WorldWideScience

Sample records for corrosion cracking propagation

  1. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  2. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, Δt greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, Δx, decreased linearly with Δt. With Δt less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, Δx = Δx* which approached a limiting value of 1 μm. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  3. Propagation of stress-corrosion cracks in unirradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norring, K.; Haag, Y.; Wikstroem, C.

    1982-01-01

    Propagation of iodine-induced stress-corrosion cracks in Zircaloy was studied using pre-cracked and internally pressurized cladding tubes. These were recrystallized at different temperatures, to obtain grain sizes between 4 μm and 10 μm. No statistically significant difference in propagation rate due to the difference in grain size was observed. If the obtained data, with Ksub(I) values ranging from 4 to 11 MNmsup(-3/2), were log-log plotted (da/dt = CKsub(I)sup(N)), as usual, they fell within the scatter-band of data reported earlier. But from this plot it could also be seen that the Ksub(I) interval can be divided into two separate parts having different da/dt-Ksub(I) relations. The transition takes place at a Ksub(I) value of about 8 MNmsup(-3/2). The region with lower Ksub(I) values shows a substantially lower n value than the upper region (2.4 and 9.8 respectively), and earlier reported values (n = 7 to 10). This transition is in good agreement with a transition from an intergranular to a transgranular propagation mode of the stress-corrosion crack. (orig.)

  4. Development of an Improved Crack Propagation Model for Corrosion-Induced Cover Cracking in RC Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilyati, S.; Nizam, Z. M.; Zurisman, M. A. A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2017-06-01

    During the last two decades, reinforced concrete (RC) has been extensively used in most of the world as one of the common construction material due to its advantages and durability. However, RC structures exposed to marine environments are subjected to chloride attack. Chlorides from seawater penetrate into RC structures are not only causing severe corrosion problems but also affect the durability and serviceability of such structures. This paper investigates the influence of transverse reinforcement and spacing of reinforcing bars on concrete cover cracking of two-way RC slab specimens using accelerated corrosion tests. The experimental program involved the testing of four RC slab specimens and was generally designed to observe the crack width and the time of crack to propagate. An improved model for predicting the timing of crack propagation based on the experimental data was then developed.

  5. Corrosion initiation and propagation in cracked concrete - a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Polder, R.

    2012-01-01

    The major degradation mechanism in civil engineering concrete structures is corrosion of reinforcement due to chloride penetration. Corrosion reduces serviceability and safety due to cracking and spalling of concrete and loss of steel cross section. Recently, service life design has moved from

  6. Quantitative characterization of initiation and propagation in stress corrosion cracking. An approach of a phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raquet, O.

    1994-01-01

    A purely phenomenological study of stress corrosion cracking was performed using the couple Z2CN 18.10 (304L) austenitic stainless steel/boiling MgCl 2 aqueous solution. The exploitation of the morphological information (shape of the cracks and size distribution) available after constant elongation rate tests led to the proposal of an analytical expression of the crack initiation and growth rates. This representation allowed to quantitatively characterize the influence of the applied strain rate as well as the effect of corrosion inhibitors on the crack initiation and propagation phases. It can be used in the search for the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms as a 'riddle' for the determination of the rate controlling steps. As a matter of fact, no mechanistic hypothesis has been used for its development. (author)

  7. Initiation and propagation of rebar corrosion in carbonated and cracked concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghantous, Rita-Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to study the carbonation-induced corrosion initiation and propagation in cracked concrete under different conditions. It is performed in the framework of concrete ageing management of cooling towers of Electricity of France (EDF) nuclear power plants. Indeed some of them can be affected by cracks which may promote the carbonation of the concrete surrounding the cracks and induce a rapid reinforcement corrosion initiation in the carbonated area. Firstly, cracks representative of those encountered in the cooling towers concrete are reproduced on laboratory specimens using the three point bending test. Three crack openings are obtained (100 μm, 300 μm and 500 μm). Cracked specimens are thereafter exposed to accelerated carbonation for two aims. First for the acceleration of the concrete neutralization phase which ensure the suitable thermodynamic conditions for active corrosion initiation. Second, for the estimation of the length of the mechanically damaged steel/binder interface supposed to be comparable to the carbonated length along the rebar on both sides of the crack. It is found that carbonation at 50% CO_2 is not suitable here because it overestimated the damaged zone length, maybe due to enhanced carbonation shrinkage. The second part aims to investigate the corrosion initiation and propagation phases while varying several parameters. For this purpose, cracked and carbonated specimens are subjected to corrosion under different exposure conditions. Specimens showing different crack widths and different types of binder are corroded in a reference test in which 30 minutes of rain occurs each 3 days at 20 C. Additionally, some corrosion tests are realized under raining/drying cycles for 3 minutes rain, other at 40 C and other in natural environmental conditions. Moreover, some cracked specimens are exposed in different orientations with respect to rain. Furthermore, specimens with different bars locations are prepared in order to investigate

  8. Influence of corrosion environment composition on crack propagation in high-strength martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaniv, O.N.; Nikiforchin, G.N.; Tsirul'nik, A.T.

    1984-01-01

    The 40 Kh steel is taken as an example to investigate the dependence of electrochemical parameters in the crack tip and characteristics of corrosion static cracking resistance of martensitic steel on the composition of environment. The tests are performed in acidic and alkaline solutions prepared by adding HC or NaOH in distilled water. It is established that growth of pH value of initial solutions trom 0 to 13 brings about linear increase of a threshold stress intensity factor. It is found that acidic medium in the crack tip preserves up to pH 13 of initial medium. The possibility of corrosion crack propagation in alkaline solutions according to the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement is proved

  9. Modeling time-dependent corrosion fatigue crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Mark E.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted with the susceptible S-L orientation of AA7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution, to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO. This environment enhances da/dN by five to ten-fold compared to fatigue in moist air. Time-based crack growth rates from quasi-static load experiments are an order of magnitude too small for accurate linear superposition prediction of da/dN for loading frequencies above 0.001 Hz. Alternate methods of establishing da/dt, based on rising-load or ripple-load-enhanced crack tip strain rate, do not increase da/dt and do not improve linear superposition. Corrosion fatigue is characterized by two regimes of frequency dependence; da/dN is proportional to f(exp -1) below 0.001 Hz and to F(exp 0) to F(exp -0.1) for higher frequencies. Da/dN increases mildly both with increasing hold-time at K(sub max) and with increasing rise-time for a range of loading waveforms. The mild time-dependence is due to cycle-time-dependent corrosion fatigue growth. This behavior is identical for S-L nd L-T crack orientations. The frequency response of environmental fatigue in several 7000 series alloys is variable and depends on undefined compositional or microstructural variables. Speculative explanations are based on the effect of Mg on occluded crack chemistry and embritting hydrogen uptake, or on variable hydrogen diffusion in the crack tip process zone. Cracking in the 7075/NaCl system is adequately described for life prediction by linear superposition for prolonged load-cycle periods, and by a time-dependent upper bound relationship between da/dN and delta K for moderate loading times.

  10. Effect of acid corrosion on crack propagation of concrete beams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HU SHAOWEI

    2018-03-10

    Mar 10, 2018 ... sive strength, low price, convenient construction modelling and workability, as well as corrosion ... These test results showed that the elastic modulus and fracture parameters of concrete structures reduced ... due to nonlinear characteristics of concrete materials, the classical linear elastic fracture mechanics.

  11. Continuous monitoring of back-wall stress corrosion cracking propagation by means of potential drop techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasumoto; Atsumi, Takeo; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of the potential drop techniques to the continuous monitoring of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation, SCC tests were performed in a sodium thiosulfate solution at room temperature using plate specimens with weldments. The SCC propagation was monitored using the techniques of direct current potential drop (DCPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and modified induced current potential drop (MICPD) on the reverse side that on which the SCC existed and effectiveness of each technique for the continuous monitoring from the reverse side of SCC was compared from the viewpoints of sensitivity to the crack propagation and measurement stability. The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back-wall SCC propagation, which initiates from a fatigue pre-crack at a depth of about 4 mm, from which it propagates through more than 80% of the specimen thickness. The MICPD technique can decrease the effect of the current flowing in the direction of the crack length by focusing the induced current into the local area of measurement using induction coils, so that the sensitivity of the continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC propagation is higher than that of the DCPD and ACPD techniques. (author)

  12. Temperature dependency of external stress corrosion crack propagation of 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashibara, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Mayuzumi, Masami; Tani, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Temperature dependency of external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) of 304 stainless steel was examined with CT specimens. Maximum ESCC propagation rates appeared in the early phase of ESCC propagation. ESCC propagation rates generally became smaller as testing time advance. Temperature dependency of maximum ESCC propagation rate was analyzed with Arrhenius plot, and apparent activation energy was similar to that of SCC in chloride solutions. Temperature dependency of macroscopic ESCC incubation time was different from that of ESCC propagation rate. Anodic current density of 304 stainless steel was also examined by anodic polarization measurement. Temperature dependency of critical current density of active state in artificial sea water solution of pH=1.3 was similar to that of ESCC propagation rate. (author)

  13. Study on Corrosion-induced Crack Initiation and Propagation of Sustaining Loaded RCbeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, X. P.; Li, Y.; Yuan, C. B.; Yang, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2018-05-01

    For 13 pieces of reinforced concrete beams with HRB500 steel bars under long-term sustained loads, at time of corrosion-induced initial crack of concrete, and corrosion-induced crack widths of 0.3mm and 1mm, corrosion of steel bars and time-varying behavior of corrosion-induced crack width were studied by the ECWD (Electro-osmosis - constant Current – Wet and Dry cycles) accelerated corrosion method. The results show that when cover thickness was between 30 and 50mm,corrosion rates of steel bars were between 0.8% and 1.7% at time of corrosion-induced crack, and decreased with increasing concrete cover thickness; when corrosion-induced crack width was 0.3mm, the corrosion rate decreased with increasing steel bar diameter, and increased with increasing cover thickness; its corrosion rate varied between 0.98% and 4.54%; when corrosion-induced crack width reached 1mm, corrosion rate of steel bars was between 4% and 4.5%; when corrosion rate of steel bars was within 5%, the maximum and average corrosion-induced crack and corrosion rate of steel bars had a good linear relationship. The calculation model predicting the maximum and average width of corrosion-induced crack is given in this paper.

  14. Simulation of inter- and transgranular crack propagation in polycrystalline aggregates due to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musienko, Andrey; Cailletaud, Georges

    2009-01-01

    The motivation of the study is the development of a coupled approach able to account for the interaction between environment and plasticity in a polycrystalline material. The paper recalls first the constitutive equations used to describe the behavior of the grain core and of the grain boundary (GB). The procedure that is applied to generate synthetic polycrystalline aggregates with an explicit representation of the grain boundary area by 2D or 3D finite elements is then described. The approach is applied to the modeling of iodine-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in Zircaloy tubes used in nuclear power plants.

  15. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng

    FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL) specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10-7-5.748 × 10-7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa √{ m } . The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface.

  16. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes C, P.

    2003-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O 2 ; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  17. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Qin

    Full Text Available FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10−7–5.748 × 10−7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa m. The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface. Keywords: FV520B, Wedge opening loading specimen, Stress corrosion cracking, Hydrogen sulfide

  18. Study on Characteristics of Corrosion Fatigue Crack Propagation for Austenitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Uh Joh; Kim, Bu Ahn

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the corrosion fatigue cracking of both TIG weld heat affected zone and base metal for austenitic stainless steel were investigated under the environments of various specific resistance and the air. The corrosion fatigue crack initiation sensitivity was quantitatively investigated for SUS 304 weldments in the various specific resistances. Also, the characteristics of corrosion fatigue cracking for the weldments were investigated from mechanical, electrochemical, and microstructural point of view. Main results obtained are as follows: (1) The corrosion fatigue crack initiation sensitivity on the base metal and weld hea affected zone increases as the specific resistance of corrosion environment decreases, and the sensitivity of the weld heat affected zone appears increasing more than that of the base metal. (2) The corrosion potentials of various specific resistances are almost constant in initial corrosion fatigue cracking, but the corrosion potential becomes less noble promptly with the corrosion fatigue crack growth as the specific resistances decrease. (3) The corrosion fatigue crack growth of the weld heat affected zone rapid than that of the base metal, because of the softening and the less noble potential caused by welding heat cycle

  19. Corrosion Effects on the Fatigue Crack Propagation of Giga-Grade Steel and its Heat Affected Zone in pH Buffer Solutions for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. S.

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation test was conducted of giga-grade steel and its heat affected zone in pH buffer solutions, and the results were compared with model predictions. Pure corrosion effect on fatigue crack propagation, particularly, in corrosive environment was evaluated by means of the modified Forman equation. As shown in results, the average corrosion rate determined from the ratio of pure corrosion induced crack length to entire crack length under a cycle load were 0.11 and 0.37 for base metal and heat affected zone, respectively, with load ratio of 0.5, frequency of 0.5 and pH 10.0 environment. These results demonstrate new interpretation methodology for corrosion fatigue crack propagation enabling the pure corrosion effects on the behavior to be determined.

  20. Time-dependent corrosion fatique crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research is to characterize environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth for the susceptible short-longitudinal orientation of aluminum alloy 7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution. This work is necessary in order to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA-FLAGRO (NASGRO). This effort concentrates on determining relevant inputs to a superposition model in order to more accurately model environmental fatigue crack propagation.

  1. A fracture mechanics model for iodine stress corrosion crack propagation in Zircaloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crescimanno, P.J.; Campbell, W.R.; Goldberg, I.

    1984-01-01

    A fracture mechanics model is presented for iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy tubing. The model utilizes a power law to relate crack extension velocity to stress intensity factor, a hyperbolic tangent function for the influence of iodine concentration, and an exponential function for the influence of temperature and material strength. Comparisons of predicted to measured failure times show that predicted times are within a factor of two of the measured times for a majority of the specimens considered

  2. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  3. Effect of yield strength on stress corrosion crack propagation under PWR and BWR environments of hardened stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castano, M.L.; Garcia, M.S.; Diego, G. de; Gomez-Briceno, D. [CIEMAT, Nuclear Fission Department, Structural Materials Program, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels (SS) and to quantify the effect on the crack propagation rate, an experimental research program was performed using cold and warm worked 304, 316L and 347 SS. Stress corrosion crack growth rate tests, under BWR and PWR environments have been carried out. The results obtained have permitted to determine the yield strength effect in the crack propagation of austenitic stainless steels in PWR and BWR conditions. In addition, similarities on cold work and radiation hardening in enhancing the yield strength and the stress corrosion cracking propagation at high temperature water have been evaluated. (authors)

  4. Quantitative characterization of initiation and propagation in stress corrosion cracking. An approach of a phenomenological model; Caracterisation quantitative de l`amorcage et de la propagation en corrosion sous contrainte. Approche d`une modelisation phenomenologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raquet, O

    1994-11-25

    A purely phenomenological study of stress corrosion cracking was performed using the couple Z2CN 18.10 (304L) austenitic stainless steel/boiling MgCl{sub 2} aqueous solution. The exploitation of the morphological information (shape of the cracks and size distribution) available after constant elongation rate tests led to the proposal of an analytical expression of the crack initiation and growth rates. This representation allowed to quantitatively characterize the influence of the applied strain rate as well as the effect of corrosion inhibitors on the crack initiation and propagation phases. It can be used in the search for the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms as a `riddle` for the determination of the rate controlling steps. As a matter of fact, no mechanistic hypothesis has been used for its development. (author).

  5. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  6. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino C, F.J.; Fuentes C, P.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  7. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical basis for differentiation between hydrogen embrittlement and active path corrosion or anodic dissolution crack growth mechanisms is examined. The consequences of recently demonstrated acidification in crack tip region irrespective of electrochemical conditions at the bulk surface of the sample are that the hydrogen can evolve within the crack and may be involved in the cracking process. There are basically three aspects of hydrogen involvement in stress corrosion cracking. In dissolution models crack propagation is assumed to be caused by anodic dissolution on the crack tip sustained by cathodic reduction of hydrogen from electrolyte within the crack. In hydrogen induced structural transformation models it is postulated that hydrogen is absorbed locally at the crack tip producing structural changes which facilitate crack propagation. In hydrogen embrittlement models hydrogen is absorbed by stressed metal from proton reduction from the electrolyte within the crack and there is interaction between lattice and hydrogen resulting in embrittlement of material at crack tip facilitating crack propagation. In the present paper, the role of hydrogen in stress corrosion crack growth in high strength steels, austenitic stainless steels, titanium alloys and high strength aluminium alloys is discussed. (author)

  8. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  9. The lack of penetration effect on fatigue crack propagation resistance of atmospheric corrosion resistant steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Cimini Junior, Carlos Alberto; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa

    2005-01-01

    The welding process introduces defects on the welded joints, as lack of fusion and penetration, porosity, between others. These defects can compromise the structures or components, relative to the crack propagation. This engagement can be studied by fatigue crack propagation tests. The efficiency of the structure, when submitted to a cyclic loading can be evaluated by these tests. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of welded joints containing defects as lack of penetration at the root or between welding passes relative to crack propagation resistance properties, and to compare these properties with the properties of the welded joints without defects. This study was accomplished from fatigue crack propagation test results, in specimens containing lack of penetration between welding passes. With the obtained results, the Paris equation coefficients and exponents that relate the crack propagation rate with the stress intensity cyclic factor for welded joints with and without defects were obtained. (author)

  10. Influence of stress relieve heat treatment on fatigue crack propagation in structural steel resistant to atmospheric corrosion welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Villela, Jefferson Jose; Rabello, Emerson Giovani [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: gpm@cdtn.br; jjv@cdtn.br; egr@cdtn.br; Cimini Junior, Carlos Alberto[Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: cimini@demet.ufmg.br; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia]. E-mails: leonardo@demet.em.ufop.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work, the influence of stress relieve heat treatment (SRHT) on the fatigue crack propagation in USI-SAC 50 structural welded joints at the heat affected zone (HAZ) region was studied. Hardness measurements before and after the SRHT were made and crack propagation tests in specimens as welded (AW) and in specimens that were submitted to SRHT, which were accomplished. A reduction in hardness at the regions of HAZ and melted zone (MZ) after the SRHT were observed. It were also verified that the crack propagation rates (da/dN) versus DK on the specimens AW presented regions of retardation on the crack propagation rate, and in the specimens that were submitted to SRHT the crack propagation rate were homogeneous. (author)

  11. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  12. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  13. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  14. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  15. Concrete cover cracking with reinforcement corrosion of RC beam during chloride-induced corrosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruijin; Castel, Arnaud; Francois, Raoul

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the evolution of the corrosion pattern based on two beams corroded by 14 years (beam B1CL1) and 23 years (beam B2CL1) of conservation in a chloride environment. The experimental results indicate that, at the cracking initiation stage and the first stage of cracking propagation, localized corrosion due to chloride ingress is the predominant corrosion pattern and pitting corrosion is the main factor that influences the cracking process. As corrosion cracking increases, general corrosion develops rapidly and gradually becomes predominant in the second stage of cracking propagation. A comparison between existing models and experimental results illustrates that, although Vidal et al.'s model can better predict the reinforcement corrosion of beam B1CL1 under localized corrosion, it cannot predict the corrosion of beam B2CL1 under general corrosion. Also, Rodriguez's model, derived from the general corrosion due to electrically accelerated corrosion experiments, cannot match natural chloride corrosion irrespective of whether corrosion is localized or general. Thus, for natural general corrosion in the second stage of cracking propagation, a new model based on the parameter of average steel cross-section loss is put forward to predict steel corrosion from corrosion cracking.

  16. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav [Department of Materials Engineering, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, tr. 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava - Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  17. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  18. Metallurgy of stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    The susceptibility of metals and alloys to stress corrosion is discussed in terms of the relationship between structural characteristics (crystal structure, grains, and second phases) and defects (vacancies, dislocations, and cracks) that exist in metals and alloys. (U.S.)

  19. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  20. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  1. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor; Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, F.J. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fuentes C, P. [ITT, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fjmc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  2. Effect of potential on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation of inconel 600 in 50% NaOH solution at 850C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Toshihei; Sugawara, Hideo; Harada, Tadashi

    1979-01-01

    A study has been made of corrosion fatigue crack growth for Inconel 600 solution-annealed at 1100 0 C for 0.5 h in 85 0 C 50% NaOH solution with a frequency of 1.1 cycle per minute. The effect of potential on the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) as a function of ΔK was examined and the fracture surfaces were observed. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The crack growth rate and the cracking mode were affected by the applied potentials in the anodic polarization curve. The value of da/dN was arranged in the following order of the observed potentials: secondary passive region > corrosion potential > primary active region > primary passive region. (2) Intergranular cracking took place at a secondary passive potential (-0.04 V vs SCE) which gave a maximum crack growth rate. Transgranular cracking with fatigue striations occurred at the other potentials. (3) The variation in current with the alternating loading was observed at the potentials where transgranular cracking occurred, whereas no appreciable correlation between current and cyclic loading was shown at a potential of -0.04 V where the intergranular mode cracking occurred. (4) It is pointed out to be helpful in studying the influence of applied potential on the accelerated rate of cracking at the crack tip by the ''crack-tip opening displacement'' estimated from the stress intensity, as the major mechanical condition. (author)

  3. Crack propagation in dynamic thermoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    We study the singular thermoelastic fields near the crack tip, in the linear strain assumption. The equations are coupled and non linear. The asymptotic expansions of the displacement and the temperature are given for the first and the second order. It is shown that the temperature is singular when the crack propagates. However, this field does not change the dominant singularity of the mechanical field which is the same as that obtained in the theory of isothermal elasticity [fr

  4. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  5. Stress corrosion cracking and dealloying of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, M.F.; Bianchi, G.L.; Galvele, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor was studied and the results were analyzed under the scope of the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism. The copper-gold alloy undergoes stress corrosion cracking in iodine. Copper iodide was responsible of that behavior. The copper-gold alloy shows two processes in parallel: stress corrosion cracking and dealloying. As was predicted by the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism, the increase in strain rate induces an increase in the crack propagation rate. (Author)

  6. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Perez, S.; Rodrigo, P.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2011-01-01

    the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect......Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome...

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R. C.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study (1) the basic electrochemical behavior of titanium in acid chloride solutions and (2) the response of the metal to dynamic straining in the same evironment. The aim of this group of experiments was to simulate, as nearly as possible, the actual conditions which exist at the tip of a crack. One of the foremost theories proposed to explain the propagation of stress corrosion cracks is a hydrogen embrittlement theory involving the precipitation of embrittling titanium hydrides inside the metal near the crack tip. An initial survey of the basic electrochemical literature indicated that surface hydrides play a critical role in the electrochemistry of titanium in acid solutions. A comprehensive analysis of the effect of surface films, particularly hydrides, on the electrochemical behavior of titanium in these solution is presented.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, W.; Turnbull, A.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.03 and is structured as follows: General aspects of SCC testing; Non-precracked specimens; Precracked specimens - the fracture mechanics approach to SCC; Crack growth measurement; Limitations of the LEFM approach to SCC; The use of SCC data; Guide to selection of mechanical scc test method

  9. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...

  10. Concrete Cracking Prediction Including the Filling Proportion of Strand Corrosion Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Dai, Lizhao; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jianren

    2016-01-01

    The filling of strand corrosion products during concrete crack propagation is investigated experimentally in the present paper. The effects of stirrups on the filling of corrosion products and concrete cracking are clarified. A prediction model of crack width is developed incorporating the filling proportion of corrosion products and the twisting shape of the strand. Experimental data on cracking angle, crack width, and corrosion loss obtained from accelerated corrosion tests of concrete beams are presented. The proposed model is verified by experimental data. Results show that the filling extent of corrosion products varies with crack propagation. The rust filling extent increases with the propagating crack until a critical width. Beyond the critical width, the rust-filling extent remains stable. Using stirrups can decrease the critical crack width. Stirrups can restrict crack propagation and reduce the rust filling. The tangent of the cracking angle increases with increasing corrosion loss. The prediction of corrosion-induced crack is sensitive to the rust-filling extent. PMID:28772367

  11. Temperature effect on Zircaloy-4 stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.; Galvele, Jose R.

    1999-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 alloy in chloride, bromide and iodide solutions with variables as applied electrode potential, deformation rate and temperature have been studied. In those three halide solutions the susceptibility to SCC is only observed at potentials close to pitting potential, the crack propagation rate increases with the increase of deformation rate, and that the temperature has a notable effect only for iodide solutions. For chloride and bromide solutions and temperatures ranging between 20 to 90 C degrees it was not found measurable changes in crack propagation rates. (author)

  12. Fatigue crack propagation behavior under creep conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohji, Kiyotsugu; Kubo, Shiro

    1991-01-01

    The crack propagation behavior of the SUS 304 stainless steel under creep-fatigue conditions was reviewed. Cracks propagated either in purely time-dependent mode or in purely cycle-dependent mode, depending on loading conditions. The time-dependent crack propagation rate was correlated with modified J-integral J * and the cycle-dependent crack propagation rate was correlated with J-integral range ΔJ f . Threshold was observed in the cycle-dependent crack propagation, and below this threshold the time-dependent crack propagation appeared. The crack propagation rates were uniquely characterized by taking the effective values of J * and ΔJ f , when crack closure was observed. Change in crack propagation mode occurred reversibly and was predicted by the competitive damage model. The threshold disappeared and the cycle-dependent crack propagation continued in a subthreshold region under variable amplitude conditions, where the threshold was interposed between the maximum and minimum ΔJ f . (orig.)

  13. Influence of cracks on rebar corrosion in carbonated concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghantous, R.M.; L'Hostis, V.; Poyet, S.; Francois, R.; Tran, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental program allowing the determination of the effect of pre-cracks and their orientations on both initiation and propagation of reinforcement steel corrosion due to carbonation in different environmental conditions, in order to propose an operational model allowing the evaluation of the kinetic of corrosion of the reinforcement steel in cooling towers of nuclear power plants. The cracking mode that generates cracks which are representative of those appearing on the cooling towers is a three-point bending test performed on prismatic samples of 7*7*28 cm 3 size with 6 mm steel bars. The length of damaged steel / concrete interface, which appears following a three-point bending test, is then quantified. This length could be determining in the initiation and the propagation of corrosion. Results show that this length is dependent on the residual crack opening and that the length of damaged interface in its lower part is larger than that on the upper part due to the Top Bar effect. After cracking, the samples will be exposed to carbon dioxide to ensure carbonation of the steel bar localized at the bottom of the crack and the concrete/steel interface, damaged by the load applied during the three-point bending test. After carbonation of the interface, samples will be submitted to corrosion in different environmental conditions whose effect on the kinetics of corrosion will be determined. The work done so far permits the definition of the cracking protocol (three points bending) that allows obtaining cracks which are representative of those existing on cooling towers. Moreover, the length of steel/concrete damaged interface with respect to crack opening is quantified. It was found that this length is proportional to the crack opening. In addition, it was shown that the Top Bar effect increases the damaged interface length at the lower part of steel bars

  14. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    H. Ricardo, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FD&E SAE Keyh...

  15. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FDandE SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are observed

  16. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Abstract. In the previous paper (Pramana – J. Phys. 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall ...

  17. Fatigue crack initiation and propagation in steels exposed to inert and corrosive environments. Final report, May 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youseffi, K.; Finnie, I.

    1978-02-01

    The fatigue crack initiation life of AISI 1018 steel was investigated using compact tension specimens having sharp notch root radii. The data were analyzed using two methods for predicting initiation in strain cycling experiments. Also, another approach in which initiation is related to the stress intensity factor was developed. The next phase, that of propagation, was studied using AISI 1018 steel and a new high strength steel HY-180. The crack propagation data obtained for both steels tested in air can be described accurately by the power law first suggested by Paris, da/dN = C(..delta..K)/sup n/, where a is the crack length, N the number of cycles, and C and n are material constants. However, the exponent n was found to be two times larger for AISI 1018 steel than HY-180 steel.

  18. Fatigue crack initiation and propagation in steels exposed to inert and corrosive environments. Final report, May 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youseffi, K.; Finnie, I.

    1978-02-01

    The fatigue crack initiation life of AISI 1018 steel was investigated using compact tension specimens having sharp notch root radii. The data were analyzed using two methods for predicting initiation in strain cycling experiments. Also, another approach in which initiation is related to the stress intensity factor was developed. The next phase, that of propagation, was studied using AISI 1018 steel and a new high strength steel HY-180. The crack propagation data obtained for both steels tested in air can be described accurately by the power law first suggested by Paris, da/dN = C(ΔK)/sup n/, where a is the crack length, N the number of cycles, and C and n are material constants. However, the exponent n was found to be two times larger for AISI 1018 steel than HY-180 steel

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  20. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Propagation Rate Characteristics for Weldable Ship and Offshore Steels with Regard to the Influence of Loading Frequency and Saltwater Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Marek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available After Vosikovsky (1975, the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (CFCGR characteristics have been divided into three regions. The region-III rates are very close to mechanical fatigue crack growth rates. CFCGR formulae, including the long-crack length effect (in region I only, the loading frequency effect (in region II only, and the saltwater temperature effect, have been proposed. It has been assumed that CFCGR is proportional to f-k, where f is the loading frequency and k is a constant. The averaged k-value for all steels of yield stress (YS below 500 MPa, usually with ferrite-pearlite microstructures, is higher than that for YS > 500 MPa, usually with quenched and tempered microstructures. The temperature effect does not appear in region I below room temperature. In the remaining cases, that is, in region I for elevated temperatures and in region II for both low and elevated temperatures, the CFCGR increases with increasing temperature. Under a potential of -0.8 V, a long-crack-length effect, qualitatively similar to analogous effect for free corrosion conditions, appears.

  1. Smeared crack modelling approach for corrosion-induced concrete damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie Anusha; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a smeared crack modelling approach is used to simulate corrosion-induced damage in reinforced concrete. The presented modelling approach utilizes a thermal analogy to mimic the expansive nature of solid corrosion products, while taking into account the penetration of corrosion...... products into the surrounding concrete, non-uniform precipitation of corrosion products, and creep. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented modelling approach, numerical predictions in terms of corrosion-induced deformations as well as formation and propagation of micro- and macrocracks were......-induced damage phenomena in reinforced concrete. Moreover, good agreements were also found between experimental and numerical data for corrosion-induced deformations along the circumference of the reinforcement....

  2. Monte Carlo simulation taking account of surface crack effect for stress corrosion cracking in a stainless steel SUS 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohgo, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Guen; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in structural metal materials occurs by initiation and coalescence of micro cracks, subcritical crack propagation and multiple large crack formation or final failure under the combination of materials, stress and corrosive environment. In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation for the process of SCC has been proposed based on the stochastic properties of micro crack initiation and fracture mechanics concept for crack coalescence and propagation. The emphasis in the model is put on the influence of semi-elliptical surface cracks. Numerical simulations are carried out based on CBB (creviced bent beam) test results of a sensitized stainless steel SUS 304 and the influence of micro crack initiation rate and coalescence condition on the simulation results is discussed. The numerical examples indicate the applicability of the present model to a prediction of the SCC behavior in real structures. (author)

  3. Corrosion of steel in cracked concrete: a microscale study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Polder, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of concrete cracking upon reinforcement corrosion is complex. Cracks allow fast penetration of chlorides, potentially leading to a shorter initiation period of reinforcement corrosion. Structural regulations control acceptable crack width values based on the exposure class of the

  4. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was, G. S.; Ampornrat, P.; Gupta, G.; Teysseyre, S.; West, E. A.; Allen, T. R.; Sridharan, K.; Tan, L.; Chen, Y.; Ren, X.; Pister, C.

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has attracted increasing attention since SCW boiler power plants were implemented to increase the efficiency of fossil-based power plants. The SCW reactor (SCWR) design has been selected as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts because of its higher thermal efficiency and plant simplification as compared to current light water reactors (LWRs). Reactor operating conditions call for a core coolant temperature between 280 °C and 620 °C at a pressure of 25 MPa and maximum expected neutron damage levels to any replaceable or permanent core component of 15 dpa (thermal reactor design) and 100 dpa (fast reactor design). Irradiation-induced changes in microstructure (swelling, radiation-induced segregation (RIS), hardening, phase stability) and mechanical properties (strength, thermal and irradiation-induced creep, fatigue) are also major concerns. Throughout the core, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and the effect of irradiation on these degradation modes are critical issues. This paper reviews the current understanding of the response of candidate materials for SCWR systems, focusing on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking response, and highlights the design trade-offs associated with certain alloy systems. Ferritic-martensitic steels generally have the best resistance to stress corrosion cracking, but suffer from the worst oxidation. Austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys have better oxidation resistance but are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The promise of grain boundary engineering and surface modification in addressing corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance is discussed.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of uranium--niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnani, N.J.

    1978-03-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of U-2 1 / 4 , 4 1 / 2 , 6 and 8 wt % Nb alloys was evaluated in laboratory air and in aqueous Cl - solutions. Thresholds for crack propagation were obtained in these environments. The data showed that Cl - solutions are more deleterious than air environments. Tests were also conducted in pure gases to identify the species in the air responsible for cracking. These data showed the primary stress corrodent is water vapor for the most reactive alloy, U-2 1 / 4 % Nb, while O 2 is primarily responsible for cracking in the more corrosion resistant alloys, U-6 and 8% Nb. The 4 1 / 2 % alloy was found to be susceptible in both H 2 O and O 2 environments

  6. Adaptive numerical modeling of dynamic crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adouani, H.; Tie, B.; Berdin, C.; Aubry, D.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an adaptive numerical strategy that aims at developing reliable and efficient numerical tools to model dynamic crack propagation and crack arrest. We use the cohesive zone theory as behavior of interface-type elements to model crack. Since the crack path is generally unknown beforehand, adaptive meshing is proposed to model the dynamic crack propagation. The dynamic study requires the development of specific solvers for time integration. As both geometry and finite element mesh of the studied structure evolve in time during transient analysis, the stability behavior of dynamic solver becomes a major concern. For this purpose, we use the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method, well-known to provide a natural framework to manage meshes that evolve in time. As an important result, we prove that the space-time discontinuous Galerkin solver is unconditionally stable, when the dynamic crack propagation is modeled by the cohesive zone theory, which is highly non-linear. (authors)

  7. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement has been postulated as a cause of stress corrosion cracking in numerous alloy systems. Such an interrelationship is useful in design considerations because it permits the designer and working engineer to relate the literature from both fields to a potential environmental compatibility problem. The role of hydrogen in stress corrosion of high strength steels is described along with techniques for minimizing the susceptibility to hydrogen stress cracking. (U.S.)

  8. Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation, stress-corrosion, and fracture-toughness behavior in pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite for prosthetic heart valve applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, R O; Dauskardt, R H; Yu, W K; Brendzel, A M

    1990-02-01

    Fracture-mechanics tests were performed to characterize the cyclic fatigue, stress-corrosion cracking, and fracture-toughness behavior of a pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite composite material used in the manufacture of cardiac valve prostheses. Testing was carried out using compact tension C(T) samples containing "atomically" sharp precracks, both in room-temperature air and principally in a simulated physiological environment of 37 degrees C Ringer's lactate solution. Under sustained (monotonic) loads, the composite exhibited resistance-curve behavior, with a fracture toughness (KIc) between 1.1 and 1.9 MPa square root of m, and subcritical stress-corrosion crack velocities (da/dt) which were a function of the stress intensity K raised to the 74th power (over the range approximately 10(-9) to over 10(-5) m/s). More importantly, contrary to common perception, under cyclic loading conditions the composite was found to display true (cyclic) fatigue failure in both environments; fatigue-crack growth rates (da/dN) were seen to be a function of the 19th power of the stress-intensity range delta K (over the range approximately 10(-11) to over 10(-8) m/cycle). As subcritical crack velocities under cyclic loading were found to be many orders of magnitude faster than those measured under equivalent monotonic loads and to occur at typically 45% lower stress-intensity levels, cyclic fatigue in pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite is reasoned to be a vital consideration in the design and life-prediction procedures of prosthetic devices manufactured from this material.

  9. Corrosion and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete has in recent years changed from being a deterministic modelling based on experience to be stochastic modelling based on sound and consistent physical, chemical and mechanical principles. In this paper is presented a brief review of modern mod...... for time to initial corrosion, time to initial cracking, and time to a given crack width may be obtained....

  10. Stress corrosion crack growth in unirradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.

    1978-10-01

    Experimental techniques suitable for the determination of stress corrosion crack growth rates in irradiated Zircaloy tube have been developed. The techniques have been tested on unirradiated. Zircaloy and it was found that the results were in good agreement with the results of other investigations. Some of the results were obtained at very low stress intensities and the crack growth rates observed, gave no indication of the existance of a K sub(ISCC) for iodine induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy. This is of importance both for fuel rod behavior after a power ramp and for long term storage of spent Zircaloy-clad fuel. (author)

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  12. Crack retardation by load reduction during fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Nam, Ki Woo; Ahn, Seok Hwan; Do, Jae Yoon

    2003-01-01

    Fracture life and crack retardation behavior were examined experimentally using CT specimens of aluminum alloy 5083. Crack retardation life and fracture life were a wide difference between 0.8 and 0.6 in proportion to ratio of load reduction. The wheeler model retardation parameter was used successfully to predict crack growth behavior. By using a crack propagation rule, prediction of fracture life can be evaluated quantitatively. A statistical approach based on Weibull distribution was applied to the test data to evaluate the dispersion in the retardation life and fracture life by the change of load reduction

  13. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  14. Relationship between stress corrosion cracking and low frequency fatigue-corrosion of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of PWR vessel head adapters is a main problem for nuclear industry. With the aim to better understand the influence of the mechanical parameters on the cracking phenomena (by stress corrosion (SCC) or fatigue corrosion (FC)) of alloy 600 exposed to primary PWR coolant, a parametrical study has been carried out. Crack propagation tests on CT test specimens have been implemented under static loads (stress corrosion tests) or low frequency cyclic loads (fatigue corrosion tests). Results (frequency influence, type of cycles, ratio charge on velocities and propagation modes of cracks) have allowed to characterize the transition domain between the crack phenomena of SCC and FC. With the obtained results, it has been possible too to differentiate the effects due to environmental factors and the effects due to mechanical factors. At last, a quantitative fractographic study and the observations of the microstructure at the tip of crack have led to a better understanding of the transitions of the crack propagation mode between the SCC and the FC. (O.M.)

  15. Evaluation of stress corrosion crack growth in BWR piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassir, M.; Sharma, S.; Reich, M.; Chang, M.T.

    1985-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to evaluate the effects of stress intensity factor and environment on the growth behavior of intergranular stress corrosion cracks in type 304 stainless steel piping systems. Most of the detected cracks are known to be circumferential in shape, and initially started at the inside surface in the heat affected zone near girth welds. These cracks grow both radially in-depth and circumferentially in length and, in extreme cases, may cause leakage in the installation. The propagation of the crack is essentially due to the influence of the following simultaneous factors: (1) the action of applied and residual stress; (2) sensitization of the base metal in the heat affected zone adjacent to girth weld; and (3) the continuous exposure of the material to an aggressive environment of high temperature water containing dissolved oxygen and some levels of impurities. Each of these factors and their effects on the piping systems is discussed in detail in the report. The report also evaluates the time required for hypothetical cracks in BWR pipes to propagate to their critical size. The pertinent times are computed and displayed graphically. Finally, parametric study is performed in order to assess the relative influence and sensitivity of the various input parameters (residual stress, crack growth law, diameter of pipe, initial size of defect, etc.) which have bearing on the growth behavior of the intergranular stress corrosion cracks in type 304 stainless steel. Cracks in large-diameter as well as in small-diameter pipes are considered and analyzed. 27 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Crack propagation on spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Roche, R.

    1975-01-01

    The risk presented by a crack on a pressure vessel built with a ductile steel cannot be well evaluated by simple application of the rules of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, which only apply to brittle materials. Tests were carried out on spherical vessels of three different scales built with the same steel. Cracks of different length were machined through the vessel wall. From the results obtained, crack initiation stress (beginning of stable propagation) and instable propagation stress may be plotted against the lengths of these cracks. For small and medium size, subject to ductile fracture, the resulting curves are identical, and may be used for ductile fracture prediction. Brittle rupture was observed on larger vessels and crack propagation occurred at lower stress level. Preceedings curves are not usable for fracture analysis. Ultimate pressure can be computed with a good accuracy by using equivalent energy toughness, Ksub(1cd), characteristic of the metal plates. Satisfactory measurements have been obtained on thin samples. The risks of brittle fracture may then judged by comparing Ksub(1cd) with the calculated K 1 value, in which corrections for vessel shape are taken into account. It is thus possible to establish the bursting pressure of cracked spherical vessels, with the help of two rules, one for brittle fracture, the other for ductile instability. A practical method is proposed on the basis of the work reported here

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  18. The stress corrosion cracking of copper nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The extent of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear waste containers is being predicted on the basis of a 'limited propagation' argument. In this argument, it is accepted that crack initiation may occur, but it is argued that the environmental conditions and material properties required for a through-wall crack to propagate will not be present. In this paper, the effect of one environmental parameter, the supply of oxidant (J ox ), on the crack growth rate is examined. Experiments have been conducted on two grades of Cu in NANO 2 environments using two loading techniques. The supply of oxidant has been varied either electrochemically in bulk solution using different applied current densities or by embedding the loaded test specimens in compacted buffer material containing O 2 as the oxidant. Measured and theoretical crack growth rates as a function of J ox are compared with the predicted oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault and an estimate of the maximum crack depth on a container obtained. (author)

  19. The stress corrosion cracking of copper nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The extent of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear waste containers is being predicted on the basis of a limited propagation argument. In this argument, it is accepted that crack initiation may occur, but it is argued that the environmental conditions and material properties required for a through-wall crack to propagate will not be present. In this paper, the effect of one environmental parameter, the supply of oxidant (J OX ), on the crack growth rate is examined. Experiments have been conducted on two grades of Cu in NaNO 2 environments using two loading techniques. The supply of oxidant has been varied either electrochemically in bulk solution using different applied current densities or by embedding the loaded test specimens in compacted buffer material containing O 2 as the oxidant. Measured and theoretical crack growth rates as a function of J OX are compared with the predicted oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault and an estimate of the maximum crack depth on a container obtained

  20. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  1. Correlation between oxidation and stress corrosion cracking of U-4.5 wt.% Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnani, N.J.; Holloway, P.H.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms causing stress corrosion cracking on uranium alloys, the kinetics of crack propagation and oxide film growth for U-4.5 percent Nb were investigated at temperatures between 0 0 C and 200 0 C in oxygen, water vapor and oxygen-water vapor mixtures. Three regions of crack velocity rate versus stress intensity were observed in laboratory air. At low stress intensities (but above an effective K/sub ISCC/ of 22 MN/m/sup 3 / 2 /) crack velocity varied approximately as K 70 . In an intermediate stress intensity region (region II) the crack velocity was dependent upon K 4 . In the high stress intensity region, mechanical overloading was observed and crack velocities varied approximately as K 12 . Both cracking (region II) and oxidation rates were characterized by an activation energy of 7 kcal/mole. For stress corrosion cracking it was shown that oxygen was the primary stress corrodent, but a synergistic effect upon crack propagation rates was observed for oxygen-water vapor mixtures. Crack velocities were dependent upon the pressure of oxygen (P/sub O 2 //sup 1 / 3 /) and water vapor, while the oxidation rate was essentially independent of the pressure of these species. Stress sorption and oxide film formation stress corrosion cracking mechanisms were considered and reconciled with the stress corrosion and oxidation data

  2. Remote detection of stress corrosion cracking: Surface composition and crack detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Jovanovic, Igor; Motta, Arthur T.; Xiao, Xuan; Le Berre, Samuel; Fobar, David; Cho, Hwanjeong; Choi, Sungho

    2018-04-01

    Chloride induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel is a potential issue in long term dry storage of spent nuclear fuel canisters. In order for SCC to occur there must be a corrosive environment, a susceptible material, and a driving force. Because it is likely that the material in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of welded stainless steel structures has been sensitized as a result of chromium depletion at the grain boundaries and a thermal residual stress driving force is likely present if solution annealing is not performed, two issues are critical. Is the environment corrosive, i.e., are chlorides present in solution on the surface? And then, are there cracks that could propagate? Remote detection of chlorides on the surface can be accomplished by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), while cracks can be detected by shear horizontal guided waves generated by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs). Both are noncontact methods that are amenable to robotic delivery systems and harsh environments. The sensitivity to chlorine on stainless steel of a LIBS system that employs optical fiber for pulse delivery is demonstrated. Likewise, the ability of the EMAT system to detect cracks of a prescribed size and orientation is shown. These results show the potential for remote detection of Cl and cracks in dry storage spent fuel canisters.

