion product, which could induce stresses in the spent fuel canister. A programme of experimental work was undertaken to investigate the effect of corrosion product formation on the generation of stresses in the outer copper container. This report describes the construction of an apparatus to directly measure the expansion caused by the anaerobic corrosion of ferrous material in a simulated repository environment whilst under representative compressive loads. This apparatus, known as the 'stress cell' consisted of a stack of interleaved carbon steel and copper discs that was subjected to a compressive load simulating the loads expected in a repository and immersed in simulated anoxic groundwater at 69 deg C. The stack was mounted in a rigid frame and a system of levers was used to amplify any expansion caused by corrosion; the expansion of the stack was measured using sensitive displacement transducers. Initially

  16. Investigations of the magnetic fields from ships due to corrosion and its countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Peter J.

    Corrosion is one of the main concerns for the shipping industry. The enormous cost associated with the corrosion of ships means that operators are more than ever seeking methods to provide optimal protection. Another problem which results from the corrosion of ships is that the electric currents produced give rise to a corrosion related magnetic field which adds to the ships overall electromagnetic field which can trigger underwater mines. Hence for the Admiralty to protect their fleet, they need to understand, predict and reduce these electromagnetic signatures. This will also be a concern for operators of merchant ships if, as recently suggested, terrorists begin to target them. There are a number of factors contributing to the electromagnetic signature of a ship. The work presented in this study is concerned with the magnetic field arising due to corrosion and the countermeasures employed against it (namely Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP) systems]. This field is called the Corrosion Related Magnetic (CRM) field. Since this field is directly related to the rate of corrosion of a ship, it may also be used as an indicator as to the efficiency of the corrosion protection measures, This work presents a range of techniques which may be used to model the CRM field. Simple dipole models are used to investigate the general behaviour of a corroding ship in sea water. These investigations result in an expression for an approximation of the CRM field from a dipole-wire configuration which can be used to estimate the CRM field from a corroding ship with an active ICCP system. A second, more detailed, method was then developed using the Boundary Element Method (BEM) to model a ship corroding in a tank of sea water. The BEM uses a large set of simultaneous equations, the coefficients of which are calculated by numerical integration using a new method based around the moments of triangular surface elements which discretise the boundary of the domain. By using a

  17. Passive films and corrosion protection due to phosphonic acid inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J.L.; Liu, Q. (Nanjing Univ. (China)); Li, Y.; Wang, Z.W. (Nanjing Inst. of Chemical Tech. (China))

    1993-04-01

    For protecting mild steel from corrosion, aminotrimethylidenephosphonic acid (ATMP) was more effective than 1-hydroxyethylidene diphosphonic acid (HEDP), N.N-dimethylidenediphosphonic acid (EEDP), and ethylenediaminetetramethylidenephosphonic acid (EDTMP). A 20-min treatment in 1.0 mol/l of ATMP with a pH 0.23 at 45 C formed an anti-corrosive complex film that was composed of 48.4% O, 28.6% P, 7.0% Fe, 4.3% N, and 11.7% C, based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. From differences in binding energies of Fe, N, and O, in the shift of C-N and P-O vibration, in the reflection FTIR spectra, and in the change of P-OH and Fe-N vibration before and after film formation, it was deduced that N and O in ATMP were coordinated with Fe[sub 2+] in the film.

  18. Pseudarthrosis due to galvanic corrosion presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Noel Beavers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two unlike metals near one another can break down as they move toward electrochemical equilibrium resulting in galvanic corrosion. We describe a case of electrochemical corrosion resulting in pseudarthrosis, followed by instrumentation failure leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 53-year-old female with a history of cervical instability and two separate prior cervical fusion surgery with sublaminar cables presented with new onset severe neck pain. Restricted range of motion in her neck and bilateral Hoffman's was noted. X-ray of her cervical spine was negative. A noncontrast CT scan of her head and neck showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the prepontine and cervicomedullary cisterns. Neurosurgical intervention involved removal of prior stainless steel and titanium cables, repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and nonsegmental C1–C3 instrumented fusion. She tolerated the surgery well and followed up without complication. Galvanic corrosion of the Brook's fusion secondary to current flow between dissimilar metal alloys resulted in catastrophic instrumentation failure and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  19. Countermeasures for electrolytic corrosion - Part I: Traditional methods and their problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Yoon-Cheol; Kim, Dae-Kyeong; Bae, Jeong-Hyo; Ha, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Hyun-Goo

    2004-01-01

    When an underground pipeline runs parallel with DC-powered railways, it suffers from electrolytic corrosion caused by the stray current leaked from the railway negative returns. Perforation due to the electrolytic corrosion may bring about large-scale accidents even in cathodically protected systems. Traditionally, bonding methods such as direct drainage, polarized drainage and forced drainage have been used in order to mitigate the damage on pipelines. In particular, the forced drainage method is widely adopted in Korea. In this paper, we report the real-time measurement data of the pipe-to-soil potential variation in the presence and absence of the IR compensation. The drainage current variation was also measured using the Stray Current Logger developed. By analysing them, the problems of current countermeasures for electrolytic corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  20. Countermeasures for electrolytic corrosion - Part I: Traditional methods and their problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Yoon-Cheol; Kim, Dae-Kyeong; Bae, Jeong-Hyo; Ha, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Hyun-Goo [Underground Systems Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, 28-1 Sungju-dong, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    When an underground pipeline runs parallel with DC-powered railways, it suffers from electrolytic corrosion caused by the stray current leaked from the railway negative returns. Perforation due to the electrolytic corrosion may bring about large-scale accidents even in cathodically protected systems. Traditionally, bonding methods such as direct drainage, polarized drainage and forced drainage have been used in order to mitigate the damage on pipelines. In particular, the forced drainage method is widely adopted in Korea. In this paper, we report the real-time measurement data of the pipe-to-soil potential variation in the presence and absence of the IR compensation. The drainage current variation was also measured using the Stray Current Logger developed. By analysing them, the problems of current countermeasures for electrolytic corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  1. Topical problems of corrosion research for nuclear power purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremias, B.

    1978-01-01

    Currently, research is focused on stress corrosion, intergranular corrosion, corrosion in water and steam, hydrogen-induced corrosion and corrosion in liquid sodium. The effort to limit stress corrosion resulted in the application of high nickel content austenitic steels. In these steels, the susceptibility to stress corrosion is mainly affected by previous heat treatment and the presence of chloride ions. Attention is also paid to medium and high-alloy chromium steels and susceptibility is studied to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion. Of low-alloy steels the 21/4Cr-1Mo type steels stabilized with Nb or nonstabilized are studied with respect to decarburization kinetics and changes in mechanical properties in the presence of hydrogen. Of nonferrous metals zirconium alloys are studied used as cladding materials for fuel elements, mainly Zircaloy 2 and 4, with regard to their resistance to high-temperature oxidation, high-pressure steam action, etc. (J.F.)

  2. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  3. corrosion problems and their relationship with the environment in the Colombian productive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyave P, Carlos E; Herrera B, Francisco J; Delgado L, Juan; Cuervo T, Joaquin

    1999-01-01

    As a part of a broad study on the corrosion problems in the Colombian industry, it was included an assessment of the effect of the main corrosive environments (atmosphere, soil, salad and drinking water, and chemicals), on materials stability. On the other hand, the impact of the corrosion processes on the environmental constituents (live species, atmosphere, soil, materials, and water) was also assessed. Main conclusions are: Atmosphere is the more extensively corrosive environment, and, all the environmental constituents are affected by corrosion without significant differences

  4. Catastrophes caused by corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, huge attention has been paid to the problem of corrosion damage and destruction of metallic materials. Experience shows that failures due to corrosion problems are very important, and statistics at the world level shows that the damage resulting from the effects of various forms of corrosion is substantial and that, for example, in industrialized countries it reaches 4-5% of national incomes. Significant funds are determined annually for the prevention and control of corrosion...

  5. Effect of Host Media on Microbial Influenced Corrosion due to Desulfotomaculum nigrificans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lata, Suman; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, Ajay K.

    2013-04-01

    This article reports about the tests carried to investigate microbial-induced corrosion on stainless steels due to sulfate-reducing bacteria sp. Desulfotomaculum nigrificans in different host media. Stainless steel 304L, 316L, and 2205 were selected for the test. Modified Baar's media (BM), sodium chloride solution, and artificial sea water (SW) were used as test solutions in anaerobic conditions. Electrochemical polarization and immersion test were performed to estimate the extent of corrosion rate and pitting on stainless steels. SEM/EDS were used to study the details inside/outside pits formed on the corroded samples. Biofilm formed on corroded coupons was analyzed for its components by UV/Visible spectroscopy. Corrosion attack on the test samples was observed maximum in case of exposure to SW followed by NaCl solution, both having sulfide and chloride whereas stainless steel exposed to BM, having sulfide, showed minimum attack. Tendency of extracellular polymeric substances to bind metal ions is observed to be responsible for governing the extent of corrosion attack.

  6. FORMULATION OF MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM DESCRIBING PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES AT CONCRETE CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Fedosov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the relevance of new scientific research focused on modeling of physical and chemical processes occurring in the cement concrete at their exploitation. The basic types of concrete corrosion are described. The problem of mass transfer processes in a flat reinforced concrete wall at concrete corrosion of the first and the second types has been mathematically formulated.

  7. Corrosion failure due to flux residues in an electronic add-on device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Minzari, Daniel; Rathinavelu, Umadevi

    2010-01-01

    of the electrochemical behavior metallic materials (alloys) used in the switch and risk of electrochemical migration (ECM) between the switch components in presence of flux residues was also carried out. Investigations included potentiodynamic polarization measurements on the switch electrodes using a micro......-electrochemical technique, in situ ECM studies, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Failure of the switches was found to be either due to the flux residue acting as an nsulating layer or as a corrosion accelerator causing ECM....

  8. Analytical model of cracking due to rebar corrosion expansion in concrete considering the structure internal force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiangyue; Peng, Minli; Lei, Fengming; Tan, Jiangxian; Shi, Huacheng

    2017-12-01

    Based on the assumptions of uniform corrosion and linear elastic expansion, an analytical model of cracking due to rebar corrosion expansion in concrete was established, which is able to consider the structure internal force. And then, by means of the complex variable function theory and series expansion technology established by Muskhelishvili, the corresponding stress component functions of concrete around the reinforcement were obtained. Also, a comparative analysis was conducted between the numerical simulation model and present model in this paper. The results show that the calculation results of both methods were consistent with each other, and the numerical deviation was less than 10%, proving that the analytical model established in this paper is reliable.

  9. Radiation hazards due to activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products in fusion reactor coolant and tritium breeding fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The accumulation of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products on the surfaces of components in fusion reactor coolant and tritium breeding systems can cause significant personnel access problems. Remote maintenance techniques or special treatment may be required to limit the amount of radiation exposure to plant operational and maintenance personnel. A computer code, RAPTOR, has been developed to estimate the transport of this activated material throughout a fusion heat transfer and/or tritium breeding material loop. A method is devised which treats the components of the loop individually and determines the source rates, deposition and erosion rates, decay rates, and purification rates of these radioactive materials. RAPTOR has been applied to the MARS and Starfire conceptual reactor designs to determine the degree of the possible radiation hazard due to these products. Due to the very high corrosion release rate by HT-9 when exposed to LiPb in the MARS reactor design, the radiation fields surrounding the primary system will preclude direct contact maintenance even after shutdown. Even the removal of the radioactive LiPb from the system will not decrease the radiation fields to reasonable levels. The Starfire primary system will exhibit radiation fields similar to those found in present pressurized water reactors. (orig.)

  10. A canned food scheduling problem with batch due date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tsui-Ping; Liao, Ching-Jong; Smith, Milton

    2014-09-01

    This article considers a canned food scheduling problem where jobs are grouped into several batches. Jobs can be sent to the next operation only when all the jobs in the same batch have finished their processing, i.e. jobs in a batch, have a common due date. This batch due date problem is quite common in canned food factories, but there is no efficient heuristic to solve the problem. The problem can be formulated as an identical parallel machine problem with batch due date to minimize the total tardiness. Since the problem is NP hard, two heuristics are proposed to find the near-optimal solution. Computational results comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of the two proposed heuristics with an existing heuristic are reported and discussed.

  11. Degradation of the compressive strength of unstiffened/stiffened steel plates due to both-sides randomly distributed corrosion wastage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorareh Hadj Mohammad

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problem of the influence of randomly distributed corrosion wastage on the collapse strength and behaviour of unstiffened/stiffened steel plates in longitudinal compression. A series of elastic-plastic large deflection finite element analyses is performed on both-sides randomly corroded steel plates and stiffened plates. The effects of general corrosion are introduced into the finite element models using a novel random thickness surface model. Buckling strength, post-buckling behaviour, ultimate strength and post-ultimate behaviour of the models are investigated as results of both-sides random corrosion.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Perturbation Fields due to Colonies of Stress Corrosion Cracks(SCCs) in a Gas Transmission Pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Sun Ho

    2001-01-01

    The detection of axial cracks using conventional MFL pig is a significant challenge in the gas pipeline inspection. In this study, a technique using interaction of circumferentially induced torrents with axial stress corrosion crack is presented. The feasibility of this technique is investigated using finite element modeling. Finite element analysis of such interaction is a difficult problem in terms of both computation time and memory requirements. The challenges arise due to the nonlinearity of material properties, the small sire of tight cracks relative to that of the magnetizer, and also time stepping involved in modeling velocity effects. This paper presents an approach based on perturbation methods. The overall analysis procedure is divided into 4 simple steps that can be performed sequentially. Modeling results show that this technique can effectively detect colonies of SCC as well as single SCC

  13. Storage of spent fuels: implementation of a research program on the risk of waste container rupture due to stress corrosion induced by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parise, M.; Walle, E.; Foct, J.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: research programm on stress corrosion of spent fuel casks materials due to fission products, such as iodine, chemical interactions with zirconium, chemical aspects of stress corrosion, rupture risk assessment

  14. Effective new chemicals to prevent corrosion due to chlorine in power plant superheaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martti Aho; Pasi Vainikka; Raili Taipale; Patrik Yrjas [VTT, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2008-05-15

    Firing or co-firing of biomass in efficient power plants can lead to high-temperature corrosion of superheaters due to condensation of alkali chlorides into superheater deposits. Corrosion can be prevented if a significant portion of the alkali chlorides present in the flue gases is destroyed before reaching the superheaters. The alkali capturing power of aluminium and ferric sulphates was determined in a pilot-scale fluidised bed (FB) reactor. The reagents were added in solution, through a spraying nozzle, to the upper part of the freeboard. Both reagents, at economical dosages, fast and effectively destroyed the alkali chlorides by producing sufficient SO{sub 3} for the sulphation. Both the mass flow rate and type of sulphate affected the sulphation ability. Thus, the cation, too, plays a role in the reaction. The required chemical dosage is not directly proportional to the S{sub reagent}/Cl{sub 2fuel} ratio because alkali chlorides must compete with calcium and magnesium oxides and probably also with alkali oxides for the available SO{sub 3}. 17 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Reinforced concrete bridges: effects due to corrosion and concrete young modulus variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. C. Mendes

    Full Text Available Most of the Brazilian bridges of federal road network are made of reinforced concrete and are more than 30 years old, with little information about the mechanical properties of their constitutive materials. Along the service life of these bridges much modification occurred on vehicles load and geometry and in design standard. Many of them show signs of concrete and steel deterioration and their stability conditions are unknown. With the aim of contributing to the structural evaluation of reinforced concrete bridges it was decided to analyze the stresses in reinforced concrete bridge sections to verify the effects due to reinforcement corrosion and variation of the concrete Young modulus on the stress distribution regarding several load patterns and cracking effects in a representative bridge of the Brazilian road network with different longitudinal reinforcement taxes and two concrete Young modulus, Ec and 0.5Ec, and with different percentage of reinforcement corrosion. The analysis considered two finite element models: frame and shell elements as well as solid elements. The results indicate that these variation effects are more significant in reinforcement bars than in concrete.

  16. Corrosion of the CANDU steam generator tubesheet due to aqueous environment pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucan, D.; Fulger, M.; Velciu, L.

    2009-01-01

    There is a side environment that is known to be affected significantly by several factors dependent on the balance of plant conditions (condenser leaks, condensate polishing, and coolant system materials) as well on the operational conditions, particularly through their thermal-hydraulic effects. The presence of tube-tubesheet crevices and restricted flow areas within sludge or surface deposits provides for local concentration sites for various impurities, including the acidic ones. The generalized corrosion can occur and can affect the steam generator performances. It is very important to understand the generalized corrosion mechanism with the purpose of evaluating the amount of corrosion products which exist in the steam generator after a determined period of operation. The purpose of this work consists in the assessment of corrosion behavior of the tubesheet material (carbon steel SA508 cl.2) at normal secondary circuit parameters (temperature, 260 deg. C, pressure, 5.1 MPa). The testing environment was the demineralized water without impurities, at different pH values regulated with morpholine and cyclohexylamine (all volatile treatment - AVT). The results are presented like micrographs, potentiodynamic curves and graphics representing loss of metal by corrosion, corrosion rate, the total corrosion products, the adherent corrosion products, the released corrosion products and the release of the metal. (authors)

  17. Method and device for the determination of material loss due to corrosion and/or erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugstad, A.; Videm, K.

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and an apparatus for gauging material loss due to corrosion and/or erosion during a certain period of time from a given piece of material which previously has been made radioactive. The material loss is determined by measuring the intensity of the radiactive radiation from the material by means of a radiation intensity meter disposed at a measuring site a fixed distance from said piece of material for the measurement of the radioactive radiation from the piece both at the beginning and at the end of said period of time. Each of the measurements is calibrated by means of an additional radiation source disposed for controllably adopting either a most radiation screened position or alternatively a least screened position with respect to a radiation screen, and thereby providing a known radiation intensity at the measuring site in both positions. The least radiation screened position provides full unscreened radiation intensity at the measuring site, whereas the most screened position provides negligible radiation intensity at said site. The measurement results in the two positions are subsequently compared in order to deduce the contribution of said piece of material to the combined radiation intensity in proporsion to the known contribution of the radiation source. The additional radiation source is preferable made from a calibration body composed of the same material as the piece of material exposed to corrosion and/or erosion, the calibration body body being activated at the same time and by the same activation process as said piece. The calibration body is preferably dimensioned to provide at all time the same radiation intensity at the measuring site as a predetermined material loss from the piece of material, e.g. a prefixed thickness reduction of the same. 4 figs

  18. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR CALCULATION OF MINIMUM PRESSURE PERTAINING TO DESTRUCTION OF SURFACE CORROSION LAYER DUE TO IMPACT OF WORKING LIQUID REVERSIVE STREAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kachanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to balance of external and internal force capacities a variation quasistatic problem has been solved in the paper. The problem allows to determine optimum values of α and β angles in the accepted field of sliding lines when destruction pressure takes on a minimum value pmin. It has been ascertained that the minimum pressure pmin which is necessary for destruction of a corrosion layer is registered at stream compression coefficient λ = 0,063 and the pressure is equal to 8-17 MPa for the investigated speed range v = 80-140 m/s.

  19. Determination of corrosion rate of reinforcement with a modulated guard ring electrode; analysis of errors due to lateral current distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtas, H.

    2004-01-01

    The main source of errors in measuring the corrosion rate of rebars on site is a non-uniform current distribution between the small counter electrode (CE) on the concrete surface and the large rebar network. Guard ring electrodes (GEs) are used in an attempt to confine the excitation current within a defined area. In order to better understand the functioning of modulated guard ring electrode and to assess its effectiveness in eliminating errors due to lateral spread of current signal from the small CE, measurements of the polarisation resistance performed on a concrete beam have been numerically simulated. Effect of parameters such as rebar corrosion activity, concrete resistivity, concrete cover depth and size of the corroding area on errors in the estimation of polarisation resistance of a single rebar has been examined. The results indicate that modulated GE arrangement fails to confine the lateral spread of the CE current within a constant area. Using the constant diameter of confinement for the calculation of corrosion rate may lead to serious errors when test conditions change. When high corrosion activity of rebar and/or local corrosion occur, the use of the modulated GE confinement may lead to significant underestimation of the corrosion rate

  20. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  1. Problems of technology and corrosion in sodium coolant and cover gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenstler, K.; Ullmann, H.

    1977-07-01

    The meeting encloses the following themes: (i) Reactions in the system sodium-steel-cover gas (ii) Corrosion behaviour of structural and cladding materials (iii) Determination of impurities in sodium and cover gas (iv) Technology of sodium and cover gas (v) Testing equipments (vi) Safety problems

  2. Inhibition of pH fronts in corrosion cells due to the formation of cerium hydroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soestbergen, M. van; Erich, S.J.F.; Huinink, H.P.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cerium-based corrosion inhibitors on the pH front between the alkaline cathode and acidic anode in corrosion cells has been studied. The cerium component of these inhibitors can affect the pH front since it precipitates in an alkaline environment as cerium hydroxide, which is important

  3. Visual problems in young adults due to computer use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, M M; Chatziralli, I P; Siasou, G; Papazisis, L

    2012-04-01

    Computer use can cause visual problems. The purpose of our study was to evaluate visual problems due to computer use in young adults. Participants in our study were 87 adults, 48 male and 39 female, mean aged 31.3 years old (SD 7.6). All the participants completed a questionnaire regarding visual problems detected after computer use. The mean daily use of computers was 3.2 hours (SD 2.7). 65.5 % of the participants complained for dry eye, mainly after more than 2.5 hours of computer use. 32 persons (36.8 %) had a foreign body sensation in their eyes, while 15 participants (17.2 %) complained for blurred vision which caused difficulties in driving, after 3.25 hours of continuous computer use. 10.3 % of the participants sought medical advice for their problem. There was a statistically significant correlation between the frequency of visual problems and the duration of computer use (p = 0.021). 79.3 % of the participants use artificial tears during or after long use of computers, so as not to feel any ocular discomfort. The main symptom after computer use in young adults was dry eye. All visual problems associated with the duration of computer use. Artificial tears play an important role in the treatment of ocular discomfort after computer use. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. [Work days lost due to health problems in industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Sylvia Regina Trindade; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2012-05-01

    This cross-sectional study estimated the prevalence of work days lost due to health problems and associated factors among industrial workers. The study population was a simple random cluster sample of 3,403 workers from 16 to 65 years of age in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Data were collected with individual home interviews. Among industrial workers, one-year prevalence of work days lost to health problems was 12.5%, of which 5.5% were directly work-related and 4.1% aggravated by work. There were no statistically significant differences when compared to other worker categories. Self-perceived workplace hazards, history of work-related injury, and poor self-rated health were associated with work days lost due to work-related injuries/diseases. The findings showed that work days lost are common among both industrial and non-industrial workers, thereby affecting productivity and requiring prevention programs.

  5. On the enhancement of corrosion in HTR graphite due to machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, D.; Harris, A.M.; Hall, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    A correlation is reported between bands of corrosion on the coolant surface of an inner sleeve from a Dragon reactor tubular interacting pin, and peaks in the axial profile of 60 Co along the pin. Tungsten has been observed at the corroded positions and it is postulated that these materials, deposited from a tungsten carbide tipped tool during machining, cause catalytic corrosion of the graphite. (author)

  6. Prediction of crack due to corrosion of reinforcing bar in low alkali concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Nobufumi; Iriya, Keishiro; Hitomi, Takashi; Konishi, Kazuhiro; Kurihara, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    Steel-reinforced low alkaline concrete containing pozzolan has been examined for application in high level radioactive waste disposal. Marine exposure examinations a period of six years were performed for concrete with 30% water-cement ratio, and the reduction in its compressive strength, the intrusion depth of chloride ions, and the corrosion of the reinforcing bar were investigated. On the basis of these results, the progress of corrosion of the reinforcing bar and the outbreak time of a corrosion crack in the reinforcing bar were predicted. The following results are obtained. 1) There was no decrease in the compressive strength of the test pieces during the marine exposure examinations. 2) There was little penetration of the chloride ions in comparison with ordinary Portland cement. 3) Although the corrosion of the reinforcing bar commenced at an early stage with a little quantity of chloride ion intrusion, the progress over the period of six years was extremely small. 4) The corrosion rate of the reinforcing bar in groundwater including sea water was estimated as 0.30-0.55 mg/(cm 2 ·year). In the case of a reinforcing bar with a thickness of 100 mm and diameter of 22 mm, the outbreak time of the reinforcing corrosion crack was predicted as 50-100 years after construction. (author)

  7. Natural analogues for expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of ferrous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Adams, R.

    2006-10-01

    In Sweden, spent nuclear fuel will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, consisting of a cast iron insert and a copper outer container. The canisters will be placed in a deep geologic repository and surrounded by bentonite. If a breach of the outer copper container were to occur the cast iron insert would undergo anaerobic corrosion, forming a magnetite film whose volume would be greater than that of the base metal. In principle there is a possibility that accumulation of iron corrosion product could cause expansion of the copper canister. Anaerobic corrosion rates are very slow, so in the work described in this report reference was made to analogous materials that had been corroding for long periods in natural anoxic aqueous environments. The report considers the types of naturally occurring environments that may give rise to anoxic environments similar to deep geological groundwater and where ferrous materials may be found. Literature information regarding the corrosion of iron archaeological artefacts is summarised and a number of specific archaeological artefacts containing iron and copper corroding in constrained geometries in anoxic natural waters are discussed in detail. No evidence was obtained from natural analogues which would suggest that severe damage is likely to occur to the SKB waste canister design as a result of expansive corrosion of cast iron under repository conditions

  8. Natural analogues for expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of ferrous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R.; Adams, R. [Serco Assurance, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-15

    In Sweden, spent nuclear fuel will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, consisting of a cast iron insert and a copper outer container. The canisters will be placed in a deep geologic repository and surrounded by bentonite. If a breach of the outer copper container were to occur the cast iron insert would undergo anaerobic corrosion, forming a magnetite film whose volume would be greater than that of the base metal. In principle there is a possibility that accumulation of iron corrosion product could cause expansion of the copper canister. Anaerobic corrosion rates are very slow, so in the work described in this report reference was made to analogous materials that had been corroding for long periods in natural anoxic aqueous environments. The report considers the types of naturally occurring environments that may give rise to anoxic environments similar to deep geological groundwater and where ferrous materials may be found. Literature information regarding the corrosion of iron archaeological artefacts is summarised and a number of specific archaeological artefacts containing iron and copper corroding in constrained geometries in anoxic natural waters are discussed in detail. No evidence was obtained from natural analogues which would suggest that severe damage is likely to occur to the SKB waste canister design as a result of expansive corrosion of cast iron under repository conditions.

  9. Erosion-corrosion problems encountered during the operation of conventional plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaud, J.

    1984-01-01

    Are reported three experiments carried out in order to fight erosion-corrosion by a pH analysis on the heat exchangers of the plant Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux A, on the low pressure reheaters of conventional flame plants and on the reheater-separator vessels of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The utilization of certain amines, other than ammonia (morpholine and cyclohexylamine) may lead only to some limited improvements due to the thermal decomposition of the reagents and due to the subsequent effects they may have on the chemical characteristics of the water and on the condensate treatments. The solutions related to the chemistry modifications of the water in order to fight erosion-corrosion phenomena are in fact a palliative to conceptional errors which can be useful whenever it is impossible to do otherwise [fr

  10. Degradation of normal portland and slag cement concrete under load, due to reinforcement corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.; Beaudoin, J.J.; Feldman, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    The corrosion of reinforcement is one of the major degradation mechanisms of reinforced concrete elements. The majority of studies published on concrete-steel corrosion have been conducted on unstressed specimens. Structural concrete, however, is subjected to substantial strain near the steel reinforcing bars that resist tensile loads, which results in a system of microcracks. This report presents the initial results of an investigation to determine the effect of applied load and microcracking on the rate of ingress of chloride ion and corrosion of steel in concrete. Simply-supported concrete beam specimens were loaded to give a maximum strain of about 600 με on the tension face. Chloride ion ingress on cores taken from loaded specimens was monitored using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis techniques. Corrosion current and rate measurements using linear polarization electrochemical techniques were also obtained on the same loaded specimens. Variables investigated included two concrete types, two steel cover-depths, three applied load levels, bonded and unbonded rebars and the exposure of tension and compression beam faces to chloride solution. One concrete mixture was made with type 10 Portland cement, the other with 75% blast furnace slag, 22% type 50 cement and 3% silica fume. The rate of chloride ion ingress into reinforced concrete, and hence the time for chloride ion to reach the reinforcing steel, is shown to be dependent on applied load and the concrete quality. The dependence of corrosion process descriptors - passive layer formation, initiation period and propagation period - on the level of applied load is discussed. (Author) (6 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs.)

  11. Corrosion by photochemical reaction due to synchrotron radiation in TRISTAN vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Takashi; Ishimaru, Hajime

    1989-01-01

    In the electron-positron collision ring (TMR) in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, the operation at the beam energy of 30 GeV is carried out. The critical energy of synchrotron radiation corresponding to this energy is 243 keV which is the highest in the world. Consequently, the radiation damage of various substances due to this radiation has become the problem. From the viewpoint that the TMR is the vacuum system totally made of aluminum alloy for the first time in the world, the problem peculiar to aluminum alloy and the related problem of material damage and the countermeasures are discussed. Beam energy and attenuation length, the radiation dose in the TMR tunnel, the beam current-time product of TMR, the examples of radiation damage such as the atmosphere in TAR, the atmosphere in TMR, the aluminum bellows, aluminum chamber and lead radiation shield in TMR, the aluminum beam line in the atmosphere of TAR, the heat-insulating kapton film with vacuum deposited aluminum films, Teflon and polystyrene insulators, the stainless steel terminals and cables for position monitors, the O-rings for gate valves, polyvinyl chloride and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Mass transfer coefficient in disturbed flow due to orifice for flow accelerated corrosion in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Mahendra; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Parida, Smrutiranjan

    2015-01-01

    The flow of fluid in pipes cause corrosion wherein the inner surface of pipe becomes progressively thinner and susceptible to failure. This form of corrosion dependent on flow dynamics is called Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and has been observed in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Mass transfer coefficient (MTC) is related to extent of wall thinning and it changes from its value in a straight pipe (with same fluid parameters) for flow in orifices, bends, junctions etc. due to gross disturbance of the velocity profile. This paper presents two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for an orifice configuration in a straight pipe. Turbulent model K- ω with shear stress transport and transition flow was the model used for simulation studies. The mass transfer boundary layer (MTBL) thickness δ mtbl is related to the Schmidt number (Sc) and hydrodynamic boundary layer thickness δ h , as δ mtbl ~ δh/(Sc 1/3 ). MTBL is significantly smaller than δ h and hence boundary layer meshing was carried out deep into δ mtbl . Uniform velocity profile was applied at the inlet. Post orifice fluid shows large recirculating flows on the upper and lower wall. At various locations after orifice, mass transfer coefficient is calculated and compared with the value in straight pipe with fully developed turbulent flow. The MTC due to the orifice increases and it is correlated with enhanced FAC in region after orifice. (author)

  13. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the s...

  14. Corrosion problems related to the containment of high-level nuclear waste for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is examined under the headings: introduction (nature of problem; system of barriers which will initially contain the wasteform and subsequently limit the rate of transport of products from the wasteform to the external environment); environmental data (disposal in land-based repositories; disposal on or in the deep seabed); design philosophies and materials data (design; criteria for materials selection (kinetics of corrosion)); specific materials considerations (environmental parameters -temperature, pressure, heat transfer and radiation effects; single metals and alloys - steels, nickel based alloys, copper, lead, titanium, aluminium oxide); alternative approaches; an overview - information needs; summary. (U.K.)

  15. Corrosion problems related to the containment of high-level nuclear waste for disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, G P

    1981-10-01

    The subject is examined under the headings: introduction (nature of problem; system of barriers which will initially contain the wasteform and subsequently limit the rate of transport of products from the wasteform to the external environment); environmental data (disposal in land-based repositories; disposal on or in the deep seabed); design philosophies and materials data (design; criteria for materials selection (kinetics of corrosion)); specific materials considerations (environmental parameters -temperature, pressure, heat transfer and radiation effects; single metals and alloys - steels, nickel based alloys, copper, lead, titanium, aluminium oxide); alternative approaches; an overview - information needs; summary.

  16. Problems due to icing of overhead lines - Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havard, D.G.; Pon, C.J.; Krishnasamy, S.G.

    1985-01-01

    A companion paper describes uncertainties in overhead line design due to the variability of ice and wind loads. This paper reviews two other effects due to icing; conductor galloping and torsional instability, which require further study. (author)

  17. Simulation of inter- and transgranular crack propagation in polycrystalline aggregates due to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musienko, Andrey; Cailletaud, Georges

    2009-01-01

    The motivation of the study is the development of a coupled approach able to account for the interaction between environment and plasticity in a polycrystalline material. The paper recalls first the constitutive equations used to describe the behavior of the grain core and of the grain boundary (GB). The procedure that is applied to generate synthetic polycrystalline aggregates with an explicit representation of the grain boundary area by 2D or 3D finite elements is then described. The approach is applied to the modeling of iodine-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in Zircaloy tubes used in nuclear power plants.

  18. Effect of Chlorine and Sulphur on Stainless Steel (AISI 310) Due To High Temperature Corrosion.

    OpenAIRE

    Onaivi Daniel Azamata; Titus Yusuf Jibatswen; Odinize C. Michael

    2016-01-01

    In a power station boiler, there are temperature of regimes of corrosion which occurs mainly in the economizer, boiler steam generation tubes, super-heater tubes and air tubes. The specific gas temperatures in degrees centigrade for the following include: 150 – 370oC for the economizer, 1000 – 1650oC for the boiler steam generation tubes, 650 – 1000oC for super-heater tubes and 1000 – 1200oC for air tubes. For power station boilers that burn coal as the source of fuel it is recommended that a...

  19. Stability Loss of the Cemented Stem of Hip Prosthesis due to Fretting Corrosion Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Capitanu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this project was to study the fretting behaviour of the cemented femoral stem fixation of a total hip prosthesis, trying to capture the loss of contact between the femoral stem and polymetylmethacrilate cement fixation. To have a landmark, studies were performed compared with cementless fixation, where no fretting phenomenon occurs, on real prostheses, under biological 3D loading conditions. A fatigue test device, installed on a servo-hydraulic triaxial dynamic testing machine was used. It allowed monitoring the flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, inner-outer rotation movements, and the variation of the torsional torque, depending on normal loading. The test ends when the sample does not fail after 2000000 cycles, or when it has reached a predetermined number of cycles. Test fluid medium used was NaCl mixed with distilled water, a favourable environment for appearance of fretting corrosion. After the failure of stem fixation at 2450000 cycles, the mantle of bone cement remaining adherent on femoral stem was removed. Microscopic inspection of the femoral stem and of the inner part of the polymetylmethacrilate mantle demonstrated the existence of corrosion of the femoral stem surface beneath the cement mantle, and Fe2O3 deposits on the femoral stem surface and on the inner part of the mantle.

  20. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Kusmierek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  1. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of imaging modalities to diagnose wear-related corrosion problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Denis; Barrack, Robert L; Potter, Hollis G

    2014-12-01

    Adverse tissue reactions are known to occur after total hip arthroplasty using both conventional and metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings and after MoM hip resurfacing arthroplasty (SRA). A variety of imaging tools, including ultrasound (US), CT, and MRI, have been used to diagnose problems associated with wear after MoM hip arthroplasty and corrosion at the head-trunnion junction; however, the relative advantages and disadvantages of each remain a source of controversy. The purposes of this review were to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of (1) US; (2) CT; and (3) MRI as diagnostic tools in the assessment of wear-related corrosion problems after hip arthroplasty. A systematic literature review was performed through Medline, EMBASE, Scopus CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library without time restriction using search terms related to THA, SRA, US, CT, MRI, adverse tissue reactions, and corrosion. Inclusion criteria were Level I through IV studies in the English language, whereas expert opinions and case reports were excluded. The quality of included studies was judged by their level of evidence, method of intervention allocation, outcome assessments, and followup of patients. Four hundred ninety unique results were returned and 40 articles were reviewed. The prevalence of adverse local tissue reactions in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients varies based on the method of evaluation (US, CT, MRI) and imaging protocols. US is accessible and relatively inexpensive, yet has not been used to report synovial thicknesses in the setting of wear-related corrosion. CT scans are highly sensitive and provide information regarding component positioning but are limited in providing enhanced soft tissue contrast and require ionizing radiation. MRI has shown promise in predicting both the presence and severity of adverse local tissue reactions but is more expensive. All three imaging modalities have a role in the assessment of adverse local tissue reactions and tribocorrosion

  3. Fractures in high-strength bolts due to hydrogen induced stress corrosion. Causes and corrective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoche, Holger; Oechsner, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Delayed brittle fractures of high-strength bolts of the strength class 10.9 are presented, taking the example of three damage cases. The respective damage mechanisms could be attributed to hydrogen induced stress corrosion which was caused, in turn, by hydrogen absorption during operation. The examples were chosen with a particular focus on the material condition's susceptibility which explains the cause for the occurrence of the damage mechanism. However, in only one of the three cases the susceptibility was evident and could be explained by violations of normative specifications and an unfavorable material choice. Whereas in the two other examples, only slight or no deviations from the standards and/or regulations could be found. The influencing parameters that caused the damage, those that further promoted the damage, as well as possible corrective actions are discussed taking into account the three exemplary damage cases.

  4. Inspection of steel poles; ultrasonic testing of anchor ground rods and cathodic reactions : Corrosion detection : an emerging problem in buried steel structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, A.K.; Randle, R.E.; Stewart, A.H. [EDM International Inc., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A typical inspection of steel utility poles routinely overlooks what is below ground, such as anchor rods, stub angles in lattice towers, and direct embedded steel poles. Stub angles are lap or butt spliced to the tower leg and extend several feet below ground line. A case study concerning stub angles (Oberst 1998) is discussed. An inspection of steel poles erected in 1929 revealed that 40 per cent of legs had complete loss of galvanizing, 10 per cent of legs had greater than 10 per cent loss of cross-section, and 2 per cent of legs had greater than 80 per cent loss of cross-section. All corrosion was found within one foot of ground line. A relatively new concept is direct embedded steel poles. An emerging problem concerns tree induced anchor rod corrosion. A corrosion technique for anchor rods was developed and has been commercially available for the past three years. Its effectiveness was verified at the Montana Power Company 500 kV Colstrip Project, where 3 anchor failures were detected in 1995 due to corrosion wastage. The rods are classified as being in good condition up to 10 per cent loss of cross-section, moderate corrosion for losses between 10 and 25 per cent, and excessive corrosion for losses greater than 25 per cent. The results obtained at the Montana Power Company indicated the technique was 98 per cent accurate. The authors discuss the capabilities and limitations of the technique. It was also applied for the Anchor Rod Inspection Project of the Georgia Power Company (GPC). The technique is evaluated in the laboratory, then optimized. Field prototypes are developed, followed by an evaluation at different test sites. figs.

  5. Environmental problems due to mining in Jharia Coalfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, S.P.

    1985-06-01

    The Jharia coalfield to the NW of Calcutta, India is the most important source of coking coal in the country. Coal mining started in 1890; in 1971-3 the coking coal mines were nationalised, the remainder being operated by the Bharat Coking Coal Ltd., TISCO and IISCO. Intensive mining has resulted in major environmental problems - land damage, water pollution, air pollution and overpopulation - which a major reconstruction programme started in 1976 hopes to solve. 2 references.

  6. RAMs: the problem of transient errors due to alpha radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goujon, Pierre.

    1980-01-01

    Errors that remained unexplained for a long time have occurred with dynamic random access memories. It has been known since 1978 that they are due to stray alpha radiation. A good understanding of this phenomenon enables its effects to be neutralized and the reliability of the products to be guarantied [fr

  7. Some problems on the aqueous corrosion of structural materials in nuclear engineering; Problemes de corrosion aqueuse de materiaux de structure dans les constructions nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H; Grall, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to give a comprehensive view of some aqueous corrosion studies which have been carried out with various materials for utilization either in nuclear reactors or in irradiated fuel treatment plants. The various subjects are listed below. Austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys: the behaviour of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in nitric medium and in the presence of hexavalent chromium; the stress corrosion of austenitic alloys in alkaline media at high temperatures; the stress corrosion of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in 650 C steam. Ferritic steels: corrosion of low alloy steels in water at 25 and 360 C; zirconium alloys; the behaviour of ultrapure zirconium in water and steam at high temperature. (authors) [French] On presente un ensemble d'etudes de corrosion en milieu aqueux effectuees sur des materiaux utilises, soit dans la construction des reacteurs soit pour la realisation des usines de traitement des combustibles irradies. Les differents sujets etudies sont les suivants. Les alliages austenitiques Fer-Nickel-Chrome: comportement d'alliages austenitiques fer-nickel-chrome en milieu nitrique en presence de chrome hexavalent; Corrosion sous contrainte d'alliages austenitiques dans les milieux alcalins a haute temperature; Corrosion sous contrainte dans la vapeur a 650 C d'alliages austenitiques fer-nickel-chrome. Les aciers ferritiques; Corrosion d'aciers faiblement allies dans l'eau a 25 et 360 C; le zirconium et ses alliages; Comportement du zirconium tres pur dans l'eau et la vapeur a haute temperature. (auteurs)

  8. Life prediction of steam generator tubing due to stress corrosion crack using Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Liu Fei; Cheng Guangxu; Zhang Zaoxiao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A life prediction model for SG tubing was proposed. → The initial crack length for SCC was determined. → Two failure modes called rupture mode and leak mode were considered. → A probabilistic life prediction code based on Monte Carlo method was developed. - Abstract: The failure of steam generator tubing is one of the main accidents that seriously affects the availability and safety of a nuclear power plant. In order to estimate the probability of the failure, a probabilistic model was established to predict the whole life-span and residual life of steam generator (SG) tubing. The failure investigated was stress corrosion cracking (SCC) after the generation of one through-wall axial crack. Two failure modes called rupture mode and leak mode based on probabilistic fracture mechanics were considered in this proposed model. It took into account the variance in tube geometry and material properties, and the variance in residual stresses and operating conditions, all of which govern the propagations of cracks. The proposed model was numerically calculated by using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The plugging criteria were first verified and then the whole life-span and residual life of the SG tubing were obtained. Finally, important sensitivity analysis was also carried out to identify the most important parameters affecting the life of SG tubing. The results will be useful in developing optimum strategies for life-cycle management of the feedwater system in nuclear power plants.

  9. Fastener Corrosion: A Result of Moisture Problems in the Building Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews recent literature on the corrosion of metals embedded in wood and highlights the link be-tween moisture accumulation in wood and fastener cor-rosion. Mechanisms of fastener corrosion are described including dependence upon wood moisture content. These fundamental concepts are applied to practical examples by explaining how hygrothermal models can be...