  3. In-reactor fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Mervyn, D.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1979-08-01

    An in-reactor fatigue experiment is being designed to determine the effect of dynamic irradiation on the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behavior of candidate fusion first wall materials. This investigation has been prompted by studies which show gross differences in crack growth characteristics of creep rupture specimens testing by postirradiation versus dynamic in-reactor methods. The experiment utilizes miniature center-cracked-tension specimens developed specifically for in-reactor studies. In the test, a chain of eight specimens, precracked to various initial crack lengths, is stressed during irradiation to determine crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity. Load levels were chosen which result in small crack growth rates encompassing a regime of the crack growth curve not previously investigated during irradiation studies of FCP. The test will be conducted on 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel at a temperature of 425 0 C, in a sodium environment, and at a frequency of 1 cycle/min. Irradiation will occur in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, resulting in a He/dpa ratio similar to that expected at the first wall in a fusion reactor. Detailed design of the experiment is presented, along with crack growth data obtained from prototypic testing of the experimental apparatus. These results are compared to data obtained under similar conditions generated by conventional test methods

  4. The effects of strain induced martensite on stress corrosion cracking in AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. S.; Kwon, S. I.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of strain induced martensite on stress corrosion cracking behavior in AISI 304 stainless steel in boiling 42 wt% MgCl 2 solution were investigated using monotonic SSRT and cyclic SSRT with R=0.1 stress ratio. As the amount of pre-strain increased, the failure time of the specimens in monotonic SSRT test decreased independent of the existence of strain induced martensite. The strain induced martensite seems to promote the crack initiation but to retard the crack propagation during stress corrosion cracking

  5. A method for the 3-D quantification of bridging ligaments during crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babout, L.; Janaszewski, M.; Marrow, T.J.; Withers, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    This letter shows how a hole-closing algorithm can be used to identify and quantify crack-bridging ligaments from a sequence of X-ray tomography images of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. This allows automatic quantification of the evolution of bridging ligaments through the crack propagation sequence providing fracture mechanics insight previously unobtainable from fractography. The method may also be applied to other three-dimensional materials science problems, such as closing walls in foams.

  6. Corrosion characteristics of a 4-year naturally corroded reinforced concrete beam with load-induced transverse cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Chuanqing; Jin, Nanguo; Ye, Hailong; Jin, Xianyu; Dai, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A comprehensive study of corrosion characteristics of a naturally corroded RC beam. • New insights on the role of cracks in corrosion propagation of steel in concrete. • EMPA and 3D laser scanning provide quantitative analysis of corroded rebar. - Abstract: This work studies the corrosion characteristics of reinforcement in a 4-year naturally corroded concrete beam after accelerated chloride penetration. The results show that the presence of transverse cracks in the tension surface of reinforced concrete beam can globally exacerbate the loss of cross-sectional area of rebar. However, there is no strong correlation between the width of transverse cracks, with the width of longitudinal cracks and loss of cross-sectional area of corroded rebar at a specific location. The self-healing of cracks and sacrificing roles of stirrups at crack tips seem to reduce the impacts of cracks on the corrosion propagation.

  7. Steady-state propagation of interface corner crack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state propagation of interface cracks close to three-dimensional corners has been analyzed. Attention was focused on modeling the shape of the interface crack front and calculating the critical stress for steady-state propagation of the crack. The crack propagation was investigated...... on the finite element method with iterative adjustment of the crack front to estimate the critical delamination stresses as a function of the fracture criterion and corner angles. The implication of the results on the delamination is discussed in terms of crack front profiles and the critical stresses...... for propagation and the angle of intersection of the crack front with the free edge....

  8. Crack propagation at stresses below the fatigue limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, F. C.; Hyler, W. S.; Marschall, C. W.

    1967-01-01

    Crack propagation for stainless steel and Ti alloy at stresses below fatigue limit, noting of alternating stress cycles crack propagation for stainless steel and Ti alloy at stresses below fatigue limit, noting role of alternating stress cycles

  9. Analysis of 3D crack propagation by microfocus computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Bo; Chen Fuxing; Deng Cuizhen; Zeng Yabin

    2014-01-01

    The three-point bending test of notched specimens of 2A50 forging aluminum was performed by high frequency fatigue tester, and the surface cracks of different stages were analyzed and contrasted by SEM. The crack was reconstructed by microfocus computed tomography, and its size, position and distribution were visually displayed through 3D visualization. The crack propagation behaviors were researched through gray value and position of crack front of 2D CT images in two adjacent stages, and the results show that crack propagation is irregular. The projection image of crack was obtained if crack of two stages projected onto the reference plane respectively, a significant increase of new crack propagation was observed compared with the previous projection of crack, and the distribution curve of crack front of two stages was displayed. The 3D increment distribution of the crack front propagation was obtained through the 3D crack analysis of two stages. (authors)

  10. BWR alloy 182 stress Corrosion Cracking Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.M.; Hickling, J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) have successfully operated for more than three decades. Over that time frame, different materials issues have continued to arise, leading to comprehensive efforts to understand the root cause while concurrently developing different mitigation strategies to address near-term, continued operation, as well as provide long-term paths to extended plant life. These activities have led to methods to inspect components to quantify the extent of degradation, appropriate methods of analysis to quantify structural margin, repair designs (or strategies to replace the component function) and improved materials for current and future application. The primary materials issue has been the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). While this phenomenon has been primarily associated with austenitic stainless steel, it has also been found in nickel-base weldments used to join piping and reactor internal components to the reactor pressure vessel consistent with fabrication practices throughout the nuclear industry. The objective of this paper is to focus on the history and learning gained regarding Alloy 182 weld metal. The paper will discuss the chronology of weld metal cracking in piping components as well as in reactor internal components. The BWR industry has pro-actively developed inspection processes and procedures that have been successfully used to interrogate different locations for the existence of cracking. The recognition of the potential for cracking has also led to extensive studies to understand cracking behavior. Among other things, work has been performed to characterize crack growth rates in both oxygenated and hydrogenated environments. The latter may also be relevant to PWR systems. These data, along with the understanding of stress corrosion cracking processes, have led to extensive implementation of appropriate mitigation measures. (authors)

  11. Automated corrosion fatigue crack growth testing in pressurized water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschini, L.J.; Liaw, P.K.; Rudd, G.E.; Logsdon, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a novel approach to construct a test facility for developing corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties in aggressive environments. The environment studied is that of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 288 0 C (550 0 F) and 13.8 MPa (200 psig). To expedite data generation, each chamber was designed to accommodate two test specimens. A common water recirculation and pressurization system was employed to service two test chambers. Thus, four fatigue crack propagation rate tests could be conducted simultaneously in the pressurized water environment. The data analysis was automated to minimize the typically high labor costs associated with corrosion fatigue crack propagation testing. Verification FCGR tests conducted on an ASTM A469 rotor steel in a room temperature air environment as well as actual PWR environment FCGR tests performed on an ASTM A533 Grade B Class 2 pressure vessel steel demonstrated that the dual specimen test facility is an excellent system for developing the FCGR properties of materials in adverse environments

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Hossain and B. J, O’Toole: Stress Corrosion Cracking of Martensitic Stainless Steel for Transmutation Application, Presented at 2003 International...SCC of marternsitic stainless steel by Roy,[12] and learn the annealing effect on SCC of carbon steel by Haruna.[13] The application of slow...observations. In his study on SCC of AISI 304 stainless steel , Roychowdhury[3] detected no apparent SCC in solutions containing 1 ppm thiosulfate and

  13. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High threshold load at the interface between the ceramic layer and the bond coat was required to propagate the crack further into the bond coat. Once the threshold load was surpassed the crack propagated into the brittle bond coat without an appreciable increase in the load. At temperatures of 800°C the crack propagated ...

  14. Stress corrosion cracking prevention using solar electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harijan, K.; Uqaaili, M.A; Mirani, M.

    2004-01-01

    Metallic structures exposed to soil and water naturally experience corrosion due to electrolytic action. These structures are also subjected to sustained tensile stresses. The combined effects of corrosion and stress results stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Removal of either of these i.e. stress or corrosion prevents SCC. The cathodic protection (CP) prevents corrosion, and hence prevents stress corrosion. Solar Photo voltaic (PV) generated electricity can be best external power source for CP systems especially in remote areas. This paper presents CP system using solar PV generated electricity as an external power source for prevention of SCC of metallic structures. The paper also compares CP systems using solar electricity with those of CP systems using conventional electricity. The paper concludes that a solar electricity power system provides a reliable solution for powering CP stations especially in remote areas, enables the placing of CP units in any location, and thus ensures optimal current distribution for the exact protection requirements. The paper also concludes that solar electricity CP systems are well suited for SCC protection of metallic structures especially in remote areas of an energy deficit country like Pakistan. (author)

  15. A study on the fractures of iodine induced stress corrosion cracking of new zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Qian; Zhao Wenjin; Li Weijun; Tang Zhenghua; Heng Xuemei

    2005-10-01

    The morphology and chemical compositions of I-SCC fractures of new zirconium alloys were investigated by SEM and EDXA. The feature on fracture surface for I-SCC samples, such as corrosion products, the secondary cracking, intergranular cracking and pseudo-cleavage transgranular cracking, have been observed. And the fluting, the typical characteristic of I-SCC also has been found. Intergranular cracking is visible at crack initiation stage and transgranular cracking is distinguished at crack propagation stage. The corrosion products are mainly composed of Zr and O; and I can be detected on the local pseudocleavage zone. The most of grooves on the fractures of relieved-stress annealing samples are parallel with the roll plane. The intergranular cracking in relieved-stress annealing samples is not obvious. When the test temperature increases, the activity of iodine increases and the stress on crack tip is easier to be released, thus the corrosion products on fracture also increase and intergranular cracking is visible. The partial pressure of iodine influents the thickness of corrosion products, and intergranular cracking is easier to be found when iodine partial pressure is high enough. (authors)

  16. Reinforcement against crack propagation of PWR absorbers by development of boron-carbon-hafnium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provot, B.; Herter, P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the mechanical behaviour of materials used as neutron absorbers in nuclear reactors, we have developed CERCER or CERMET composites with boron and hafnium. Thus a new composite B 4 C/HfB 2 has been especially studied. We have identified three kinds of degradation under irradiation (thermal gradient, swelling due to fission products and accidental corrosion) that induce imposed deformations cracking phenomena. Mechanical behaviour and crack propagation resistance have been studied by ball-on-three-balls and double torsion tests. A special device was developed to enable crack propagation and associated stress intensity factor measurements. Effects of structure and of a second phase are underline. First results show that these materials present crack initiation and propagation resistance much higher than pure boron carbide or hafnium diboride. We observe R-Curves effects, crack bridging or branching, crack arrests, and toughness increases that we can relate respectively to the composite structures. (author)

  17. International Conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The planning meeting for a conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation was held at M.LT. in February 1971 and attended by research workers from several industrial, governmental and academic organizations. It was felt that a more specialized meeting would provide a better opportunity for both U.S. and foreign researchers to exchange their ideas and views on dynamic fracture, a subject which is seldom emphasized in national or international fracture conferences. Dynamic crack propagation has been a concern to specialists in many fields: continuum mechanics, metallurgy, geology, polymer chemistry, orthopedics, applied mathematics, as well as structural design and testing. It impinges on a wide variety of problems such as rock breaking and earthquakes, pressure vessels and line pipes, comminution and the per­ formance of armament and ordnance, etc. Advances have been numerous, covering theories and experiments from both the microscopic and macro­ scopic points of view. Hence, the need for comparing the theoretical ...

  18. In situ fatigue-crack-propagation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Chin, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    An in-reactor fatigue experiment was conducted in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor to determine the effects of dynamic irradiation on fatigue crack propagation. Eight 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were precracked to various initial crack lengths, linked together to form a chain, and inserted into a specially designed in-reactor fatigue machine. Test conditions included a maximum temperature of 460 0 C, an environment of sodium, a frequency of 1 cycle/min, and a stress ratio of 0.10. Results indicated that (1) no effects of dynamic irradiation were observed for a fluence of 1.5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV); and (2) crack growth rates in elevated temperature sodium were a factor of 3 to 4 lower than in room temperature air

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Fraser; Newman, Roger

    2010-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  1. A study on stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Seiichi; Fujii, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakuma, Koosuke; Hibi, Seiji; Morimoto, Hiroyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part are conducted. SUS 304 stainless steel is used as testing material. The distribution of residual stress in plug and tube plate after plugging is obtained. The effect of residual stress on the stress corrosion cracking is studied. Residual stress in tube plate near the plug is compressive and stress corrosion cracking dose not occur in the tube plate there, and it occurs on the inner surface of plug because of residual tensile stress in axial direction of the plug. Stress corrosion test in MgCl 2 solution under constant load is conducted. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the explosive bonded boundary is lower than that of base metal because of greater resistance to plastic deformation. Stress corrosion test in high temperature and high pressure pure water is also conducted by means of static type of autoclave but stress corrosion cracking does not occur under the testing condition used. (author)

  2. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of LD10 Aluminum Alloy in UDMH and N2O4 propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youhong; Chang, Xinlong; Liu, Wanlei

    2018-03-01

    The LD10 aluminum alloy double cantilever beam specimens were corroded under the conditions of Unsymmetric Uimethyl Hydrazine (UDMH), Dinitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4), and 3.5% NaCl environment. The crack propagation behavior of the aluminum alloy in different corrosion environment was analyzed. The stress corrosion cracking behavior of aluminum alloy in N2O4 is relatively slight and there are not evident stress corrosion phenomenons founded in UDMH.

  4. Penetration of corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Brad J.; Peterova, Adela

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current-induced c......This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current......-dependent concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used to measure corrosion-induced deformations including deformations between steel and cementitious matrix as well as formation and propagation of corrosion-induced cracks. Based on experimental...... observations, a conceptual model was developed to describe the penetration of solid corrosion products into capillary pores of the cementitious matrix. Only capillary pores within a corrosion accommodating region (CAR), i.e. in close proximity of the steel reinforcement, were considered accessible...

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in non-aqueous iodine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Sanchez, Andrea V.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the susceptibility to intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in different iodine alcoholic solutions was studied. The influence of different variables such as the molecular weight of the alcohols, the water content of the solutions, the alcohol type (primary, secondary or tertiary) and the temperature was evaluated. To determine the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking the slow strain rate technique was used. Specimens of Zircaloy-4 were also exposed between 0.5 and 300 hours to the solutions without applied stress to evaluate the susceptibility to intergranular attack. The electrochemical behavior of the material in the corrosive media was studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests. It was determined that the active species responsible for the stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in iodine alcoholic solutions is a molecular complex between the alcohol and iodine. The intergranular attack precedes the 'true' stress corrosion cracking phenomenon (which is associated to the transgranular propagation of the crack) and it is controlled by the diffusion of the active specie to the tip of the crack. Water acts as inhibitor to intergranular attack. Except for methanolic solutions, the minimum water content necessary to inhibit stress corrosion cracking was determined. This critical water content decreases when increasing the molecular weight of the alcohol. An explanation for this behavior is proposed. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking also depends on the type of the alcohol used as solvent. The temperature dependence of the crack propagation rate is in agreement with a thermal activated process, and the activation energy is consistent with a process controlled by the volume diffusion of the active species. (author) [es

  6. Mechanistic differences between transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrinsky, Santiago A.; Galvele, Jose R.

    2000-01-01

    Constant extension rate tests (CERT or CSRT) with the strain rate (SR) covering a 7 orders of magnitude range were applied to the study of many systems. In particular, the kinetics of SCC were measured via the stress corrosion (SCC) crack propagation rate (CPR). The main experimental findings are: a) increasing SR produces a monotonic (logarithmic) increase in CPR; b) the slopes α in log CPR vs. log SR plots take distinct values depending on the morphology: intergranular (IG) cracks are more steeply accelerated by SR than transgranular (TG), with α lG =0.4 to 0.7 and α TG =0.2 to 0.3; c) an increase in SR only shifts the log CPR vs. potential curves to higher CPR values, without changing its shape. Quantitative evaluation shows that dislocations piled-up at grain boundaries may combine with the surface mobility mechanism to give the experimental results. (author)

  7. Crack propagation in teeth: a comparison of perimortem and postmortem behavior of dental materials and cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Cris E; White, Crystal A

    2009-03-01

    This study presents a new method for understanding postmortem heat-induced crack propagation patterns in teeth. The results demonstrate that patterns of postmortem heat-induced crack propagation differ from perimortem and antemortem trauma-induced crack propagation patterns. Dental material of the postmortem tooth undergoes dehydration leading to a shrinking and more brittle dentin material and a weaker dentin-enamel junction. Dentin intertubule tensile stresses are amplified by the presence of the pulp cavity, and initiates crack propagation from the internal dentin, through the dentin-enamel junction and lastly the enamel. In contrast, in vivo perimortem and antemortem trauma-induced crack propagation initiates cracking from the external surface of the enamel toward the dentin-enamel junction where the majority of the energy of the crack is dissipated, eliminating the crack's progress into the dentin. These unique patterns of crack propagation can be used to differentiate postmortem taphonomy-induced damage from antemortem and perimortem trauma in teeth.

  8. Development of chloride-induced corrosion in pre-cracked RC beams under sustained loading: Effect of load-induced cracks, concrete cover, and exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Linwen [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); François, Raoul, E-mail: raoul.francois@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Dang, Vu Hiep [Hanoi Architectural University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Hanoi (Viet Nam); L' Hostis, Valérie [CEA Saclay, CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gagné, Richard [Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    This paper deals with corrosion initiation and propagation in pre-cracked reinforced concrete beams under sustained loading during exposure to a chloride environment. Specimen beams that were cast in 2010 were compared to specimens cast in 1984. The only differences between the two sets of beams were the casting direction in relation to tensile reinforcement and the exposure conditions in the salt-fog chamber. The cracking maps, corrosion maps, chloride profiles, and cross-sectional loss of one group of two beams cast in 2010 were studied and their calculated corrosion rates were compared to that of beams cast in 1984 in order to investigate the factors influencing the natural corrosion process. Experimental results show that, after rapid initiation of corrosion at the crack tip, the corrosion process practically halted and the time elapsing before corrosion resumed depended on the exposure conditions and cover depth.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and its alloys in halogenide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.

    2001-01-01

    A doctoral thesis developed at the corrosion labs in CNEA a few years ago showed that zirconium and Zircaloy-4 were susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. However, the nature of the phenomenon was not elucidated. On the other hand, references about the subject were scarce and contradictory. The development of new SCC models, in particular, the surface mobility SCC mechanism suggested a review of zirconium and Zircaloy-4 SCC in halogenide aqueous solutions. This mechanism predicts that zirconium should be susceptible to SCC not only in chloride solutions but also in bromide and iodide solutions due to the low melting point of the surface compounds formed by the interaction between the metal and the environment. The present work was aimed to determine the conditions under which SCC takes place and the mechanism operating during this process. For that purpose, the effect of electrochemical potential, strain rate and temperature on the SCC susceptibility of both, zirconium and Zircaloy-4 in chloride, bromide and iodide solutions was investigated. It was observed that those materials undergo stress corrosion cracking only at potentials higher than the breakdown potential. The crack velocity increased slightly with the applied potential, and the strain rate had an accelerating effect on the crack propagation rate. In both materials two steps were found during cracking. The first one was characterized as intergranular attack assisted by stress due to an anodic dissolution process. This step is followed by a transition to a transgranular mode of propagation, which was considered as the 'true' stress corrosion cracking step. The intergranular attack is the rate-determining step due to the fact that the transgranular propagation rate is higher than the intergranular propagation rate. Several stress corrosion cracking mechanisms were analyzed to explain the transgranular cracking. The predictions

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of iron-nickel-chromium alloys in primary circuit environment of PWR-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, Jean-Marie

    1993-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing is a great concern for pressurized water reactors. The mechanism that controls intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary water (lithiated-borated water) has yet to be clearly identified. A study of stress corrosion cracking behaviour, which can identify the main parameters that control the cracking phenomenon, was so necessary to understand the stress corrosion cracking process. Constant extension rate tests, and constant load tests have evidenced that Alloy 600 stress corrosion cracking involves firstly an initiation period, then a slow propagation stage with crack less than 50 to 80 micrometers, and finally a rapid propagation stage leading to failure. The influence of mechanical parameters have shown the next points: - superficial strain hardening and cold work have a strong effect of stress corrosion cracking resistance (decrease of initiation time and increase of crack growth rate), - strain rate was the most suitable parameter for describing the different stage of propagation. The creep behaviour of alloy 600 has shown an increase of creep rate in primary water compared to air, which implies a local interaction plasticity/corrosion. An assessment of the durations of the initiation and the propagation stages was attempted for the whole uniaxial tensile tests, using the macroscopic strain rate: - the initiation time is less than 100 hours and seems to be an electrochemical process, - the durations of the propagation stage are strongly dependent on the strain rate. The behaviour in high primary water temperature of Alloys 690 and 800, which replace Alloy 600, was studied to appraise their margin, and validate their choice. Then the last chapter has to objective to evaluate the crack tip strain rate, in order to better describe the evolution of the different stages of cracking. (author) [fr

  11. Analytical model for time to cover cracking in RC structures due to rebar corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Ghosh, A.K.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ramanujam, S.

    2006-01-01

    The structural degradation of concrete structures due to reinforcement corrosion is a major worldwide problem. Reinforcement corrosion causes a volume increase due to the oxidation of metallic iron, which is mainly responsible for exerting the expansive radial pressure at the steel-concrete interface and development of hoop tensile stresses in the surrounding concrete. Cracking occurs, once the maximum hoop tensile stress exceeds the tensile strength of the concrete. The cracking begins at the steel-concrete interface and propagates outwards and eventually results in the thorough cracking of the cover concrete and this would indicate the loss of service life for the corrosion affected structures. An analytical model is proposed to predict the time required for cover cracking and the weight loss of reinforcing bar in corrosion affected reinforced concrete structures. The modelling aspects of the residual strength of cracked concrete and the stiffness contribution from the combination of reinforcement and expansive corrosion products have also been incorporated in the model. The problem is modeled as a boundary value problem and the governing equations are expressed in terms of the radial displacement. The analytical solutions are presented considering a simple two-zone model for the cover concrete, viz. cracked or uncracked. Reasonable estimation of the various parameters in the model related to the composition and properties of expansive corrosion products based on the available published experimental data has also been discussed. The performance of the proposed corrosion cracking model is then investigated through its ability to reproduce available experimental trends. Reasonably good agreement between experimental results and the analytical predictions has been obtained. It has also been found that tensile strength and initial tangent modulus of cover concrete, annual mean corrosion rate and modulus of elasticity of reinforcement plus corrosion products combined

  12. Modelling of stress corrosion cracking in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fandeur, O.; Rouillon, L.; Pilvin, P.; Jacques, P.; Rebeyrolle, V.

    2001-01-01

    During normal and incidental operating conditions, PWR power plants must comply with the first safety requirement, which is to ensure that the cladding wall is sound. Indeed some severe power transients potentially induce Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) of the zirconium alloy clad, due to strong Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI). Since, at present, the prevention of this risk has some consequences on the French reactors manoeuvrability, a better understanding and forecast of the clad damage related to SCC/PCI is needed. With this aim, power ramp tests are performed in experimental reactors to assess the fuel rod behaviour and evaluate PCI failure risks. To study in detail SCC mechanisms, additional laboratory experiments are carried out on non-irradiated and irradiated cladding tubes. Numerical simulations of these tests have been developed aiming, on the one hand, to evaluate mechanical state variables and, on the other hand, to study consistent mechanical parameters for describing stress corrosion clad failure. The main result of this simulation is the determination of the validity ranges of the stress intensity factor, which is frequently used to model SCC. This parameter appears to be valid only at the onset of crack growth, when crack length remains short. In addition, the role of plastic strain rate and plastic strain as controlling parameters of the SCC process has been analysed in detail using the above mechanical description of the crack tip mechanical fields. Finally, the numerical determination of the first-order parameter(s) in the crack propagation rate law is completed by the development of laboratory tests focused on these parameters. These tests aim to support experimentally the results of the FE simulation. (author)

  13. Dynamic crack propagation through nanoporous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Wilkerson, Justin

    2015-06-01

    The deformation and failure of nanoporous metals may be considerably different than that of more traditional bulk porous metals. The length scales in traditional bulk porous metals are typically large enough for classic plasticity and buckling to be operative. However, the extremely small length scales associated with nanoporous metals may inhibit classic plasticity mechanisms. Here, we motivate an alternative nanovoid growth mechanism mediated by dislocation emission. Following an approach similar to Lubarda and co-workers, we make use of stability arguments applied to the analytic solutions of the elastic interactions of dislocations and voids to derive a simple stress-based criterion for emission activation. We then propose a dynamic nanovoid growth law that is motivated by the kinetics of dislocation emission. The resulting failure model is implemented into a commercial finite element software to simulate dynamic crack growth. The simulations reveal that crack propagation through a nanoporous media proceeds at somewhat faster velocities than through the more traditional bulk porous metal.

  14. Propagation of steel corrosion in concrete: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Otieno, M.; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program includ...

  15. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  16. Possibility of crack propagation in first wall by cyclic electromagnetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, T.; Saito, M.

    1998-01-01

    A strong electromagnetic force due to plasma disruption damages the structural integrity of fusion reactor components. If a crack is generated on disruption, this crack may propagate to a critical length by the iteration of disruption. In this study, electro-magneto-mechanical analysis is conducted to evaluate the crack behavior under various field conditions. The crack propagation life is estimated by the experimental fatigue data. (author)

  17. Zircaloy-4 stress corrosion by iodine: crack kinetics and influence of irradiation on the crack initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, A.

    2008-01-01

    During the PWR power transients, iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is one of the potential failure modes of Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under Pellet-Cladding Interaction conditions. The primary objective of this study is to distinguish the parameters that contribute to the I-SCC phenomenon in iodized methanol solutions at ambient temperature, on notched tensile specimens, using crack growth rate measurements provided by Direct Current Potential Drop. The results show that for a KI lower than 20 MPa.m 1/2 , the IG and mixed IG/TG velocity of propagation is a linear function of KI, regardless of the propagation mode. Between 20 and 25 MPa.m 1/2 , the TG crack growth rate also depends linearly on KI, but increases at a faster rate with respect to KI than during the IG and mixed IG/TG propagation steps. The crack propagation direction and plane (LT and TL) have an impact on the propagation modes, but no impact on the kinetics. The increase of iodine content induces an increase of the crack growth rate for a given KI, and a decrease of the KI, threshold, allowing the crack propagation. This work enables us to quantify the effect of iodine content and of KI on the crack propagation step, propose a propagation law taking into accounts these parameters, and improve the I-SCC description for models. During operation, a zirconium cladding is neutron-irradiated, modifying its microstructure and deformation modes. The second objective of the study is therefore to investigate the impact of these modifications on I-SCC. For that purpose, smooth specimens in recrystallized Zircaloy-4 are proton-irradiated to 2 dpa at 305 C, the microstructure and deformation modes of unirradiated and irradiated Zircaloy-4 are characterized by TEM and SEM, and the influence of these radiation-induced modifications on the I-SCC susceptibility is studied. The Laves phases precipitates are slightly modified by irradiation. The formation of P -type dislocation loops correlated with

  18. Monitoring reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced cracking using non-destructive x-ray attenuation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2011-01-01

    To test the applicability of the x-ray attenuation method to monitor the movement of corrosion products as well as the formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials reinforced mortar samples were prepared and tested under accelerated corrosion conditions. It is evident from the ex...... of the corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel, obtained by the x-ray attenuation method, was found to be in very good agreement with the mass loss obtained by gravimetric method as well as Faraday's law....

  19. Study of the Effect of Swelling on Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the methodology used to study the effect of swelling on the crack growth rate of an irradiation-assisted stress corrosion crack that is propagating in highly irradiated stainless steel 304 material irradiated to 33 dpa in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. The material selection, specimens design, experimental apparatus and processes are described. The results of the current test are presented.

  20. Alloy SCR-3 resistant to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowaka, Masamichi; Fujikawa, Hisao; Kobayashi, Taiki

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is used widely because the corrosion resistance, workability and weldability are excellent, but the main fault is the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in the environment containing chlorides. Inconel 600, most resistant to stress corrosion cracking, is not necessarily safe under some severe condition. In the heat-affected zone of SUS 304 tubes for BWRs, the cases of stress corrosion cracking have occurred. The conventional testing method of stress corrosion cracking using boiling magnesium chloride solution has been problematical because it is widely different from actual environment. The effects of alloying elements on stress corrosion cracking are remarkably different according to the environment. These effects were investigated systematically in high temperature, high pressure water, and as the result, Alloy SCR-3 with excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance was found. The physical constants and the mechanical properties of the SCR-3 are shown. The states of stress corrosion cracking in high temperature, high pressure water containing chlorides and pure water, polythionic acid, sodium phosphate solution and caustic soda of the SCR-3, SUS 304, Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 are compared and reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel under deaerated high-temperature water. Influence of cold work and processing orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terachi, Takumi; Yamada, Takuyo; Chiba, Goro; Arioka, Koji

    2006-01-01

    The influence of cold work and processing orientation on the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steel under hydrogenated high-temperature water was examined. It was shown that (1) the crack growth rates increased with heaviness of cold work, and (2) processing orientation affected crack growth rate with cracking direction. Crack growth rates showed anisotropy of T-L>>T-S>L-S, with T-S and L-S branches representing high shear stress direction. Geometric deformation of crystal grains due to cold work caused the anisotropy and shear stress also assisted the SCC propagation. (3) The step intervals of slip like patterns observed on intergranular facets increased cold work. (4) Nano-indentation hardness of the crack tip together with EBSD measurement indicated that the change of hardness due to crack propagation was less than 5% cold-work, even though the distance from the crack tip was 10μm. (author)

  2. Zirconium alloy fuel cladding resistant to PCI crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.; Foster, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element is described cladding tube comprising: concentric tubular layers of zirconium base alloys; the concentric tubular layers including an inner layer and outer layer; the outer layer metallurgically bonded to the inner layer; the outer layer composed of a first zirconium base alloy characterized by excellent resistance to corrosion caused by exposure to high temperature and pressure aqueous environments; the inner layer composed of a second zirconium base alloy consisting of: about 0.2 to 0.6 wt.% tin, about 0.03 to 0.11 wt.% iron, less than about 0.02 wt.% chromium, up to about 350 ppm oxygen and the remainder being zirconium and incidental impurities, and the inner layer characterized by improved resistance to crack propagation under reactor operating conditions compared to the first zirconium alloy

  3. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Keith J., E-mail: leonardk@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stevens, Jacqueline N. [AREVA Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Busby, Jeremy T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In the present work, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. The cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  4. Investigation of Non-Uniform Rust Distribution and Its Effects on Corrosion Induced Cracking in Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutrisno Wahyuniarsih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniform corrosion still widely used by a lot of researchers and engineers to analyze the corrosion induced cracking. However, in practice, corrosion process occurred non-uniformly. The part nearest to the exposed surface is more likely to have faster corrosion initiation compared with other regions. This research is mainly focused on investigating the effect of non-uniform rust distribution to cover cracking in reinforced concrete. An experimental test performed using accelerated corrosion test by using 5% NaCl solution and applied a constant electric current to the concrete samples. The rust distribution and measurement were observed by using a digital microscope. Based on the experimental result, it was found that the rust was distributed in a non-uniform pattern. As a result, the cracks also formed non-uniformly along the perimeter of steel bar. At the last part of this paper, a simulation result of concrete cracking induced by non-uniform corrosion is presented. The result compared with a simulation using uniform corrosion assumption to investigate the damage pattern of each model. The simulation result reveals stress evolution due to rust expansion which leads to concrete cracking. Furthermore, a comparison of stresses induced by non-uniform corrosion and uniform corrosion indicates that non-uniform corrosion could lead to earlier damage to the structure which is specified by the formation and propagation of the crack.

  5. Mechanistic model of stress corrosion cracking (scc) of carbon steel in acidic solution with the presence of H2s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmara, Y P; Juliawati, A; Sulaiman, A; Jamiluddin

    2013-01-01

    In oil and gas industrial environments, H 2 S gas is one of the corrosive species which should be a main concern in designing infrastructure made of carbon steel. Combination between the corrosive environment and stress condition will cause degradation of carbon steel increase unpredictably due to their simultaneous effects. This paper will design a model that involves electrochemical and mechanical theories to study crack growth rate under presence of H 2 S gas. Combination crack and corrosion propagation of carbon steel, with different hydrogen concentration has been investigated. The results indicated that high concentration of hydrogen ions showed a higher crack propagation rate. The comparison between corrosion prediction models and corrosion model developed by researchers used to verify the model accuracy showed a good agreement

  6. Crack propagation along polymer/non-polymer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, Willem-Pier; Fedorov, Alexander; De Hosson, Jeff T.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms of the propagation of crack fronts along interfaces between a glassy polymer and metal or glass are discussed. Specifically, the systems studied are Poly-Ethylene Terephthalate (PETG) spin-coated on A1, PETG-glass and PETG hot-pressed on Cr-sputtered glass. Cracks studied propagate in an

  7. Stress corrosion cracking experience in steam generators at Bruce NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.J.; Gonzalez, F.; Brown, J.

    1993-01-01

    In late 1990 and through 1991, units 1 and 2 at the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (BNGS-A) experienced a number of steam generator tube leaks. Tube failures were identified by eddy current to be circumferential cracks at U-bend supports on the hot-leg side of the boilers. In late 1991, tubes were removed from these units for failure characterization. Two active failure modes were found: corrosion fatigue in both units 1 and 2 and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in unit 2. In unit 2, lead was found in deposits, on tubes, and in cracks, and the cracking was mixed-mode: transgranular and intergranular. This convincingly indicated the involvement of lead in the stress corrosion cracking failures. A program of inspection and tube removals was carried out to investigate more fully the extent of the problem. This program found significant cracking only in lead-affected boilers in unit 2, and also revealed a limited extent of non-lead-related intergranular stress corrosion cracking in other boilers and units. Various aspects of the failures and tube examinations are presented in this paper. Included is discussion of the cracking morphology, measured crack size distributions, and chemical analysis of tube surfaces, crack faces, and deposits -- with particular emphasis on lead

  8. Stress corrosion crack tip microstructure in nickel-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shei, S.A.; Yang, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behavior of several nickel-base alloys in high temperature caustic environments has been evaluated. The crack tip and fracture surfaces were examined using Auger/ESCA and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) to determine the near crack tip microstructure and microchemistry. Results showed formation of chromium-rich oxides at or near the crack tip and nickel-rich de-alloying layers away from the crack tip. The stress corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys in caustic may be explained by the preferential oxidation and dissolution of different alloying elements at the crack tip. Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) shows good general corrosion and intergranular attack resistance in caustic because of its high nickel content. Thermally treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690) and Alloy 600 provide good stress corrosion cracking resistance because of high chromium contents along grain boundaries. Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) does not show as good stress corrosion cracking resistance as Alloy 690 or Alloy 600 because of its high molybdenum content

  9. Initiation model for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, Mamoru; Kawakubo, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yuji; Arii, Mitsuru.

    1981-01-01

    Discussions were made on the keys of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature water in laboratories and stress corrosion cracking incidents in operating plants. Based on these discussions, a model was set up of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation in BWR pipes. Regarding the model, it was presumed that the intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiates during start up periods whenever heat-affected zones in welded pipes are highly sensitized and suffer dynamic strain in transient water containing dissolved oxygen. A series of BWR start up simulation tests were made by using a flowing autoclave system with slow strain rate test equipment. Validity of the model was confirmed through the test results. (author)

  10. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Type 304 Stainless Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Louthan, M

    1964-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel exposed in dilute chloride solutions is being investigated at the Savannah River Laboratory in attempts to develop a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon...

  12. Threshold intensity factors as lower boundaries for crack propagation in ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Per-Ole

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Slow crack growth can be described in a v (crack velocity versus KI (stress intensity factor diagram. Slow crack growth in ceramics is attributed to corrosion assisted stress at the crack tip or at any pre-existing defect in the ceramic. The combined effect of high stresses at the crack tip and the presence of water or body fluid molecules (reducing surface energy at the crack tip induces crack propagation, which eventually may result in fatigue. The presence of a threshold in the stress intensity factor, below which no crack propagation occurs, has been the subject of important research in the last years. The higher this threshold, the higher the reliability of the ceramic, and consequently the longer its lifetime. Methods We utilize the Irwin K-field displacement relation to deduce crack tip stress intensity factors from the near crack tip profile. Cracks are initiated by indentation impressions. The threshold stress intensity factor is determined as the time limit of the tip stress intensity when the residual stresses have (nearly disappeared. Results We determined the threshold stress intensity factors for most of the all ceramic materials presently important for dental restorations in Europe. Of special significance is the finding that alumina ceramic has a threshold limit nearly identical with that of zirconia. Conclusion The intention of the present paper is to stress the point that the threshold stress intensity factor represents a more intrinsic property for a given ceramic material than the widely used toughness (bend strength or fracture toughness, which refers only to fast crack growth. Considering two ceramics with identical threshold limits, although with different critical stress intensity limits, means that both ceramics have identical starting points for slow crack growth. Fast catastrophic crack growth leading to spontaneous fatigue, however, is different. This growth starts later in those ceramic materials

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloys. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R.L.; Syrett, B.C.

    1980-03-01

    The overall aim has been to develop an improved understanding of the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanism considered to be responsible for pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) failures of nuclear fuel rods. The objective of the present phase of the project was to investigate the potential for improving the resistance of Zircaloy to iodine-induced SCC by modifying the manufacturing techniques used in the commercial production of fuel cladding. Several aspects of iodine SCC behavior of potential relevance to cladding performance were experimentally investigated. It was found that the SCC susceptibility of Zircaloy tubing is sensitive to crystallographic texture, surface condition, and residual stress distribution and that current specifications for Zircaloy tubing provide no assurance of an optimum resistance to SCC. Additional evidence was found that iodine-induced cracks initiate at local chemical inhomogeneities in the Zircaloy surface, but laser melting to produce a homogenized surface layer did not improve the SCC resistance. Several results were obtained that should be considered in models of PCI failure. The ratio of axial to hoop stress and the temperature were both shown to affect the SCC resistance whereas the difference in composition between Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 had no detectable effect. Damage accumulation during iodine SCC was found to be nonlinear: generally, a given life fraction at low stress was more damaging than the same life fraction at higher stress. Studies of the thermochemistry of the zirconium-iodine system (performed under US Department of Energy sponsorship) revealed many errors in the literature and provided important new insights into the mechanism of iodine SCC of Zircaloys

  14. Steel fibre corrosion in cracks:durability of sprayed concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Nordström, Erik

    2000-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced sprayed concrete is common practice for permanent linings in underground construction. Today there is a demand on "expected technical service life" of 120 years. Thin steel fibres could be expected to discontinue carrying load fast with a decrease of fibre diameter caused by corrosion, especially in cracks. The thesis contains results from inspections on existing sprayed concrete structures and a literature review on corrosion of steel fibres in cracked concrete. To stu...

  15. Crack propagation of brittle rock under high geostress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Chu, Weijiang; Chen, Pingzhi

    2018-03-01

    Based on fracture mechanics and numerical methods, the characteristics and failure criterions of wall rock cracks including initiation, propagation, and coalescence are analyzed systematically under different conditions. In order to consider the interaction among cracks, adopt the sliding model of multi-cracks to simulate the splitting failure of rock in axial compress. The reinforcement of bolts and shotcrete supporting to rock mass can control the cracks propagation well. Adopt both theory analysis and simulation method to study the mechanism of controlling the propagation. The best fixed angle of bolts is calculated. Then use ansys to simulate the crack arrest function of bolt to crack. Analyze the influence of different factors on stress intensity factor. The method offer more scientific and rational criterion to evaluate the splitting failure of underground engineering under high geostress.

  16. Fast fracture: an adiabatic restriction on thermally activated crack propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Slow, isothermal, crack propagation is widely suspected to be rate controlled by thermally activated plastic deformation in the crack tip region. Adiabatic conditions are generally established in the fracture modified material at the tip of a crack during fast fracture. The temperature of this material is not the temperature of the specimen and is generally not measured during fast fracture. Thus, a complete thermodynamic description of adiabatic crack propagation data can not be made. When the slow, isothermal, crack propagation mechanisms are assumed to be operative during adiabatic crack propagation then certain predictions can be made. For example: the changes in the driving force due to temperature and rate are always in the opposite sense; there is no minimum in the driving force versus crack velocity without a change in mechanism; the temperature rise in the crack tip fracture modified material is determined mainly by the activation enthalpy for crack propagation; the interpretation of fast fracture structural steel data from simple plastic models is suspect since these materials have dissimilar isothermal temperature dependencies.

  17. FATIGUE CRACK PROPAGATION THROUGH AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON MICROSTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Bubenko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron (ADI has a wide range of application, particularly for castings used in automotive and earth moving machinery industries. These components are usually subjected to variable dynamic loading that may promote initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks up to final fracture. Thus, it is important to determine the fatigue crack propagation behavior of ADI. Since fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN vs. stress intensity factor K data describe fatigue crack propagation resistance and fatigue durability of structural materials, da/dN vs. Ka curves of ADI 1050 are reported here. The threshold amplitude of stress intensity factor Kath is also determined. Finally, the influence of stress intensity factor amplitude to the character of fatigue crack propagation through the ADI microstructure is described.

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature water: a study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Bouvier, O. de; Gras, J.M.; Noel, D.; Vaillant, F.; Rios, R.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations of the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 tubing in high temperature water were performed in order to get a precise knowledge of the different stages of the cracking and their dependence on various parameters. The compatibility of the results with the main mechanisms to be considered was examined. Results showed three stages in the cracking: a true incubation time, a slow-rate propagation period followed by a rapid-propagation stage. Tests separating stress and strain rate contributions show that the strain rate is the main parameter which controls the crack propagation. The hydrogen overpressure was found to increase the crack growth rate up to 1-4 bar, but a strong decrease is observed from 4 to 20 bar. Analysis of the hydrogen ingress in the metal showed that it is neither correlated to the hydrogen overpressure nor to the severity of cracking; so cracking resulting from an hydrogen-model is unlikely. No detrimental effect of oxygen (4 bar) was noticed both in the mill-annealed and the sensitized conditions. Finally, none of the classical mechanisms, neither hydrogen-assisted cracking nor slip-step dissolution, can correctly describe the observed behaviour. Some fractographic examinations, and an influence of primary water on the creep rate of Alloy 600, lead to consider that other recent mechanisms, involving an interaction between dissolution and plasticity, have to be considered

  19. Prediction of reinforcement corrosion using corrosion induced cracks width in corroded reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Inamullah; François, Raoul; Castel, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the evolution of reinforcement corrosion in comparison to corrosion crack width in a highly corroded reinforced concrete beam. Cracking and corrosion maps of the beam were drawn and steel reinforcement was recovered from the beam to observe the corrosion pattern and to measure the loss of mass of steel reinforcement. Maximum steel cross-section loss of the main reinforcement and average steel cross-section loss between stirrups were plotted against the crack width. The experimental results were compared with existing models proposed by Rodriguez et al., Vidal et al. and Zhang et al. Time prediction models for a given opening threshold are also compared to experimental results. Steel cross-section loss for stirrups was also measured and was plotted against the crack width. It was observed that steel cross-section loss in the stirrups had no relationship with the crack width of longitudinal corrosion cracks. -- Highlights: •Relationship between crack and corrosion of reinforcement was investigated. •Corrosion results of natural process and then corresponds to in-situ conditions. •Comparison with time predicting model is provided. •Prediction of load-bearing capacity from crack pattern was studied

  20. Fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. T. V.; Ritchie, R. O.; Piascik, R. S.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The principal mechanisms which govern the fatigue crack propagation resistance of aluminum-lithium alloys are investigated, with emphasis on their behavior in controlled gaseous and aqueous environments. Extensive data describe the growth kinetics of fatigue cracks in ingot metallurgy Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 and in powder metallurgy alloys exposed to moist air. Results are compared with data for traditional aluminum alloys 2024, 2124, 2618, 7075, and 7150. Crack growth is found to be dominated by shielding from tortuous crack paths and resultant asperity wedging. Beneficial shielding is minimized for small cracks, for high stress ratios, and for certain loading spectra. While water vapor and aqueous chloride environments enhance crack propagation, Al-Li-Cu alloys behave similarly to 2000-series aluminum alloys. Cracking in water vapor is controlled by hydrogen embrittlement, with surface films having little influence on cyclic plasticity.

  1. Elucidating the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) process for zircaloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, M.; Shimada, S.; Nishimura, S.; Amano, K.

    1984-01-01

    Several experimental investigations were made to enhance understanding of the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) process for Zircaloy: (1) oxide penetration process, (2) crack initiation process, and (3) crack propagation process. Concerning the effect of the oxide layer produced by conventional steam-autoclaving, no significant difference was found between results for autoclaved and as-pickled samples. Tests with 15 species of metal iodides revealed that only those metal iodides which react thermodynamically with zirconium to produce zirconium tetraiodide (ZrI 4 ) caused SCC of Zircaloy. Detailed SEM examinations were made on the SCC fracture surface of irradiated specimens. The crack propagation rate was expressed with a da/dt=C Ksup(n) type equation by combining results of tests and calculations with a finite element method. (author)

  2. Stainless steel waste containers: an assessment of the probability of stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanklyn, J.N.; Naish, C.C.

    1991-06-01

    The paper summarises information obtained from the literature and discussions held with corrosion experts from universities and industry, relevant to the possibility that stainless steel radioactive waste containers containing low level and intermediate level radioactive waste (LLW and ILW) could, when buried in concrete, suffer one or more of the forms of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion cracking is caused by the simultaneous and synergistic action of a corrosive environment and stress. The initiation and propagation of SCC depend on a number of factors being present, namely a certain level of stress, an environment which will cause cracking and a susceptible metal or alloy. Generally the susceptibility of a metal or alloy to SCC increases as its strength level increases. The susceptibility in a specific environment will depend on: solution concentration, pH, temperature, and electrochemical potential of the metal/alloy. It is concluded that alkaline stress corrosion cracking is unlikely to occur under even the worst case conditions, that chloride stress corrosion cracking is a distinct possibility at the higher end of the temperature range (25-80 o C) and that stress corrosion related to sensitization of the steel will not be a problem for the majority of container material which is less than 5 mm in cross section. Thicker section material could become sensitized leading to a local problem in these areas. Contact with metals that are electrochemically more negative in corrosion potential is likely to reduce the incidence of SCC, at least locally. Measurement of repassivation potentials and rest potentials in solutions of relevant composition would provide a firmer prediction of the extent to which a high pH could reduce the likelihood of SCC caused by chlorides. (author)

  3. Ductile cast irons: microstructure influence on fatigue crack propagation resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cavallini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure influence on fatigue crack propagation resistance in five different ductile cast irons (DCI was investigated. Four ferrite/pearlite volume fractions were considered, performing fatigue crack propagation tests according to ASTM E647 standard (R equals to 0.1, 0.5 and 0.75, respectively. Results were compared with an austempered DCI. Damaging micromechanisms were investigated according to the following procedures: - “traditional” Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM fracture surfaces analysis; - SEM fracture surface analysis with 3D quantitative analysis; - SEM longitudinal crack profile analysis - Light Optical Microscope (LOM transversal crack profile analysis;

  4. Influence of a gaseous atmosphere on fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henaff, G.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a review of the current knowledge on the influence of gaseous atmospheres, and primarily ambient air, on fatigue crack propagation in metallic alloys. Experimental evidence of the effect of exposure to ambient air or any moist environment on fatigue crack propagation in steels is first proposed. The different interacting processes are analyzed so as to clearly uncouple the influence of the various factors on crack growth resistance. Two distinct mechanisms are identified: the adsorption of vapour molecules and hydrogen assisted fracture at crack tip. (author)

  5. Towards modeling intergranular stress corrosion cracks on grain size scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonovski, Igor; Cizelj, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simulating the onset and propagation of intergranular cracking. ► Model based on the as-measured geometry and crystallographic orientations. ► Feasibility, performance of the proposed computational approach demonstrated. - Abstract: Development of advanced models at the grain size scales has so far been mostly limited to simulated geometry structures such as for example 3D Voronoi tessellations. The difficulty came from a lack of non-destructive techniques for measuring the microstructures. In this work a novel grain-size scale approach for modelling intergranular stress corrosion cracking based on as-measured 3D grain structure of a 400 μm stainless steel wire is presented. Grain topologies and crystallographic orientations are obtained using a diffraction contrast tomography, reconstructed within a detailed finite element model and coupled with advanced constitutive models for grains and grain boundaries. The wire is composed of 362 grains and over 1600 grain boundaries. Grain boundary damage initialization and early development is then explored for a number of cases, ranging from isotropic elasticity up to crystal plasticity constitutive laws for the bulk grain material. In all cases the grain boundaries are modeled using the cohesive zone approach. The feasibility of the approach is explored.

  6. Corrosion cracking of rotor steels of steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melekhov, R.K.; Litvintseva, E.N.

    1994-01-01

    Results of investigation of stress corrosion cracking of steam turbine materials in nuclear, fossil and geothermal power plants have been analysed. The role of factors that cause damage to rotor discs, mono block and welding rotors of steam turbines has been shown. These are yield stress and steel composition, stress intensity coefficient and crack growth rate, composition and temperature of the condensed steam and water, electrochemical conditions. The conclusion has been made about the state of stress corrosion cracking of the rotors materials, and main investigation trends which are necessary to solve this problem have been listed

  7. Unstable propagation behavior of a ductile crack in SUS-304 stainless steel under high compliance tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoda, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    In relation to the safe maintenance of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to prevent reactor coolant pipings from burst type failure caused by the unstable propagation of defects and cracks, such as stress corrosion cracking and fatigue cracks. In ductile materials, crack propagation is stable in tensile loading under fixed grip condition, when a specimen is controlled to deform in proportion to the increase of tensile load. However, it has been known that the instability of ductile cracks occurs after tensile load reached the maximum, especially under constant loading condition arising in the loading devices with high compliance or low tensile rigidity. In order to confirm the reliability of SUS 304 stainless pipes subjected to SCC, the crack propagation behavior was examined with the specimens having center cracks, using both testing machines with high compliance and low compliance. The instability of ductile cracks and the propagation velocity of unstable cracks were analyzed, and the calculated results were compated with the experimental results. Not only the compliance of testing machines but also the conditions of specimens affected the propagation of cracks. (Kako, I.)

  8. An Industrial Perspective on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Some Commercially Used Carbon Steels and Corrosion-Resistant Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Yugo; Daigo, Yuzo; Sugahara, Katsuo

    2017-08-01

    Commercial metals and alloys like carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-based super alloys frequently encounter the problem of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) and resulting failure in engineering components. This article aims to provide a perspective on three critical industrial applications having EAC issues: (1) corrosion and cracking of carbon steels in automotive applications, (2) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in salt production and processing, and (3) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water. The review focuses on current industrial-level understanding with respect to corrosion fatigue, hydrogen-assisted cracking, or stress corrosion cracking, as well as the dominant factors affecting crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, some ongoing industrial studies and directions of future research are also discussed.

  9. Rail base corrosion and cracking prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Rail base corrosion combined with fatigue or damage can significantly reduce rail life. Studies were done to examine the relative contribution of damage, corrosion, and fatigue on rail life. The combined effects can be separated into constituent fact...

  10. Fatigue crack propagation under elastic plastic medium at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asada, Y.; Yuuki, R.; Sakon, T.; Sunamoto, D.; Tokimasa, K.; Makino, Y.; Kitagawa, M; Shingai, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purposes of the present study are to establish the testing method to obtain compatible data on the low cycle fatigue crack propagation at elevated temperature, and to investigate the parameter controlling the crack propagation rate. In the present study, the preliminary experiments have been carried out on low cycle fatigue crack propagation behaviour in type 304 stainless steel in air at 550 0 C, using two types of specimen with a through thickness notch. Both strain controlled and stress controlled fatigue tests have been done under a fully reversed strain or stress cycling. The data obtained are correlated with some fracture mechanics parameters and are discussed with the appropriate parameter for evaluating the low cycle fatigue crack propagation behaviour at elevated temperature. (author)

  11. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  12. Subsurface crack initiation and propagation mechanisms in gigacycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhiyong; Wagner, Daniele; Bathias, Claude; Paris, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    In the very high cycle regime (N f > 10 7 cycles) cracks can nucleate on inclusions, 'supergrains' and pores, which leads to fish-eye propagation around the defect. The initiation from an inclusion or other defect is almost equal to the total crack growth lifetime, perhaps much more than 99% of this lifetime in many cases. Integration of the Paris law allows one to predict the number of cycles to crack initiation. A cyclic plastic zone around the crack exists, and recording the surface temperature of the sample during the test may allow one to follow crack propagation and determine the number of cycles to crack initiation. A thermo-mechanical model has been developed. In this study several fish-eyes from various materials have been observed by scanning electron microscopy, and the fractographic results analyzed as they related to the mechanical and thermo-mechanical models.

  13. Primary water stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy 690 heat affected zones of butt welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, L.; Calonne, O.; Toloczko, M.B.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Massoud, J.P.; Lemaire, E.; Gerard, R.; Somville, F.; Richnau, A.; Lagerstrom, J.

    2015-01-01

    A wide V-groove butt weld was fabricated from Alloy 690 plates using Alloy 152 filler material, maximum allowable heat input, and very stiff strong-backs. Alloy 690 heat affected zones (HAZ) was characterized in terms of microstructure and plastic strains induced by weld shrinkage. Crack initiation tests were carried out in pure hydrogenated steam at 400 C. degrees for 4000 h. Crack growth rate tests were performed in simulated PWR primary water at a temperature of 360 C. degrees. A maximum plastic strain around 5% was measured in the vicinity of the fusion line, which decreased almost linearly with the distance from the fusion line. Crack initiation tests on Alloy 690 HAZ specimens as well as on 30% cold-rolled Alloy 690 specimens were performed in pure hydrogenated steam at 400 C. degrees (partial pressure of hydrogen = 0.7 bar) for a total of 4000 h using cylindrical notched tensile specimens, reverse U-bends and flat micro-tensile specimens. No crack initiation was detected. Stress corrosion propagation rates revealed extremely low SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) growth rates both in the base metal and in the HAZ region whose magnitudes are of no engineering significance. Overall, the results indicated limited plastic strain induced by weld shrinkage in butt weld HAZ, and to no particular susceptibility of primary water stress corrosion cracking. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  15. On governing equations for crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Botsis, J.

    1988-01-01

    Results of analysis on damage distribution of a crack layer, in a model material, supported the self-similarity hypothesis of damage evolution which has been adopted by the crack layer theory. On the basis of measurements of discontinuity density and the double layer potential technique, a solution to the crack damage interaction problem has been developed. Evaluation of the stress intensity factor illustrated the methodology. Analysis of experimental results showed that Arrhenius type constitutive relationship described very well the expansion of the active zone of a crack layer.

  16. Study of fatigue crack propagation in magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarema, S.Ya.; Zinyuk, O.D.; Ostash, O.P.; Kudryashov, V.G.; Elkin, F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in standard (MA2-1, MA8) and super light (MA21, MA18) alloys has been investigated in the whole range of load amplitude changes-from threshold to critical; the materials have been compared by cyclic crack resistance, fractographic analysis has been made. It is shown that MA2-1 alloy crack resistance is slightly lower than the resistance of the other three alloys. MA8 and MA21 alloys having similar mechanical properties almost do not differ in cyclic crack resistance as well. MA18 alloy has the highest resistance to fatigue crack propagation in the whole range of Ksub(max) changes. The presented results on cyclic crack resistance of MA21 and MA18 alloys agree with the data on statistic fracture toughness. The fractures have been also investigated using a scanning electron microscope. Fracture microrelieves of MA8 and MA21 alloys are very similar. At low crack propagation rates (v - 7 m/cycle) it develops through grains, in MA2-1 alloy fracture intergrain fracture areas can be observed. In MA8 and MA21 alloy fractures groove covered areas can be seen alonside with areas of slipping plane laminatron; their specific weight increases with #betta# decrease. Lower crack propagation rates and higher values of threshold stress intensity factors for MA8 and MA21 alloys than for MA2-1 alloy are caused by the absence of intergrain fracture

  17. Suppression of Fatigue Crack Propagation of Duralumin by Cavitation Peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was demonstrated in the present paper that cavitation peening which is one of the mechanical surface modification technique can suppress fatigue crack propagation in duralumin. The impacts produced when cavitation bubble collapses can be utilised for the mechanical surface modification technique in the same way as laser peening and shot peening, which is called “cavitation peening”. Cavitation peening employing a cavitating jet in water was used to treat the specimen made of duralumin Japanese Industrial Standards JIS A2017-T3. After introducing a notch, fatigue test was conducted by a load-controlled plate bending fatigue tester, which has been originally developed. The fatigue crack propagation behavior was evaluated and the relationship between the fatigue crack propagation rate versus stress intensity factor range was obtained. From the results, the fatigue crack propagation rate was drastically reduced by cavitation peening and the fatigue life of duralumin plate was extended 4.2 times by cavitation peening. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation can be suppressed by 88% in the stable crack propagation stage by cavitation peening.

  18. Solvent effects on stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and Zircaloy-4 in iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.; Galvele, Jose R.

    2000-01-01

    Localized corrosion (pitting, intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking) of Zircaloy-4 and its principal component, zirconium, was investigated in solutions of iodine in different alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-octanol). Intergranular attack was found in all of the solutions tested, and the attack velocity increases when the size of the alcohol molecule decreases. In some cases it was found that intergranular attack is accompanied by pitting. Slow strain-rate experiments showed that the propagation rate of stress corrosion cracks also depends on the size of the solvent molecule. From these results it may be inferred that the cause of the variation in the velocity is the steric hindrance of the alcohol molecules. The surface mobility SCC mechanism may account for these results. (author)

  19. The effect of crack branching on the residual lifetime of machine components containing stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdowski, R.M.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Speidel, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations concerning the effect of crack branching on the reduction of stress intensity at the tip of single cracks. The results indicate that the division of a single crack into n branches reduces the stress intensity at the branch tips by a factor of about 1/√n. This permits branched cracks to grow to larger depths before becoming critical. The implication is that longer residual lifetimes and longer operating times between inspections can be calculated for machine components with growing branched stress corrosion cracks. (author)

  20. FEM Modeling of Crack Propagation in a Model Multiphase Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihe QIAN; Seishi NISHIDO; Hiroyuki TODA; Tosliro KOBAYASHI

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, several widely applied fracture criteria were first numerically examined and the crack-tip-region Jintegral criterion was confirmed to be more applicable to predict fracture angle in an elastic-plastic multiphase material. Then, the crack propagation in an idealized dendritic two-phase Al-7%Si alloy was modeled using an elastic-plastic finite element method. The variation of crack growth driving force with crack extension was also demonstrated. It is found that the crack path is significantly influenced by the presence of α-phase near the crack tip, and the crack growth driving force varies drastically from place to place. Lastly, the simulated fracture path in the two-phase model alloy was compared with the experimentally observed fracture path.

  1. The effect of single overloading on stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yuzuru; Saito, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    In the normal course of nuclear power plant operation in Japan, proof testing has been performed after periodic plant inspections. In this proof test procedure, the reactor pressure vessel and pipes of the primary coolant loop are subjected to a specified overload with a slightly higher hydraulic pressure than during normal operation. This specified overload is so called a single overload' in material testing. It is well known that the fatigue crack growth rate is decreased after a single overload has been applied to the specimen. However, it is not clear whether the stress corrosion cracking rate is also decreased after a single overload. In this study, the effect of a single overload on the stress corrosion cracking rate under simulated boiling water reactor environment was evaluated by examining a singly overloaded WOL (wedge opening load) specimen. The WOL specimen for the stress corrosion cracking test was machined from sensitized 304 type austenitic stainless steel. Since the crack extension length was 3.2% longer in the case of a more severely overloaded specimen, it was observed than the stress corrosion cracking rate is also decreased after the single overload has been applied to the specimen. (author)

  2. Biaxial fatigue crack propagation behavior of perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; Shi, Shouwen; Wang, Lei; Chen, Xu; Chen, Gang

    2018-04-01

    Perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes have long been used as the typical electrolyte for polymer-electrolyte fuel cells, which not only transport proton and water but also serve as barriers to prevent reactants mixing. However, too often the structural integrity of perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes is impaired by membrane thinning or cracks/pinholes formation induced by mechanical and chemical degradations. Despite the increasing number of studies that report crack formation, such as crack size and shape, the underlying mechanism and driving forces have not been well explored. In this paper, the fatigue crack propagation behaviors of Nafion membranes subjected to biaxial loading conditions have been investigated. In particular, the fatigue crack growth rates of flat cracks in responses to different loading conditions are compared, and the impact of transverse stress on fatigue crack growth rate is clarified. In addition, the crack paths for slant cracks under both uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions are discussed, which are similar in geometry to those found after accelerated stress testing of fuel cells. The directions of initial crack propagation are calculated theoretically and compared with experimental observations, which are in good agreement. The findings reported here lays the foundation for understanding of mechanical failure of membranes.

  3. Relationship between turbine rotor and disk metallurgical characteristics and stress corrosion cracking behavior. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayley, H.B.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes stress corrosion test results in which several heats of turbine rotor steels specially prepared to achieve different degrees of segregation to the grain boundaries were tested in concentrated laboratory and actual steam turbine environments. Grain boundary characteristics are considered important because turbine rotor failures in field service have been of an intergranular nature and because grain boundary segregation is known to affect the impact toughness of rotor steels (''temper embrittlement''). The laboratory stress corrosion testing results showed no differences between heavily and lightly segregated test pieces which differed greatly in impact toughness. All test specimens cracked, indicating the laboratory environments may have been too severe to allow differentiation between the various metallurgical conditions, if any differences exist. Test loops and autoclaves for chemical analysis and mechanical testing were designed, installed and are operating in the field testing portion of this program. No intergranular cracking has occurred to date; hence, no differentiation between heavily and lightly segregated test pieces has been possible in field testing. Instrumented crack propagation specimens, which permit measurement of cracking as it occurs, have been installed for the continuing field testing program. Correlation of such cracking with the continuously monitored chemical composition of the environment will increase understanding of the cracking process and may give the possibility of providing an early warning of the existence of conditions which might cause turbine rotor cracking

  4. Theoretical aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kwon; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical aspects of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22 in contact with saturated NaCl solution are explored in terms of the Coupled Environment Fracture Model (CEFM), which was calibrated upon available experimental crack growth rate data. Crack growth rate (CGR) was then predicted as a function of stress intensity, electrochemical potential, solution conductivity, temperature, and electrochemical crack length (ECL). From the dependence of the CGR on the ECL and the evolution of a semi-elliptical surface crack in a planar surface under constant loading conditions it is predicted that penetration through the 2.5-cm thick Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer of the waste package (WP) could occur 32,000 years after nucleation. Accordingly, the crack must nucleate within the first 968,000 years of storage. However, we predict that the Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer will not be penetrated by SCC within the 10,000-year Intermediate Performance Period, even if a crack nucleates immediately upon placement of the WP in the repository.

  5. Crack propagation and fracture in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.G.; Lange, F.F.

    1975-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and strength studies performed on two silicon carbides - a hot-pressed material (with alumina) and a sintered material (with boron) - have shown that both materials exhibit slow crack growth at room temperature in water, but only the hot-pressed material exhibits significant high temperature slow crack growth (1000 to 1400 0 C). A good correlation of the observed fracture behaviour with the crack growth predicted from the fracture mechanics parameters shows that effective failure predictions for this material can be achieved using macro-fracture mechanics data. (author)

  6. Study of regularities in propagation of thermal fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachkova, N.G.; Sobolev, N.D.; Egorov, V.I.; Rostovtsev, Yu.V.; Ivanov, Yu.S.; Sirotin, V.L.

    1978-01-01

    Regularities in the propagation of thermal fatigue cracks in the Cr-Ni steels of the austenite class depending upon deformation conditions in the crack zone, have been considered. Thin-walled tube samples of the Kh16N40, Kh18N20 and Kh16N15 steels have been tested in the 10O reversible 400 deg C and 100 reversible 500 deg C regimes. The samples have possessed a slot-shaped stress concentrator. Stress intensity pseudocoefficient has been calculated for the correlation of experimental data. The formula for determining crack propagation rate has been obtained. The experiments permit to conclude that propagation rate of thermal fatigue cracks in the above steels depends upon the scope of plastic deformation during a cycle and stress intensity pseudocoefficient, and is determined by plastic deformation resistance during thermal cyclic loading

  7. Modeling of the propagation of crevice corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousson, Jean-Louis; Vuillemin, Bruno; Oltra, Roland; Crusset, Didier; Santarini, Gerard; Combrade, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Models of crevice corrosion can be divided into two categories: the first one is aimed to define the time necessary to reach a Critical Crevice Solution susceptible to initiate a stable crevice propagation whereas the second one is focused on the chemical composition and potential in the crevice during its steady propagation. In this second category the geometry of the crevice is kept constant which is a very rough approximation since a real crevice never reaches a steady state mainly because of its shape evolution. Such an approach necessitates the determination of the most important input parameters (external solution composition, applied potential, shape of the crevice, etc.) in the stabilization of a crevice providing a stability criterion is defined, taking into account the occurrence of precipitation or of gas evolution. The objective of this study was to determine under which conditions of pH and potential a crevice was susceptible to re-passivate. For doing this we used commercial code, since existing ones are mostly home-made, keeping in mind that it had to be as a modular as possible. This code was developed using the Chemical Engineering Module of FEMLAB, which is a MATLAB-based tool for finite element methods. In a first part of this study the ability of this software to be used for crevice corrosion on iron will be presented. As function of the environment (bulk composition and applied potential), calculations were performed in order to determine the occurrence of solid precipitation like FeCl 2 and Fe(OH) 2 or H 2 gas bubbles generation inside the occluded cavity. (authors)

  8. Crack growth testing of cold worked stainless steel in a simulated PWR primary water environment to assess susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Stairmand, J.W.; Fairbrother, H.J.; Stock, A.

    2007-01-01

    Although austenitic stainless steels do not show a high degree of susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in PWR primary environments, there is limited evidence from laboratory testing that crack propagation may occur under some conditions for materials in a cold-worked condition. A test program is therefore underway to examine the factors influencing SCC propagation in good quality PWR primary coolant. Type 304 stainless steel was subjected to cold working by either rolling (at ambient or elevated temperature) or fatigue cycling, to produce a range of yield strengths. Compact tension specimens were fabricated from these materials and tested in simulated high temperature (250-300 o C) PWR primary coolant. It was observed that the degree of crack propagation was influenced by the degree of cold work, the crack growth orientation relative to the rolling direction and the method of working. (author)

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of A515 grade 60 carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.L.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of welding method plate thickness, and subsequent stress relief treatment on the stress corrosion cracking propensity of ASTM A515 Grade 60 carbon steel plate exposed to a 5 M NaNO 3 solution at 190 0 F for eight weeks. It was found that all weld coupons receiving no thermal stress relief treatment cracked within eight weeks; all weld coupons given a vibratory stress relief cracked within eight weeks; two of the eight weld coupons stress relieved at 600 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; none of the weld coupons stress relieved at 1100 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; and that cracking was generally more severe in coupons fabricated from 7/8 inch plate by shielded metal arc welding than it was in coupons fabricated by other welding methods. (U.S.)

  10. Dynamic propagation and cleavage crack arrest in bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaj, M.

    2006-06-01

    In complement of the studies of harmfulness of defects, generally realized in term of initiation, the concept of crack arrest could be used as complementary analyses to the studies of safety. The stop occurs when the stress intensity factor becomes lower than crack arrest toughness (KIa) calculated in elasto-statics (KI ≤ KIa). The aim of this thesis is to understand and predict the stop of a crack propagating at high speed in a 18MND5 steel used in the pressure water reactor (PWR). The test chosen to study crack arrest is the disc thermal shock test. The observations under the scanning electron microscope of the fracture surface showed that the crack arrest always occurs in cleavage mode and that the critical microstructural entity with respect to the propagation and crack arrest corresponds to at least the size of the prior austenitic grain. The numerical analyses in elasto-statics confirm the conservatism of the codified curve of the RCC-M with respect to the values of KIa. The dynamic numerical analyses show that the deceleration of the crack measured at the end of the propagation is related to the global dynamic of the structure (vibrations). The transferability to components of crack arrest toughness obtained from tests analysed in static is thus not assured. The disc thermal shock tests were also modelled by considering a criterion of propagation and arrest of the type 'RKR' characterized by a critical stress sc which depends on the temperature. The results obtained account well for the crack jump measured in experiments as well as the shape of the crack arrest front. (author)

  11. Concrete cover cracking due to uniform reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2013-01-01

    and reinforcement de-passivation is a frequently used limit state. The present paper investigates an alternative limit state: corrosion-induced cover cracking. Results from numerical simulations of concrete cover cracking due to reinforcement corrosion are presented. The potential additional service life...... is calculated using literature data on corrosion rate and Faraday’s law. The parameters varied comprise reinforcement diameter, concrete cover thickness and concrete material properties, viz. concrete tensile strength and ductility (plain concrete and fibre reinforced concrete). Results obtained from......Service life design (SLD) is an important tool for civil engineers to ensure that the structural integrity and functionality of the structure is not compromised within a given time frame, i.e. the service life. In SLD of reinforced concrete structures, reinforcement corrosion is of major concern...

  12. Electromagnetic modeling of stress corrosion cracks in Inconel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haoyu; Miya, Kenzo; Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Sera, Takehiko; Hirano, Shinro

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates suitable numerical modeling of stress corrosion cracks appearing in Inconel welds from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The stress corrosion cracks analyzed in this study are five artificial ones introduced into welded flat plate, and three natural ones found in a pressurized nuclear power plant. Numerical simulations model a crack as a planar region having a uniform conductivity inside and a constant width, and evaluate the width and conductivity that reproduce the maximum eddy current signals obtained by experiments. The results obtained validate the existence of the minimum value of the equivalent resistance, which is defined by the width divided by conductivity. In contrast, the values of the width and conductivity themselves vary across a wide range. The results also lead to a discussion about (1) the effect of probe utilized on the numerical model, (2) the difference between artificial and natural stress corrosion cracks, and (3) the difference between stress corrosion cracks in base metals and those in Inconel welds in their models. Electromagnetic characteristics of four different Inconel weld alloys are additionally evaluated using a resistance tester and a vibrating sample magnetometer to support the validity of the numerical modeling and the generality of results obtained. (author)

  13. Effects of temperature on corrosion fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Bramwell, I.L.; Fairbrother, H.; Worswick, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results concerning crack propagation rates in A508-III pressure vessel steel (medium sulphur content) exposed to PWR primary water at temperatures between 130 and 290 C. The results indicate that the greatest increase in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate occurs at temperatures in the range 150 to 200 C. Under these conditions, there was a marked change in the appearance of the fracture surface, with extensive micro-branching of the crack front and occasional bifurcation of the whole crack path. In contrast, at 290 C, the fracture surface is smoother, similar to that due to inert fatigue. The implication of these observations for assessment of the pressure vessel integrity, is examined. 14 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking of 26Cr-1Mo Ferritic Stainless Steels in Hot Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H. S.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Elongation measurements of 26Cr-1Mo ferritic stainless steels undergoing stress corrosion in boiling LiCl solution allow the induction period to be distinguished from the propagation period of cracks by the deviation of elongation from the logarithmic creep law. Localised corrosion cells are activated exclusively at slip steps by loading and developed into corrosion trenches. No cracks have developed from the corrosion trenches until the induction period is exceeded. The induction period is regarded as a time for localised corrosion cells to achieve a critical degree of occlusion for crack initiation. The repassivation rate of exposed metal by creep or emergence of slip steps decreases as the load increases and is very sensitive to the microstructural changes that affect slip tep height. The greater susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of either prestrained or grain coarsened 26Cr-1Mo alloy compared with that of mill annealed material results from a significant reduction of repassivation rate associated with the increased slip step height. The angular titanium carbonitrides particles dispersed in Ti-stabilized 26Cr-1Mo alloy have a detrimental effect on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking

  15. Effect of copper on crack propagation in beryllium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldinger, F.; Wilhelm, M.

    The effect of copper additives on the fracture energy and the development of cracks parallel to the basal plane was studied in zone-refined single crystalline beryllium. At 77 0 K the cleavage planes are very smooth, so the crack propagation energy, which is independent of copper content (less than 2 at. percent Cu) in the range of measurement accuracy, is only a little higher than the surface energy of the basal plane. At room temperature, due to intense plastic processes taking place in front of the crack tip, the fracture energy is an order of magnitude higher than at low temperatures. The effect of copper on the plastic processes can be divided into two regions. In region I (less than 1.2 at. percent Cu), in which the crack propagation energy increases sharply with increasing copper content, crack propagation is controlled by prism slips. The decrease in crack propagation energy in region II (greater than 1.2 at. percent Cu) can be attributed to a reduction of beryllium twinning energy with increasing copper content. (auth)

  16. Crack closure in near-threshold fatigue crack propagation in railway axle steel EA4T

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Pavel; Vojtek, Tomáš; Náhlík, Luboš; Hutař, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, NOV (2017), s. 2-19 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Fatigue crack propagation * crack closure * EA4T * Railway axle Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering , reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.151, year: 2016

  17. A model for high-cycle fatigue crack propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Marcela Angela [Rosario National Univ. (Argentina); National Council of Scientific Research and Technology (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of high-cycle fatigue behavior for four different materials (7075-T6 alloy, Ti-6Al-4 V alloy, JIS S10C steel and 0.4 wt.-% C steel) using Chapetti's approach to estimate the fatigue crack propagation curve. In the first part of the paper, a single integral equation for studying the entire propagation process is determined using the recent results of Santus and Taylor, which consider a double regime of propagation (short and long cracks) characterized by the model of El Haddad. The second part of the paper includes a comparison of the crack propagation behavior model proposed by Navarro and de los Rios with the one mentioned in the first half of this work. The results allow us to conclude that the approach presented in this paper is a good and valid estimation of high-cycle fatigue crack propagation using a single equation to describe the entire fatigue crack regime.

  18. Crack propagation and arrest simulation of X90 gas pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fengping; Huo, Chunyong; Luo, Jinheng; Li, He; Li, Yang

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether X90 steel pipe has enough crack arrest toughness or not, a damage model was suggested as crack arrest criterion with material parameters of plastic uniform percentage elongation and damage strain energy per volume. Fracture characteristic length which characterizes fracture zone size was suggested to be the largest mesh size on expected cracking path. Plastic uniform percentage elongation, damage strain energy per volume and fracture characteristic length of X90 were obtained by five kinds of tensile tests. Based on this criterion, a length of 24 m, Φ1219 × 16.3 mm pipe segment model with 12 MPa internal gas pressure was built and computed with fluid-structure coupling method in ABAQUS. Ideal gas state equation was used to describe lean gas behavior. Euler grid was used to mesh gas zone inside the pipe while Lagrangian shell element was used to mesh pipe. Crack propagation speed and gas decompression speed were got after computation. The result shows that, when plastic uniform percentage elongation is equal to 0.054 and damage strain energy per volume is equal to 0.64 J/mm"3, crack propagation speed is less than gas decompression speed, which means the simulated X90 gas pipe with 12 MPa internal pressure can arrest cracking itself. - Highlights: • A damage model was suggested as crack arrest criterion. • Plastic uniform elongation and damage strain energy density are material parameters. • Fracture characteristic length is suggested to be largest mesh size in cracking path. • Crack propagating simulation with coupling of pipe and gas was realized in ABAQUS. • A Chinese X90 steel pipe with 12 MPa internal pressure can arrest cracking itself.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  20. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  1. Modeling of crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks is a problem that has not yet been addressed properly. To investigate it, a cracked half-infinite disk of concrete is strengthened with a linear elastic material bonded to the surface, and analyzed using two different finite element modeling...... instead of 3D calculations to predict the response of a structure and that it opens up for simpler evaluation of strengthened concrete structures using the finite element method....

  2. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  3. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, B.; Isaacs, H.S.; Weeks, J.R.

    1976-12-01

    A study was conducted of the intergranular stress corrosion cracking of materials used in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) aimed at developing an understanding of the mechanism(s) of this mode of failure and at developing tests to determine the susceptibility of a given material to this form of attack

  4. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the variational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed with extended forms of ...

  5. Reducing Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Bearing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, N. E.; Dennies, D. P.; Lumsden, I., J.b.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in some stainless-steel alloys increased by addition of small amounts of noble metals. 0.75 to 1.00 percent by weight of palladium or platinum added to alloy melt sufficient to improve properties of certain stainless steels so they could be used in manufacture of high-speed bearings.

  6. Development of a crack monitoring technique for use in a corrosion fatigue study of SA533-B pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, J.M.; Tait, R.B.; Garrett, G.G.

    1981-10-01

    At present there does not exist a realistic crack growth law which will provide a good description of the relationship between the alternating stress intensity factor and the crack growth per cycle of stress. Such a law should be applicable to either the pressurized water reactor environment (PWR) or boiling water reactor environmnt (BWR). This project was formulated with the aim of examining the fatigue crack growth rate of SA533-B steel (a nuclear pressure vessel steel) in the threshold region in a simulated PWR environment. The aim of this report is to develop a crack monitoring technique for use in corrosion fatigue studies. Factors affecting fatigue crack propagation include: frequency, stress range, the effect of irradiation, ageing and environment. The mechanisms of crack propagation that are discussed include: slip dissolution, hydrogen assisted cracking, corrosion potential, and morphology studies. D.C. electrical potential, the compliance technique and the back-faced strain gauge method can be used for crack monitoring. Details are also given on the experimental equipment and programme. The results of the experiment has shown that the potential difference technique for monitoring crack length is a valuable one and is well suited for use in fatigue testing applications

  7. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd [Institute for Composite Materials (IVW GmbH) Technical University of Kaiserslautern, 67633 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  8. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  10. Potential drop technique for monitoring stress corrosion cracking growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Celia F.C.; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.; Moreira, Pedro A.L.D.P.L.P.

    2002-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of most severe damage mechanisms influencing the lifetime of components in the operation of nuclear power plants. To assess the initiation stages and kinetics of crack growth as the main parameters coming to residual lifetime determination, the testing facility should allow active loading of specimens in the environment which is close to the real operation conditions of assessed component. Under cooperation of CDTN/CNEN and International Atomic Energy Agency a testing system has been developed by Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, that will be used for the environmentally assisted cracking testing at CDTN/CNEN. The facility allows high temperature autoclave corrosion mechanical testing in well-defined LWR water chemistry using constant load, slow strain rate and rising displacement techniques. The facility consists of autoclave and refreshing water loop enabling testing at temperatures up to 330 deg C. Active loading system allows the maximum load on a specimen as high as 60 kN. The potential drop measurement is used to determine the instant crack length and its growth rate. The paper presents the facility and describes the potential drop technique, that is one of the most used techniques to monitor crack growth in specimens under corrosive environments. (author)

  11. Infrared thermography study of the fatigue crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Plekhov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the experimental study of heat dissipation process caused by fatigue crack propagation. To investigate a spatial and time temperature evolution at the crack tip set of experiments was carried out using specimens with pre-grown centered fatigue crack. An original mathematical algorithm for experimental data treatment was developed to obtain a power of heat source caused by plastic deformation at crack tip. The algorithm includes spatial-time filtration and relative motion compensation procedures. Based on the results of mathematical data treatment, we proposed a way to estimate the values of J-integral and stress intensity factor for cracks with pronounced the plastic zone.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of nickel base alloys characterization and prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.; Pinard-Legry, G.

    1988-01-01

    For many years, studies have been carried out in several laboratories to characterize the IGSCC (Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) behaviour of nickel base alloys in aqueous environments. For their relative shortness, CERTs (Constant Extension Rate Tests) have been extensively used, especially at the Corrosion Department of the CEA. However, up to recently, the results obtained with this method remained qualitative. This paper presents a first approach to a quantitative interpretation of CERT results. The basic datum used is the crack trace depth distribution determined on a specimen section at the end of a CERT. It is shown that this information can be used for the calculation of initiation and growth parameters which quantitatively characterize IGSCC phenomenon. Moreover, the rationale proposed should lead to the determination of intrinsic cracking parameters, and so, to in-service behaviour prediction

  13. Laboratory results of stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubes in a complex environment - An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Olivier; Pavageau, Ellen-Mary; Vaillant, Francois [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components Department, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Bouvier, Odile de [EDF Nuclear Engineering Division, Centre d' Expertise et d' Inspection dans les Domaines de la Realisation et de l' Exploitation, 93206 Saint Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs in the flow-restricted areas on the secondary side of steam generator tubes of Pressured Water Reactors (PWR), where water pollutants are likely to concentrate. Chemical analyses carried out during the shutdowns gave some insight into the chemical composition of these areas, which has evolved during these last years (i.e. less sodium as pollutants). It has been modeled in laboratory by tests in two different typical environments: the sodium hydroxide and the sulfate environments. These models satisfactorily describe the secondary side corrosion of steam generator tubes for old plant units. Furthermore, a third typical environment - the complex environment - which corresponds to an All Volatile Treatment (AVT) environment containing alumina, silica, phosphate and acetic acid has been recently studied. This particular environment satisfactorily reproduces the composition of the deposits observed on the surface of the steam generator tubes as well as the degradation of the tubes. A review of the recent laboratory results obtained by considering the complex environment are presented here. Several tests have been carried out in order to study initiation and propagation of secondary side corrosion cracking for some selected materials in such an environment. 600 Thermally Treated (TT) alloy reveals to be less sensitive to secondary side corrosion cracking than 600 Mill Annealed (MA) alloy. Finally, the influence of some related factors like stress, temperature and environmental factors are discussed. (authors)

  14. Laboratory results of stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubes in a complex environment - An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, Olivier; Pavageau, Ellen-Mary; Vaillant, Francois; Bouvier, Odile de

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs in the flow-restricted areas on the secondary side of steam generator tubes of Pressured Water Reactors (PWR), where water pollutants are likely to concentrate. Chemical analyses carried out during the shutdowns gave some insight into the chemical composition of these areas, which has evolved during these last years (i.e. less sodium as pollutants). It has been modeled in laboratory by tests in two different typical environments: the sodium hydroxide and the sulfate environments. These models satisfactorily describe the secondary side corrosion of steam generator tubes for old plant units. Furthermore, a third typical environment - the complex environment - which corresponds to an All Volatile Treatment (AVT) environment containing alumina, silica, phosphate and acetic acid has been recently studied. This particular environment satisfactorily reproduces the composition of the deposits observed on the surface of the steam generator tubes as well as the degradation of the tubes. A review of the recent laboratory results obtained by considering the complex environment are presented here. Several tests have been carried out in order to study initiation and propagation of secondary side corrosion cracking for some selected materials in such an environment. 600 Thermally Treated (TT) alloy reveals to be less sensitive to secondary side corrosion cracking than 600 Mill Annealed (MA) alloy. Finally, the influence of some related factors like stress, temperature and environmental factors are discussed. (authors)

  15. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part I: Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Correlation technique was used to locate the crack tip and monitor the crack growth. For the specimens with H45 core, unstable crack growth took place initially. Following the unstable propagation, the crack propagated in the core underneath the resin-rich cell layer approaching the interface. However......, the crack did not kink into the interface. For the specimens with H100 core, the crack propagated initially in the core and then returned into the interface and continued to propagate in the interface. For the specimens with H250 core, the crack initially propagated in the core and then kinked...

  16. Iodine stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, A.H.P. de; Pelloux, R.M.N.

    1983-01-01

    The subcritical growth of iodine-induced cracks in unirradiated Zircaloy plates is investigated as a function of the stress intensity factor K. The testing variables are: crystallographic texture (f-Number), microstructure (grain directionaly), heat treatment (stress relieved vs recrystallized plate), and temperature. The iodine partial pressure is 40Pa. (author) [pt

  17. Sub-critical cohesive crack propagation with hydro-mechanical coupling and friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Valente

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Looking at the long-time behaviour of a dam, it is necessary to assume that the water can penetrate a possible crack washing away some components of the concrete. This type of corrosion reduces the tensile strength and fracture energy of the concrete compared to the same parameters measured during a short-time laboratory test. This phenomenon causes the so called sub-critical crack propagation. That is the reason why the International Commission of Large Dams recommends to neglect the tensile strength of the joint between the dam and the foundation, which is the weakest point of a gravity dam. In these conditions a shear displacement discontinuity starts growing in a point, called Fictitious Crack Tip (shortened FCT, which is still subjected to a compression stress. In order to manage this problem, in this paper the cohesive crack model is re-formulated with the focus on the shear stress component. In this context, the classical Newton-Raphson method fails to converge to an equilibrium state. Therefore the approach used is based on two stages: (a a global one in which the FCT is moved ahead of one increment; (b a local one in which the non-linear conditions occurring in the Fracture Process Zone are taken into account. This two-stage approach, which is known in the literature as a Large Time Increment method, is able to model three different mechanical regimes occurring during the crack propagation between a dam and the foundation rock.

  18. Effect of thermomechanical treatment of the stress corrosion cracking of metastable beta III titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seats, J.H.; Condit, D.O.

    1974-01-01

    Results of studies on the relations of microstructural changes with stress corrosion of Ti--11.5 Mo--6 Zr--4.5 Sn (Beta III) alloys are presented. It was found that this alloy is virtually immune to stress corrosion cracking if no imperfections in the surface are present. Specimens that had not been cold worked showed surface deterioration, but it was not serious enough to cause any marked reduction in yield strengths. The alloy is, however, susceptible to SCC if the surface contains an imperfection such as a fatigue crack where high stresses can concentrate during testing. These high stress levels at the crack tip may cause mechanical destruction of the passivating oxide and allow a higher concentration of chloride ions near the fresh metal surfaces. However, even with precracked specimens, crack propagation is slow as evidenced by no failures within the 720 hour test period. The extreme notch sensitivity of Beta III prevented initiation of fatigue cracks in the sections of the alloy with 20 and 50 percent cold work. More research must be done to test Beta III in this condition. However, on the basis of the research conducted thus far, SCC susceptibility of Beta III titanium alloy appears to be independent of thermomechanical pretreatment. (U.S.)

  19. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  20. Two-phase flow experiments through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flows rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  1. Estimation of flow rates through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flow rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  2. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  3. Fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1976-05-01

    The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were employed to characterize the effects of several parameters upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Inconel 600. The parameters studied included temperature, cyclic frequency, stress ratio, thermal aging, and a limited amount of testing in a liquid sodium environment

  4. A phenomenological model for iodine stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.K.; Tasooji, A.

    1981-01-01

    To predict the response of Zircaloy tubing in iodine environments under conditions where either crack initiation or crack propagation predominates, a unified model of the SCC process has been developed based on the local conditions (the local stress, local strain, and local iodine concentration) within a small volume of material at the cladding inner surface or the crack tip. The methodology used permits computation of these values from simple equations. A nonuniform distribution of local stress and strain results once a crack has initiated. The local stress can be increased due to plastic constraint and triaxiality at the crack tip. Iodine penetration is assumed to be a surface diffusion-controlled process. Experimental data are used to derive criteria for intergranular failure, transgranular failure, and ductile rupture in terms of the local conditions. The same failure criteria are used for both crack initiation and crack propagation. Irradiation effects are included in the model by changing the value of constants in the equation governing iodine penetration and by changing the values used to represent the mechanical properties of the Zircaloy. (orig./HP)

  5. A microstructural study of dynamic crack propagation in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; McEnaney, B.; Tucker, M.O.; Rose, A.P.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports a new microstructural study of dynamic crack propagation in three nuclear graphites: (i) PGA, the moderator material in UK Magnox reactors; (ii) IMl-24, the moderator material in UK Advanced gas cooled reactors (AGR); and (iii) a pitch coke graphite, which is used in the fabrication of AGR fuel sleeves. The fracture mechanisms in nuclear graphites are initiated by microcrack formation at low stresses. Typically, microcracks form in regions of well-aligned binder or at favourably-oriented pores, where stress is concentrated. With increasing applied loads, microcracks propagate taking advantage of easy cleavage paths or linking with pores. Eventually, coalescence of such cracks and inherent porosity produces a crack of critical length for fast fracture. (orig./MM)

  6. FEM Modelling of the Evolution of Corrosion Cracks in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Corrosion cracks are caused by the increasing volume of corrosion products during the corrosion of the reinforcement. After corrosion initiation the rust products from the corroded reinforcement will initially fill the porous zone near the reinforcement and the result in an expansion of the concr......Corrosion cracks are caused by the increasing volume of corrosion products during the corrosion of the reinforcement. After corrosion initiation the rust products from the corroded reinforcement will initially fill the porous zone near the reinforcement and the result in an expansion...... of the concrete near the reinforcement. Tensile stresses are then initiated in the concrete. With increasing corrosion, the tensile stresses will at a certain time reach a critical value and cracks will be developed. The increase of the crack with after formation of the initial crack is the subject of this paper...