  10. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  11. Scoping calculation of nuclides migration in engineering barrier system for effect of volume expansion due to overpack corrosion and intrusion of the buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshita, Takashi; Ishihara, Yoshinao; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Ohi, Takao; Nakajima, Kunihiko

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion of the carbon steel overpack leads to a volume expansion since the specific gravity of corrosion products is smaller than carbon steel. The buffer material is compressed due to the corrosive swelling, reducing its thickness and porosity. On the other hand, buffer material may be extruded into fractures of the surrounding rock and this may lead to a deterioration of the planned functions of the buffer, including retardation of nuclides migration and colloid filtration. In this study, the sensitivity analyses for the effect of volume expansion and intrusion of the buffer material on nuclide migration in the engineering barrier system are carried out. The sensitivity analyses were performed on the decrease in the thickness of the buffer material in the radial direction caused by the corrosive swelling, and the change in the porosity and dry density of the buffer caused by both compacting due to corrosive swelling and intrusion of buffer material. As results, it was found the maximum release rates of relatively shorter half-life nuclides from the outside of the buffer material decreased for taking into account of a volume expansion due to overpack corrosion. On the other hand, the maximum release rates increased when the intrusion of buffer material was also taking into account. It was, however, the maximum release rates of longer half-life nuclides, such as Cs-137 and Np-237, were insensitive to the change of buffer material thickness, and porosity and dry density of buffer. (author)

  12. An overall view on corrosion and bio-fouling problems in sea water cooling systems at MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyanarayanan, V.; Umapathy, P.; Bhaskaran, R.; Nagarajan, J.; Pradeep, Jeena; Krishna Rao, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    clean the PSWHXs on routine basis due to difficulty in isolating these equipments. Further backwashing of condenser tubes are carried out on routine basis. Hence to control the fouling in PSWHXs, a broad spectrum biocide treatment (Acti-bromide with surfactant and bio-dispersant) has been started in 1997 in MAPS-2 on experimental basis and is continued both in MAPS-1 and 2 process seawater cooling systems due to its effectiveness. Actibromide and sodium hypochlorite solutions are mixed in the ratio of 1:3 and injected at the inlet of PSWHXs by gravity in each shift with TRO (Total Residual Oxidant) concentration of 0.10 - 0.15 ppm. As HOBr is a more stable species as compared to HOCI at seawater pH of 8.0 - 8.2 actibromide treatment is more effective than chlorine treatment. The experience gained with the treatment and the corrosion problems encountered in the seawater system are discussed in this paper. (author)

  13. Corrosion of Iron by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: New Views of an Old Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrelfs, Julia

    2014-01-01

    About a century ago, researchers first recognized a connection between the activity of environmental microorganisms and cases of anaerobic iron corrosion. Since then, such microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has gained prominence and its technical and economic implications are now widely recognized. Under anoxic conditions (e.g., in oil and gas pipelines), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly considered the main culprits of MIC. This perception largely stems from three recurrent observations. First, anoxic sulfate-rich environments (e.g., anoxic seawater) are particularly corrosive. Second, SRB and their characteristic corrosion product iron sulfide are ubiquitously associated with anaerobic corrosion damage, and third, no other physiological group produces comparably severe corrosion damage in laboratory-grown pure cultures. However, there remain many open questions as to the underlying mechanisms and their relative contributions to corrosion. On the one hand, SRB damage iron constructions indirectly through a corrosive chemical agent, hydrogen sulfide, formed by the organisms as a dissimilatory product from sulfate reduction with organic compounds or hydrogen (“chemical microbially influenced corrosion”; CMIC). On the other hand, certain SRB can also attack iron via withdrawal of electrons (“electrical microbially influenced corrosion”; EMIC), viz., directly by metabolic coupling. Corrosion of iron by SRB is typically associated with the formation of iron sulfides (FeS) which, paradoxically, may reduce corrosion in some cases while they increase it in others. This brief review traces the historical twists in the perception of SRB-induced corrosion, considering the presently most plausible explanations as well as possible early misconceptions in the understanding of severe corrosion in anoxic, sulfate-rich environments. PMID:24317078

  14. Finite element model for expansive stress due to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures; Analisis con elemento finito de los esfuerzos expansivos por corrosion en las estructuras de concreto reforzado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorena Gonzalez, J.H.; Calderon Guillen, J.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Los Mochis, Sinaloa (Mexico)]. E-mail: kstor28@yahoo.com.mx; cajoel_99@yahoo.com; Almeraya Calderon, F.; Gaona Tiburcio, C. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: facundo.almeraya@cimav.edu.mx; citlalli.gaona@cimav.edu.mx; Almaral Sanchez, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Los Mochis, Sinaloa (Mexico)]. E-mail: jalmaral@gmail.com; Martinez Villafane, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: martinez.villafane@cimav.edu.mx

    2011-01-15

    The corrosion in the reinforcement steel is a problem that diminishes the useful life of reinforced concrete structures, reside committing its structural security. In the available models to estimate the mechanical effect of the corrosion, it is assumed that the corroded steel, through the oxides that grow to its surroundings, exercises a pressure on the surrounding concrete supposing a problem of plane stress or plane strain. In this work, the problem is modeled with three-dimensional finite element starting from an experiment on a subjected cylinder to accelerated corrosion, with strain gage to measure the pressure indirectly in the interface steel-concrete. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the effect of the length of corroded steel, anodic length, has a significant effect on the magnitude of the pressure in the interface steel-concrete, fact that can be used to improve the existing models. [Spanish] La corrosion en el acero de refuerzo es un problema que disminuye la vida util en las estructuras de concreto reforzado, ademas de comprometer su seguridad estructural. En los modelos disponibles para estimar el efecto mecanico de la corrosion, se supone que el acero corroido, a traves de los oxidos que crecen a su alrededor, ejercen una presion sobre el concreto circundante suponiendo un problema de esfuerzos o deformaciones planas, En el presente trabajo, se modela el problema con elemento finito tridimensional a partir de un experimento sobre un cilindro de concreto reforzado sometido a corrosion acelerada, instrumentado para medir indirectamente la presion en la interfase acero-concreto. De los resultados obtenidos se concluye que el efecto de la longitud de acero corroido, longitud anodica, tiene un efecto significativo sobre la magnitud de la presion en la interfase acero-concreto, hecho que puede ser utilizado para mejorar los modelos existentes.

  15. MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF IRON CORROSION PROBLEM BASED ON CONDENSATION CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basuki Widodo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion process is a natural case that happened at the various metals, where the corrosion process in electrochemical can be explained by using galvanic cell. The iron corrosion process is based on the acidity degree (pH of a condensation, iron concentration and condensation temperature of electrolyte. Those are applied at electrochemistry cell. The iron corrosion process at this electrochemical cell also able to generate electrical potential and electric current during the process takes place. This paper considers how to build a mathematical model of iron corrosion, electrical potential and electric current. The mathematical model further is solved using the finite element method. This iron corrosion model is built based on the iron concentration, condensation temperature, and iteration time applied. In the electric current density model, the current based on electric current that is happened at cathode and anode pole and the iteration time applied. Whereas on the potential  electric model, it is based on the beginning of electric potential and the iteration time applied. The numerical results show that the part of iron metal, that is gristle caused by corrosion, is the part of metal that has function as anode and it has some influences, such as time depth difference, iron concentration and condensation temperature on the iron corrosion process and the sum of reduced mass during corrosion process. Moreover, difference influence of time and beginning electric potential has an effect on the electric potential, which emerges during corrosion process at the electrochemical cell. Whereas, at the electrical current is also influenced by difference of depth time and condensation temperature applied.Keywords: Iron Corrosion, Concentration of iron, Electrochemical Cell and Finite Element Method

  16. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  17. Some problems on the aqueous corrosion of structural materials in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, H.; Grall, L.

    1964-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to give a comprehensive view of some aqueous corrosion studies which have been carried out with various materials for utilization either in nuclear reactors or in irradiated fuel treatment plants. The various subjects are listed below. Austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys: the behaviour of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in nitric medium and in the presence of hexavalent chromium; the stress corrosion of austenitic alloys in alkaline media at high temperatures; the stress corrosion of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in 650 C steam. Ferritic steels: corrosion of low alloy steels in water at 25 and 360 C; zirconium alloys; the behaviour of ultrapure zirconium in water and steam at high temperature. (authors) [fr

  18. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  19. Single-machine common/slack due window assignment problems with linear decreasing processing times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingong; Lin, Win-Chin; Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Wu, Chin-Chia

    2017-08-01

    This paper studies linear non-increasing processing times and the common/slack due window assignment problems on a single machine, where the actual processing time of a job is a linear non-increasing function of its starting time. The aim is to minimize the sum of the earliness cost, tardiness cost, due window location and due window size. Some optimality results are discussed for the common/slack due window assignment problems and two O(n log n) time algorithms are presented to solve the two problems. Finally, two examples are provided to illustrate the correctness of the corresponding algorithms.

  20. Corrosion of circulating water pipings in thermal and nuclear power stations and corrosion prevention measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachiya, Minoru

    1982-01-01

    In the age of energy conservation at present, the power generation facilities have been examined from the viewpoint of performance, endurance and economy, and in particular, the prevention of the loss due to the corrosion of various facilities is one of most important problems. Since circulating water pipings are in contact with sea water and soil, the peculiar corrosion phenomena are brought about on their external and internal surfaces. Namely, the pitting corrosion due to the environment of soil quality difference, the defects of coating and the contact with reinforcing bars in concrete occurs on the external surface, and the overall corrosion due to the increase of flow velocity and the pitting corrosion due to the defects of coating, the contact with different kinds of metals and the gap in corrosion-resistant steel occur on the internal surface. As the measures for corrosion prevention, corrosion-preventive coating and electric corrosion prevention are applied. The principle, the potential and current density, the system, the design procedure and the examples of application of electric corrosion prevention are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. Implications of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field to the PCI stress corrosion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1980-01-01

    Fractographic observations on irradiated Zircaloy cladding stress corrosion fracture surfaces are considered against the background of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field. Dimples have been observed on the fracture surfaces of failed cladding, even though the cracks in metallographic sections are tight, i.e., crack propagation is associated with a low crack tip opening angle. This result is interpreted as providing evidence for an environmentally assisted ductile mode of fracture. The presence of this fracture mode forms the basis of an argument, which adds further support for the view that power ramp stress corrosion cladding failures are caused by stress concentrations that produce stress gradients in the cladding. (orig.)

  2. Numerical simulation of the detection of crack in reinforced concrete structures of NPP due to expansion of reinforcing corrosive products using Impact-Echo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morávka Š.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy boom is starting nowadays. But also current nuclear power plants (NPP are duty to certify their security for regular renewal of their operating licenses. NPP security can be significantly affected by defects of large amount of ageing reinforced concrete structures. Advanced Impact-Echo method seams to be very hopeful to cooperate at performing in-service inspections such structures. Just these in-service inspections are included in the first priority group of specific technical issues according to the recommendations of OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency, Commission on Safety of Nuclear Installation in the field of ageing management.This paper continues of extensive project dealing with Impact-Echo method application. It will present method description and main results of numerical modeling of detection and localization of crack caused by corrosive product expansion. Steel reinforcing rods are subjected to corrosion due to diffusion of corrosive agents from structure surface. Corrosive products have up to 7-times larger volume than pure steel. Raised strain can cad lead up to concrete failure and crack development. We investigate whether it is possible to detect these growing cracks by Impact-Echo method in time.Experimental verification of our numerical predictions is prepared on Civil Faculty in Brno.

  3. Assessment of structural integrity of Monju steel liner against sodium leakage and combustion. Modeling of thinning process of liner due to corrosion in structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukimori, K.; Kato, T.; Furuhashi, I.; Iwata, K.; Akatsu, M.

    2001-01-01

    The lining structure of LMFBR (Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor) has an important role to prohibit leaking sodium from touching a concrete floor in a sodium leakage incident. JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) experienced a sodium leakage incident in 1995 in the secondary heat transport system room of the prototype LMFBR MONJU. In this incident, a part of the liner was covered with a certain amount of high temperature leaked sodium and its compounds. Visible but small distortion and thinning of the liner were detected, which were due to heating by sodium fire and chemical corrosion, respectively. To simulate the MONJU incident, JNC conducted a series of sodium leakage tests, in one of which severer corrosion (molten salt type corrosion) than that in the MONJU incident was observed. In order to secure the conservativeness in the integrity assessment of the liner, consideration of a severest corrosion process was demanded. This means that the loss of parts of the structure with time should be considered in the structural analyses. In this study a modeling of thinning process of the liner was developed in order to realize reasonable analysis from the point of view of actual phenomena. The concept of the method is to release the stress of the lost region by using artificial creep and reducing Young's modulus. The necessity of this kind of model and the validity was verified through an application analysis of the liner in the secondary heat transport system room of MONJU. (authors)

  4. Rebar corrosion due to carbonation in structural reinforced concretes for near-surface LLW repositories: A critical failure mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torok, J

    1995-03-01

    The concrete roof of a near-surface radioactive waste repository is the principle protection against water infiltration and intrusion. The following potential roof failure mechanism is examined: carbon dioxide generated by the biodegradation of organic materials in the repository initiates corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in the concrete roof. Because the bottom surface of the roof is mostly under tension, it is susceptible to cracking. The migration path for carbon dioxide is through cracks in the concrete between the bottom of the roof and the reinforcing bars. Carbonate corrosion of the reinforcing bars may result in concrete spalling, more extensive rebar corrosion and ultimately structural failure. Attention is brought to this failure mechanism because it has generally been overlooked in repository performance assessments. Literature relevant to the above failure is reviewed. Prerequisites for rebar corrosion are the presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the repository gas, high relative humidity and through-cracks in the concrete. High carbon dioxide concentrations and relative humidity are expected in the repository. The oxygen concentration in the repository is expected to be very low, and that is expected to minimize rebar corrosion rates. Cracks are likely to form in locations with high tensile stresses. Healing of the cracks could be a mitigating factor, but based on our analysis, it can not be relied on. To minimize the potential of this failure mechanism occurring with the Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure (IRUS), Canada`s proposed near-surface repository, carbon dioxide from the repository gas will be absorbed by the reactive, porous concrete placed between the waste and the roof. (author). 4 refs.

  5. Rebar corrosion due to carbonation in structural reinforced concretes for near-surface LLW repositories: A critical failure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, J.

    1995-03-01

    The concrete roof of a near-surface radioactive waste repository is the principle protection against water infiltration and intrusion. The following potential roof failure mechanism is examined: carbon dioxide generated by the biodegradation of organic materials in the repository initiates corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in the concrete roof. Because the bottom surface of the roof is mostly under tension, it is susceptible to cracking. The migration path for carbon dioxide is through cracks in the concrete between the bottom of the roof and the reinforcing bars. Carbonate corrosion of the reinforcing bars may result in concrete spalling, more extensive rebar corrosion and ultimately structural failure. Attention is brought to this failure mechanism because it has generally been overlooked in repository performance assessments. Literature relevant to the above failure is reviewed. Prerequisites for rebar corrosion are the presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the repository gas, high relative humidity and through-cracks in the concrete. High carbon dioxide concentrations and relative humidity are expected in the repository. The oxygen concentration in the repository is expected to be very low, and that is expected to minimize rebar corrosion rates. Cracks are likely to form in locations with high tensile stresses. Healing of the cracks could be a mitigating factor, but based on our analysis, it can not be relied on. To minimize the potential of this failure mechanism occurring with the Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure (IRUS), Canada's proposed near-surface repository, carbon dioxide from the repository gas will be absorbed by the reactive, porous concrete placed between the waste and the roof. (author). 4 refs

  6. Pressurized water reactor fuel performance problems connected with fuel cladding corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, Pressurized Water Reactor (WWER, PWR) Fuel Element Performance is connected with fuel cladding corrosion and crud deposition processes. By transient to extended fuel cycles in nuclear power reactors, aiming to achieve higher burnup and better fuel utilization, the role of these processes increases significantly. This evolution modifies the chemical and electrochemical conditions in the reactor primary system, including change of fuel claddings' environment. The higher duty cores are always attended with increased boiling (sub-cooled nucleate boiling) mainly on the feed fuel assemblies. This boiling process on fuel cladding surfaces can cause different consequences on fuel element cladding's environment characteristics. In the case of boiling at the cladding surfaces without or with some cover of corrosion product deposition, the behavior of gases dissolved in water phase is strongly influenced by the vapor generation. The increase of vapor partial pressure will reduce the partial pressures of dissolved gases and will cause their stripping out. By these circumstances the concentrations of dissolved gases in cladding wall water layer can dramatically decrease, including also the case by which all dissolved gases to be stripped out. On the other hand it is known that the hydrogen is added to primary coolant in order to avoid the production of oxidants by radiolysis of water. It is clear that if boiling strips out dissolved hydrogen, the creation of oxidizing conditions at the cladding surfaces will be favored. In this case the local production of oxidants will be a result from local processes of water radiolysis, by which not only both oxygen (O 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) but also hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) will be produced. While these hydrogen and oxygen will be stripped out preferentially by boiling, the bigger part of hydrogen peroxide will remain in wall water phase and will act as the most important factor for creation of oxidizing conditions in fuel

  7. Solving erosion corrosion problems in HP-preheaters at Loviisa NPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, E.

    1984-01-01

    Several tubes have failed because of tube inlet erosion at Loviisa. Mild steel used as tube material will very easily be attacked by erosion corrosion because of unfavorable conditions in the heaters. One reason to the failures is the unsufficient design of the heaters. As a remedy we have replaced the thinned tube-ends with a ferritic-austenitic stainless steel NU 44LN. (author)

  8. Program of assessment of mechanical and corrosion mechanical properties of reactor internals materials due to operation conditions in WWERs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruscak, M.; Zamboch, M.

    1998-01-01

    Reactor internals are subject to three principle operation influences: neutron and gamma irradiation, mechanical stresses, both static and dynamic, and coolant chemistry. Several cases of damage have been reported in previous years in both boiling and pressure water reactors. They are linked with the term of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking as a possible damage mechanism. In WWERs, the principal material used for reactor internals is austenitic titanium stabilized stainless steel 08Kh18N10T, however high strength steels are used as well. To assess the changes of mechanical properties and to determine whether sensitivity to intergranular cracking can be increased by high neutron fluences, the experimental program has been started. The goal is to assure safe operation of the internals as well as life management for all planned operation period. The program consists of tests of material properties, both mechanical and corrosion-mechanical. Detailed neutron fluxes calculation as well as stress and deformation calculations are part of the assessment. Model of change will be proposed in order to plan inspections of the facility. In situ measurements of internals will be used to monitor exact status of structure during operation. Tensile specimens manufactured from both base metal and model weld joint have been irradiated to the total fluences of 3-20 dpa. Changes of mechanical properties are tested by the tensile test, stress corrosion cracking tests are performed in the autoclave with water loop and active loading. Operation temperature, pressure and water chemistry are chosen for the tests. (author)

  9. Gender differences in 16-year trends in assault- and police-related problems due to drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timko, Christine; Moos, Bernice S; Moos, Rudolf H

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the frequency and predictors of physical assault and having trouble with the police due to drinking over 16 years among women and men who, at baseline, were untreated for their alcohol use disorder. Predictors examined were the personal characteristics of impulsivity, self-efficacy, and problem-solving and emotional-discharge coping, as well as outpatient treatment and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) participation. Women and men were similar on rates of perpetrating assault due to drinking, but men were more likely to have had trouble with the police due to drinking. Respondents who, at baseline, were more impulsive and relied more on emotional discharge coping, and less on problem-solving coping, assaulted others more frequently during the first year of follow-up. Similarly, less problem-solving coping at baseline was related to having had trouble with the police more often at one and 16 years due to drinking. The association between impulsivity and more frequent assault was stronger for women, whereas associations of self-efficacy and problem-solving coping with less frequent assault and police trouble were stronger for men. Participation in AA was also associated with a lower likelihood of having trouble with the police at one year, especially for men. Interventions aimed at decreasing impulsivity and emotional discharge coping, and bolstering self-efficacy and problem-solving coping, during substance abuse treatment, and encouragement to become involved in AA, may be helpful in reducing assaultive and other illegal behaviors.

  10. Multimode Preemptive Resource Investment Problem Subject to Due Dates for Activities: Formulation and Solution Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Afshar-Nadjafi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The preemptive Multimode resource investment problem is investigated. The Objective is to minimize the total renewable/nonrenewable resource costs and earliness-tardiness costs by a given project deadline and due dates for activities. In this problem setting preemption is allowed with no setup cost or time. The project contains activities interrelated by finish-start type precedence relations with a time lag of zero, which require a set of renewable and nonrenewable resources. The problem formed in this way is an NP-hard. A mixed integer programming formulation is proposed for the problem and parameters tuned genetic algorithm (GA is proposed to solve it. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, 120 test problems are used. Comparative statistical results reveal that the proposed GA is efficient and effective in terms of the objective function and computational times.

  11. Recent Research and Development in Solving Atmospheric Corrosion Problems of Steel Industries in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M.; Uchida, H.

    2002-01-01

    A rust layer, so called 'protective' rust layer, on a weathering low-alloy steel has strong protective ability for atmospheric corrosion of the steel. We have recently found through a large number of spectroscopic studies including Moessbauer spectroscopy that the protective rust layer forms after long-term phase transformation. The phase and structure of the rust definitely control the protective ability of the rust layer. From this recent knowledge, some new technologies have been developed. One is the surface-treatment technique that provides a possibility for obtaining the protective rust layer in a relatively short period even in the severe environments such as in marine and chloride (de-icing salts) containing environments. Others are based on selection of effective alloying elements for steel materials. These are particularly important for application in areas where protective rust layer formation may be hindered or prevented. In this paper, we mention recent progress in research and development on rusting protection by rust for atmospheric corrosion of steels in Japan.

  12. Investigation of medical board reports of disability due to mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Yildiz

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: We think that this report might be helpful for regulations related to disabled people, and might guide adult psychiatric services for patients who present to medical boards for disability due to mental health problems. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 253-258

  13. Electrochemical techniques application in corrosion problems of fossil power plants; Aplicacion de tecnicas electroquimicas en problemas de corrosion en centrales termoelectricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano Castillo, Ulises; Garcia Ochoa, Esteban Miguel; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Mariaca Rodriguez, Liboria; Malo Tamayo, Jose Maria; Uruchurtu Chavarin, Jorge [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1990-12-31

    Some aspects of the electrochemical techniques employed to evaluate the corrosion at low temperature in fossil power plants are commented, as well as the results obtained with the application of them in three power plants of this type. [Espanol] Se comentan algunos aspectos de tecnicas electroquimicas utilizadas para evaluar la corrosion en baja temperatura en centrales termoelectricas, asi como los resultados de la aplicacion de las mismas en tres centrales de este tipo.

  14. Electrochemical techniques application in corrosion problems of fossil power plants; Aplicacion de tecnicas electroquimicas en problemas de corrosion en centrales termoelectricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano Castillo, Ulises; Garcia Ochoa, Esteban Miguel; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Mariaca Rodriguez, Liboria; Malo Tamayo, Jose Maria; Uruchurtu Chavarin, Jorge [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    Some aspects of the electrochemical techniques employed to evaluate the corrosion at low temperature in fossil power plants are commented, as well as the results obtained with the application of them in three power plants of this type. [Espanol] Se comentan algunos aspectos de tecnicas electroquimicas utilizadas para evaluar la corrosion en baja temperatura en centrales termoelectricas, asi como los resultados de la aplicacion de las mismas en tres centrales de este tipo.

  15. Measuring production loss due to health and work environment problems: construct validity and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Malin Lohela; Bergström, Gunnar; Björklund, Christina; Hagberg, Jan; Jensen, Irene

    2013-12-01

    The aim was to validate two measures of production loss, health-related and work environment-related production loss, concerning their associations with health status and work environment factors. Validity was assessed by evaluating the construct validity. Health problems related and work environment-related problems (or factors) were included in separate analyses and evaluated regarding the significant difference in proportion of explained variation (R) of production loss. health problems production loss was not found to fulfill the criteria for convergent validity in this study; however, the measure of work environment-related production loss did fulfill the criteria that were set up. The measure of work environment-related production loss can be used to screen for production loss due to work environment problems as well as an outcome measure when evaluating the effect of organizational interventions.

  16. Microbiological corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems is considered of development of the microbiological corrosion of the NPP equipment. The main attention is paid to the selective character of microbiological corrosion in zones of welded joints of austenitic steels. It is noted that the presence of technological defects promotes growth of corrosional damages. Methods for microbiological corrosion protection are discussed

  17. New corrosion issues in gas sweetening plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G. (CLI International and Asperger Technologies, Houston, TX (United States))

    Gas treating plants are experiencing corrosion problems which impact on efficiency and safety. While general corrosion is not particularly hazardous in the gas processing industry, local corrosion is very dangerous since it has several different mechanisms, all of which have dangerously high rates, and it occurs at locations which are hard to find and hard to predict. A newly discovered, velocity-dependent type of corrosion is reported. It is related to yet-undefined species which cause excessively high corrosion in areas of turbulence. This accelerated corrosion is not due to erosion or cavitation, but to a diffusion-limited reaction accelerated by turbulence. A full-flow test loop was built to evaluate the corrosiveness of gas plant solutions at their normal temperature and flow rates. Test runs were conducted with Co[sub 2]-loaded amine solutions for periods of 12 days. Carbon steel specimens mounted in the test loop were examined and corrosion rates calculated. Chromium alloys were shown to be attacked by corrodents in the low-velocity part of the loop and very aggressively attacked in the high-velocity part. The tests demonstrate the need for rigorous monitoring of corrosion in areas of higher velocity such as piping elbows and other points of turbulence. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Absenteeism due to voice disorders in female teachers: a public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Adriane Mesquita; Assunção, Ada Ávila; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2012-11-01

    This study estimates the prevalence of absenteeism due to voice disorders among teachers and investigates individual and contextual factors associated with it. The study involved 1,980 teachers from 76 municipal schools. The response rate was 85%. The survey was carried out between May 2004 and July 2005 using a self-administered structured questionnaire containing sociodemographic, lifestyle, health, and work-related questions. The dependent variable was obtained from answers to the following question: In the last 2 weeks, have you missed work because of voice problems? Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the associated factors. Voice-related absenteeism in the prior 2 weeks was reported by 66 teachers (3.35%). During their entire careers, approximately one-third of teachers missed work at least once due to voice problems. In the final model, factors associated with recent absenteeism were as follows: witnessing violence by students or parents one or more times (OR = 2.10; 95% CI = 1.14-3.90), presence of depression or anxiety (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.09-3.78), upper respiratory problems in the prior 2 weeks (OR = 2.85; 95% CI = 1.53-5.29), and absenteeism because of voice problems during the preceding 6 months (OR = 15.79; 95% CI = 8.18-30.45). The results encourage new approaches to the problems of absenteeism in the educational sector and contribute to addressing the weaknesses of economic and administrative approaches to the phenomenon.

  19. On the nucleon renormalization in many nucleon problems due to pionic degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, P.U.; Sawicki, M.; Furui, Sadataka.

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual problems of unified two-nucleon force models are discussed. The force models are based on the pion-nucleon vertex and attempt a description of the nucleon-nucleon interaction below and above pion threshold. The conceptual problems arise from the nucleon renormalization due to pionic degrees of freedom. Keeping channels with a single pion only no renormalization procedure can be given which is consistent in the one-nucleon and in the many-nucleon systems. The medium dependence of the one-pion exchange potential is illustrated. (author)

  20. Spectral inversion of an indefinite Sturm-Liouville problem due to Richardson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanley, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    We study an indefinite Sturm-Liouville problem due to Richardson whose complicated eigenvalue dependence on a parameter has been a puzzle for decades. In atomic physics a process exists that inverts the usual Schroedinger situation of an energy eigenvalue depending on a coupling parameter into the so-called Sturmian problem where the coupling parameter becomes the eigenvalue which then depends on the energy. We observe that the Richardson equation is of the Sturmian type. This means that the Richardson and its related Schroedinger eigenvalue functions are inverses of each other and that the Richardson spectrum is therefore no longer a puzzle

  1. Admissions through the emergency department due to drug-related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yosef H Al-Olah; Khalifa M Al Thiab

    2010-01-01

    Hospital admissions due to drug-related problems (DRPs) have been studied internationally, but local data are limited. Therefore, we undertook a prospective, observational study of all admissions through the emergency department (ED) at a tertiary referral hospital in Saudi Arabia to determine the incidence of admissions through the ED due to DRPs, types of DRPs, length of stay (LOS) in the hospital after ED admissions due to DRPs, and assessment of preventability of admissions due to DRPs.All admissions through the ED over a period of 28 consecutive days were evaluated to determine if they were due to definite or possible DRPs. Data was collected on a daily basis for each admission over the previous 24 hours. Each incident was assessed by three investigators Of 557 patients admitted through the ED, 82 (14.7%) admissions were due to DRP (53 definite, 29 possible). The most common types of DRP were failure to receive medication in 25 cases (47.2%), an adverse drug reaction in 13 cases (24.5%), and drug overdose in 6 cases (11.3%). In the definite DRP group, 83.0% were definitely preventable, 3.8% were possibly preventable and 13.2% were definitely non-preventable.DRPs are a serious and costly issue facing health care professionals and health care systems. Most admissions due to DRPs are avoidable (Author).

  2. Water side corrosion prevention in boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeid, A.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion may be defined as a naturally occurring physical and chemical deterioration of a material due to reaction with the environment or surrounding atmosphere. In boilers the material is subjected on both sides to two different media which may cause severe corrosion. At the water side the content of O 2 considered one of the principal factors which determine the extent of corrosion in the boiler tubes. This paper deals with certain conditions that result in the increase of O 2 in the boiler water and hence increase the corrosion rate, to minimize the effect of these conditions a chemical treatment was carried out the results obtained indicated the success of the treatment procedure in corrosion prevention and boiler material protection. The treatment is traditional. But the study indicates how a simple mean could be applied to solve a serious problem. 4 tab

  3. Drill string corrosion problems at Pilar field; Corrosao na coluna de perfuracao no Campo de Pilar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Antimio Santos [PETROBRAS, XX (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao do Nordeste. Setor de Fluidos de Perfuracao

    1988-12-31

    Drilling column failures and washout problems are described as experienced in the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin`s Pilar field. Statistical data presented indicate the extent of this problem. A discussion is offered on causes detected and solutions adopted. (author) 3 refs., 16 figs.

  4. A phenomenological approach to simulating the evolution of radioactive-waste container damage due to pitting corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshall, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    The damage to high-level radioactive-waste containers by pitting corrosion is an important design and performance assessment consideration. It is desirable to calculate the evolution of the pit depth distribution, not just the time required for initial penetration of the containers, so that the area available for advective of diffusive release of radionuclides through the container can be estimated. A phenomenological approach for computing the time evolution of these distributions is presented which combines elements of the deterministic and stochastic aspects of pit growth. The consistency of this approach with the mechanisms believed to control the evolution of the pit depth distribution is discussed. Qualitative comparisons of preliminary model predictions with a variety of experimental data from the literature are shown to be generally favorable. The sensitivity of the simulated distributions to changes in the input parameters is discussed. Finally, the results of the current model are compared to those of existing approaches based on extreme-value statistics, particularly regarding the extrapolation of laboratory data to large exposed surface areas

  5. Localized corrosion of carbon steels due to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Development of a specific sensor; Corrosion localisee des aciers au carbone induite par des bacteries sulfato-reductrices. Developpement d'un capteur specifique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monfort Moros, N.

    2001-11-01

    This work concerns the microbiologically influenced corrosion of carbon steels in saline anaerobic media (3% of NaCl) containing sulfato-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio gabonensis, DSM 10636). In these media, extreme localised corrosion occurs by pitting under the bio-film covering the metallic substrate. A sensor with concentric electrodes was designed to initiate the phenomenon of bio-corrosion, recreating the favourable conditions for growth of a corrosion pit, and then measuring the corrosion current maintained by bacterial activity. The pit initiation was achieved through either of two methods. The electrochemical conditioning involved driving the potential difference between inner and outer electrodes to values corresponding to a galvanic corrosion that can be maintained by the bacterial metabolism. The mechanical process involved removal of a portion of the bio-film by scratching, yielding galvanic potential differences equivalent to that found by the conditioning technique. This protocol was found to be applicable to a bio-corrosion study on industrial site for the monitoring of the metallic structures deterioration (patent EN 00/06114, May 2000). Thereafter, a fundamental application uses the bio-corrosion sensor for Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), Electrochemical Noise Analysis (ENA) and current density cartography by the means of micro-electrodes. Thus, the EIS technique reveals the importance of the FeS corrosion products for initiation of bio-corrosion start on carbon steel. In addition, depending on the method used to create a pit, the ENA gives rise to supplementary processes (gaseous release) disturbing the bio-corrosion detection. The beginning of a bio-corrosion process on a clean surface surrounded with bio-film was confirmed by the current density cartography. These different results establish the sensor with concentric electrodes as an indispensable tool for bio-corrosion studies, both in the laboratory and on industrial sites

  6. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  7. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  8. SOLVING A COPPER CORROSION PROBLEM WITH ORTHOPHOSPHATE: INDIAN HILL, OHIO CASE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many small and medium-sized water systems have troublt complying with the copper Action Level (of the Lead and Copper Rule), sometimes concurrently with meeting the lead Action level. The problem is especially troubling and widespread with ground water supplies having high alkali...

  9. Evaluation on ultrasonic examination methods applied to Ni-base alloy weld including cracks due to stress corrosion cracking found in BWR reactor internal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Shinichi; Shimizu, Sadato

    2005-01-01

    A Ni-base alloy weld, including cracks due to stress corrosion cracking found in the reactor internal of the oldest BWR in Japan, Tsuruga unit 1, in 1999, was examined by three (3) types of UT method. After this examination, a depth of each crack was confirmed by carrying out a little excavation with a grinder and PT examination by turns until each crack disappeared. Then, the depth measured by the former method was compared with the one measured by the latter method. In this fashion, performances of the UT methods were verified. As a result, a combination of the three types of UT method was found to meet the acceptance criteria given by ASME Sec.XI Appendix VIII, Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems-Supplement 6. In this paper, the results of the UT examination described above and their evaluation are discussed. (author)

  10. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  11. Environmental problems attributed due to increased road traffic intensity in Hyderabad city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, Z.; Ansari, A.K.

    2001-01-01

    Hyderabad is a historical city, so roads are not so wide to cater the present intensity of traffic, hence it is facing transportation problems. No any attempt of traffic management and control has been made in this regard to solve the acute problem of city. Some of the typical problems can be stated as poor driving, encroachments, unsystematic parking on roads, improper road markings and road sings, inadequate road geometry and inadequate control system at intersections etc. This study involves measurement of vehicles flow at five sites of Hyderabad city, and assessment of health hazards on human being due to noise congestion, improper road planning coupled with old city streets converted into roads which are now insufficient for present traffic density, resulting disturbance to pedestrians and dwellers who are living near by road for smooth walk. Motor vehicles, however, play a vital role in the field of public and goods transportation and this survey shows that there are about 726 vehicles operating per hour at the five sites in the city. (author)

  12. Fighting corrosion in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  13. Tube failures due to cooling process problem and foreign materials in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, J. [Kapar Energy Ventures Sdn Bhd, Jalan Tok Muda, Kapar 42200 (Malaysia); Purbolaksono, J., E-mail: judha@uniten.edu.m [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Km 7 Jalan Kajang-Puchong, Kajang 43009, Selangor (Malaysia); Beng, L.C. [Kapar Energy Ventures Sdn Bhd, Jalan Tok Muda, Kapar 42200 (Malaysia)

    2010-07-15

    Cooling process which uses water for heat transfer is an essential factor in coal-fired and nuclear plants. Loss of cooling upset can force the plants to shut down. In particular, this paper reports visual inspections and metallurgical examinations on the failed SA210-A1 right-hand side (RHS) water wall tube of a coal-fired plant. The water wall tube showed the abnormal outer surface colour and has failed with wide-open ductile rupture and thin edges indicating typical signs of short-term overheating. Metallurgical examinations confirmed the failed tube experiencing higher temperature operation. Water flow starvation due to restriction inside the upstream tube is identified as the main root cause of failure. The findings are important to take failure mitigation actions in the future operation. Discussion on the typical problems related to the cooling process in nuclear power plants is also presented.

  14. Tube failures due to cooling process problem and foreign materials in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, J.; Purbolaksono, J.; Beng, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Cooling process which uses water for heat transfer is an essential factor in coal-fired and nuclear plants. Loss of cooling upset can force the plants to shut down. In particular, this paper reports visual inspections and metallurgical examinations on the failed SA210-A1 right-hand side (RHS) water wall tube of a coal-fired plant. The water wall tube showed the abnormal outer surface colour and has failed with wide-open ductile rupture and thin edges indicating typical signs of short-term overheating. Metallurgical examinations confirmed the failed tube experiencing higher temperature operation. Water flow starvation due to restriction inside the upstream tube is identified as the main root cause of failure. The findings are important to take failure mitigation actions in the future operation. Discussion on the typical problems related to the cooling process in nuclear power plants is also presented.

  15. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  16. Corrosion problems in the aluminum tank of the reactor of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazon, R.

    1995-01-01

    The contention developed a leak that was found on March 15th 1985 in a routine inspection to the exposure room. The maximum water leak reached almost 5 liters per hour, it started to diminish until it disappeared completely two months later. It is believed that the holes were blocked by particles in suspension that were introduced to the primary system during the leaking tests. Immediately after the finding of the leak an inspection, testing and repair program was established. Hydrostatic tests to the primary cooling system and cooling system of the exposure room piping showed that the problem was the aluminum liner and not the piping. In order to have the possibility of inspecting the walls of the tank, the pool was drained from its 7.49 m of water down to 3.6 m of depth. At this point the reactor operation stopped and the inspection work started. Previously gamma radiation doses were evaluated using TLD crystals and was determined that 3.6 m of water column gave 0.1 mR/hr of gamma radiation doses at the surface. (orig./HP)

  17. An overview of materials degradation by stress corrosion in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P. M. [Framatome ANP, Tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    The aging of water cooled and moderated nuclear steam supply systems has given rise to many material corrosion problems of which stress corrosion cracking has proved to be one of the most serious. The aim of this paper is to review some examples of corrosion and particularly stress corrosion problems from the author's experience of interpreting and modelling these phenomena in PWR systems. Examples of stress corrosion cracking in PWR systems described include the major issue of Alloy 600 intergranular cracking in primary PWR coolants, for which it is generally perceived that both adequate life prediction models and remedial measures now exist. Intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes that occur in occluded superheated crevices on the secondary side of steam generators due to hide-out and concentration of water borne impurities are also addressed. Rather less extensive or well known examples are discussed such as the stress corrosion cracking of carbon and low alloy steels and of stainless steels in occluded dead-leg situations where it is sometimes difficult to guarantee adequate control of water chemistry, particularly at plant start-up. Reference is also be made to the use of high strength fastener materials in PWR systems as well as to the emerging issue of the effect of high neutron doses on the stress corrosion resistance of core structural components fabricated from austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  18. An overview of materials degradation by stress corrosion in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    The aging of water cooled and moderated nuclear steam supply systems has given rise to many material corrosion problems of which stress corrosion cracking has proved to be one of the most serious. The aim of this paper is to review some examples of corrosion and particularly stress corrosion problems from the author's experience of interpreting and modelling these phenomena in PWR systems. Examples of stress corrosion cracking in PWR systems described include the major issue of Alloy 600 intergranular cracking in primary PWR coolants, for which it is generally perceived that both adequate life prediction models and remedial measures now exist. Intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes that occur in occluded superheated crevices on the secondary side of steam generators due to hide-out and concentration of water borne impurities are also addressed. Rather less extensive or well known examples are discussed such as the stress corrosion cracking of carbon and low alloy steels and of stainless steels in occluded dead-leg situations where it is sometimes difficult to guarantee adequate control of water chemistry, particularly at plant start-up. Reference is also be made to the use of high strength fastener materials in PWR systems as well as to the emerging issue of the effect of high neutron doses on the stress corrosion resistance of core structural components fabricated from austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  19. Early detection of micro-structural changes due to fatigue of non-corrosive austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M.

    2003-03-01

    In view of life extension efforts of nuclear power plants, many investigations are in progress in order to assess the structural integrity of different components. In many cases, this involves unexpected loads, which were not taken into account during design of components, e.g. temperature cycling arising from unforeseen stratification flow conditions. Under certain power plant transients (start-up/shut-down, hot stand-by, thermal stratification) at critical locations of piping and nozzles, material degradation caused by accumulated cyclic plastic strain takes place. However, materials subjected to cyclic loading exhibit changes in microstructure already before macroscopic crack initiation begins, this period covers a considerable part of fatigue life. Existing methods for in-service inspection are mainly specialised for crack detection. Advanced non-destructive testing methods for monitoring of material degradation are sensitive to any micro-structural changes in the material leading to a degradation of the mechanical properties. Therefore, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing. During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, microstructural changes occur, which affect both the mechanical and the physical properties. Typical features are the rearrangement of dislocations and, in some cases, a deformation-induced martensitic phase transformation. In our investigation martensite formation was used as an indication for material degradation due to fatigue. Knowledge about mechanisms and influencing parameters of the martensitic transformation process is essential for the application in a lifetime monitoring system. The investigations showed that for a given austenitic stainless steel the deformation-induced martensite depends on the applied strain amplitude, the cycle number (usage factor, lifetime) and the temperature. It was demonstrated that the volume fraction of

  20. Error due to unresolved scales in estimation problems for atmospheric data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Tijana

    The error arising due to unresolved scales in data assimilation procedures is examined. The problem of estimating the projection of the state of a passive scalar undergoing advection at a sequence of times is considered. The projection belongs to a finite- dimensional function space and is defined on the continuum. Using the continuum projection of the state of a passive scalar, a mathematical definition is obtained for the error arising due to the presence, in the continuum system, of scales unresolved by the discrete dynamical model. This error affects the estimation procedure through point observations that include the unresolved scales. In this work, two approximate methods for taking into account the error due to unresolved scales and the resulting correlations are developed and employed in the estimation procedure. The resulting formulas resemble the Schmidt-Kalman filter and the usual discrete Kalman filter, respectively. For this reason, the newly developed filters are called the Schmidt-Kalman filter and the traditional filter. In order to test the assimilation methods, a two- dimensional advection model with nonstationary spectrum was developed for passive scalar transport in the atmosphere. An analytical solution on the sphere was found depicting the model dynamics evolution. Using this analytical solution the model error is avoided, and the error due to unresolved scales is the only error left in the estimation problem. It is demonstrated that the traditional and the Schmidt- Kalman filter work well provided the exact covariance function of the unresolved scales is known. However, this requirement is not satisfied in practice, and the covariance function must be modeled. The Schmidt-Kalman filter cannot be computed in practice without further approximations. Therefore, the traditional filter is better suited for practical use. Also, the traditional filter does not require modeling of the full covariance function of the unresolved scales, but only

  1. HOSPITALIZATIONS DUE TO RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS DURING DIWALI FESTIVAL IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The burning of firecrackers during Diwali festival produces an adverse respiratory outcome. However, there are no published articles on the impact of fireworks on hospital admission due to acute respiratory issues, hospital stay, and respiratory mortality during Diwali in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective, open label, observational study. It was conducted in patients admitted to the pulmonary emergency unit with respiratory symptoms 15 days before and after Diwali. It was conducted after the approval of ethics committee and written informed consent. RESULTS The number of admissions post-Diwali were significantly more compared to pre-Diwali from both rural and urban locations (p<0.001. The mean duration of hospital stay was significantly less pre-Diwali (7.59±0.74 days compared to post-Diwali (9.46±0.44 days. Also, significantly increased number of patients required ventilator support post Diwali. CONCLUSION The findings from the present study validate the deterioration of respiratory health during Diwali festival in India. There should be more awareness campaigns about the harmful effects of fire-crackers. Patients suffering from respiratory problems should be advised to avoid heavy exposure to fireworks

  2. Multi-Objective Flexible Flow Shop Scheduling Problem Considering Variable Processing Time due to Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy is an alternative to non-renewable energy to reduce the carbon footprint of manufacturing systems. Finding out how to make an alternative energy-efficient scheduling solution when renewable and non-renewable energy drives production is of great importance. In this paper, a multi-objective flexible flow shop scheduling problem that considers variable processing time due to renewable energy (MFFSP-VPTRE is studied. First, the optimization model of the MFFSP-VPTRE is formulated considering the periodicity of renewable energy and the limitations of energy storage capacity. Then, a hybrid non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm with variable local search (HNSGA-II is proposed to solve the MFFSP-VPTRE. An operation and machine-based encoding method is employed. A low-carbon scheduling algorithm is presented. Besides the crossover and mutation, a variable local search is used to improve the offspring’s Pareto set. The offspring and the parents are combined and those that dominate more are selected to continue evolving. Finally, two groups of experiments are carried out. The results show that the low-carbon scheduling algorithm can effectively reduce the carbon footprint under the premise of makespan optimization and the HNSGA-II outperforms the traditional NSGA-II and can solve the MFFSP-VPTRE effectively and efficiently.

  3. Measuring impairment when diagnosing adolescent ADHD: Differentiating problems due to ADHD versus other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Alejandro L; H Sibley, Margaret; Campez, Mileini

    2018-04-13

    The DSM-5 requires clinicians to link ADHD symptoms to clinically meaningful impairments in daily life functioning. Measuring impairment during ADHD assessments may be particularly challenging in adolescence, when ADHD is often not the sole source of a youth's difficulties. Existing impairment rating scales are criticized for not specifying ADHD as the source of impairment in their instructions, leading to potential problems with rating scale specificity. The current study utilized a within subjects design (N = 107) to compare parent report of impairment on two versions of a global impairment measure: one that specified ADHD as the source of impairment (Impairment Rating Scale-ADHD) and a standard version that did not (Impairment Rating Scale). On the standard family impairment item, parents endorsed greater impairment as compared to the IRS-ADHD. This finding was particularly pronounced when parents reported high levels of parenting stress. More severe ADHD symptoms were associated with greater concordance between the two versions. Findings indicate that adolescent family related impairments reported during ADHD assessments may be due to sources other than ADHD symptoms, such as developmental maladjustment. To prevent false positive diagnoses, symptom-specific wording may optimize impairment measures when assessing family functioning in diagnostic assessments for adolescents with ADHD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Corrosion and anticorrosion. Industrial practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, G.; Mazille, H.