  7. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C. [Industrial Technology Research Inst., Taiwan (China); Yeh, T.K. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  8. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C.; Yeh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  9. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  11. Crack-tip chemistry modeling of stage I stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1991-10-01

    Stage I stress corrosion cracking usually exhibits a very strong K dependence with Paris law exponents of up to 30. 2 Model calculations indicate that the crack velocity in this regime is controlled by transport through a salt film and that the K dependence results from crack opening controlled salt film dissolution. An ionic transport model that accounts for both electromigration through the resistive salt film and Fickian diffusion through the aqueous solution was used for these predictions. Predicted crack growth rates are in excellent agreement with measured values for Ni with P segregated to the grain boundaries and tested in IN H 2 SO 4 at +900 mV. This salt film dissolution may be applicable to stage I cracking of other materials

  12. The influence of loading on the corrosion of steel in cracked ordinary Portland cement and high performance concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Shahzma Jafferali

    was a minor effect of the type of loading on rebar corrosion within the period of the project. These measurements also highlighted the problems associated with corrosion measurements, for example, identifying the actual corroding area and the influence of the length of rebar. The numbers of cracks and crack-widths in each beam were measured after the beam's initial exposure to salt solution and, again, after the final corrosion measurements. HPC beams had more cracks than the OPCC. Also, final measurements illustrated increased crack-widths in dynamically loaded beams, regardless of the concrete type. The cracks in both statically and dynamically loaded OPCC and HPC beams bifurcated at the rebar level and propagated parallel to the rebar. This project also examined the extent of corrosion on the rebars and the distribution of corrosion products in the concrete and on the concrete walls of the cracks. Corrosion occurred only at cracks in the concrete and was spread over a larger area on the rebars in HPC than those in OPCC. The damage due to corrosion was superficial in HPC and crater-like in OPCC. Regardless of the concrete type, there was a larger distribution of corrosion products on the crack walls of the dynamically loaded beams. Corrosion products diffused into the cement paste and the paste-aggregate interface in OPCC but remained in the crack in HPC. The most voluminous corrosion product identified was ferric hydroxide. Elemental analysis of mill-scale on rebar which was not embedded in concrete or exposed to chlorides was compared to that of the bars that had been embedded in uncontaminated concrete and in cracked concrete exposed to chlorides. In uncontaminated concrete, mill-scale absorbed calcium and silicon. At a crack, a layer, composed of a mixture of cement paste and corrosion products, developed between the mill-scale and the substrate steel. Based on the results, it was concluded that (i) corrosion occurred on the rebar only at cracks in the concrete

  13. Embrittlement and anodic process in stress corrosion cracking: study of the influent micro-mechanical parameters; Fragilisation et processus anodiques en corrosion sous contrainte: etude des parametres micro-mecaniques influents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinnes, J.Ph

    2006-11-15

    We study the influence of local mechanical parameters on crack propagation in Stress Corrosion Cracking, at the scale of the microstructure. Two systems are compared: the CuAl{sub 9}Ni{sub 3}Fe{sub 2} copper-aluminium alloy in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization, where the crack propagation mechanism is related to strain-assisted anodic dissolution, and the 316L austenitic stainless steel in MgCl{sub 2} solution, where embrittlement mechanisms related to hydrogen effects prevail. We use micro-notched tensile specimen that allow to study isolated short cracks. These experiments are modelled by means of finite elements calculations, and further characterized by Electron Back scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in the case of the 316L alloy. In terms of the local mechanical parameters that control propagation, fundamental differences are outlined between the two systems. They are discussed from the viewpoint of the available models of Stress Corrosion Cracking. (author)

  14. Study of initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks. Quantitative characterization and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrat, Christine

    1997-01-01

    A phenomenological study of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) cracks initiation and growth was carried out on a Z 2 CN 18.10 stainless steel in a boiling aqueous magnesium chloride solution at 153 deg. C. The characterization method exploits the morphological information (cracks shape and size distribution) available on a specimen after SCC test. This method, independent of any mechanistic hypothesis, led to the analytical representation of the growth rate of a given crack as a function of its depth and of the density of deeper cracks. The presence of this last parameter could be the expression of a 'shielding effect' of mechanical origin, exerted by the cracks of large size. A 'true initiation' rate was calculated by an extrapolation based on the analytical expression of the growth rate. This analytical representation of cracks initiation and growth accounts for the saturation observed in the experimental determination of the 'apparent initiation'. As time goes, the number of cracks deeper than a given threshold depth tends towards a limit which depends very strongly on the chosen threshold. This saturation effect can be interpreted as exclusively due to the way the small cracks propagate, as the 'true initiation' rate can be expressed versus time by a simple power law. In the case of slow strain rate tests, it is shown that the kinetic parameters characteristic of initiation and growth depend on the applied elongation rate. In particular, the initial crack growth rate increases with elongation rate. The validity domains of the proposed expressions have been specified by means of SCC tests carried out under different types of mechanical loading. (author) [fr

  15. Stress corrosion crack preventive method for long housing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Maki.

    1992-01-01

    If a neutron flux monitoring housing or a control rod driving mechanism (CRD) housing, as a long housing, is welded to reactor container, a portion of the long housing put under the effect of heat upon welding is converted to a sensitized austenite stainless steel, to cause stress corrosion cracks (SCC). Then, the inner surface of the a region of the long housing put under the effect of heat by welding is melted by a relatively low amount of heat input so that δ-ferrite tissues are caused to deposit in this region. With such procedures, crack sensitivity can be lowered, thereby enabling to improve SCC resistance. (T.M.)

  16. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  17. SCC life estimation based on cracks initiated from the corrosion pits of bolting material SCM435 used in steam turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hitomi; Ochi, Mayumi; Fujiwara, Isao; Momoo, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Life estimation was performed for the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) that occurs in deaerated and wet hot pure steam at the bottoms of the threads of bolts made of SCM435 (equivalent to AISI 4137) used in steam turbine. SCC is believed to occur when corrosion pits are formed and grow to critical size, after which SCC is initiated and cracks propagate until the critical fracture toughness value is reached. Calculations were performed using laboratory and field data. The results showed that, for a 40mm diameter bolt with 0.2% offset strength of 820MPa, the critical crack depth for straight-front cracks was 5.4mm. The SCC life depends on the lubricant used; the SCC life estimated from this value is approximately 70,000 hours when graphite is used as a lubricant. (author)

  18. Microbial Corrosion and Cracking in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the report is to give a fundamental understanding of the response of different electrochemical techniques on carbon steel in a sulphide environment as well as in a biologically active sulphate-reducing environment (SRB). This will form the basis for further studies and for recommendati......The aim of the report is to give a fundamental understanding of the response of different electrochemical techniques on carbon steel in a sulphide environment as well as in a biologically active sulphate-reducing environment (SRB). This will form the basis for further studies...... will be based on results from the entire 3 year period, but only selected experimental data primarily from the latest experiments will be presented in detail here.Microbial corrosion of carbon steel under influence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is characterised by the formation of both biofilm...... and corrosion products (ferrous sulphides) on the metal surface. Experiments have been conducted on carbon steel exposed in near neutral (pH 6 to 8.5) saline hydrogen sulphide environment (0 to 100 mg/l total dissolved sulphide) for a period of 14 days. Furthermore coupons have been exposed in a bioreactor...

  19. Fabrication of irradiation capsule for IASCC irradiation tests (2). Irradiation capsule for crack propagation test (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Kawamata, Kazuo; Taguchi, Taketoshi; Kanazawa, Yoshiharu; Onuma, Yuichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Shuichi; Izumo, Hironobu; Ishida, Takuya; Saito, Takashi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ugachi, Hirokazu; Tsukada, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    It is known that irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) occurs when austenitic stainless steel components used for light water reactor (LWR) are irradiated for a long period. In order to evaluate the high aging of the nuclear power plant, the study of IASCC becomes the important problem. The specimens irradiated in the reactor were evaluated by post irradiation examination in the past study. For the appropriate evaluation of IASCC, it is necessary to test it under the simulated LWR conditions; temperature, water chemistry and irradiation conditions. In order to perform in-pile SCC test, saturated temperature capsule (SATCAP) was developed. There are crack growth test, crack propagation test and so on for in-pile SCC test. In this report, SATCAP for crack propagation test is reported. (author)

  20. Hydrogen-related stress corrosion cracking in line pipe steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between hydrogen concentration (C0) and the critical stress intensity factor for propagation of hydrogen-related cracks has been established by fracture mechanical testing of CT-specimens for the heat affected zone of an X-70 pipeline steel. This has been compared with field...

  1. Susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking of 254SMO SS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Micheli Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC of solubilized and sensitized 254SMO SS was studied in sodium chloride, and sodium fluoride solutions at 80 °C and sulfuric acid solutions in presence of sodium chloride at 25 °C. The influence of salt concentration, pH values and the addition of thiosulfate was examined. The susceptibility to SCC was evaluated by Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT, at 1.5 x 10-6 s-1 strain rate. The behavior of 254SMO was compared to those of AISI 316L SS and Hastelloy C276. 254SMO showed an excellent resistance to SCC in all conditions, except in the more acidic solutions (pH <= 1 where, in the sensitized conditions, intergranular stress corrosion cracking occurred.

  2. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  3. Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water was studied. The IASCC failure has been considered as a degradation phenomenon potential not only in the present light water reactors but rather common in systems where the materials are exposed simultaneously to radiation and water environments. In this study, effects of the material and environmental factors on the IASCC of austenitic stainless steels were investigated in order to understand the underlying mechanism. The following three types of materials were examined: a series of model alloys irradiated at normal water-cooled research reactors (JRR-3M and JMTR), the material irradiated at a spectrally tailored mixed-spectrum research reactor (ORR), and the material sampled from a duct tube of a fuel assembly used in the experimental LMFBR (JOYO). Post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in a high-temperature water, electrochemical corrosion tests, etc., were performed at hot laboratories. Based on the results obtained, analyses were made on the effects of alloying/impurity elements, irradiation/testing temperatures and material processing, (i.e., post-irradiation annealing and cold working) on the cracking behavior. On the basis of the analyses, possible remedies against IASCC in the core internals were discussed from viewpoints of complex combined effects among materials, environment and processing factors. (author). 156 refs.

  4. Prevention of stress corrosion cracking in nuclear waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant, stress corrosion of carbon steel storage tanks containing alkaline nitrate radioactive waste is prevented by stress relief and specification of limits on waste composition and temperature. Actual cases of cracking have occurred in the primary steel shell of tanks designed and built before 1960 and were attributed to a combination of high residual stresses from fabrication welding and aggressiveness of fresh wastes from the reactor fuel reprocessing plants. The fresh wastes have the highest concentration of nitrate, which has been shown to be the cracking agent. Also, as the waste solutions age and are reduced in volume by evaporation of water, nitrite and hydroxide ions become more concentrated and inhibit stress corrosion. Thus, by providing a heel of aged evaporated waste in tanks that receive fresh wastes, concentrations of the inhibitor ions are maintained within specific ranges to protect against nitrate cracking. The concentration and temperature range limits to prevent cracking were determined by a series of statistically designed experiments

  5. Stress-corrosion cracking in BWR and PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of weld-sensitized wrought stainless steel piping has been an increasingly ubiquitous and expensive problem in boiling-water reactors over the last decade. In recent months, numerous cracks have been found, even in large-diameter lines. A number of potential remedies have been developed. These are directed at providing more resistant materials, reducing weld-induced stresses, or improving the water chemistry. The potential remedies are discussed, along with the capabilities of ultrasonic testing to find and size the cracks and related safety issues. The problem has been much less severe to date in pressurized-water reactors, reflecting the use of different materials and much lower coolant oxygen levels

  6. Stress corrosion crack growth rate in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M. P.; Lapena, J.; Lancha, A. M.; Perosanz, F. J.; Navas, M.

    2000-01-01

    Dissimilar welds, used to join different sections in light water reactors, are potentially susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous mediums characteristic of nuclear plants. However, the study of these The ma has been limited to evaluating the weld material susceptibility in these mediums. Little scarce data are available on crack growth rates due, fundamentally, to inadequate testing techniques. In order to address this lack of information the crack growth rate at the interface of ferritic SA 533 B-1 alloy and alloy I-82, in a dissimilar weld (SA533B-1/I-82/316L), was studied. Experiments were conducted in water at 288 degree centigrade, 8 ppm of O 2 and 1 μS/cm conductivity. (Author) 33 refs

  7. Low temperature spalling of silicon: A crack propagation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoni, Mariana; Uberg Naerland, Tine; Stoddard, Nathan; Guimera Coll, Pablo

    2017-06-08

    Spalling is a promising kerfless method for cutting thin silicon wafers while doubling the yield of a silicon ingot. The main obstacle in this technology is the high total thickness variation of the spalled wafers, often as high as 100% of the wafer thickness. It has been suggested before that a strong correlation exists between low crack velocities and a smooth surface, but this correlation has never been shown during a spalling process in silicon. The reason lies in the challenge associated to measuring such velocities. In this contribution, we present a new approach to assess, in real time, the crack velocity as it propagates during a low temperature spalling process. Understanding the relationship between crack velocity and surface roughness during spalling can pave the way to attain full control on the surface quality of the spalled wafer.

  8. Fatigue crack propagation in additively manufactured porous biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Amin Yavari, S; Zadpoor, A A

    2017-07-01

    Additively manufactured porous titanium implants, in addition to preserving the excellent biocompatible properties of titanium, have very small stiffness values comparable to those of natural bones. Although usually loaded in compression, biomedical implants can also be under tensional, shear, and bending loads which leads to crack initiation and propagation in their critical points. In this study, the static and fatigue crack propagation in additively manufactured porous biomaterials with porosities between 66% and 84% is investigated using compact-tension (CT) samples. The samples were made using selective laser melting from Ti-6Al-4V and were loaded in tension (in static study) and tension-tension (in fatigue study) loadings. The results showed that displacement accumulation diagram obtained for different CT samples under cyclic loading had several similarities with the corresponding diagrams obtained for cylindrical samples under compression-compression cyclic loadings (in particular, it showed a two-stage behavior). For a load level equaling 50% of the yield load, both the CT specimens studied here and the cylindrical samples we had tested under compression-compression cyclic loading elsewhere exhibited similar fatigue lives of around 10 4 cycles. The test results also showed that for the same load level of 0.5F y , the lower density porous structures demonstrate relatively longer lives than the higher-density ones. This is because the high bending stresses in high-density porous structures gives rise to local Mode-I crack opening in the rough external surface of the struts which leads to quicker formation and propagation of the cracks. Under both the static and cyclic loading, all the samples showed crack pathways which were not parallel to but made 45 ° angles with respect to the notch direction. This is due to the fact that in the rhombic dodecahedron unit cell, the weakest struts are located in 45 ° direction with respect to the notch direction

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  10. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the more

  11. Prediction of crack propagation in layered ceramics with strong interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Šestáková, L.; Hutař, Pavel; Bermejo, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 11 (2010), s. 2192-2199 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB200410803; GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Ceramic laminate * Crack propagation direction * Residual stress * Flaw tolerant ceramics * Optimal design Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.571, year: 2010

  12. Basic study on development of monitoring for crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoki, Manabu; Kishi, Teruo; Kawasaki, Hirotsugu; Aoto, Kazumi

    2000-03-01

    The system for detecting the generation and propagation of cracks in products and materials has been investigated in this research. Firstly, in order to apply the method to harsh environment such as plant equipment, the system with laser interferometer which cables to detect fracture in non-contact way was tried. It was confirmed that the heterodyne interferometer with He-Ne laser could detect elastic waves propagating through materials, and the non-contact system with four interferometers to detect acoustic emission (AE) wave was developed. It was applied to the thermal stress fracture in alumina coating materials. AE wave during cooling of specimens due to microfracture near the interfaces was detected and the generation time, location, size and fracture mode could be evaluated by the inverse analysis. Thus, the quantitative system for evaluating AE wave was developed and the validity of this system was confirmed. Secondly, in order to predict the crack initiation, the detection tests which were performed to detect a change in damage in the pre-stage of micro crack initiation were tried. For the components that were subject to transient cyclic thermal loading changes, the ultrasonic detection test was performed, and the obtained echo was analyzed. Furthermore, the measurement of micro hardness was performed by using the micro hardness tester for the grain boundary at near crack. The ultrasound velocity which could detect damaged state before crack initiation was estimated from the wavelet analysis of ultrasonic echoes obtained here. It was confirmed to be possible to predict the crack initiation from the change of micro hardness on the grain boundary. (author)

  13. Influence of cracks and pitting corrosion on residual ultimate strength of stiffened plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jing

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] Ships and offshore platforms serve in the harsh sea environment for a long time. Cracks and pitting corrosion will occur in such a structure and the damage will affect its ultimate strength.[Methods] To investigate the influence of cracks and pitting corrosion on ultimate bearing capacity, the ultimate strength of a structure under axial compression is studied by using a nonlinear finite element. The mesh size of a stiffened plate with cracks and pitting corrosion is first discussed. Then the influence of the relative positions of cracks and pitting corrosion, number of corrosion points and crack length impact on the residual ultimate strength of damaged stiffened plates is discussed via a series of calculations.[Results] The results indicate that the increase in crack length and pitting corrosion significantly decreases the ultimate strength of a stiffened plate. [Conclusions] This provides a useful reference for designing and maintaining ships and offshore structures in their life cycles.

  14. Crack propagation in touch ductile materials. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, R.D.; Sinclair, A.N.; McCammond, D.

    1989-06-01

    The thrust of this work was to investigate published J material resistance and stress-strain data applicable to the understanding of crack propagation in tough ductile steels, particularly SA 106 Grade B pipe steel. This data has been assembled from PIFRAC, AECB report INFO-0254-1 and Ontario Hydro sources and has been uniformly formatted and presented to facilitate comparison and assessment. While the data is in many aspects incomplete it has enabled an evaluation of the influence of temperature, specimen thickness and specimen orientation to be made in the context of the experimental J-R curves so determined. Comparisons of the stress-strain data within the Ramburg-Osgood formulation are also considered. A further component of this report addresses the development of the required software to utilize what is referred to as the engineering approach to elasto-plastic analysis to investigate the load carrying capacity of selected cracked pipe geometries which are representative of applied crack propagation studies associated with piping systems in the nuclear industry. Three specific geometries and loading situations, identified as Condition A, B and C have been evaluated; the results are presented and illustrate the variation in applied load as a function of an initial and final crack extension leading to instability

  15. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels: Part 1, medium-sulfur forging steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Poskie, T.J.; Auten, T.A.; Cullen, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a medium- sulfur ASTM A508-2 forging steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 30.3--38.3 mm, and depths of 13.1--16.8 mm. The experiments were conducted in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 degrees C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, and cyclic frequency) conductive to environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) in higher-sulfur steels under quasi-stagnant conditions. Earlier experiments on unclad compact tension specimens of this heat of steel did not exhibit EAC, and the present experiments on semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating cladding also did not exhibit EAC

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of equipment materials in domestic pressurized water reactors and the relevant safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Haitao

    2015-01-01

    International and domestic research and project state about stress corrosion cracking of nuclear equipments and materials (including austenitic stainless steel and nickel based alloys) in pressurized water reactor are discussed, and suggestions on how to prevent, mitigate ana deal with the stress corrosion cracking issues in domestic reactors are given in this paper based on real case analysis and study ondomestic nuclear equipment and material stress corrosion cracking failure. (author)

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  18. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...... showed that x-ray attenuation measurements allow determination of the actual concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel measured by x-ray attenuation was found to be in very good agreement with the calculated mass loss obtained by Faraday......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  19. Radiation efficiency during slow crack propagation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestin, Camille; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Creeping faults are known to host a significant aseismic deformation. However, the observations of micro-earthquake activity related to creeping faults (e.g. San Andreas Faults, North Anatolian Fault) suggest the presence of strong lateral variabilities of the energy partitioning between radiated and fracture energies. The seismic over aseismic slip ratio is rather difficult to image over time and at depth because of observational limitations (spatial resolution, sufficiently broad band instruments, etc.). In this study, we aim to capture in great details the energy partitioning during the slow propagation of mode I fracture along a heterogeneous interface, where the toughness is strongly varying in space.We lead experiments at laboratory scale on a rock analog model (PMMA) enabling a precise monitoring of fracture pinning and depinning on local asperities in the brittle-creep regime. Indeed, optical imaging through the transparent material allows the high resolution description of the fracture front position and velocity during its propagation. At the same time, acoustic emissions are also measured by accelerometers positioned around the rupture. Combining acoustic records, measurements of the crack front position and the loading curve, we compute the total radiated energy and the fracture energy. We deduce from them the radiation efficiency, ηR, characterizing the proportion of the available energy that is radiated in form of seismic wave. We show an increase of ηR with the crack rupture speed computed for each of our experiments in the sub-critical crack propagation domain. Our experimental estimates of ηR are larger than the theoretical model proposed by Freund, stating that the radiation efficiency of crack propagation in homogeneous media is proportional to the crack velocity. Our results are demonstrated to be in agreement with existing studies which showed that the distribution of crack front velocity in a heterogeneous medium can be well described by a

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in NaCl-AlCl/sub 3/ at 175C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyrl, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride media. A test that is often used to determine the susceptibility of a new alloy involves boiling aqueous MgCl/sub 2/ solutions. The compositions of the solution is not controlled in the tests, and changes as water is evaporated. The pH may change as well. Such poorly defined conditions make any mechanistic interpretation very tenuous, and the results may be tabulated as purely empirical data. the choice of the molten salt in the present investigation was made for two reasons. First, the studies could be carried in the molten salt media with the exclusion of H/sub 2/O. Second, the crack propagation could be investigated under well controlled electrochemical conditions. Therefore, the results may help to identify the controlling processes that occur during stress corrosion cracking, and the comparison to results in boiling MgCl/sub 2/ may help to reveal the controlling processes in that medium as well. Crack propagation has been studied for several nitronic stainless steels in the molten salt medium under controlled electrochemical potential conditions. The alloys were studied under fully austenitic conditions. The material was studied in the annealed and work hardened condition, and both were susceptible to cracking in the molten salt. The velocity of cracking was studied as a function of applied stress at several electrochemical potentials

  1. Statistical analysis of failure time in stress corrosion cracking of fuel tube in light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Keiichi; Yamane, Toshimi; Minamino, Yoritoshi

    1991-01-01

    This report is to show how the life due to stress corrosion cracking breakdown of fuel cladding tubes is evaluated by applying the statistical techniques to that examined by a few testing methods. The statistical distribution of the limiting values of constant load stress corrosion cracking life, the statistical analysis by making the probabilistic interpretation of constant load stress corrosion cracking life, and the statistical analysis of stress corrosion cracking life by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) method are described. (K.I.)

  2. Countermeasures to stress corrosion cracking by stress improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemoto, Tadahiro

    1983-01-01

    One of the main factors of the grain boundary stress corrosion cracking occurred in the austenitic stainless steel pipes for reactor cooling system was the tensile residual stress due to welding, and a number of methods have been proposed to reduce the residual stress or to change it to compressive stress. In this paper, on the method of improving residual stress by high frequency heating, which has been applied most frequently, the principle, important parameters and the range of application are explained. Also the other methods of stress improvement are outlined, and the merit and demerit of respective methods are discussed. Austenitic stainless steel and high nickel alloys have good corrosion resistance, high toughness and good weldability, accordingly they have been used for reactor cooling system, but stress corrosion cracking was discovered in both BWRs and PWRs. It occurs when the sensitization of materials, tensile stress and the dissolved oxygen in high temperature water exceed certain levels simultaneously. The importance of the residual stress due to welding, induction heating stress improvement, and other methods such as heat sink welding, last pass heat sink welding, back lay welding and TIG torch heating stress improvement are described. (Kako, I.)

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of highly irradiated 316 stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Morihito; Fukuya, Koji; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Nakajima, Nobuo; Furutani, Gen [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Mechanical property tests, grain boundary (GB) composition analysis and slow strain rate test (SSRT) in simulated PWR primary water changing dissolved hydrogen (DH) and dissolved oxygen (DO) content were carried out on cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steels which were irradiated to 1-8x10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) in a Japanese PWR in order to evaluate irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility. Highly irradiated stainless steels were susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in both hydrogenated water and oxygenated water and to intergranular cracking in inert gas atmosphere. IASCC susceptibility increased with increasing DH content (0-45 ccH{sub 2}/kgH{sub 2}O). Hydrogen content of the section containing fracture surface was higher than that of the section far from fracture surface. These results suggest that hydrogen would have an important role for IASCC. While mechanical property was saturated, GB segregation and IASCC susceptibility increased with an increase in fluence, suggesting that GB segregation would have a dominant role for an increase in IASCC susceptibility at this high fluence region. (author)

  4. Iodine induced stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunisholz, L.; Lemaignan, C.

    1984-01-01

    Iodine is considered as one of the major fission products responsible for PCI failure of Zry cladding by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Usual analysis of SCC involves both initiation and growth as sequential processes. In order to analyse initiation and growth independently and to be able to apply the procedures of fracture mechanics to the design of cladding, with respect to SCC, stress corrosion tests of Zry cladding tubes were undertaken with a small fatigue crack (approx. 200 μm) induced in the inner wall of each tube before pressurization. Details are given on the techniques used to induce the fatigue crack, the pressurization test procedure and the results obtained on stress releaved or recrystallized Zry 4 tubings. It is shown that the Ksub(ISCC) values obtained during these experiments are in good agreement with those obtained from large DCB fracture mechanics samples. Conclusions will be drawn on the applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to cladding design and related safety analysis. The work now underway is aimed at obtaining better understanding of the initiation step. It includes the irradiation of Zry samples with heavy ions to simulate the effect of recoil fragments implanted in the inner surface of the cladding, that could create a brittle layer of about 10 μm

  5. Structural integrity and fatigue crack propagation life assessment of welded and weld-repaired structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah

    2005-11-01

    Structural integrity is the science and technology of the margin between safety and disaster. Proper evaluation of the structural integrity and fatigue life of any structure (aircraft, ship, railways, bridges, gas and oil transmission pipelines, etc.) is important to ensure the public safety, environmental protection, and economical consideration. Catastrophic failure of any structure can be avoided if structural integrity is assessed and necessary precaution is taken appropriately. Structural integrity includes tasks in many areas, such as structural analysis, failure analysis, nondestructive testing, corrosion, fatigue and creep analysis, metallurgy and materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue life assessment, welding metallurgy, development of repairing technologies, structural monitoring and instrumentation etc. In this research fatigue life assessment of welded and weld-repaired joints is studied both in numerically and experimentally. A new approach for the simulation of fatigue crack growth in two elastic materials has been developed and specifically, the concept has been applied to butt-welded joint in a straight plate and in tubular joints. In the proposed method, the formation of new surface is represented by an interface element based on the interface potential energy. This method overcomes the limitation of crack growth at an artificial rate of one element length per cycle. In this method the crack propagates only when the applied load reaches the critical bonding strength. The predicted results compares well with experimental results. The Gas Metal Arc welding processes has been simulated to predict post-weld distortion, residual stresses and development of restraining forces in a butt-welded joint. The effect of welding defects and bi-axial interaction of a circular porosity and a solidification crack on fatigue crack propagation life of butt-welded joints has also been investigated. After a weld has been repaired, the specimen was tested in a universal

  6. Effect of thermal stabilization on the low-temperature stress-corrosion cracking of Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    The propensity to low-temperature stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of thermally stabilized Inconel 600 in sulfur-bearing environments has been investigated using U-bends and slow-strain-rate testing. The results have been compared with those of sensitized Inconel 600. The potential dependence of crack-propagation rate has been established in a single test by using several U-bends held at different potentials, by choosing an appropriate electrical circuitry. The difference in SCC susceptibility of the sensitized and stabilized materials is discussed in terms of the grain-boundary chromium depletion and resulting intergranular attack in boiling ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid tests, and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) tests. 10 figures

  7. Effects of potential and concentration of bicarbonate solution on stress corrosion cracking of annealed carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruna, Takumi; Zhu, Liehong; Murakami, Makoto; Shibata, Toshio

    2000-01-01

    Effects of potential and concentration of bicarbonate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of annealed SM 400 B carbon steel has been investigated in bicarbonate solutions at 343 K. The surface of annealed specimen had decarburized layer of about 0. 5 mm thickness. A potentiostatic slow strain rate testing apparatus equipped with a charge coupled device camera system was employed to evaluate SCC susceptibility from the viewpoint of the crack behavior. In a constant bicarbonate concentration of 1 M, cracks were observed in the potential range from -800 to 600 mV Ag/ A gCl . and especially, the initiation and the propagation of the cracks were accelerated at -600 mV. At a constant potential of -600 mV, cracks were observed in the concentration range from 0.001 to 1 M, and the initiation and the propagation of the cracks were suppressed as the concentration decreased. Polarization curves for the decarburized surface were measured with two different scan rates. High SCC susceptibility may be expected in the potential range where the difference between the two current densities is large. It was found in this system that the potential with the maximum difference in the current density was -600 mV for 1 M bicarbonate solution, and the potential increased with a decrease in the concentration of bicarbonate. This means that an applied potential of -600 mV provides the highest SCC susceptibility for 1 M bicarbonate solution, and that the SCC susceptibility decreases as the concentration decreases. These findings support the dependence of the actual SCC behavior on the potential and the concentration of bicarbonate. (author)

  8. Crack formation and crack propagation under multiaxial mechanical and thermal stresses. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 25th meeting of the DV Fracture Group was held on 16/17 February 1993 at Karlsruhe Technical University. The main topic, ''Crack formation and crack propagation under multiaxial mechanical and thermal stresses'', was discussed by five invited papers (by K.J. Miller, D. Loehe, H.A. Richard, W. Brocks, A. Brueckner-Foit) and 23 short papers. The other 21 papers were devoted to various domains of fracture mechanics, with emphasis on elastoplastic fracture mechanics. (orig./MM) [de

  9. Fundamental approaches to predicting stress corrosion: 'Quantitative micro-nano' (QMN) approach to predicting stress corrosion cracking in water cooled nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staehle, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling and experimental studies of stress corrosion cracking with full disciplinary set at the atomic level. Its objective is to develop an intellectual structure for quantitative prediction of stress corrosion cracking in water cooled reactors.

  10. Acoustic emission characteristics of stress corrosion cracks in a type 304 stainless steel tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woong Gi; Bae, Seung Gi; Lee, Bo Young [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seong [Center for Robot Technology and Manufacturing, Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Sik [Dept. of Nuclear Safety Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, Nog Won [Ultrasonic Division, RM910, Byucksan Digital Valley II, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the promising methods for detecting the formation of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) in laboratory tests. This method has the advantage of online inspection. Some studies have been conducted to investigate the characteristics of AE parameters during SCC propagation. However, it is difficult to classify the distinct features of SCC behavior. Because the previous studies were performed on slow strain rate test or compact tension specimens, it is difficult to make certain correlations between AE signals and actual SCC behavior in real tube-type specimens. In this study, the specimen was a AISI 304 stainless steel tube widely applied in the nuclear industry, and an accelerated test was conducted at high temperature and pressure with a corrosive environmental condition. The study result indicated that intense AE signals were mainly detected in the elastic deformation region, and a good correlation was observed between AE activity and crack growth. By contrast, the behavior of accumulated counts was divided into four regions. According to the waveform analysis, a specific waveform pattern was observed during SCC development. It is suggested that AE can be used to detect and monitor SCC initiation and propagation in actual tubes.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking life estimation of hold-down spring screw for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Hold-down spring screw fractures due to primary water stress corrosion cracking were observed in nuclear fuel assemblies. The screw fastens hold-down springs that are required to maintain the nuclear fuel assembly in contact with upper core plate and permit thermal and irradiation-induced length changes. In order to investigate the primary causes of the screw fractures, the finite element stress analysis and fracture mechanics analysis were performed on the hold-down spring assembly. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Preloading on the screw applied for tightening had beneficial effects on the screw strength by reducing the stress level at the critical regions, compared to the screw without preload. Calculated deflections and strains at the hold-down springs using the finite element analysis were in very close agreements with the experimentally measured deflections and strains. Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by integrating the Scott's model and resulted in a life of 1.42 years, which was fairly close to the field experience. Cracks were expected to originate at the threaded region of the screw and propagated to the opposite side of the spring, which was confirmed by the fractographic analysis of the fractured screws. (orig.)

  12. Multiple cracks initiation and propagation behavior of stainless steel in high temperature water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Chiba, Goro; Nakajima, Nobuo; Totsuka, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    Environmentally assisted crack initiation behavior is greatly affected by applied stress and environmental factors, such as water temperature, contained impurities and so on. On the other hand, crack initiation behavior also influences crack propagation. A typical example of this influence can be observed as the interference effects of multiple cracks, such as the coalescence of approaching crack tips or the arrest phenomena in the relaxation zone of an adjacent crack. To understand these effects of crack initiation on crack propagation behavior is very important to predict the lifetime of components, in which quite a few cracks tend to occur. This study aimed at revealing the crack initiation behavior and the influence of this behavior on propagation. At first, to evaluate the effect of applied stress on crack initiation behavior, sensitized stainless steel was subjected to a four-point bending test in a high temperature water environment at the constant potentials of ECP +50 mV and ECP +150 mV. Secondly, a crack initiation and growth simulation model was developed, in which the interference effect of multiple cracks is evaluated by the finite element method, based on the experimental results. Using this model, the relationship between crack initiation and propagation was studied. From the model, it was revealed that the increasing number of the cracks accelerates crack propagation and reduces life. (author)

  13. Initiation and propagation of multiple cracks of stainless steel in high temperature water environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Chiba, Goro; Nakajima, Nobuo; Totsuka, Nobuo [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Environmentally assisted crack initiation behavior is greatly affected by applied stress and environmental factors, such as water temperature, contained impurities and so on. Crack initiation behavior also influences crack propagation. A typical example of this influence can be observed as the interference effects of multiple cracks, such as the coalescence of approaching crack tips or the arrest phenomena in the relaxation zone of an adjacent crack. To understand these effects of crack initiation on crack propagation behavior is very important to predict the lifetime of components, in which relatively large number of cracks tend to occur. This study aimed at revealing the crack initiation behavior and the influence of this behavior on propagation. At first, to evaluate the effect of applied stress on crack initiation behavior, sensitized stainless steel was subjected to a four-point bending test in high temperature water environment at the constant potentials of +50 mV SHE and +150 mV SHE Secondly, a crack initiation and growth simulation model was developed, in which the interference effect of multiple cracks is evaluated by the finite element method, based on the experimental results. Using this model, the relationship between crack initiation and propagation was investigated, and it was revealed that the increasing number of the cracks accelerates crack propagation and reduces life. (author)

  14. Effect of water impurities on stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungbery, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D

    1985-01-01

    A series of stress corrosion tests, including corrosion potential and water chemistry measurements, has been performed in the Swedish Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor. Tests have been run under reactor start-up and reactor power operation with normal reactor water conditions and with alternate water chemistry in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater to suppress stress corrosion cracking. During one alternate water chemistry test, there was significant intergranular corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless specimens. It is shown that nitrate and sulfate, arising from an accidental resin intrusion, are likely causes. Nitrate increases the oxidizing power of the water, and sulfate enhances cracking under oxidizing conditions. During another test under start-up conditions, enhanced transgranular stress corrosion cracking in low alloy steels and possibly initiation of cracking in a nickel base alloy was observed as a result of resin intrusion into the reactor water. The intrusion produced acid and sulfate, which are believed to enhance hydrogen cracking conditions

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiya, P.S.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1989-09-01

    Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS), Incoloy 825, Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al have been selected as candidate materials for the containment of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. The susceptibility of these materials to stress corrosion cracking has been investigated by slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in water which simulates that from well J-13 (J-13 water) and is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. The SSRTs were performed on specimens exposed to simulated J-13 water at 93 degree C and at a strain rate 10 -7 s -1 under crevice conditions and at a strain rate of 10 -8 s -1 under both crevice and noncrevice conditions. All the tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strains of 1--4%. Examination by scanning electron microscopy showed some crack initiation in virtually all specimens. Optical microscopy of metallographically prepared transverse sections of Type 304L SS suggests that the crack depths are small (<10 μm). Preliminary results suggest that a lower strain rate increases the severity of cracking of Types 304L and 316L SS, Incoloy 825, and Cu but has virtually no effect on Cu-30%Ni and Cu-7%Al. Differences in susceptibility to cracking were evaluated in terms of a stress ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the increase in stress after local yielding in the environment to the corresponding stress increase in an identical test in air, both computed at the same strain. On the basis of this stress ratio, the ranking of materials in order of increasing resistance to cracking is: Types 304L SS < 316L SS < Incoloy 825 congruent Cu-30%Ni < Cu congruent Cu-7%Al. 9 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Simulation of crack propagation in rock in plasma blasting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Tahiliani, K.; Chaturvedi, S.

    Plasma Blasting Technology (PBT) involves the production of a pulsed electrical discharge by inserting a blasting probe in a water-filled cavity drilled in a rock, which produces shocks or pressure waves in the water. These pulses then propagate into the rock, leading to fracture. In this paper, we present the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the SHALE code to study crack propagation in rock. Three separate issues have been examined. Firstly, assuming that a constant pressure P is maintained in the cavity for a time τ , we have determined the P- τ curve that just cracks a given rock into at least two large-sized parts. This study shows that there exists an optimal pressure level for cracking a given rock-type and geometry. Secondly, we have varied the volume of water in which the initial energy E is deposited, which corresponds to different initial peak pressures Ppeak. We have determined the E- Ppeak curve that just breaks the rock into four large-sized parts. It is found that there must be an optimal Ppeak that lowers the energy consumption, but with acceptable probe damage. Thirdly, we have attempted to identify the dominant mechanism of rock fracture. We also highlight some numerical errors that must be kept in mind in such simulations.

  17. Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking in austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austentic alloys is a complicated phenomenon that poses a difficult problem for designers and operators of nuclear plants. Because IASCC accelerates the deterioration of various reactor components, it is imperative that it be understood and modeled to maintain reactor safety. Unfortunately, the costs and dangers of gathering data on radiation effects are high, and the phenomenon itself is so complex that it is difficult to enumerate all of the causes. This article reviews current knowledge of IASCC and describes the goals of ongoing work

  18. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanneman, R.E.; Cowan, R.L. II

    1980-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has occurred in a statistically small number of weld heat affected zones (HAZ) of 304 SS piping in BWR's. A range of mitigating actions have been developed and qualified that provide viable engineering solutions to the unique aspects of (1) operating plants, (2) plants under various stages of construction, and (3) future plants. This paper describes the technical development of each mitigating concept, relates it to the fundamental causal factors for IGSCC, and discusses its applicability to operating, in-construction and new BWR's. 31 refs

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels exposed to hot water. Experimental fracture mechanics results are compared with data from the literature and other laboratories. Thus a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge concerning stress corrosion crack growth rates is provided. Several sets of data confirm that 'fast' stress corrosion cracks with growth rates between 10 -8 and 10 -7 m/s and threshold stress intensities around 20 MN m -3/2 can occur under certain conditions. However, it appears possible that specific environmental, mechanical and metallurgical conditions which may prevail in reactors can result in significantly lower stress corrosion crack growth rates. The presently known stress corrosion crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves are discussed with emphasis on their usefulness in establishing safety margins against stress corrosion cracking of components in service. Further substantial research efforts would be helpful to provide a data base which permits well founded predictions as to how stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels and piping can be reliably excluded or tolerated. It is emphasized, however, that the nucleation of stress corrosion cracks (as opposed to their growth) is difficult and may contribute substantially to the stress corrosion free service behaviour of the overwhelming majority of pressure vessels and pipes. (author)

  20. Heat affected zone and fatigue crack propagation behavior of high performance steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Won; Kang, Dong Hwan; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jong Kwan

    2009-01-01

    The effect of heat affected zone in high performance steel on fatigue crack propagation behavior, which is related to the subsequent microstructure, was investigated. A modified Paris-Erdogan equation was presented for the analysis of fatigue crack propagation behavior corresponding to the heat affected zone conditions. Fatigue crack propagation tests under 0.3 stress ratio and 0.1 load frequency were conducted for both finegrained and coarse-grained heat affected zones, respectively. As shown in the results, much higher crack growth rate occurred in a relatively larger mean grain size material under the same stress intensity range of fatigue crack propagation process for the material.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of nickel base alloys in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerre, C.; Chaumun, E.; Crepin, J.; De Curieres, I.; Duhamel, C.; Heripre, E.; Herms, E.; Laghoutaris, P.; Molins, R.; Sennour, M.; Vaillant, F.

    2013-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of nickel base alloys and associated weld metals in primary water is one of the major concerns for pressurized water reactors (PWR). Since the 90's, highly cold-worked stainless steels (non-sensitized) were also found to be susceptible to SCC in PWR primary water ([1], [2], [3]). In the context of the life extension of pressurized water reactors, laboratory studies are performed in order to evaluate the SCC behaviour of components made of nickel base alloys and of stainless steels. Some examples of these laboratory studies performed at CEA will be given in the talk. This presentation deals with both initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks. The aims of these studies is, on one hand, to obtain more data regarding initiation time or crack growth rate and, one the other hand, to improve our knowledge of the SCC mechanisms. The aim of these approaches is to model SCC and to predict components life duration. Crack growth rate (CGR) tests on Alloy 82 with and without post weld heat treatment are performed in PWR primary water (Figure 1). The heat treatment seems to be highly beneficial by decreasing the CGR. This result could be explained by the effect of thermal treatment on the grain boundary nano-scopic precipitation in Alloy 82 [4]. The susceptibility to SCC of cold worked austenitic stainless steels is also studied. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility increases with increasing cold-work ([2], [5]). Despite the fact that the SCC behaviour of Alloy 600 has been widely studied for many years, recent laboratory experiments and analysis ([6], [7], [8]) showed that oxygen diffusion is not a rate-limiting step in the SCC mechanism and that chromium diffusion in the bulk close the crack tip could be a key parameter. (authors)

  2. Brutal crack propagation in dynamic fracture: industrial application to the length of the crack arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumouchel, P.E.

    2008-03-01

    This research thesis aims at understanding and analysing some mechanisms involved in the dynamic failure under various loadings which are notably present in industrial environment, and more particularly in some parts of EDF's plants where networks of micro-cracks may steadily grow: heterogeneous zones, defects under coating. The author presents a simplified model based on the de-bonding of a film to understand the mechanisms of a sudden failure under a quasi-static loading. He develops a similar model to explore the influence of a defect on crack propagation under a quasi-static loading, and then under a sudden loading. This model is then generalized to the case of several defects, and more particularly very small defects. Finally, the author gives a numerical interpretation of a sudden propagation under quasi-static loading

  3. Dynamical observations on the crack tip zone and stress corrosion of two-dimensional MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Ly, Thuc Hue

    2017-01-18

    Whether and how fracture mechanics needs to be modified for small length scales and in systems of reduced dimensionality remains an open debate. Here, employing in situ transmission electron microscopy, atomic structures and dislocation dynamics in the crack tip zone of a propagating crack in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer MoS2 membrane are observed, and atom-to-atom displacement mapping is obtained. The electron beam is used to initiate the crack; during in situ observation of crack propagation the electron beam effect is minimized. The observed high-frequency emission of dislocations is beyond previous understanding of the fracture of brittle MoS2. Strain analysis reveals dislocation emission to be closely associated with the crack propagation path in nanoscale. The critical crack tip plastic zone size of nearly perfect 2D MoS2 is between 2 and 5 nm, although it can grow to 10 nm under corrosive conditions such as ultraviolet light exposure, showing enhanced dislocation activity via defect generation.

  4. Stress-corrosion cracks behavior under underground disposal environment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isei, Takehiro; Seto, Masahiro; Ogata, Yuji; Wada, Yuji; Utagawa, Manabu; Kosugi, Masayuki

    2000-01-01

    This study is composed by two sub-theme of study on stress-corrosion cracking under an environment of disposal on radioactive wastes and control technique on microscopic crack around the disposal cavity, and aims at experimental elucidation on forming mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking phenomenon on rocks and establishment of its control technique. In 1998 fiscal year, together with an investigation on effect of temperature on fracture toughness and on stress-corrosion cracks performance of sedimentary rocks (sandy rocks), an investigation on limit of the stress-corrosion cracking by addition of chemicals and on crack growth in a rock by in-situ observation using SEM were carried out. As a result, it was formed that fracture toughness of rocks reduced at more than 100 centigrade of temperature, that a region showing an equilibrium between water supply to crack end and crack speed appeared definitely, that a limit of stress-corrosion cracking appeared by addition of chemicals, and that as a result of observing crack advancement of saturated rock by in-situ observation of crack growth using SEM, a process zone was formed at the front of main crack due to grain boundary fracture. (G.K.)

  5. Stress corrosion cracking lifetime prediction of spring screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Ryu, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    A lifetime prediction of holddown spring screw in nuclear fuel assembly was performed using fracture mechanics approach. The spring screw was designed such that it was capable of sustaining the loads imposed by the initial tensile preload and operational loads. In order to investigate the cause of failure and to predict the stress corrosion cracking life of the screw, a stress analysis of the top nozzle spring assembly was done using finite element analysis. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded than the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Normalized stress intensity factors for PWSCC life prediction was proposed. Primary water stress corrosion cracking life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by using integration of the Scott model and resulted in 1.78 years, which was fairly close to the actual service life of the holddown spring screw

  6. Life prediction of steam generator tubing due to stress corrosion crack using Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Liu Fei; Cheng Guangxu; Zhang Zaoxiao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A life prediction model for SG tubing was proposed. → The initial crack length for SCC was determined. → Two failure modes called rupture mode and leak mode were considered. → A probabilistic life prediction code based on Monte Carlo method was developed. - Abstract: The failure of steam generator tubing is one of the main accidents that seriously affects the availability and safety of a nuclear power plant. In order to estimate the probability of the failure, a probabilistic model was established to predict the whole life-span and residual life of steam generator (SG) tubing. The failure investigated was stress corrosion cracking (SCC) after the generation of one through-wall axial crack. Two failure modes called rupture mode and leak mode based on probabilistic fracture mechanics were considered in this proposed model. It took into account the variance in tube geometry and material properties, and the variance in residual stresses and operating conditions, all of which govern the propagations of cracks. The proposed model was numerically calculated by using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The plugging criteria were first verified and then the whole life-span and residual life of the SG tubing were obtained. Finally, important sensitivity analysis was also carried out to identify the most important parameters affecting the life of SG tubing. The results will be useful in developing optimum strategies for life-cycle management of the feedwater system in nuclear power plants.

  7. 3D ductile crack propagation within a polycrystalline microstructure using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beese, Steffen; Loehnert, Stefan; Wriggers, Peter

    2018-02-01

    In this contribution we present a gradient enhanced damage based method to simulate discrete crack propagation in 3D polycrystalline microstructures. Discrete cracks are represented using the eXtended finite element method. The crack propagation criterion and the crack propagation direction for each point along the crack front line is based on the gradient enhanced damage variable. This approach requires the solution of a coupled problem for the balance of momentum and the additional global equation for the gradient enhanced damage field. To capture the discontinuity of the displacements as well as the gradient enhanced damage along the discrete crack, both fields are enriched using the XFEM in combination with level sets. Knowing the crack front velocity, level set methods are used to compute the updated crack geometry after each crack propagation step. The applied material model is a crystal plasticity model often used for polycrystalline microstructures of metals in combination with the gradient enhanced damage model. Due to the inelastic material behaviour after each discrete crack propagation step a projection of the internal variables from the old to the new crack configuration is required. Since for arbitrary crack geometries ill-conditioning of the equation system may occur due to (near) linear dependencies between standard and enriched degrees of freedom, an XFEM stabilisation technique based on a singular value decomposition of the element stiffness matrix is proposed. The performance of the presented methodology to capture crack propagation in polycrystalline microstructures is demonstrated with a number of numerical examples.

  8. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking of α-brass in Mattsson's solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan; Newman, Roger C.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic strain rate ahead of a crack tip formed during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a static load is assumed to arise from the crack propagation. The strain surrounding the crack tip would be redistributed as the crack grows, thereby having the effect of dynamic strain. Recently, several studies have shown cold work to cause accelerated crack growth rates during SCC, and the slip-dissolution mechanism has been widely applied to account for this via a supposedly increased crack-tip strain rate in cold worked material. While these interpretations consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, dislocations are generated inhomogeneously within the microstructure during cold work. The presence of grain boundaries results in dislocation pile-ups that cause local strain concentrations. The local strains generated from cold working α-brass by tensile elongation were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The role of these local strains in SCC was studied by measuring the strain distributions from the same regions of the sample before cold work, after cold work, and after SCC. Though, the cracks did not always initiate or propagate along boundaries with pre-existing local strains from the applied cold work, the local strains surrounding the cracked boundaries had contributions from both the crack propagation and the prior cold work. - Highlights: • Plastic strain localization has a complex relationship with SCC susceptibility. • Surface relief created by cold work creates its own granular strain localization. • Cold work promotes crack growth but several other factors are involved

  9. Specific features of corrosion processes in a crack tip in chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurov, O.V.; Vasilenko, I.I.

    1981-01-01

    Electrode potentials of metal and pH solution are measured by means of microelectrodes on structural materials-45 and 12Kh18N10T steels, AT3 titanium alloy and D16 aluminium alloy in the vertex of corrosion crack formed during corrosion cracking in 3% NaCl solution. Metal corrosion is shown to be followed by hydrogen liberation on all the investigated materials at corrosion potentials. The effects of chemical composition of alloys as well as external polarization on the solution pH in the crack vertex are determined

  10. Effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Onimura, K.

    1987-01-01

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking resistance of cold worked nickel base alloys in PWR primary water, the effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloys 600, X-750 and 690, in high temperature water, have been studied. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 0 C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours (43.2Ms). From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked alloys of thermally treated 690 and X-750 have excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. (Author)

  11. Electrochemical study of stress corrosion cracking of copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malki, Brahim

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical study of stress corrosion of copper alloys in aqueous environment. Selective dissolution and electrochemical oxidation are two key-points of the stress corrosion of these alloys. The first part of this thesis treats of these aspects applied to Cu-Au alloys. Measurements have been performed using classical electrochemical techniques (in potentio-dynamic, potentio-static and galvano-static modes). The conditions of occurrence of an electrochemical noise is analysed using signal processing techniques. The impact on the behavior of Cu 3 Au are discussed. In the second part, the stress corrosion problem is addressed in the case of surface oxide film formation, in particular for Cu-Zn alloys. We have found useful to extend this study to mechanical stress oxidation mechanisms in the presence of an oscillating potential electrochemical system. The aim is to examine the influence of these new electrochemical conditions (galvano-static mode) on the behavior of stressed brass. Finally, the potential distribution at crack tip is calculated in order to compare the different observations [fr

  12. TGO growth and crack propagation in a thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.R.; Archer, R.; Huang, X. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Marple, B.R. [National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, PQ (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    In thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems, a continuous alumina layer developed at the ceramic topcoat/bond coat interface helps to protect the metallic bond coat from further oxidation and improve the durability of the TBC system under service conditions. However, other oxides such as spinel and nickel oxide, formed in the oxidizing environment, are believed to be detrimental to TBC durability during service at high temperatures. It was shown that in an air-plasma-sprayed (APS) TBC system, post-spraying heat treatments in low-pressure oxygen environments could suppress the formation of the detrimental oxides by promoting the formation of an alumina layer at the ceramic topcoat/bond coat interface, leading to an improved TBC durability. This work presents the influence of post-spraying heat treatments in low-pressure oxygen environments on the oxidation behaviour and durability of a thermally sprayed TBC system with high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-produced Co-32Ni-21Cr-8Al-0.5Y (wt.%) bond coat. Oxidation behaviour of the TBCs is evaluated by examining their microstructural evolution, growth kinetics of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers, as well as crack propagation during low frequency thermal cycling at 1050 C. The relationship between the TGO growth and crack propagation will also be discussed. (orig.)

  13. Crack Initiation and Growth Behavior at Corrosion Pit in 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    concepts of fracture mechanics. Corrosion crack initiation or growth can develop when exposed to continuous or intermittent humid environment during...act as nucleation sites. For many materials of the structure such as Al, steel the growth of fatigue cracks from corrosion pit stands legitimate...critical or rather threshold values below which the nucleation of fatigue crack is not possible [6]. Under certain conditions that prevail on

  14. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500 o C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  15. Effects of Specimen Diameters on the Distribution of Corrosion Fatigue Cracks

    OpenAIRE

    石原, 外美; 塩澤, 和章; 宮尾, 嘉寿

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of corrosion fatigue cracks observed on the un-notched round specimen surface differs with specimen diameter, especially in the low stress amplitude region. At a constant fatigue life ratio, many long cracks are initiated on the larger specimen, 12 mm (diameter), in comparison with the smaller specimen, 6 mm (diameter). On the other hand, in the high stress amplitude region of corrosion fatigue and fatigue in laboratory air, the distribution of cracks during the fatigue proce...

  16. Influence of Pitting Corrosion on Fatigue and Corrosion Fatigue of Ship and Offshore Structures, Part II: Load - Pit - Crack Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Marek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper has been discussed influence of stresses on general corrosion rate and corrosion pit nucleation rate and growth , whose presence has been questioned by some authors but accepted by most of them. Influence of roughness of pit walls on fatigue life of a plate suffering pit corrosion and presence of the so called „ non-damaging” pits which never lead to initiation of fatigue crack, has been presented. Possibility of prediction of pit-to-crack transition moment by two different ways, i.e. considering a pit a stress concentrator or an equivalent crack, has been analyzed. Also, influence of statistical distribution of depth of corrosion pits as well as anticorrosion protection on fatigue and corrosion fatigue has been described.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking for 316 stainless steel clips in a condensate stabilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Awar, A.; Aldajah, S.; Harhara, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, P. O. Box 17555 Al-AIn 17555 (United Arab Emirates)

    2011-09-15

    In one of the gas processing facilities in Abu Dhabi, UAE; a case of 316L stainless steel material failure occurred in the fractionating column due to stress cracking corrosion twice in a cycle of less than 2 years. This paper studies the stress corrosion cracking behavior of the 316L stainless steel in an accelerated corrosion environment and compares it with a higher corrosion resistant nickel alloy (Inconel 625). The experimental work was designed according to ASTM G36 standard, the samples were immersed in a boiling magnesium chloride medium which provided the accelerated corrosion environment and the tested samples were shaped into U-bend specimens as they underwent both plastic and elastic stresses. The specimens were then tested to determine the time required for cracks to initiate. The results of the experimental work showed that the main mode of failure was stress corrosion cracking initiated by the proven presence of chlorides, hydrogen sulfide, and water at elevated temperatures. Inconel 625 samples placed in the controlled environment showed better corrosion resistance as it took them an average of 56 days to initiate cracks, whereas it took an average of 24 days to initiate cracks in the stainless steel 316L samples. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs showed that the cracks in the stainless steel 316L samples were longer, wider, and deeper compared to the cracks of Inconel 625. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  19. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  1. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Nd:YAG laser-treated aluminum alloy 7075

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, T.M.; Yan, L.J.; Chan, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Nd-YAG laser surface treatment was conducted on 7075-T651 aluminum alloy with the aim of improving the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. Laser surface treatment was performed under two different gas environments, air and nitrogen. After the laser treatment, coarse constituent particles were removed and fine cellular/dendritic structures had formed. In addition, for the N 2 -treated specimen, an AlN phase was detected. The results of the stress corrosion test showed that after 30 days of immersion, the untreated specimen had been severely attacked by corrosion, with intergranular cracks having formed along the planar grain boundaries of the specimen. For the air-treated specimen, some relatively long stress corrosion cracks and a small number of relatively large corrosion pits were found. The cracks mainly followed the interdendritic boundaries; the fusion boundary was found to be acting as an arrestor to corrosion attacks. In contrast, only few short stress corrosion cracks appeared in the N 2 -treated specimen, indicating an improvement in corrosion initiation resistance. The superior corrosion resistance was attributed to the formation of the AlN phase in the surface of the laser-melted layer, which is an electrical insulator. The electrochemical impedance measurements taken during the stress corrosion test showed that the film resistance of the laser-treated specimens was always higher than that of the untreated specimen, with the N 2 -treated specimen showing the highest resistance

  2. Effect of W substitution for Mo on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 25Cr-7Ni duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Tae Hong; Kim, Kyoo Young

    1998-01-01

    The effect of W substitution for Mo in duplex stainless steel (DSS) was investigated with respect to microstructure and stress corrosion cracking behavior. Homogenizing treatment was performed at 1100.deg.C for 10 minutes, while aging treatment was performed at 900.deg.C with different holding times. In homogenized condition, regardless of W substitution, all the specimens had the nearly equal volume-ratio of ferrite and austenite, and had no secondary phase precipitation. On aging, the W modification on suppression of secondary phase precipitation was very effective. Total amount of secondary phase precipitates was greatly reduced in the W-modified DSS in the early stage of the ageing treatment comparing to the commercial grade DSS without W modification. However, this effect was reduced rapidly as the aging time increased. Stress corrosion cracking(SCC) was examined in boil-ing 42% MgCl 2 solution by slow strain rate test(SSRT) and constant load test (CLT). Under the homogenized condition, the beneficial effect of W was clearly observed at the low applied stress levels where the electrochemical action plays a dominant role. In the commercial grade DSS without W modification, the crack propagated in a trans-phase mode,whereas in the W-modified DSS, the crack propagated in a mixed mode of trans-phase and inter-phase due to barrier effect of austenite phase against crack growth. Under the aged condition, the signification improvement in SCC resistance of the aged DSS specimens with W modification resulted from increase in toughness due to a relatively small amount of the brittle secondary phase precipitates. However, the cracks propagated in a trans-phase mode in the DSS specimens regardless of W modification

  3. Experimental study on fatigue crack propagation rate of RC beam strengthened with carbon fiber laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peiyan; Liu, Guangwan; Guo, Xinyan; Huang, Man

    2008-11-01

    The experimental research on fatigue crack propagation rate of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fiber laminate (CFL) is carried out by MTS system in this paper. The experimental results show that, the main crack propagation on strengthened beam can be summarized into three phases: 1) fast propagation phase; 2) steady propagation and rest phase; 3) unsteady propagation phase. The phase 2-i.e. steady propagation and rest stage makes up about 95% of fatigue life of the strengthened beam. The propagation rate of the main crack, da/dN, in phase 2 can be described by Paris formula, and the constant C and m can be confirmed by the fatigue crack propagation experiments of the RC beams strengthened with CFL under three-point bending loads.

  4. Fatigue crack propagation under combined cyclic mechanical loading and electric field in piezoelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakihara, Kaori; Tanaka, Keisuke; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyoshi; Mukai, Hirokatsu

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation tests of PZT specimens were performed under cyclic four-point bending with and without superposition of electric fields. The specimens were poled in the longitudinal direction (PL specimens) perpendicular to the crack plane. The crack propagation rate for the case of open circuit was faster than that for the case of short circuit. The application of a negative or positive electric field parallel to the poling direction accelerated the crack propagation rate, and the amount of acceleration was larger for the case of the negative field. The change of the crack propagation rate with crack extension can be divided into three regions. In the region I, the crack propagation rate decreases with increasing crack length, and then turn to increase in the region III. In the region II, the propagation rate is nearly constant. The mechanisms of fatigue crack propagation were correlated to domain switching near the crack tip. The grain boundary fracture was predominant in the low-rate region, while transgranular fracture became abundant on the unstable fracture surface. (author)

  5. Study on mitigation of stress corrosion cracking by peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeguchi, Takaharu; Tsutsumi, Kazuya; Toyoda, Masahiko; Ohta, Takahiro; Okabe, Taketoshi; Sato, Tomonobu

    2010-01-01

    In order to verify stability of residual stress improvement effect of peeing for mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in components of PWR plant, relaxation behavior of residual stress induced by water jet peening (WJP) and ultrasonic shot peening (USP) on surface of alloy 600 and its weld metal was investigated under various thermal aging and stress condition considered for actual plant operation. In the case of thermal aging at 320-380degC, surface residual stress relaxation was observed at the early stage of thermal aging, but no significant stress relaxation was observed after that. Applied stress below yield stress does not significantly affect stress relaxation behavior of surface residual stress. Furthermore, it was confirmed that cyclic stress does not accelerate stress relaxation. (author)

  6. Toward the multiscale nature of stress corrosion cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the multiscale nature of stress corrosion cracking (SCC observed by high-resolution characterizations in austenite stainless steels and Ni-base superalloys in light water reactors (including boiling water reactors, pressurized water reactors, and supercritical water reactors with related opinions. A new statistical summary and comparison of observed degradation phenomena at different length scales is included. The intrinsic causes of this multiscale nature of SCC are discussed based on existing evidence and related opinions, ranging from materials theory to practical processing technologies. Questions of interest are then discussed to improve bottom-up understanding of the intrinsic causes. Last, a multiscale modeling and simulation methodology is proposed as a promising interdisciplinary solution to understand the intrinsic causes of the multiscale nature of SCC in light water reactors, based on a review of related supporting application evidence.

  7. Effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Hoffman, N.J.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate effects of a large water leak into the sodium side of a steam generator in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) at Canoga Park, California, is performing a series of tests in a Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR). This test series involves heating a large steam generator that possibly contains localized pockets of aqueous caustic retained from a previous sodium-water reaction. Such pockets of caustic solution could be in contact with welds and other components that contain residual stresses up to the yield point. The LMEC and General Electric (GE) ran a series of tests to evaluate the effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for alloys either used or considered for the LLTR. A summary of the temperatures and caustic concentration ranges that can result in caustic SCC for carbon steel and Type-304 stainless steel is given

  8. Iodine stress-corrosion cracking in irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Yaggee, F.L.; Neimark, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiated Zircaloy cladding specimens, which had experienced fluences from 0.1 to 6 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV), were gas-pressure tested in an iodine environment to investigate their stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility. The test temperatures and hoop stresses ranged from 320 to 360 0 C and 150 to 500 MPa, respectively. The results indicate that irradiation, in general, increases the susceptibility of Zircaloy to iodine SCC. For specimens that experienced fluences >2 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV), the 24-h failure stress was 177+-18 MPa, regardless of the preirradiation metallurgical condition. An analytical model for iodine SCC has been developed which agrees reasonably well with the test results

  9. Pitting and Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Nanostructured Al-Mg Alloys in Natural and Artificial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mala M.; Ziemian, Constance W.

    2008-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of two developmental nanocrystalline 5083 alloys with varied composition and processing conditions was studied. The results were compared to a commercial aluminum AA 5083 (H111) alloy. The pitting densities, size and depths, and residual tensile strengths were measured after alternate immersion in artificial seawater and atmospheric exposure under different loading conditions. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDX was used to analyze the fracture surfaces of failed specimen after removal at selected intervals and tensile testing. One of the nanostructured Al-Mg alloys exhibited significantly superior pitting resistance when compared to conventional microstructured AA 5083. Under conditions where pitting corrosion showed up as local tunnels toward phase inclusions, transgranular cracking was observed, whereas under conditions when pitting corrosion evolved along grain boundaries, intergranular cracking inside the pit was observed. Pit initiation resistance of the nano alloys appears to be better than that of the conventional alloys. However, long-term pit propagation is a concern and warrants further study. The objective of this investigation was to obtain information regarding the role that ultra-fine microstructures play in their degradation in marine environments and to provide insight into the corrosion mechanisms and damage processes of these alloys.

  10. Modelling probabilistic fatigue crack propagation rates for a mild structural steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.F.O. Correia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A class of fatigue crack growth models based on elastic–plastic stress–strain histories at the crack tip region and local strain-life damage models have been proposed in literature. The fatigue crack growth is regarded as a process of continuous crack initializations over successive elementary material blocks, which may be governed by smooth strain-life damage data. Some approaches account for the residual stresses developing at the crack tip in the actual crack driving force assessment, allowing mean stresses and loading sequential effects to be modelled. An extension of the fatigue crack propagation model originally proposed by Noroozi et al. (2005 to derive probabilistic fatigue crack propagation data is proposed, in particular concerning the derivation of probabilistic da/dN-ΔK-R fields. The elastic-plastic stresses at the vicinity of the crack tip, computed using simplified formulae, are compared with the stresses computed using an elasticplastic finite element analyses for specimens considered in the experimental program proposed to derive the fatigue crack propagation data. Using probabilistic strain-life data available for the S355 structural mild steel, probabilistic crack propagation fields are generated, for several stress ratios, and compared with experimental fatigue crack propagation data. A satisfactory agreement between the predicted probabilistic fields and experimental data is observed.

  11. Numerical investigation on the prefabricated crack propagation of FV520B stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juyi Pan

    Full Text Available FV520B is a common stainless steel for manufacturing centrifugal compressor impeller and shaft. The internal metal flaw destroys the continuity of the material matrix, resulting in the crack propagation fracture of the component, which seriously reduces the service life of the equipment. In this paper, Abaqus software was used to simulate the prefabricated crack propagation of FV520B specimen with unilateral gap. The results of static crack propagation simulation results show that the maximum value of stress–strain located at the tip of the crack and symmetrical distributed like a butterfly along the prefabricated crack direction, the maximum stress is 1990 MPa and the maximum strain is 9.489 × 10−3. The Mises stress and stress intensity factor KI increases with the increase of the expansion step, the critical value of crack initiation is reached at the 6th extension step. The dynamic crack propagation simulation shows that the crack propagation path is perpendicular to the load loading direction. Similarly, the maximum Mises stress located at the crack tip and is symmetrically distributed along the crack propagation direction. The critical stress range of the crack propagation is 23.3–43.4 MPa. The maximum value of stress–strain curve located at the 8th extension step, that is, the crack initiation point, the maximum stress is 55.22 MPa, and the maximum strain is 2.26 × 10−4. On the crack tip, the stress changed as 32.24–40.16 MPa, the strain is at 1.292 × 10−4–1.897 × 10−4. Keywords: FV520B, Crack propagation, Mises stress, Stress–strain, Numerical investigation

  12. Initiation of stress corrosion cracking in pre-stained austenitic stainless steels exposed to primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plants. However, a limited number of cases of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) has been detected in cold-worked (CW) areas of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steel components in French PWRs. A previous program launched in the early 2000's identified the required conditions for SCC of cold-worked stainless steels. It was found that a high strain hardening coupled with a cyclic loading favoured SCC. The present study aims at better understanding the role of pre-straining on crack initiation and at developing an engineering model for IGSCC initiation of 304L and 316L stainless steels in primary water. Such model will be based on SCC initiation tests on notched (not pre-cracked) specimens under 'trapezoidal' cyclic loading. The effects of pre-straining (tensile versus cold rolling), cold-work level and strain path on the SCC mechanisms are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate the dominating effect of strain path on SCC susceptibility for all pre-straining levels. Initiation can be understood as crack density and crack depth. A global criterion has been proposed to integrate both aspects of initiation. Maps of SCC initiation susceptibility have been proposed. A critical crack depth between 10 and 20 μm has been demonstrated to define transition between slow propagation and fast propagation for rolled materials. For tensile pre-straining, the critical crack depth is in the range 20 - 50 μm. Experimental evidences support the notion of a KISCC threshold, whose value depends on materials, pre-straining ant load applied. The initiation time has been found to depend on the applied loading as a function of (σ max max/YV) 11,5 . The effect of both strain path and surface hardening is indirectly taken into account via the yield stress. In this study, material differences rely on strain path effect on mechanical properties. As a result, a stress

  13. Mechano-electrochemical study of stress corrosion crack tip area: Case of Zircaloy-4 in halide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durif, E.

    2012-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damage phenomenon which results from the synergy between corrosion process (dissolution, adsorption) and mechanical fracture (crack propagation). Although this phenomenon is well known, its modelling is still a challenging issue, especially concerning mechano-electrochemical coupling mechanisms at crack tip, because it depends on model system (metal/aggressive media) and large number of mechanical and electrochemical factors. In this thesis, mutual interactions between dissolution and the stress state around the crack tip (stress intensity factor) are studied in the case of Zircaloy-4 in aqueous halide solution. Samples are first pre-cracked in air by using fatigue load-shedding procedure to control the stress intensity factor. Then, pre-oxidation is used to produce a thin protective passive layer on their surface. The electro-chemical reactions are thus concentrated at the crack tip which also induces a concentration of the mechanical effect. During the test, digital images of the sample surface are acquired. Digital Image Correlation is performed a posteriori in order to obtain the evolution of the crack length and the stress intensity factors. Further, a specific procedure is developed in order to perform the DIC analysis while the test is running. This allows to control the load so that a given value of the stress intensity factor is prescribed. With this innovative experimental technique, we perform experimental tests that allow to discriminate the effects between different stress corrosion cracking mechanisms. It is suggested that once a critical anodic polarization is exceeded, the crack growth rate depends on the stress intensity factor but also on its time derivative. Indeed, a threshold effect is obtained on the stress intensity factor, meaning that plasticity must increase for the dissolution reaction to occur, but also on its rate meaning that time for plasticity to produce new dislocations must not exceed the

  14. FY17 Status Report: Research on Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindelholz, Eric John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alexander, Christopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This progress report describes work done in FY17 at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. Work in FY17 refined our understanding of the chemical and physical environment on canister surfaces, and evaluated the relationship between chemical and physical environment and the form and extent of corrosion that occurs. The SNL corrosion work focused predominantly on pitting corrosion, a necessary precursor for SCC, and process of pit-to-crack transition; it has been carried out in collaboration with university partners. SNL is collaborating with several university partners to investigate SCC crack growth experimentally, providing guidance for design and interpretation of experiments.

  15. Crack propagation behavior of TiN coatings by laser thermal shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Youngkue; Jeon, Seol; Jeon, Min-seok; Shin, Hyun-Gyoo; Chun, Ho Hwan; Lee, Youn-seoung; Lee, Heesoo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The crack propagation behavior of TiN coating after laser thermal shock experiment was observed by using FIB and TEM. ► Intercolumnar cracks between TiN columnar grains were predominant cracking mode after laser thermal shock. ► Cracks were propagated from the coating surface to the substrate at low laser pulse energy and cracks were originated at coating-substrate interface at high laser pulse energy. ► The cracks from the interface spread out transversely through the weak region of the columnar grains by repetitive laser shock. - Abstract: The crack propagation behavior of TiN coatings, deposited onto 304 stainless steel substrates by arc ion plating technique, related to a laser thermal shock experiment has been investigated using focused ion beam (FIB) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ablated regions of TiN coatings by laser ablation system have been investigated under various conditions of pulse energies and number of laser pulses. The intercolumnar cracks were predominant cracking mode following laser thermal shock tests and the cracks initiated at coating surface and propagated in a direction perpendicular to the substrate under low loads conditions. Over and above those cracks, the cracks originated from coating-substrate interface began to appear with increasing laser pulse energy. The cracks from the interface also spread out transversely through the weak region of the columnar grains by repetitive laser shock.

  16. Fatigue crack propagation behavior and acoustic emission characteristics of the heat affected zone of super duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Jae Yoon; Kim, Jin Hwan; Ahn, Seok Hwan; Park, In Duck; Kang, Chang Yong; Nam, Ki Woo

    2002-01-01

    Because duplex stainless steel shows the good strength and corrosion resistance properties, the necessity of duplex stainless steel, which has long life in severe environments, has been increased with industrial development. The fatigue crack propagation behavior of Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) has been investigated in super duplex stainless steel. The fatigue crack propagation rate of HAZ of super duplex stainless steel was faster than that of base metal of super duplex stainless steel. We also analysed acoustic emission signals during the fatigue test with time-frequency analysis method. According to the results of time-frequency analysis, the frequency ranges of 200-400 kHz were obtained by striation and the frequency range of 500 kHz was obtained due to dimple and separate of inclusion

  17. Comments on the 'Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and zircaloy-4 in halide aqueous solutions' by S.B. Farina, G.S. Duffo, J.R. Galvele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The above paper [Corros. Sci. 45 (2003) 2497] declares a general approach to describing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanism and despite of the criticism of the so-called 'surface mobility mechanism' (SMM) e.g., [Corros. Sci. 36 (1994) 669, Corros. Sci. 45 (2003) 2105]. The paper [Corros. Sci. 45 (2003) 2497] demonstrates inner contradictions and mutually excluding statements of SMM when fitted calculated and measured values of crack propagation rate. As shown in these Comments, the crack propagation rate calculated using SMM is only the Nabarro-Herring creep deformation rate, which can never be numerically equal to the crack propagation rate. Thus, tests undertaken by the author of SMM cannot be accepted as experimental evidence of the SMM

  18. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saithala, Janardhan R.

    An investigation has been performed to determine the pitting resistance of stainless steels and stress corrosion cracking of super duplex stainless steels in water containing chloride ions from 25 - 170°C. The steels studied are 12% Cr, FV520B, FV566, 304L, Uranus65, 2205, Ferallium Alloy 255, and Zeron 100. All these commercial materials used in very significant industrial applications and suffer from pitting and stress corrosion failures. The design of a new experimental setup using an autoclave enabled potentiodynamic polarisation experiments and slow strain rate tests in dilute environments to be conducted at elevated temperatures. The corrosion potentials were controlled using a three electrode cell with computer controlled potentiostat.The experimental programme to determine pitting potentials was designed to simulate the service conditions experienced in most industrial plants and develop mathematical model equations to help a design engineer in material selection decision. Stress corrosion resistance of recently developed Zeron100 was evaluated in dilute environments to propose a mechanism in chloride solutions at high' temperatures useful for the nuclear and power generation industry. Results have shown the significance of the composition of alloying elements across a wide range of stainless steels and its influence on pitting. Nitrogen and molybdenum added to modern duplex stainless steels was found to be unstable at higher temperatures. The fractographic results obtained using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has given insight in the initiation of pitting in modem duplex and super duplex stainless steels. A mathematical model has been proposed to predict pitting in stainless steels based on the effect of environmental factors (temperature, chloride concentration, and chemical composition). An attempt has been made to identify the mechanism of SCC in Zeron100 super duplex stainless steel.The proposed empirical models have shown good correlation

  19. Oxidation and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in SCWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Castro, L.; Blazquez, F.

    2008-01-01

    SCWRs are high-temperature, high-pressure, water-cooled reactors that operate above the thermodynamic critical point of water (374 deg C, 22.1 MPa). The SCWR offers many advantages compared to state-of- the-art LWRs including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy, the elimination of components such as steam generators and steam separators and dryers, a low coolant mass inventory resulting in smaller components, and a much higher efficiency ∼ 44% vs. 33% in current LWRs). In these systems high pressure (25 MPa) coolant enters the vessel at 280 deg C which is heated to about 500 deg C and delivered to a power conversion cycle. Supercritical water (SCW) exhibits properties significantly different from those of liquid water below the critical point. Supercritical water acting essentially as a non-polar dense gas with solvation properties approaching those of a low-polarity organic. In this conditions, can dissolve gases like oxygen to complete miscibility. Depending upon what species are present and how much oxygen is present in the solution can becomes a very aggressive oxidising environment. Most of the data on corrosion in supercritical water are from fossil plant or oxidation waste disposal systems. However there is very limited data on corrosion in low conductivity de-aerated SCW and less on stress corrosion cracking behaviour under operating conditions foreseen for SCWR. Candidate materials for structural components are materials for high temperatures and include ferritic-martensitic alloys; oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic/martensitic steels and strengthened steels by precipitation and for lower temperatures the austenitic stainless steels, such as 304 and 316, used in the LWR. Low swelling austenitic steels are also of high interest for areas with high dpa and high temperature. A review of the available information on corrosion and stress corrosion behaviour of different types of stainless steels in supercritical water at high

  20. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  1. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D.; Gelpi, A.

    1997-01-01

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor's primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author)

  2. An acceleration test for stress corrosion cracking using humped specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Fukumura, Takuya; Totsuka, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    By using the humped specimen, which is processed by the humped die, in the slow strain rate technique (SSRT) test, fracture facet due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can be observed in relatively short duration. Although the cold work and concentrated stress and strain caused by the characteristic shape of the specimen accelerate the SCC, to date these acceleration effects have not been examined quantitatively. In the present study, the acceleration effects of the humped specimen were examined through experiments and finite element analyses (FEA). The experiments investigated the SCC of alloy 600 in the primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor. SSRT tests were conducted using two kinds of humped specimen: one was annealed after hump processing in order to eliminate the cold work, and the other was hump processed after the annealing treatment. The work ratio caused by the hump processing and stress/strain conditions during SSRT test were evaluated by FEA. It was found that maximum work ratio of 30% is introduced by the hump processing and that the distribution of the work ratio is not uniform. Furthermore, the work ratio is influenced by the friction between the specimen and dies as well as by the shape of dies. It was revealed that not only the cold work but also the concentrated stress and strain during SSRT test accelerate the crack initiation and growth of the SCC. (author)

  3. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of zircaloy-2 in iodine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Seiichi

    1983-01-01

    The effects of strain rates, iodine partial pressure and testing temperature on SCC behavior of zircaloy-2 in iodine environment were studied by means of slow strain rate technique (SSRT). SCC behavior of recrystallized specimens in iodine environment was remarkably influenced by the testing temperatures, and the susceptibility to SCC of specimens tested at 623 K was higher than that at 573 K. The susceptibility to SCC of recrystallized specimens increased with increasing iodine partial pressure at the lower strain rates of 4.2 x 10 -6 s -1 and 8.3 x 10 -7 s -1 . Cold worked specimens indicate no SCC failure in iodine environment regardless of strain rates, although those were tested only at 573 K. Fractographic observation revealed that SCC features of recrystallized specimens can be classified into two groups. One group, mostly specimens tested at 573 K, are characterized by the fact that cracks are initiated from corrosion pits. The other group are characterized by transgranuler SCC in the absence of pitting. This type of crack is found on specimens tested in environments containing more than 570 Pa iodine and seems to be produced by iodine embrittlement. (author)

  4. Inhibition of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 by prestrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Kearns, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Tests of precracked and as-notched compact tension specimens were conducted in 3600C hydrogenated water to determine the effect of prestrain on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of Alloy X-750 in the HTH, AH and HOA heat treated conditions. Prestraining is defined as the intentional application of an initial load (or strain) that is higher than the final test load. Prestrain was varied from 10% to 40% (i.e., the initial to final load ratios ranged from 1.1 to 1.4). Other variables included notch root radius, stress level and irradiation. Specimens were bolt-loaded to maintain essentially constant displacement conditions during the course of the test. The frequent heat up and cooldown cycles that were necessary for periodic inspections provided an opportunity to evaluate the effect of test variables on rapid low temperature crack propagation to which this alloy is subject. For Condition HTH, application of 20% to 40% prestrain either eliminates or significantly retards SCC initiation in as-notched specimens and the onset of crack growth in precracked specimens. In addition, this procedure reduces the propensity for low temperature crack growth during cooldown. Similar results were observed for precracked HOA specimens. Application of 20% prestrain also retards SCC in as-notched and precracked AH specimens, but the effects are not as great as in Condition HTH. Prestraining at the 10% level was found to produce an inconsistent benefit. In-reactor SCC testing shows that prestrain greatly improves the in-flux and out-of-flux SCC resistance of Condition HTH material. No SCC was observed in precracked specimens prestrained 30%, whereas extensive cracking was observed in their nonprestrain counterparts

  5. Stress field determination in an alloy 600 stress corrosion crack specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassineux, B.; Labbe, T.

    1995-05-01

    In the context of EDF studies on stress corrosion cracking rates in the Alloy 600 steam generators tubes, we studied the influence of strain hardened surface layers on the different stages of cracking for a tensile smooth specimen (TLT). The stress field was notably assessed to try and explain the slow/rapid-propagation change observed beyond the strain hardened layers. The main difficulty is to simulate in a finite element model the inner and outer surfaces of these strain hardened layers, produced by the final manufacturing stages of SG tubes which have not been heat treated. In the model, the strain hardening is introduced by simulating a multi-layer material. Residual stresses are simulated by an equivalent fictitious thermomechanical calculation, realigned with respect to X-ray measurements. The strain hardening introduction method was validated by an analytical calculation giving identical results. Stress field evolution induced by specimen tensile loading were studied using an elastoplastic 2D finite element calculations performed with the Aster Code. The stress profile obtained after load at 660 MPa shows no stress discontinuity at the boundary between the strain hardened layer and the rest of the tube. So we propose that a complementary calculation be performed, taking into account the multi-cracked state of the strain hardened zones by means of a damage variable. In fact, this state could induce stress redistribution in the un-cracked area, which would perhaps provide an explanation of the crack-ground rate change beyond the strain hardened zone. The calculations also evidence the harmful effects of plastic strains on a strain hardened layer due to the initial state of the tube (not heat-treated), to grit blasting or to shot peening. The initial compressive stress condition of this surface layer becomes, after plastic strain, a tensile stress condition. These results are confirmed by laboratory test. (author). 10 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs., 2 appends

  6. Failure prediction for Crack-in-Corrosion defects in natural gas transmission pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedairi, B.; Cronin, D.; Hosseini, A.; Plumtree, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cracks occurring coincidentally with corrosion (Crack-in-Corrosion or CIC), represent a new hybrid defect in pipelines that are not directly addressed in the current codes or assessment methods. To understand the failure response of these defects, the finite element method using an elastic–plastic fracture mechanics approach was applied to predict the failure pressures of comparable crack, corrosion and CIC defects in 508 mm diameter pipe with 5.7 mm wall thickness. Failure pressure predictions were made based on measured tensile, Charpy impact and J testing data, and validated using experimental rupture tests. Plastic collapse was predicted for corrosion and crack defects using the critical strength based on the material tensile strength, whereas fracture was predicted using the measured J 0.2 value. The model predictions were found to be conservative for the CIC defects (17.4% on average), 12.4% conservative for crack-only defects, and 3.2% conservative for corrosion defects compared to the experimental tests, demonstrating the applicability of the material-based failure criteria. For the defects considered in this study, all were predicted to fail by plastic collapse. The finite element method provided less conservative predictions than existing corrosion or crack-based analytical methods. Highlights: ► Cracks occurring coincidentally with corrosion represent a new hybrid defect in pipelines. ► Existing methods for prediction corrosion and crack defect failure pressures are conservative. ► The FE method can provide improved prediction of rupture pressure using actual material properties. ► Failure was predicted using FE with a critical stress for plastic collapse and J value for fracture. ► FE failure pressure predictions for crack in corrosion defects were 17% conservative on average.

  7. Effect of overloads on fatigue crack propagation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogaev, V.P.; Bojtsov, B.V.; Petukhov, Yu.V

    1986-01-01

    An overload coefficient Q, the number of overload cycles Nsub(0), the value of the stress intensity coefficient swing of basic loading conditions ΔK are experimentally studied for their effect on the delay of the fatigue crack propagation Nsub(D) in 30KhGSNA steel. Results of the study are presented. It is shown that as a result of single overloads the value attains 60 - 10 thous. cycles. The delay Nsub(D) grows with the overload coefficient Q=Ksub(max)sup(0)/Ksub(max) and the number of the overload cycles Nsub(0). The regularity indicated is described by the equations valid within the limits of variation in Q and Nsub(0) values studied in the paper

  8. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in bolting materials on light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory experiments performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that the concentration of boric acid to a moist paste at approximately the boiling point of water can produce corrosion rates of the order of approximately 3.5mm per year on bolting and piping materials, which values are consistent with service experience. Other failure evaluation experience has shown that primary coolant-lubricant interaction may lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator manway studs. An investigation was also performed on eleven lubricants and their effects on A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials. H 2 S generation by the lubricants, coefficient of friction results and transgranular SCC of the bolting materials in steam are discussed. (author)

  9. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in bolting materials on light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments performed at BNL have shown that the concentration of boric acid to a moist paste at approximately the boiling point of water can produce corrosion rates of the order of several tenths of an inch per year on bolting and piping materials, which values are consistent with service experience. Other failure evaluation experience has shown that primary coolant/lubricant interaction may lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator manway studs. An investigation was also performed on eleven lubricants and their effects on A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials. H 2 S generation by the lubricants, coefficient of friction results and transgranular SCC of the bolting materials in steam are discussed. 13 refs

  10. The Effect of Crack Width on Chloride-Induced Corrosion of Steel in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When subjected to loading or thermal shrinkage, reinforced concrete structures usually behave in a cracking state, which raises the risk of bar corrosion from the working environment. The influence of cover cracking on chloride-induced corrosion was experimentally investigated through a 654-day laboratory test on cracked reinforced concrete specimens exposed to chloride solution. The concrete specimens have a dimension of 100 mm × 100 mm × 400 mm and a single prefabricated crack at the midspan. When the percentage concentration of chloride ion (0.6%, 1.2%, 2.1%, 3.0%, and 6.0% and crack width (uncracked, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mm are taken as variables, the experimental results showed that the corrosion rates for cracked specimens increased with increasing percentage concentration of chloride and increasing crack width. This study also showed the interrelationship between crack width and percentage concentration of chloride on the corrosion rate. In addition, an empirical model, incorporating the influence of the cover cracking and chloride concentration, was developed to predict the corrosion rate. This model allows the prediction of the maximum allowable wcr based on the given percentage concentration of chloride in the exposure condition.

  11. Transient dynamic crack propagation in gas pressurised pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldis, E.S.; Owen, D.R.J.; Taylor, C.

    1983-01-01

    The prime limitation of dynamic fracture analysis is the lack of a fundamental crack advance theory which can be easily and economically adopted for use with numerical models. The necessity for the inclusion of inertia effects in the solution of certain problem classes is now evident, but most transient dynamic fracture models considered to date include (of necessity) some intuitive/empirical parameters with a frequent need of a priori knowledge of experimental solutions. The particular problem considered in this study is Mode I transient dynamic crack propagation in gas pressurised pipelines. The steel pipe is modelled using thin shell Semiloof finite elements and its transient response is coupled to a one-dimensional finite element model of the compressible gas equations, incorporating a lateral gas flow parameter. The pipe is governed by the usual dynamic equilibrium equation which is discretised in the time domain by a central difference explicit algorithm. The compressible gas response is modelled by the Continuity and Momentum equations and time discretisation is performed by means of a fully backward difference scheme in time. (orig./GL)

  12. A new stress corrosion cracking model for Inconel 600 in PWR media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, T.