    2002-01-01

    This book comprises 14 chapters written with the collaboration of about 50 French experts of corrosion. It is complementary to another volume entitled 'corrosion of metals and alloys' and published by the same editor. This volume comprises two parts: part 1 presents the basic notions of corrosion phenomena, the properties of surfaces, the electrochemical properties of corrosion etc.. Part 2 describes the most frequent forms of corrosion encountered in industrial environments and corresponding to specific problems of protection: marine environment, atmospheric corrosion, galvanic corrosion, tribo-corrosion, stress corrosion etc.. The first 8 chapters (part 1) treat of the corrosion problems encountered in different industries and processes: oil and gas production, chemical industry, phosphoric acid industry, PWR-type power plants, corrosion of automobile vehicles, civil engineering and buildings, corrosion of biomaterials, non-destructive testing for the monitoring of corrosion. The other chapters (part 2) deal with anticorrosion and protective coatings and means: choice of materials, coatings and surface treatments, thick organic coatings and enamels, paints, corrosion inhibitors and cathodic protection. (J.S.)

  5. A flow reactor for the flow supercritical water oxidation of wastes to mitigate the reactor corrosion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have designed a flow tube reactor for supercritical water oxidation of wastes that confines the oxidation reaction to the vicinity of the axis of the tube. This prevents high temperatures and reactants as well as reaction products from coming in intimate contact with reactor walls. This implies a lessening of corrosion of the walls of the reactor. We display numerical simulations for a vertical reactor with conservative design parameters that illustrate our concept. We performed our calculations for the destruction of sodium nitrate by ammonium hydroxide In the presence of supercritical water, where the production of sodium hydroxide causes corrosion. We have compared these results with that for a horizontal set-up where the sodium hydroxide created during the reaction ends up on the floor of the tube, implying a higher probability of corrosion

  6. Review about corrosion of superheaters tubes in biomass plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlanga-Labari, C.; Fernandez-Carrasquilla, J.

    2006-01-01

    The design of new biomass-fired power plants with increased steam temperature raises concerns of high-temperature corrosion. The high potassium and chlorine contents in many biomass, specially in wheat straw, are potentially harmful elements with regard to corrosion. Chlorine may cause accelerated corrosion resulting in increased oxidation, metal wastage, internal attack, void formations and loose non-adherent scales. The most severe corrosion problems in biomass-fired systems are expected to occur due to Cl-rich deposits formed on superheater tubes. In the first part of this revision the corrosion mechanism proposed are described in function of the conditions and compounds involved. The second part is focused on the behaviour of the materials tested so far in the boiler and in the laboratory. First the traditional commercial alloys are studied and secondly the new alloys and the coasting. (Author). 102 refs

  7. Review about corrosion of superheaters tubes in biomass plants; Revision sobre la corrosion de tubos sobrecalentadores en plantas de biomasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlanga-Labari, C.; Fernandez-Carrasquilla, J.

    2006-07-01

    The design of new biomass-fired power plants with increased steam temperature raises concerns of high-temperature corrosion. The high potassium and chlorine contents in many biomass, specially in wheat straw, are potentially harmful elements with regard to corrosion. Chlorine may cause accelerated corrosion resulting in increased oxidation, metal wastage, internal attack, void formations and loose non-adherent scales. The most severe corrosion problems in biomass-fired systems are expected to occur due to Cl-rich deposits formed on superheater tubes. In the first part of this revision the corrosion mechanism proposed are described in function of the conditions and compounds involved. The second part is focused on the behaviour of the materials tested so far in the boiler and in the laboratory. First the traditional commercial alloys are studied and secondly the new alloys and the coasting. (Author). 102 refs.

  8. Improvement of PWR reliability by corrosion prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Since first PWR in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, we have encountered the various modes of corrosion on primary and secondary side components. We have paid much efforts for resolving these corrosion problems, that is, investigating the causes of corrosion and establishing the countermeasures for these corrosion. We summarize these efforts in this article. (author)

  9. Deposition and high temperature corrosion in a 10 MW straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Hanne Philbert; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Deposition and corrosion measurements were conducted at a 10 MW wheat straw fired stoker boiler used for combined power and heat production. The plant experiences major problems with deposits on the heat transfer surfaces, and test probes have shown enhanced corrosion due to selective corrosion...... for metal temperatures above 520 C. Deposition measurements carried out at a position equal to the secondary superheater showed deposits rich in potassium and chlorine and to a lesser extent in silicon, calcium, and sulfur. Potassium and chlorine make up 40-80 wt% of the deposits. Mechanisms of deposit...

  10. Corrosion in power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventakeshwarlu, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief account of the problem areas encountered as a result of corrosion in the electrical power industry including nuclear power industry is given and some of the measures contemplated and/or implemented to control corrosion are outlined. The corrosion problems in the steam generators and cladding tubes of the nuclear power plant have an added dimension of radioactivation which leads to contamination and radiation field. Importance of monitoring water quality and controlling water chemistry by addition of chemicals is emphasised. (M.G.B.)

  11. Corrosion of reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-01-15

    Much operational experience and many experimental results have accumulated in recent years regarding corrosion of reactor materials, particularly since the 1958 Geneva Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, where these problems were also discussed. It was, felt that a survey and critical appraisal of the results obtained during this period had become necessary and, in response to this need, IAEA organized a Conference on the Corrosion of Reactor Materials at Salzburg, Austria (4-9 June 1962). It covered many of the theoretical, experimental and engineering problems relating to the corrosion phenomena which occur in nuclear reactors as well as in the adjacent circuits

  12. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  13. Corrosion Behavior of SA508 Coupled with and without Magnetite in Chemical Cleaning Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Yeong-Ho; Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Song, Geun Dong; Hur, Do Haeng; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    To mitigate these problems, chemical cleaning process has been widely used. However, the chemical cleaning solution can affect the corrosion of SG structural materials as well as the magnetite dissolution. During the chemical cleaning process, the galvanic corrosion between SG materials and magnetite is also anticipated because they are in electrical connection. However, the corrosion measurement or monitoring for the materials has been performed without consideration of galvanic effect coupled with magnetite during the chemical cleaning process. In this study, the effect of temperature and EDTA concentration on the corrosion behavior of SA508 tubesheet material with and without magnetite was studied in chemical cleaning solutions. The galvanic corrosion behavior between SA508 and magnetite is predicted by using the mixed potential theory and its effect on the corrosion rate of SA508 is also discussed. By newly designed immersion test, it was confirmed that the extent of galvanic corrosion effect between SA508 and magnetite increased with increasing temperature and EDTA concentration. The galvanic corrosion behavior of SA508 coupled with magnetite in chemical cleaning environments was predicted by the mixed potential theory and verified by ZRA and LP technique. Galvanic coupling increased the corrosion rate of SA508 due to the shift in its potential to the anodic direction. Therefore, the galvanic corrosion effect between SA508 and magnetite should be considered when the corrosion measurement is performed during the chemical cleaning process in steam generators.

  14. Achievments of corrosion science and corrosion protection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.; Stehjl, R.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of corrosion-mechanical strength of metals, effect of corrosive media on creep characteristics are presented. New concepts of the mechanism of corrosion cracking and its relation to hydrogen embrittlement are described. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement effect on the process of corrosion cracking of different steels and alloys are considered. The dependence of such types of failure on various structural factors is shown. Data on corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminium and titanium alloys, mechanism of the processes and protective methods are given

  15. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    species grow as multicel- lular filaments called hyphae forming a mycelium, some fungal species also grow as single cells. Sexual and asexual...reinforced fluorinated 18 MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION polyimide composites due to hyphae penetration into resin interiors. The

  16. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2008-01-01

    CO2 corrosion is a general problem in the industry and it is expensive. The focus of this study is an oil gas production related problem. CO2 corrosion is observed in offshore natural gas transportation pipelines. A general overview of the problem is presented in chapter 1. The chemical system...... with the basic thermodynamics of electrolytes in chapter 2, the extension and general description of electrolyte mass transport in chapter 3, and the electrochemical kinetics of corrosion in chapter 4. A literature overview of CO2 corrosion is shown in chapter 5 and possible extensions of the models...... and validated against heat capacity data. The model is also fitted to experimental data produced and shown in chapter 8 for SLE in the Na2CO3-NaHCO3-MEG-H2O system. The application of the above model is shown in chapter 9. Here the thermodynamic correction factors are calculated. These show how the diffusion...

  17. Return to Work after sick leave due to mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerveld, S.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    The article will describe factors of influence on return to work RTW and evidence-based interventions that enhance return to work (RTW) after sick leave due to common mental health disorders (CMD). First the concepts of both RTW and CMD are outlined. Second, the sense of urgency for effective RTW

  18. Mental health problems due to community violence exposure in a small urban setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Studies conducted in large metropolitan inner-city communities with high violent crime rates have demonstrated an association between exposure to violence and mental health problems; therefore the purpose of this study was to determine if similar trends exist in smaller inner-city communities with substantially lower violent crime rates. Methods: One hundred twenty-six children and young adults living in inner-city Omaha, Nebraska, were screened for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, and anxiety symptoms and assessed for community violence exposure (CVE. Pearson’s correlation and analysis of variance were used to determine the relationship between PTSD, depression, and anxiety symptoms and CVE. Results: A statistically significant relationship was found between CVE and PTSD and anxiety symptoms among participants despite their having lower rates of exposure to violent events in comparison with other studies. No association was found between violence and depression symptoms. Additionally, the presence of anxiety and depression, as well as increased age of participants, was associated with higher rates of PTSD symptoms. Conclusion: We recommend that health care providers in smaller cities, where the effects of violent crime may be underestimated or overlooked, be informed of the existence of this public health problem within their community and that they screen at-risk patients for mental health problems.

  19. Investigation of protection problems due to geomagnetically induced currents (solar magnetic disturbances, transformers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The problems with geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) flowing in power systems during solar magnetic disturbances were studied. Transformers can overheat as a result of GIC because they can cause offset saturation of power system transformers. Harmonic currents can also be introduced into the system which then affect the relay and protection systems. Several studies have been conducted using simplified transformer core models to predict the transformer response to DC excitation. In this study, an accurate transformer core model was developed and validated by comparing the recorded waveforms during GIC events with simulated waveforms using the model. The new transformer core model was used to evaluate the performance of different protection schemes under GIC

  20. Supervisory behaviour as a predictor of return to work in employees absent from work due to mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, K.; Verbeek, J.H.A.M.; Boer, A.G.E.M. de; Blonk, R.W.B.; Dijk, F.J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To study supervisory behaviour as a predictive factor for return to work of employees absent due to mental health problems; and to explore the association between conditional factors and supervisory behaviour. Methods: Eighty five supervisors of employees were interviewed by telephone.

  1. Work problems due to low back pain: what do GPs do? A questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coole, Carol; Watson, Paul J; Drummond, Avril

    2010-02-01

    Low back pain can affect work ability and remains a main cause of sickness absence. In the UK the GP is usually the first contact for patients seeking health care. The UK government intends that the GP will continue to be responsible for sickness certification and work advice. This role requires a considerable level of understanding of work rehabilitation, and effective communication between GPs, patients, employers and therapists. The aim of this study was to identify GPs' current practice in managing patients whose ability to work is affected by low back pain, and their perception of the support services required. A postal questionnaire of 441 GPs in the South Nottinghamshire area of the UK was carried out. Areas covered included referral patterns, sickness certification, and communication with therapists and employers. There was a 54.6% response rate. The majority of GPs (76.8%) reported that they did not take overall responsibility for managing the work problems of patients arising from low back pain. Few 'mainly agreed' that they initiated communication with employers (2.5%) and/or therapists (10.4%) regarding their patients' work. The results of this study demonstrate that most GPs do not readily engage in vocational rehabilitation and do not initiate contact with employers or other health care practitioners regarding patients' work problems. Thus the current government expectation that GPs are able to successfully manage this role may be unrealistic; considerable training and a change in the GPs' perception of their role will be required.

  2. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  3. Evaluation of corrosion products formed by sulfidation as inhibitors of the naphthenic corrosion of AISI-316 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Cala, J. A.; Montañez, N. D.; Laverde Cataño, D.; Y Peña Ballesteros, D.; Mejía, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Naphthenic acids present in oil from most regions worldwide currently stand as the main responsible for the naphthenic corrosion problems, affecting the oil-refining industry. The phenomenon of sulfidation, accompanying corrosion processes brought about by naphthenic acids in high-temperature refining plant applications, takes place when the combination of sulfidic acid (H2S) with Fe forms layers of iron sulphide (FeS) on the material surface, layers with the potential to protect the material from attack by other corrosive species like naphthenic acids. This work assessed corrosion products formed by sulfidation as inhibitors of naphthenic corrosion rate in AISI-316 steel exposed to processing conditions of simulated crude oil in a dynamic autoclave. Calculation of the sulfidation and naphthenic corrosion rates were determined by gravimetry. The surfaces of the AISI-316 gravimetric coupons exposed to acid systems; were characterized morphologically by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Fluorescence by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). One of the results obtained was the determination of an inhibiting effect of corrosion products at 250 and 300°C, where lower corrosion rate levels were detected. For the temperature of 350°C, naphthenic corrosion rates increased due to deposition of naphthenic acids on the areas where corrosion products formed by sulfidation have lower homogeneity and stability on the surface, thus accelerating the destruction of AISI-316 steel. The above provides an initial contribution to oil industry in search of new alternatives to corrosion control by the attack of naphthenic acids, from the formation of FeS layers on exposed materials in the processing of heavy crude oils with high sulphur content.

  4. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  5. Grievances in cases using antibiotics due to orodental problems and assessment of the need for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, S; Ergül, N

    2000-04-01

    To assess the complaints of patients who were prescribed antibiotics following orodental problems and the need for antibiotics prescribed for this purpose. Examinations were carried out in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Ege University, Turkey. A total of 203 patients (129 females and 74 males) between 8-70 years of age (mean age 37.7 +/- 13.9). Examination and report. Frequency of unnecessary antibiotic use. Antibiotic therapy was not necessary for 151 (74.4 per cent) cases. Antibiotics were unnecessarily prescribed in 45 cases of acute irreversible pulpitis, 10 chronic apical abscess, 6 acute apical paradontitis, 7 gingivitis, 10 periodontitis, 4 epulis, 2 TMJ (temporomandibular junction) dysfunction, 2 sharp ridge of alveolar bone, 1 burning mouth syndrome and 1 recurrent aphthous stomatitis. In 108 (53.2 per cent) of the cases, the prescribed antibiotics were found to be penicillins, 102 of which were broad-spectrum. It was also determined that only 6 (7.7 per cent) of the 78 cases diagnosed as acute apical abscess were given drainage as local therapy. Principles for treating dental infections suggest that an antibiotic should only be used to supplement and not substitute for conventional surgical methods. Therefore, in cases with acute apical abscess, mechanical treatment (drainage) should be the first step. Inappropriate antibiotic use is quite widespread in dentistry. Dentists should avoid inappropriate use of antibiotics. To prevent inappropriate administration, necessary precautions need to be taken against dispensing antibiotics without prescription.

  6. Number of deaths due to lung diseases: How large is the problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagener, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of lung disease as an indicator of environmentally induced adverse health effects has been recognized by inclusion among the Health Objectives for the Nation. The 1990 Health Objectives for the Nation (US Department of Health and Human Services, 1986) includes an objective that there should be virtually no new cases among newly exposed workers for four preventable occupational lung diseases-asbestosis, byssinosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis. This brief communication describes two types of cause-of-death statistics- underlying and multiple cause-and demonstrates the differences between the two statistics using lung disease deaths among adult men. The choice of statistic has a large impact on estimated lung disease mortality rates. The choice of statistics also may have large effect on the estimated mortality rates due to other chromic diseases thought to be environmentally mediated. Issues of comorbidity and the way causes of death are reported become important in the interpretation of these statistics. The choice of which statistic to use when comparing data from a study population with national statistics may greatly affect the interpretations of the study findings

  7. Corrosion control in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    This article looks in detail at tribology-related hazards of corrosion in irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and tries to identify and minimize problems which could contribute to disaster. First, the corrosion process is explained. Then the corrosion aspects at each of four stages in reprocessing are examined, with particular reference to oxide fuel reprocessing. The four stages are fuel receipt and storage, fuel breakdown and dissolution, solvent extraction and product concentration and waste management. Results from laboratory and plant corrosion trails are used at the plant design stage to prevent corrosion problems arising. Operational procedures which minimize corrosion if it cannot be prevented at the design stage, are used. (UK)

  8. Metacognitions Are Associated with Subjective Memory Problems in Individuals on Sick Leave due to Chronic Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Henrik B; Aasvik, Julie K; Borchgrevink, Petter C; Landrø, Nils I; Stiles, Tore C

    2016-01-01

    Subjective cognitive impairments are frequent, but poorly understood in patients with chronic fatigue. We hypothesized that maladaptive metacognitive beliefs at baseline were associated with baseline subjective cognitive impairments, that they predict subjective cognitive impairments at treatment termination, and that a reduction in maladaptive metacognitive beliefs was associated with less subjective cognitive impairments at treatment termination, independent of changes in fatigue, pain, insomnia, depression, and anxiety. In this non-controlled study, patients (n = 137) on sick leave due to chronic fatigue received a 3.5-week inpatient RTW rehabilitation program. Of these patients 69 (50.4%) was referred with a ICPC-2 diagnosis of chronic fatigue. Patients completed questionnaires about metacognitive beliefs, somatic complaints, psychological complaints, and cognitive impairments before and after treatment. To test the hypotheses we performed paired t-tests of change, as well as seven hierarchical linear regressions. RESULTS showed that baseline maladaptive metacognitive beliefs were significantly associated with subjective cognitive impairments at baseline, controlling for symptoms. Score on baseline metacognitive beliefs did not predict impairments post-treatment. Testing specific maladaptive beliefs, pre-treatment scores on cognitive confidence were associated with subjective cognitive impairments both pre and post-treatment, controlling for symptoms. Post-treatment metacognitive beliefs and post-treatment cognitive confidence were associated with post-treatment subjective cognitive impairments, controlling for pre-treatment impairments and pre-treatment metacognitive beliefs, as well as pre and post-scores on symptom measures. This study reports associations between maladaptive metacognitive beliefs and subjective cognitive impairments in patients with chronic fatigue. Targeting metacognitive beliefs could prove an effective therapeutic intervention for

  9. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  10. Corrosion in Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Gudla, Helene Virginie Conseil; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2017-01-01

    Electronic control units, power modules, and consumer electronics are used today in a wide variety of varying climatic conditions. Varying external climatic conditions of temperature and humidity can cause an uncontrolled local climate inside the device enclosure. Uncontrolled humidity together...... and high density packing combined with the use of several materials, which can undergo electrochemical corrosion in the presence of water film formed due to humidity exposure and bias conditions on the PCBA surface. This article provides a short review of the corrosion reliability issues of electronics due...... to the use of electronics under varying humidity conditions. Important PCBA aspects, which are fundamental to the corrosion cell formation under humid conditions, are discussed. Effect of hygroscopic residues from the process and service and their role in assisting water film build up and corrosion...

  11. Meta-heuristic algorithms for parallel identical machines scheduling problem with weighted late work criterion and common due date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenzhen; Zou, Yongxing; Kong, Xiangjie

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this paper investigates the first application of meta-heuristic algorithms to tackle the parallel machines scheduling problem with weighted late work criterion and common due date ([Formula: see text]). Late work criterion is one of the performance measures of scheduling problems which considers the length of late parts of particular jobs when evaluating the quality of scheduling. Since this problem is known to be NP-hard, three meta-heuristic algorithms, namely ant colony system, genetic algorithm, and simulated annealing are designed and implemented, respectively. We also propose a novel algorithm named LDF (largest density first) which is improved from LPT (longest processing time first). The computational experiments compared these meta-heuristic algorithms with LDF, LPT and LS (list scheduling), and the experimental results show that SA performs the best in most cases. However, LDF is better than SA in some conditions, moreover, the running time of LDF is much shorter than SA.

  12. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  13. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  14. A wireless embedded passive sensor for monitoring the corrosion potential of reinforcing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadra, Sharmistha; Thomson, Douglas J; Bridges, Greg E

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel, which results in premature deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, is a worldwide problem. Most corrosion sensing techniques require some type of wired connection between the sensor and monitoring electronics. This causes significant problems in their installation and long-term use. In this paper we describe a new type of passive embeddable wireless sensor that is based on an LC coil resonator where the resonant frequency is changed by the corrosion potential of the reinforcing steel. The resonant frequency can be monitored remotely by an interrogator coil inductively coupled to the sensor coil. The sensor unit comprises an inductive coil connected in parallel with a voltage dependent capacitor (varactor) and a pair of corrosion electrodes consisting of a reinforcing steel sensing electrode and a stainless steel reference electrode. Change of potential difference between the electrodes due to variation of the corrosion potential of the reinforcing steel changes the capacitance of the varactor and shifts the resonant frequency of the sensor. A time-domain gating method was used for the interrogation of the inductively coupled corrosion sensor. Results of an accelerated corrosion test using the sensor indicate that the corrosion potential can be monitored with a resolution of less than 10 mV. The sensor is simple in design and requires no power source, making it an inexpensive option for long-term remote monitoring of the corrosion state of reinforcing steel. (paper)

  15. Concrete cover cracking with reinforcement corrosion of RC beam during chloride-induced corrosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruijin; Castel, Arnaud; Francois, Raoul

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the evolution of the corrosion pattern based on two beams corroded by 14 years (beam B1CL1) and 23 years (beam B2CL1) of conservation in a chloride environment. The experimental results indicate that, at the cracking initiation stage and the first stage of cracking propagation, localized corrosion due to chloride ingress is the predominant corrosion pattern and pitting corrosion is the main factor that influences the cracking process. As corrosion cracking increases, general corrosion develops rapidly and gradually becomes predominant in the second stage of cracking propagation. A comparison between existing models and experimental results illustrates that, although Vidal et al.'s model can better predict the reinforcement corrosion of beam B1CL1 under localized corrosion, it cannot predict the corrosion of beam B2CL1 under general corrosion. Also, Rodriguez's model, derived from the general corrosion due to electrically accelerated corrosion experiments, cannot match natural chloride corrosion irrespective of whether corrosion is localized or general. Thus, for natural general corrosion in the second stage of cracking propagation, a new model based on the parameter of average steel cross-section loss is put forward to predict steel corrosion from corrosion cracking.

  16. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  17. Guidelines for destructive examination of potential MIC [microbiologically influenced corrosion]-related failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borenstein, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is recognized as a major cause of pitting corrosion failures in natural waters. In order to alleviate the problem, it is important to establish the exact cause of corrosion. If there is a possibility that the failure is due to MIC, a particularly careful failure analysis must be conducted. MIC can be misdiagnosed as attack due to conventional chloride crevice/pitting corrosion unless specialized techniques are used. Certain techniques generally must be employed, including a careful visual examination, is situ bacterial sampling of residual water, bacterial analysis for corrosion products, radiographic examinations, and metallographic examinations. Other techniques may be necessary, or may be very helpful in the analysis, including culture growth, scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasonic examinations. Metallographic examinations can reveal MIC characteristics such as selective pitting of one phase in duplex stainless steel weldments. The methods of failure analysis and their importance are addressed, including each of the steps in the nondestructive examinations and destructive analyses

  18. Influence of Chloride Ion and Temperature on the Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloy 028

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. N.; Dong, J. X.; Szpunar, J. A.; Zhang, M. C.; Basu, R.

    Recently, the working condition of tubing systems used in oil and natural gas industries are severer than before with the increasing exploitation of acidic gas fields. The corrosion problems induced from the corrosive environment with chloride ion medium and high temperature have been much more concerned. The presence of chloride ion can accelerate the dissolution of metals. The corrosion performance is also sensitive to the operating temperature. Classic localized corrosions such as the pitting or the crevice type due to environmental temperature and chloride ion.

  19. A Comprehensive Study for the Laser Cleaning of Corrosion Layers due to Environmental Pollution for Metal Objects of Cultural Value: Preliminary Studies on Artificially Corroded Coupons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siatou, A.; Charalambous, D.; Argyropoulos, V.; Pouli, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is focused on the systematic investigation of the layer-by-layer removal of corrosion products on artificially corroded metal coupons aiming to introduce a methodology for the optimum laser cleaning approach of historical metal objects. Thus, it is very important to determine the chemical composition of the studied surfaces before and after irradiation. A series of laser cleaning studies has been performed on test coupons (reference and artificially corroded). Wavelength and pulse duration effects are investigated. Initial studies were focused on the use of infrared (1064 nm) and ultraviolet (355 nm and 248 nm) radiations of nanosecond (ns) pulse duration. Damage and removal threshold values were determined for the substrates and the corrosion layers, respectively. The irradiated surfaces are evaluated microscopically under the optical and the scanning electron microscope, while the mineralogical and chemical composition of the various layers is determined with X-ray diffraction and SEM-EDAX analyses, respectively. The results obtained are providing a comprehensive approach for understanding the main mechanisms that are significant in the different laser cleaning regimes, while the optimum cleaning methodologies for the studied materials are being established.

  20. How copper corrosion can be retarded--New ways investigating a chronic problem for cellulose in paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyujin; Hofmann, Christa; Horsky, Monika; Potthast, Antje

    2015-12-10

    To better assess the stabilization effects of chemical treatments on Cu(II)-catalyzed cellulose degradation, we developed Cu(II)-containing model rag paper with typical copper corrosion characteristics using e-beam radiation. The paper can be prepared homogeneously and quickly compared to tedious pre-aging methods. Using the Cu(II)-containing model rag paper, the stabilization effects of various chemicals on Cu(II)-catalyzed degradation of cellulose were tested. Benzotriazol was highly effective in retarding the degradation of the Cu(II)-containing model rag paper under hot and humid aging condition, as well as under photo-oxidative stress. Tetrabutylammonium bromide reduced Cu(II)-catalyzed degradation of cellulose, but its efficacy was dependent on the accelerated aging conditions. The results with the alkaline treatments and gelatin treatment suggested that their roles in the degradation mechanisms of cellulose in the presence of Cu(II) differ from those of benzotriazol and tetrabutylammonium bromide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  2. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  3. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M.

    2008-06-01

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants

  4. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  5. Applications of cathodic protection for the protection of aqueous and soil corrosion of power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.K.; Mitra, A.K.; Bhakta, U.C.; Sanyal, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    Power plant components exposed to environments such as water and soil are susceptible to severe corrosion. Many times the effect of corrosion in power plant components can be catastrophic. The problem is aggravated for underground pipelines due to additional factors such as large network of pipelines, proximity to earth mat, high voltage transmission lines, corrosive chemicals, inadequate approach etc. Other components such as condenser water boxes, internals of pipelines, clarifier bridge structures, cooling water inlet gates and pipes etc. which are in continuous contact with water, are subjected to severe corrosion. The nature and locations of all such components are at places which are not accessible for routine maintenance and hence they require long term reliable protection against corrosion. Experience has shown that anti-corrosive coatings are inadequate in preventing corrosion and due to their location regular maintenance coatings are also not feasible. Under such circumstances the applications of cathodic protection provides a long term solution the design of cathodic protection, for such applications differs from the commonly employed cathodic protection for cross-country pipelines and submerged structures due to other complexities in the plant region and maintenance of the applied system. The present paper intends to discuss the applications of cathodic protection with suitable anti-corrosive coatings for protection of various power plant components and the specific features of each type of application. (author)

  6. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  7. Health problems due to long working hours in Japan: working hours, workers' compensation (Karoshi), and preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Kenji; Takahashi, Masaya; Nakata, Akinori

    2006-10-01

    Late in the 1970s, serious social concern over health problems due to long working hours has arisen in Japan. This report briefly summarizes the Japanese circumstances about long working hours and what the Government has achieved so far. The national statistics show that more than 6 million people worked for 60 h or more per week during years 2000 and 2004. Approximately three hundred cases of brain and heart diseases were recognized as labour accidents resulting from overwork (Karoshi) by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) between 2002 and 2005. Consequently, the MHLW has been working to establish a more appropriate compensation system for Karoshi, as well as preventive measures for overwork related health problems. In 2001, the MHLW set the standards for clearly recognizing Karoshi in association with the amount of overtime working hours. These standards were based on the results of a literature review and medical examinations indicating a relationship between overwork and brain and heart diseases. In 2002, the MHLW launched the program for the prevention of health impairment due to overwork, and in 2005 the health guidance through an interview by a doctor for overworked workers has been enacted as law. Long working hours are controversial issues because of conflicts between health, safety, work-life balance, and productivity. It is obvious that we need to continue research regarding the impact on worker health and the management of long working hours.

  8. Synthesis of Dipeptide Benzoylalanylglycine Methyl Ester and Corrosion Inhibitor Evaluation by Tafel Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurrahman, J.; Wahyuningrum, D.; Achmad, S.; Bundjali, B.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the major problems in petroleum mining and processing industry. The pipelines used to transport crude oil from reservoir to the processing installation were made from carbon steel that is susceptible towards corrosion. One of the best methods to prevent corrosion that occurred at the inner parts of carbon steel pipelines is to use organic corrosion inhibitor. One of the potent organic corrosion inhibitors is amino acids derivatives. In this study, dipeptide compound namely benzoylalanylglycine methyl ester and benzoylalanylglycine have been synthesized. The structure elucidation of the products was performed by IR, MS and NMR spectroscopy. The determination of corrosion inhibition activity utilized the Tafel method. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of glycine methyl ester, benzoyl alanine, dipeptide benzoylalanylglycine methyl ester and dipeptide benzoylalanylglycine were 63.34 %, 35.86 %, 68.40 % and 27.72 %, respectively. These results showed that the formation of dipeptide benzoylalanylglycine methyl ester, derived from carboxylic protected glycine and amine protected alanine, increased the corrosion inhibition activity due to the loss of acidity center in the structure of glycine and L-alanine that would induce the corrosive environment towards carbon steel. (author)

  9. Il problema dei debiti internazionali nel periodo tra le due guerre mondiali. (The international debt problem in the interwar period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. DE CECCO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Grande attenzione è stata recentemente dedicata al problema attuale del debito del terzo mondo e le sue implicazioni per il sistema bancario internazionale . Una rassegna di eventi simili a volte precedenti in passato dimostra che gli operatori dei mercati finanziari internazionali hanno la memoria corta , poiché la maggior parte degli aspetti della crisi si sono verificati in passato. Questo è confermato dal considerare il problema del debito internazionale tra la prima e la seconda guerra mondiale . La principale differenza tra allora e adesso è che il periodo tra le due guerre fu un periodo di transizione da un sistema di commercio dominato daòòa sterlina ad uno dominato  dal dollaro statunitense . Molti dei problemi di oggi derivano da questa continua dominazione dollaroConsiderable attention has recently been paid to the current problem of third world debt and its implications for the international banking system. A review of similar events at previous times in the past shows that operators in international financial markets have very short memories, since most of the aspects of the current crisis have occurred in the past. This is borne out by considering the international debt problem between the first and second world wars. The major difference between then and now is that the interwar period was a time of transition from a sterling-dominated trading system to one dominated by the US dollar. Many of today's problems stem from this continuing dollar domination.JEL: N24

  10. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Svintradze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitting corrosion behavior was derived from solid-state physics and some solutions and simulations are presented and discussed.

  11. Thermal spray coating for corrosion under insulation (CUI) prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Mohd Fazril Irfan Ahmad; Razak, Khalil Abdul; Alias, Nur Hashimah; Othman, Nur Hidayati; Lah, Nik Khairul Irfan Nik Ab

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is one of the predominant issues affecting process of Oil and Gas and Petrochemical industries. CUI refers to external corrosion, but it is difficult to be detected as the insulation cover masks the corrosion problem. One of the options to prevent CUI is by utilizing the protective coating systems. Thermal spray coating (TSC) is an advanced coating system and it shows promising performance in harsh environment, which could be used to prevent CUI. However, the application of TSC is not attractive due to the high initial cost. This work evaluates the potential of TSC based on corrosion performance using linear polarization resistance (LPR) method and salt spray test (SST). Prior to the evaluation, the mechanical performance of TSC was first investigated using adhesion test and bend test. Microstructure characterization of the coating was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The LPR test results showed that low corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/years was obtained for TSC in compared to the bare steel especially at high temperature of 80 °C, where usually normal coating would fail. For the salt spray test, there was no sign of corrosion products especially at the center (fully coated region) was observed. From SEM images, no corrosion defects were observed after 336 hours of continuous exposure to salt fog test. This indicates that TSC protected the steel satisfactorily by acting as a barrier from a corrosive environment. In conclusion, TSC can be a possible solution to minimize the CUI in a long term. Further research should be done on corrosion performance and life cycle cost by comparing TSC with other conventional coating technology.

  12. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  13. Corrosion investigation of material combinations in a mobile phone dome-key pad system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Møller, Per

    2007-01-01

    to multiple corrosion problems. In this paper, the corrosion susceptibility of dome (Ag/AISI 202 steel) and key pad system (Au/Ni/Cu) is investigated with an aim to understand the corrosion performance of such multi-material combinations in chloride containing environment. Investigation includes...... microstructural studies, polarization measurements using microelectrochemical technique, salt spray testing, and corrosion morphology analysis. The immersion Au layer on pads showed pores, and rolled bonded silver layer on dome had cracks and kinks. The difference in electrochemical behaviour of the metallic...... layers together with imperfections in the top layer results in severe pitting due to galvanic coupling. However, corrosion performance of the pads was much worse than domes. The results are applicable to a broad spectrum of PCB parts where similar material combinations are employed, especially Au/Ni/Cu....

  14. Corrosion Induced Leakage Problem of the Radial Beam Port 1 of BAEC Triga Mark-II Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalam, A.; Salam, M. A.; Sarder, M. A.; Rahman, M. M.; Rahman, M.; Rahman, A.; Chowdhury, A. Z.; Uddin, M. S.; Haque, M. M.; Zulquarnain, M.A., E-mail: kalambaec@yahoo.com [Reactor Operation and Maintenance Unit, Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2014-08-15

    The BAEC reactor has so far been operated as per the technical specifications and procedures laid down in the SAR of the research reactor. The BP leakage problem of the BAEC research reactor was an issue that could lead to a situation close to a LOCA. Therefore, the matter was handled carefully, taking all measures so that such an incident could be prevented. Assistance of agencies outside BAEC was taken for solving the problem. It is understood that the silicone rubber lining of the encirclement clamp may become damaged by neutron irradiation. Therefore, while designing the clamp, provisions were kept such that it can be dismantled and reinstalled again following lining replacement. As a moderately aged facility, the ageing management BAEC TRIGA research reactor deserves significant attention. BAEC, together with its strategic partners, are doing what is needed in this regard.

  15. Corrosion monitoring in insulated pipes using x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad; Abd Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Suffian Saad; Shaharuddin Sayuti; Shukri Ahmad

    2000-01-01

    In engineering plants, detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using radiography method are considered as very challenging tasks. In general, this degradation problem is attributed to water condensation. It causes the formation of deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe in cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the study of corrosion in pipelines, one of the most important parameters to be monitored and measured is the wall thickness. Currently, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is performed using an ultrasonic method. The most notable disadvantage of using this method is that the insulation covering the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason, the possibility of employing other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method was studied. The technique used in this studied are known as tangential technique. In this study it was found that the result found using tangential technique is consistent with the actual thickness of the pipe. Besides the thickness, types of corrosion can also be identified easily. Result of this study is presented and discussed in this paper. (Author)

  16. How are things adding up? Neural differences between arithmetic operations are due to general problem solving strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschentscher, Nadja; Hauk, Olaf

    2014-05-15

    A number of previous studies have interpreted differences in brain activation between arithmetic operation types (e.g. addition and multiplication) as evidence in favor of distinct cortical representations, processes or neural systems. It is still not clear how differences in general task complexity contribute to these neural differences. Here, we used a mental arithmetic paradigm to disentangle brain areas related to general problem solving from those involved in operation type specific processes (addition versus multiplication). We orthogonally varied operation type and complexity. Importantly, complexity was defined not only based on surface criteria (for example number size), but also on the basis of individual participants' strategy ratings, which were validated in a detailed behavioral analysis. We replicated previously reported operation type effects in our analyses based on surface criteria. However, these effects vanished when controlling for individual strategies. Instead, procedural strategies contrasted with memory retrieval reliably activated fronto-parietal and motor regions, while retrieval strategies activated parietal cortices. This challenges views that operation types rely on partially different neural systems, and suggests that previously reported differences between operation types may have emerged due to invalid measures of complexity. We conclude that mental arithmetic is a powerful paradigm to study brain networks of abstract problem solving, as long as individual participants' strategies are taken into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation on the thermographic detection of corrosion in RC structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantele, Elia A.; Votsis, Renos A.; Kyriakides, Nicholas; Georgiou, Panagiota G.; Ioannou, Fotia G.

    2017-09-01

    Corrosion of the steel reinforcement is the main problem of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Over the past decades, several methods have been developed aiming to detect the corrosion process early in order to minimise the structural damage and consequently the repairing costs. Emphasis was given in developing methods and techniques of non-destructive nature providing fast on-the-spot detection and covering large areas rather that concentrating on single locations. This study, investigates a non-destructive corrosion detection technique for reinforced concrete, which is based on infrared thermography and the difference in thermal characteristics of corroded and non-corroded steel rebars. The technique is based on the principle that corrosion products have poor heat conductivity, and they inhibit the diffusion of heat that is generated in the reinforcing bar due to heating. For the investigation RC specimens, have been constructed in the laboratory using embedded steel bars of different corrosion states. Afterward, one surface of the specimens was heated using an electric device while thermal images were captured at predefined time instants on the opposite surface with an IR camera. The test results showed a clear difference between the thermal characteristics of the corroded and the non-corroded samples, which demonstrates the potential of using thermography in corrosion detection in RC structures.

  18. Corrosion of weldments in orthodontic appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, S.M.; Riesgo, O.; Duffo, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    The study of corrosion-related problems of dental materials has undergone a considerable development in recent years in order to avoid the use of materials with insufficient corrosion resistance in patients mouth. The subject of the present work was to study a particular type of corrosion: galvanic corrosion. One of the most common case of galvanic couples in patients mouth are the orthodontic appliances. The materials studied in the present work were stainless steel strips and silver-copper wires, isolated and welded between them. The electrochemical tests were performed in a NaCl 0.1M and Lactic Acid 0.1 M solution (pH2.3), and after test, the specimens were observed using the optical and scanning electron microscope. The results show that when stainless steel is coupled with a silver solder, the last is the anode of the galvanic couple. As a consequence of this, the silver solder undergone a severe attack. Stainless steel orthodontic appliances with silver solder are feasibly destroyed due to a severe attack on the filler metal disjoining the welded parts. (author) 9 refs

  19. Microbiologically induced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Biological attack is a problem that can affect all metallic materials in a variety of environments and systems. In the power industry, corrosion studies have focused on condensers and service water systems where slime, barnacles, clams, and other macro-organisms are easily detected. Efforts have been made to eliminate the effect of these organisms through the use of chlorination, backflushing, organic coating, or thermal shock. The objective is to maintain component performance by eliminating biofouling and reducing metallic corrosion. Recently, corrosion of power plant components by micro-organisms (bacteria) has been identified even in very clean systems. A system's first exposure to microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) occurs during its first exposure to an aqueous environment, such as during hydrotest or wet layup. Corrosion of buried pipelines by sulfate-reducing bacteria has been studied by the petrochemical industry for years. This paper discusses various methods of diagnosing, monitoring, and controlling MIC in a variety of systems, as well as indicates areas where further study is needed

  20. Impaired reasoning and problem-solving in individuals with language impairment due to aphasia or language delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Juliana V.; Paulraj, Selvi R.; Curran, Brian C.; Dronkers, Nina F.

    2015-01-01

    The precise nature of the relationship between language and thought is an intriguing and challenging area of inquiry for scientists across many disciplines. In the realm of neuropsychology, research has investigated the inter-dependence of language and thought by testing individuals with compromised language abilities and observing whether performance in other cognitive domains is diminished. One group of such individuals is patients with aphasia who have an impairment in speech and language arising from a brain injury, such as a stroke. Our previous research has shown that the degree of language impairment in these individuals is strongly associated with the degree of impairment on complex reasoning tasks, such as the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) and Raven’s Matrices. In the current study, we present new data from a large group of individuals with aphasia that show a dissociation in performance between putatively non-verbal tasks on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) that require differing degrees of reasoning (Picture Completion vs. Picture Arrangement tasks). We also present an update and replication of our previous findings with the WCST showing that individuals with the most profound core language deficits (i.e., impaired comprehension and disordered language output) are particularly impaired on problem-solving tasks. In the second part of the paper, we present findings from a neurologically intact individual known as “Chelsea” who was not exposed to language due to an unaddressed hearing loss that was present since birth. At the age of 32, she was fitted with hearing aids and exposed to spoken and signed language for the first time, but she was only able to acquire a limited language capacity. Chelsea was tested on a series of standardized neuropsychological measures, including reasoning and problem-solving tasks. She was able to perform well on a number of visuospatial tasks but was disproportionately impaired on tasks that required

  1. Aspects of high temperature corrosion of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, M.; Bendick, W. [Salzgitter-Mannesmann-Forschung GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The development of new boiler steels for power generation has to consider significant creep strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. High temperature corrosion of boiler materials concerns steam oxidation as well as fireside corrosion of parts, in contact with the flue gas. It will be shown that depending on the quality of the fuel, especially chlorine and sulphur are responsible for most of the fireside corrosion problems. Corrosion mechanisms will be presented for flue gas induced corrosion (HCl) and deposit induced corrosion (chlorides and sulfates). Especially for the 700 C technology, deposit induced corrosion issues have to be considered and the mechanisms of corrosion by molten sulfates 'Hot Corrosion' will be explained. Finally, an overview will be given on the selection of suitable materials in order to minimise corrosion relates failures. (orig.)

  2. Corrosion and indices of operating reliability of steam-water circuits of foreign NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynova, O.I.

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion failures in circuits of foreign NPPs are considered. According to American statistics there are more corrosion failures in two-circuit NPPs than in NPPs with one circuit. Steam generators mostly suffer from ''corrosion denting''. Lately pitting corrosion becomes a potentially serious problem. Steam generator vertical tubes are maiply subjected to this corrosion type. Attention is drawn to intercrystalline corrosion. The causes of corrosion are described. The problem of optimization of structural materials is discussed to reduce corrosion failures as well as other methods of decreasing corrosion failures. Organization of nondestructive testing, increased requirements to water and steam purity are of great importance

  3. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  4. Protection during production: Problems due to prevention? Nail and skin condition after prolonged wearing of occlusive gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke; Uter, Wolfgang; Drexler, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Wearing of occlusive gloves during the whole working shift is considered a risk factor for developing hand eczema, similar to wet work. Moreover, the increased hydration due to glove occlusion may lead to brittle nails. Two hundred and seventy clean room workers, wearing occlusive gloves for prolonged periods, and 135 administrative employees not using gloves were investigated. This included a dermatological examination of the nails and the hands, using the Hand Eczema ScoRe for Occupational Screening (HEROS), measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and a standardized interview. Of the clean room workers, 39%, mainly women, reported nail problems, mostly brittle nails with onychoschisis. Skin score values showed no significant differences between HEROS values of both groups. TEWL values of exposed subjects were similar to TEWL values of controls 40 min after taking off the occlusive gloves. In a multiple linear regression analysis, male gender and duration of employment in the clean room were associated with a significant increase in TEWL values. The effect of occlusion on TEWL seems to be predominantly transient and not be indicative of a damaged skin barrier. This study confirmed the results of a previous investigation showing no serious adverse effect of wearing of occlusive gloves on skin condition without exposure to additional hazardous substances. However, occlusion leads to softened nails prone to mechanical injury. Therefore, specific prevention instructions are required to pay attention to this side effect of occlusion.

  5. Analysis of disability indicators due to occupational diseases in the Lviv region: problems and perspectives of the decision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Borisova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Disability is a social phenomenon that can not be ruled out by any society. The potential of society in combating the growth of disability – as a social evil – is determined not only by the degree of understanding of this problem but mainly by economic resources. The risk of developing oc­cupational diseases in the coal industry is 5-10 times higher than in other branches of industry. In Ukraine, about 3 million people work under the harmful conditions of production, 60.0% of them are miners. The study analyzed the dy­namics of disability as a result of occupational diseases in the Lviv region for the period 2015-2017. The results of the study prove that the disability indicators due to occupational diseases tend to grow. The ways to overcome this unfa­vorable tendency should be state measures on improvement of normative and legal documents, coherence between dif­ferent state institutions and strengthening effective state control over hygiene norms in industries with harmful factors.

  6. Medical and economic impact of extraintestinal infections due to Escherichia coli: focus on an increasingly important endemic problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Thomas A; Johnson, James R

    2003-04-01

    Escherichia coli is probably the best-known bacterial species and one of the most frequently isolated organisms from clinical specimens. Despite this, underappreciation and misunderstandings exist among medical professionals and the lay public alike regarding E. coli as an extraintestinal pathogen. Underappreciated features include (i) the wide variety of extraintestinal infections E. coli can cause, (ii) the high incidence and associated morbidity, mortality, and costs of these diverse clinical syndromes, (iii) the pathogenic potential of different groups of E. coli strains for causing intestinal versus extraintestinal disease, and (iv) increasing antimicrobial resistance. In this era in which health news often sensationalizes uncommon infection syndromes or pathogens, the strains of E. coli that cause extraintestinal infection are an increasingly important endemic problem and underappreciated "killers". Billions of health care dollars, millions of work days, and hundreds of thousands of lives are lost each year to extraintestinal infections due to E. coli. New treatments and prevention measures will be needed for improved outcomes and a diminished disease burden.

  7. Effect of Plasma Nitriding Process Conditions on Corrosion Resistance of 440B Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łępicka Magdalena

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Martensitic stainless steels are used in a large number of various industrial applications, e.g. molds for plastic injections and glass moldings, automotive components, cutting tools, surgical and dental instruments. The improvement of their tribological and corrosion properties is a problem of high interest especially in medical applications, where patient safety becomes a priority. The paper covers findings from plasma nitrided AISI 440B (PN-EN or DIN X90CrMoV18 stainless steel corrosion resistance studies. Conventionally heat treated and plasma nitrided in N2:H2 reaction gas mixture (50:50, 65:35 and 80:20, respectively in two different temperature ranges (380 or 450°C specimens groups were examined. Microscopic observations and electrochemical corrosion tests were performed using a variety of analytical techniques. As obtained findings show, plasma nitriding of AISI 440B stainless steel, regardless of the process temperature, results in reduction of corrosion current density. Nevertheless, applying thermo-chemical process which requires exceeding temperature of about 400°C is not recommended due to increased risk of steel sensitization to intergranular and stress corrosion. According to the results, material ion nitrided in 450°C underwent leaching corrosion processes, which led to significant disproportion in chemical composition of the corroded and corrosion-free areas. The authors suggest further research into corrosion process of plasma nitrided materials and its degradation products.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-04-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 a). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  9. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 xa). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  10. The corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. Since gas production is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible on the corrosion rate of steel in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities lie in the range 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 .a). Corrosion rates of this order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, with the result that there is very little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. Given the current situation, it would appear somewhat risky to accept the lower value for hydrogen production as proven. Proposals are made for experiments which would reduce this element of uncertainty. (author) 10 figs., 35 refs

  11. Corrosion management in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a major degradation mechanism of metals and alloys which significantly affects the global economy with an average loss of 3.5% of GDP of several countries in many important industrial sectors including chemical, petrochemical, power, oil, refinery, fertilizer etc. The demand for higher efficiency and achieving name plate capacity, in addition to ever increasing temperatures, pressures and complexities in equipment geometry of industrial processes, necessitate utmost care in adopting appropriate corrosion management strategies in selecting, designing, fabricating and utilising various materials and coatings for engineering applications in industries. Corrosion control and prevention is an important focus area as the savings achieved from practicing corrosion control and prevention would bring significant benefits to the industry. Towards this, advanced corrosion management strategies starting from design, manufacturing, operation, maintenance, in-service inspection and online monitoring are essential. At the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) strategic corrosion management efforts have been pursued in order to provide solutions to practical problems emerging in the plants, in addition to innovative efforts to provide insight into mechanism and understanding of corrosion of various engineering materials and coatings. In this presentation the author highlights how the nuclear industry benefited from the practical approach to successful corrosion management, particularly with respect to fast breeder reactor programme involving both reactor and associated reprocessing plants. (author)

  12. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  13. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  14. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  15. Relationship between stress corrosion cracking and low frequency fatigue-corrosion of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of PWR vessel head adapters is a main problem for nuclear industry. With the aim to better understand the influence of the mechanical parameters on the cracking phenomena (by stress corrosion (SCC) or fatigue corrosion (FC)) of alloy 600 exposed to primary PWR coolant, a parametrical study has been carried out. Crack propagation tests on CT test specimens have been implemented under static loads (stress corrosion tests) or low frequency cyclic loads (fatigue corrosion tests). Results (frequency influence, type of cycles, ratio charge on velocities and propagation modes of cracks) have allowed to characterize the transition domain between the crack phenomena of SCC and FC. With the obtained results, it has been possible too to differentiate the effects due to environmental factors and the effects due to mechanical factors. At last, a quantitative fractographic study and the observations of the microstructure at the tip of crack have led to a better understanding of the transitions of the crack propagation mode between the SCC and the FC. (O.M.)

  16. Acute health problems due to recreational drug use in patients presenting to an urban emergency department in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakoni, Evangelia; Dolder, Patrick C; Rentsch, Katharina; Liechti, Matthias E

    2015-01-01

    To describe acute toxicity of recreational drugs including novel psychoactive substances. We included all cases presenting at the emergency department (ED) of the University Hospital of Basel, Switzerland, between October 2013 and September 2014 with acute toxicity due to self-reported recreational drug use or with symptoms/signs consistent with acute toxicity. Isolated ethanol intoxications were excluded. Intoxications were confirmed with immunoassays and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), which also detected novel psychoactive substances. Among the 47,767 attendances at the ED, 216 were directly related to acute toxicity of recreational drugs. The mean patient age was 31 years and 69% were male. Analytical drug confirmation was available in 180 cases. Most presentations were related to cocaine (36%), cannabis (31%), opioids (13%), 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA, 9%), other amphetamines (7%), benzodiazepines (7%), and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD, 5%). The substances most commonly detected analytically were cannabis (37%), cocaine (33%), opioids (29%), benzodiazepines (21%), and amphetamines including MDMA (13%). Notably, there were only two cases of novel psychoactive substances (2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromophenethylamine [2C-B] and pentylone). The most frequent symptoms were tachycardia (31%), anxiety (27%), nausea or vomiting (23%), and agitation (22%). Severe complications included myocardial infarction (2), psychosis (10), seizures (10), and 1 fatality. Most patients were discharged home (68%), 8% were admitted to intensive care and 9% were referred to psychiatric care. Medical problems related to illicit drugs mostly concerned cocaine and cannabis and mainly involved sympathomimetic toxicity and/or psychiatric disorders. ED presentations associated with novel psychoactive substances appeared to be relatively rare.

  17. Stochastic electron dynamics due to drift waves in a sheared magnetic field and other drift motion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1986-12-01

    Electron motion in a single electrostatic wave in a sheared magnetic field is shown to become stochastic in the presence of a second wave at an amplitude well below that obtained from the overlapping pendulum resonance approximation. The enhanced stochasticity occurs for low parallel velocity electrons for which the parallel trapping motion from eE/sub parallel//m interacts strongly with the E x B trapping motion due to the presence of magnetic shear. The guiding-center equations for single particle electron orbits in given fields are investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. The model assumes a slab magnetic field geometry with shear and two electrostatic plane waves propagating at an angle with respect to each other. Collisions and the self-consistent effect of the electron motion upon the fields are ignored. The guiding-center motion in an inertial reference frame moving in phase with the two waves is given by a two degree-of-freedom, autonomous Hamiltonian system. The single wave particle motion may be reduced to a two parameter family of one degree-of-freedom Hamiltonians which bifurcate from a pendulum phase space to a topology with three chains of elliptic and hyperbolic fixed points separated in radius about the mode-rational surface. In the presence of a perturbing wave with a different helicity, electrons in the small parallel velocity regime become stochastic at an amplitude scaling as the fourth root of the wave potential. The results obtained for stochastic motion apply directly to the problem of electron diffusion in drift waves occurring in toroidal fusion confinement devices. The effect of an adiabatically changing radial electric field upon guiding-center orbits in tokamaks is also investigated. This perturbation causes a radial polarization drift of trapped particle tokamak orbits

  18. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  19. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  20. Corrosion phenomena on alloy 625 in aqueous solutions containing hydrochloric acid and oxygen under subcritical and supercritical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukis, N.; Kritzer, P.

    1997-01-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is a very effective process to destroy hazardous aqueous wastes containing organic contaminants. The main target applications in the USA are the destruction of DOD and DOE wastes such as rocket fuels and explosives, warfare agents and organics present in low level radioactive liquid wastes. Alloy 625 is frequently used as reactor material for Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) applications. This is due to the favorable combination of mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, price and availability. Nevertheless, the corrosion of alloy 625 like the corrosion of other Ni-base alloys during oxidation of hazardous organic waste containing chloride proceeds too fast and is a major problem in SCWO applications. In these experiments high pressure, high-temperature resistant tube reactors made of alloy 625 were used as specimens. They were exposed to SCWO conditions, without organics, at temperatures up to 500 C and pressures up to 37 MPa for up to 150 h. Simultaneously, coupons also made from alloy 625 are exposed inside the test tubes. The most important corrosion problem for alloy 625 is pitting and intercrystalline corrosion at temperatures near the critical temperature, i.e. in the preheater and cooling sections of the test tubes. Under certain conditions, stress corrosion cracking appears and leads to premature failure of the test reactors. The corrosion products were insoluble in supercritical water and formed thick layers in the supercritical part of the reactor. Under these layers only minor corrosion occurred. 33 refs

  1. Corrosion engineering in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazak, M.; Tlamsa, J.; Jirousova, D.; Silber, K.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion problems in nuclear power industry are discussed from the point of view of anticorrosion measures, whose aim is not only increasing the lifetime of the equipment but, first of all, securing ecological safety. A brief description is given of causes of corrosion damage that occurred at Czechoslovak nuclear power plants and which could have been prevented. These involve the corrosion of large-volume radioactive waste tanks made of the CSN 17247 steel and of waste piping of an ion exchange station made of the same material, a crack in a steam generator collector, contamination of primary circuit water with iron, and corrosion of CrNi corrosion-resistant steel in a spent fuel store. It is concluded that if a sufficient insight into the corrosion relationships exists and a reasonable volume of data is available concerning the corrosion state during the nuclear facility performance, the required safety can be achieved without adopting extremely costly anticorrosion measures. (Z.M.)

  2. Survey of Water Chemistry and Corrosion of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Sok; Hong, Bong Geon

    2008-06-15

    Status of water chemistry of nuclear power plant and materials corrosion has been surveyed. For PWR, system chemistry of primary coolant and secondary coolant as well as the related corrosion of materials was surveyed. For BWR, system chemistry as whole has been surveyed with its accompanying corrosion problems. Radiolysis of coolant water and activation of corrosion products also was surveyed. Future NPP such as supercritical water cooled reactor and fusion reactor has also been surveyed for their water chemistry and corrosion problems. As a result, proposal for some research items has been suggested. Some related corrosion research techniques and electrochemical fundamentals are also presented.

  3. Survey of Water Chemistry and Corrosion of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ki Sok; Hong, Bong Geon

    2008-06-01

    Status of water chemistry of nuclear power plant and materials corrosion has been surveyed. For PWR, system chemistry of primary coolant and secondary coolant as well as the related corrosion of materials was surveyed. For BWR, system chemistry as whole has been surveyed with its accompanying corrosion problems. Radiolysis of coolant water and activation of corrosion products also was surveyed. Future NPP such as supercritical water cooled reactor and fusion reactor has also been surveyed for their water chemistry and corrosion problems. As a result, proposal for some research items has been suggested. Some related corrosion research techniques and electrochemical fundamentals are also presented

  4. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhu Paulraj; Rajnish Garg

    2015-01-01

    Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic pha...

  5. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  6. Corrosive components of nutshells and their chars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karczewski Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass combustion stands among various technologies pointed at fossil fuels consumption decrease. Biomass can be found in very diversified sources spread more evenly across the globe, can be burned with use of traditional combustion solutions and is more CO2 neutral in combustion than their fossil fuel counterparts. On the other hand biomass has several problems with composition that despite its potential diversity. Problem of excess moisture can be already solved by material selection or by preliminary pyrolysis. The main problem concerns however biomass ash composition. Biomass ashes are more prone to have higher quantities of potentially corrosive components than their coal counterparts. The example of such constituents are alkali metals, sulphur and chlorine. Ash basic composition is also important due to various ash properties like its melting temperature and slagging or fouling tendencies. To address the problem, several indices for fast properties prediction and earlier problem identification can be appointed. This work concentrates on ash quality evaluation for potentially attractive biomass fuel from nutshell materials and their corresponding char obtained by pyrolysis in 300, 450 and 550 °C. Pistachio and hazelnut shells with their chars will be analysed for corrosive compounds and their potential influence on combustion process.

  7. Early detection of micro-structural changes due to fatigue of non-corrosive austenitic stainless steels; Frueherkennung von mikrostrukturellen Aenderungen bei Ermuedung in nichtrostenden austenitischen Staehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M

    2003-03-01

    In view of life extension efforts of nuclear power plants, many investigations are in progress in order to assess the structural integrity of different components. In many cases, this involves unexpected loads, which were not taken into account during design of components, e.g. temperature cycling arising from unforeseen stratification flow conditions. Under certain power plant transients (start-up/shut-down, hot stand-by, thermal stratification) at critical locations of piping and nozzles, material degradation caused by accumulated cyclic plastic strain takes place. However, materials subjected to cyclic loading exhibit changes in microstructure already before macroscopic crack initiation begins, this period covers a considerable part of fatigue life. Existing methods for in-service inspection are mainly specialised for crack detection. Advanced non-destructive testing methods for monitoring of material degradation are sensitive to any micro-structural changes in the material leading to a degradation of the mechanical properties. Therefore, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing. During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, microstructural changes occur, which affect both the mechanical and the physical properties. Typical features are the rearrangement of dislocations and, in some cases, a deformation-induced martensitic phase transformation. In our investigation martensite formation was used as an indication for material degradation due to fatigue. Knowledge about mechanisms and influencing parameters of the martensitic transformation process is essential for the application in a lifetime monitoring system. The investigations showed that for a given austenitic stainless steel the deformation-induced martensite depends on the applied strain amplitude, the cycle number (usage factor, lifetime) and the temperature. It was demonstrated that the volume fraction of

  8. Practical assessment of magnetic methods for corrosion detection in an adjacent precast, prestressed concrete box-beam bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Bertrand; Titus, Michael; Nims, Douglas Karl; Ghorbanpoor, Al; Devabhaktuni, Vijay Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic methods are progressing in the detection of corrosion in prestressing strands in adjacent precast, prestressed concrete box-beam bridges. This study is the first field trial of magnetic strand defect detection systems on an adjacent box-beam bridge. A bridge in Fayette County, Ohio, which was scheduled for demolition, was inspected. Damage to prestressed box-beams is often due to corrosion of the prestressing strands. The corroded strands show discontinuities and a reduced cross-sectional area. These changes, due to corrosion, are reflected in the magnetic signatures of the prestressing steel. Corrosion in the prestressing steel was detected using two magnetic methods, namely the 'magnetic flux leakage' (MFL) and the 'induced magnetic field'. The purpose of these tests was to demonstrate the ability of the magnetic methods to detect hidden corrosion in box-beams in the field and tackle the logistic problem of inspecting box-beams from the bottom. The inspections were validated by dissecting the bottom of the box-beams after the inspections. The results showed that the MFL method can detect hidden corrosion and strand breaks. Both magnetic field methods were also able to estimate corrosion by detecting the effective cross-sectional area of the strand in sections of the beams. Thus, it was shown that the magnetic methods can be used to predict hidden corrosion in prestressing strands of box-beams.

  9. Corrosion in power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The proceedings contain the full texts of 25 papers of which 10 fall under the INIS Subject Scope. They concern the problems of corrosion in WWER type nuclear power plants. The topics include structural materials and equipment of the primary and the secondary circuits of nuclear power plants, components used in disposal of spent nuclear fuel, sodium valves for fast reactors and basic study of the properties of materials used in nuclear power. (Z.M.). 12 figs., 6 tabs., 46 refs

  10. Proceedings of the sixteenth national congress on corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The congress was a forum for presenting the industrial problems and ideas derived from current research and various topics on corrosion. The conference thereon was focussed on corrosion degradation phenomena in various industries and mitigative actions or solutions to the issues of corrosion. The corrosion problems in ports, petroleum, chemical and fertilizer, power, steel, nuclear, shipping, defence, construction, and refinery industries are discussed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  11. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion......Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  12. Corrosion Control in the Aerospace Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it..

  13. Degradation of aged plants by corrosion: 'Long cell action' in unresolved corrosion issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Genn

    2009-01-01

    In a series of previously published papers the author has identified that 'long cell action' corrosion plays a pivotal role in practically all unresolved corrosion issues for all types of nuclear power plants (e.g. PWR/VVER, BWR/RBMK and CANDU). Some of these unresolved issues are IGSCC, PWSCC, AOA and FAC (erosion-corrosion). In conventional corrosion science it is well established that 'long cell action' can seriously accelerate or suppress the local cell corrosion activities. Although long cell action is another fundamental mechanism of corrosion, especially in a 'soil corrosion' arena, potential involvement of this corrosion process has never been studied in nuclear and fossil power plants as far as the author has been able to establish. The author believes that the omission of this basic corrosion mechanism is the root cause of practically all un-resolved corrosion issues. In this paper, the author further elaborated on his assessment to other key corrosion issues, e.g. steam generator and turbine corrosion issues, while briefly summarizing previous discussions for completeness purposes, as well as introducing additional experimental and theoretical evidence of this basic corrosion mechanism. Due to the importance of this potential mechanism the author is calling for institutional review activities and further verification experiments in the form of a joint international project.

  14. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  15. Water chemistry: cause and control of corrosion degradation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kain, Vivekanand

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion degradation of a material is directly determined by the water chemistry, material (composition, fabrication procedure and microstructure) and by the stress/strain in the material under operating conditions. Water chemistry plays an important role in both uniform corrosion and localized forms of corrosion of materials. Once we understand how water chemistry is contributing to corrosion of a material, it is logical to modify/change that water chemistry to control the corrosion degradation. In nuclear power plants, different water chemistries have been used in different components/systems. This paper will cover the origin of corrosion degradation in the Primary Heat Transport system of different reactor types, Steam Generator tubing, secondary circuit pipelines, service water pipelines and auxiliary systems and establish the role of water chemistry in causing corrosion degradation. The history of changes in water chemistry adopted in these systems to control corrosion degradation is also described. It is shown by examples that there is an obvious limitation in changing water chemistry to control corrosion degradation and in those cases, a change of material or change of the state of stresses/fabrication procedure becomes necessary. The role of water chemistry as a causative factor and also as a controlling parameter on particular types of corrosion degradation e.g. stress corrosion cracking, flow accelerated corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion is illustrated. It will be shown that increase in dissolved oxygen content (due to radiolysis in nuclear reactors) is sufficient to make even the de-mineralized water to cause stress corrosion cracking in Boiling Water Reactors. Hydrogen Water Chemistry (by hydrogen injection) to control dissolved oxygen is shown to control the stress corrosion cracking. However, it is not possible to control dissolved oxygen at all parts of the Boiling Water Reactors. Therefore, a further refinement in terms of noble metal

  16. Recent Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Chigondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, reduction of corrosion has been managed by various methods including cathodic protection, process control, reduction of the metal impurity content, and application of surface treatment techniques, as well as incorporation of suitable alloys. However, the use of corrosion inhibitors has proven to be the easiest and cheapest method for corrosion protection and prevention in acidic media. These inhibitors slow down the corrosion rate and thus prevent monetary losses due to metallic corrosion on industrial vessels, equipment, or surfaces. Inorganic and organic inhibitors are toxic and costly and thus recent focus has been turned to develop environmentally benign methods for corrosion retardation. Many researchers have recently focused on corrosion prevention methods using green inhibitors for mild steel in acidic solutions to mimic industrial processes. This paper provides an overview of types of corrosion, corrosion process, and mainly recent work done on the application of natural plant extracts as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel.

  17. Effective flow-accelerated corrosion programs in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselman, Thomas C.; McBrine, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Piping Flow-Accelerated Corrosion Programs in nuclear power generation facilities are classically comprised of the selection of inspection locations with the assistance of a predictive methodology such as the Electric Power Research Institute computer codes CHECMATE or CHECWORKS, performing inspections, conducting structural evaluations on the inspected components, and implementing the appropriate sample expansion and corrective actions. Performing such a sequence of steps can be effective in identifying thinned components and implementing appropriate short term and long term actions necessary to resolve flow-accelerated corrosion related problems. A maximally effective flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) program requires an understanding of many programmatic details. These include the procedural control of the program, effective use of historical information, managing the activities performed during a limited duration outage, allocating resources based on risk allocation, having an acute awareness of how the plant is operated, investigating components removed from the plant, and several others. This paper will describe such details and methods that will lead to a flow-accelerated corrosion program that effectively minimizes the risk of failure due to flow-accelerated corrosion and provide full and complete documentation of the program. (author)

  18. Methods to Evaluate Corrosion in Buried Steel Structures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena-de Arriba-Rodriguez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, there are thousands of metal structures completely or partially buried in the soil. The main concern in their design is corrosion. Corrosion is a mechanism that degrades materials and causes structural failures in infrastructures, which can lead to severe effects on the environment and have direct impact on the population health. In addition, corrosion is extremely complex in the underground environment due to the variability of the local conditions. The problem is that there are many methods to its evaluation but none have been clearly established. In order to ensure the useful life of such structures, engineers usually consider an excess thickness that increases the economic cost of manufacturing and does not satisfy the principles of efficiency in the use of resources. In this paper, an extended revision of the existing methods to evaluate corrosion is carried out to optimize the design of buried steel structures according to their service life. Thus, they are classified into two categories depending on the information they provide: qualitative and quantitative methods. As a result, it is concluded that the most exhaustive methodologies for estimating soil corrosion are quantitative methods fed by non-electrochemical data based on experimental studies that measure the mass loss of structures.

  19. Corrosion characteristics of Hastelloy N alloy after He+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jianbo; Yu Xiaohan; Li Aiguo; He Shangming; Cao Xingzhong; Wang Baoyi; Li Zhuoxin

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the invalidation problem of irradiated Hastelloy N alloy under the condition of intense irradiation and severe corrosion, the corrosion behavior of the alloy after He + ion irradiation was investigated in molten fluoride salt at 700 °C for 500 h. The virgin samples were irradiated by 4.5 MeV He + ions at room temperature. First, the virgin and irradiated samples were studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) to analyze the influence of irradiation dose on the vacancies. The PALS results showed that He + ion irradiation changed the size and concentration of the vacancies which seriously affected the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Second, the corroded samples were analyzed using synchrotron radiation micro-focused X-ray fluorescence, which indicated that the corrosion was mainly due to the dealloying of alloying element Cr in the matrix. Results from weight-loss measurement showed that the corrosion generally correlated with the irradiation dose of the alloy. (author)

  20. Effect of Solder Flux Residues on Corrosion of Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirsten Stentoft; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2009-01-01

    Flux from ‘No Clean’ solder processes can cause reliability problems in the field due to aggressive residues, which may be electrical conducting or corrosive in humid environments. The solder temperature during a wave solder process is of great importance to the amount of residues left on a PCBA...... testing and use in the field, consequences and recommendations are given. Failures, caused by harsh[1] customer environments, are not covered in this paper....

  1. Corrosion experience in nuclear waste processing at Battelle Northwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, S.C.; Maness, R.F.

    1976-11-01

    Emphasis is on corrosion as related to waste storage canister. Most work has been done in support of the In-Can Melter (ICM) vitrification system. It is assumed that the canister goes through the ICM process and is then stored in a water basin. The most severe corrosion effect seen is oxidation of stainless steel (SS) surfaces in contact with gases containing oxygen during processing. The processing temperature is near 1100 0 C and furnace atmosphere, used until now, has been air with unrestricted flow to the furnace. The oxidation rate at 1100 0 C is 15.8 g/cm 2 for 304L SS. Techniques for eliminating this corrosion currently being investigated include the use of different materials, such as Inconel 601, and the use of an inert cover gas. Corrosion due to the waste melt is not as rapid as the air oxidation. This effect has been studied extensively in connection with the development of a metallic crucible melter at Battelle. Data are available on the corrosion rates of several waste compositions in contact with various materials. Long-term compatibility tests between the melt and the metal have been run; it was found the corrosion rates due to the melt or its vapor do not pose a serious problem to the waste canister. However, these rates are high enough to preclude the practical use of a metallic melter. Interim water storage of the canister may be a problem if proper corrective measurements are not taken.The canister may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because it will be sensitized to some extent and it will be nearly stressed to yield. The most favorable solution to SCC involves minimizing canister sensitization and stress plus providing good water quality control. It has been recommended to keep the chlorine ion concentration below 1 ppM and the pH above 10. At these conditions no failures of 304L are predicted due to SCC. It is concluded that corrosion of a canister used during the In-Can Melter process and interim storage can be controlled

  2. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Suess

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, materi...

  3. Preliminary study of life cycle cost of preventive measures and repair options for corrosion in concrete infrastructurecorrosion in concrete infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Pan, Yifan; Courage, Wim; Peelen, Willy H A

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance costs of reinforced concrete infrastructure (bridges, tunnels, harbours, parking structures) are increasing due to aging of structures under aggressive exposure. Corrosion of reinforcement due to chloride ingress is the main problem for existing structures in marine and de-icing salt

  4. NDT method in determining the rate of corrosion applicable to risk based inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Hairul Hasmoni; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in oil and gas industries, refineries and chemical process plants as the equipment is often exposed to corrosive environments or elevated temperature. Important equipment need to operate safely and reliably to avoid injuries to personnel and the public, and to prevent loss time and cost incurred due to loss of production and shutdown. The paper assess the approach in evaluating the technique of non-destructive testing (NDT) using Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in determining the rate of corrosion and remaining life of equipment applicable to Risk Based Inspection (RBI). Methods in determining the corrosion rate are presented using analytical method. Examples and data from MINT chiller water pipeline are presented to illustrate the application of these methods. (Author)

  5. Corrosion Characteristics of Ti-29Nb-xHf Ternary Alloy for Biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, Sun Young; Choi, Han Chul [Chosun Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The Cp-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were widely used for dental materials due to their mechanical properties and good corrosion resistance. However, Cp-Ti was known as bio-inert materials, Ti-6Al-4V alloy has a problem such as high Young modulus, potential loss of the surrounding bone, and to the release of potentially toxic ions from the alloy. To overcome this problem, Ti alloys containing Nb and Hf elements have been used for biomaterials due to low toxicity and high corrosion resistance. Especially, alloying element of Nb was known as β phase stabilizer. The β phase alloy was widely used to replace currently used implant materials. The corrosion resistances of Ti-29Nb-xHf ternary alloys were dependent on Hf content in oral environment solution.

  6. Corrosion Evaluation of INTEC Waste Storage Tank WM-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirk, W. J.; Anderson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been stored and reprocessed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1953 using facilities located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This reprocessing produced radioactive liquid waste which was stored in the Tank Farm. The INTEC Tank Farm consists of eleven vaulted 300,000-gallon underground tanks including Tank WM-182. Tank WM-182 was put into service in 1955, has been filled four times, and has contained aluminum and zirconium fuel reprocessing wastes as well as sodium bearing waste. A program to monitor corrosion in the waste tanks was initiated in 1953 when the first of the eleven Tank Farm tanks was placed in service. Austenitic stainless steel coupons representative of the materials of construction of the tanks are used to monitor internal tank corrosion. This report documents the final inspection of the WM-182 corrosion coupons. Physical examination of the welded corrosion test coupons exposed to the tank bottom conditions of Tank WM-182 revealed very light uniform corrosion. Examination of the external surfaces of the extruded pipe samples showed very light uniform corrosion with slight indications of preferential attack parallel to extrusion marks and start of end grain attack of the cut edges. These indications were only evident when examined under stereo microscope at magnifications of 20X and above. There were no definite indications of localized corrosion, such as cracking, pitting, preferential weld attack, or weld heat affected zone attack on either the welded or extruded coupons. Visual examination of the coupon support cables, where they were not encased in plastic, failed to reveal any indication of liquid-liquid interface attack of any crevice corrosion. Based on the WM-182 coupon evaluations, which have occurred throughout the life of the tank, the metal loss from the tank wall due to uniform corrosion is not expected to exceed 5.5 x 10-1 mil (0.00 055 inch

  7. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  8. Materials Problems and Solutions in Biomass Fired Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Hede; Montgomery, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. In woodchip boilers, a similar corrosion rate and corrosion mechanism has on some occasions been observed. Co-firing of straw (10 and 20% energy basis) with coal has shown corrosion rates lower than those in straw-fired plants......Due to Denmark’s pledge to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, biomass is utilised increasingly as a fuel for generating energy. Extensive research and demonstration projects especially in the area of material performance for biomass fired boilers have been undertaken to make biomass a viable fuel...... resource. When straw is combusted, potassium chloride and potassium sulphate are present in ash products, which condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific chlorine corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly...

  9. Using a Problem-Solving Strategy to Prevent Work-Related Accidents Due to Unsafe Worker Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Ronald C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A two-stage problem-solving strategy involving cue cards and their gradual withdrawal was used to teach nine sheltered workshop employees how to prevent work-related accidents. Results indicated that participants used the strategy appropriately and generalized their skills to similar and dissimilar situations up to eight weeks after training.…

  10. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  11. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    attribud au choix de traitements et de rev~tements spproprids. Au contrairo, dens d’sutros structures des corrosions iirportsntea se sont msnifestdes...au traitement . micaniqus qui provoque une compression de surface - h1l’spplication i1’une double protection comportant oxydation snodique et...chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont

  12. [Violence due to Armed Conflict and Prevalence of Mood Disorders, Anxiety and Mental Problems in the Colombian Adult Population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Tamayo-Martínez, Nathalie; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Guarnizo-Herreño, Carol Cristina; Garzón-Orjuela, Nathaly; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; de Vries, Esther; Rengifo, Herney; Rodríguez, Andrea; Rincón, Carlos Javier

    2016-12-01

    Violence in Colombia has a history of over 50 years. Between 1985 and 2012 an estimated of 220,000 Colombians have died and about 6,000,000 have been displaced by violence. To describe and compare the prevalence of some problems and mental disorders in the adult population in Colombia, taking into account the characteristics of the municipality, as regards its history of violence or armed conflict. The results for adults (over 18 years) of some problems and mental disorders were taken from the ENSM-2015. The municipalities were classified according to the presence and intensity of the conflict using the classification proposed by the CERAC. Disorders were measured using CIDI-CAPI, and problems with AUDIT, modified PCL (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist). An estimate was also made of psychoactive substances consumption. A total of 10,870 people were interviewed, of whom 5,429 had not changed residence. There was had permanent conflict in 21.8% of the municipalities, 65.5% had a discontinued conflict, and only 12.7% had been pacified or had no conflict. The intensity of the conflict was reported as high by 31.8% of the people. Violent municipalities have a higher prevalence of anxiety disorders, depression, possible Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and smoking. Alcohol consumption was more common in municipalities with less intense conflict. The municipalities classified as having high levels of violence have a higher prevalence of mental disorders and the majority of the mental problems. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  13. Statistical evaluation of unobserved nonuniform corrosion in A216 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsipher, B.A.

    1988-07-01

    Tests designed to promote nonuniform corrosion have been conducted at PNL on A216 steel. In all of the tests performed to date, there have been no manifestations of significant nonuniform corrosion. Although this may suggest that nonuniform corrosion in A216 steel may not be a significant problem in the nuclear waste repository, a question arises as to whether enough tests have been conducted for a sufficient length of time to rule out nonuniform corrosion of A216 steel. In this report, a method for determining the required number of tests is examined for two of the mechanisms of nonuniform corrosion: pitting and crevice corrosion

  14. Corrosion and Protection of Metal in the Seawater Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiangyu; Gao, Lili; Cui, Zhendong; Yin, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    Seawater desalination develops rapid for it can solve water scarcity efficiently. However, corrosion problem in the seawater desalination system is more serious than that in normal water. So, it is important to pay attention to the corrosion and protection of metal in seawater desalination. The corrosion characteristics and corrosion types of metal in the seawater desalination system are introduced in this paper; In addition, corrosion protect methods and main influencing factors are stated, the latest new technologies about anti-corrosion with quantum energy assisted and magnetic inhibitor are presented.

  15. Drywell corrosion stopped at Oyster Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipford, B.L.; Flynn, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the detection of corrosion on the drywell containment vessel of Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant and the application of a protective coating to repair the drywell. The topics of the article include drywell design features, identification of the problem, initial action, drywell corrosion, failure of cathodic protection, long-term repair, and repair results

  16. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, D.J.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced

  17. Fighting corrosion in air pollution control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenhouse, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that materials is the name of the game for corrosion prevention in air pollution control equipment. Whether the system is already in place, a retrofit, are specified for a new power pant, preventing corrosion is critical, because such deterioration easily undermines reliability. Hence, materials can heavily influence power plant compliance to the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, perhaps the most vulnerable area to corrosion, are expected to be the method of choice for sulfur removal in many power plants in the near term. Components of these systems have various degrees of susceptibility to corrosion and related problems

  18. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  19. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  20. Acute health problems due to recreational drug use in patients presenting to an urban emergency department in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Liakoni, Evangelia; Dolder, Patrick C.; Rentsch, Katharina; Liechti, Matthias E.

    2015-01-01

    QUESTIONS UNDER STUDY: To describe acute toxicity of recreational drugs including novel psychoactive substances. METHODS: We included all cases presenting at the emergency department (ED) of the University Hospital of Basel, Switzerland, between October 2013 and September 2014 with acute toxicity due to self-reported recreational drug use or with symptoms/signs consistent with acute toxicity. Isolated ethanol intoxications were excluded. Intoxications were confirmed with immunoassa...

  1. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry; La Corrosion et l'alteration des materiaux du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-07-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  2. Current status of studies on nodular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Takayoshi; Kawasaki, Satoru; Echigoya, Hironori; Kinoshita, Yutaka; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takao; Yamanaka, Tuneyasu.

    1993-01-01

    The studies on nodular corrosion formed on the outer surface of BWR fuel cladding tubes were reviewed. Main factors affecting the corrosion behavior were material and environmental conditions and combined effect. The effects of such material conditions as fabrication process, alloy elements, texture and surface treatment and environmental factors as neutron irradiation, thermo-hydrodynamic, water chemistry, purity of the coolant and contact with foreign metals on the corrosion phenomena were surveyed. Out-of-reactor corrosion test methods and models for the corrosion mechanism were also reviewed. Suppression of the accumulated annealing temperature during tube reduction process improved the nodular corrosion resistance of Zircaloys. Improved resistance for the nodular corrosion was reported for the unirradiated Zircaloys with some additives. Detailed irradiation test under the BWR conditions is needed to confirm the trend. Concerning the environmental factors, boiling on the cladding surface due to heat flux reduces the nodular corrosion susceptibility, while oxidizing radical generated from dissolved oxygen accelerates the corrosion. Concerning corrosion mechanisms, importance of such phenomena as the depleted zone of alloying elements in zirconium matrix, reduction of H + to H 2 in oxide layer, electrochemical property of precipitates, crystallographic anisotropy of oxidation rates were revealed. (author) 59 refs

  3. Environmental problems associated with floods due to abundant rains in the Veguita People's Council: Proposal for a mitigation strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alianna Corona-Rodríguez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to elaborate a strategy of prevention-mitigation-preparation in the floods caused by the overflow of the River Buey due to the occurrence of intensive rains in the municipality Yara (Granma province. The methodologies used were based on the historical-trend analysis of the main elements of the study area, systematic and participatory scientific observation, statistical analysis, and the evaluation of risk, vulnerability and hazard studies. These elements served as a basis for designing a strategy based on forestry, land use and environmental education guidelines, mainly aimed at the conservation of non-structural means affected by floods.

  4. Environmental problems associated with blasting in mines: public apprehensions of damage due to blast vibrations - case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padhi, S.N. [DGMS, Bhubaneswar (India)

    1994-12-31

    Blast vibrations may be felt in intensities as small as 1/100 of that required to cause any damage to structures. Therefore, the public response and thus complaints regarding damages are often imaginary. The paper deals with three case studies, involving alleged damage from blasting in surface and underground coal mines where public litigations and agitations resulted due to such apprehensions. The paper is written in simple technical language as the situations warranted that the blast vibration studies should be understood by the general public. 7 tabs.

  5. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  6. Corrosion in waste incineration facilities; Korrosion i avfallsfoerbraenningsanlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staalenheim, Annika; Henderson, Pamela

    2004-11-01

    Waste is a heterogeneous fuel, often with high levels of chlorine, alkali and heavy metals. This leads to much more severe corrosion problems than combustion of fossil fuels. The corrosion rates of the materials used can be extremely high. Materials used for heat transferring parts are usually carbon steel or low alloyed steel. These are significantly cheaper than other steels. Austenitic stainless steel is also used, but is often avoided due to its sensitivity to stress corrosion cracking. More advanced materials, such as nickel base alloys, can be used in extremely aggressive environments. Since these materials are expensive and do not always have sufficient mechanical properties, they are often used as coatings on carbon steel tubes or as composite tubes. A new method, which shows good results at the first tests in plants, is electroplating with nickel. Plastic materials can be used in low temperature parts if the temperature does not exceed 150 deg C. A glass fibre inforced material is probably the best choice. The parts of the furnace that are most prone to corrosion are waterwalls where the refractory coating is lost, has not been applied to a sufficient height in the boiler or is not used at all. Failures of superheaters often occur in areas near soot blowers or on the tubes exposed to the highest flue gas temperatures. Few cases of low temperature corrosion are reported in the literature, possibly because these problems are unusual or because low temperature corrosion rarely causes costly and dramatic failures. Waterwall tubes should be made of carbon steel, because of the price and to minimise the risk for stress corrosion cracking. Usually the tubes must be covered with a more corrosion resistant material to withstand the environment in the boiler. Metal coatings can be used in less demanding environments. Refractory is probably the best protection for waterwalls from severe erosion. Surfaces in extremely corrosive areas, e.g. the fuel feed area, should

  7. A One-Dimensional Thermoelastic Problem due to a Moving Heat Source under Fractional Order Theory of Thermoelasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhu He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of a one-dimensional problem for a thermoelastic rod with finite length is investigated in the context of the fractional order theory of thermoelasticity in the present work. The rod is fixed at both ends and subjected to a moving heat source. The fractional order thermoelastic coupled governing equations for the rod are formulated. Laplace transform as well as its numerical inversion is applied to solving the governing equations. The variations of the considered temperature, displacement, and stress in the rod are obtained and demonstrated graphically. The effects of time, velocity of the moving heat source, and fractional order parameter on the distributions of the considered variables are of concern and discussed in detail.

  8. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Blunt force injuries due to martial arts in children--a diagnostic problem? Delayed diagnosis of an infected hematoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, C; Goericke, S L; Matheney, T; Ozokyay, L; Schildhauer, T A; Muhr, G; Dudda, M

    2010-10-01

    Blunt force injuries in martial arts occur frequently but isolated hematoma of muscles in the extremities is rare. Even minor trauma of the lower extremities due to throwing techniques in judo and other forms of Asian martial arts can lead to major pathologies. A 9-year-old girl presented with an unclear swelling and soreness of the calf muscle. The patient could not remember an obvious traumatic event. She was admitted 4 days later because of increased swelling, pain and erythema. The parents reported a minor trauma at judo training 1 week ago. Further investigation was performed with MRI and confirmed a massive hematoma much greater than previously shown by sonography. Histologic and microbiologic evaluation demonstrated florid inflammation and proof of Staphylococcus aureus was found intra-operatively. The diagnosis of blunt force injuries due to martial arts is difficult in childhood because often children do not remember a traumatic event. Therefore, it is important to obtain a thorough history from caregivers. Because sonography depends highly on the experience of the investigator MRI is considered to be a better diagnostic modality to diagnose and guide treatment in this age group.

  10. Evaluation of corrosion attack of chimney liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahetová M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The case study of chimney liner corrosion addresses three specific cases of damage of chimney systems from of stainless steels. These systems were used for flue of gas arising from the combustion of brown coal in small automatic boilers, which are used for heating. Detailed analyzes implied that the cause of devastating corrosion of the steel AISI 316 and 304 steel (CSN 17349, 17241 was particularly high content of halides (chlorides and fluorides, which caused a severe pitting corrosion, which led up to the perforation of the liner material. Simultaneous reduction of the thickness of the used sheets was due to by the general corrosion, which was caused by the sulfur in the solid fuel. The condensation then led to acid environment and therefore the corrosion below the dew point of the sulfuric acid has occurred. All is documented by metallographic analysis and microanalysis of the corrosion products.

  11. Ultrasonic guided wave for monitoring corrosion of steel bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Qin, Lei; Huang, Bosheng

    2018-01-01

    Steel corrosion of reinforced concrete structures has become a serious problem all over the word. In this paper, the work aims at monitoring steel corrosion using ultrasonic guided wave (UGW). Ultrasonic guided wave monitoring is a dynamic and non-destructive testing technology. The advantages of ultrasonic guided wave monitoring for reinforcement corrosion are real-time, online and continuous. In addition, it can judge the different stages of steel bar corrosion, which achieved non-destructive detection.

  12. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in ship ballast tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is known to be a dangerous process in ship tanks due to its rapid and yet unpredictable occurrence, leading to extremely fast local corrosion, possibly jeopardizing the structural integrity, in a relatively short time. This project focuses on a

  13. Emerging Corrosion Inhibitors for Interfacial Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Taghavikish

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is a deterioration of a metal due to reaction with environment. The use of corrosion inhibitors is one of the most effective ways of protecting metal surfaces against corrosion. Their effectiveness is related to the chemical composition, their molecular structures and affinities for adsorption on the metal surface. This review focuses on the potential of ionic liquid, polyionic liquid (PIL and graphene as promising corrosion inhibitors in emerging coatings due to their remarkable properties and various embedment or fabrication strategies. The review begins with a precise description of the synthesis, characterization and structure-property-performance relationship of such inhibitors for anti-corrosion coatings. It establishes a platform for the formation of new generation of PIL based coatings and shows that PIL corrosion inhibitors with various heteroatoms in different form can be employed for corrosion protection with higher barrier properties and protection of metal surface. However, such study is still in its infancy and there is significant scope to further develop new structures of PIL based corrosion inhibitors and coatings and study their behaviour in protection of metals. Besides, it is identified that the combination of ionic liquid, PIL and graphene could possibly contribute to the development of the ultimate corrosion inhibitor based coating.