    1993-01-01

    A model of cracking in corrosion under stress, based on corrosion-plasticity interactions at cracking points, is proposed to describe the generally intergranular breakage of Inconel 600 in PWR medium. It is shown by calculation, and verified experimentally by observations in SEM, that a pseudo-intergranular breakage connected to the formation of micro facets in zigzags along the joints is possible, as well as a completely intergranular breakage. This allows us to assume that a continuity of mechanisms exists between the trans- and intergranular cracking by corrosion under material stress. (author)

  13. Acoustic Emission Detection and Prediction of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Composite Patch Repairs Using Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Singh, Navdeep; Singh, Navrag

    2007-01-01

    An aircraft is subjected to severe structural and aerodynamic loads during its service life. These loads can cause damage or weakening of the structure especially for aging military and civilian aircraft, thereby affecting its load carrying capabilities. Hence composite patch repairs are increasingly used to repair damaged aircraft metallic structures to restore its structural efficiency. This paper presents the results of Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring of crack propagation in 2024-T3 Clad aluminum panels repaired with adhesively bonded octagonal, single sided boron/epoxy composite patch under tension-tension fatigue loading. Crack propagation gages were used to monitor crack initiation. The identified AE sensor features were used to train neural networks for predicting crack length. The results show that AE events are correlated with crack propagation. AE system was able to detect crack propagation even at high noise condition of 10 Hz loading; that crack propagation signals can be differentiated from matrix cracking signals that take place due to fiber breakage in the composite patch. Three back-propagation cascade feed forward networks were trained to predict crack length based on the number of fatigue cycles, AE event number, and both the Fatigue Cycles and AE events, as inputs respectively. Network using both fatigue cycles and AE event number as inputs to predict crack length gave the best results, followed by Network with fatigue cycles as input, while network with just AE events as input had a greater error

  14. [Monitoring of Crack Propagation in Repaired Structures Based on Characteristics of FBG Sensors Reflecting Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shen-fang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Lei; Huang, Hong-mei

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the security of aircraft repaired structures, a method of crack propagation monitoring in repaired structures is put forward basing on characteristics of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) reflecting spectra in this article. With the cyclic loading effecting on repaired structure, cracks propagate, while non-uniform strain field appears nearby the tip of crack which leads to the FBG sensors' reflecting spectra deformations. The crack propagating can be monitored by extracting the characteristics of FBG sensors' reflecting spectral deformations. A finite element model (FEM) of the specimen is established. Meanwhile, the distributions of strains which are under the action of cracks of different angles and lengths are obtained. The characteristics, such as main peak wavelength shift, area of reflecting spectra, second and third peak value and so on, are extracted from the FBGs' reflecting spectral which are calculated by transfer matrix algorithm. An artificial neural network is built to act as the model between the characteristics of the reflecting spectral and the propagation of crack. As a result, the crack propagation of repaired structures is monitored accurately and the error of crack length is less than 0.5 mm, the error of crack angle is less than 5 degree. The accurately monitoring problem of crack propagation of repaired structures is solved by taking use of this method. It has important significance in aircrafts safety improvement and maintenance cost reducing.

  15. Analysis of crack propagation in concrete structures with structural information entropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of cracks in concrete structures causes energy dissipation and release, and also causes energy redistribution in the structures. Entropy can characterize the energy redistribution. To investigate the relation between the propagation of cracks and the entropy in concrete structures, cracked concrete structures are treated as dissipative structures. Structural information entropy is defined for concrete structures. A compact tension test is conducted. Meanwhile, numerical simulations are also carried out. Both the test and numerical simulation results show that the structural information entropy in the structures can characterize the propagation of cracks in concrete structures.

  16. Experimental study of fatigue crack propagation in type 316 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, M.; Vessiere, G.; Hamel, A.; Boivin, M.

    1983-01-01

    In this work, are grouped and compared the crack propagation rates in type 316 austenitic stainless steel in two loading cases: plane strain and plane stress. Plane strain has been obtained on axisymmetric cracked specimens, plane stress on thin notched specimens, subjected to alternative bending. The results show that the crack propagation rate is greater for plane strain, i.e. in the case of the smallest plastic zone. The Elber concept was also used for explaining the different values of the crack propagation rate. It's noteworthy to find out that the Paris' law coefficients for different loading levels and those fo Elber's law are correlated [fr

  17. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    An effort has been undertaken in order to develop a concept for evaluation of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking in cathodically protected gas transmission pipelines. The effort was divided into the following subtasks: A. Establish a correlation between the fracture mechanical properties...... crack propagation. This resulted in threshold curves that can be used for assessment of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking as a function of operating pressure and hydrogen content - having the flaw size as discrete parameter. The results are to be used mainly on a conceptual basis......, but it was indicated that the requirements for crack propagation include an overprotective CP-condition, a severe sulphate-reducing environment, as well as a large flaw (8 mm or a leak in the present case). A 1 mm flaw (which may be the maximum realistic flaw size) is believed to be unable to provoke crack propagation...

  18. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  19. Impacts of bedding directions of shale gas reservoirs on hydraulically induced crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Shale gas reservoirs are different from conventional ones in terms of their bedding architectures, so their hydraulic fracturing rules are somewhat different. In this paper, shale hydraulic fracturing tests were carried out by using the triaxial hydraulic fracturing test system to identify the effects of natural bedding directions on the crack propagation in the process of hydraulic fracturing. Then, the fracture initiation criterion of hydraulic fracturing was prepared using the extended finite element method. On this basis, a 3D hydraulic fracturing computation model was established for shale gas reservoirs. And finally, a series of studies were performed about the effects of bedding directions on the crack propagation created by hydraulic fracturing in shale reservoirs. It is shown that the propagation rules of hydraulically induced fractures in shale gas reservoirs are jointly controlled by the in-situ stress and the bedding plane architecture and strength, with the bedding direction as the main factor controlling the crack propagation directions. If the normal tensile stress of bedding surface reaches its tensile strength after the fracturing, cracks will propagate along the bedding direction, and otherwise vertical to the minimum in-situ stress direction. With the propagating of cracks along bedding surfaces, the included angle between the bedding normal direction and the minimum in-situ stress direction increases, the fracture initiation and propagation pressures increase and the crack areas decrease. Generally, cracks propagate in the form of non-plane ellipsoids. With the injection of fracturing fluids, crack areas and total formation filtration increase and crack propagation velocity decreases. The test results agree well with the calculated crack propagation rules, which demonstrate the validity of the above-mentioned model.

  20. On the mechanism of crack propagation resistance of fully lamellar TiAl alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, R.; Yao, H.J.; Chen, J.H.; Zhang, J.

    2006-01-01

    The study was done using notched two-colony thick tensile specimens of a directionally solidified cast fully lamellar TiAl alloy. In-situ observations of fracture processes in scanning electron microscope (SEM) were combined with section-to-section related observations of fracture surfaces to investigate the crack growth process. Finite element method (FEM) calculations are carried out to evaluate the stresses for propagating cracks. The results reveal that: (1) the reason why enhancement of applied load is required to propagate the main crack, was attributed to that the main crack observed at the surface did not extend all the way through the specimen's thickness thus the stress field was still controlled by the notch, in which a definite stress required for extending a crack tip should be kept by increasing the applied load. (2) Crack propagation resistance is enhanced at colony boundaries, only when a change occurs from an inter-lamellar propagation to a trans-lamellar propagation (3) Ligament bridging toughening phenomena can be integrated into aforementioned mechanism. As a whole the processes of new crack nucleation with bridging ligament formation decreases the crack propagation resistance rather than increasing it. (4) In case the majority of microcracks are surface cracks, the effect of microcrack shielding is not obvious

  1. Mechanistic dissimilarities between environmentally-influenced fatigue-crack propagation at near-threshold and higher growth rates in lower-strength steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, S.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1981-11-01

    The role of hydrogen gas in influencing fatigue crack propagation is examined for several classes of lower strength pressure vessel and piping steels. Based on measurements over a wide range of growth rates from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -2/ mm/cycle, crack propagation rates are found to be significantly higher in dehumidified gaseous hydrogen compared to moist air in two distinct regimes of crack growth, namely (i) at the intermediate range of growth typically above approx. 10/sup -5/ mm/cycle, and (ii) at the near-threshold region below approx. 10/sup -6/ mm/cycle approaching lattice dimensions per cycle. Both effects are seen at maximum stress intensities (K/sub max/) far below the sustained-load threshold stress intensity for hydrogen-assisted cracking (K/sub Iscc/). Characteristics of environmentally influenced fatigue crack growth in each regime are shown to be markedly different with regard to fractography and the effect of such variables as load ratio and frequency. It is concluded that the primary mechanisms responsible for the influence of the environment in each regime are distinctly different. Whereas corrosion fatigue behavior at intermediate growth rates can be attributed to hydrogen embrittlement processes, the primary role of moist environments at near-threshold levels is shown to involve a contribution from enhanced crack closure due to the formation of crack surface corrosion deposits at low load ratios.

  2. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  3. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    Five of the world's best laboratories at performing stress corrosion crack growth studies - ABB Atom AB, AEA Technology, GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Studsvik Material AB, and VTT Manufacturing Technology, were selected to participate in a round robin to evaluate the quality and reproducibility of testing conditions and resulting stress corrosion crack growth rates in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 288 deg C water. Heat treated, machined and fatigue pre-cracked specimens were provided to all laboratories, and detailed test procedures prescribed the use of active loading, reversed dc potential drop crack monitoring, a common reference electrode supplied to all laboratories by GE CRD (to be used along side each laboratory's own reference electrode), and highly specified water chemistry conditions. The ability of each laboratory to achieve optimal testing conditions varied, although all laboratories achieved an impressive standard of testing control. The most significant laboratory-to-laboratory differences were associated with their ability to achieve high purity autoclave outlet water, reproduce accurate measurements of corrosion potential on the test specimen, and provide high resolution crack following using a reversed dc potential drop. However, the most notable outcome of the program is the consistent observation by all laboratories that initiating and sustaining stress corrosion crack growth at constant load in sensitized type 304 stainless steel is difficult, despite the use of a moderately high stress intensity, and high dissolved oxygen and corrosion potential conditions. Concerns for specimen machining and pre-cracking were identified, although these factors were not the sole cause of difficulty in initiating and sustaining stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that many phases of specimen preparation and testing can have a large influence on the measured SCC response. Even under the best test conditions it is critical to ensure

  4. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, Peter L. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Five of the world`s best laboratories at performing stress corrosion crack growth studies - ABB Atom AB, AEA Technology, GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Studsvik Material AB, and VTT Manufacturing Technology, were selected to participate in a round robin to evaluate the quality and reproducibility of testing conditions and resulting stress corrosion crack growth rates in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 288 deg C water. Heat treated, machined and fatigue pre-cracked specimens were provided to all laboratories, and detailed test procedures prescribed the use of active loading, reversed dc potential drop crack monitoring, a common reference electrode supplied to all laboratories by GE CRD (to be used along side each laboratory`s own reference electrode), and highly specified water chemistry conditions. The ability of each laboratory to achieve optimal testing conditions varied, although all laboratories achieved an impressive standard of testing control. The most significant laboratory-to-laboratory differences were associated with their ability to achieve high purity autoclave outlet water, reproduce accurate measurements of corrosion potential on the test specimen, and provide high resolution crack following using a reversed dc potential drop. However, the most notable outcome of the program is the consistent observation by all laboratories that initiating and sustaining stress corrosion crack growth at constant load in sensitized type 304 stainless steel is difficult, despite the use of a moderately high stress intensity, and high dissolved oxygen and corrosion potential conditions. Concerns for specimen machining and pre-cracking were identified, although these factors were not the sole cause of difficulty in initiating and sustaining stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that many phases of specimen preparation and testing can have a large influence on the measured SCC response. Even under the best test conditions it is critical to ensure

  5. Corrosion fatigue cracking behavior of Inconel 690 (TT) in secondary water of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jun; Chen Luyao; Qiu Shaoyu; Chen Yong; Lin Zhenxia; Fu Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    Inconel 690 (TT) is one of the key materials for tubes of steam generators for pressurized water reactors, where it is susceptible to corrosion fatigue cracking. In this paper, the corrosion fatigue cracking behavior of Inconel 690 (TT) was investigated under small scale yielding conditions, in the simulated secondary water of pressurized water reactor. It was observed that the fatigue crack growth rate was accelerated by a maximum factor up to 3 in the simulated secondary water, comparing to that in room temperature air. In addition, it was found that the accelerating effect was influenced by out-of-plane cracking of corrosion fatigue cracks and also correlated with stress intensity factor range, maximum stress intensity factor and stress ratio. (authors)

  6. Effect of Sensitization on Corrosion-Fatigue Cracking in Al 5083 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-21

    immediately ahead of the fatigue precrack in 0.001 and 0.01% NaCl solutions are transgranular ductile void coalescences. This observation suggests the 9...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6355--15-9581 Effect of Sensitization on Corrosion- Fatigue Cracking in Al 5083 Alloy...area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Effect of Sensitization on Corrosion- Fatigue Cracking in Al 5083

  7. The Effect of Sensitization on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloy 5456

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    hydrolysis of the aluminum and magnesium produced by the reactions shown in Equations (6–7) can lead to acidification within the crack, and as a...addition of a residual compressive stress. There are several ways of adding residual compressive stresses by way of permanent plastic deformation to...was to propagate the initial crack outside of any plastic zone created by the cyclic loading at the higher ∆K. The fatigue crack propagation was

  8. Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

    2013-10-01

    The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650

  9. Stress corrosion cracking studies of reactor pressure vessel steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform a critical review of the information available in open literature on stress corrosion cracking of reactor pressure vessel materials in simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) conditions, develop a test procedure for conducting stress corrosion crack growth experiments in simulated LWR environments, and conduct a test program in an effort to duplicate some of the data available from the literature. The authors concluded that stress corrosion crack growth has been observed in pressure vessel steels under laboratory test conditions. The composition of the water in most cases where growth was observed is outside of the composition specified for operating conditions. Crack growth was observed in the experiments performed in this program, and it was intermittent. The cracking would start and stop for no apparent reason. In most instances, it would not restart without the change of some external variable. In a few instances, it restarted on its own. Crack growth rates as high as 3.6 x 10 -9 m/sec were observed in pressure vessel steels in high-purity water with 8 ppm oxygen. These high crack growth rates were observed for extremely short bursts in crack extension. They could not be sustained for crack growth extensions greater than a few tenths of a millimeter. From the results of this project it appears highly unlikely that stress corrosion cracking will be observed in operating nuclear plants where the coolant composition is maintained within water chemistry guidelines. However, more work is needed to better define the contaminations that cause crack growth. The crack growth rates are so high and the threshold values for crack nucleation are so low that the conditions causing them need to be well defined and avoided

  10. The importance of the strain rate and creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a nuclear, power, petrochemical, and other industries equipment and components (like pressure vessels, nozzles, tubes, accessories) life degradation mode, involving fragile fracture. The stress corrosion cracking failures can produce serious accidents, and incidents which can put on risk the safety, reliability, and efficiency of many plants. These failures are of very complex prediction. The stress corrosion cracking mechanisms are based on three kinds of factors: microstructural, mechanical and environmental. Concerning the mechanical factors, various authors prefer to consider the crack tip strain rate rather than stress, as a decisive factor which contributes to the process: this parameter is directly influenced by the creep strain rate of the material. Based on two KAPL-Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory experimental studies in SSRT (slow strain rate test) and CL (constant load) test, for prediction of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel based alloys, it has done a data compilation of the film rupture mechanism parameters, for modeling PWSCC of Alloy 600 and discussed the importance of the strain rate and the creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models. As derived from this study, a simple theoretical model is proposed, and it is showed that the crack growth rate estimated with Brazilian tests results with Alloy 600 in SSRT, are according with the KAPL ones and other published literature. (author)

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of effect of hydrogen atoms on crack propagation behavior of α-Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, H.Y., E-mail: gsfshy@sohu.com; Zhang, L.; Xiao, M.X.

    2016-12-16

    The effect of the hydrogen concentration and hydrogen distribution on the mechanical properties of α-Fe with a pre-existing unilateral crack under tensile loading is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The results reveal that the models present good ductility when the front region of crack tip has high local hydrogen concentration. The peak stress of α-Fe decreases with increasing hydrogen concentration. The studies also indicate that for the samples with hydrogen atoms, the crack propagation behavior is independent of the model size and boundaries. In addition, the crack propagation behavior is significantly influenced by the distribution of hydrogen atoms. - Highlights: • The distribution of hydrogen plays a critical role in the crack propagation. • The peak stress decrease with the hydrogen concentration increasing. • The crack deformation behavior is disclosed and analyzed.

  12. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modelling of fatigue crack propagation assisted by gaseous hydrogen in metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriconi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies in a hydrogenous environment indicate that hydrogen created by surface reactions, then drained into the plastic zone, leads to a modification of deformation and damage mechanisms at the fatigue crack tip in metals, resulting in a significant decrease of crack propagation resistance. This study aims at building a model of these complex phenomena in the framework of damage mechanics, and to confront it with the results of fatigue crack propagation tests in high pressure hydrogen on a 15-5PH martensitic stainless steel. To do so, a cohesive zone model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS. A specific traction-separation law was developed, which is suitable for cyclic loadings, and whose parameters depend on local hydrogen concentration. Furthermore, hydrogen diffusion in the bulk material takes into account the influence of hydrostatic stress and trapping. The mechanical behaviour of the bulk material is elastic-plastic. It is shown that the model can qualitatively predict crack propagation in hydrogen under monotonous loadings; then, the model with the developed traction-separation law is tested under fatigue loading. In particular, the simulated crack propagation curves without hydrogen are compared to the experimental crack propagation curves for the 15-5PH steel in air. Finally, simulated fatigue crack propagation rates in hydrogen are compared to experimental measurements. The model's ability to assess the respective contributions of the different damage mechanisms (HELP, HEDE) in the degradation of the crack resistance of the 15-5PH steel is discussed. (author)

  14. Methodology for formulating predictions of stress corrosion cracking life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Hattori, Shigeo; Shindo, Takenori; Kuniya, Jiro

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for formulating predictions to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) potential of each light-water reactor component, where an index is introduced as a life index or F index. The index denotes the SCC time ratio of a given SCC system to be evaluated against a reference SCC system. The life index is expressed by the products of several subdivided life indexes, which correspond to each SCC influencing factor. Each subdivided life index is constructed as a function containing the influencing factor variable, obtained by analyzing experimental SCC life data. The methodology was termed the subdivided factor method. Application of the life index to SCC life data and field data showed that it was effective for evaluating the SCC potential, i.e. the SCC life. Accordingly, the proposed methodology can potentially describe a phenomenon expressed by a function which consists of the variables of several influencing factors whether there are formulae which unite as a physical model or not. ((orig.))

  15. Stress corrosion cracking in superheater and reheater austenitic tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, R. Barry [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States); Bursik, Albert [PowerPlant Chemistry GmbH, Neulussheim (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    University 101 courses are typically designed to help incoming first-year undergraduate students to adjust to the university, develop a better understanding of the college environment, and acquire essential academic success skills. Why are we offering a special Boiler and HRSG Tube Failures PPChem 101? The answer is simple, yet very conclusive: - There is a lack of knowledge on the identification of tube failure mechanisms and for the implementation of adequate counteractions in many power plants, particularly at industrial power and steam generators. - There is a lack of knowledge to prevent repeat tube failures. The vast majority of BTF/HTF have been, and continue to be, repeat failures. It is hoped that the information about the failure mechanisms of BTF supplied in this course will help to put plant engineers and chemists on the right track. The major goal of this course is the avoidance of repeat BTF. This eights lesson is focused on Stress Corrosion Cracking in Superheater and Reheater Austenitic Tubing. (orig.)

  16. Stress-corrosion cracking of indium tin oxide coated polyethylene terephthalate for flexible optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierros, Konstantinos A.; Morris, Nicholas J.; Ramji, Karpagavalli; Cairns, Darran R.

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of transparent conductive layers of indium tin oxide (ITO), sputtered on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates, is an issue of paramount importance in flexible optoelectronic devices. These components, when used in flexible device stacks, can be in contact with acid containing pressure-sensitive adhesives or with conductive polymers doped in acids. Acids can corrode the brittle ITO layer, stress can cause cracking and delamination, and stress-corrosion cracking can cause more rapid failure than corrosion alone. The combined effect of an externally-applied mechanical stress to bend the device and the corrosive environment provided by the acid is investigated in this work. We show that acrylic acid which is contained in many pressure-sensitive adhesives can cause corrosion of ITO coatings on PET. We also investigate and report on the combined effect of external mechanical stress and corrosion on ITO-coated PET composite films. Also, it is shown that the combination of stress and corrosion by acrylic acid can cause ITO cracking to occur at stresses less than a quarter of those needed for failure with no corrosion. In addition, the time to failure, under ∼ 1% tensile strain can reduce the total time to failure by as much as a third

  17. Strain-induced corrosion cracking in ferritic components of BWR primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.-P.; Ritter, S.; Ineichen, U.; Tschanz, U.; Gerodetti, B.

    2003-04-01

    The present final report of the RIKORR project is a summary of a literature survey and of the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) and dynamic strain ageing (DSA) susceptibility of low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature (HT) water. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials has been investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The strain-induced corrosion cracking (SICC) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (CF) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels under simulated transient and stationary BWR/NWC conditions was characterized by slow rising load / low-frequency corrosion fatigue and constant load / periodical partial unloading / ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated HT water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 o C. Modern high-temperature water loops, on-line crack growth monitoring and fractographic analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to quantify the cracking response. (author)

  18. Fatigue-crack propagation in gamma-based titanium aluminide alloys at large and small crack sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzic, J.J.; Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-01-01

    Most evaluations of the fracture and fatigue-crack propagation properties of γ+α 2 titanium aluminide alloys to date have been performed using standard large-crack samples, e.g., compact-tension specimens containing crack sizes which are on the order of tens of millimeters, i.e., large compared to microstructural dimensions. However, these alloys have been targeted for applications, such as blades in gas-turbine engines, where relevant crack sizes are much smaller ( 5 mm) and (c ≅ 25--300 microm) cracks in a γ-TiAl based alloy, of composition Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr-0.2B (at.%), specifically for duplex (average grain size approximately17 microm) and refined lamellar (average colony size ≅150 microm) microstructures. It is found that, whereas the lamellar microstructure displays far superior fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth resistance in the presence of large cracks, in small-crack testing the duplex microstructure exhibits a better combination of properties. The reasons for such contrasting behavior are examined in terms of the intrinsic and extrinsic (i.e., crack bridging) contributions to cyclic crack advance

  19. Assessment of NDE Technologies for Detection and Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bond, Leonard J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2012-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in light water reactors (LWRs) has been a persistent form of degradation in the nuclear industry. Examples of SCC can be found for a range of materials in boiling and pressurized water reactor environments, including carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base stainless alloys. The evolution of SCC is often characterized by a long initiation stage followed by a phase of more rapid crack growth to failure. This provides a relatively short window of opportunity to detect the start of observable SCC, and it is conceivable that SCC could progress from initiation to failure between subsequent examinations when managed by applying periodic in-service inspection techniques. Implementation of advanced aging management paradigms in the current fleet of LWRs will require adaptation of existing measurement technologies and development of new technologies to perform on-line measurements during reactor operation to ensure timely detection of material degradation and to support the implementation of advanced diagnostics and prognostics. This paper considers several non-destructive examination (NDE) technologies with known sensitivity to detection of indicators for SCC initiation and/or propagation, and assesses these technologies with respect to their ability to detect and accurately characterize the significance of an SCC flaw. Potential strategies to improve SCC inspection or monitoring performance are offered to benefit management of SCC degradation in LWRs.

  20. Assessment of NDE technologies for detection and characterization of stress corrosion cracking in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.M.; Ramuhalli, P.; Toloczko, M.B.; Bond, L.J.; Montgomery, R.O.

    2012-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in light water reactors (LWRs) has been a persistent form of degradation in the nuclear industry. Examples of SCC can be found for a range of materials in boiling and pressurized water reactor environments, including carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base alloys. The evolution of SCC is often characterized by a long initiation stage followed by a phase of more rapid crack growth to failure. This provides a relatively short window of opportunity to detect the start of observable SCC, and it is conceivable that SCC could progress from initiation to failure between subsequent examinations when managed by applying periodic in-service inspection techniques. Implementation of advanced aging management paradigms in the current fleet of LWRs will require adaptation of existing measurement technologies and development of new technologies to perform on-line measurements during reactor operation to ensure timely detection of material degradation and to support the implementation of advanced diagnostics and prognostics. This paper considers several non-destructive examination (NDE) technologies with known sensitivity to detection of indicators for SCC initiation and/or propagation, and assesses these technologies with respect to their ability to detect and accurately characterize the significance of an SCC flaw. Potential strategies to improve SCC inspection or monitoring performance are offered to benefit management of SCC degradation in LWRs. (author)

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of the tubing materials for nuclear steam generators in an environment containing lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Uh Chul; Lee, Eun Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    Steam generator tube materials show a high susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in an environment containing lead species and some nuclear power plants currently have degradation problems associated with lead-induced stress corrosion cracking in a caustic solution. Effects of an applied potential on SCC is tested for middle-annealed Alloy 600 specimens since their corrosion potential can be changed when lead oxide coexists with other oxidizing species like copper oxide in the sludge. In addition, all the steam generator tubing materials used for nuclear power plants being operated and currently under construction in Korea are tested in a caustic solution with lead oxide. (author)

  2. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Zheng, W. [Materials Technology Laboratory, NRCan, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Guzonas, D.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500{sup o}C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  3. The design of an instrumented rebar for assessment of corrosion in cracked reinforced concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    rebar with 17 electronically isolated corrosion sensors. Instrumented and standard rebars were cast into concrete beams and bending cracks were induced and held open using steel frames. Epoxy impregnation was used to assess and compare cracks in the concrete around the instrumented and standard rebar...... between the steel and concrete. Cracked beams with cast-in instrumented and standard rebars were ponded with a 10\\% chloride solution and the open circuit corrosion potential (OCP) of the 17 sensors was measured for up to 62 days. Measurements from the individual sensors indicate when and where active...

  4. Stable propagation of interacting crack systems and modeling of damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Tabbara, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents general thermodynamic criteria for the stable states and stable path of structures with an interacting system of cracks. In combination with numerical finite element results for various cracked structure geometries, these criteria indicate that the crack response path of structures may exhibit bifurcations, after which the symmetry of the crack system is broken and some cracks grow preferentially. The problem is of interest for the prediction of ultimate loads, ductility and energy absorption capability of nuclear concrete structures as well as structures made of composites and ceramics

  5. Intrinsic fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys - The effect of gaseous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous environmental effects on intrinsic fatigue crack growth are significant for the Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090, peak aged. For both moderate Delta K-low R and low Delta K-high R regimes, crack growth rates decrease according to the environment order: purified water vapor, moist air, helium and oxygen. Gaseous environmental effects are pronounced near threshold and are not closure dominated. Here, embrittlement by low levels of H2O (ppm) supports hydrogen embrittlement and suggests that molecular transport controlled cracking, established for high Delta K-low R, is modified near threshold. Localized crack tip reaction sites or high R crack opening shape may enable the strong, environmental effect at low levels of Delta K. Similar crack growth in He and O2 eliminates the contribution of surface films to fatigue damage in alloy 2090. While 2090 and 7075 exhibit similar environmental trends, the Al-Li-Cu alloy is more resistant to intrinsic corrosion fatigue crack growth.

  6. Diffraction-based study of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul K.

    The crack initiation sites and microstructure-sensitive growth of small fatigue cracks are experimentally characterized in two precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys, 7075-T651 and 7050-T7451, stressed in ambient temperature moist-air (warm-humid) and -50°C dry N2 (cold-dry) environmental conditions. Backscattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the fracture surfaces showed that Fe-Cu rich constituent particle clusters are the most common initiation sites within both alloys stressed in either environment. The crack growth within each alloy, on average, was observed to be slowed in the cold-dry environment than in the warm-humid environment, but only at longer crack lengths. Although no overwhelming effects of grain boundaries and grain orientations on small-crack growth were observed, crack growth data showed local fluctuations within individual grains. These observations are understood as crack propagation through the underlying substructure at the crack surface and frequent interaction with low/high-angle grain and subgrain boundaries, during cyclic loading, and, are further attributed to periodic changes in crack propagation path and multiple occurrences of crack-branching observed in the current study. SEM-based stereology in combination with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) established fatigue crack surface crystallography within the region from ˜1 to 50 mum of crack initiating particle clusters. Fatigue crack facets were parallel to a wide variety of crystallographic planes, with pole orientations distributed broadly across the irreducible stereographic triangle between the {001} and {101}-poles within both warm-humid and cold-dry environments. The results indicate environmentally affected fatigue cracking in both cases, given the similarity between the observed morphology and crystallography with that of a variety of aerospace aluminum alloys cracked in the presence of moist-air. There was no evidence of

  7. An accurately controllable imitative stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose a method to simulate stress corrosion cracking. ► The method offers nondestructive signals similar to those of actual cracking. ► Visual and eddy current examinations validate the method. - Abstract: This study proposes a simple and cost-effective approach to fabricate an artificial flaw that is identical to stress corrosion cracking especially from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The key idea of the approach is to embed a partially-bonded region inside a material by bonding together surfaces that have grooves. The region is regarded as an area of uniform non-zero conductivity from an electromagnetic nondestructive point of view, and thus simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking. Since the grooves are introduced using electro-discharge machining, one can control the profile of the imitative stress corrosion cracking accurately. After numerical simulation to evaluate the spatial resolution of conventional eddy current testing, six specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel were fabricated on the basis of the results of the simulations. Visual and eddy current examinations were carried out to demonstrate that the artificial flaws well simulated the characteristics of actual stress corrosion cracking. Subsequent destructive test confirmed that the bonding did not change the depth profiles of the artificial flaw.

  8. The influence of creep properties on crack propagation in thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeker, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used to protect turbine blades from the high temperature of the process gas inside a turbine. They consist of a metallic bond coat and of a ceramic top coat with low thermal conductivity. During service, an additional oxide layer forms between bond coat and top coat that eventually causes failure. Finite element simulations show that the roughness of the interface between top and bond coat is crucial for determining the stress state. Lifetime models have been inferred that assume that cracks form in the peak positions at small oxide thickness and propagate when the oxide layer grows and the stress field shifts. A two-dimensional finite element model of crack propagation in the TBC layer is presented. Since the cracks propagate near a material interface and since plasticity may occur in the bond coat, standard tools of fracture mechanics for predicting the crack propagation direction are difficult to apply. This problem is circumvented in a very simple way by propagating short 'test cracks' in different directions and optimising to find the crack direction with the maximum energy release rate. It is shown that the energy release rate and the crack propagation direction are sensitive to the details of the stress state and especially to the creep properties of the materials. Implications for failure models are discussed.

  9. Response of reinforced concrete structures to macrocell corrosion of reinforcements. Part I: Before propagation of microcracks via an analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani, Keivan; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Response of RC structures to macrocell corrosion of a rebar is studied analytically. ► The problem is solved prior to the onset of microcrack propagation. ► Suitable Love's potential functions are used to study the steel-rust-concrete media. ► The role of crucial factors on the time of onset of concrete cracking is examined. ► The effect of vital factors on the maximum radial stress of concrete is explored. - Abstract: Assessment of the macrocell corrosion which deteriorates reinforced concrete (RC) structures have attracted the attention of many researchers during recent years. In this type of rebar corrosion, the reduction in cross-section of the rebar is significantly accelerated due to the large ratio of the cathode's area to the anode's area. In order to examine the problem, an analytical solution is proposed for prediction of the response of the RC structure from the time of steel depassivation to the stage just prior to the onset of microcrack propagation. To this end, a circular cylindrical RC member under axisymmetric macrocell corrosion of the reinforcement is considered. Both cases of the symmetric and asymmetric rebar corrosion along the length of the anode zone are studied. According to the experimentally observed data, corrosion products are modeled as a thin layer with a nonlinear stress–strain relation. The exact expressions of the elastic fields associated with the steel, and concrete media are obtained using Love's potential function. By imposing the boundary conditions, the resulting set of nonlinear equations are solved in each time step by Newton's method. The effects of the key parameters which have dominating role in the time of the onset of concrete cracking and maximum radial stress field of the concrete have been examined.

  10. Design and fabrication of an apparatus to study stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscarlet, Carol

    1977-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first gives a large overview of tests methods of stress corrosion cracking: definition and generalities, stress corrosion cracking in the laboratory (test methods with imposed deformation, load or strain rate, theories of hydrogen embrittlement, of adsorption, of film breaking, and electrochemical theories), stress corrosion cracking in alkaline environment (in light water reactors, of austenitic stainless steels), and conventional tests on polycrystals and monocrystals of stainless steels in sodium hydroxide. The next parts address the core of this research, i.e. the design of an autoclave containing a tensile apparatus, the fabrication of this apparatus, the stress application device, the sample environment, pressurization, control and command, preliminary tests in a melt salt, and the first cracking tests [fr

  11. Review of current research and understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Concerns for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of reactor internals are increasing, especially for components that are not readily replaceable. Both laboratory and field data show that intergranular stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys can result from long term exposure to the high energy neutron and gamma radiation that exists in the core of light water reactors (LWR's). Radiation affects cracking susceptibility via changes in material micro-chemistry (radiation induced segregation, or RIS), water chemistry (radiolysis) and material properties/stress (e.g., radiation induced creep and hardening). Based on many common dependencies, e.g., to solution purity, corrosion potential, crevicing and stress, IASCC falls within the continuum of environmental cracking phenomenon in high temperature water

  12. Improvement of detection of stress corrosion cracks with ultrasonic phased array probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wustenberg, H.; Mohrle, W.; Wegner, W.; Schenk, G.; Erhard, A.

    1986-01-01

    Probes with linear arrays can be used for the detection of stress corrosion cracks especially if the variability of the sound field is used to change the skewing angle of angle beam probes. The phased array concept can be used to produce a variable skewing angle or a variable angle of incidence depending on the orientation of the linear array on the wedge. This helps to adapt the direction of the ultrasonic beam to probable crack orientations. It has been demonstrated with artificial reflectors as well as with corrosion cracks, that the detection of misoriented cracks can be improved by this approach. The experiences gained during the investigations are encouraging the application of phased array probes for stress corrosion phenomena close to the heat effected zone of welds. Probes with variable skewing angles may find some interesting applications on welds in tubular structures e.g., at off shore constructions and on some difficult geometries within the primary circuit of nuclear power plants

  13. Fatigue Crack Propagation Under Variable Amplitude Loading Analyses Based on Plastic Energy Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiane Maachou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity effects at the crack tip had been recognized as “motor” of crack propagation, the growth of cracks is related to the existence of a crack tip plastic zone, whose formation and intensification is accompanied by energy dissipation. In the actual state of knowledge fatigue crack propagation is modeled using crack closure concept. The fatigue crack growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable amplitude loading of the aluminum alloy 2024 T351 are analyzed using in terms energy parameters. In the case of VAL (variable amplitude loading tests, the evolution of the hysteretic energy dissipated per block is shown similar with that observed under constant amplitude loading. A linear relationship between the crack growth rate and the hysteretic energy dissipated per block is obtained at high growth rates. For lower growth rates values, the relationship between crack growth rate and hysteretic energy dissipated per block can represented by a power law. In this paper, an analysis of fatigue crack propagation under variable amplitude loading based on energetic approach is proposed.

  14. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  15. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program

  16. Rail Base Corrosion and Cracking Prevention: Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-09

    EWI was engaged by the Federal Railroad Administration to research rail treatments to prevent rail base corrosion in corrosive environments. A coating system was selected in Phase 1 and recommended for field trials. In Phase 2, four railroads sponsor...

  17. On the crack propagation analysis of rock like Brazilian disc specimens containing cracks under compressive line loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Haeri

    Full Text Available The pre-existing cracks in the brittle substances seem to be the main cause of their failure under various loading conditions. In this study, a simultaneous analytical, experimental and numerical analysis of crack propagation, cracks coalescence and failure process of brittle materials has been performed. Brazilian disc tests are being carried out to evaluate the cracks propagation paths in rock-like Brazilian disc specimens containing single and double cracks (using rock-like specimens which are specially prepared from Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC, fine sands and water in a rock mechanics laboratory. The failure load of the pre-cracked disc specimens are measured showing the decreasing effects of the cracks and their orientation on the final failure load. The same specimens are numerically simulated by a higher order indirect boundary element method known as displacement discontinuity method. These numerical results are compared with the existing analytical and experimental results proving the accuracy and validity of the proposed numerical method. The numerical and experimental results obtained from the tested specimens are in good agreement and demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  18. Inhibition of stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in 10% NaOH solutions with and with lead oxide at 315 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, D.H.; Kim, J.S.; Baek, J.S.; Kim, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Alloy 600 steam generator tube materials have experienced various degradations by corrosion such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the inner and outer diameter surface of tube, intergranular attack and pitting, and by mechanical damage such as fretting-wear and fatigue. These tube degradations not only increase the costs for tube inspection, maintenance and repair but also reduce the operation safety and the efficiency of plants. Therefore, the methodologies have been extensively developed to mitigate them. The addition of inhibitors to the coolant is a feasible method to mitigate tube degradations in operating plants. In this paper, a new inhibitor is proposed to mitigate the secondary side stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 tubes. The effect of inhibitors on the electrochemical behavior and the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy 600 was evaluated in 10% sodium hydroxide solution with and without lead oxide at 315 C. The specimens of a C-ring type for stress corrosion cracking test were polarized at 150 mV above the corrosion potential for 120 hours without and with inhibitors such as titanium oxide, titanium boride, cerium boride. The chemical compositions of the films formed on the crack tip in the C-ring specimens were analyzed using a scanning Auger electron spectroscopy. The cerium boride, the most effective inhibitors, was observed to decrease the crack propagation rate more than a factor of three compared with that obtained in pure 10% NaOH solution. Furthermore, no SCC was observed in lead contaminated 10% NaOH solution by the addition of the cerium boride. (authors)

  19. The influence of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur and nickel on the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihal, V.

    1985-01-01

    From the results of the stress corrosion cracking tests it is evident that austenitic alloys with a phosphorus content 0.01% causes a strong increase in stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloys with a nickel content in the range 33 to 38%. With a nickel content of approx. 35%, an increase of nitrogen concentration to approx. 0.15% also produces a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. A sulphur content up to 0.033% does not produce a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  20. Probabilistic aspects of fatigue crack propagation data for zirconium-2.5 % niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, B.J.S.; Reich, A.R.

    1976-11-01

    Fatigue crack propagation data for Zr-2.5 % Nb pressure tube material at 20 and 400 deg C are presented. The practical application of these data in terms of error analysis and extrapolation errors is discussed. (author)

  1. Effect of short-term overloads on crack propagation under creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushok, V.V.; Sobolev, N.D.; Zolotukhin, S.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetics of crack propagation after overload has been studied using plane samples of Kh18N10T steel. Tests of samples with a notch have been carried out in the air at 293 K. Observation of the crack growth has been carried out by the microscope and the method of electric potential difference. It is established that during overload besides crack tip blunting, decrease of creep rate of the material stregthened near it, that leads to crack retardation, decrease of plasticity and formation of microcracks in front of the tip of the main-line crack occurs. It is marked that, estimating serviceability of a member, it is necessary to take into account the decrease of crack propagation rate after short term overloads

  2. Prediction of the remaining lifetime of stainless steels under conditions of stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandler, M.; Vehovar, L.; Dolecek, V.; Rotnik, U.

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of the lifetime of metal structures and equipment under conditions of stress corrosion is very complicated because of the complexity of this process of degradation. Recently a new method, based on the so-called corrosion elongation curves, has been found, which can be used to predict the time to failure under these conditions. By upgrading of these curves (and thus obtaining Upgraded Corrosion Elongation Curves - UCEC's) it has been possible to obtain a precise definition of the time needed for the initiation of the corrosion crack, and for its stable growth. It is upon this basis that diagrams for the prediction of remaining lifetime (DPRL's) have been developed. DPRL's can also be used to predict the values of various critical parameters which have to be achieved if a stress corrosion crack is to occur. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  3. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloy 7000 series after two-step aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of one step-and a new (short two-step aging on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy 7000 series was investigated, using slow strain rate test and fracture mechanics method. Aging level in the tested alloy was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy and measurements of electrical resistivity. It was shown that the alloy after the new two-step aging is significantly more resistant to stress corrosion cracking. Values of tensile properties and fracture toughness are similar for both thermal states. Processes that take place at the crack tip have been considered. The effect of the testing solution temperature on the crack growth rate on the plateau was determined. Two values of the apparent activation energy were obtained. These values correspond to different processes that control crack growth rate on the plateau at higher and lower temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34028 i br. TR 34016

  4. Caustic stress corrosion cracking of Inconel-600, Incoloy-800, and Type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theus, G.J.

    1976-01-01

    High-temperature electrochemical tests have resulted in the stress corrosion cracking of Inconel-600 and Incoloy-800 (registered trademarks, International Nickel Company), and Type 304 stainless steel in caustic solutions. Results show that stress corrosion cracking of these alloys can be prevented or accelerated by varying their electrochemical potential. To a certain extent, the same effect can be achieved by altering the gas atmosphere above the test solution from a pure nitrogen cover gas to a mixture of 5 percent H 2 and 95 percent N 2 . The effect of the cover gas can then be negated by adjusting the specimen's electrochemical potential either to cause or to inhibit stress corrosion cracking. Some specifics of the test results reveal that in deoxygenated caustic solutions, Inconel-600 cracks intergranularly at mildly anodic potentials; Incoloy-800 cracks transgranularly at reduced potentials (at or near the open circuit potential) and intergranularly at highly oxidizing potentials; and cracking is mixed (transgranular/intergranular) for Type 304 stainless steel at or near the open circuit potential. The severity of cracking for both Inconel-600 and Incoloy-800 in deoxygenated caustic solutions is reduced by giving the materials a simulated post-weld heat treatment (1150 0 F for 18 h). Test results on Inconel-600 show that high-carbon (0.06 percent) material cracks less severely than low-carbon (0.02 percent) material, in both the simulated post-weld heat-treated condition and the mill-annealed condition

  5. Evaluation of stress corrosion cracking as a function of its resistance to eddy currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2009-01-01

    This study discusses the equivalent conductivity, the equivalent width, and the equivalent resistance of stress corrosion cracks from the viewpoint of eddy current testing. Four artificial stress corrosion cracks were prepared for this study, and their eddy current signals were gathered using two absolute pancake probes and two differential type plus point probes. Then their numerical models were evaluated using finite element simulations on the basis of the measured eddy current signals and their profiles revealed by destructive tests. The results of this study revealed that whereas the equivalent conductivity and the equivalent width depend on the exciting frequency utilized, the equivalent resistance of a crack has much less dependency, which agrees well with an earlier report. This study also revealed that the resistance of a crack depends on probe utilized. Larger probes tend to lead to smaller crack resistance. Pancake type probes tend to lead to larger crack resistance than plus point probes. Analyzing the results together with earlier reports indicates that cracks with a large equivalent conductivity tend to have large equivalent width, and supports the validity of assuming the minimum resistance of a stress corrosion crack whereas considering the conductivity and the width individually would not be viable.

  6. A theoretical evaluation of the oxygen concentration in a corrosion-fatigue crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.

    1981-01-01

    The oxygen concentration in a corrosion-fatigue crack has been evaluated theoretically by assuming that oxygen was consumed by cathodic reduction on the walls of the crack and mass transport occurred by diffusion and advection (forced convection), with the latter resulting from the sinusoidal variation of the displacement of the crack walls. By using parameters relevant to a compact tension specimen, the time-dependent distribution of the oxygen concentration in the crack was calculated as a function of ΔK (the range of the stress intensity factor), R-value (minimum load/maximum load), frequency, crack length, and electrode potential. The influence of advection was to significantly enhance the mass transport of oxygen in the crack compared with ''diffusion-only'' even at low frequencies and low ΔK. Regions in the crack were identified in which advection dominance or diffusion dominance of the mass transport of oxygen occurred

  7. Workshop on initiation of stress corrosion cracking under LWR conditions: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Cubicciotti, D.; Licina, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    A workshop titled ''Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking under LWR Conditions'' was held in Palo Alto, California on November 13, 1986, hosted by the Electric Power Research Institute. Participants were experts on the topic from nuclear steam supply and component manufacturers, public and private research laboratories, and university environments. Presentations included discussions on the definition of crack initiation, the effects of environmental and electrochemical variables on cracking susceptibility, and detection methods for the determination of crack initiation events and measurement of critical environmental and stress parameters. Examination of the questions related to crack initiation and its relative importance to the overall question of cracking of LWR materials from these perspectives provided inputs to EPRI project managers on the future direction of research efforts designed to prevent and control cracking. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately

  8. Crack propagation under conditions of low cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmann, D.

    1988-01-01

    A literature review is given of convenient concepts describing the mechanical behaviour of a cracked body under cyclic loading. Only the range of high growth rates is considered. However, caused by large scale yielding in this range, the application of linear elastic fracture mechanics is no longer possible. Mechanical parameters which control fatigue crack growth are a modified stress intensity factor, the J-integral, the crack tip opening displacement and a suitable strain amplitude. (orig.) With 20 figs [de

  9. Research on the mechanism of inhibition of stress corrosion cracking by water chemistry of nuclear reactor. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H10-004 (contact research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshio; Haruna, Takumi; Fujimoto, Shinji; Zhang, Shenghan

    2000-09-01

    We have developed a slow strain rate testing apparatus combined with a CCD camera system for researching stress corrosion cracking of the materials in high temperature and high pressure water, like nuclear reactor environment. The features of the tensile testing apparatus are the following; pressure up to 100 kg/cm 2 , temperature up to 300degC, and cross head speed down to 10 -5 mm/min. In addition, initiation and propagation of the multiple crack appearing on the material surface in the water at high pressure and high temperature can be clearly observed through a sapphire window penetrating an autoclave. Using the apparatus, we investigated the effects of temperature and species of anion, SO 4 2- and B 4 O 7 2- on the crack initiation and propagation of sensitized 304 stainless steel. The following were revealed: in the sulfate solutions, crack initiation time decreased with increase in temperature from 100 to 250degC, while crack initiation frequency showed maximum at 150degC. In the borate solutions, however, no crack was found on the gauge section of the specimen at any temperatures. This indicates the borate can suppress the initiation of cracks. The effect of anion on the crack initiation may be explained by hardness of anion based on the hard and soft acids and bases concept and the passive film model. (author)

  10. Effect of temperature upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Inconel 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1977-03-01

    The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were employed to characterize the effect of temperature upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of mill-annealed Inconel 625 in an air environment over the range 75 0 - 1200 0 F (24 0 - 649 0 C). In general, fatigue-crack growth rates increased with increasing test temperature. Two different specimen sizes were employed at each test temperature, and no effects of specimen size upon crack growth were noted

  11. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  12. Crack propagation under thermal cycling loading inducing a thermal gradient in the specimen thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.N.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to figure out the crack growth phenomenon by thermal fatigue induced by thermal gradient through thickness of specimen. Firstly, an experimental facility has been developed: a rectangular parallelepiped specimen is subjected to thermal cycling between 350 C and 100 C; the specimen is freed to expand and contract. Two semi-circular notches (0,1 mm depth and 4 mm length) have been machined on the surface of the specimen. A series of interrupted tests has been carried out to characterize and quantify the crack growth in depth and surface of the pre-existing crack. Next, a three-dimensional crack growth simulation has been implemented in ABAQUS. Automation using Python was used to simulate the propagation of a crack under thermal cycling, with re-meshing at crack front after each calculation step. No assumption has been taken on the crack front during the crack propagation. A comparison with test results showed very good agreement on the evolution of crack front shape and on the kinetics of propagation on the edge and the heart of pre-existing crack. An analytical approach was also developed based on the calculation of stress intensity factors (SIC). A two-dimensional approach was first introduced enabling us to better understand the influence of various thermal and geometric parameters. Finally, a three dimensional approach, with an elliptical assumption crack shape during the propagation, leading to a prediction of crack growth on the surface and in depth which is very similar to that obtained numerically, but with computational time much lower. (author)

  13. Crack propagation direction in a mixed mode geometry estimated via multi-parameter fracture criteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, L.; Veselý, V.; Seitl, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 89, AUG (2016), s. 99-107 ISSN 0142-1123. [International Conference on Characterisation of Crack Tip Fields /3./. Urbino, 20.04.2015-22.04.2015] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Near-crack-tip fields * Mixed mode * Crack propagation direction * Multi-parameter fracture criteria * Finite element analysis Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  14. Effect of Chamber Pressurization Rate on Combustion and Propagation of Solid Propellant Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei-Lan; Wei, Shen; Yuan, Shu-Shen

    2002-01-01

    area of the propellant grain satisfies the designed value. But cracks in propellant grain can be generated during manufacture, storage, handing and so on. The cracks can provide additional surface area for combustion. The additional combustion may significantly deviate the performance of the rocket motor from the designed conditions, even lead to explosive catastrophe. Therefore a thorough study on the combustion, propagation and fracture of solid propellant cracks must be conducted. This paper takes an isolated propellant crack as the object and studies the effect of chamber pressurization rate on the combustion, propagation and fracture of the crack by experiment and theoretical calculation. deformable, the burning inside a solid propellant crack is a coupling of solid mechanics and combustion dynamics. In this paper, a theoretical model describing the combustion, propagation and fracture of the crack was formulated and solved numerically. The interaction of structural deformation and combustion process was included in the theoretical model. The conservation equations for compressible fluid flow, the equation of state for perfect gas, the heat conducting equation for the solid-phase, constitutive equation for propellant, J-integral fracture criterion and so on are used in the model. The convective burning inside the crack and the propagation and fracture of the crack were numerically studied by solving the set of nonlinear, inhomogeneous gas-phase governing equations and solid-phase equations. On the other hand, the combustion experiments for propellant specimens with a precut crack were conducted by RTR system. Predicted results are in good agreement with experimental data, which validates the reasonableness of the theoretical model. Both theoretical and experimental results indicate that the chamber pressurization rate has strong effects on the convective burning in the crack, crack fracture initiation and fracture pattern.

  15. Estimation of stepwise crack propagation in ceramic laminates with strong interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Štegnerová, Kateřina; Hutař, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 34 (2015), s. 116-124 ISSN 1971-8993. [International Conference on Crack Paths /5./. Ferrara, 16.09.2015-18.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09347S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Ceramic laminates * Crack behaviour * Residual stresses * Strain energy density factor * Crack propagation direction Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics http://www.fracturae.com/index.php/fis/article/view/IGF-ESIS.34.12

  16. Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip

  17. Effect of temperature upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Hastelloy X-280

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1976-05-01

    The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were employed to characterize the effect of temperature upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Hastelloy X-280 in an air environment. Also included in this study are survey tests to determine the effects of thermal aging and stress ratio upon crack growth behavior in this alloy

  18. Effect of temperature upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Inconel X-750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1976-05-01

    The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were employed to characterize the effect of temperature upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of precipitation heat-treated Inconel X-750 in an air environment over the range 75-1200 0 F. In general, fatigue-crack growth rates increased with increasing test temperature

  19. Low temperature fatigue crack propagation in neutron irradiated Type 316 steel and weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.; Walls, J.D.; Gravenor, J.

    1981-02-01

    The fast cycling fatigue crack propagation characteristics of Type 316 steel and weld metal have been investigated at 380 0 C after irradiation to 1.72-1.92x10 20 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) and 2.03x10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) at the same temperature. With mill-annealed Type 316 steel, modest decreases in the rates of crack propagation were observed for both dose levels considered, whereas for cold-worked Type 316 steel irradiation to 2.03x10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) caused increases in the rate of crack propagation. For Type 316 weld metal, increases in the rate of crack propagation were observed for both dose levels considered. The diverse influences of irradiation upon fatigue crack propagation in these materials are explained by considering a simple continuum mechanics model of crack propagation together with the results of control tensile experiments made on similarly irradiated materials. (author)

  20. Crack Propagation Calculations for Optical Fibers under Static Bending and Tensile Loads Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxia; Cui, Yuxuan; Gong, Wenjun

    2017-01-01

    Static fatigue behavior is the main failure mode of optical fibers applied in sensors. In this paper, a computational framework based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) is presented to calculate the crack propagation process and failure time of optical fibers subjected to static bending and tensile loads. For this purpose, the static fatigue crack propagation in the glass core of the optical fiber is studied. Combining a finite element method (FEM), we use the continuum damage mechanics for the glass core to calculate the crack propagation path and corresponding failure time. In addition, three factors including bending radius, tensile force and optical fiber diameter are investigated to find their impacts on the crack propagation process and failure time of the optical fiber under concerned situations. Finally, experiments are conducted and the results verify the correctness of the simulation calculation. It is believed that the proposed method could give a straightforward description of the crack propagation path in the inner glass core. Additionally, the predicted crack propagation time of the optical fiber with different factors can provide effective suggestions for improving the long-term usage of optical fibers. PMID:29140284

  1. Pipe stress intensity factors and coupled depressurization and dynamic crack propagation. 1976 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, A.F.; Kobayashi, A.S.; Love, W.J.

    1978-04-01

    This report contains the description of predictive models for the initiation and propagation of cracks in pipes and the numerical results obtained. The initiation of the crack was studied by evaluating stress intensity factors under static conditions for a series of representative flaws. Three-dimensional static stress intensity factors were determined for quarter-elliptical cracks at the corner of a hole in an infinite plate and at the corner of a bore in a rotating disk. Semi-elliptical cracks for plates in bending and in pressurized and thermally stressed hollow cylinders were also evaluated. The stress fields, in the absence of a crack, were used in the ''alternating technique'' to compute the stress intensity factors along the crack front. Parametric studies were made to assess the effects of crack thickness, the ratio of the major and minor axes of the ellipse and the thickness of the cylinders or plates. These parametric results may be used to predict critical flaw sizes for the initiation of the running crack. The initiation and propagation of axial through cracks in pressurized pipes was studied by using an elastic-plastic finite different shell code coupled with a one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code which computed the leakage through the crack opening and the depressurization of the fluid in the pipe. The effects of large deflections and different fluid pressure profiles were investigated. The results showed that the crack opening shape is dependent upon the fracture criterion used and upon the average pressure on the crack flaps, but not upon the specific pressure profile. The consideration of large deflections changed the opening size of the crack and through the coupling with the pipe pressures, strongly affected the crack tip speed. However, for equal crack lengths, there was little difference between calculations made for large and small deflection

  2. 3D characterization of crack propagation in building stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, N.; Martinez-Martinez, J.; Crosta, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    Opening of fractures can strongly modify mechanical characteristics of natural stones and thus significantly decrease stability of historical and modern buildings. It is commonly thought that fractures origin from pre-existing structures of the rocks, such as pores, veins, stylolythes (Meng and Pan, 2007; Yang et al., 2008). The aim of this study is to define relationships between crack formation and textural characteristics in massive carbonate lithologies and to follow the evolution of fractures with loading. Four well known Spanish building limestones and dolostones have been analysed: Amarillo Triana (AT): a yellow dolomitic marble, with fissures filled up by calcite and Fe oxides or hydroxides; Blanco Tranco (BT): a homogeneous white calcitic marble with pore clusters orientated parallel to metamorphic foliation; Crema Valencia (CV): a pinkish limestone (mudstone), characterized by abundant stilolythes, filled mainly by quartz (80%) and kaolin (11%); Rojo Cehegin (RC): a red fossiliferous limestone (packstone) with white veins, made up exclusively by calcite in crystals up to 300 micron. All lithotypes are characterized by homogeneous mineralogical composition (calcitic or dolomitic) and low porosity (<10%). Three cores 20 mm in diameter have been obtained for each lithotype. Uniaxial compressive tests have been carried out in order to induce sample fracturing by a series of successive steps with application of a progressive normal stress. Crack propagation has been checked after each stress level application by microCT-RX following Hg impregnation of the sample (in a Hg porosimeter). Combination of both tests (microCT-RX and Hg porosimeter) guarantees a better characterization of small defects and their progressive propagation inside low-porous rocks than by employing solely microCT-RX (Fusi et al., 2009). Due to the reduced dimensions of sample holder (dilatometers) in porosimeter, cores have been cut with a non standard h/d = 1.5. Several cycles of: a) Hg

  3. Fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1975-09-01

    The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were used to characterize the effect of several variables (temperature, environment, cyclic frequency, stress ratio, and heat-treatment variations) upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Inconel 718 base metal and weldments. Relevant crack growth data on this alloy from other laboratories is also presented. (33 fig, 39 references)

  4. Application of wire beam electrode technique to investigate initiation and propagation of rebar corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Wei; Dong, Ze Hua; Kong, De Jie; Guo, Xing Peng

    2013-01-01

    Multi-electrode technique named as wire beam electrode (WBE) was used to study pitting corrosion of rebar under concrete cover. When WBE embedded mortar sample was immersed in NaCl solution, uneven distributions of galvanic current and open circuit potential (OCP) on the WBE were observed due to the initiation of pitting corrosion. The following oxygen depletion in mortar facilitated the negative shift of the OCP and the smoothing of the current and potential distributions. Wetting–drying cycle experiments showed that corrosion products instead of oxygen in wet mortar specimen sustained the propagation of pitting corrosion due to Fe (III) taking part in cathodic depolarization during oxygen-deficient wet period, which was confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition, new pitting corrosion occurred mainly near the corrosion products, leading to preferentially horizontal propagation of rust layer on the WBE. A localized corrosion factor was further presented to quantify the localised corrosion based on galvanic current maps

  5. Application of wire beam electrode technique to investigate initiation and propagation of rebar corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wei; Dong, Ze Hua, E-mail: zehua.dong@gmail.com; Kong, De Jie; Guo, Xing Peng

    2013-06-15

    Multi-electrode technique named as wire beam electrode (WBE) was used to study pitting corrosion of rebar under concrete cover. When WBE embedded mortar sample was immersed in NaCl solution, uneven distributions of galvanic current and open circuit potential (OCP) on the WBE were observed due to the initiation of pitting corrosion. The following oxygen depletion in mortar facilitated the negative shift of the OCP and the smoothing of the current and potential distributions. Wetting–drying cycle experiments showed that corrosion products instead of oxygen in wet mortar specimen sustained the propagation of pitting corrosion due to Fe (III) taking part in cathodic depolarization during oxygen-deficient wet period, which was confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition, new pitting corrosion occurred mainly near the corrosion products, leading to preferentially horizontal propagation of rust layer on the WBE. A localized corrosion factor was further presented to quantify the localised corrosion based on galvanic current maps.

  6. Autogenous healing and reinforcement corrosion of water-penetrated separation cracks in reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramm, W.; Biscoping, M.

    1998-01-01

    Depending on the crack width, the thickness of the structure, the water pressure, and the degree of acid of the water, long-term investigations have been performed over a period of 2 years with respect to the autogenous healing and reinforcement corrosion of water-penetrated separation cracks in reinforced concrete by the University of Kaiserslautern, supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG). For the waters penetrating the cracks deionised water (neutral, pH=7.0), and boric acid treated deionised water with a pH-value of 6.1 and 5.2 (weakly acid waters) were used. A complete autogenous healing could not be observed. The water penetrating the cracks could hardly be measured with a pH-value of 7.0 at the end of the test. While naturally at the beginning of the test, no influence of the water-chemical degree of the acids could be determined, the existing flow-through quantities towards the end of the test period depended clearly on the crack width and the pH-value. With an increasing crack width and an increasing acid-degree larger flow-through quantities were measured. Depending on the pH-value and the crack width it was determined whether and to which extent corrosion developed at the reinforcing steel bars crossing the cracks. With a crack width of 0.1 mm, corrosion was not to be observed in any case. For the test specimens with a crack width of 0.2 mm a start of the corrosion was found depending on the pH-value. With an increasing width of the crack, an increasing corrosion development is to be expected for test specimens penetrated by acid water. For a crack width of 0.4 mm and a pH-value of 5.2, the highest corrosion development was to be observed, however, there were weakenings of the cross section not worth being mentioned even after a 2-year test period. (orig.)

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Crack propagation rate modelling for 316SS exposed to PWR-relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankeerberghen, M.; Weyns, G.; Gavrilov, S.; Martens, B.; Deconinck, J.

    2009-01-01

    The crack propagation rate of Type 316 stainless steel in boric acid-lithium hydroxide solutions under PWR-relevant conditions was modelled. A film rupture/dissolution/repassivation mechanism is assumed and extended to cold worked materials by including a stress-dependent bare metal dissolution current density. The chemical and electrochemical conditions within the crack are calculated by finite element calculations, an analytical expression is used for the crack-tip strain rate and the crack-tip stress is assumed equal to 2.5 times the yield stress (plane-strain). First the model was calibrated against a literature published data set. Afterwards, the influence of various variables - dissolved hydrogen, boric acid and lithium hydroxide content, stress intensity, crack length, temperature, flow rate - was studied. Finally, other published crack growth rate tests were modelled and the calculated crack growth rates were found to be in reasonable agreement with the reported ones

  9. Crack propagation in disordered materials: how to decipher fracture surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponson, L.

    For a half-century, engineers know how to describe and predict the propagation of a crack in a model elastic homogeneous medium. The case of real materials is much more complex. Indeed, we do not know how to relate their lifetime or their resistance to their microstructure. To achieve such a prediction, understanding the role of the microstructural disorder on the behavior of a crack is determinant. Fracture surfaces represent a promising field of investigation to address this question. From the study of various disordered materials, we propose a statistical description of their roughness and determine to which extent their properties are dependent of the material. We show that fracture surfaces display an anisotropic scale invariant geometry characterized by two universal exponents. Glass ceramics is then studied because its microstructure can be tuned in a controlled manner. Their fracture surfaces display the same general anisotropic properties but with surprisingly low exponents independent of the detail of the ceramics microstructure. This suggests the existence of a second universality class in failure problems. Using finally theoretical tools from out-of-equilibrium statistical physics and fracture mechanics, we relate the statistical properties of fracture surfaces with the mechanisms occurring at the microscopic scale during the failure of a material. In particular, we show that the first class of fracture surfaces results from a failure involving damage processes while the second one results from a perfectly brittle failure. Propagation de fissures dans les matériaux désordonnés : comment déchiffrer les surfaces de rupture. Depuis près d'un demi-siècle, les ingénieurs savent décrire et prévoir la propagation d'une fissure dans un milieu élastique homogène modèle. Le cas des matériaux réels est beaucoup plus complexe. En effet, on ne sait pas relier leur durée de vie ou leur résistance à leur microstructure. Passage obligé avant de telles

  10. Analysis of parameters effects on crack breathing and propagation in shaft of rotor dynamic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Serier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the design of experiment method is used to investigate and explain the effects of the rotor parameters on crack breathing and propagation in the shaft. Three factors are considered which have an influence on the behavior and the propagation of the crack: the rotational speed, the length of the rotor and the diameter of the shaft. The elaborated mathematical model allows determining the effects and interaction of speed, diameter and length on crack breathing mechanism.The model also determines the optimal values of the parameters to achieve high performance.

  11. Study of fatigue crack propagation in laminated metal composites alluminium 1100/alluminium 2024

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, R.I.

    1984-01-01

    A study has been made of fatigue crack propagation in laminated metal composites with different volume fraction of constituents. The composites were produced by hot rolling, combining 1100 and 2024 aluminum alloys in crack divider orientation. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of the composites and original alloys sheets have been evaluated. Paris type relationship, corresponding to stage II of fatigue crack propagation curves, has been determined by two different methods, wich have shown to be equivalent. A computer software in FORTRAN language was developed for all the mathematical manipulation of fatigue data including statistical analysis and graphics. (Author) [pt

  12. Tomographic visualization of stress corrosion cracks in tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.A.; Kruger, R.P.; Wecksung, G.W.

    1979-06-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine the possibility of detecting and sizing cracks in reactor cooling water tubes using tomographic techniques. Due to time and financial constraints, only one tomographic reconstruction using the best technique available was made. The results indicate that tomographic reconstructions can, in fact, detect cracks in the tubing and might possibly be capable of measuring the depth of the cracks. Limits of detectability and sensitivity have not been determined but should be investigated in any future work

  13. Measurements of delayed hydride cracking propagation rate in the radial direction of Zircaloy-2 cladding tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, T., E-mail: kubo@nfd.co.jp [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [M.O.X. Co., Ltd., 1828-520 Hirasu-cho, Mito, Ibaraki 311-0853 (Japan); Uchikoshi, H. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The delayed hydride cracking (DHC) velocity of Zircaloy-2 was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The velocity followed the Arrhenius law up to 270 Degree-Sign C. Activation energy was 49 kJ/mol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The threshold stress intensity factor for the DHC was from 4 to 6 MPa m{sup 1/2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in material strength accelerated the DHC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation and fracture of hydrides at a crack tip is responsible for the DHC. - Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) tests of Zircaloy-2 cladding tubes were performed in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to directly observe the crack propagation and measure the crack velocity in the radial direction of the tubes. Pre-cracks were produced at the outer surfaces of the tubes. Hydrogen contents of the tubes were from 90 ppm to 130 ppm and test temperatures were from 225 Degree-Sign C to 300 Degree-Sign C. The crack velocity followed the Arrhenius law at temperatures lower than about 270 Degree-Sign C with apparent activation energy of about 49 kJ/mol. The upper temperature limit for DHC, above which DHC did not occur, was about 280 Degree-Sign C. The threshold stress intensity factor for the initiation of the crack propagation, K{sub IH}, was from about 4 MPa m{sup 1/2} to 6 MPa m{sup 1/2}, almost independent of temperature. An increase in 0.2% offset yield stress of the material accelerated the crack velocity and slightly decreased K{sub IH}. Detailed observations of crack tip movement showed that cracks propagated in an intermittent fashion and the propagation gradually approached the steady state as the crack depth increased. The SEM observations also showed that hydrides were formed at a crack tip and a number of micro-cracks were found in the hydrides. It was presumed from these observations that the repetition of precipitation and fracture of hydrides at the crack tip would be

  14. Magnetic Carpet Probe for Large Area Instant Crack/Corrosion Detection and Health Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yushi; Ouyang Tianhe; Yang Xinle; Zhu Haiou

    2007-01-01

    Recently a new NDE tool, Magnet Carpet Probe (MCP), has been developed by Innovative Materials Testing Technologies, Inc. supported by FAA to meet the demands of large area crack/corrosion detection and health monitoring. MCP is a two-dimensional coil array built on a piece of very thin flexible printed circuit board. A two-dimensional electromagnetic scan is going on within the MCP placed on top of a metallic surface under inspection. Therefore, one can finish the inspection, without moving anything, and see the crack/corrosion identification image on the instrument screen in a few second. Recent test results show that it can detect 0.030 x 0.016'' EDM notches on a Titanium standard; 0.024'' ∼ 0.036: real cracks on titanium standards, as well as penetrate through a 0.040'' aluminum layer for corrosion detection

  15. Study on fracture and stress corrosion cracking behavior of casing sour service materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequera, C.; Gordon, H.

    2003-01-01

    Present work describes sulphide stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness tests performed to high strength sour service materials of T-95, C-100 and C-110 oil well tubular grades. P-110 was considered as a reference case, since it is one of the high strength materials included in specification 5CT of American Petroleum Institute, API. Sulphide stress corrosion cracking, impact and fracture toughness values obtained in the tests show that there is a correspondence among them. A decreasing classification order was established, namely C-100, T-95, C-110 and P-110. Special grades steels studied demonstrated a better behavior in the evaluated properties than the reference case material grade: P-110. Results obtained indicate that a higher sulphide stress corrosion cracking resistance is related to a higher toughness. The fracture toughness results evidence the hydrogen influence on reducing the toughness values. (author)

  16. Dislocations, the elastic energy momentum tensor and crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, Chi-wei

    1979-07-01

    Based upon dislocation theory, some stress intensity factors can be calculated for practical cases. The results obtained by this method have been found to agree fairly well with the results obtained by the conventional fracture mechanics. The elastic energy momentum tensor has been used to calculate the force acting on the crack tip. A discussion on the kinetics of migration of impurities to the crack tip was given. It seems that the crack tip sometimes may be considered as a singularity in an elastic field and the fundamental law of classical field theory is applicable on the problem in fracture of materials. (author)

  17. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  18. The Influence Of Modified Water Chemistries On Metal Oxide Films, Activity Build-Up And Stress Corrosion Cracking Of Structural Materials In Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1998-07-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of activated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  19. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  20. Effect of random microstructure on crack propagation in cortical bone tissue under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, X; Li, S; Adel-Wahab, A; Silberschmidt, V

    2013-01-01

    A fracture process in a cortical bone tissue depends on various factors, such as bone loss, heterogeneous microstructure, variation of its material properties and accumulation of microcracks. Therefore, it is crucial to comprehend and describe the effect of microstructure and material properties of the components of cortical bone on crack propagation in a dynamic loading regime. At the microscale level, osteonal bone demonstrates a random distribution of osteons imbedded in an interstitial matrix and surrounded by a thin layer known as cement line. Such a distribution of osteons can lead to localization of deformation processes. The global mechanical behavior of bone and the crack-propagation process are affected by such localization under external loads. Hence, the random distribution of microstructural features plays a key role in the fracture process of cortical bone. The purpose of this study is two-fold: firstly, to develop two-dimensional microstructured numerical models of cortical bone tissue in order to examine the interaction between the propagating crack and bone microstructure using an extended finite-element method under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions; secondly, to investigate the effect of randomly distributed microstructural constituents on the crack propagation processes and crack paths. The obtained results of numerical simulations showed the influence of random microstructure on the global response of bone tissue at macroscale and on the crack-propagation process for quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions

  1. Propagation of cracks and damage in non aging linear viscoelastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    Most of France's energy is nuclear. The reactor building comprises a internal and external containment. The internal containment is prestressed to limit the flow of leakage in the internal-external space. The prestress decreases during time by the creep of concrete. It may propagate the cracks by the accidental internal pressure. So we define two research problems: propagation of macro-cracks in viscoelastic structure; effective behavior of micro-cracked viscoelastic material. Firstly, we develop a Burger viscoelastic model of concrete with two approaches: numerical and analytical. Then we solve the problem of single cracks in developing thermodynamically the concept of energy release rate. In the third part we develop a viscoelastic model to study the effective behavior of micro-cracked materials in the case without propagation. The problem of propagation of microcracks is then studied by a numerical approach based on the 'representative pattern morphology'. These studies are finally applied to solve the problems of crack propagation and damage of containment under accidental internal pressure. (authors)

  2. SCC crack propagation behavior in 316L weld metal under high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakade, Katsuyuki; Hirasaki, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Shunichi; Takamori, Kenro; Kumagai, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Umeoka, Kuniyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 316L weld metal is of concern to the BWR plants. PLR pipes in commercial BWR plants have shown SCC in almost HAZ area in high temperature water, whereas, SCC has been arrested around fusion boundary for long time in the actual PLR pipe. The SCC behavior could be characterized in terms of dendrite direction, which was defined as the angle between dendrite growth direction and macro-SCC direction. In this study, the relationship between dendrite growth direction and macro-SCC direction was clearly showed on the fracture surface. The relative large difference of SCC susceptibility of 316L HAZ and weld metal was observed on the fracture surface. In the case of 0 degree, SCC has rapidly propagated into the weld metal parallel to the dendrite structure. In the case of more than 30 degree SCC direction, SCC was arrested around fusion area, and 60 degree SCC was drastically arrested around the fusion area. The large inclined dendrite structure for SCC is highly resistant to SCC. (author)

  3. Study of toughening mechanisms through the observations of crack propagation in nanostructured and layered metallic sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.Y.; Li, D.F.; Zhang, J.B.; Liu, F.; Liu, X.R.; Lu, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A nanostructured and layered steel exhibits high strength and large ductility. → The excellent combination originates from a multiple interlaminar cracking. → The initiation and propagation of cracks are controlled by three aspects. → The cracks are deflected by interface and arrested by compressive residual stress. → Finally, the cracks are blunted by the graded grain size distribution. - Abstract: A layered and nanostructured (LN) 304 SS sheet was produced by combination of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) with warm co-rolling. The microstructure of LN sheet is characterized by a periodic distribution of nanocrystalline layers and micron-grained layers with a graded transition of grain size. Tensile test results show that exceptional properties of high yield strength and large elongation to fracture are achieved. A multiple interlaminar cracking was observed by scanning electron microscopy, which is induced by repeated crack initiation and propagation. The toughening mechanisms of the LN sheet are proposed to be controlling the crack propagation path by several strategies. The main cracks initiating at interface defects are arrested by large compressive residual stress, deflected by weak interface bonding and blunted by the graded grain size distribution.

  4. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  5. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, R.B. [California Univ., Livermore, CA (United States). Lawrence Livermore National Lab

    2001-07-01

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of crack propagation of alloy 600 tube in high temperature water, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Hideo; Kawamura, H.; Kawamura, Kohji; Matsubara, Masaaki

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the analysis of stress intensity factors at cracks in alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Based on the results of the analysis, IGA/SCC tests were carried out to examine the effect of stress intensity and water quality on the crack propagation rate. The main test result are as follows: (1) Hoop stress was caused by the pressure difference between the internal and external surface of the steam generator tube. The calculated hoop stress was about 7 kg/mm 2 . In addition, the temperature difference between the internal and external surface caused thermal stress. The thermal stress was about 10 kg/mm 2 at the external surface and the one at the internal surface was about -10 kg/mm 2 . Total stress at the external and internal surface was 17 kg/mm 2 and -3 kg/mm 2 , respectively. (2) The stress intensity factor at the crack tip increased with increasing crack length. For a long crack, the stress intensity factor decreased with increasing crack number. However, for a short crack, the stress intensity factor decreased little with increasing crack number. (3) Under high stress-intensity conditions, i.e. 40∼50 kg·mm -3/2 , the IGA/SCC test showed that IGA/SCC propagated in AVT and AVT/boric-acid solution at 320degC and 350degC. However, the propagation rate was low. (author)

  7. Critique of the Ford-Andresen film rupture model for aqueous stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Ford-Andresen film rupture model for aqueous stress corrosion cracking has obtained a prominent position in the nuclear reactor industry. The model is said to have superior predictive capabilities because it is derived from a fundamental understanding of the film rupture-repassivation mechanism of crack advance. However, a critical review shows that there are conceptual and mathematical problems with the Ford-Andresen model development; there are inconsistencies among the stated and implied assumptions, the crack tip current density expression lacks the necessary dependence on crack tip strain rate and the fundamental proportionality that exists between crack tip strain rate and crack growth rate is overlooked and omitted from the model development. Consequently, the Ford-Andresen model must be considered neither phenomenologically nor fundamentally supported.

  8. The effect of a single tensile overload on stress corrosion cracking growth of stainless steel in a light water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue He; Li Zhijun; Lu Zhanpeng; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The affect of a single tensile overload on SCC growth rate is investigated. → A single tensile overload would produce a residual plastic strain in the SCC tip. → The residual plastic strain would decrease the plastic strain rate in the SCC tip. → A single tensile overload would cause crack growth rate retardation in the SCC tip. → SCC growth rate in the quasi-stationary crack tip is relatively lower. - Abstract: It has been found that a single tensile overload applied during constant load amplitude might cause crack growth rate retardation in various crack propagating experiments which include fatigue test and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test. To understand the affecting mechanism of a single tensile overload on SCC growth rate of stainless steel or nickel base alloy in light water reactor environment, based on elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM), the residual plastic strain in both tips of stationary and growing crack of contoured double cantilever beam (CDCB) specimen was simulated and analyzed in this study. The results of this investigation demonstrate that a residual plastic strain in the region immediately ahead of the crack tips will be produced when a single tensile overload is applied, and the residual plastic strain will decrease the plastic strain rate level in the growing crack tip, which will causes crack growth rate retardation in the tip of SCC.

  9. Experimental and numerical modelling of ductile crack propagation in large-scale shell structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Törnquist, R.

    2004-01-01

    plastic and controlled conditions. The test specimen can be deformed either in combined in-plane bending and extension or in pure extension. Experimental results are described for 5 and 10 mm thick aluminium and steel plates. By performing an inverse finite-element analysis of the experimental results......This paper presents a combined experimental-numerical procedure for development and calibration of macroscopic crack propagation criteria in large-scale shell structures. A novel experimental set-up is described in which a mode-I crack can be driven 400 mm through a 20(+) mm thick plate under fully...... for steel and aluminium plates, mainly as curves showing the critical element deformation versus the shell element size. These derived crack propagation criteria are then validated against a separate set of experiments considering centre crack specimens (CCS) which have a different crack-tip constraint...

  10. High temperature initiation and propagation of cracks in 12%Cr-steel turbine disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Foletti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the crack propagation in 12%Cr steel for turbine disks. Creep Crack Growth (CCG tests on CT specimens have been performed to define the proper fracture mechanics which describes the initiation of the crack propagation and the crack growth behaviour for the material at high temperature. Results have been used to study the occurrence of crack initiation on a turbine disk at the extreme working temperature and stress level experienced during service, and validate the use of C* integral in correlating creep growth rate on the disk component, in case C* is numerically calculated through FEM analysis or calculated by the use of reference stress concept.

  11. Comparative Study on Crack Initiation and Propagation of Glass under Thermal Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the fracture process based on finite element simulation. Both probabilistic and deterministic methods are employed to model crack initiation, and several commonly used criteria are utilized to predict crack growth. It is concluded that the criteria of maximum tensile stress, maximum normal stress, and maximum Mises stress, as well as the Coulomb-Mohr criterion are able to predict the initiation of the first crack. The mixed-mode criteria based on the stress intensity factor (SIF, energy release rate, and the maximum principal stress, as well as the SIF-based maximum circumferential stress criterion are suitable to predict the crack propagation.

  12. Shear crack formation and propagation in fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms controlling crack formation, propagation and failure of FRCC under shear loading is currently limited. This paper presents a study that utilized photogrammetry to monitor the shear deformations of two FRCC materials and ordinary concrete (OC). Multiple shear cracks...... and strain hardening of both FRCC materials was observed under shear loading. The influence of fibers, fiber type, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polypropylene (PP) fibers, and shear crack angle were investigated. Based upon photogrammetric results, fundamental descriptions of shear crack opening...

  13. Shear crack formation and propagation in fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms controlling crack formation, propagation and failure of FRCC under shear loading is currently limited. This paper presents a study that utilized photogrammetry to monitor the shear deformations of two FRCC materials and ordinary concrete (OC). Multiple shear cracks...... and strain hardening of both FRCC materials was observed under shear loading. The influence of fibers, fiber type, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polypropylene (PP) fibers, and shear crack angle were investigated. Based upon photogrammetric results, fundamental descriptions of shear crack opening...

  14. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel in cracked concrete – Part I: Experimental studies under accelerated and natural marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otieno, M.; Beushausen, H.; Alexander, M.

    2016-01-01

    Parallel corrosion experiments were carried out for 2¼ years by exposing one half of 210 beam specimens (120 × 130 × 375 mm long) to accelerated laboratory corrosion (cyclic wetting and drying) while the other half underwent natural corrosion in a marine tidal zone. Experimental variables were crack width w cr (0, incipient crack, 0.4, 0.7 mm), cover c (20, 40 mm), binder type (PC, PC/GGBS, PC/FA) and w/b ratio (0.40, 0.55). Results show that corrosion rate (i corr ) was affected by the experimental variables in the following manner: i corr increased with increase in crack width, and decreased with increase in concrete quality and cover depth. The results also show that the corrosion performance of concretes in the field under natural corrosion cannot be inferred from its performance in the laboratory under accelerated corrosion. Other factors such as corrosion process should be taken into account.

  15. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Krenk, Steen; Brincker, Rune

    1995-01-01

    An analytical model for load-displacement curves of concrete beams is presented. The load-displacement curve is obtained by combining two simple models. The fracture is modeled by a fictitious crack in an elastic layer around the midsection of the beam. Outside the elastic layer the deformations...... are modeled by beam theory. The state of stress in the elastic layer is assumed to depend bilinearly on local elongation corresponding to a linear softening relation for the fictitious crack. Results from the analytical model are compared with results from a more detailed model based on numerical methods...... for different beam sizes. The analytical model is shown to be in agreement with the numerical results if the thickness of the elastic layer is taken as half the beam depth. It is shown that the point on the load-displacement curve where the fictitious crack starts to develop and the point where the real crack...

  16. Effect of Local Strain Distribution of Cold-Rolled Alloy 690 on Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S.-W.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of cold-rolled Alloy 690 in the primary water of a pressurized water reactor. Compared with Alloy 600, which shows typical intergranular cracking along high angle grain boundaries, the cold-rolled Alloy 690, with its heterogeneous microstructure, revealed an abnormal crack growth behavior in mixed mode, that is, in transgranular cracking near a banded region, and in intergranular cracking in a matrix region. From local strain distribution analysis based on local mis-orientation, measured along the crack path using the electron back scattered diffraction method, it was suggested that the abnormal behavior was attributable to a heterogeneity of local strain distribution. In the cold-rolled Alloy 690, the stress corrosion crack grew through a highly strained area formed by a prior cold-rolling process in a direction perpendicular to the maximum principal stress applied during a subsequent stress corrosion cracking test.

  17. Acoustic emission reviling and danger level evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muravin, Gregory; Muravin, Boris; Lezvinsky, Luidmila

    2000-01-01

    Breakdowns and catastrophic damage occurring during the operation of nuclear power stations pipelines cause substantial economic and social loss annually throughout the world. Stress corrosion, vibration, fatigue, erosion, water shock, dynamic load, construction defects/errors are the main causes of pipes failures. For these reasons and in view of the age of nuclear power station pipes, there is an increased interest in finding means to prevent potential pipe failures. Nevertheless, statistical data of pipe failures continues to show significant numbers of accidents mainly due to stress corrosion cracking (about 65-80% of total number). To this end, a complex of investigations was carried out for the reliable AE diagnosis of pipes undergone stress corrosion cracking. These include: finding AE indications (fingerprints) of flaws developing in the metal in original condition as well as in metal subjected to stress corrosion; preparing AE criteria for evaluating the danger level of defects. (author)

  18. Elastic and plastic strains and the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccaro, F.P.; Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.

    1979-08-01

    The influence of elastic (stress) and plastic (cold work) strains on the stress corrosion cracking of a transformable austenitic stainless steel was studied in several aqueous chloride environments. Initial polarization behavior was active for all deformation conditions as well as for the annealed state. Visual observation, potential-time, and current-time curves indicated the development of a pseudo-passive (flawed) film leading to localized corrosion, occluded cells and SCC. SCC did not initiate during active corrosion regardless of the state of strain unless severe low temperature deformation produced a high percentage of martensite. Both elastic and plastic deformation increased the sensitivity to SCC when examined on the basis of percent yield strength. The corrosion potential, the critical cracking potential, and the potential at which the current changes from anodic to cathodic were essentially unaffected by deformation. It is apparent that the basic electrochemical parameters are independent of the bulk properties of the alloy and totally controlled by surface phenomena

  19. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  20. On the thermally activated crack propagation in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devezas, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth was studied in the temperature 25-100 0 C in two commercial aluminas containing different amounts of a glassy phase. The experimental method employed was that of double torsion under constant load, using a device specially built to carry out mechanical tests at constant compressive load and high temperatures. Activation enthalpies of subcritical crack growth were determined for the two materials. (Author) [pt

  1. Fatigue Crack Propagation Simulation in Plane Stress Constraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricardo, Luiz Carlos Hernandes; Spinelli, Dirceu

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using finite element method. This work presents a numerical determination of fatigue crack opening and closure stress intensity factors of a C(T) specimen. Two different standard variable spectrum loadings...... are utilized, Mini-Falstaff and Wisper. The effects in two-dimensional (2D) small scale yielding models of fatigue crack growth were studied considering plane stress constraint....

  2. Inhibition of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.F.

    1977-01-01

    The effectiveness of various inhibitors in mitigating stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel in hot aqueous environment was evaluated. The inhibitors studied were of three types: poly-oxy-anions, organic competitive absorbers, and simple cations; the corrosive medium was 4M NaCl acidified with H 2 SO 4 to ph of about 2.3. The following conclusions were reached: pH does not affect cracking kinetics in a sensitive way; cracking time is highly dependent on chloride concentrations; poly-oxy-anions do not perform well; organics offer some possibilities as inhibitors; cationic additives can have effects varying from trivial to total suppression of cracking--behavior is both cation and concentration dependent. 2 figures, 5 tables

  3. Estimation of stepwise crack propagation in ceramic laminates with strong interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Štegnerová

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last years many researchers put so much effort to design layered structures combining different materials in order to improve low fracture toughness and mechanical reliability of the ceramics. It has been proven, that an effective way is to create layered ceramics with strongly bonded interfaces. After the cooling process from the sintering temperature, due to the different coefficients of thermal expansion of individual constituents of the composite, significant internal residual stresses are developed within the layers. These stresses can change the crack behaviour. This results to the higher value of so-called apparent fracture toughness, i.e. higher resistance of the ceramic laminate to the crack propagation. The contribution deals with a description of the specific crack behaviour in the layered alumina-zirconia ceramic laminate. The main aim is to clarify crack behaviour in the compressive layer and provide computational tools for estimation of crack behaviour in the field of strong residual stresses. The crack propagation was investigated on the basis of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Fracture parameters were computed numerically and by author’s routines. Finite element models were developed in order to obtain a stress distribution in the laminate containing a crack and to simulate crack propagation. The sharp change of the crack propagation direction was estimated using Sih’s criterion based on the strain energy density factor. Estimated crack behaviour is qualitatively in a good agreement with experimental observations. Presented approach contributes to the better understanding of the toughening mechanism of ceramic laminates and can be advantageously used for design of new layered ceramic composites and for better prediction of their failure.

  4. Applicability assessment of plug weld to ITER vacuum vessel by crack propagation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, Junji; Nakahira, Masataka; Takeda, Nobukazu; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Sago, Hiromi; Onozuka, Masanori

    2006-03-01

    In order to improve the fabricability of the vacuum vessel (VV) of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), applicability of plug weld between VV outer shell and stiffening ribs/blanket support housings has been assessed using crack propagation analysis for the plug weld. The ITER VV is a double-wall structure of inner and outer shells with ribs and housings between the shells. For the fabrication of VV, ribs and housings are welded to outer shell after welding to inner shell. A lot of weld grooves should be adjusted for welding outer shell. The plug weld is that outer shells with slit at the weld region are set on ribs/housings then outer shells are welded to them by filling the slits with weld metal. The plug weld can allow larger tolerance of weld groove gap than ordinary butt weld. However, un-welded lengths parallel to outer sell surface remain in the plug weld region. It is necessary to evaluate the allowable un-welded length to apply the plug weld to ITER VV fabrication. For the assessment, the allowable un-welded lengths have been calculated by crack propagation analyses for load conditions, conservatively assuming the un-welded region is a crack. In the analyses, firstly allowable crack lengths are calculated from the stresses of the weld region. Then assuming initial crack length, crack propagation is calculated during operation period. Allowable initial crack lengths are determined on the condition that the propagated cracks should not exceed the allowable crack lengths. The analyses have been carried out for typical inboard straight region and inboard upper curved region with the maximum housing stress. The allowable initial cracks of ribs are estimated to be 8.8mm and 38mm for the rib and the housing, respectively, considering inspection error of 4.4mm. Plug weld between outer shell and ribs/housings could be applicable. (author)

  5. A contribution to the question of stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel cladding in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, I.; Mrkous, P.