  14. Corrosion and protection of magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghali, E. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Metallurgy

    2000-07-01

    The oxide film on magnesium offers considerable surface protection in rural and some industrial environments and the corrosion rate lies between that of aluminum and low carbon steels. Galvanic coupling of magnesium alloys, high impurity content such as Ni, Fe, Cu and surface contamination are detrimental for corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Alloying elements can form secondary particles which are noble to the Mg matrix, thereby facilitating corrosion, or enrich the corrosion product thereby possibly inhibiting the corrosion rate. Bimetallic corrosion resistance can be increased by fluxless melt protection, choice of compatible alloys, insulating materials, and new high-purity alloys. Magnesium is relatively insensible to oxygen concentration. Pitting, corrosion in the crevices, filiform corrosion are observed. Granular corrosion of magnesium alloys is possible due to the cathodic grain-boundary constituent. More homogeneous microstructures tend to improve corrosion resistance. Under fatigue loading conditions, microcrack initiation in Mg alloys is related to slip in preferentially oriented grains. Coating that exclude the corrosive environments can provide the primary defense against corrosion fatigue. Magnesium alloys that contain neither aluminum nor zinc are the most SCC resistant. Compressive surface residual stresses as that created by short peening increase SCC resistance. Cathodic polarization or cladding with a SCC resistant sheet alloy are good alternatives. Effective corrosion prevention for magnesium alloy components and assemblies should start at the design stage. Selective surface preparation, chemical treatment and coatings are recommended. Oil application, wax coating, anodizing, electroplating, and painting are possible alternatives. Recently, it is found that a magnesium hydride layer, created on the magnesium surface by cathodic charging in aqueous solution is a good base for painting. (orig.)

  15. Health problems associated with international travel: a case of cutaneous myiasis in China due to Cordylobia anthropophaga imported from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wei; Feng, Yan; Zhang, Lingling; Sun, Jimin; Yao, Linong

    2014-12-01

    More affordable international travel, global trade and commerce, and the exporting of labor have all contributed to international population mobility. Furthermore, population migration leads to the incidence or recurrence of once-controlled diseases. Evidence shows that the popularity of travel can impact health through imported infections and illness. Imported cutaneous myiasis, a type of skin lesion, has attracted the attention of the current authors. This condition often occurs among travelers and it has been reported in several non-endemic countries. However, diagnosis of myiasis and identification of the larvae are difficult. Advances in molecular detection techniques could provide a new way to identify larvae. This study used sequencing of the 28S rRNA gene and morphology to identify the larva infesting the upper arm of a Chinese woman returning from Uganda. The larva was identified as Cordylobia anthropophaga (C. anthropophaga) and the sequences were submitted to GenBank (accession number: KM506761). As foreign interaction increases, imported health problems may become more common in China. Knowledge about various pathogens needs to be increased and molecular methods need to be used to accurately identify those pathogens.

  16. Spectrum interpretation problems with well-type Ge(Li) detectors due to self-absorption variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruin, M. de; Korthoven, P.J.M.; Bode, P.

    1979-01-01

    For use in instrumental neutron activation analysis, a well-type Ge(Li) detector compares favourably with a comparable detector without well. It combines a good energy resolution with a relatively high detector efficiency. Moreover, this efficiency is almost independent of sample dimensions. But the use of a well-type Ge(Li) detector also has been some drawbacks, as large summation effects will result from the high detector efficiency. The least severe aspect of this summation is the additional formation of many extra sum peaks in gamma-ray spectra of nuclides with moderate or highly complex decay schemes. This leads to higher computation times, but in general, the accuracy of the analysis will not be affected. A far more important aspect of the summation is found in the fact that the intensity ratios between high energy peaks and the sum peaks of self-absorption effects, which in a flat detector is limited to only the low energy part of the spectrum, may be extended to the high energy region. This leads to sample-dependent distortion of the high energy part of the gamma-ray spectrum which may result in misinterpretation of instrumental neutron activation analysis data. The only solution to this problem seems to be to prevent the relevant low energy photons from reaching the detector. This can be accomplished by using a high Z absorber inside the detector well. (Auth.)

  17. Disparities in Spatial Prevalence of Feline Retroviruses due to Data Aggregation: A Case of the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal K. Chhetri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the spatial distribution feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus infections, which are untreatable, can inform on their risk factors and high-risk areas to enhance control. However, when spatial analysis involves aggregated spatial data, results may be influenced by the spatial scale of aggregation, an effect known as the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP. In this study, area level risk factors for both infections in 28,914 cats tested with ELISA were investigated by multivariable spatial Poisson regression models along with MAUP effect on spatial clustering and cluster detection (for postal codes, counties, and states by Moran’s I test and spatial scan test, respectively. The study results indicate that the significance and magnitude of the association of risk factors with both infections varied with aggregation scale. Further more, Moran’s I test only identified spatial clustering at postal code and county levels of aggregation. Similarly, the spatial scan test indicated that the number, size, and location of clusters varied over aggregation scales. In conclusion, the association between infection and area was influenced by the choice of spatial scale and indicates the importance of study design and data analysis with respect to specific research questions.

  18. Biofouling problems in freshwater cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, T.S.

    2007-01-01

    In aqueous environments, microorganisms (bacteria, algae, fungi etc.,) are attracted towards surfaces, which they readily colonise resulting in the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofouling are energy losses due to increased fluid frictional resistance and increased heat transfer resistance. The temperatures prevalent inside the condenser system provide a favorable environment for the rapid growth of microorganisms. This results in thick slime deposit, which is responsible for heat transfer losses, thereby enhancing aggregation of deposits on the material surface and induces localised corrosion. There have been instances of increased capital costs due to premature replacement of equipment caused by severe under deposit corrosion due to biofouling. Moreover, fouling of service water systems of nuclear power plants is of concern, because it reduces the heat transfer capacity during an emergency or an accident. The growth of microbial films (slimes) a few tens of microns thick, in a condenser tube is sufficient to induce microbiologically influenced corrosion and cause irreparable damage to the condenser tubes and other structural materials. The down time costs to power plant due to condenser fouling and corrosion are quite large. This paper presents the author's experience in biofouling and corrosion problems in various power plants cooled by freshwater. (author)

  19. High temperature cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion behaviours of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    eutectic reaction below 600°C. When the temperature ... blades, consequently corrosion rate rapidly increases due ... the corrosion run. ... Figure 1. Surface macrographs of superalloys subjected to hot corrosion and oxidation .... show the oxide scales of three different chemical compo- .... Li J and Wahi R P 1995 Acta Metall.

  20. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  1. The association of chronic neck pain, low back pain, and migraine with absenteeism due to health problems in Spanish workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesas, Arthur Eumann; González, Alberto Durán; Mesas, Cézar Eumann; de Andrade, Selma Maffei; Magro, Isabel Sánchez; del Llano, Juan

    2014-07-01

    Cross-sectional. To examine whether 3 types of chronic pain are associated with absenteeism and with the number of days absent from work in the general population of Spain. Chronic pain has been associated with absenteeism, but most of the evidence is based on unadjusted analyses and on specific professional categories. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on the basis of data of 8283 Spanish workers. Chronic pain was ascertained from self-reported information on frequent symptoms of pain in the low back and neck and/or migraine in the last 12 months. Absenteeism was defined as missing at least 1 day from work because of health problems. Multivariate regression models were adjusted for the main confounders. Health-related absenteeism was reported by 27.8% of subjects. The prevalence of chronic pain was reported to be 12.3% in the neck, 14.1% in the low back, and 10.3% migraine. In adjusted analyses, absenteeism was associated with chronic neck pain (odds ratio: 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.40), low back pain (odds ratio: 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.42), and migraine (odds ratio: 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04-1.44). These associations were strongest in younger (18-34 yr) rather than in older workers. Furthermore, those who reported frequent pain in the neck and low back were 44% more likely to be absent for more than 30 days in the past year than those who did not report these symptoms. Spanish workers with chronic pain were more likely to be absent from work and to stay absent from work for longer. These associations are independent of sociodemographic characteristics, occupation, lifestyle, health status, and analgesics use. N/A.

  2. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Dosage uniformity problems which occur due to technological errors in extemporaneously prepared suppositories in hospitals and pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Éva; Lasher, Jason Richard; Tarry, Thomas Dean; Myers, Andrea; Szakonyi, Gerda; Dombi, György; Baki, Gabriella; Alexander, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of suppositories in Hungary, especially in clinical pharmacy practice, is usually provided by extemporaneous preparations. Due to the known advantages of rectal drug administration, its benefits are frequently utilized in pediatrics. However, errors during the extemporaneous manufacturing process can lead to non-homogenous drug distribution within the dosage units. To determine the root cause of these errors and provide corrective actions, we studied suppository samples prepared with exactly known errors using both cerimetric titration and HPLC technique. Our results show that the most frequent technological error occurs when the pharmacist fails to use the correct displacement factor in the calculations which could lead to a 4.6% increase/decrease in the assay in individual dosage units. The second most important source of error can occur when the molding excess is calculated solely for the suppository base. This can further dilute the final suppository drug concentration causing the assay to be as low as 80%. As a conclusion we emphasize that the application of predetermined displacement factors in calculations for the formulation of suppositories is highly important, which enables the pharmacist to produce a final product containing exactly the determined dose of an active substance despite the different densities of the components. PMID:25161378

  4. Specific absorption rate variation in a brain phantom due to exposure by a 3G mobile phone: problems in dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behari, J; Nirala, Jay Prakash

    2013-12-01

    A specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements system has been developed for compliance testing of personal mobile phone in a brain phantom material contained in a Perspex box. The volume of the box has been chosen corresponding to the volume of a small rat and illuminated by a 3G mobile phone frequency (1718.5 MHz), and the emitted radiation directed toward brain phantom .The induced fields in the phantom material are measured. Set up to lift the plane carrying the mobile phone is run by a pulley whose motion is controlled by a stepper motor. The platform is made to move at a pre-determined rate of 2 degrees per min limited up to 20 degrees. The measured data for induced fields in various locations are used to compute corresponding SAR values and inter comparison obtained. These data are also compared with those when the mobile phone is placed horizontally with respect to the position of the animal. The SAR data is also experimentally obtained by measuring a rise in temperature due to this mobile exposures and data compared with those obtained in the previous set. To seek a comparison with the safety criteria same set of measurements are performed in 10 g phantom material contained in a cubical box. These results are higher than those obtained with the knowledge of induced field measurements. It is concluded that SAR values are sensitive to the angular position of the moving platform and are well below the safety criteria prescribed for human exposure. The data are suggestive of having a fresh look to understand the mode of electromagnetic field -bio interaction.

  5. MODELLING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING TUBES CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Cech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes materials made of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding fabrication. It is focused on corrosion problems their theoretical description and modeling in nuclear engineering.

  6. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for four-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focus...

  7. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for 4-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focused ...

  8. Available Prediction Methods for Corrosion under Insulation (CUI): A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Burhani Nurul Rawaida Ain; Muhammad Masdi; Ismail Mokhtar Che

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is an increasingly important issue for the piping in industries especially petrochemical and chemical plants due to its unexpected catastrophic disaster. Therefore, attention towards the maintenance and prediction of CUI occurrence, particularly in the corrosion rates, has grown in recent years. In this study, a literature review in determining the corrosion rates by using various prediction models and method of the corrosion occurrence between the external su...

  9. Study on corrosion products from ear piercing studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogero, Sizue O.; Costa, Isolda; Saiki, Mitiko

    2000-01-01

    In this work instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to analyse elemental composition of commercial gold coated ear piercing substrate and metals present in their corrosion products. The cytotoxic effect was also verified in these corrosion product extracts, probably, due to the lixiviation of Ni present in high quantity in their substrates. The analysis of gold coated ear piercing surfaces by scanning electron microscopy before and after the corrosion test showed coating defects and the occurrence of corrosion process. (author)

  10. Relationship between Corrosion Level of Rebar Embedded in Concrete, Corrosion Potential and Current Density Measured by Non-destructive Test Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Lan; Cho, Seung Ho; Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Joong Koo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify corrosion mechanism and develop qualitative measurement method of corrosion level. Fist of all, structural behavior of each different level of corrosion states have been evaluated. And mathematical models that can predict corrosion level in terms of electric potential and corrosion intensity are proposed. Corrosion rate in reinforcing bar was investigated in this study using accelerated corrosion method due to electric potential differences based on Faradays law. Total 288 measurement spots were designed in terms of corrosion rates, diameter of reinforcing bars, and concrete cover thickness. Corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials of concrete were measured on these specimens using Gecor device. This study suggested the relationship between corrosion levels, and measured electric current density as follows

  11. Microaspersores entupidos devido a problemas de ferro na água Microsprinkler clogged due to iron problems in the water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio Assunção Pires Ribeiro

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Um dos aspectos relevantes a ser considerado no manejo da irrigação é a uniformidade de distribuição de água pelo sistema. Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de avaliar a eficiência da cloração com a utilização de hipoclorito de sódio na desobstrução de microaspersores devido à utilização de águas com elevado teor de ferro. Um sistema com dez meses de uso apresentava setores com vazões de 5% a 57% menores que a vazão de projeto. Foi feito o tratamento químico da água de irrigação, utilizando-se hipoclorito de sódio com 12% de cloro livre na dosagem de 100 mg L-1 e ácido sulfúrico, na concentração de 98%, para manter o pH da água de irrigação em torno de 4,5. O resultado indicou que houve aumento significativo nas vazões médias dos microaspersores em todos os setores avaliados e diminuição na variação da vazão dos mesmos com relação à estimada no projeto.An important aspect to be considered in irrigation managment is the uniformity distribution of water through the irrigation system. This research had the objective to evaluate the efficiency of chlorination in the use of sodium hypochlorite in clearing of microsprinkler due to the presence of high iron concentration in water. The equipment with less than a year of use presenting sectors with 5% and 57% lower flow than the original project flow. The chemical treatment of water irrigation utilized sodium hypochlorite with 12% free chlorine on 100mg L-1 concentration, and sulphuric acid 98% to maintain the pH of water irrigation about 4.5. The result demonstrated a significant increase in the average flow of the microsprinkler's variation in all evaluted setors, and decrease in their flow variation related to the estimated in the project.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  13. Corrosion in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danko, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the major corrosion problems in light water reactors, the research on the corrosion mechanism(s), and the development of engineering solutions and their implementation. To understand the occurrence of corrosion problems, a brief historical perspective of the corrosion design basis of commercial light water reactors, boiling water, and pressurized water reactors is necessary. Although corrosion was considered in the plant designs, it was not viewed as a serious problem. This was based on the results of laboratory experiments and in-reactor tests that did not indicate any major corrosion problems with the materials selected for the plant construction. However, the laboratory tests did not necessarily reproduce the reactor operating conditions and the early in-reactor test did not fully represent the commercial reactor conditions in all cases, and, finally, the test times were indeed of short duration relative to the plant design lifetime of 40 years. Thus, the design basis for the materials selection was determined on the favorable but limited test data that were available, and corrosion limitations on component integrity were therefore not anticipated

  14. Absenteeism due to mental health problems and systems for return to work: an internet-based unmatched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doki, Shotaro; Sasahara, Shinichiro; Hirai, Yasuhito; Oi, Yuichi; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for absenteeism due to mental health problems with regard to company characteristics and systems for return to work in Japan. This was an Internet-based unmatched case-control study. Two hundred and fifty-eight workers who experienced over 28 days of sick leave due to mental health problems (cases) and 258 workers who have not taken sick leave (controls) were recruited. Company characteristics and the awareness and presence of systems for return to work were analysed as indicators of absenteeism. A total of 501 workers were included in the analysis. Females were less likely to experience absenteeism when adjustments were made for both the awareness and presence of systems [odds ratio (OR) = 0.51 and 0.41, respectively]. Large companies showed an increased risk of having absentee workers than small companies. The awareness of a gradual resumption system and the presence of a sick pay system were related to absenteeism (OR = 2.75 and 2.40, respectively). The awareness and presence of systems for return to work are related to the long-term absenteeism. The predictors of sex and company size are also related to the experience of the long-term absenteeism. To understand the effect of systems for return to work on absenteeism due to mental problems, further studies are needed.

  15. Performance investigation of low-toxic organic corrosion inhibitors in amine treating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veawab, A.; Tanthapanichakoon, W.

    2003-01-01

    Amine treating unit is constantly subject to severe corrosion problems leading to extra expenditure and operational limitations. Heavy-metal vanadium compounds are extensively used as corrosion inhibitors to suppress the severe corrosion to an acceptable level. In recent years, the fact that these vanadium compounds are inherently toxic and can potentially pose adverse impacts on the human health and the environment has brought about environmental awareness that causes their uses costly due to the difficulty in waste disposal. To respond to the environmental concern and reduce cost of waste disposal as well as prepare for more stringent regulations for chemical uses, the development of low-toxic corrosion inhibitors is necessary. This work therefore focuses on an investigation of inhibition performance of a number of organic and inorganic compounds that have relatively low toxicity in comparison with conventional inhibitors. The performance evaluation was carried out through corrosion experiments using carbon steel specimens. The experiments were done in 3 and 5 kmol/m 3 monoethanolamine (MEA) solution saturated with CO 2 at 80 o C. It was found that several tested compounds have potential to be effective low-toxic corrosion inhibitors. The promising compounds provide reasonable and in some cases comparable protection performance to the conventional inhibitor. (author)

  16. Preliminary Design of the Liquid Lead Corrosion Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chung Ho; Cha, Jae Eun; Cho, Choon Ho; Song, Tae Yung; Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2005-01-01

    Recently, Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) or Lead has newly attracted considerable attraction as a coolant to get the more inherent safety. Above all, LBE is preferred as the coolant and target material for an Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) due to its high production rate of neutrons, effective heat removal, and good radiation damage properties. But, the LBE or Lead as a coolant has a challenging problem that the LBE or Lead is more corrosive to the construction materials and fuel cladding material than the sodium because the solubility of Ni, Cr and Fe is high. After all, the LBE or Lead corrosion has been considered as an important design limit factor of ADS and Liquid Metal cooled Fast Reactors (LMFR). The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an ADS called HYPER. HYPER is designed to transmute Transuranics (TRU), Tc-99 and I-129 coming from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) and uses an LBE as a coolant and target material. Also, an experimental apparatuses for the compatibility of fuel cladding and structural material with the LBE or Lead are being under the construction or design. The main objective of the present paper is introduction of Lead corrosion test loop which will be built the upside of the LBE corrosion test loop by the end of October of 2005

  17. Undoped Polyaniline/Surfactant Complex for the Corrosion Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lo-Min; Levon, Kalle

    1998-01-01

    Due to the strict regulations on the usage of heavy metals as the additives in the coating industries, the search for effective organic corrosion inhibitors in replace of those metal additives has become essential. Electrically conducting polymers have been shown to be effective for corrosion prevention but the poor solubility of these intractable polymers has been a problem. We have explored a polyaniline/4-dodecylphenol complex (PANi/DDPh) to improve the dissolution and it has been shown to be an effective organic corrosion inhibitor. With the surfactant, DDPh, PANi could be diluted into the coatings and the properties of the coatings were affected. Emeraldine base (EB) form of PANi was also found to be oxidized by the hardener. The oxidized form of polyaniline provides improved corrosion protection of metals than that of emeraldine base since the value of the standard electrode potential for the oxidized form of PANi is higher than that of EB. Additionally, the surfactant improves the wet adhesion property between the coating and the metal surface.

  18. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  19. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic phases and their effects on corrosion and mechanical properties. First the effect of various alloying elements on DSS and SDSS has been discussed followed by formation of various intermetallic phases. The intermetallic phases affect impact toughness and corrosion resistance significantly. Their deleterious effect on weldments has also been reviewed.

  20. New Technology for Corrosion Mitigation of Steam Generator Tubesheet in Secondary Side Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Do Haeng; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Han, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Denting has been mitigated by a modification of the design and material of the tube support structures, it has been an inevitable problem in the crevice region of the top of the tubesheet(TTS). Denting at the TTS has been a significant concern regardless of the tube materials. This is because it is a mechanical process resulted from a volume expansion of corrosion products of the tubesheet materials. It should be noted that the corrosion rate of low alloy tubesheet materials is accelerated due to the presence of corrosion products accumulated at the top of the tubesheet. Therefore a reduction of the corrosion rate of the tubesheet material should be a key strategy to prevent tube denting at the TTS as well as an improvement of the secondary water chemistry. This paper provides a new technology to prevent denting by cladding the secondary side surface of the tubesheet with a corrosion resistant material. In this study, Alloy 690 material on the surface of the SA508 tubesheet was cladded to a thickness of about 9mm. The corrosion rates of the SA508 original tubesheet and Alloy 690 clad material were measured in acidic and caustic simulated environments. Denting has been a precursor of stress corrosion cracking in nuclear steam generator tubing, although it may be mitigated by a design and material modification of the tube support structures and secondary water chemistry control. Corrosion resistant Alloy 690 tubing is not an exception because denting at the TTS is due to corrosion of the tubesheet material. In this paper, a new technology was suggested to prevent denting at the TTS by cladding the secondary side surface of the tubesheet with a corrosion resistant material. It was verified that the corrosion rates of a tubesheet with an Alloy 690 clad layer drastically decreased in both acidic and alkaline environments, even inside the magnetite sludge pile. Because the cladding processes of Alloy 690 have already been applied to the primary side surface of a

  1. A new corrosion monitoring technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Gerald K.

    2000-01-01

    Internal Corrosion Monitoring has relied upon 5 basic techniques. Little improvement in performance has been achieved in any of these. Many newer internal corrosion monitoring techniques have proved of little value in the field although some have instances of success in the laboratory. Industry has many high value hydrocarbon applications requiring corrosion rate monitoring for real-time problem solving and control. The high value of assets and the cost of asset replacement makes it necessary to practice cost effective process and corrosion control with sensitivity beyond the 5 basic techniques. This new metal loss technology offers this sensitivity. Traditional metal loss technology today provides either high sensitivity with short life, or conversely, long life but with substantially reduced sensitivity. The new metal loss technology offers an improved working life of sensors without significantly compromising performance. The paper discusses the limitations of existing on-line technologies and describes the performance of a new technology. This new metal loss technology was introduced at NACE Corrosion 99'. Since that time several field projects have been completed or are ongoing. This paper will discuss the new metal loss technology and report on some of the data that has been obtained.(author)

  2. Factors and mechanisms affecting corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehqanian, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic power plants possess reinforced concrete structures which are exposed to sea water or sea atmosphere. Sea water or its surrounding environment contain very corrosive species which cause corrosion of metal in concrete. It should be mentioned that corrosion of steel in concrete is a complex problem that is not completely understood. Some of the factors which influence the corrosion mechanism and can be related to the pore solution composition is discussed. Chloride ion caused problems are the main source of the corrosion damage seen on the reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion rate in concrete varies and depends on the way chloride ion diffuses into concrete. In addition, the associated cations can influence diffusion of chloride into concrete. The type of portland cement and also the concrete mix design all affect the corrosion behaviour of steel in concrete

  3. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  4. Some observations on phosphate based corrosion inhibitors in preventing carbon steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anupkumar, B.; Satpathy, K.K.

    2000-01-01

    Among the various types of phosphonic acid based inhibitors assayed, namely HEDP, ATMP and a commercial corrosion inhibitor (code named Betz), it was found that Betz has the maximum amount of organic phosphate followed by HEDP and ATMP. The corrosion rate studies show that Betz gives the highest inhibition efficiency followed by HEDP and ATMP. This shows that organic phosphate plays a significant role in corrosion protection. However, it was observed that due to synergestic effect, HEDP in the presence of Zn 2+ gave a better corrosion protection than Betz. The results are discussed in the light of available literature. (author)

  5. Research on corrosion mechanism of suspension insulator steel foot of direct current system and measures for corrosion inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Yang, Yueguang; Su, Guolei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hourong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fan, Youping

    2017-09-01

    There are increasingly serious electrocorrosion phenomena on insulator hardware caused by direct current transmission due to the wide-range popularization of extra high voltage direct current transmission engineering in our country. Steel foot corrosion is the main corrosion for insulators on positive polarity side of transmission lines. On one hand, the corrosion leads to the tapering off of steel foot diameter, having a direct influence on mechanical property of insulators; on the other hand, in condition of corrosion on steel foot wrapped in porcelain ware, the volume of the corrosion product is at least 50% more than that of the original steel foot, leading to bursting of porcelain ware, threatening safe operation of transmission lines. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct research on the phenomenon and propose feasible measures for corrosion inhibition. Starting with the corrosion mechanism, this article proposes two measures for corrosion inhibition, and verifies the inhibition effect in laboratory conditions, providing reference for application in engineering.

  6. Real time corrosion monitoring in atmosphere using automated battery driven corrosion loggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosek, T.; Kouril, M.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2008-01-01

    diminishes due to corrosion. Zinc, iron, copper and nickel sensors at several thicknesses are available. Sensitivity of the corrosion measurement varies from 1 to 10 nm depending on the type and thickness of the sensor. Changes in the air corrosivity can be thus detected within hours or even tens of minutes......A logger enabling continuous measurement of corrosion rate of selected metals in indoor and outdoor atmospheres has been developed. Principle of the measurement method is based on the increasing electrical resistance of a measuring element made of the material concerned as its cross-sectional area....... The logger lifetime in medium corrosive environments is designed to be 2 years with full autonomy. Data on the sensor corrosion rate are available any time through GPRS connection or by a non-contact inductive reading without the need of retracting the logger from the exposure site....

  7. Study on the corrosion assessment of overpack welds-III (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Rieko; Otsuki, Akiyoshi; Asano, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Naoki; Yui, Mikazu

    2006-12-01

    There is some possibility that the corrosion resistance of overpack welds is different from that of base metal due to the differences of material properties. In this study, corrosion behavior of welded joint for carbon steel was compared with base metal using the specimens taken from welded joint model fabricated by TIG, MAG and EBW respectively. The corrosion tests were performed for following four items. Passivation behavior and corrosion type. Propagation of general corrosion, pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion under aerobic condition. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. Propagation of general corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement under anaerobic condition. The results of these corrosion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of welded metal by TIG and MAG was inferior to base metal for general corrosion, pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. It was implied that the filler materials used for welding affected the corrosion resistance. No deterioration of corrosion resistance was observed in any corrosion modes for EBW, which does not need filler material. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of welded metal and heat affected zone was lower than that of base metal. (author)

  8. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels; Montgomery, Melanie; Hede Larsen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. To avoid such high corrosion rates, woodchip...... has also been utilised as a fuel. Combustion of woodchip results in a smaller amount of ash, and potassium and chlorine are present in lesser amounts. However, significant corrosion rates were still seen. A case study of a woodchip fired boiler is described. The corrosion mechanisms in both straw-fired...... and woodchip fired boilers are discussed....

  9. Hanford transuranic storage corrosion review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Divine, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    The rate of atmospheric corrosion of the transuranic (TRU) waste drums at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project, near Richland, Washington, was evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The rate of corrosion is principally contingent upon the effects of humidity, airborne pollutants, and temperature. Results of the study indicate that actual penetration of barrels due to atmospheric corrosion will probably not occur within the 20-year specified recovery period. Several other US burial sites were surveyed, and it appears that there is sufficient uncertainty in the available data to prevent a clearcut statement of the corrosion rate at a specific site. Laboratory and site tests are recommended before any definite conclusions can be made. The corrosion potential at the Hanford TRU waste site could be reduced by a combination of changes in drum materials (for example, using galvanized barrels instead of the currently used mild steel barrels), environmental exposure conditions (for example, covering the barrels in one of numerous possible ways), and storage conditions

  10. Mortar fights acid corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-14

    The burning of coal or oil to produce heat required to operate a power boiler also generates a severe corrosion problem within the interior of the duct and stacks used to emit the flue gas into the atmosphere. How can concrete and steel be protected from the effects of acid attack, when the acids are carried in a gas form, or come into direct contact with the steel or concrete from spillage or immersion conditions. Industry in North America has found that the solution to this problem is to build an outside concrete column, in this case of Portland cement, and inside that column, build a totally independent brick liner bonded with Sauereisen mortar.

  11. Corrosion of candidate materials for canister: applications in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azkarate, I.; Madina, V.; Barrio, A. del; Macarro, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Previous corrosion studies carried out on various metallic materials in typical salt rock environments show that carbon steel and titanium alloys are the most promising candidates for canister applications in this geological formation. Although carbon steels have a low corrosion resistance, they are considered acceptable as corrosion-allowance materials for a thick walled container due to their practical immunity to the localized corrosion phenomena such as stress corrosion cracking, pitting or crevice corrosion. Aiming to improve the performances of these materials, studies on the effect of small additions of Ni and V on the general corrosion are in process. The improvement in the resistance to general corrosion should not be accompanied by a sensitivity to stress corrosion cracking. On the contrary, alfa titanium alloys are considered the most resistant materials to general corrosion in salt brines. However, pitting, are potential deficiencies of this corrosion-resistant materials for a thin walled container. (Author)

  12. Cuticular characteristics in the detection of plant stress due to air pollution - new problems in the use of these cuticular characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrec, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The foliar surface, and particularly the cuticle, is the first zone of impact of air pollutants on leaves. At the level of the cuticle, it is mainly studies on the modifications of the physico-chemical properties of the waxes that allow us to detect and estimate plant stress. However, during recent years, with modifications in the nature and level of air pollution (decrease of primary pollutants: SO 2 , HF; increase of secondary pollutants: O 2 , acid deposits; increase of nitrogen deposits; increase of organic micropollutants; appearence of global environmental problems: CO 2 , climatic change), the physiological impact on plants and in particular on the cuticle is different. For this reason, new problems have appeared and use of cuticular characteristics in the detection of plant stress due to air pollutants has recently evolved. Some examples are given, but much remains to be done to understand the effects on the cuticle of these new modifications of the atmospheric environment of plants. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion study in molten fluoride salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keny, S.J.; Kumbhar, A.G.; Rangarajan, S.; Gupta, V.K.; Maheshwari, N.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of two alloys viz. Inconel 625 and Inconel 617 were tested in molten fluoride salts of lithium, sodium and potassium (FLiNaK) in the temperature range of 550-750 ℃ in a nickel lined Inconel vessel. Electrochemical polarization (Tafel plot) technique was used for this purpose. For both alloys, the corrosion rate was found to increase sharply beyond 650 ℃ . At 600 ℃ , Inconel 625 showed a decreasing trend in the corrosion rate over a period of 24 hours, probably due to changes in the surface conditions. After fifteen days, re-testing of Inconel 625 in the same melt showed an increase in the corrosion rate. Inconel 625 was found to be more corrosion resistant than Inconel 617. (author)

  14. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate

  15. Corrosion and Environmental Degradation, 2 Volume Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Michael; Cahn, Robert W.; Haasen, Peter; Kramer, E. J.

    2001-06-01

    Corrosion and corrosion protection is one of most important topics in applied materials science. Corrosion science is not only important from an economic point of view, but, due to its interdisciplinary nature combining metallurgy, materials physics and electrochemistry, it is also of high scientific interest. Nowadays corrosion science even gets new impetus from surface science and polymer chemistry. This two-volume reference work belonging to the well renown series Materials Science and Tehcnology provides the reader with a sound and broad survey on the whole subject - from the fundamentals to the latest research results. Written by a team of international top-experts it will become an indispensable reference for any materials scientist, physicist or chemist involved in corrosion science.

  16. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...

  17. High Temperature Corrosion on Biodust Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi

    The high content of alkali metals and chlorine in biomass gives rise to fouling/slagging and corrosion of heat exchange components, such as superheaters, in biomass fired power plants. Increasing the lifetime of these components, and in addition, preventing unwarranted plant shutdowns due...... to their failure, requires understanding of the complex corrosion mechanisms, as well as development of materials that are resistant to corrosion under biomass firing conditions, thereby motivating the current work. To understand the mechanisms of corrosion attack, comprehensive analysis of corrosion products...... by the combined use of complementary information from microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and various X-ray diffraction characterization techniques. In light of the wide variation in operating conditions in biomass fired power plants, systematic and well-controlled, but realistic laboratory scale...

  18. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate.

  19. Corrosion monitoring of insulated pipe using radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Abd Razak Hamzah; Mohd Pauzi Ismail; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Shaharudin Sayuti; Shukri Ahmad

    2001-01-01

    In petrochemical and power plants, detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using radiographic technique are considered as very challenging tasks. In general this degradation problem is attributed to water condensation. It causes the formation of deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe in cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the study of corrosion in pipelines, one of the most important parameters to be monitored and measured is he wall thickness. Currently, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is performed using an ultrasonic method. The most common technique is that based on the A-Scan, using either a normal flaw detector or some form of dedicated equipment. However, with recent development of ultrasonic technology, more advance method, namely B-Scan and C-scan techniques are also available. The most notable disadvantage of using this method is that the insulation covering the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason, the possibility of employing other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method was studied. The technique used in this studied are known as tangential technique. In this study it was found that the result found using tangential technique is consistent with the actual thickness of the pipe. Result of this study is presented and discussed in this paper. (Author)

  20. Corrosion evaluation in insulated pipes by non destructive testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Razak Hamzah; Azali Muhammad; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Sufian Saad; Saharuddin Sayuti; Shukri Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    In engineering plants, detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using radiography method are considered as a very challenging tasks. In General this degradation problem is attributed to water condensation. It causes the formation of deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe in cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the study of corrosion in pipelines, one of the most important parameters to be monitored and measured is the wall thickness. Currently, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is performed using an ultrasonic method. The most common technique is that based on the A-Scan, using either a normal flaw detector or some form of dedicated equipment. However, with recent development of ultrasonic technology, more advance method, namely B-Scan and C-scan techniques are also available. The most notable disadvantage of using this method is that the insulation covering the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason, the possibility of employing other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method were studied. The technique used in this studied are known as tangential technique. In this study it was found that the result found using tangential technique is consistent with the actual thickness of the pipe. Result of this study is presented and discussed in this paper. (Author)

  1. Stochastic process corrosion growth models for pipeline reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazán, Felipe Alexander Vargas; Beck, André Teófilo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Novel non-linear stochastic process corrosion growth model is proposed. •Corrosion rate modeled as random Poisson pulses. •Time to corrosion initiation and inherent time-variability properly represented. •Continuous corrosion growth histories obtained. •Model is shown to precisely fit actual corrosion data at two time points. -- Abstract: Linear random variable corrosion models are extensively employed in reliability analysis of pipelines. However, linear models grossly neglect well-known characteristics of the corrosion process. Herein, a non-linear model is proposed, where corrosion rate is represented as a Poisson square wave process. The resulting model represents inherent time-variability of corrosion growth, produces continuous growth and leads to mean growth at less-than-one power of time. Different corrosion models are adjusted to the same set of actual corrosion data for two inspections. The proposed non-linear random process corrosion growth model leads to the best fit to the data, while better representing problem physics

  2. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete, Part I – Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2006-01-01

    prematurely. Reinforcement corrosion is identified to be the foremost cause of deterioration. Steel in concrete is normally protected by a passive layer due the high alkalinity of the concrete pore solution; corrosion is initiated by neutralization through atmospheric carbon dioxide and by ingress...... of depassivation ions, especially chloride ions. The background and consequences of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures caused by steel corrosion are summarized. Selected corrosion mechanisms postulated in the literature are briefly discussed and related to observations. The key factors controlling...... initiation and propagation of corrosion of steel in concrete are outlined....

  3. Corrosion of copper alloys in sulphide containing district heting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Copper and some copper alloys are prone to corrosion in sulphide containing geothermal water analogous to corrosion observed in district heating systems containing sulphide due to sulphate reducing bacteria. In order to study the corrosion of copper alloys under practical conditions a test...... was carried out at four sites in the Reykjavik District Heating System. The geothermal water chemistry is different at each site. The corrosion rate and the amount and chemical composition of deposits on weight loss coupons of six different copper alloys are described after exposure of 12 and 18 months......, respectively. Some major differences in scaling composition and the degree of corrosion attack are observed between alloys and water types....

  4. Corrosion mechanism of copper in palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, M.A.; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of copper in biodiesel increases with the increase of immersion time. ► The corrosion patina is found to be composed of CuO, Cu 2 O, CuCO 3 and Cu(OH) 2 . ► Green CuCO 3 was found as the major corrosion product. ► The mechanisms governing corrosion of copper in palm biodiesel are discussed. - Abstract: Biodiesel is a promising alternative fuel. However, it causes enhanced corrosion of automotive materials, especially of copper based components. In the present study, corrosion mechanism of copper was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Compositional change of biodiesel due to the exposure of copper was also investigated. Corrosion patina on copper is found to be composed of Cu 2 O, CuO, Cu(OH) 2 and CuCO 3. Dissolved O 2 , H 2 O, CO 2 and RCOO − radical in biodiesel seem to be the leading factors in enhancing the corrosiveness of biodiesel.

  5. Corrosion products in power generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, D.H.

    1980-06-01

    The important mechanisms of corrosion and corrosion product movement and fouling in the heat transport systems of thermal electric generating stations are reviewed. Oil- and coal-fired boilers are considered, along with nuclear power systems - both direct and indirect cycle. Thus, the fireside and waterside in conventional plants, and the primary coolant and steam-raising circuits in water-cooled reactors, are discussed. Corrosion products in organic- and liquid-metal-cooled reactors also are shown to cause problems if not controlled, while their beneficial effects on the cooling water side of condensers are described. (auth)

  6. Psychosocial problems of children whose parents visit the emergency department due to intimate partner violence, substance abuse or a suicide attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoytema van Konijnenburg, E M M; van der Lee, J H; Teeuw, A H; Lindeboom, R; Brilleslijper-Kater, S N; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, T; van Goudoever, J B; Lindauer, R J L

    2017-05-01

    High levels of maltreatment are found in children who are identified because their parents visit the emergency department due to partner violence, substance abuse or suicide attempt. However, it is unknown if these children experience psychosocial problems. This study aims to assess their levels of post-traumatic stress, anxiety, depression, behavioural problems and health-related quality of life. A cross-sectional study was conducted in six hospitals. All consecutive families of which a parent visited the emergency department due to partner violence, substance abuse or suicide attempt between 1 July 2012 and 1 March 2014 with children aged 1.5-17 years were approached for participation. Parents and children aged 8 years and older filled out questionnaires measuring post-traumatic stress [13-item version of Children's Revised Impact of Event Scale (CRIES-13)], anxiety, depression (Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale), behavioural problems [Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Youth Self-Report (YSR)] and health-related quality of life (PedsQL). Scores of participants were compared with reference data obtained in children in similar age ranges from representative Dutch community samples (CRIES-13, Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale, PedsQL and CBCL) and to a normed cutoff score (CRIES-13). Of 195 eligible families, 89 (46%) participated in the study. Participating children did not score different from community children, both on child-reported and parent-reported instruments. Standardized mean differences of total sum scores were 0 (CRIES-13 and CBCL 1.5-5), 0.1 (YSR), 0.2 (CBCL 6-18) and -0.3 (PedsQL) and not statistically different from community children. Thirty-five percent of the participating children scored above the cutoff score on the CRIES-13, indicating post-traumatic stress disorder, but this difference was not statistically significant from community children (mean difference 8%; 95% CI -4-22%). We found no differences in psychosocial

  7. Predicting concrete corrosion of sewers using artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is often a major failure mechanism for concrete sewers and under such circumstances the sewer service life is largely determined by the progression of microbially induced concrete corrosion. The modelling of sewer processes has become possible due to the improved understanding of in-sewer transformation. Recent systematic studies about the correlation between the corrosion processes and sewer environment factors should be utilized to improve the prediction capability of service life by sewer models. This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN)-based approach for modelling the concrete corrosion processes in sewers. The approach included predicting the time for the corrosion to initiate and then predicting the corrosion rate after the initiation period. The ANN model was trained and validated with long-term (4.5 years) corrosion data obtained in laboratory corrosion chambers, and further verified with field measurements in real sewers across Australia. The trained model estimated the corrosion initiation time and corrosion rates very close to those measured in Australian sewers. The ANN model performed better than a multiple regression model also developed on the same dataset. Additionally, the ANN model can serve as a prediction framework for sewer service life, which can be progressively improved and expanded by including corrosion rates measured in different sewer conditions. Furthermore, the proposed methodology holds promise to facilitate the construction of analytical models associated with corrosion processes of concrete sewers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  9. Analysis of corrosion product transport in PWR primary system under non-convective condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub

    1992-02-01

    The increase of occupational radiation exposure (ORE) due to the increase of the operational period at existing nuclear power plant and also the publication of the new version of ICRP recommendation (ICRP publication No. 60) for radiological protection require much more strict reduction of radiation buildup in the nuclear power plant. The major sources of the radiation, i.e. the radioactive corrosion-products, are generated by the neutron activation of the corrosion products at the reactor core, and then the radioactive corrosion products are transported to the outside of the core, and accumulated near the steam generator side at PWR. Major radioactive corrosion-products of interest in PWR are Cr 51 ,: Mn 54 ,: Co 58 ,: Fe 59 and Co 60 . Among them Co 58 and Co 60 are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. Thus our main concerns are focused on predicting the transport and deposition of the Co radionuclides and suggesting the optimizing method which can minimize and control the ORE of the nuclear power plant. It is well known that Co-source is most effectively controlled by pH-solubility radiation control, and also some complex computer codes such as CORA and PACTOLE have been developed and revised to predict the corrosion product behavior. However these codes still imply some intrisic problems in simulating the real behavior of corrosion products in the reactor because of 1) the lack of important experimental data, coefficients and parameters of the transport and reactions under actual high temperature and pressure conditions, 2) no general theoretical modelling which can describe such many different mechanisms involved in the corrosion product movements, 3) the newly developed and measured behavior of the corrosion product transport mechanism. Since no sufficient and detailed information is available from the above-mentioned codes (also due to propriority problems), we concentrate on developing a new computer code, CP-TRAN (Corrosion

  10. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  11. Corrosion behaviour of boiler tube materials during combustion of fuels containing Zn and Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankiewicz, D.

    2012-11-01

    Many power plants burning challenging fuels such as waste-derived fuels experience failures of the superheaters and/or increased waterwall corrosion due to aggressive fuel components already at low temperatures. To minimize corrosion problems in waste-fired boilers, the steam temperature is currently kept at a relatively low level which drastically limits power production efficiency. The elements found in deposits of waste and waste-derived fuels burning boilers that are most frequently associated with high-temperature corrosion are: Cl, S, and there are also indications of Br; alkali metals, mainly K and Na, and heavy metals such as Pb and Zn. The low steam pressure and temperature in waste-fired boilers also influence the temperature of the waterwall steel which is nowadays kept in the range of 300 deg C - 400 deg C. Alkali chloride (KCl, NaCl) induced high-temperature corrosion has not been reported to be particularly relevant at such low material temperatures, but the presence of Zn and Pb compounds in the deposits have been found to induce corrosion already in the 300 deg C - 400 deg C temperature range. Upon combustion, Zn and Pb may react with Cl and S to form chlorides and sulphates in the flue gases. These specific heavy metal compounds are of special concern due to the formation of low melting salt mixtures. These low melting, gaseous or solid compounds are entrained in the flue gases and may stick or condense on colder surfaces of furnace walls and superheaters when passing the convective parts of the boiler, thereby forming an aggressive deposit. A deposit rich in heavy metal (Zn, Pb) chlorides and sulphates increases the risk for corrosion which can be additionally enhanced by the presence of a molten phase. The objective of this study was to obtain better insight into high-temperature corrosion induced by Zn and Pb and to estimate the behaviour and resistance of some boiler superheater and waterwall materials in environments rich in those heavy metals

  12. New approaches to the estimation of erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakirov, Murat; Ereemin, Alexandr; Levchuck, Vasiliy; Chubarov, Sergey

    2006-09-01

    erosion-corrosion in a double-phase flow is that of moving deaerated liquid in directly contact with metal as a barrier between the metal and main steam-drop flow. Local processes of mass transfer, corrosion properties and water-chemical parameters of this film define intensity of erosion-corrosion and features of its behavior. Erosion-corrosion of metal in a double-phase flow is determined by the gas-dynamics of double-phase flaws, water chemistry, thermodynamic, materials science, etc. The goal of the work: development of theoretical and methodological basis of physical, chemical and mathematical models, as well as the finding of technical solutions and method of diagnostics, forecast and control of the erosion-corrosion processes. It will allow the increase of reliability and safety operation of the power equipment of the secondary circuit in NPP with WWER by use of monitoring of erosion-corrosion wear of pipelines. One concludes by stressing that the described design-experimental approach for solving of FAC problem will enable to carry out the following works: - elaboration and certification of the procedure of design-experimental substantiation of zones, aims and periodicity of the NPP elements operational inspection; - development and certification of a new Regulatory Document of stress calculation for definition of the minimum acceptable wall thickness levels considering real wear shape, FAC rates and inaccuracy of devices for wall thickness measurements; - improving the current Regulatory Documents and correcting of the Typical programs of operational inspection - optimization of zones, aims and periodicity of the inspection; - elaboration of recommendations for operational lifetime prolongation of the WWER secondary circuits elements by means of increasing of erosion-corrosion resistance of the new equipment and of the equipment, exceeding the design lifetime; - improving of safe and uninterrupted work of the power unit due to prediction of the most damaged

  13. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement has been postulated as a cause of stress corrosion cracking in numerous alloy systems. Such an interrelationship is useful in design considerations because it permits the designer and working engineer to relate the literature from both fields to a potential environmental compatibility problem. The role of hydrogen in stress corrosion of high strength steels is described along with techniques for minimizing the susceptibility to hydrogen stress cracking. (U.S.)

  14. Corrosion of materials for heat exchangers and the countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    When the materials for heat exchangers are selected, the heat transfer performance, mechanical strength, workability, cost, corrosion resistance and so on are taken in consideration. Most of the failure of heat exchangers is due to corrosion, and the corrosion failure on cooling water side occurs frequently, to which attention is not paid much usually. The rate of occurrence of corrosion failure is overwhelmingly high in heating tubes, and the failure owing to cooling water exceeds that owing to process fluid. The material of heating tubes is mostly aluminum brass, and local failure such as pitting corrosion or stress corrosion cracking holds a majority. The cause of corrosion failure due to cooling water is mostly the poor water quality. The mechanism of corrosion of metals can be explained by the electrochemical reaction between the metals and solutions. As for the factors affecting corrosion, dissolved oxygen, pH, Cl - ions, temperature, flow velocity, and foreign matters are enumerated. Copper alloys are sensitive to the effect of polluted sea water. Erosion corrosion is caused by eddies and bubbles owing to high flow velocity, and impingement attack is caused by scratching foreign matters. The quality of fresh water affects corrosion more than sea water in case of copper alloys. The preliminary examination of water quality is essential. (Kako, I.)

  15. GCR dismantling: corrosion of vessel internals during decay storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    Gas-cooled reactor decommissioning confronts EDF with the problem of the corrosion resistance of vessel internals over a decay storage period fixed at 50 years. The layer of magnetite previously formed in the C0 2 should protect structural steelwork from atmospheric corrosion. In any case, estimated steel corrosion after 50 years may be put at below or equal to 0.1 mm and the corresponding swelling induced by corrosion products at 0.2 mm. There should be no risk of hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking of threaded fasteners. Corrosion tests aimed at providing further insight into the effects of the magnetite layer and a program for the surveillance of post-decommissioning structural corrosion should nevertheless be envisaged

  16. An overview of erosion corrosion models and reliability assessment for corrosion defects in piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srividya, A.; Suresh, H.N.; Verma, A.K.; Gopika, V.; Santosh

    2006-01-01

    Piping systems are part of passive structural elements in power plants. The analysis of the piping systems and their quantification in terms of failure probability is of utmost importance. The piping systems may fail due to various degradation mechanisms like thermal fatigue, erosion-corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and vibration fatigue. On examination of previous results, erosion corrosion was more prevalent and wall thinning is a time dependent phenomenon. The paper is intended to consolidate the work done by various investigators on erosion corrosion in estimating the erosion corrosion rate and reliability predictions. A comparison of various erosion corrosion models is made. The reliability predictions based on remaining strength of corroded pipelines by wall thinning is also attempted. Variables in the limit state functions are modelled using normal distributions and Reliability assessment is carried out using some of the existing failure pressure models. A steady state corrosion rate is assumed to estimate the corrosion defect and First Order Reliability Method (FORM) is used to find the probability of failure associated with corrosion defects over time using the software for Component Reliability evaluation (COMREL). (author)

  17. Corrosion of aluminium in soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seruga, M; Hasenay, D

    1996-04-01

    The corrosion of aluminium (Al) in several brands of soft drinks (cola- and citrate-based drinks) has been studied, using an electrochemical method, namely potentiodynamic polarization. The results show that the corrosion of Al in soft drinks is a very slow, time-dependent and complex process, strongly influenced by the passivation, complexation and adsorption processes. The corrosion of Al in these drinks occurs principally due to the presence of acids: citric acid in citrate-based drinks and orthophosphoric acid in cola-based drinks. The corrosion rate of Al rose with an increase in the acidity of soft drinks, i.e. with increase of the content of total acids. The corrosion rates are much higher in the cola-based drinks than those in citrate-based drinks, due to the facts that: (1) orthophosphoric acid is more corrosive to Al than is citric acid, (2) a quite different passive oxide layer (with different properties) is formed on Al, depending on whether the drink is cola or citrate based. The method of potentiodynamic polarization was shown as being very suitable for the study of corrosion of Al in soft drinks, especially if it is combined with some non-electrochemical method, e.g. graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).

  18. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  19. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  20. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  1. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3-2 and NO-3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10-4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  2. Case histories of microbial induced corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birketveit, Oe.; Liengen, T.

    2006-03-15

    Recent years bacterial activity has caused process problems and corrosion on several of Hydro s installations in the North Sea. The process problems are related to iron sulphide formed in process equipment and increased oil in discharge water. The corrosion problem is seen in downstream pipelines made of carbon steel, where deposits and formation of biofilm cause the corrosion inhibitor to be ineffective. In most cases the bacteria reproduce in the topside system and especially in the reclaimed oil sump tank. The problems observed, related to bacterial activity, are often a result of how the content from the reclaimed oil sump tank is re-circulated to the process system. Process modifications, changes in biocide treatment strategy, sulphide measurements, cleaning strategy and bio monitoring are presented. (author) (tk)

  3. Erosion--corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, B.

    1978-01-01

    The deterioration of materials by corrosion or erosion by itself presents a formidable problem and for this reason investigators have studied these two phenomena independently. In fact, there are very few systematic studies on E-C and the majority of references mention it only in passing. In most real systems, however, the two destructive processes take place simultaneously, hence the purpose of this review is to present the various interactions between the chemical and mechanical agents leading to accelerated degradation of the material. The papers cited in the review are those that lead to a better understanding of the process involved in the accelerated rate of material loss under E-C conditions

  4. Electrochemical Corrosion Investigations on Anaerobic Treated Distillery Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    Present study is focused on the corrosivity of anaerobic treated distillery effluent and corrosion performance of mild steel and stainless steels. Accordingly, electrochemical polarization tests were performed in both treated distillery and synthetic effluents. Polarization tests were also performed in synthetic solutions and it was observed that Cl- and K+ increase whereas SO4 -, PO4 -, NO3 -, and NO2 - decrease the corrosivity of effluent at alkaline pH. Further, comparison in corrosivity of distillery and synthetic effluents shows the former to be less corrosive and this is assigned due to the presence of amino acids and melanoidins. Mild steel experienced to have the highest corrosion rate followed by stainless steels—304L and 316L and lowest in case of SAF 2205. Relative corrosion resistance of stainless steels is observed to depend upon Cr, Mo, and N content.

  5. Corrosion initiation and propagation in cracked concrete - a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Polder, R.

    2012-01-01

    The major degradation mechanism in civil engineering concrete structures is corrosion of reinforcement due to chloride penetration. Corrosion reduces serviceability and safety due to cracking and spalling of concrete and loss of steel cross section. Recently, service life design has moved from

  6. Effects of Variations in Salt-Spray Conditions on the Corrosion Mechanisms of an AE44 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of how corrosion affects magnesium alloys is of utmost importance as the automotive and aerospace industries have become interested in the use of these lightweight alloys. However, the standardized salt-spray test does not produce adequate corrosion results when compared with field data, due to the lack of multiple exposure environments. This research explored four test combinations through three sets of cycles to determine how the corrosion mechanisms of pitting, intergranular corrosion, and general corrosion were affected by the environment. Of the four test combinations, Humidity-Drying was the least corrosive, while the most corrosive test condition was Salt Spray-Humidity-Drying. The differences in corrosivity of the test conditions are due to the various reactions needed to cause corrosion, including the presence of chloride ions to cause pit nucleation, the presence of humidity to cause galvanic corrosion, and the drying phase which trapped chloride ions beneath the corrosion by-products.

  7. Betaine-based heat transfer fluids as a natural solution for environmental, toxic and corrosion problems in heating and cooling systems; Betaine gebaseerde koudedragers als natuurlijke oplossing voor milieu-, toxiciteit- en corrosieproblemen in verwarming- en koelsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokinen, J. [Fortum Oil and Gas Oy, Porvoo (Finland); Willems, B.P.M. [Marketing and Technology Consult, Rijen (Netherlands)

    2005-02-01

    The reason for the study on the title subject was the environmental risk and toxicity of many conventional heat transfer fluids like glycols. Fluid toxicity and environmental risk in building systems and industrial use is becoming less acceptable. Alternative fluids have been sought from among salt solutions and vegetable oils. Still, those alternative materials are not very attractive. Main technical problems have been high viscosity and corrosion. A new possible alternative, a betaine-water solution was tested and developed for heat transfer purposes. Betaine (trimethyl glycine) is a by-product of the sugar industry. Therefore, betaine is completely non-toxic and also not harmful to the environment. Betaine is a renowned substance in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, food and medical industry. Adequate freezing protection is achieved with betaine concentration of 20-55% by weight. This solution was found to have other good qualities also; it has good heat transfer abilities, is not harmful to materials used in systems and has natural corrosion protection properties. The development work consisted of carefully measuring freeze protection and pipe burst protection with different betaine concentrations, measuring physical properties in the same circumstances and developing the additive package for enhanced corrosion protection. Field-testing was carried out for four years. Testing showed that a betaine-water solution has good thermodynamic properties to be used as a heat transfer fluid in the HVAC industry, with additional environmental-, non-toxic and corrosion properties. The concrete result was a trademark and patent protected new product for the industry. [Dutch] Warmteoverdracht wordt heden ten dage veelvuldig toegepast in zowel de industrie als in kantoren en gebouwen. Hoewel de warmteoverdrachttechnologie enorm is vooruitgegaan worden het potentieel en de voordelen van een zorgvuldig gekozen koudedrager vaak over het hoofd gezien. De selectie van de juiste

  8. Cases of corrosion in power plant components at NTPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Bhakta, U.C.; Sinha, Ashwini

    2000-01-01

    Power plants are one of the major industries suffering from severe corrosion problems resulting in substantial losses. The problem is becoming more prominent as the plants are getting older. NTPC as the leading power utility with very good performance track record, had been conscious of the menace of corrosion prevailing in the industry and had established a Research and Development Centre to cater to applied O and M needs of the plants. A specialized group has been involved in studying the corrosion related problems and recommending suitable cost effective solutions to such problems. The present paper aims at discussing various corrosion related analysis carried out at the Research and Development Centre of NTPC and the remedial measures suggested. The paper also describes some of the case studies of corrosion related failures with recommendations given for preventing such failures in future. (author)

  9. Effect of aluminum coatings on corrosion properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu Liuho; Lin Hsingan; Chen Chunchin; Yang Chihfu [Dept. of materials engineering, Tatung Univ., Taipei (Taiwan); Chang Chiahua; Wu Jenchin [Physical chemistry section, chemical systems research div., Chung-Shan Inst. of Science and Technology, Tao-Yuan (Taiwan)

    2003-07-01

    This investigation aimed to increase the corrosion resistance of an AZ31 magnesium alloy by an aluminum arc spray coating and a post-treatment consisted of hot pressing and anodizing. It was found that the aluminum arc spraying alone was incapable of protection against corrosion due to the high amount of pores present in the coating layer. In order to solve the problem, densification of the Al arc-sprayed layer was carried out by hot pressing the coated AZ31 Mg alloy plate under an appropriate range of temperature, time and pressure. After hot pressing the Al coated AZ31 Mg alloy plate exhibited a much improved corrosion resistance. A final anodizing treatment applied to the AZ31 alloy with the dense Al coating further improved its resisting to corrosion. The results showed that, by adopting the Al arc spraying, hot pressing and anodizing process, the corrosion current density of the AZ31 alloy in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution was from 2.1 x 10{sup -6} A/cm{sup 2} (original AZ31) to 3.7 x 10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} (after the surface treatment), which value is close to that of an anodized aluminum plate. (orig.)

  10. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  11. Corrosion of carbon steel under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in the United Kingdom under granitic groundwater conditions, with pH between 5 and 10 and possibly substantial amounts of Cl - , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- . Corrosion modes considered include uniform corrosion under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions; passive corrosion; localized attack in the form of pitting or crevice corrosion; and environmentally assisted cracking - hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking. Studies of these processes are being carried out in order to predict the metal thicknesses required to give container lifetimes of 500 to 1000 years. A simple uniform corrosion model predicts a corrosion rate of around 13.4 μm/a at 20C, rising to 69 μm/a at 50C and 208 μm/a at 90C. A radiation dose of 10 5 rad/h and a G-value of 2.8 for the production of oxidizing species would account for an increase in corrosion rate of 7 μm/a. This model overestimates slightly the results actually achieved for experimental samples exposed for two years, the difference being due to a protective film formed on the samples. These corrosion rates predict that the container must be 227 mm thick to withstand uniform corrosion; however, they predict very high levels of hydrogen production. Conditions will be favourable for localized or pitting corrosion for about 125 years, leading to a maximum penetration of 160 mm. Since the exposure environment cannot be predicted precisely, one cannot state that stress corrosion cracking is impossible. Thus the container must be stress relieved. Other corrosion mechanisms such as microbial corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are not considered significant

  12. Corrosion of silicon-containing austenitic stainless steels under trans-passive conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolarz, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    This research thesis addresses austenitic stainless steels which are used in installations for the chemical treatment of nuclear fuels, and are there in contact with nitric acid solutions the oxidising character of which generally promotes metal passivity. However, if this nitric environment becomes too oxidising, these steels may face severe corrosion problems. More particularly, this thesis addresses the study of intergranular corrosion, and aims at analysing various aspects of the corrosion of these austenitic stainless steels in trans-passive conditions. The author aims at determining and distinguishing the contributions due to silicon and those related to the presence of other impurities and addition elements by comparing the behaviours of industrial grade steels and high purity alloys in rigorously controlled electrochemical conditions. Another objective is to study the influence of the intergranular structure on silicon segregation by means of an attack technique in trans-passive conditions. After a report of a bibliographical study on the addressed topics and a presentation of the studied materials and implemented experimental techniques, the author reports the study of steel behaviour with respect to generalised dissolution in trans-passive conditions, as well in the nitric environment as in a sulphuric acid solution at imposed potential. Localised intragranular corrosion phenomena are discussed. A trans-passive intragranular corrosion model is proposed, and its possibilities in the analysis of intergranular segregation analysis are discussed. Experimental results of trans-passive intergranular corrosion of stainless steels are presented and interpreted by using the McLean segregation model. The influence of steel composition and of experimental conditions is discussed, as well as the role of grain boundary structure in the corrosion process [fr

  13. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  14. Corrosion induced failure analysis of subsea pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Khan, Faisal; Thodi, Premkumar; Abbassi, Rouzbeh

    2017-01-01

    Pipeline corrosion is one of the main causes of subsea pipeline failure. It is necessary to monitor and analyze pipeline condition to effectively predict likely failure. This paper presents an approach to analyze the observed abnormal events to assess the condition of subsea pipelines. First, it focuses on establishing a systematic corrosion failure model by Bow-Tie (BT) analysis, and subsequently the BT model is mapped into a Bayesian Network (BN) model. The BN model facilitates the modelling of interdependency of identified corrosion causes, as well as the updating of failure probabilities depending on the arrival of new information. Furthermore, an Object-Oriented Bayesian Network (OOBN) has been developed to better structure the network and to provide an efficient updating algorithm. Based on this OOBN model, probability updating and probability adaptation are performed at regular intervals to estimate the failure probabilities due to corrosion and potential consequences. This results in an interval-based condition assessment of subsea pipeline subjected to corrosion. The estimated failure probabilities would help prioritize action to prevent and control failures. Practical application of the developed model is demonstrated using a case study. - Highlights: • A Bow-Tie (BT) based corrosion failure model linking causation with the potential losses. • A novel Object-Oriented Bayesian Network (OOBN) based corrosion failure risk model. • Probability of failure updating and adaptation with respect to time using OOBN model. • Application of the proposed model to develop and test strategies to minimize failure risk.

  15. Prediction of corrosion rates of water distribution pipelines according to aggressive corrosive water in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, W S; Yu, M J; Lee, H D

    2004-01-01

    The drinking water network serving Korea has been used for almost 100 years. Therefore, pipelines have suffered various degrees of deterioration due to aggressive environments. The pipe breaks were caused by in-external corrosion, water hammer, surface loading, etc. In this paper, we focused on describing corrosion status in water distribution pipes in Korea and reviewing some methods to predict corrosion rates. Results indicate that corrosive water of lakes was more aggressive than river water and the winter was more aggressive compared to other seasons. The roughness growth rates of Dongbok lake showed 0.23 mm/year. The high variation of corrosion rates is controlled by the aging pipes and smaller diameter. Also the phenolphthalein test on a cementitious core of cement mortar lined ductile cast iron pipe indicated the pipes over 15 years old had lost 50-100% of their lime active cross sectional area.

  16. Corrosion and deposit evaluation in industrial plants by non destructive testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad; Abd Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohd Pauzi Ismail; S Saad; S Sayuti; S Ahmad

    2000-01-01

    In petrochemical plants, the detection of corrosion and evaluation of deposit in insulated pipes using a radiography method are very challenging tasks. This main degradation problem experienced by pipelines is due to water condensation. It will cause deposit and scale inside the pipe, as well as between the insulation and pipe for the cold temperature pipes. On the other hand, for the hot temperature pipes the main problem is mainly due to corrosion/erosion attack inside the pipe. In the case of corrosion study one of the most important parameters in a piping or pipeline to be monitored and measured is that the wall thickness. In general, most pipeline corrosion monitoring and evaluation for both insulated and non-insulated pipes is done by using an ultrasonic method. The most common technique for corrosion is that based on the A-Scan, using either a normal flow detector or some form of dedicated equipment. However, with recent development of ultrasonic technology, more advance method, namely B-Scan and C-scan techniques are also available. The most notable disadvantage of using this current method is that the insulation covered the pipe has to be removed before the inspection can be carried out and this is considered as not so cost effective. Due to this reason other alternative NDT method, namely radiographic testing method has been studied. The testing technique used in this studied are tangential technique and double wall radiographic technique which involve studying the changing in density of radiographic film. The result found using tangential technique is consistent with real thickness of the pipe. However for the later technique the result is only achieved with a reasonable accuracy when the changing in wall thickness is very small. The result of the studies is discussed in this paper

  17. Corrosion principles and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter examines the important strategies provided by the newer ideas of corrosion science and engineering that surface modification techniques must utilize to help prevent corrosion, especially the most damaging kind of aqueous corrosion, localized corrosion. Provides a brief introduction to the principles underlying the phenomenon of corrosion in order to use them to discuss surface modification strategies to combat corrosion. Discusses the electrochemistry of corrosion; the thermodynamics of corrosion; the kinetics of corrosion; thermodynamic strategies; and kinetic strategies (formation of more protective passive films; resistance to breakdown; ductility; repassivation)

  18. Corrosion on air preheaters and economisers; Korrosion hos luftfoervaermare och ekonomisrar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus

    2012-05-15

    Combustion plants in Sweden are exposed to considerable stress regarding low temperature corrosion, and failures due to low temperature corrosion occur regularly. Particularly common is corrosion problems connected to air preheaters and economisers. The number of combustion plants having air preheaters and economisers is however large, and the result of a collection of experiences regarding corrosion on air preheaters and economisers therefore has the potential to give a broad knowledge base. The summary of collection of experiences that has been done here, complemented with a literature survey, is expected to give plant owners and plant constructors a valuable tool to prevent corrosion on the flue gas side of air preheaters and economisers. The choice of plants for the inquiry was made using a list from the Swedish Naturvaardsverket (Environmental Protection Agency) indicating the emissions of NO{sub x}gases from Swedish combustion plants. From that list mainly the plants with the largest emissions were chosen, resulting in a number of 30 plants. Depending on that most of the plants have several boilers, and that the connected tubes often have several economisers and air preheaters, the number of economisers and air preheaters in this experience collection is at least 85. The study was however not limited to economisers and air preheaters, but also experiences connected to corrosion of other units were collected when mentioned, and the most interesting information here is also included in the report. Also a number of the plants were visited to improve the basis of the report, e.g. by photographing the most interesting parts. As the insight of the extension of the problem increased, renewed interview rounds were made, and the last one was made in August 2011.

  19. The effects of corrosion conditions and cold work on the nodular corrosion of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung

    1992-02-01

    The nodular corrosion of Zircaloy-4 was investigated on the effects of corrosion conditions and cold work. Variation of steam pressures, heat-up environments and prefilms were considered and cold work effects were also studied. The corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 was dependent on pressure between 1 and 100 atm and it followed the cubic law as W=16.85 x P 0.31 for plate specimens and W=12.69 x P 0.27 for tube specimens, where W is weight gain (mg/dm 2 ) and P is the steam pressure (atm). The environment variation in autoclave during heat-up period did not affect the early stage of nodular corrosion. The prefilm, which was formed at 500 .deg. C under 1 atm steam for 4 hours, restrained the formation of the initial small nodules. The oxide film formed under 1 atm steam showed no difference of electrical resistivity from the oxides formed under 100 atm steam pressure. Cold work specimens showed the higher resistivity against nodular corrosion than as-received specimens. The corrosion resistance arising from cold work seems to be due to the texture changes by the cold work. The results showed that cold work can affect the later stage of uniform corrosion and the early stage of nodular corrosion, namely, the nodule initiation stage

  20. Development of an equipment for the detection and measurement of localized corrosion of carbon steel induced by sulfidogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotiche, C. [CFG Services, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin, BP 6429, 45064 Orleans Cedex (France); Dauma, S. [CFG Services, 117 avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2004-07-01

    Most of the geothermal installations exploiting the Dogger aquifer of the Paris basin are faced to corrosion and scaling problems. Localized corrosion phenomena due to the presence of sulfate reducing bacteria which have been identified in the geothermal water and in scales deposited on corrosion coupons is the most insidious being able to induce rapid failures of the casings of production and injection wells and surface pipelines. In order to evaluate and prevent the occurrence of such corrosion risks that are similar to those encountered in oil and gas industry, a specific equipment has been developed by CFG Services, engineering company specialized in the exploitation and maintenance of geothermal plants. This equipment which includes a probe and an electronic device has to be installed on the pipeline transporting the corrosive medium through a nipple secured to it. The principle is based on the generation of a pit on a circular electrode in carbon steel by anodic polarization and on the measurement of the corrosion current between this electrode and the pipeline or the probe body used as cathodic pole. Then, the current freely flowing between the anode and cathode is monitored and used to estimate if the pitting corrosion artificially created by an electric pulse may be maintained or not by the activity of sulfidogenic bacteria which may have developed on the surface of the electrode. This equipment has been tested on a geothermal exploitation where the risk of microbial corrosion has been identified and the sensibility of the signal of the probe to the injection of biocide products proved. (authors)

  1. Fatigue strength degradation of metals in corrosive environments

    OpenAIRE

    Adasooriya, Mudiyan Nirosha Damayanthi; Hemmingsen, Tor; Pavlou, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Structures exposed to aggressive environmental conditions are often subjected to time-dependent loss of coating and loss of material due to corrosion; this causes reduction in the cross-sectional properties of the members, increased surface roughness, surface irregularities and corrosion pits, and degradation of material strengths. These effects have been identified and simulated in different research studies. However, time and corrosive media dependent fatigue strength curves for materials h...

  2. Faltas ao trabalho por problemas de saúde na indústria Work days lost due to health problems in industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Regina Trindade Yano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo transversal, estima-se a prevalência de episódios de faltas ao trabalho por motivo de saúde (FTS, e fatores associados, focalizando o trabalho na indústria. A população do estudo foi uma amostra aleatória por conglomerado de 3.403 trabalhadores de 16 a 65 anos residentes em Salvador, Bahia, Brasil. Dados foram obtidos em entrevistas domiciliares. Entre os trabalhadores da indústria, a prevalência em um ano de FTS em geral, foi 12,5%, 5,5% para FTS relacionados ao trabalho, e 4,1% para FTS agravados pelo trabalho. Não houve diferenças estatisticamente significantes em relação aos demais trabalhadores. Fatores associados à FTS foram percepção de perigo no trabalho, história de acidente de trabalho, e saúde autopercebida como ruim. Os resultados indicam que a ocorrência de faltas ao trabalho é comum, tanto na indústria como nos demais ramos de atividade, podem afetar a produtividade, o que requer programas de prevenção de agentes de risco em locais de trabalho.This cross-sectional study estimated the prevalence of work days lost due to health problems and associated factors among industrial workers. The study population was a simple random cluster sample of 3,403 workers from 16 to 65 years of age in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Data were collected with individual home interviews. Among industrial workers, one-year prevalence of work days lost to health problems was 12.5%, of which 5.5% were directly work-related and 4.1% aggravated by work. There were no statistically significant differences when compared to other worker categories. Self-perceived workplace hazards, history of work-related injury, and poor self-rated health were associated with work days lost due to work-related injuries/diseases. The findings showed that work days lost are common among both industrial and non-industrial workers, thereby affecting productivity and requiring prevention programs.

  3. Device of capturing for radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Atsushi; Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the area of contact between the capturing materials for the radioactive corrosion products contained in the coolants and the coolants by producing stirred turbulent flows in the coolant flow channel of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: Constituent materials for the nuclear fuel elements or the reactor core structures are activated under the neutron irradiation, corroded and transferred into the coolants. While capturing devices made of pure metal nickel are used for the elimination of the corrosion products, since the coolants form laminar flows due to the viscosity thereof near the surface of the capturing materials, the probability that the corrosion products in the coolants flowing through the middle portion of the channel contact the capturing materials is reduced. In this invention, rotating rolls and flow channels in which the balls are rotated are disposed at the upstream of the capturing device to forcively disturb the flow of the liquid sodium, whereby the radioactive corrosion products can effectively be captured. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Polarized Neutron Reflectometry of Nickel Corrosion Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mary H; Welbourn, Rebecca J L; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Gutfreund, Philipp; Clarke, Stuart M

    2015-06-30

    Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to investigate the detailed adsorption behavior and corrosion inhibition mechanism of two surfactants on a nickel surface under acidic conditions. Both the corrosion of the nickel surface and the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer could be monitored in situ by the use of different solvent contrasts. Layer thicknesses and roughnesses were evaluated over a range of pH values, showing distinctly the superior corrosion inhibition of one negatively charged surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) compared to a positively charged example (dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide) due to its stronger binding interaction with the surface. It was found that adequate corrosion inhibition occurs at significantly less than full surface coverage.

  5. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques......Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  6. SRB seawater corrosion project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  7. Balance Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often, it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems can make you feel unsteady. You may ... related injuries, such as a hip fracture. Some balance problems are due to problems in the inner ...

  8. A compilation of experiences of corrosion in Nordic nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norring, K.; Rosborg, B.

    1985-01-01

    14 reactors in commercial operation in the Nordic countries exhibit a great variety of corrosion induced damages. The largest number of such damages have affected turbine plants and seawater cooling systems. More severe cases of corrosion which have been experienced are intergranular stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing, stainless steel piping, and high strenght bolts and screws, together with erosion corrosion of structural steel in turbine plants. In all units in operation some form of corrosion damage has occurred. In a worldwide perspective the corrosion problems in the Nordic nuclear power plants have been of manageable extent

  9. Metallic Corrosion. Vol. 1, 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The three volumes of the Congress Proceedings form the basis for the discussion of the prevailing problems in all areas of applied and basic research and their application in evera-day life and industry. The sequence of the contents of the three volumes corresponds to the scientific and technical Congress topics. Volume I contains basic and applied research on corrosion processes, testing and prevention Volume II starts with corrosion protection techniques, covers solutions to problems in specific industrial fields, and collects papers on economics, education, information and R and D programmes. Volume III contains all plenary lectures held on various topics. (orig.)

  10. Corrosion by liquid metals - Application to liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavielle, Lisette.

    1978-10-01

    In this bibliographic review on the corrosion by liquid metals, the first part is devoted to the theoretical aspects of the problem and the second part concerns the corrosion of steels by liquid sodium, as example. Obvious the numerous works now published, the mechanisms are still leaving bad known [fr

  11. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seabed sediment (SBS) is a special soil that is covered by seawater. With the developments in marine oil exploitation and engineering, more and more steel structures have been buried in SBS. SBS corrosion has now become a serious problem in marine environment and an important issue in corrosion science. In this ...

  12. Experimental application of design principles in corrosion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyrl, W.H.; Pohlman, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental design criteria for corrosion investigations are based on established principles for systems that have uniform, or nearly uniform, corrosive attack. Scale-up or scale-down may be accomplished by proper use of dimensionless groups that measure the relative importance of interfacial kinetics, solution conductivity, and mass transfer. These principles have been applied to different fields of corrosion which include materials selection testing and protection; and to a specific corrosion problem involving attack of a substrate through holes in a protective overplate

  13. Modelación con elementos finitos del agrietamiento en el hormigón por corrosión localizada en la armadura Finite element modeling of cracking in concrete due to localized corrosion in the reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Castorena

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available En base a estudios con elemento finito, en el presente trabajo se obtiene un modelo capaz de predecir la cantidad de acero corroído (rcrit en la armadura necesaria para que aparezca la primera grieta visible en la superficie del recubrimiento del hormigón. Para el análisis con elemento finito se utiliza el software ANSYS, el cual dispone del elemento SOLID65, con el que es posible modelar el hormigón simple, ya que tiene la capacidad de sufrir aplastamiento en compresión y agrietarse a tracción. El caso de la capa de óxido es modelado mediante elementos de contacto CONTA174, y la armadura con SOLID65, pero sin las opciones de aplastamiento y agrietamiento. El modelo obtenido está en función del recubrimiento libre, diámetro del refuerzo, tipo de hormigón y la longitud corroída, denominada ésta longitud anódica. Los resultados muestran la gran influencia que tiene la corrosión localizada (longitud anódica pequeña-longitud catódica grande sobre el cálculo de rcrit, y que dicho efecto sólo es posible analizarlo de manera tridimensional. Así mismo, se muestra la eficiencia de utilizar los elementos de contacto CONTA174 para representar el crecimiento de óxidos. El modelo obtenido explica en un 92% el fenómeno y se compara con resultados experimentales encontrados en la literaturaBased on studies with finite element method, a model able to predict the quantity of steel corrosion (rcrit necessary for the first visible crack appearance in the surface of the concrete cover was obtained. For the finite element analysis the software ANSYS was used, which has the element SOLID65, with which is possible to model plain concrete, since has the capacity to show crushing in compression and to cracking in tension. The case of the oxide layer is modeled by means of contact elements CONTA174 and the steel with SOLID65, but without the crushing and cracking options. The obtained model is in function of the free cover, diameter of the

  14. KTA 625 alloy tube with excellent corrosion resistance and heat resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Kadonaga, Toshiki; Kikuma, Seiji.

    1982-01-01

    The problems when seamless tubes are produced by using nickel base 625 alloy (61Ni-22Cr-9Mo-Cb) which is known as a corrosion resistant and heat resistant alloyF were examined, and the confirmation experiment was carried out on its corrosion resistance and heat resistance. Various difficulties have been experienced in the tube making owing to the characteristics due to the chemical composition, but they were able to be solved by the repeated experiments. As for the characteristics of the product, the corrosion resistance was excellent particularly in the environment containing high temperature, high concentration chloride, and also the heat resistance was excellent in the wide temperature range from normal temperature to 1000 deg C. From these facts, the wide fields of application are expected for these alloy tubes, including the evaporation and concentration equipment for radioactive wastes in atomic energy field. Expecting the increase of demand hereafter, Kobe Steel Ltd. examined the problems when seamless tubes are produced from the 625 alloy by Ugine Sejournet process. The aptitude for tube production such as the chemical composition, production process and the product characteristics, the corrosion resistance against chloride, hydrogen sulfide, polythionic and other acids,F the high temperature strength and oxidation resistance are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Corrosion control. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to train engineers and technologists not just to understand corrosion but to control it. Materials selection, coatings, chemical inhibitors, cathodic and anodic protection, and equipment design are covered in separate chapters. High-temperature oxidation is discussed in the final two chapters ne on oxidation theory and one on controlling oxidation by alloying and with coatings. This book treats corrosion and high-temperature oxidation separately. Corrosion is divided into three groups: (1) chemical dissolution including uniform attack, (2) electrochemical corrosion from either metallurgical or environmental cells, and (3) stress-assisted corrosion. Corrosion is logically grouped according to mechanisms rather than arbitrarily separated into different types of corrosion as if they were unrelated. For those university students and industry personnel who approach corrosion theory very hesitantly, this text will present the electrochemical reactions responsible for corrosion summed up in only five simple half-cell reactions. When these are combined on a polarization diagram, which is also explained in detail, the electrochemical processes become obvious. For those who want a text stripped bare of electrochemical theory, several noted sections can be omitted without loss of continuity. However, the author has presented the material in such a manner that these sections are not beyond the abilities of any high school graduate who is interested in technology

  16. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  17. Radiation-induced corrosion of stellite-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behazin, M.; Wren, J.C.

    2012-09-01

    Co (OH) 2 , the increase in the corrosion potential due to irradiation does not result in an increase in the rate of cobalt dissolution from the Stellite. The oxide film that grows with irradiation present is uniform. SEM and XPS analyses of this oxide film indicate that there is no preferential oxidation or dissolution occurring on either the cobalt-rich phase or the chromium-rich phase of the alloy. (authors)

  18. Mechanistic understanding of irradiation corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants: stimuli, status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.; Ishigure, K.; Johnson, A.B.; Lemalgnan, J.C.; Nechaev, A.F.; Petrik, N.G.; Reznichenko, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive information about the corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys under irradiation is presented. Review of the existing models of radiation corrosion is given. An accent is made on a necessity in conducting basic investigations to overcome contradictions in interpreting the experimental data available. Importance of solving the problem of zirconium alloy corrosion for safe NPP operation is underlined. 34 refs.; 6 figs.; 4 tabs

  19. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigates the inhibition of corrosive behavior of SAE1010 steel by bacterial exopolysaccharides. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of diffe...

  20. Ultrafast lasers for precise and corrosion free marking on chirurgical steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Christoph; Aalderink, Dennis; Maurer, Erich; Faisst, Birgit; Budnicki, Aleksander

    2017-02-01

    The unique properties of ultrashort laser pulses and the decrease of invest pave the way to numerous novel applications. Even in the very price sensitive field of laser marking, ultrashort laser can compete due to a new cost structure and remarkable properties of the marking results. In this study we concentrated on industrial marking of medical equipment by using IR ultrashort lasers and compared the results with common marking laser systems. We demonstrate the benefits of ultrashort lasers marking on chirurgical devices, observing the influence of pulse energy, pulse duration, scanning velocity in respect to the visibility, corrosion resistance and long term durability under clinical conditions. Nowadays many parts and products are marked for the purpose of identification and traceability. One kind of laser marking is the well known annealing of stainless steel by nanosecond marking lasers. When annealing occurs a colored oxide layer grows due to the local heating of the material surface. Compared to the raw material, the annealed marking shows increased corrosion sensitivity. Regarding the traceability, the poor durability of the ns marking resulting in contrast reduction and the corrosion susceptibility are a huge problem. Therefore three different laser sources with ns-psfs pulse duration were observed. The focus rests on the realization of parameter studies (various lasers) and their effect on the corrosion and passivation behavior. Furthermore analysis of the oxide layers by use of EDX and XRD were performed to obtain further information on the composition and structure of the markings.

  1. Corrosion of aluminum components and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, S.T.; Khalique, A.; Malik, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum has versatile physical properties, mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, and is used in special applications like aerospace, automobiles and other strategic industries. The outdoor exposed structural components of aluminum have very good corrosion resistance due to the thick oxide layer (0.2 -0.4 micro). This study involves the corrosion of aluminum based components, though aluminum is protected by an oxide layer but due to extreme weather and environmental conditions the oxide layer was damaged. The corroded product was removed, pits or cavities formed due to the material removal were filled with epoxy resins and acrylic-based compounds containing fibreglass as reinforcement. Optimum results were obtained with epoxy resins incorporated with 5% glass fibers. The inner surface of the components was provided further protection with a cellulose nitrate compound. (author)

  2. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); Edwards, R [Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States); Hayman, A [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France); Hill, D [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); Mehta, S [Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom); Semerad, T [Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia)

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  3. Corrosion in ICPP fuel storage basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirk, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant currently stores irradiated nuclear fuel in fuel storage basins. Historically, fuel has been stored for over 30 years. During the 1970's, an algae problem occurred which required higher levels of chemical treatment of the basin water to maintain visibility for fuel storage operations. This treatment led to higher levels of chlorides than seen previously which cause increased corrosion of aluminum and carbon steel, but has had little effect on the stainless steel in the basin. Corrosion measurements of select aluminum fuel storage cans, aluminum fuel storage buckets, and operational support equipment have been completed. Aluminum has exhibited good general corrosion rates, but has shown accelerated preferential attack in the form of pitting. Hot dipped zinc coated carbon steel, which has been in the basin for approximately 40 years, has shown a general corrosion rate of 4 mpy, and there is evidence of large shallow pits on the surface. A welded Type 304 stainless steel corrosion coupon has shown no attack after 13 years exposure. Galvanic couples between carbon steel welded to Type 304 stainless steel occur in fuel storage yokes exposed to the basin water. These welded couples have shown galvanic attack as well as hot weld cracking and intergranular cracking. The intergranular stress corrosion cracking is attributed to crevices formed during fabrication which allowed chlorides to concentrate

  4. Effect of chlorides on the corrosion behaviour of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kazuyuki; Shimada, Minoru

    1980-01-01

    In PWR's steam generators, ''denting'' resulted from corrosion of support plate material, carbon steel is an important problem. The role of chlorides in corrosion acceleration of mild steel was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted at temperature from 100 0 C to 280 0 C in deaerated solutions of NaCl and MgCl 2 which are main content of sea water. 1) Solution of MgCl 2 was more corrosive than that of NaCl. The more increased in concentration of each chloride solution, the more corrosive in MgCl 2 soln. but the less corrosive in NaCl soln. 2) The rate of corrosion in the mixed solution of NaCl and MgCl 2 was governed by the concentration of MgCl 2 soln. The corrosion behaviour in sea water was suggested to be not controlled by NaCl but by MgCl 2 . 3) Acidification of MgCl 2 soln. could be evaluated by experiment at 100 0 C, the degree of acidification increased with increasing the concentration. However, the value of pH during corrosion was kept constant by the concentration of dissolved Fe 2+ ions. 4) The corrosion acceleration by MgCl 2 soln. was arised not only from acidification by the solution itself but from continuous supplementation of H + ions with the hydrolysis of dissolved Fe 2+ ions. This autocatalytic corrosion process not exhausting acid was characterized with the corrosion in closed system such as in crevice. In addition to acidification of MgCl 2 soln., the formation of non-protective magnetite film by Mg 2+ ion was estimated to be a reason of accelerated corrosion. (author)

  5. Days out-of-role due to common physical and mental health problems: Results from the Sao Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Helena Andrade

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relative importance of common physical and mental disorders with regard to the number of days out-of-role (DOR; number of days for which a person is completely unable to work or carry out normal activities because of health problems in a population-based sample of adults in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area, Brazil. METHODS: The São Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey was administered during face-to-face interviews with 2,942 adult household residents. The presence of 8 chronic physical disorders and 3 classes of mental disorders (mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders was assessed for the previous year along with the number of days in the previous month for which each respondent was completely unable to work or carry out normal daily activities due to health problems. Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the associations of the disorders and their comorbidities with the number of days out-of-role while controlling for socio-demographic variables. Both individual-level and population-level associations were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 13.1% of the respondents reported 1 or more days out-of-role in the previous month, with an annual median of 41.4 days out-of-role. The disorders considered in this study accounted for 71.7% of all DOR; the disorders that caused the greatest number of DOR at the individual-level were digestive (22.6, mood (19.9, substance use (15.0, chronic pain (16.5, and anxiety (14.0 disorders. The disorders associated with the highest population-attributable DOR were chronic pain (35.2%, mood (16.5%, and anxiety (15.0% disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Because pain, anxiety, and mood disorders have high effects at both the individual and societal levels, targeted interventions to reduce the impairments associated with these disorders have the highest potential to reduce the societal burdens of chronic illness in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area.

  6. Corrosion of titanium: Part 1: aggressive environments and main forms of degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prando, Davide; Brenna, Andrea; Diamanti, Maria Vittoria; Beretta, Silvia; Bolzoni, Fabio; Ormellese, Marco; Pedeferri, MariaPia

    2017-11-11

    Titanium has outstanding corrosion resistance due to the external natural oxide protective layer formed when it is exposed to an aerated environment. Despite this, titanium may suffer different forms of corrosion in severe environments: uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, stress-corrosion cracking, fretting corrosion and erosion. In this first review, forms of corrosion affecting titanium are analyzed based on a wide literature review. For each form of corrosion, the mechanism and most severe environment are reported according to the current understanding.In the second part, this review will address the possible surface treatments that can increase corrosion resistance on commercially pure titanium: Electrochemical anodizing, thermal oxidation, chemical oxidation and bulk treatments such as alloying will be considered, highlighting the advantages of each technique.

  7. Electrochemical and corrosion properties of carbon steel in simulated geological disposal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Katsuhisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews electrochemical and corrosion studies on the application of carbon steel to an overpack container, which is used for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Deaerated alkaline Na 2 SO 4 -NaHCO 3 - NaCl solutions and bentonite soaked with the solutions are used as simulated geological disposal environments. Electrochemical studies show the corrosion of the steel in an early stage is the activation control. Corrosion rates are controlled by the composition of the solutions, alloying elements, and the structure of the steel. The rates decrease with time due to the formation of FeCO 3 (siderite) film on the steel. Immersion corrosion tests show general corrosion morphology. Average corrosion rates of long duration have been evaluated. Clear proofs of the initiation of localized corrosion, such as pitting, crevice corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking, have not been reported. (author)

  8. Enhancing corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete structures with hybrid fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt, J.; Jen, G.; Ostertag, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Reinforced concrete beams were subjected to cyclic flexural loading. • Hybrid fiber reinforced composites were effective in reducing corrosion rates. • Crack resistance due to fibers increased corrosion resistance of steel rebar. • Galvanic corrosion measurements underestimated corrosion rates. • Polarization resistance measurements predicted mass loss more accurately. - Abstract: Service loads well below the yield strength of steel reinforcing bars lead to cracking of reinforced concrete. This paper investigates whether the crack resistance of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HyFRC) reduces the corrosion rate of steel reinforcing bars in concrete after cyclic flexural loading. The reinforcing bars were extracted to examine their surface for corrosion and compare microcell and macrocell corrosion mass loss estimates against direct gravimetric measurements. A delay in corrosion initiation and lower active corrosion rates were observed in the HyFRC beam specimens when compared to reinforced specimens containing plain concrete matrices cycled at the same flexural load

  9. Fabrication of multifunctional CaP-TC composite coatings and the corrosion protection they provide for magnesium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cui; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Li, Qing

    2017-08-28

    Two major problems with magnesium (Mg) alloy biomaterials are the poor corrosion resistance and infection associated with implantation. In this study, a novel calcium phosphate (CaP)/tetracycline (TC) composite coating for Mg implants that can both improve the corrosion resistance of Mg and release a drug in a durable way is reported. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed that TC additives make the CaP coating more compact and uniform. Electrochemical tests indicated CaP/TC coatings can provide excellent corrosion protection for Mg alloy substrates. Besides, TC additives can also provide effective prevention of bone infection and inflammation due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial properties. The one-step hydrothermal process reported here greatly simplified the multi-step fabrication of smart coatings reported previously.

  10. Non-destructive electrochemical techniques applied to the corrosion evaluation of the liner structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, I.; Castillo, A.; Andrade, C.

    2008-01-01

    The liner structure in nuclear power plants provides containment for the operation and therefore the study of its durability and integrity during its service life is an important issue. There are several causes for the deterioration of the liner, which in general involve corrosion due to its metallic nature. The present paper is aimed at describing the assessment of corrosion problems of two liners from two different nuclear power plants, which were evaluated using non-destructive electrochemical techniques. In spite of the testing difficulties arisen, from the results extracted it can be concluded that the electrochemical techniques applied are adequate for the corrosion evaluation. They provide important information about the integrity of the structure and allow for its evolution with time to be assessed

  11. The study on corrosion resistance of decorative satin nickel plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Wenya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the corrosion resistance of satin nickel plating on conductive plastic.The electrochemical tests were to analyze the corrosion behavior of satin nickel plating with different processes in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results show that,because the satin nickel plating has an organic film on its surface due to process characteristics,the film results in different corrosion resistance.By increasing satin additive dosage,the nickel plating chroma decreases,the microsurface of the plating becomes rough,and the corrosion resistance is followed by decrease.

  12. Corrosion study on high power feeding of telecomunication copper cable in 5 wt.% CaSO4.2H2O solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsudin, Shaiful Rizam; Hashim, Nabihah; Ibrahim, Mohd Saiful Bahri; Rahman, Muhammad Sayuzi Abdul; Idrus, Muhammad Amin; Hassan, Mohd Rezadzudin; Abdullah, Wan Razli Wan

    2016-07-01

    The studies were carried out to find out the best powering scheme over the copper telephone line. It was expected that the application of the higher power feeding could increase the data transfer and capable of providing the customer's satisfaction. To realize the application of higher remote power feeding, the potential of corrosion problem on Cu cables was studied. The natural corrosion behaviour of copper cable in the 0.5% CaSO4.2H2O solution was studied in term of open circuit potential for 30 days. The corrosion behaviour of higher power feeding was studied by the immersion and the planned interval test to determine the corrosion rate as well as the effect of voltage magnitudes and the current scheme i.e. positive direct (DC+) and alternating current (AC) at about 0.40 ± 0.01 mA/ cm2 current density. In the immersion test, both DC+ and AC scheme showed the increasing of feeding voltage magnitude has increased the corrosion rate of Cu samples starting from 60 to 100 volts. It was then reduced at about 100 - 120 volts which may due to the passive and transpassive mechanism. The corrosion rate was slowly reduced further from 120 to 200 volts. Visually, the positively charged of Cu cable was seems susceptible to severe corrosion, while AC scheme exhibited a slight corrosion reaction on the surface. However, the planned interval test and XRD results showed the corrosion activity of the copper cable in the studied solution was a relatively slow process and considered not to be corroded as a partially protective scale of copper oxide formed on the surface.

  13. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A. [Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, Michael I., E-mail: m.ojovan@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface. - Highlights: • The radionuclides yield is determined by the transport from the glass through the surface corrosion layer. • Formation of the surface layer is due to the dissolution of the glass network and the formation of insoluble compounds. • The model proposed accounts for glass dissolution, formation of corrosion layer, specie diffusion and chemical reactions. • Analytical solutions are found for corrosion layer growth rate and glass components component leaching rates.

  14. Performance of RC columns with partial length corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaohui; Liang Fayun

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies on the load capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) columns with partial length corrosion are presented, where only a fraction of the column length was corroded. Twelve simply supported columns were eccentrically loaded. The primary variables were partial length corrosion in tensile or compressive zone and the corrosion level within this length. The failure of the corroded column occurs in the partial length, mainly developed from or located nearby or merged with the longitudinal corrosion cracks. For RC column with large eccentricity, load capacity of the column is mainly influenced by the partial length corrosion in tensile zone; while for RC column with small eccentricity, load capacity of the column greatly decreases due to the partial length corrosion in compressive zone. The destruction of the longitudinally mechanical integrality of the column in the partial length leads to this great reduction of the load capacity of the RC column

  15. Analysis of corrosion in petroleum pipeline by laser shearography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusnisyam Yusof; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Ahmad Nasruddin Ahmad Puad

    2008-08-01

    This paper aims at assessing of the corrosion defects in standard petroleum pipelines by using shearography method. Shearography technique reveals the stress-affected zone due to additional loading which utilized the laser speckle correlation on the subject inspected. In this study, the artificial corroded pipeline is modeled by different of corrosion depth and width. The pressure was subjected into the 7 mm thickness pipe wall to form an internal air pressure as the loading mechanism. The study shows that change of internal pressure is very effective mechanism to reveal corrosion activity in the pipe. The speckle correlation for corrosion of more than 3 mm depth with ΔP≤0.24 MPa can clearly be observed. For comparison the Radiography Technique is used to correlate the depth, size and shape of the corrosion and finally the location of corrosion area. (Author)

  16. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  17. A new corrosion sensor to determine the start and development of embedded rebar corrosion process at coastal concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-09-30

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  18. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiliang Jin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  19. Corrosion evaluation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo.

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of ± 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs

  20. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study

  1. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  2. Archaeological analogs and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  3. Stress corrosion cracking prevention using solar electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harijan, K.; Uqaaili, M.A; Mirani, M.

    2004-01-01

    Metallic structures exposed to soil and water naturally experience corrosion due to electrolytic action. These structures are also subjected to sustained tensile stresses. The combined effects of corrosion and stress results stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Removal of either of these i.e. stress or corrosion prevents SCC. The cathodic protection (CP) prevents corrosion, and hence prevents stress corrosion. Solar Photo voltaic (PV) generated electricity can be best external power source for CP systems especially in remote areas. This paper presents CP system using solar PV generated electricity as an external power source for prevention of SCC of metallic structures. The paper also compares CP systems using solar electricity with those of CP systems using conventional electricity. The paper concludes that a solar electricity power system provides a reliable solution for powering CP stations especially in remote areas, enables the placing of CP units in any location, and thus ensures optimal current distribution for the exact protection requirements. The paper also concludes that solar electricity CP systems are well suited for SCC protection of metallic structures especially in remote areas of an energy deficit country like Pakistan. (author)

  4. Atmospheric corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, P.; Accary, A.

    1965-01-01

    The authors study the corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys having compositions close to that of the mono-carbide; they show that the extent of the observed corrosion effects increases with the water vapour content of the surrounding gas and they conclude that the atmospheric corrosion of these alloys is due essentially to the humidity of the air, the effect of the oxygen being very slight at room temperature. They show that the optimum conditions for preserving U-C alloys are either a vacuum or a perfectly dry argon atmosphere. The authors have also established that the type of corrosion involved is a corrosion which 'cracks under stress' and is transgranular (it can also be intergranular in the case of sub-stoichiometric alloys). They propose, finally, two hypotheses for explaining this mechanism, one of which is illustrated by the existence, at the fissure interface, of corrosion products which can play the role of 'corners' in the mono-carbide grains. (authors) [fr

  5. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System For Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Joseph; Curran, Jerome; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem facing Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other Government Agencies, and the general public. These problems include KSC launch support structures, highway bridge infrastructure, and building structures such as condominium balconies. Due to these problems, the development of a Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System would be a breakthrough technology having great commercial value for the following industries: Transportation, Infrastructure, Marine Infrastructure, Civil Engineering, and the Construction Industry. This sacrificial coating system consists of a paint matrix that may include metallic components, conducting agents, and moisture attractors. Similar systems have been used in the past with varying degrees of success. These systems have no proven history of effectiveness over the long term. In addition, these types of systems have had limited success overcoming the initial resistance between the concrete/coating interface. The coating developed at KSC incorporates methods proven to overcome the barriers that previous systems could not achieve. Successful development and continued optimization of this breakthrough system would produce great interest in NASA/KSC for corrosion engineering technology and problem solutions. Commercial patents on this technology would enhance KSC's ability to attract industry partners for similar corrosion control applications.

  6. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  7. Exploratory shaft liner corrosion estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An estimate of expected corrosion degradation during the 100-year design life of the Exploratory Shaft (ES) is presented. The basis for the estimate is a brief literature survey of corrosion data, in addition to data taken by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The scope of the study is expected corrosion environment of the ES, the corrosion modes of general corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, dissimilar metal corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. The expected internal and external environment of the shaft liner is described in detail and estimated effects of each corrosion mode are given. The maximum amount of general corrosion degradation was estimated to be 70 mils at the exterior and 48 mils at the interior, at the shaft bottom. Corrosion at welds or mechanical joints could be significant, dependent on design. After a final determination of corrosion allowance has been established by the project it will be added to the design criteria. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Corrosion detection and monitoring in steam generators by means of ultrasound; Deteccion y monitoreo de corrosion por medio de ultrasonido en generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon Nava, Jose G; Calva, Mauricio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Fuentes Samaniego, Raul [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Peraza Garcia, Alejandro [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1988-12-31

    The tube and component failures in steam generators due to corrosion cause huge economical losses. In this article the internal corrosion processes (hydrogen attack) and high temperature corrosion are described, as well as the ultrasound techniques used for its detection. The importance of obtaining corrosion rates, which are fundamental parameters for the detection of the tube`s residual life. The purpose is to prevent possible failures that would diminish the power plant availability. [Espanol] Las fallas de tuberia en componentes de generadores de vapor debidas a corrosion ocasionan considerables perdidas economicas. En este articulo se describen los procesos de corrosion interna (ataque por hidrogeno) y corrosion en alta temperatura, asi como tecnicas de ultrasonido empleadas para su deteccion. Se destaca la importancia de obtener valores de velocidad de corrosion, que es un parametro fundamental para la determinacion de la vida residual de tuberias. El proposito es poder prevenir posibles fallas que disminuyan la disponibilidad de centrales termoelectricas.

  9. Corrosion detection and monitoring in steam generators by means of ultrasound; Deteccion y monitoreo de corrosion por medio de ultrasonido en generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon Nava, Jose G.; Calva, Mauricio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Fuentes Samaniego, Raul [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Peraza Garcia, Alejandro [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1987-12-31

    The tube and component failures in steam generators due to corrosion cause huge economical losses. In this article the internal corrosion processes (hydrogen attack) and high temperature corrosion are described, as well as the ultrasound techniques used for its detection. The importance of obtaining corrosion rates, which are fundamental parameters for the detection of the tube`s residual life. The purpose is to prevent possible failures that would diminish the power plant availability. [Espanol] Las fallas de tuberia en componentes de generadores de vapor debidas a corrosion ocasionan considerables perdidas economicas. En este articulo se describen los procesos de corrosion interna (ataque por hidrogeno) y corrosion en alta temperatura, asi como tecnicas de ultrasonido empleadas para su deteccion. Se destaca la importancia de obtener valores de velocidad de corrosion, que es un parametro fundamental para la determinacion de la vida residual de tuberias. El proposito es poder prevenir posibles fallas que disminuyan la disponibilidad de centrales termoelectricas.

  10. Corrosion fatigue of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaehn, H.; Wagner, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue phenomena can be classified into two main groups according to the electrochemical state of the metal surface in the presence of electrolytes: the active and the passive state with an important sub-group of corrosion fatigue in the unstable passive state. The allowable stress for structures exposed to the conjoint action of corrosion and fatigue is influenced by many factors: kind of media, number of cycles, frequency, mean stress, size, notches, loading mode, alloy composition and mechanical strength. A critical literature review shows contradictory results if a classification by the electrochemical surface state is not applied. Case histories and counter measures illustrate the practical importance of corrosion fatigue in many branches of industry as well as the urgent need for a better knowledge about the mutual influence of the phenomena to get rules by which the engineer can appraise the risk of corrosion fatigue. (orig.) [de

  11. Application of wire beam electrode technique to investigate initiation and propagation of rebar corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Wei; Dong, Ze Hua; Kong, De Jie; Guo, Xing Peng

    2013-01-01

    Multi-electrode technique named as wire beam electrode (WBE) was used to study pitting corrosion of rebar under concrete cover. When WBE embedded mortar sample was immersed in NaCl solution, uneven distributions of galvanic current and open circuit potential (OCP) on the WBE were observed due to the initiation of pitting corrosion. The following oxygen depletion in mortar facilitated the negative shift of the OCP and the smoothing of the current and potential distributions. Wetting–drying cycle experiments showed that corrosion products instead of oxygen in wet mortar specimen sustained the propagation of pitting corrosion due to Fe (III) taking part in cathodic depolarization during oxygen-deficient wet period, which was confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition, new pitting corrosion occurred mainly near the corrosion products, leading to preferentially horizontal propagation of rust layer on the WBE. A localized corrosion factor was further presented to quantify the localised corrosion based on galvanic current maps

  12. Application of wire beam electrode technique to investigate initiation and propagation of rebar corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wei; Dong, Ze Hua, E-mail: zehua.dong@gmail.com; Kong, De Jie; Guo, Xing Peng

    2013-06-15

    Multi-electrode technique named as wire beam electrode (WBE) was used to study pitting corrosion of rebar under concrete cover. When WBE embedded mortar sample was immersed in NaCl solution, uneven distributions of galvanic current and open circuit potential (OCP) on the WBE were observed due to the initiation of pitting corrosion. The following oxygen depletion in mortar facilitated the negative shift of the OCP and the smoothing of the current and potential distributions. Wetting–drying cycle experiments showed that corrosion products instead of oxygen in wet mortar specimen sustained the propagation of pitting corrosion due to Fe (III) taking part in cathodic depolarization during oxygen-deficient wet period, which was confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition, new pitting corrosion occurred mainly near the corrosion products, leading to preferentially horizontal propagation of rust layer on the WBE. A localized corrosion factor was further presented to quantify the localised corrosion based on galvanic current maps.

  13. Microbial induced corrosion in French concept of nuclear waste underground disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.; Crusset, D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give a short overview of how the bacteria, that may influence the corrosion behaviour of metals and alloys, are taken into account in the French concept of geological repository. It is important to underline that microbial induced corrosion is not a new corrosion phenomena but the presence of bacteria may modify (increase or decrease) anodic or cathodic corrosion reactions. In aerobic conditions, high corrosion rates may be obtained due to the bio-oxidation of pyrites. Under anaerobic conditions (longer period), bacteria may have negative (localised corrosion) or positive (consumption of hydrogen) effects. The mixed conditions (with and without oxygen) may be the most dangerous period for localised corrosion of metals and alloys due to the coupling and galvanic corrosion phenomena enhanced by aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The first conclusions lead to consider that MIC is a 'short term' issue rather than a long term one. (authors)

  14. Effect of Cl on the corrosive wear of AISI 321 stainless steel in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-07-25

    Jul 25, 2002 ... The passivation current oscillates tremendously due to the coexistence of passive and active ions in the solution with 0⋅2 mol/l Cl–. 3.2 Corrosive wear behaviour of 321 stainless steel in Cl– + H2SO4 solution at free corrosion and passive potentials. The relationship between corrosive wear rate and Cl–.

  15. Critical corrosion issues and mitigation strategies impacting the operability of LWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent corrosion experience in US light water reactor nuclear power plants is reviewed with emphasis on mitigation strategies to control the cost of corrosion to LWR operators. Many components have suffered corrosion problems resulting in industry costs of billions of dollars. The most costly issues have been stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel coolant piping in boiling water reactors and corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactors. Through industry wide R and D programs these problems are now understood and mitigation strategies have been developed to address the issues in a cost effective manner. Other significant corrosion problems for both reactor types are briefly reviewed. Tremendous progress has been made in controlling corrosion, however, minimizing its impact on plant operations will present a continuing challenge throughout the remaining service lives of these power plants

  16. Development of a nondestructive testing method and facility for investigation of surface reactions appearing in damage, corrosion, adsorption and catalytic processes encountered in the heat transfer systems of nuclear power plants and the energy storage problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumhalter, G.

    1986-08-01

    Studies of corrosion, oxide layer growth, etc., necessitate the investigation of processes which take place at surfaces: adsorption and desorption. Two problems are of major importance: i) initial stages of oxidative attack, e.g. the adsorptive properties of oxygen for a given system and possible synergetic effects of coadsorbed species like CO, H 2 O, OH, H 2 , SH 2 , impurities, and ii) the influence of surface conditions (crystalography, defects, pores, impurities, segregates) on the oxidative attack. An apparatus has been developed with three surface sensitive techniques: a) quartzcrystal micro-balance as a method for measuring the kinetics of deposition of thin metal films and gas adsorption, b) diode probe for the measurement of work function change caused by gas adsorption at metallic surfaces, and c) thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) which gives information on adsorption/desorption properties of a system studied: activation energy, preexponential factors for desorption, coverage, precursor states, lateral interaction, etc. The system investigated was oxygen/palladium foil (polycrystalline) by means of TDS and the following conclusions have been drawn: 1. Oxygen adsorbs on Pd foil both dissociatively and nondissociatively - depending on the adsorption temperature. 2. Certain amounts of oxygen penetrates into the surface and subsurface region, giving rise to a desorption peak around 1350K. 3. There are two groups of desorption peaks corresponding to atomically adsorbed oxygen (730K and 800K). The analysis of these peaks show the existence of strong lateral interactions between oxygen atoms at high coverages, which is not the case for low coverages. The position of the peaks and the dynamics of their evolution is consistent with the data obtained for Pd(111) and Pd(100) single crystal surfaces

  17. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Corrosion is a serious problem that has enormous costs for the nation (4.2% GDP in 2007) and worldwide. Kennedy Space Center is located in one of the most naturally...

  18. Capturing device for radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kiyoshi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To render the flow channel area uniform for each of coolants over the entire capturing device and reduce the corrosion of capturing materials due to coolants. Constitution: Most of radioactivity caused by radioactive corrosion products are due to Mn-54 radioactive nuclides and it has been known that the nuclides are readily deposited to the surface of nickel material in sodium at high temperature. It is difficult in a conventional capturing device constituted by winding a nickel plate fabricated with protrusions in a multiple-coaxial configuration, that the flow channel area is reduced in a portion of the flow channel and it is difficult to make the flow of the coolants uniform. In view of the above, by winding a nickel plate having a plurality of protrusions at the surface formed integrally by way of an electrolytic process into a multiple-coaxial or spiral shape, those having high resistance to the coolant corrosion can be obtained. (Takahashi, M.)

  19. COPPER PITTING CORROSION: A CASE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack can lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. Water quality has b...

  20. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-01-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along...

  1. Corrosion studies on containment materials for vitrified high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.J.; Bland, I.D.; Marsh, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    The general corrosion of carbon steels buried in granite or bentonite beds and saturated with synthetic granitic ground water is investigated. Corrosion rates were measured after 170 and 470 days, and pitting corrosion after 200hrs and 300hrs. Experiments to measure corrosion rates due to radiolysis of γ-radiated argon-purged ground water were also carried out. Results support the feasibility of using carbon steel packs for isolating high-level wastes for 500-1000 yrs. (U.K.)

  2. Corrosion-electrochemical behavior of zirconium in molten alkali metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion and electrochemical characteristics of zirconium during its interaction with molten lithium, sodium, and potassium carbonates containing from 1 to 5 wt % additives to the salt phase are studied in a temperature range of 500-800°C using gravimetry, corrosion potential measurement, and anodic polarization. The substances decreasing the corrosion losses due to the strengthening and thickening of an oxide film (lithium, sodium, potassium hydroxides) are used as passivators. Sodium chloride, fluoride, and sulfate serve as corrosion stimulators (activators).

  3. Atmospheric corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys; Corrosion atmospherique des alliages uranium-carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, P; Accary, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The authors study the corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys having compositions close to that of the mono-carbide; they show that the extent of the observed corrosion effects increases with the water vapour content of the surrounding gas and they conclude that the atmospheric corrosion of these alloys is due essentially to the humidity of the air, the effect of the oxygen being very slight at room temperature. They show that the optimum conditions for preserving U-C alloys are either a vacuum or a perfectly dry argon atmosphere. The authors have also established that the type of corrosion involved is a corrosion which 'cracks under stress' and is transgranular (it can also be intergranular in the case of sub-stoichiometric alloys). They propose, finally, two hypotheses for explaining this mechanism, one of which is illustrated by the existence, at the fissure interface, of corrosion products which can play the role of 'corners' in the mono-carbide grains. (authors) [French] Les auteurs etudient la corrosion des alliages uranium-carbone de composition voisine du monocarbure; ils montrent que l'importance des effets de la corrosion observee augmente avec la teneur en vapeur d'eau du milieu gazeux ambiant et concluent que la corrosion atmospherique de ces alliages est due essentiellement a l'humidite de l'air, l'action de l'oxygene de l'air etant tres faible a la temperature ambiante. Ils indiquent que les conditions optimales de conservation des alliages U-C sont le vide ou une atmosphere d'argon parfaitement desseches. D'autre part, les auteurs etablissent que le type de corrosion mis en jeu est une corrosion 'fissurante sous contrainte', transgranulaire (pouvant egalement etre intergranulaire dans le cas d'alliages sous-stoechiometriques). Ils proposent enfin deux hypotheses pour rendre compte de ce mecanisme, dont l'une est illustree par la mise en evidence, a l'interface des fissures, de produits de corrosion pouvant jouer le role de 'coins' dans les grains de

  4. RESEARCH OF FRUIT CONSERVES’ CORROSIVE AGGRESSIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kuznecova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of metal canning containers is one of the obstacles in spreading its application for packing of food. Particularly aggressive to the metal container is fruit canned medium, containing organic acids.The basic material for the production of metal canning container is white tinplate. The main advantage of white tinplate is the tin compounds are harmless to human organism. For this reason, a white badge is used widely, usually used for production of canning containers, packaging beverages. Despite the fact that recently often used containers made of aluminum badge (foil, the basic material for manufacturing metal canning containers is steel white tinplate.Now applied for coating paints and varnishes do not provide anti-corrosion protection of inner surface of metal containers during storage. Preserving of canned fruit quality in metal containers is largely defined corrosion resistance of the containers. This is due to the fact that the metal transition to canned fruit in due courses of corrosion processes is lowering the nutritional value and deterioration taste of the product, and while allocation of hydrogen is accompanied by swelling and destruction of metal containers.We have investigated a number of anti-corrosion coatings based on Fe-Cr and Fe-Sn-Ti of their behavior in aggressive mediums canned fruit. For the purpose of modeling such mediums the solutions of most widespread organic acids were used. The research allowed conclude, that in surface solid solutions Fe-Sn-Ti increase the corrosion resistance of carbon steel in aqueous solutions of malic, citric and tartaric acids. This implies that the surface solid solutions’ formation can significantly improve corrosion resistance in aggressive canning mediums.

  5. Corrosion-product inventory: the Bruce-B secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Price, J.; Brett, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion inspection and corrosion-product characterization in water and steam systems are important for component and systems maintenance in nuclear power stations. Corrosion products are produced, released and redeposited at various sites in the secondary system. Depending on the alloys used in the condenser and feedwater heaters, particulate iron oxides and hydroxides can account for about 95-99% of the total corrosion-product transport. Where brass or cupro-nickel alloys are present, copper and zinc contribute significantly to the total transport and deposition. Particulates are transported by the feedwater to the steam generators, where they accumulate and can cause a variety of problems, such as loss of heat transfer capability through deposition on boiler tubes, blockage of flow through boiler-tube support plates and accelerated corrosion in crevices, either in deep sludge piles or at blocked tube supports. The influx of oxidized corrosion products may have a particularly adverse effect on the redox environment of steam generator tubing, thereby increasing the probability of localized corrosion and other degradation mechanisms. In this paper, there is a description of a survey of general corrosion deposits in Bruce-B, Units 5-8, which helps to identify the origin, evolution and inventory of corrosion products along the secondary system of Candu reactors

  6. Corrosion behavior of Ti–39Nb alloy for dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fojt, Jaroslav, E-mail: fojtj@vscht.cz [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Joska, Ludek [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Malek, Jaroslav [UJP Praha, Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Prague-Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Sefl, Vaclav [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus–high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti–39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. - Highlights: • Alloy Ti–39Nb shows excellent corrosion resistance in physiological solution. • Corrosion resistance of Ti–39Nb alloy is significantly higher than that of titanium in the presence of fluoride ions. • The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicates a porous passive layer. • Passive layer of the alloy is enriched by niobium.

  7. Corrosion behavior of Ti–39Nb alloy for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus–high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti–39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. - Highlights: • Alloy Ti–39Nb shows excellent corrosion resistance in physiological solution. • Corrosion resistance of Ti–39Nb alloy is significantly higher than that of titanium in the presence of fluoride ions. • The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicates a porous passive layer. • Passive layer of the alloy is enriched by niobium

  8. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  9. Corrosion aspects in steam generators of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visoni, E.; Santos Pinto, M. dos

    1988-01-01

    Steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWR), transfer heat from a primary coolant system to a secondary coolant system. Primary coolant water is heated in the core and passes through the steam generator that transfer heat to the secondary coolant water. However, the steam generator is dead for ionic impurities, corrosion products and fabrication/maintenence residues. These impurities concentrate between crevice and cracks. Many types of degradation mechanisms affect the tubes. The tubes are dented, craked, ovalized, wasted, etc. This paper describes the main corrosion problems in steam generators and includes the corrective actions to considered to reduce or eliminate these corrosion problems. (author) [pt

  10. Corrosion of carbon steel in contact with bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, D.; Vokal, A.; Bruha, P.

    2010-01-01

    of approximately 2-3 mm/yr in bentonite pore water solution. No significant pressure increase was observed due to generation of hydrogen. The results of surprising behaviour of carbon steels in bentonite could be explained by the different composition of solution after granitic water flow through bentonite or by hypothesis based on our modelling experiments that corrosion rate increase is caused by so called pumping effect of bentonite which is in turn caused by different solubilities of corrosion products in the corrosion layer and bentonite. Influence of corrosion products on bentonite is another important question. It was clearly visible that the transport of corrosion products into Volclay bentonite is approximately 1 mm after 30 days of corrosion at 70 deg. C. The reason why no pressure increase was observed due to hydrogen evolution could be explained by higher rate of hydrogen transport in bubbles than is its evolution rate. But these hydrogen bubbles might be also accumulated between carbon steel layer and bentonite what results in inhomogeneity of corrosion layer. The results achieved significantly affect performance assessment of concept of disposal with carbon steel and bentonite. Only rather short term (30 days) experiments were carried out. In the next period longer experiments will have to give answer if the increase of corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with bentonite is transient or will last for long time. (authors)

  11. Intersections of discrimination due to unemployment and mental health problems: the role of double stigma for job- and help-seeking behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Tobias; Waldmann, Tamara; Oexle, Nathalie; Wigand, Moritz; Rüsch, Nicolas

    2018-05-21

    The everyday lives of unemployed people with mental health problems can be affected by multiple discrimination, but studies about double stigma-an overlap of identities and experiences of discrimination-in this group are lacking. We therefore studied multiple discrimination among unemployed people with mental health problems and its consequences for job- and help-seeking behaviors. Everyday discrimination and attributions of discrimination to unemployment and/or to mental health problems were examined among 301 unemployed individuals with mental health problems. Job search self-efficacy, barriers to care, and perceived need for treatment were compared among four subgroups, depending on attributions of experienced discrimination to unemployment and to mental health problems (group i); neither to unemployment nor to mental health problems (group ii); mainly to unemployment (group iii); or mainly to mental health problems (group iv). In multiple regressions among all participants, higher levels of discrimination predicted reduced job search self-efficacy and higher barriers to care; and attributions of discrimination to unemployment were associated with increased barriers to care. In ANOVAs for subgroup comparisons, group i participants, who attributed discrimination to both unemployment and mental health problems, reported lower job search self-efficacy, more perceived stigma-related barriers to care and more need for treatment than group iii participants, as well as more stigma-related barriers to care than group iv. Multiple discrimination may affect job search and help-seeking among unemployed individuals with mental health problems. Interventions to reduce public stigma and to improve coping with multiple discrimination for this group should be developed.

  12. Drinking water quality assessment and corrosion mitigation in the hospital water supply system of Chacas Village (Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Bigoni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rural hospitals in developing countries often lack appropriate water treatments to assure their water needs. In these facilities, due to water different uses and its use with medical equipment, water quality problems can cause very hazardous situations. In particular, corrosion of water distribution systems is a common issue that can cause unwanted changes in water quality and failures of the distribution system’s pipes. These considerations suggest that a complete monitoring program and water treatments to control and guarantee the water quality would be required in each health-care facility. This study assessed the quality of the water at the rural hospital of Chacas (Peru as measured via specific physical-chemical and microbiological parameters. The results show that the chemical and microbiological qualities of the water generally worsen from catchment to the hospital’s taps. Moreover, this work investigated the effects of a dolomite limestone filter installed to adjust the quality of the water distributed at the hospital and thereby mitigate the water’s corrosiveness. Corrosion indices were calculated to provide useful information on the water’s corrosiveness and positive results were obtained in reducing corrosiveness after the installation of the dolomite filter.

  13. Influence of the S/N ratio on the corrosion release of Alloy 690 tubes in a primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Hee-Sang; Choi, Myung Sik; Kim, Kyung Mo; Seo, Myung Ji; Hur, Do Haeng; Choi, Tack-Sang; Yoo, One

    2014-01-01

    Alloy 690TT is a promising steam generator (SG) tube material of a pressurized water reactor due to its excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) that has caused problems in Alloy 600 as an old SG tube material. The qualities of this material have been managed thoroughly from manufacturing step under various specification regulations as well as in in-service step. For examples, the surface roughness are prescribed as the values less than 1.6 μm for the tube outside and 0.5 μm for the inside, respectively. In addition, the surface state and defect must be qualified through the eddy current test (ECT) and the ultrasonic test (UT) according to the ASME Section III, NB2550. Then, the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, which is measured using ECT bobbin probe, is the important criteria to determine the material and it shall be 15 to 1 or higher at the standard frequency for any fixed 0.5 m length of any tube. The corrosion behaviours of the Alloy 690TT under high-temperature pressurized primary water have been studied widely in a point of the SCC but discussed narrowly in a point of the corrosion release. In particular, the effect of the S/N ratio on the corrosion release of this material surface has been rarely investigated. In this work, we evaluate the influence of the S/N ratio on the corrosion release of Alloy 690 SG tubes. The specimens with different S/N ratio were selected through ECT bobbin inspection and a corrosion release test was conducted using a simulated primary circulation loop. The material properties and oxidation behaviours were investigated by surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and etc. As a result, the corrosion rate was matched preferably with the MRPC characteristics showing macroscopic surface state rather than with the bobbin S/N ratio results. (author)

  14. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serdar, Marijana [Department of Materials, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Meral, Cagla [Middle East Technical University, Department of Civil Engineering, Ankara (Turkey); Kunz, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bjegovic, Dubravka [Department of Materials, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Wenk, Hans-Rudolf [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide–hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel. - Highlights: • Synchrotron micro-diffraction used to map the distribution of crystalline phases. • Goethite and akaganeite are the main corrosion products during chloride induced corrosion in mortar. • Layers of goethite and akaganeite are negatively correlated. • EDS showed Cr present in corrosion products identified by SEM.

  15. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Kunz, Martin; Bjegovic, Dubravka; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide–hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel. - Highlights: • Synchrotron micro-diffraction used to map the distribution of crystalline phases. • Goethite and akaganeite are the main corrosion products during chloride induced corrosion in mortar. • Layers of goethite and akaganeite are negatively correlated. • EDS showed Cr present in corrosion products identified by SEM

  16. Reduced ash related operational problems (slagging, bed agglomeration, corrosion and fouling) by co-combustion biomass with peat; Minskade askrelaterade driftsproblem (belaeggning, slaggning, hoegtemperatur-korrosion, baeddagglomerering) genom inblandning av torv i biobraenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Marcus; Boman, Christoffer; Erhardsson, Thomas; Gilbe, Ram; Pommer, Linda; Bostroem, Dan; Nordin, Anders; Samuelsson, Robert; Burvall, Jan

    2006-12-15

    Combustion studies were performed in both a fluidized bed (5 kW) and in an under-feed pellets burner (20 kW) to elucidate the responsible mechanisms for the positive effects on ash related operational problems (i.e. slagging, fouling, corrosion and bed agglomeration) during co-combustion of several problematic biomass with peat. Three typical carex-containing Swedish peat samples with differences in e.g. silicon-, calcium- and sulfur contents were co-fired with logging residues, willow and straw in proportions corresponding to 15-40 weight %d.s. Mixing of corresponding 20 wt-% of peat significantly reduced the bed agglomeration tendencies for all fuels. The fuel specific agglomeration temperature were increased by 150-170 deg C when adding peat to the straw fuel and approximately 70-100 deg C when adding peat to the logging residue- and the willow fuel. The increased level of calcium in the inner bed particle layer caused by the added reactive calcium from the peat and/or removing alkali in the gas phase to a less reactive particular form via sorption and/or reaction with reactive peat ash (containing calcium, silica etc.) during which larger particles (>1{mu}m) are formed where collected potassium is present in a less reactive form, is considered to be the dominated reason for the increased agglomeration temperatures during combustion of logging residues and willow. During straw combustion, the ash forming matter were found as individual ash sticky particles in the bed. The iron, sulphur and calcium content of these individual ash particles were significantly increased when adding peat to the fuel mix thereby decreasing the stickiness of these particles i.e. reducing the agglomeration tendencies. Adding peat to the relatively silicon-poor fuels (willow and logging residues) resulted in higher slagging tendencies, especially when the relative silicon rich peat fuel (Brunnskoelen) was used. However, when co-combusting peat with the relatively silicon and potassium

  17. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of safety use limit for crevice corrosion in Ni-Cr-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuichi; Akashi, Masatsune; Sasaki, Hidetsugu; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    The most important problem with corrosion-resistant alloys such as stainless steels is localized corrosion. Crevice corrosion, which is a typical localized corrosion, occurs under the mildest environmental conditions. Consequently, whether crevice corrosion occurs or not is an important issue in structural material selection. This study investigated highly corrosion-resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloys whose resistance for crevice corrosion is difficult to evaluate with the JIS G 0592 standard for common strainless steels. The optimized procedures for determining the critical potential and temperature for crevice corrosion of the alloys were developed based on the JIS method. The limits of safety usage of various Ni-Cr-Mo alloys were evaluated quantitatively in chloride solution environments. (author)

  19. Sulfation of corrosive alkali chlorides by ammonium sulfate in a biomass fired CFB boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brostroem, Markus; Backman, Rainer; Nordin, Anders [Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden); Kassman, Haakan [Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Box 1046, SE-611 29 Nykoeping (Sweden); Helgesson, Anna; Berg, Magnus; Andersson, Christer [Vattenfall Research and Development AB, SE-814 26 Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2007-12-15

    Biomass and waste derived fuels contain relatively high amounts of alkali and chlorine, but contain very little sulfur. Combustion of such fuels can result in increased deposit formation and superheater corrosion. These problems can be reduced by using a sulfur containing additive, such as ammonium sulfate, which reacts with the alkali chlorides and forms less corrosive sulfates. Ammonium sulfate injection together with a so-called in situ alkali chloride monitor (IACM) is patented and known as ''ChlorOut''. IACM measures the concentrations of alkali chlorides (mainly KCl in biomass combustion) at superheater temperatures. Tests with and without spraying ammonium sulfate into the flue gases have been performed in a 96MW{sub th}/25MW{sub e} circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. The boiler was fired mainly with bark and a chlorine containing waste. KCl concentration was reduced from more than 15 ppm to approximately 2 ppm during injection of ammonium sulfate. Corrosion probe measurements indicated that both deposit formation and material loss due to corrosion were decreased using the additive. Analysis of the deposits showed significantly higher concentration of sulfur and almost no chlorine in the case with ammonium sulfate. Results from impactor measurements supported that KCl was sulfated to potassium sulfate by the additive. (author)

  20. Material characterization and corrosion control in wet storage of Chilean spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamas, C.; Klein, J.; Escobar, I.

    2002-01-01

    Chile has two MTR type research reactors and the spent fuel will be stored in water previous to the conditioning for final disposal. One of the serious problem presented during wet storage is the phenomenon of corrosion, which depends on the water quality, the structural materials and the storage conditions. Thus, it is necessary to solve how to guarantee the integrity of the spent fuel during its wet storage. The water quality and fuel assembly materials are being characterized with the purpose to define the criteria of surveillance and control of corrosion as a function of time. The behavior of the 6061 Al and N4 Al alloys is being studied to characterize the susceptibility to pitting corrosion in solutions with chloride and cadmium as aggressive ions. The analyses were performed in a three-electrode electrochemical cell with 6061 Al and N4 Al as working electrodes. Platinum wire was the auxiliary electrode while Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode. To obtain the electrochemical characterization the polarization curves were used and the evolution of the corrosion potential of the aluminum alloys and SS 304 were measured. The electrolyte was deionized water with different concentrations of chloride and cadmium. At present, the results show that 6061 Al and N4 Al alloys are more susceptible to be attacked by pitting due to the presence of chloride than cadmium. (author)

  1. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  2. Influence of turbulent flow on the corrosion kinetics of API X52 pipeline steel in aqueous solutions containing H{sub 2}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvan-Martinez, Ricardo; Genesca-Llongueras, Juan [Departamento Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza-Flores, Juan; Duran-Romero, Ruben [Corrosion, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A corrosion process can be influenced by the relative movement between the corroding environment and the metal. This relative movement could increase the heat transfer and the mass transfer of reactants towards and from the surface of the corroding metal, with a consequent increase in the corrosion rate. Also, if solid particles are present, removal of protective films, erosion and wear can occur on the metallic surface. Many industrial processes involve the movement of corrosive liquids in close contact to metallic structures. Therefore, the influence of flow on the corrosion processes is an important issue to be considered in the design and operation of industrial equipment. This influence is complex and many variables are involved. Several observations of flow-accelerated corrosion problems have been documented, particularly in the oil and gas industries, where the combined effect of flow and dissolved gases, such as hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), is important. Turbulent flow conditions are commonly found in industrial processes. However, few corrosion studies in controlled turbulent flow conditions are available. With the increasing necessity to describe the corrosion of metals in turbulent flow conditions some laboratory hydrodynamic systems have been used with different degrees of success. The use of the rotating cylinder electrode (RCE), as a laboratory hydrodynamic test system, has gained popularity in corrosion studies. This popularity is due to its characteristics, such as, its operation mainly at turbulent flow conditions; its well understood mass transfer properties and its easiness of construction and operation. The aim of the present work is to explore the effect that turbulent flow conditions have on the electrochemical kinetics of steel samples immersed in aqueous environments containing H{sub 2}S. In order to control the turbulent flow conditions in the laboratory, a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) was used. In

  3. Corrosion of well casings in compressed air energy storage environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, R.P.; Stottlemyre, J.A.

    1980-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine corrosive effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) environments on several well casing materials to aid in material selections. A literature search on corrosion behavior of well casing material in similar environments revealed that corrosion rates of 0.20 to 0.25 mm/y might be expected. This information was employed in designing the laboratory study. Unstressed electrically isolate samples of various carbon steels were autoclaved at varying humidities, temperatures, and exposure durations to simulate anticipated environments in the well bore during CAES operation. All compressed air tests were run at 12.1 MPa. Temperatures varied from 323/sup 0/K to 573/sup 0/K, and humidity varied from 100% to completely dry air. The effects of salts in the humidified air were also studied. Results indicated that typical well casings of carbon steel as used in oil, gas, and water production wells adequately withstand the anticipated CAES reservoir environment. An acceptable corrosion rate arrived at by these laboratory simulations was between 0.0015 and 0.15 mm/y. Corrosion was caused by metal oxidation that formed a protective scale of iron oxide. Higher temperatures, humidity rates, or salinity content of the humid air increased corrosion. Corrosion also increased on a metal coupon in contact with a sandstone sample, possibly due to crevice corrosion. For each of these factors either singularly or collectively, the increased corrosion rates were still acceptable with the maximum measured at 0.15 mm/y. When coupons were reused in an identical test, the corrosion rates increased beyond the anticipated values that had been determined by extrapolation from one-time runs. Fine cracking of the protective scale probably occurred due to thermal variations, resulting in increased corrosion rates and a greater potential for particulates, which could plug the reservoir.

  4. Detecting Corrosion Under Paint and Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion is a major concern at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida due to the proximity of the center to the Atlantic Ocean and to salt water lagoons. High humidity, salt fogs, and ocean breezes, provide an ideal environment in which painted steel structures become corroded. Maintenance of painted steel structures is a never-ending process.

  5. Benchmarking of Zinc Coatings for Corrosion Protection: A Detailed Characterization of Corrosion and Electrochemical Properties of Zinc Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, Sudesh L; Zixi, Tan [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Nanyang Drive (Singapore)

    2017-02-15

    Due to various types of Zn coatings for many decades for various applications, it is imperative to study and compare their corrosion resistance properties of some of these. Here, we introduce a systematic methodology for evaluation and validation of corrosion protection properties of metallic coatings. According to this methodology, samples are were exposed in an advanced cyclic corrosion test chamber according to ISO 14993, and removed at the end of each withdrawal for respective corrosion and electrochemical characterization to evaluate both barrier and galvanic protection properties. Corrosion protection properties of coatings were evaluated by visual examination according to ISO 10289, mass loss and subsequent corrosion rate measurements, electrochemical properties, and advanced electrochemical scanning techniques. In this study, corrosion protection properties of a commercial zinc rich coating (ZRC) on AISI 1020 mild steel substrates were evaluated and benchmarked against hot dip galvanized (HDG). Results were correlated, and corrosion protection capabilities of the two coatings were compared. The zinc rich coating performed better than hot dip galvanized coating in terms of overall corrosion protection properties, according to the exposure and experimental conditions used in this study. It proved to be a suitable candidate to replace hot dip galvanized coatings for desired applications.

  6. Corrosion-under-insulation (CUI) guidelines

    CERN Document Server

    Staff, European Federation of Corrosion; Winnik, S

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) refers to the external corrosion of piping and vessels that occurs underneath externally clad/jacketed insulation as a result of the penetration of water. By its very nature CUI tends to remain undetected until the insulation and cladding/jacketing is removed to allow inspection or when leaks occur. CUI is a common problem shared by the refining, petrochemical, power, industrial, onshore and offshore industries. The European Federation of Corrosion (EFC) Working Parties WP13 and WP15 have worked to provide guidelines on managing CUI together with a number of major European refining, petrochemical and offshore companies including BP, Chevron-Texaco, Conoco-Phillips, ENI, Exxon-Mobil, IFP, MOL, Scanraff, Statoil, Shell, Total and Borealis. The guidelines within this document are intended for use on all plants and installations that contain insulated vessels, piping and equipment. The guidelines cover a risk-based inspection methodology for CUI, inspection techniques (including n...

  7. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  8. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  9. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.); M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar (Southwest Research Institute)

    2007-09-29

    -base alloys, stainless steels and copper-nickel alloys and (2) the effects of heat treatment on localized corrosion. Excellent agreement with experimental data has been obtained for alloys in various environments, including acids, bases, oxidizing species, inorganic inhibitors, etc. Further, a probabilistic model has been established for predicting the long-term damage due to localized corrosion on the basis of short-term inspection results. This methodology is applicable to pitting, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. Finally, a comprehensive model has been developed for predicting sensitization of Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-W-N alloys and its effect on localized corrosion. As a vehicle for the commercialization of this technology, OLI Systems has developed the Corrosion Analyzer, a software tool that is already used by many companies in the chemical process industry. In process design, the Corrosion Analyzer provides the industry with (1) reliable prediction of the tendency of base alloys for localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and (2) understanding of how to select alloys for corrosive environments. In process operations, the software will help to predict the remaining useful life of equipment based on limited input data. Thus, users will also be able to identify process changes, corrosion inhibition strategies, and other control options before costly shutdowns, energy waste, and environmental releases occur. With the Corrosion Analyzer, various corrosion mitigation measures can be realistically tested in a virtual laboratory.

  10. Guided wave testing for touch point corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleyne, David

    2012-01-01

    Guided wave testing (GWT) is established in the petrochemical and related industries, primarily for the detection of corrosion flaws. Touch point corrosion at support positions in pipe-work has become a significant problem within many operating gas, chemical and petro-chemical plants world-wide, particularly as a high proportion of these plants have been operational for many decades. This article demonstrates how GWT using guided waves sent axially along the pipe can be performed for the detection and accurate classification of touchpoint corrosion. The major advantage of GWT methods for the detection of touch point corrosion is its ability to examine several support positions from a single easy to access transducer position. The strategy is then to prioritize or rank the condition of the pipe at the supports by removing those with negligible wall loss from scheduling for further inspection. Guided waves are accurate at detecting and classifying corrosion patches at support positions, but deep pits within such patches are more difficult to accurately identify. Examples using data from routine inspection testing are used to support the development of the methods and testing approaches presented. Recent developments of the interpretation methods, testing procedures and calibration methods have significantly enhanced the capabilities of GWT for this important application.

  11. Monitoring corrosion in reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Many defects can cause deterioration and cracks in concrete; these are results of poor concrete mix, poor workmanship, inadequate design, shrinkage, chemical and environmental attack, physical or mechanical damage, and corrosion of reinforcing steel (RS). We want to develop a suite of sensors and systems that can detect that corrosion is taking place in RS and inform owners how serious the problem is. By understanding the stages of the corrosion process, we can develop special a sensor that detects each transition. First, moisture ingress can be monitored by a fiber optics humidity sensor, then ingress of Chloride, which acts as a catalyst and accelerates the corrosion process by converting iron into ferrous compounds. We need a fiber optics sensor which can quantify Chloride ingress over time. Converting ferric to ferrous causes large volume expansion and cracks. Such pressure build-up can be detected by a fiber optic pressure sensor. Finally, cracks emit acoustic waves, which can be detected by a high frequency sensor made with phase-shifted gratings. This paper will discuss the progress in our development of these special sensors and also our plan for a field test by the end of 2014. We recommend that we deploy these sensors by visually inspecting the affected area and by identifying locations of corrosion; then, work with the designers to identify spots that would compromise the integrity of the structure; finally, drill a small hole in the concrete and insert these sensors. Interrogation can be done at fixed intervals with a portable unit.

  12. Corrosion Map for Metal Pipes in Coastal Louisiana : Tech Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this project was to create a guidance document with maps that delineates zones where metal pipe is prone to increased corrosion due to environmental conditions. Results from this project will provide a logical rationale to support DO...

  13. Response of reinforced concrete structures to macrocell corrosion of reinforcements. Part I: Before propagation of microcracks via an analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani, Keivan; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Response of RC structures to macrocell corrosion of a rebar is studied analytically. ► The problem is solved prior to the onset of microcrack propagation. ► Suitable Love's potential functions are used to study the steel-rust-concrete media. ► The role of crucial factors on the time of onset of concrete cracking is examined. ► The effect of vital factors on the maximum radial stress of concrete is explored. - Abstract: Assessment of the macrocell corrosion which deteriorates reinforced concrete (RC) structures have attracted the attention of many researchers during recent years. In this type of rebar corrosion, the reduction in cross-section of the rebar is significantly accelerated due to the large ratio of the cathode's area to the anode's area. In order to examine the problem, an analytical solution is proposed for prediction of the response of the RC structure from the time of steel depassivation to the stage just prior to the onset of microcrack propagation. To this end, a circular cylindrical RC member under axisymmetric macrocell corrosion of the reinforcement is considered. Both cases of the symmetric and asymmetric rebar corrosion along the length of the anode zone are studied. According to the experimentally observed data, corrosion products are modeled as a thin layer with a nonlinear stress–strain relation. The exact expressions of the elastic fields associated with the steel, and concrete media are obtained using Love's potential function. By imposing the boundary conditions, the resulting set of nonlinear equations are solved in each time step by Newton's method. The effects of the key parameters which have dominating role in the time of the onset of concrete cracking and maximum radial stress field of the concrete have been examined.

  14. Study on the Synthesis and Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Mannich-Modified Imidazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjun Kong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel Mannich-modified imidazoline (MMI as cationic emulsifier was synthesised for corrosion harm reduction, through three steps — acylation, cyclization, and Mannich reaction. The surface activity was characterized by determination of surface tensions and critical micelle concentration (CMC. The corrosion inhibition performance of five types of steels in the simulated corrosion solution in the presence of the MMI was investigated by static weight loss tests. The results showed that the MMI had good surface activities, with CMC of 19.8 μg g−1 and surface tension of 36.4 mN m−1. The corrosion test results indicated that the corrosion rates of different materials were decreased significantly, and degrees of corrosion inhibition were always higher than 80.0 %. The main inhibition mechanism was most likely due to the adsorption of the corrosion inhibitor on the steel surface, leading to the prevention of corrosion medium from the metal surface.

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Ceramic Cup of Blast Furnace Hearth by Liquid Iron and Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanglong; Cheng, Shusen; Wang, Zhifeng

    2016-10-01

    Three kinds of sample bricks of ceramic cups for blast furnace hearth were studied by dynamic corrosion tests based on different corrosion systems, i.e., liquid iron system, liquid slag system and liquid iron-slag system. Considering the influence of temperature and sample rotational speed, the corrosion profiles and mass loss of the samples were analyzed. In addition, the microstructure of the corroded samples was observed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was found that the corrosion profiles could be divided into iron corrosion region, slag corrosion region and iron-slag corrosion region via corrosion degree after iron-slag corrosion experiment. The most serious corrosion occurred in iron-slag corrosion region. This is due to Marangoni effect, which promotes a slag film formed between liquid iron and ceramic cup and results in local corrosion. The corrosion of the samples deepened with increasing temperature of liquid iron and slag from 1,623 K to 1,823 K. The variation of slag composition had greater influence on the erosion degree than that of rotational speed in this experiment. Taking these results into account the ceramic cup composition should be close to slag composition to decrease the chemical reaction. A microporous and strong material should be applied for ceramic cup.

  16. Flow-induced corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Shanov, Vesselin; Xu, Zhigang; Collins, Boyce; White, Leon; Jang, Yongseok; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study corrosion behavior of magnesium (Mg) alloys (MgZnCa plates and AZ31 stents) under varied fluid flow conditions representative of the vascular environment. Experiments revealed that fluid hydrodynamics, fluid flow velocity and shear stress play essential roles in the corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stent devices. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerates the overall corrosion (including localized, uniform, pitting and erosion corrosions) due to the increased mass transfer and mechanical force. FISS increased the average uniform corrosion rate, the localized corrosion coverage ratios and depths and the removal rate of corrosion products inside the corrosion pits. For MgZnCa plates, an increase of FISS results in an increased pitting factor but saturates at an FISS of ∼0.15Pa. For AZ31 stents, the volume loss ratio (31%) at 0.056Pa was nearly twice that (17%) at 0Pa before and after corrosion. Flow direction has a significant impact on corrosion behavior as more severe pitting and erosion corrosion was observed on the back ends of the MgZnCa plates, and the corrosion product layer facing the flow direction peeled off from the AZ31 stent struts. This study demonstrates that flow-induced corrosion needs be understood so that Mg-based stents in vascular environments can be effectively designed. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis and countermeasures for the corrosion on the shaft of seawater pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hongtao; Chen Haiming

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of the shaft material-3Cr13 was studied through immersion test and electrochemistry test. The results indicated that 3Cr13 and the chromium plating on the shaft had poor resistance against local corrosion in seawater. And the free corrosion potential of 3Cr13 in seawater was lower than other components of the pump, this could accelerate the corrosion rate of the shaft due to galvanic corrosion. A comprehensive analysis showed that the root cause of the corrosion on the No.4 shaft was that 3Cr13 had poor resistance against local corrosion in seawater. Because of the exist of fit-up gap, galvanic corrosion effect and corrosive wear caused by sand, crevice corrosion, galvanic corrosion and wear occurred. All of these accelerated the corrosion rate of the shaft and finally caused its failure. It is suggested that the sealant should be improved and the current material 3Cr13 should be replaced by a kind of materials with better corrosion resistance. (authors)

  18. Monitoring and modeling stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue damage in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P.; Solomon, H.D.; Taylor, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue are significant problems in many industries, causing economic penalties from decreased plant availability and component repair or replacement. In nuclear power reactors, environmental cracking occurs in a wide variety of components, including reactor piping and steam generator tubing, bolting materials and pressure vessels. Life assessment for these components is complicated by the belief that cracking is quite irreproducible. Indeed, for conditions which were once viewed as nominally similar, orders of magnitude variability in crack growth rates are observed for stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue of stainless steels and low-alloy steels in 288 degrees C water. This paper shows that design and life prediction approaches are destined to be overly conservative or to risk environmental failure if life is predicted by quantifying only the effects of mechanical parameters and/or simply ignoring or aggregating environmental and material variabilities. Examples include the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) disposition line for stress-corrosion cracking of stainless steel in boiling water reactor (BWR) water and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Section XI lines for corrosion fatigue

  19. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  20. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...

  1. Corrosive wear. Evaluation of wear and corrosive resistant materials; Noetningskorrosion. Utvaerdering av noetnings- och korrosionsbestaendiga material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H.; Hjertsen, D.; Waara, P.; Prakash, B.; Hardell, J.

    2007-12-15

    With a new purchase of a waste conveyer screw at hand, for the 'A-warehouse' at the combined power and heating plant at E.ON Norrkoeping, the request for improved construction materials was raised. The previous screw required maintenance with very short intervals due to the difficult operation conditions. With the new screw the expectation is to manage 6 months of operation without interruption. The environment for the screw has two main components that sets the demand on the materials, on one hand the corrosive products that comes along and which forms at digestion of the waste and on the other hand the abrasive content in the waste. The term of the mechanism is wear-corrosion and can give considerably higher material loss than the two mechanisms wear and corrosion separately. Combination of a strong corrosive environment together with extensive wear is something that we today have limited knowledge about. The overall objective of the project has been to establish better wear and corrosive resistant construction materials for a waste conveyer screw that will lead to reduced operational disturbance costs. The evaluation has been performed in both controlled laboratory environments and in field tests, which has given us a better understanding of what materials are more suitable in this tough environment and has given us a tool for future predictions of the wear rate of the different material. The new conveyer screw, installed in February 2007 and with which the field test have been performed, has considerably reduced the wear of the construction and the target of 6 month maintenance-free operation is met with this screw for all the evaluated materials. The wear along the screw varies very much and with a clear trend for all the materials to increase towards the feeding direction of the screw. As an example, the wear plate SS2377 (stainless duplex steel) has a useful life at the most affected areas that is calculated to be 1077 days of operation with the

  2. Corrosion of Magnesium in Multimaterial System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Agnew, Sean

    2017-08-16

    The TMS Magnesium Committee has been actively involved in presenting cutting-edge research and development and the latest trends related to magnesium and its alloys to industry and academia. Topics including magnesium alloy development, applications, mechanism of deformation and corrosion, thermomechanical processing, modelling, etc. have been captured year after year through the Magnesium Technology symposium and conference proceedings at TMS and through special topics in JOM. Every year, based on the unanimous endorsement from the industry and academia, a topic is selected to address the latest developments within this subject in JOM. In continuation with last year’s coverage of Advances and Achievements in In-Situ Analysis of Corrosions and Structure–Property Relationship in Mg Alloys,[1] this year’s topic focuses on the Corrosion of Magnesium in Multimaterial Systems. Magnesium, the lightest of all the structural materials, has garnered much interest in the transportation, electronics packaging, defense equipments and industries alike and are more commonly being incorporated in multimaterial design concepts.[2-4] However, the application of the same is limited due to its highly corrosive nature, and understanding and mitigating the corrosion of magnesium has been a major research challenge.

  3. Development of an Improved Crack Propagation Model for Corrosion-Induced Cover Cracking in RC Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilyati, S.; Nizam, Z. M.; Zurisman, M. A. A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2017-06-01

    During the last two decades, reinforced concrete (RC) has been extensively used in most of the world as one of the common construction material due to its advantages and durability. However, RC structures exposed to marine environments are subjected to chloride attack. Chlorides from seawater penetrate into RC structures are not only causing severe corrosion problems but also affect the durability and serviceability of such structures. This paper investigates the influence of transverse reinforcement and spacing of reinforcing bars on concrete cover cracking of two-way RC slab specimens using accelerated corrosion tests. The experimental program involved the testing of four RC slab specimens and was generally designed to observe the crack width and the time of crack to propagate. An improved model for predicting the timing of crack propagation based on the experimental data was then developed.

  4. Influence of Deposit Formation on Corrosion at a Straw Fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug; Michelsen, Hanne Philbert; Frandsen, Flemming

    2000-01-01

    Straw-fired boilers generally experience severe problems with deposit formation and are expected to suffer from severe superheater corrosion at high steam temperatures due to the large alkali and chlorine content in straw. In this study, deposits collected (1) on air-cooled probes and (2) directly...... at the existing heat transfer surfaces of a straw-fired boiler have been examined. Deposits collected on air-cooled probes were found to consist of an inner layer of KCl and an outer layer of sintered fly ash. Ash deposits formed on the heat transfer surfaces all had a characteristic layered structure......, with a dense layer of K2SO4 present adjacent to the metal surface. It is argued that the K2SO4 layer present adjacent to the metal surface may lead to reduced corrosion rates at this boiler. A discussion of the deposit structure, the K2SO4 layer formation mechanism, and the influence of the inner layer...

  5. Corrosion on Mars: An Investigation of Corrosion Mechanisms Under Relevant Simulated Martian Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Johansen, Michael R.; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2017-01-01

    This one-year project was selected by NASA's Science Innovation Fund in FY17 to address Corrosion on Mars which is a problem that has not been addressed before. Corrosion resistance is one of the most important properties in selecting materials for landed spacecraft and structures that will support surface operations for the human exploration of Mars. Currently, the selection of materials is done by assuming that the corrosion behavior of a material on Mars will be the same as that on Earth. This is understandable given that there is no data regarding the corrosion resistance of materials in the Mars environment. However, given that corrosion is defined as the degradation of a metal that results from its chemical interaction with the environment, it cannot be assumed that corrosion is going to be the same in both environments since they are significantly different. The goal of this research is to develop a systematic approach to understand corrosion of spacecraft materials on Mars by conducting a literature search of available data, relevant to corrosion in the Mars environment, and by performing preliminary laboratory experiments under relevant simulated Martian conditions. This project was motivated by the newly found evidence for the presence of transient liquid brines on Mars that coincided with the suggestion, by a team of researchers, that some of the structural degradation observed on Curiosity's wheels may be caused by corrosive interactions with the brines, while the most significant damage was attributed to rock scratching. An extensive literature search on data relevant to Mars corrosion confirmed the need for further investigation of the interaction between materials used for spacecraft and structures designed to support long-term surface operations on Mars. Simple preliminary experiments, designed to look at the interaction between an aerospace aluminum alloy (AA7075-T73) and the gases present in the Mars atmosphere, at 20degC and a pressure of 700 Pa

  6. Corrosivity of hot flue gases in the fluidized bed combustion of recovered waste wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enestam, S.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, recovered waste wood has become a fuel of interest due to its green energy benefits and low price compared to virgin wood-based fuels. However, waste wood is often contaminated with paint, plastic, and metal components, producing concentrations of heavy metals such as zinc and lead, chlorine, sodium, and sometimes sulphur that are elevated relative to those in virgin wood. In several cases, boilers burning waste wood have experienced increased fouling and corrosion of furnace walls, superheaters, and economizers, problems associated with chlorine, zinc, lead, and alkali metals in the deposits. The location of the deposits and the corrosion as well as the composition of the deposits vary with the fuel composition, boiler design, combustion parameters, flue gas temperature, and material temperature. Experience gained from the operation of biofuel and waste boilers shows that corrosion damage can be reduced, or even avoided, by the selection of optimum materials or for heat exchanger surfaces, by the use of fuel mixtures or additives that decrease the corrosivity of the combustion environment, by the placement of superheaters in a less corrosive environment, and by adjusting the steam parameters. Finding the right solutions for boilers burning RWW requires a thorough understanding of the whole process, including the fuel fed into the boiler, the combustion atmosphere, the corrosivity of the flue gas and the deposits, and the corrosion resistance of different boiler materials under the prevailing conditions. The objective of this work was to shed more light on the combustion environment in bubbling fluidized bed boilers burning RWW and thus increase knowledge about the corrosivity of zinc- and lead-rich deposits formed during the combustion of RWW, with the final goal of developing a corrosion prediction tool for use in the design of boilers for RWW combustion. With such a tool, it would be possible to optimize boiler design and material selection with

  7. Boric acid corrosion of low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.; White, G.; Collin, J.; Marks, C. [Dominion Engineering, Inc., Reston, Virginia (United States); Reid, R.; Crooker, P. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2010-07-01

    In the last decade, the industry has been aware of a potential loss of coolant accident (LOCA) per the following scenario: primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of a primary system component or weld leads to a coolant leak, the coolant corrodes a low alloy steel structural component (e.g., the reactor vessel (RV) or the reactor vessel head (RVH)), and corrosion degrades the pressure boundary leading to a loss of coolant accident. The industry has taken several steps to address this concern, including replacement of the most susceptible components (RVH replacement), enhanced inspection (both NDE of components and visual inspections for boric acid deposits), and safety analyses to determine appropriate inspection intervals. Although these measures are generally thought to have adequately addressed this issue, there have been some uncertainties in the safety analyses which the industry has sought to address in order to quantify the extent of conservatism in the safety analyses. Specifically, there has been some uncertainty regarding the rate of boric acid corrosion under various conditions which might arise due to a PWSCC leak and the extent to which boric acid deposits are retained near the leak under various geometries. This paper reviews the results of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Reliability Program (MRP) boric acid corrosion (BAC) test programs conducted over the last 8 years, focusing on the most recent results of full-scale mockup testing of CRDM nozzle and bottom mounted nozzle (BMN) configurations. The main purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of the risk of boric acid corrosion as it is informed by the results of the testing conducted over the last eight years. The rate of boric acid corrosion has been found to be a function of many factors, including initial chemistry, the extent of concentration due to boiling, the temperature at which concentration takes place, the velocity

  8. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: I. Swamp Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyoweni Widanarko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of infrastructures using steel concrete to reinforce the strength of concrete. Steel concrete is so vulnerable to chemical compounds that can cause corrosion. It can happen due to the presence of chemical compounds in acid environment in low pH level. These chemical compounds are SO42-, Cl-, NO3-. There are many swamp area in Indonesia. The acid contents and the concentration of ion sulphate, chlorides, and nitrate are higher in the swamp water than in the ground water .The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals in the swamp water to the steel concrete corrosion rate. There were two treatment used: (1 emerging ST 37 and ST 60 within 60 days in the 'polluted' swamp water, (2 moving the ST 37 up and down periodically in the ' polluted' swamp water. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp water were made by increasing the concentration of corrosive chemical up to 1X, 5X and 10X respectively. The corrosion rate was measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that chloride had the greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by sulphate and Nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 is 24.29 mpy and for ST 60 is 22.76 mpy. By moving the sample up and down, the corrosion rate of ST 37 increase up to 37.59 mpy, and chloride still having the greatest influence, followed by sulphate and nitrate.

  9. Research process of nondestructive testing pitting corrosion in metal material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo ZHANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion directly affects the usability and service life of metal material, so the effective nondestructive testing and evaluation on pitting corrosion is of great significance for fatigue life prediction because of data supporting. The features of pitting corrosion are elaborated, and the relation between the pitting corrosion parameters and fatigue performance is pointed out. Through introducing the fundamental principles of pitting corrosion including mainly magnetic flux leakage inspection, pulsed eddy current and guided waves, the research status of nondestructive testing technology for pitting corrosion is summarized, and the key steps of nondestructive testing technologies are compared and analyzed from the theoretical model, signal processing to industrial applications. Based on the analysis of the signal processing specificity of different nondestructive testing technologies in detecting pitting corrosion, the visualization combined with image processing and signal analysis are indicated as the critical problems of accurate extraction of pitting defect information and quantitative characterization for pitting corrosion. The study on non-contact nondestructive testing technologies is important for improving the detection precision and its application in industries.

  10. Surface treatment and history-dependent corrosion in lead alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ning; Zhang Jinsuo; Sencer, Bulent H.; Koury, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    In oxygen-controlled lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), steel corrosion may be strongly history dependent. This is due to the competition between liquid metal dissolution corrosion and oxidation as a 'self-healing' protection barrier. Such effects can be observed from corrosion testing of a variety of surface-treated materials, such as cold working, shot peening, pre-oxidation, etc. Shot peening of austenitic steels produces surface-layer microstructural damages and grain compression, which could contribute to increased Cr migration to the surface and enhance the protection through an impervious oxide. Pre-oxidation under conditions different from operating ones may form more protective oxides, reduce oxygen and metal ion migration through the oxides, and achieve better protection for longer durations. Corrosion and oxidation modeling and analysis reveal the potential for significantly reducing long-term corrosion rates by initial and early-stage conditioning of steels for Pb/LBE services

  11. Surface treatment and history-dependent corrosion in lead alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ning [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)]. E-mail: ningli@lanl.gov; Zhang Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sencer, Bulent H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Koury, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2006-06-23

    In oxygen-controlled lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), steel corrosion may be strongly history dependent. This is due to the competition between liquid metal dissolution corrosion and oxidation as a 'self-healing' protection barrier. Such effects can be observed from corrosion testing of a variety of surface-treated materials, such as cold working, shot peening, pre-oxidation, etc. Shot peening of austenitic steels produces surface-layer microstructural damages and grain compression, which could contribute to increased Cr migration to the surface and enhance the protection through an impervious oxide. Pre-oxidation under conditions different from operating ones may form more protective oxides, reduce oxygen and metal ion migration through the oxides, and achieve better protection for longer durations. Corrosion and oxidation modeling and analysis reveal the potential for significantly reducing long-term corrosion rates by initial and early-stage conditioning of steels for Pb/LBE services.

  12. New water guidelines developed to battle nuclear corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses methods of preventing degradation of nuclear steam generators due to a combination of impurities and corrosion products in the secondary system. Explains that tube and support-plate corrosion has been the main concern, manifesting itself primarily in the recirculating units used in PWR systems. Points out that the battle against corrosion is closely linked to control of ionic impurities, alkalinity, oxidants, and sludge-copper and iron corrosion products, primarily-in condensate and feedwater systems. Examines a set of secondary-water-chemistry guidelines developed by the Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG). Presents diagram showing changes at Salem 1 to arrest corrosion, including condenser retubing, addition of condensate polisher and recirculation loop. Table indicates how preventive measures at Salem 1, affected secondary-water chemistry

  13. Examination of personality traits and social problem-solving skills of individuals whose driving licenses have been confiscated due to drunk driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymur, Ibrahim; Budak, Ersin; Duyan, Veli; Kanat, Bilgen Biçer; Önen, Sinay

    2017-01-02

    Drunk driving is one of the major behavioral issues connected with problematic alcohol consumption. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between personality traits and social problem-solving skills of individuals who drive while intoxicated. One hundred forty-four individuals apprehended twice while driving drunk and sent to a driver behavior training program (9 females and 135 males) participated in our study. The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised-Abbreviated (EPQ-RA) composed of 4 subscales (Extroversion, Neuroticism, Psychoticism, and Lying) and the Social Problem Solving Inventory (SPSI) composed of 7 subscales (Cognitive, Emotion, Behavior, Problem Definition and Formulation, Creating Solution Options, Solution Implementation and Verification, and Decision Making) were used to evaluate the participants. A positive relationship was found between the Extroversion subscale of the EPQ-RA and the Cognition subscale (P .05). Drinking and driving behaviors appear to be negative or maladaptive behaviors closely related to personality traits and may represent an effort to avoid negative emotions. Evaluation of negative emotions may have an important place in training programs intended to change drunk driving behavior.

  14. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, C; Milodowski, A E; Baker, A C

    2014-02-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm(-2) y(-1) and 2.5-48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The role of stress in self-ordered porous anodic oxide formation and corrosion of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraz, Omer Ozgur

    The phenomenon of plastic flow induced by electrochemical reactions near room temperature is significant in porous anodic oxide (PAO) films, charging of lithium batteries and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). As this phenomenon is poorly understood, fundamental insight into flow from our work may provide useful information for these problems. In-situ monitoring of the stress state allows direct correlation between stress and the current or potential, thus providing fundamental insight into technologically important deformation and failure mechanisms induced by electrochemical reactions. A phase-shifting curvature interferometry was designed to investigate the stress generation mechanisms on different systems. Resolution of our curvature interferometry was found to be ten times more powerful than that obtained by state-of-art multiple deflectometry technique and the curvature interferometry helps to resolve the conflicting reports in the literature. During this work, formation of surface patterns during both aqueous corrosion of aluminum and formation of PAO films were investigated. Interestingly, for both cases, stress induced plastic flow controls the formation of surface patterns. Pore formation mechanisms during anodizing of the porous aluminum oxide films was investigated . PAO films are formed by the electrochemical oxidation of metals such as aluminum and titanium in a solution where oxide is moderately soluble. They have been used extensively to design numerous devices for optical, catalytic, and biological and energy related applications, due to their vertically aligned-geometry, high-specific surface area and tunable geometry by adjusting process variables. These structures have developed empirically, in the absence of understanding the process mechanism. Previous experimental studies of anodizing-induced stress have extensively focused on the measurement of average stress, however the measurement of stress evolution during anodizing does not provide

  16. Corrosion control in CANDU nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesurf, J.E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion control in CANDU reactors which use pressurized heavy water (PHW) and boiling light water (BLW) coolants is discussed. Discussions are included on pressure tubes, primary water chemistry, fuel sheath oxidation and hydriding, and crud transport. It is noted that corrosion has not been a significant problem in CANDU nuclear power reactors which is a tribute to design, material selection, and chemistry control. This is particularly notable at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station which will have four CANDU-PHW reactors of 540 MWe each. The net capacity factor for Pickering-I from first full power (May 1971) to March 1972 was 79.5 percent, and for Pickering II (first full power November 1971) to March 1972 was 83.5 percent. Pickering III has just reached full power operation (May 1972) and Pickering IV is still under construction. Gentilly CANDU-BLW reached full power operation in May 1972 after extensive commissioning tests at lower power levels with no major corrosion or chemistry problems appearing. Experience and operating data confirm that the value of careful attention to all aspects of corrosion control and augur well for future CANDU reactors. (U.S.)

  17. Review of hot corrosion of thermal barrier coatings of gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yongbao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The review was done in order to make clear the problem of the hot corrosion of the Thermal Barrier Coatings(TBCsduring gas turbine serving. This paper summarizes the factors resulting from the hot corrosion of TBCs during turbine service and classifies methods for enhancing the corrosive resistance of TBCs. A prospective methodology for improving corrosion resistance is also formulated. The main types of corrosion coating include phase reaction, oxidizing of the bond coating, salt-fog corrosion, CMAS corrosion and fuel impurity corrosion. So far, methods for improving the corrosion resistance of TBCs include developing new coating materials, anticorrosive treatment on the surface of TBCs, modifying the stacking configuration and improving the cleansing functions of the gas turbines. In the future, developing new materials with excellent performance will still be the main direction for boosting the improvement of the hot corrosion resistance of TBCs. Simultaneously, improving the tacking configuration and nanotechnology of TBC coatings are potential approaches for improving corrosion resistance. With the development of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC, the focus of the hot corrosion of TBCs may turn to that of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs.

  18. The Evaluation of Crevice Corrosion of Inconel-600 and 304 Stainless Steel in Reductive Decontamination Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Junyoung; Park, Sangyoon; Won, Huijun; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon; Park, Sojin

    2014-01-01

    In this sturdy, we investigated the characteristics of corrosion to Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel which are mainly used for the steam generator and primary system of PWR reactor respectively. We conducted the corrosion test for the HYBRID (HYdrazine Based metal Ion Reductive decontamination) which was developed in KAERI, Citrox and Oxalic acid solutions used in reductive decontamination of the inner surface of PWR. Since Citrox and oxalic acid solution were well-known conventional decontamination solutions, it is meaningful to compare the corrosion result of HYBRID with those solutions to confirm the corrosion compatibility. In order to obtain visible results in a limited time, we conducted the crevice corrosion tests under harsh condition. According to the results of crevice corrosion tests, we can conclude that metals such as type 304 stainless steel and Inconel-600 in HYBRID are very stable against crevice corrosion. On the other hand, those metals in Citrox and oxalic acid solutions were very susceptible to the crevice corrosion. Especially when using the oxalic acid solution, severe corrosion was observed not only Inconel-600 but also 304 stainless steel. The degree of corrosion can be expressed as; HYBRID << Citrox < OA. Conclusively, our results support that the HYBRID is more stable to the corrosion of structural materials in primary system than other Citrox and oxalic acid solutions. This finding will appoint the HYBRID solution as a candidate to solve the corrosion problem which is often issued by existing chemical decontamination processes

  19. Evaluation of corrosive behavior of SAE 5155 by corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening and corrosive condition for corrosion property was investigated on immersed in 3.5% NaCl, 10% HNO 3 + 3% HF, 6% FeCl 3 . The immersion test was performed on two kinds of specimen. The immersion periods was performed 30days. Corrosion potential, weight loss were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated

  20. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorek, Jolanta; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Jones, Walis; Krzak, Justyna

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented. PMID:29373540

  1. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Gąsiorek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented.

  2. Functionalizable Sol-Gel Silica Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsiorek, Jolanta; Szczurek, Anna; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Jones, Walis; Krzak, Justyna

    2018-01-26

    Corrosion is constantly a major problem of the world economy in the field of metal products, metal processing and other areas that utilise metals. Previously used compounds utilizing hexavalent chromium were amongst the most effective materials for corrosion protection but regulations have been recently introduced that forbid their use. Consequently, there is a huge drive by engineers, technologists and scientists from different disciplines focused on searching a new, more effective and environmentally-friendly means of corrosion protection. One novel group of materials with the potential to solve metal protection problems are sol-gel thin films, which are increasingly interesting as mitigation corrosion barriers. These environmentally-friendly and easy-to-obtain coatings have the promise to be an effective alternative to hexavalent chromium compounds using for anti-corrosion industrial coatings. In this review the authors present a range of different solutions for slow down the corrosion processes of metallic substrates by using the oxides and doped oxides obtained by the sol-gel method. Examples of techniques used to the sol-gel coating examinations, in terms of anti-corrosion protection, are also presented.

  3. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Serdar, Marijana

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide-hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel.

  4. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Kunz, Martin; Bjegovic, Dubravka; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide-hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel.

  5. A corrosion detection system for buried pipeline (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Seok; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jung Gu

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop a new corrosion sensor for detecting and monitoring the corrosion of buried pipeline, the electrochemical property of sensors and the correlation of its output to corrosion rate of steel pipe, were evaluated by electrochemical methods in synthetic groundwater, two soils of varying resistivity (5,000 ohm-cm, 10,000 ohm-cm), and synthetic tap water. In this paper, two types of electrochemical probes were used: galvanic cells containing of pipeline steel-copper and pipeline steel-stainless steel (Type 304). The results of EIS measurement indicated that the sensor current was inversely related to sensor resistance, which was governed by the corrosion behavior of cathode. In galvanic corrosion tests, the galvanic current of Cu-CS probe was higher than that of SS-CS probe. The comparison of the sensor output and corrosion rates revealed that a linear relationship was found between the probe current and the corrosion rates. A good linear quantitative relationship was found between the Cu-CS probe current and the corrosion rate of pipeline steel coupons in the soil resistivity of 5,000 ohm-cm, and synthetic tap water. In the case of the soil resistivity of 10,000 ohm-cm, although the SS-CS probe showed a better linear correlation than that of Cu-CS probe, the Cu-CS probe is more suitable than SS-CS probe, due to the high current output

  6. Improvement of the corrosion resistance by using enamel coating applied to the carbon steel fin tubes of the HRSG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Seok; Lee, Jong Wook [BHI, Haman (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Gas side corrosion affects all heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs). Consequences range from unsightliness and reduced performance to reliability problems and potential safety hazards. The enamel coating used for the HRSG fin tubes was visually and microscopically inspected, analyzed and compared with original one. From the results of the analysis, there was not much different between the coating and the original in the comparison of the strength, SEM (scanning electron microscope), and thermal expansion. For the overall heat transfer due to the coating, it was found that the coating fin tubes have about 2% degradation in comparison with the original ones. However, the use of enamel coating can help strongly to delay the corrosion problem by flue gases in the HRSG.

  7. Electrochemical noise measurements of steel corrosion in the molten NaCl-K2SO4 system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm; Bjerrum, Niels; Petrushina, Irina

    2005-01-01

    -called active corrosion (i.e., the corrosion proceeds with no passivation due to the influence of chlorine), characterized by the formation of volatile metal chlorides as a primary corrosion product. It was found possible to obtain an empirical separation of general and intergranular corrosion using kurtosis (a......Electrochemical noise measurements have been carried out on AISI347, 10CrMo910, 15Mo3, and X20CrMoV121 steels in molten NaCl-K2SO4 at 630 degrees C. Different types of current noise have been identified for pitting, intergranular and peeling corrosion. The corrosion mechanism was the so...... statistical parameter calculated from the electrochemical noise data). It was found that average kurtosis values above 6 indicated intergranular corrosion and average values below 6 indicated general corrosion. The response time for localized corrosion detection in in-plant monitoring was approximately 90 min...

  8. Corrosion failure analysis as related to prevention of corrosion failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suss, H.

    1977-10-01

    The factors and conditions which have contributed to many of the corrosion related service failures are discussed based on a review of actual case histories. The anti-corrosion devices which developed as a result of these failure analyses are reviewed, and the method which must be adopted and used to take advantage of the available corrosion prevention techniques is discussed

  9. Modelling hydrodynamic parameters to predict flow assisted corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulson, B.; Greenwell, B.; Chexal, B.; Horowitz, J.

    1992-01-01

    During the past 15 years, flow assisted corrosion has been a worldwide problem in the power generating industry. The phenomena is complex and depends on environment, material composition, and hydrodynamic factors. Recently, modeling of flow assisted corrosion has become a subject of great importance. A key part of this effort is modeling the hydrodynamic aspects of this issue. This paper examines which hydrodynamic parameter should be used to correlate the occurrence and rate of flow assisted corrosion with physically meaningful parameters, discusses ways of measuring the relevant hydrodynamic parameter, and describes how the hydrodynamic data is incorporated into the predictive model

  10. Decontamination and materials corrosion concerns in the BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Gordon, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    The qualification of chemical decontamination processes to decontaminate complete systems or individual components in essential if effective inspection, maintenance, repair or replacement of plant components is to be achieved with minimum exposure of workers to ionizing radiation. However, it is critical that the benefits of decontamination processes are not overshadowed by deleterious materials/ corrosion side effects during the application of the process or during subsequent operation. This paper discusses such potential corrosion/materials problems in the BWR and presents relevant available corrosion data for the various commercial decontamination processes. (author)

  11. Corrosion resistance of metal materials for HLW canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takashi; Muraoka, Susumu; Tashiro, Shingo

    1982-02-01

    In order to verify the materials as an important artificial barrier for canister of vitrified high-level waste from spent fuel reprocessing, data and reports were researched on corrosion resistance of the materials under conditions from glass form production to final disposal. Then, in this report, investigated subjects, improvement methods and future subjects are reviewed. It has become clear that there would be no problem on the inside and outside corrosion of the canister during glass production, but long term corrosion and radiation effect tests and the vitrification methods would be subjects in future on interim storage and final disposal conditions. (author)

  12. Electrochemical tests for pitting and crevice corrosion susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postlethwaite, J.

    1983-01-01

    Passive metals are being considered as container materials for the disposal of nuclear waste by deep burial. Localized corrosion is a potential problem and electrochemical techniques have an important role in the assessment of the susceptibility of these container materials to crevice and pitting corrosion. This paper critically reviews both the theoretical background and the experimental details of the electrochemical test methods presently used in both industrial and scientific studies of localized corrosion in both halide and non-halide solutions and identifies those areas where theory and experimental behaviour are in agreement and those areas for which there is neither well established theory nor an experimental test method

  13. Localized corrosion information using high resolution measurement devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan

    2005-01-01

    High performance demand for several engineering alloys and components, and miniaturization of electronics and development of MEMS requires better understanding of local corrosion characteristics frequently down to µm scale. This is because in metallic materials corrosion is a sensitive function...... in conjunction with microstructural analysis, using advanced microscopic tools, becomes very important. Corrosion of microelectronics circuits and MEMs is also a recent problem, which demands measurement resolution down to few microns as the components are extremely small, and measurement needs to be carried out...

  14. TRU drum corrosion task team report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooda, K.E.; Lavery, C.A.; Zeek, D.P.

    1996-05-01

    During routine inspections in March 1996, transuranic (TRU) waste drums stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) were found with pinholes and leaking fluid. These drums were overpacked, and further inspection discovered over 200 drums with similar corrosion. A task team was assigned to investigate the problem with four specific objectives: to identify any other drums in RWMC TRU storage with pinhole corrosion; to evaluate the adequacy of the RWMC inspection process; to determine the precise mechanism(s) generating the pinhole drum corrosion; and to assess the implications of this event for WIPP certifiability of waste drums. The task team investigations analyzed the source of the pinholes to be Hcl-induced localized pitting corrosion. Hcl formation is directly related to the polychlorinated hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the waste. Most of the drums showing pinhole corrosion are from Content Code-003 (CC-003) because they contain the highest amounts of polychlorinated VOCs as determined by headspace gas analysis. CC-001 drums represent the only other content code with a significant number of pinhole corrosion drums because their headspace gas VOC content, although significantly less than CC-003, is far greater than that of the other content codes. The exact mechanisms of Hcl formation could not be determined, but radiolytic and reductive dechlorination and direct reduction of halocarbons were analyzed as the likely operable reactions. The team considered the entire range of feasible options, ranked and prioritized the alternatives, and recommended the optimal solution that maximizes protection of worker and public safety while minimizing impacts on RWMC and TRU program operations.

  15. TRU drum corrosion task team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooda, K.E.; Lavery, C.A.; Zeek, D.P.

    1996-05-01

    During routine inspections in March 1996, transuranic (TRU) waste drums stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) were found with pinholes and leaking fluid. These drums were overpacked, and further inspection discovered over 200 drums with similar corrosion. A task team was assigned to investigate the problem with four specific objectives: to identify any other drums in RWMC TRU storage with pinhole corrosion; to evaluate the adequacy of the RWMC inspection process; to determine the precise mechanism(s) generating the pinhole drum corrosion; and to assess the implications of this event for WIPP certifiability of waste drums. The task team investigations analyzed the source of the pinholes to be Hcl-induced localized pitting corrosion. Hcl formation is directly related to the polychlorinated hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the waste. Most of the drums showing pinhole corrosion are from Content Code-003 (CC-003) because they contain the highest amounts of polychlorinated VOCs as determined by headspace gas analysis. CC-001 drums represent the only other content code with a significant number of pinhole corrosion drums because their headspace gas VOC content, although significantly less than CC-003, is far greater than that of the other content codes. The exact mechanisms of Hcl formation could not be determined, but radiolytic and reductive dechlorination and direct reduction of halocarbons were analyzed as the likely operable reactions. The team considered the entire range of feasible options, ranked and prioritized the alternatives, and recommended the optimal solution that maximizes protection of worker and public safety while minimizing impacts on RWMC and TRU program operations

  16. Effect of diamond-like carbon coating on corrosion rate of machinery steel HQ 805

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slat, Winda Sanni; Malau, Viktor; Iswanto, Priyo Tri; Sujitno, Tjipto; Suprapto

    2018-04-01

    HQ 805 is known as a super strength alloys steel and widely applied in military equipment and, aircraft components, drilling device and so on. It is due to its excellent behavior in wear, fatigue, high temperature and high speed operating conditions. The weakness of this material is the vulnerablality to corrosion when employed in sour environments where hydrogen sulfide and chlorides are present. To overcome the problems, an effort should be made to improve or enhance the surface properties for a longer service life. There are varieties of coatings developed and used to improve surface material properties. There are several kinds of coating methods; chemical vapour deposition (CVD), physical vapour deposition (PVD), thermochemical treatment, oxidation, or plasma spraying. This paper presents the research result of the influence of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coating deposited using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) on corrosion rate (by potentiodynamic polarization method) of HQ 805 machinery steel. As a carbon sources, a mixture of argon (Ar) and methane (CH4) with ratio 76% : 24% was used in this experiment. The conditions of experiment were 400 °C of temperature, 1.2 mbar, 1.4 mbar, 1.6 mbar and 1.8 mbar of pressure of process. Investigated surface properties were hardness (microhardness tester), roughness (roughness test), chemical composition (Spectrometer), microstructure (SEM) and corrosion rate (potentiodynamic polarization). It has been found that the optimum condition with the lowest corrosion rate is at a pressure of 1.4 mbar with a deposition duration of 4 hours at a constant temperature of 400 °C. In this condition, the corrosion rate decreases from 12.326 mpy to 4.487 mpy.

  17. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-09-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters, - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pin deposits (activation), - the release and transport of cobalt-60, - the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarised. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobalt build-up in the primary circuit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of chromium-nickel steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with the understanding of activation processes of cobalt deposited on the fuel pins and in the mass transfer of cobalt-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. Accumulation of data from different BWRs contributes little to the understanding of the activity build-up. However, there are examples that the problem of activity build-up can be kept under control. Although many details for a quantitative understanding are still missing, the most important correlations are visible. The activity build-up in the BWR recirculation systems cannot be kept low by a single measure. Rather a whole series of measures is necessary, which influences not only cobalt-60 deposition but also plant and operation costs. (author) 26 figs., 13 tabs., 90 refs

  18. Ultrasonic assessment of service life of concrete structures subject to reinforcing steel corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udegbunam, Ogechukwu Christian

    Over half of the bridges in the United States were built before 1970. Such bridges and the network of roads that they carry include the Inter State system, which was built as part of the great public works program, following the end of the Second World War. During that era, the emphasis was on strength design and economical construction of new structures, and not much premium was placed on durability and maintainability concerns. Since the end of this construction boom in the early 1970s, the concern for the durability of transportation infrastructure has steadily gained prominence among those agencies that must secure, program and administer funds for maintaining highway networks. The objective of this research was to develop a nondestructive method of assessing the durability of concrete bridge decks susceptible to damage from corrosion of embedded reinforcing steel. This was accomplished by formulating a holistic approach that accounts for the major factors that influence corrosion based deterioration of reinforced concrete. In this approach, the assessment of the durability of concrete bridge decks is based on a model that estimates the time it takes for the cover concrete to fail a result of stresses caused by expansion of reinforcing steel bars, due to corrosion activities. This time to failure is comprised of two distinct periods that must be evaluated before the problem can be solved. The research consisted of an experimental program and an analytical study. In the experimental program concrete specimens were cast and tested to determine their diffusivity and mechanical properties. The diffusivity was used to evaluate the period it takes for corrosion of the reinforcing bars to commence. In the analytical study, the resistance of the concrete structure against the internal forces caused by corrosion was evaluated with the finite element techniques. This resistance was used to evaluate the period defining the failure of the cover concrete. These two periods

  19. Enhancement of wear and corrosion resistance of beta titanium alloy by laser gas alloying with nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Lee, Seunghwan; Smith, Graham; Sarri, Gianluca; Ng, Chi-Ho; Sharba, Ahmed; Man, Hau-Chung

    2016-03-01

    The relatively high elastic modulus coupled with the presence of toxic vanadium (V) in Ti6Al4V alloy has long been a concern in orthopaedic applications. To solve the problem, a variety of non-toxic and low modulus beta-titanium (beta-Ti) alloys have been developed. Among the beta-Ti alloy family, the quaternary Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta (TNZT) alloys have received the highest attention as a promising replacement for Ti6Al4V due to their lower elastic modulus and outstanding long term stability against corrosion in biological environments. However, the inferior wear resistance of TNZT is still a problem that must be resolved before commercialising in the orthopaedic market. In this work, a newly developed laser surface treatment technique was employed to improve the surface properties of Ti-35.3Nb-7.3Zr-5.7Ta alloy. The surface structure and composition of the laser-treated TNZT surface were examined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wear and corrosion resistance were evaluated by pin-on-plate sliding test and anodic polarisation test in Hanks' solution. The experimental results were compared with the untreated (or base) TNZT material. The research findings showed that the laser surface treatment technique reported in this work can effectively improve the wear and corrosion resistance of TNZT.

  20. Corrosion resistant alloy uses in the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, J.L.; Hall, F.A.; Asphahani, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Nickel-base alloys have been used as cost-effective measures in a variety of severely corrosive situations in pollution control units for coal-fired power plants. Cost effectiveness and practical answers to corrosion problems are illustrated (specifically the wallpaper concept/metallic lining technique). Numerous cases of successful use of HASTELLOY alloys in Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) systems and hazardous waste treatment incineration scrubber systems are listed. In this paper developments in nickel-base alloys and their use in FGD and other segments of the power industry are discussed. In the Ni-Cr-Mo-W alloy family, the C-22 alloy has the best resistance to localized corrosion in halide environments (chloride/fluoride-containing solutions). This alloy is also used effectively as a universal filler metal to weld less-resistant alloys were weld corrosion may be a problem. Field performance of this alloy in the power industry is described