    1977-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the basic types of corrosion damage (uniform corrosion, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion) and their influence on operational safety are estimated. Corrosion cracking is analyzed of austenitic stainless steel cladding taking into account the adverse impact of coolant and stress (both operational and residual) in a light water reactor primary circuit. Experimental data are given of residual stresses in the stainless steel clad material, as well as their magnitude and distribution after cladding and heat treatment. (author)

  6. Study of scratch-induced stress corrosion cracking for steam generator tubes and scratch control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, F.; Xu, X.; Liu, X.; Wang, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces field cases for scratch-induced stress corrosion cracking (SISCC) of steam generator tubes in PWR and current studies in laboratories. According to analysis result of broke tubes, scratches caused intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) with outburst. The effect of microstructure for nickel-base alloys, residual stresses caused by scratching process and water chemistry on SISCC and possible mechanism of SISCC are discussed. The result shows that scratch-induced microstructure evolution contributes to SISCC significantly. The causes of scratches during steam generator tubing manufacturing and installation process are stated and improved reliability with scratch control is highlighted for steam generator tubes in newly built nuclear power plants. (author)

  7. Study of scratch-induced stress corrosion cracking for steam generator tubes and scratch control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, F.; Xu, X.; Liu, X. [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute, Shanghai (China); Wang, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Research, Shenyang (China)

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces field cases for scratch-induced stress corrosion cracking (SISCC) of steam generator tubes in PWR and current studies in laboratories. According to analysis result of broke tubes, scratches caused intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) with outburst. The effect of microstructure for nickel-base alloys, residual stresses caused by scratching process and water chemistry on SISCC and possible mechanism of SISCC are discussed. The result shows that scratch-induced microstructure evolution contributes to SISCC significantly. The causes of scratches during steam generator tubing manufacturing and installation process are stated and improved reliability with scratch control is highlighted for steam generator tubes in newly built nuclear power plants. (author)

  8. Fabrication of imitative stress corrosion cracking specimens suitable for electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations using solid state bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes a method to fabricate artificial defects that is almost identical to stress corrosion cracking from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The key idea is to realize a region having electrical resistance embedded inside a conductive materials using solid state bonding. A rough region is introduced into the surface of the materials so that the region is partially bonded to realize electrical resistance. The validity of the method is demonstrated using type 316L austenitic stainless steels. Eddy current tests and subsequent destructive tests confirm that signals due to the fabricated specimens are very similar to those due to stress corrosion cracks. (author)

  9. Prediction of three-dimensional crack propagation paths taking high cycle fatigue into account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Dhondt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine components are usually subject to complex loading patterns such as mixed-mode Low Cycle Fatigue Loading due to maneuvering. In practice, this LCF Loading has to be superimposed by High Cyclic Fatigue Loading caused by vibrations. The changes brought along by HCF are twofold: first, the vibrational cycles which are superposed on the LCF mission increase the maximum loading of the mission and may alter the principal stress planes. Secondly, the HCF cycles themselves have to be evaluated on their own, assuring that no crack propagation occurs. Indeed, the vibrational frequency is usually so high that propagation leads to immediate failure. In the present paper it is explained how these two effects can be taken care of in a standard LCF crack propagation procedure. The method is illustrated by applying the Finite Element based crack propagation software CRACKTRACER3D on an engine blade.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of steam generator tubing on secondary side in restricted flow areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulger, M.; Lucan, D.; Radulescu, M.; Velciu, L.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear steam generator tubes operate in high temperature water and on the secondary side in restricted flow areas many nonvolatile impurities accidentally introduced into circuit tend to concentrate. The concentration process leads to the formation of highly aggressive alkaline or acid solutions in crevices, and these solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stressed tube materials. Even though alloy 800 has shown to be highly resistant to general corrosion in high temperature water, it has been found that the steam generator tubes may crack during service from the primary and/or secondary side. Stress corrosion cracking is still a serious problem occurring on outside tubes in operating steam generators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the environmental factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking of steam generators tubing. The main test method was the exposure for 1000 hours into static autoclaves of plastically stressed C-rings of Incoloy 800 in caustic solutions (10% NaOH) and acidic chloride solutions because such environments may sometimes form accidentally in crevices on secondary side of tubes. Because the kinetics of corrosion of metals is indicated by anodic polarization curves, in this study, some stressed specimens were anodically polarized in caustic solutions in electrochemical cell, and other in chloride acidic solutions. The results presented as micrographs, potentiokinetic curves, and electrochemical parameters have been compared to establish the SCC behavior of Incoloy 800 in such concentrated environments. (authors)

  11. The manufacturing of Stress Corrosion Crack (SCC) on Inconel 600 tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Seunggi; Bak, Jaewoong; Kim, Seongcheol; Lee, Sangyul; Lee, Boyoung

    2014-01-01

    The Stress Corrosion Crack (SCC), taken a center stage in recently accidents about nuclear power plants, is one of the environmentally induced cracking occurred when a metallic structure under tensile stress is exposed to corrosive environment. In this study, the SCC was manufactured in the simulated corrosive environmental conditions on Inconel 600 tube that widely applied in the nuclear power plants. The tensile stress which is one of the main factors to induce SCC was given by GTAW welding in the inner surface of the specimen. The corrosive environment was simulated by using the sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium sulfide (Na 2 S). In this study, SCC was manufactured in the simulated corrosive environmental conditions with Inconel 600 tube that widely applied in the nuclear power plants. 1) The SCC was manufactured on Inconel 600 tube in simulated operational environments of nuclear power plants. In the experiment, the welding heat input which is enough to induce the cracking generated the SCC near the welding bead. So, in order to prevent the SCC, the residual stress on structure should be relaxed. 2) The branch-type cracking was detected

  12. Effect of heat treatment conditions on stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy X-750 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Onimura, Kichiro; Sakamoto, Naruo; Sasaguri, Nobuya; Susukida, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hidenori.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance of the Alloy X-750 in high temperature and high purity water, the authors investigated the influence of heat treatment condition on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. This paper describes results of the stress corrosion cracking test and some discussion on the mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water. The following results were obtained. (1) The stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water remarkably depended upon the heat treatment condition. The materials solution heat treated and aged within temperature ranges from 1065 to 1100 0 C and from 704 to 732 0 C, respectively, have a good resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. Especially, water cooling after the solution heat treatment gives an excellent resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. (2) Any correlations were not observed between the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water and grain boundary chromium depleted zones, precipitate free zones and the grain boundary segregation of impurity elements and so on. It appears that there are good correlations between the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy in the environment and the kinds, morphology and coherency of precipitates along the grain boundaries. (author)

  13. Sizing of intergranular stress corrosion cracking using low frequency ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, M.D.; Avioli, M.J.; Rose, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Based upon the work thus far accomplished on low frequency sizing, the following conclusions can be drawn: the potential of low frequency ultrasound for the sizing of IGSCC seams encouraging as demonstrated in this work. If minimal walking is expected, larger values of crack height/wavelength ratios should not affect the reliability of estimates; notch data points out the validity of signal amplitude for sizing. With care in frequency consideration, the technique can be extended to cracks; when wavelength is greater than flaw size, importance of orientation and reflector shape diminishes although less so for deeper cracks; when beam profile is larger than the defect size, echo amplitude is proportional to defect area when using shear wave probes and corner reflectors; other factors, in addition to crack size, affect signal amplitude. Reference data to compensate for depth and material (HAZ) is a must; additional crack samples should be studied in order to further develop and characterize the use of low frequency ultrasonics

  14. A Continuum-Atomistic Analysis of Transgranular Crack Propagation in Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.

    2009-01-01

    A concurrent multiscale modeling methodology that embeds a molecular dynamics (MD) region within a finite element (FEM) domain is used to study plastic processes at a crack tip in a single crystal of aluminum. The case of mode I loading is studied. A transition from deformation twinning to full dislocation emission from the crack tip is found when the crack plane is rotated around the [111] crystallographic axis. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [112] twinning direction, the crack propagates through a twinning mechanism. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [011] slip direction, the crack propagates through the emission of full dislocations. In intermediate orientations, a transition from full dislocation emission to twinning is found to occur with an increase in the stress intensity at the crack tip. This finding confirms the suggestion that the very high strain rates, inherently present in MD simulations, which produce higher stress intensities at the crack tip, over-predict the tendency for deformation twinning compared to experiments. The present study, therefore, aims to develop a more realistic and accurate predictive modeling of fracture processes.

  15. Characterization of acoustic emission signals generated by water flow through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A program is under way at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop an independent capability to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. The program will establish whether meaningful quantitative data on flow rates and leak location can be obtained from acoustic signatures of leaks due to intergranular stress corrosion cracks (TGSCCs) and fatigue cracks, and whether these can be distinguished from other types of leaks. 5 refs., 3 figs

  16. Studies of the corrosion and cracking behavior of steels in high temperature water by electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.F.; Bullerwell, J.; Steward, F.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical methods were used to study the corrosion and cracking behavior of five Fe-Cr alloy steels and 304L stainless steel in high temperature water. A layer of magnetite film forms on the metal surface, which decreases the corrosion rate in high temperature water. Passivity can be achieved on A-106 B carbon steel with a small content of chromium, which cannot be passivated at room temperature. The formation rate and the stability of the passive film (magnetite film) increased with increasing Cr-content in the steels. A mechanistic model was developed to simulate the corrosion and cracking processes of steels in high temperature water. The crack growth rate on steels was calculated from the maximum current of the repassivation current curves according to the slip-oxidation model. The highest crack growth rate was found for 304L stainless steel in high temperature water. Of the four Fe-Cr alloys, the crack growth rate was lower on 0.236% Cr- and 0.33% Cr-steels than on 0.406% Cr-steel and 2.5% Cr-1% Mo steel. The crack growth rate on 0.33% Cr-steel was the smallest over the tested potential range. A higher temperature of the electrolyte led to a higher rate of electrochemical dissolution of steel and a higher susceptibility of steel to cracking, as shown by the positive increase of the electrochemical potential. An increase in Cr-content in the steel is predicted to reduce the corrosion rate of steel at high temperatures. However, this increase in Cr-content is predicted not to reduce the susceptibility of steel to cracking at high temperatures. (author)

  17. Theoretical and experimental study of stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steel in near neutral pH environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B.; Fan, J.; Chudnovsky, A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Gogotsi, Y. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Teitsma, A. [Gas Technology Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Field observations indicate that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a near neutral pH environment starts with microcracks growing from corrosion pits on the external surface of the buried pipe. A complex phenomenon, SCC combines stochasticity and determinism resulting in the evolution of a SCC colony. The authors proposed a statistical model which generates a random field of corrosion pits and crack initiation at randomly selected pits. Using the framework of the Crack Layer theory, a thermodynamic model of individual stress corrosion growth was also developed recently. Relations between the crack growth, hydrogen diffusion and corrosion rates on one hand and corresponding thermodynamic forces on the other were used to develop the mathematical realization of the stress corrosion crack growth model. Additionally, there is a quick overview of the experimental program for determination of the kinetic coefficients employed in the crack growth equations. A simulation of SCC colony evolution, including a stage of the large-scale crack interaction is provided by applying the individual crack growth law to random configuration of multiple cracks. Finally, the FRANC2D Finite Element Methods resulted in a computer simulation of multi-crack cluster formation within the colony. 14 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Influence of bovine serum albumin in Hanks' solution on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of a magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Banerjee, Parama Chakraborty; Easton, Christopher D; Singh Raman, R K

    2017-11-01

    It is essential for any temporary implant to possess adequate strength to maintain their mechanical integrity under the synergistic effects of mechanical loading characteristics of human body and the corrosive physiological environment. Such synergistic effects can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to Hanks' solution in corrosion and SCC susceptibility of AZ91D magnesium alloy. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results indicated that the addition of BSA increased corrosion resistance of the alloy during the first 48h of immersion and then decreased it rapidly. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicated adsorption of BSA on the alloy surface during initial hours of immersion. However, with the increasing immersion time, BSA chelated with the corrosion products causing disruption of the protective film; thus, it accelerated the corrosion of the alloy. Both the mechanical data and fractographic evidence have confirmed susceptibility of the alloy to SCC. However, in the presence of BSA, the alloy suffered greater SCC which was attributed to its increased susceptibility towards localized corrosion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. In-vitro characterization of stress corrosion cracking of aluminium-free magnesium alloys for temporary bio-implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Singh Raman, R K; Hofstetter, Joelle; Uggowitzer, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The complex interaction between physiological stresses and corrosive human body fluid may cause premature failure of metallic biomaterials due to the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking. In this study, the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of biodegradable and aluminium-free magnesium alloys ZX50, WZ21 and WE43 was investigated by slow strain rate tensile testing in a simulated human body fluid. Slow strain rate tensile testing results indicated that each alloy was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, and this was confirmed by fractographic features of transgranular and/or intergranular cracking. However, the variation in alloy susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking is explained on the basis of their electrochemical and microstructural characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D multiscale crack propagation using the XFEM applied to a gas turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Matthias; Rogge, Timo; Loehnert, Stefan; Wriggers, Peter; Rolfes, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a new multiscale technique to investigate advancing cracks in three dimensional space. This fully adaptive multiscale technique is designed to take into account cracks of different length scales efficiently, by enabling fine scale domains locally in regions of interest, i.e. where stress concentrations and high stress gradients occur. Due to crack propagation, these regions change during the simulation process. Cracks are modeled using the extended finite element method, such that an accurate and powerful numerical tool is achieved. Restricting ourselves to linear elastic fracture mechanics, the -integral yields an accurate solution of the stress intensity factors, and with the criterion of maximum hoop stress, a precise direction of growth. If necessary, the on the finest scale computed crack surface is finally transferred to the corresponding scale. In a final step, the model is applied to a quadrature point of a gas turbine blade, to compute crack growth on the microscale of a real structure.

  1. On-line monitoring of crack propagation by the acoustic emission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Park, D.Y.; Choi, S.P.; Kim, H.J.; Moon, Y.S.; Shon, G.H.; Kim, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking experiment was carried out to find out the acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of Al 5052 and SCM-4 steel in 3.5% NaCl-H 2 O solution. In advance of the above test, some mechanical properties of these materials were investigated through the tensile test with standard round tensile specimens and WOL specimens which were originaly designed for the stress corrosion cracking experiment. About 5mm fatigue crack was given to WOL specimen by MTS system. We measure the relationship between stress intensity factor and AE count rate under various temperature of the solution such as 15degC, 33 degC, 45 degC and compared their AE characteristics of two materials. While AE count rate of Al 5052 is even higher than that of SCM-4 steel by one order or two, velocity of corrosion crack is much slow. The AE generation rate of SCM-4 steel is discrete and about 0.25 mm corrosion growth corresponds to 10 3 counts. Also location of defects in linear specimen was studied. (Author)

  2. Behavior of Fatigue Crack Tip Opening in Air and Corrosive Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Morihito; Toeda, Kazunori

    In the study, a formula for predicting fatigue crack tip opening displacement is deduced firstly. And then, due to comparing actual crack growth rate with the deduced formula, the crack tip configuration factor is defined to figure out the crack tip opening configuration that is useful to clarify the behavior of fatigue crack tip formation apparently. Applying the concept, the crack growth of 7/3 brass and 6/4 brass is predicted from the formula, by replacing material properties such as plastic flow resistance, Young modulus, the Poisson ratio, and fatigue toughness, and fatigue test conditions such as the stress intensity factor range, the load ratio, and cycle frequency. Furthermore, the theoretically expected results are verified with the fatigue tests which were carried out on CT specimens under different load conditions of load ratio, cycle frequency, and cyclic peak load, in different environments of air or corrosive ammonia atmosphere, for various brasses. And by comparing and discussing the calculated crack growth rate with attained experimental results, the apparent configuration factor at the crack tip is determined. And through the attained factor which changes along with crack growth, the behaviors of fatigue crack tip formation under different test conditions have been found out.

  3. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking: A rationalization of apparent differences among stress corrosion cracking tendencies for sensitized regions in the process water piping and in the tanks of SRS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency of stress corrosion cracking in the near weld regions of the SRS reactor tank walls is apparently lower than the cracking frequency near the pipe-to-pipe welds in the primary cooling water system. The difference in cracking tendency can be attributed to differences in the welding processes, fabrication schedules, near weld residual stresses, exposure conditions and other system variables. This memorandum discusses the technical issues that may account the differences in cracking tendencies based on a review of the fabrication and operating histories of the reactor systems and the accepted understanding of factors that control stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

  4. Protective effect of KhOSP-10 inhibitor during corrosion, hydrogenadsorption and corrosion cracking of a steel in sulfuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindyuk, A K; Svist, E I; Savitskaya, O P; Goyan, E B; Gopanenko, A N [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Lvov. Fiziko-Mekhanicheskij Inst.

    1975-01-01

    The protective propeties of inhibitor KhOSP-10 in the time of corrosion and corrosive cracking of steel 40Kh are higher then those of inhibitors KPI-1, KI-1, I-I-V etc. Its ability to reduce steel hydrogenation is the same as in the case of KPI-1 inhibitor i.e. below that of KI-1. HCl additives enhance the efficiency of inhibitors KPI-1, KI-1, I-1-V etc. up to the protective ability of KhOSP-10. Kinetics of the electrode processes was estimated from polarization curves.

  5. A methodology for the investigation of toughness and crack propagation in mouse bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriero, Alessandra; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Ritchie, Robert O

    2014-11-01

    Bone fracture is a health concern for those with aged bone and brittle bone diseases. Mouse bone is widely used as a model of human bone, especially to investigate preclinical treatment strategies. However, little is known about the mechanisms of mouse bone fracture and its similarities and differences from fracture in human bone. In this work we present a methodology to investigate the fracture toughness during crack initiation and crack propagation for mouse bone. Mouse femora were dissected, polished on their periosteal surface, notched on the posterior surface at their mid-diaphysis, and tested in three-point bending under displacement control at a rate of 0.1mm/min using an in situ loading stage within an environmental scanning electron microscope. We obtained high-resolution real-time imaging of the crack initiation and propagation in mouse bone. From the images we can measure the crack extension at each step of the crack growth and calculate the toughness of the bone (in terms of stress intensity factor (K) and work to fracture (Wf)) as a function of stable crack length (Δa), thus generating a resistance curve for the mouse bone. The technique presented here provides insight into the evolution of microdamage and the toughening mechanisms that resist crack propagation, which are essential for preclinical development of treatments to enhance bone quality and combat fracture risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of Dissimilar Welding of AISI 310S Austenitic Stainless Steel to 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago AmaroVicente

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the weld metal chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibility of dissimilar weldments between 310S austenitic stainless steel and 2304 duplex steels was investigated by constant load tests and microstructural examination. Two filler metals (E309L and E2209 were used to produce fusion zones of different chemical compositions. The SCC results showed that the heat affected zone (HAZ on the 2304 base metal side of the weldments was the most susceptible region to SCC for both filler metals tested. The SCC results also showed that the weldments with 2209 duplex steel filler metal presented the best SCC resistance when compared to the weldments with E309L filler metal. The lower SCC resistance of the dissimilar joint with 309L austenitic steel filler metal may be attributed to (1 the presence of brittle chi/sigma phase in the HAZ on the 2304 base metal, which produced SC cracks in this region and (2 the presence of a semi-continuous delta-ferrite network in the fusion zone which favored the nucleation and propagation of SC cracks from the fusion zone to HAZ of the 2304 stainless steel. Thus, the SC cracks from the fusion zone associated with the SC cracks of 2304 HAZ decreased considerably the time-of-fracture on this region, where the fracture occurred. Although the dissimilar weldment with E2209 filler metal also presented SC cracks in the HAZ on the 2304 side, it did not present the delta ferrite network in the fusion zone due to its chemical composition. Fractography analyses showed that the mixed fracture mode was predominant for both filler metals used.

  7. Influence of the crack propagation rate in the obtaining opening and closing stress intensity factor by finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo; Carlos Alexandre J. Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique as criterion design. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading fr...

  8. Contribution of solution pH and buffer capacity to suppress intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel at 95 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Shibata, T.; Haruna, T.

    1999-01-01

    Controlling pH of high-temperature water to ∼pH 7 at 300 C by adding lithium hydroxide (LiOH) into the coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) successfully has been mitigating the corrosion of PWR component materials. The effects of solution pH and buffer capacity on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized type 304 stainless steel ([SS] UNS S30400) was examined at 95 C by slow strain rate technique (SSRT) with an in-situ cracking observation system. It was found that an increase in solution pH or buffer capacity increased crack initiation time and decreased mean crack initiation frequency, but exerted almost no effect on crack propagation. This inhibition effect on IGSCC initiation was explained as resulting from a retarding effect of solution pH and buffer capacity on the decrease in pH at crack nuclei caused by the hydrolysis of metal ions dissolved when the passive film was ruptured by strain in SSRT

  9. The relationship between X-ray residual stress near the crack and crack opening/closing behavior controlling fatigue crack propagation in Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Tashiyuki; Toi, Norihiko; Nakano, Kohji; Honda, Kazuo

    1998-01-01

    Using the X-ray method of stress measurement for Ti-6Al-4V alloys, the residual stress near the crack was measured for annealed (AN) and solution treated and aged (STA) titanium alloys, under the condition that the measured X-ray stress was in satisfactory agreement with the applied stress under tension. The residual stress measured in the wake of the propagating fatigue crack, σ r , was compressive, resulting in a smaller crack opening displacement, COD, than theorized. The measured σ r and COD-values let us understand the fatigue crack propagation rate da/dN in terms of the effective stress intensity factor K eff . As a result, the da/dN under the same K eff -value was smaller in the AN specimen with zigzag crack growth than in the STA specimen with straight crack growth, although the da/dN-K eff relationship under various stress amplitudes was represented by a straight line in a log-log scale separately for the AN and STA specimens. (author)

  10. Shear crack formation and propagation in reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear. The experimental program consists of ECC with short randomly distributed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber beams with different stirrup arrangements and conventional reinforced concrete (R/C) counterparts for comparison. The shear crack formation mechanism of ECC......This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behaviour of beams consisting of steel reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (R/ECC). Based on the strain hardening and multiple cracking behaviour of ECC, this study investigates the extent to which ECC influences the shear...

  11. Stress field determination in an alloy 600 stress corrosion crack specimen; Determination du champ de contraintes dans une eprouvette de corrosion sous contrainte de l`alliage 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassineux, B.; Labbe, T.

    1995-05-01

    In the context of EDF studies on stress corrosion cracking rates in the Alloy 600 steam generators tubes, we studied the influence of strain hardened surface layers on the different stages of cracking for a tensile smooth specimen (TLT). The stress field was notably assessed to try and explain the slow/rapid-propagation change observed beyond the strain hardened layers. The main difficulty is to simulate in a finite element model the inner and outer surfaces of these strain hardened layers, produced by the final manufacturing stages of SG tubes which have not been heat treated. In the model, the strain hardening is introduced by simulating a multi-layer material. Residual stresses are simulated by an equivalent fictitious thermomechanical calculation, realigned with respect to X-ray measurements. The strain hardening introduction method was validated by an analytical calculation giving identical results. Stress field evolution induced by specimen tensile loading were studied using an elastoplastic 2D finite element calculations performed with the Aster Code. The stress profile obtained after load at 660 MPa shows no stress discontinuity at the boundary between the strain hardened layer and the rest of the tube. So we propose that a complementary calculation be performed, taking into account the multi-cracked state of the strain hardened zones by means of a damage variable. In fact, this state could induce stress redistribution in the un-cracked area, which would perhaps provide an explanation of the crack-ground rate change beyond the strain hardened zone. The calculations also evidence the harmful effects of plastic strains on a strain hardened layer due to the initial state of the tube (not heat-treated), to grit blasting or to shot peening. The initial compressive stress condition of this surface layer becomes, after plastic strain, a tensile stress condition. These results are confirmed by laboratory test. (author). 10 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs., 2 appends.

  12. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, T., E-mail: kubo@nfd.co.jp [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [M.O.X. Co., Ltd., 1828-520 Hirasu-cho, Mito, Ibaraki 311-0853 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Steady state crack velocity of delayed hydride cracking in Zircaloy-2 was analyzed. • A large stress peak is induced at an end of hydride by volume expansion of hydride. • Hydrogen diffuses to the stress peak, thereby accelerating steady hydride growth. • Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the stress peak. • There was good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. -- Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data.

  13. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC. The

  14. Analysis of Crack Propagation Path on the Anisotropic Bi-Material Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Shi Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a single-domain boundary element method (SDBEM for linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis in the 2D anisotropic bimaterial. In this formulation, the displacement integral equation is collocated on the uncracked boundary only, and the traction integral equation is collocated on one side of the crack surface only. The complete fundamental solution (Green's function for anisotropic bi-materials was also derived and implemented into the boundary integral formulation so the discretization along the interface can be avoided except for the interfacial crack part. A special crack-tip element was introduced to capture exactly the crack-tip behavior. A computer program with the FORTRAN code has been developed to effectively calculate the stress intensity factors, crack initiation angle, and propagation path of an anisotropic bi-material. This SDBEM program has been verified having a good accuracy with the previous researches. In addition, a rock of type (1/(2 disk specimen with a central crack was made to conduct the Brazilian test under diametrical loading. The result shows that the numerical analysis can predict relatively well the direction of crack initiation and the path of crack propagation.

  15. Modelling of liquid sodium induced crack propagation in T91 martensitic steel: Competition with ductile fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemery, Samuel [Institut PPRIME, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ISAE ENSMA, UPR 3346, Téléport 2, 1 Avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Berdin, Clotilde, E-mail: clotilde.berdin@u-psud.fr [Univ Paris-Sud, SP2M-ICMMO, CNRS UMR 8182, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Auger, Thierry; Bourhi, Mariem [Ecole Centrale-Supelec, MSSMat CNRS UMR 8579, F-92295 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (France)

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of T91 steel is numerically modeled by the finite element method to analyse experimental results in an axisymmetric notched geometry. The behavior of the material is identified from tensile tests then a crack with a constant crack velocity is introduced using the node release technique in order to simulate the brittle crack induced by LME. A good agreement between the simulated and the experimental macroscopic behavior is found: this suggests that the assumption of a constant crack velocity is correct. Mechanical fields during the embrittlement process are then extracted from the results of the finite element model. An analysis of the crack initiation and propagation stages: the ductile fracture probably breaks off the LME induced brittle fracture. - Highlights: • T91 martensitic steel is embrittled by liquid sodium depending on the loading rate at 573 K. • The mechanical behavior is modeled by a von Mises elastic-plastic law. • The LME induced crack propagates at a constant velocity. • The mechanical state at the crack tip does not explain a brittle crack arrest. • The occurrence of the ductile fracture breaks off the brittle fracture.

  16. Fatigue crack propagation and delamination growth in Glare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderliesten, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    Fibre Metal Laminate Glare consists of thin aluminium layers bonded together with pre-impregnated glass fibre layers and shows an excellent fatigue crack growth behaviour compared to monolithic aluminium. The fibres are insensitive to the occurring fatigue loads and remain intact while the fatigue

  17. Dynamic Initiation and Propagation of Multiple Cracks in Brittle Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodan Ren

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Brittle materials such as rock and ceramic usually exhibit apparent increases of strength and toughness when subjected to dynamic loading. The reasons for this phenomenon are not yet well understood, although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. Based on dynamic fracture mechanics, the present work offers an alternate insight into the dynamic behaviors of brittle materials. Firstly, a single crack subjected to stress wave excitations is investigated to obtain the dynamic crack-tip stress field and the dynamic stress intensity factor. Second, based on the analysis of dynamic stress intensity factor, the fracture initiation sizes and crack size distribution under different loading rates are obtained, and the power law with the exponent of −2/3 is derived to describe the fracture initiation size. Third, with the help of the energy balance concept, the dynamic increase of material strength is directly derived based on the proposed multiple crack evolving criterion. Finally, the model prediction is compared with the dynamic impact experiments, and the model results agree well with the experimentally measured dynamic increasing factor (DIF.

  18. Crack Propagation in Plane Strain under Variable Amplitude Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricardo, Luiz Carlos Hernandes

    2010-01-01

    . In this paper procedures to determine the crack opening and closure by finite elements analyses in plane strain will be presented. The objective of this paper is also provide a review of retardation models under variable spectrum loading considering plane strain constraint as well as their correlation...

  19. Effect of defect length on rolling contact fatigue crack propagation in high strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Makino

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to clarify the effect of defect length in depth direction on rolling contact fatigue (RCF crack propagation in high strength steel. RCF test and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SR micro CT imaging were conducted. In the case of the defect with the 15 m diameter, flaking life decreased with increasing defect length. In a comparison of the CT image and the SEM view, the shapes of defects and the locations of the horizontal cracks were almost the same respectively. The mechanism of RCF crack propagation was discussed by finite element (FE analysis. Defects led to higher tensile residual stress than that without defects in the region where the defect exists. The shear stress range at 0.1 mm in depth on the middle line of the defect and the range of mode II stress intensity factor at the bottom of a vertical crack increased with increasing defect length.

  20. On the calculation of crack propagation behavior in disks and plates using a mixed finite method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    1991-01-01

    According to the linear theory of elasticity, infinitely high stresses occur in the crack tips of cracked components. Plastic flow initiation or previous damage, however, will limit these stress singularities to an upper maximum stress for all real materials. To permit acquisition of this highly localized material behavior, while avoiding a very high physical nonlinear calculation effort for the evaluation of crack propagation behavior in disks and plates, models essentially based on Dugdale and Barenblatt are used. This involves determining the stress and displacement conditions required for the simulation of crack propagation by means of a mixed finite method introducing the disk cutting forces and plate curvatures or moments as unknown quantities. In addition to pure disk and plate problems, also coupled disk-plate problems are covered, where the coupling, on one hand, is due to the consideration of high deformations. (orig.) With 66 figs., 8 tabs [de

  1. 3D dynamic simulation of crack propagation in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijerathne, M. L. L.; Hori, Muneo; Sakaguchi, Hide; Oguni, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Some experimental observations of Shock Wave Lithotripsy(SWL), which include 3D dynamic crack propagation, are simulated with the aim of reproducing fragmentation of kidney stones with SWL. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of kidney stones by focusing an ultrasonic pressure pulse onto the stones. 3D models with fine discretization are used to accurately capture the high amplitude shear shock waves. For solving the resulting large scale dynamic crack propagation problem, PDS-FEM is used; it provides numerically efficient failure treatments. With a distributed memory parallel code of PDS-FEM, experimentally observed 3D photoelastic images of transient stress waves and crack patterns in cylindrical samples are successfully reproduced. The numerical crack patterns are in good agreement with the experimental ones, quantitatively. The results shows that the high amplitude shear waves induced in solid, by the lithotriptor generated shock wave, play a dominant role in stone fragmentation.

  2. Control of welding residual stress for ensuring integrity against fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito

    2007-01-01

    The availability of several techniques for residual stress control is discussed in this paper. The effectiveness of these techniques in protecting from fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking is verified by numerical analysis and actual experiment. In-process control during welding for residual stress reduction is easier to apply than using post-weld treatment. As an example, control of the welding pass sequence for multi-pass welding is applied to cruciform joints and butt-joints with an X-shaped groove. However, residual stress improvement is confirmed for post-weld processes. Water jet peening is useful for obtaining a compressive residual stress on the surface, and the tolerance against both fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking is verified. Because cladding with a corrosion-resistant material is also effective for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from a metallurgical perspective, the residual stress at the interface of the base metal is carefully considered. The residual stress of the base metal near the clad edge is confirmed to be within the tolerance of crack generation. Controlling methods both during and after welding processes are found to be effective for ensuring the integrity of welded components

  3. Inter granular stress corrosion cracking of Ignalina NPP austenitic piping of outside diameter 325 mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedzinskas, L.; Klimasauskas, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Inter Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of Ignalina NPP main circulation circuit piping, produced from austenitic stainless steel is presented covering current performances and further 'Ageing Management' related actions and plans as well as experience (lessons learned) on solving IGSCC phenomenon, which is currently under investigations and no yet comprehensive answer how to avoid it. (author)

  4. ''C-ring'' stress corrosion cracking scoping experiment for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.

    1986-03-01

    This document describes the purpose and execution of the stress corrosion cracking scoping experiment using ''C-ring'' cladding specimens. The design and operation of the ''C-ring'' stressing apparatus is described and discussed. The experimental procedures and post-experiment sample evaluation are described

  5. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of selected materials for steam plant bolting applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, P.; Noga, J.O.; Ogundele, G.

    1996-12-01

    The incidence of alloy steel bolting failure in nuclear and fossil fired generating plants was discussed. The problem manifests itself in the form of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. A study was conducted to rank the susceptibility of three materials (Alloy AISI, type 4140, Alloy ASTM A564-92AXM 13 and Inconel 718) to stress corrosion cracking and to determine threshold stress intensity factors of currently used and alternate alloys in service environments typically encountered in steam generating utility plants. Although most alloy steel bolting failures have involved Cr-Mo, failures have also been reported for all the above mentioned materials. Attempts to minimize the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking have involved a ban on molybdenum disulphide, limiting bolt tightening torque and placing an upper limit on bolt hardness, and by correlation on tensile strength. Slow strain rate and wedge opening-loading specimen tests were used to evaluate commonly used and superior alternative bolting materials. Electrochemical polarization tests were also conducted. Threshold stresses in a H{sub 2}S environment were determined according to NACE standard TM-01-77. Results showed that, to a certain degree, all tested materials were susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. They ranked as follows from best to worst performance: (1) the Inconel 718, (2) alloy SM 13, and (3) alloy 4140. 9 refs., 20 tabs., 34 figs.

  6. Depassivation and repassivation of austenitic stainless steels. Consequences on stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, M.; Desjardins, D.; Puiggali, M.; Petit, M.C.

    1983-06-01

    The influence of strain rate and solution temperature on depassivation and repassivation processes, and the consequences on stress corrosion cracking phenomenon are presented. The tests are performed in concentrated magnesium chloride solutions at various boiling temperatures (160 0 C, 153 0 C, 140 0 C, 130 0 C, 125 0 C, 110 0 C, 102 0 C) to which potassium dichromate is added in some cases. The depassivation and repassivation of the tested wires are analysed in term of current-time curves at fixed potential. The wire is placed into a ''corrosion cell'' with the boiling chloride solution on a tensile testing machine. Tests at 153 0 C on 304L and 309L stainless steels show that competition between passivation and depassivation depends on applied strain rate: at low strain rates rupture is mainly due to mechanical stress, at high strain rates the wire shows track of corrosion and the rupture is ductile. Between the two, stress corrosion cracking presents a maximum and in this case the rupture is mainly brittle. Influence of temperature shows the existence of a transitional temperature 130 0 C for a 304L. The cracking velocity is 100 times higher above 130 0 C than below and the cracking mode is transgranular and mainly intergranular below 130 0 C. Addition of potassium dichromate modifies both electrochemical and mechanical properties; it is more difficult to obtain a frank depassivation and the repassivation rate is higher

  7. Thermomechanical processing of 5083 aluminum to increase strength without increasing susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edstrom, C.M.; Blakeslee, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    5083 aluminium with 25% cold work must be processed above 215 0 C or below 70 0 C to avoid forming continuous precipitate in the grain boundaries which makes the material susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Time at temperature above 215 0 C should be held to minimum (less than 30 min) to retain some strength from the 25% cold work

  8. Nonlocal Peridynamic Modeling and Simulation on Crack Propagation in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended peridynamic approach for crack propagation analysis in concrete structures was proposed. In the peridynamic constitutive model, concrete material was described as a series of interacting particles, and the short-range repulsive force and anisotropic behavior of concrete were taken into account in the expression of the interactive bonding force, which was given in terms of classical elastic constants and peridynamic horizon. The damage of material was defined locally at the level of pairwise bond, and the critical stretch of material bond was described as a function of fracture strength in the classical concrete failure theory. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed model and algorithms were validated by simulating the propagation of mode I and I-II mixed mode cracks in concrete slabs. Furthermore, crack propagation in a double-edge notched concrete beam subjected to four-point load was simulated, in which the experimental observations are captured naturally as a consequence of the solution.

  9. Strain-induced cracking corrosion in pipelines of conventional power plants; Dehnungsinduzierte Risskorrosion in Rohrsystemen von konventionellen Kraftwerksanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamsky, F.J.; Kempkes, B. [PreussenElektra Engineering GmbH, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Ernst, J. [RWE Energie AG, Essen (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Since the mid-sixties, stress corrosion cracking has been reported in highly loaded components of conventional power plants. Damage investigations were followed by extensive fundamental studies on crack initiation and propagation mechanisms, with particular regard to the water quality. The contribution presents causes, patterns, preferred sites and operating conditions of strain-induced corrosion. [German] Seit Anfang der 60er-Jahre wird ueber Risskorrosionsschaeden im wasserberuehrten Teil konventioneller Kraftwerksanlagen berichtet, die stets an hochbeanspruchten Bereichen festzustellen sind - vorwiegend in unrunden Rohrbogen oder Fallrohrbohrungen von Kesseltrommeln. Den Schadensuntersuchungen schlossen sich umfangreiche Grundsatzuntersuchungen an, um den Mechanismus von Rissbildung und Rissfortschritt kennenzulernen und daraus dann Abhilfemassnahmen abzuleiten. Bei schadhaften Rohrboegen stellte man in den Rissbereichen meist hoehere Unrundheiten fest und bei Kesseltrommeln Spannungsspitzen an den Lochraendern. Der Wasserqualitaet, vornehmlich dem O{sub 2}-Gehalt, der Art der Konservierung bei Stillstaenden und insbesondere haeufigeren Anfahrten bei kleineren und aelteren Anlagen wurde besondere Bedeutung beigemessen. Im Beitrag werden Ursachen, Erscheinungsformen, bevorzugte Bereiche und Betriebszustaende der dehnungsinduzierten Korrosion dargestellt. (orig.)

  10. Methodology to evaluate the crack growth rate by stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metals weld in simulated environment of PWR nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Rabelo, Emerson G.

    2013-01-01

    Inconel alloys weld metal is widely used to join dissimilar metals in nuclear reactors applications. It was recently observed failures of weld components in plants, which have triggered an international effort to determine reliable data on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of this material in reactor environment. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to determine the crack growth rate caused by stress corrosion in Inconel alloy 182, using the specimen (Compact Tensile) in simulated PWR environment. (author)

  11. Detection of stress corrosion cracks and wastage in reactor pressure vessels and primary coolant system studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, G.M.; Joshi, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    Over the last few years, nuclear plants have experienced stud bolt failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion wastage. Many of these stud bolts were over 1 m long and had no heater hole. The use of conventional longitudinal wave inspection for bolts longer than 1 m has shown inconsistent results. A nondestructive testing technique was needed to inspect the stud bolts in place. The cylindrically guided wave technique was developed to inspect stud bolts of various lengths (up to 3 m) and various diameters. This technique is based on the fact that an ultrasonic wave traveling in a long cylinder becomes guided by the geometry of the cylinder. The wave begins to spread in the cylinder as interaction with the outer wall produces mode conversions. A large number of model stud bolts were tested to verify that the cylindrically guided wave technique could be used to detect crack-like defects and simulated corrosion wastage. This work shows that the cylindrically guided wave technique can be used on a wide variety of stud bolt configurations, and that the technique can be used to effectively detect the two most common modes of stud bolt failure (corrosion cracking and corrosion wastage) at early stages of development

  12. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  13. Development of fatigue crack propagation models for engineering applications at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomkins, B.

    1975-05-01

    The value of modelling the fatigue crack propagation process is discussed and current models are examined in the light of increasing knowledge of crack tip deformation. Elevated temperature fatigue is examined in detail as an area in which models could contribute significantly to engineering design. A model is developed which examines the role of time-dependent creep cavitation on the failure process in an interactive creep-fatigue situation. (auth)

  14. G-control fatigue testing for cyclic crack propagation in composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manca, Marcello; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a computer controlled testing methodology called “The G-control Method” which allows cyclic crack growth testing using real-time control of the cyclic energy release rate. The advantages of using this approach are described and compared with traditional fatigue testing methods...... that the G-control method allows fatigue testing at a constant range of energy release rates leading to a constant crack propagation rate....

  15. Ductile crack initiation and propagation assessed via in situ synchrotron radiation-computed laminography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgeneyer, T.F.; Helfen, L.; Sinclair, I.; Proudhon, H.; Xu, F.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-01-01

    Ductile crack initiation and propagation within a naturally aged aluminium alloy sheet has been observed in situ via synchrotron radiation-computed laminography, a technique specifically adapted to three-dimensional imaging of thin objects that are laterally extended. Voids and intermetallic particles, and their subsequent evolution during ductile crack extension at different associated levels of stress triaxiality, were clearly observed within fracture coupons of a reasonable engineering length-scale, overcoming the conventional sample size limitation of computed tomography at high resolutions.

  16. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  17. Demonstration through EPR tests of the sensitivity of austeno-ferritic steels to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can be sensitised to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under some conditions (heat treatments, welding). The aim of this work is to contribute to the validation of the EPR (Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation) test in order to determine conditions for normalisation. This method, based on the dissolution of chromium depleted areas due to precipitation of σ-phase, provides a degree of sensitisation to intergranular corrosion. The test is broaden considering the mechanical stress by the way of slow strain rate tests, performed in chloride magnesium and in a solution similar to the EPR solution. A metallurgical study puts on the precipitates and the structural modifications due to welding and heat treatments, in order to make a critical analysis of the EPR test. (author) [fr

  18. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of 22% Cr duplex stainless steel in simulated sour environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, T.; Tsuge, H.; Moroishi, T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the effect of nickel and nitrogen contents on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 22%Cr - 3%Mo-base duplex stainless steel investigated in simulated sour environments with respect to both the base metal and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welding. The threshold stress and the critical chloride concentration for SCC were evaluated as a function of the ferrite content (α-content) in the alloy. The threshold stress is highest at the α-content of 40 to 45%, and is lowered with decreasing and increasing the α-content from its value. The alloy whose α-content exceeds 80% at the HAZ has also high susceptibilities to pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion (ICG). The critical chloride concentration for cracking increases with the decrease in the α-content. Moreover, the contents of chromium, nickel and molybdenum in the α-phase are considered to be an important factor for determining the critical chloride concentration

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of 350 maraging steel in 3.5 Wt. % NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, I.; Hussain, T.; Tauqir, A.; Hashmi, F.H.; Khan, A.Q.

    1993-01-01

    Stress corrosion behavior of 350 maraging steel in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated. The results suggest that the steel is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking as the time to failure was always considerably shorter, as compared to those in air at the same stress level. The fracture mode was nearly intergranular and occasionally transgranular. There was no definite trend for the different modes of failure. The strain rate effect was also considered and the results show that the stress corrosion cracks were absent at strain rate high than 1.97 x 10/sup -4/S/sup -1/ and lower than 1.29 x 10/sup -7/S/sup -1/. The critical strain rate range was found to be between 6.4 x 10/sup -7/ to 3.24 x10/sup -5/S /sup -1/. (author)

  20. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of fixed deflection stressed slotted rings of Zircaloy fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejnoha, R.; Wood, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy fuel cladding by fission products is thought to be an important mechanism influencing power ramping defects of water-reactor fuels. We have used the fixed-deflection stressed slotted-ring technique to demonstrate cracking. The results show both the sensitivity and limitations of the stressed slotted-ring method in determining the responses of tubing to stress corrosion cracking. They are interpreted in terms of stress relaxation behavior, both on a microscopic scale for hydrogen-induced stress-relief and on a macroscopic scale for stress-time characteristics. Analysis also takes account of nonuniform plastic deformation during loading and residual stress buildup on unloading. 27 refs

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  2. Transport and Corrosion Behavior of Cracked Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin

    Reinforced concrete, due to its inherent versatility and durability as a building material, has been implemented for use in a multitude of structural applications which are exposed to widely varying environmental conditions. Often times these structures are designed for lengthy service lives....... The exposure conditions may vary from industrial products, chemicals, and gases, to annual variations in temperature, to chloride-rich environments such as marine structures and structures exposed to deicing salts. These chloride-rich environments are of central concern in Denmark and throughout the world....... In addition, cracks develop in concrete through various physical and chemical processes, which occur at varying periods of the lifetime of a structure, resulting in varying crack parameters (i.e. width, depth, and tortuosity). These cracks provide easy access of aggressive substances from the environment...

  3. Stress corrosion cracking in 3,5 NiCrMoV steel in a 403 K potential-PH diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitomi, Itoh; Takashi, Momoo

    2001-01-01

    3,5 NiCrMoV steel is used in low-pressure turbine rotors and discs. It has been pointed out that intergranular stress corrosion cracking may occur in this material in the wet region at temperatures of about 400 K. Accordingly, the authors focused on the environmental conditions under which stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurs. A potential-pH diagram was used to investigate the region in which SCC occurs in the high strength materials that are particularly susceptible to SCC. The investigation found that SCC is initiated in this material not only in the high caustic region but in the neutral region as well. The investigation also found that initiation and propagation were accelerated in dissolved oxygen environments with increased chemical potential in the neutral region. Since careful observation of the starting point of cracks has shown that corrosion pits trigger SCC, subsequent immersion tests under constant potential were conducted. The results showed that corrosion pits are generated at the high potential range. These results led to the development of an acceleration test environment for laboratory to determine the susceptibility of SCC in field turbine disc and rotor materials. (author)

  4. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Krenk, S.; Brincker, Rune

    An analytical model for load-displacement curves of unreinforced notched and un-notched concrete beams is presented. The load displacement-curve is obtained by combining two simple models. The fracture is modelled by a fictitious crack in an elastic layer around the mid-section of the beam. Outside...... the elastic layer the deformations are modelled by the Timoshenko beam theory. The state of stress in the elastic layer is assumed to depend bi-lineary on local elongation corresponding to a linear softening relation for the fictitious crack. For different beam size results from the analytical model...... is compared with results from a more accurate model based on numerical methods. The analytical model is shown to be in good agreement with the numerical results if the thickness of the elastic layer is taken as half the beam depth. Several general results are obtained. It is shown that the point on the load...

  5. Shear crack propagation in MBC strengthened concrete beams”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas; Carolin, Anders

    2008-01-01

    thermal compatibility to the base concrete and are often sensitive to the surface nature and surrounding temperature. By using mineral based composites (MBC) some of these challenges can be overcome. MBC refers here to a cementitious bonding agent and a carbon FRP grid. This paper is a part of an ongoing......Repair and upgrading existing concrete structures using FRPs and an epoxy adhesive as the bonding agent has some disadvantages when it comes to compatibility to the base concrete. Epoxies are often restricted by regulations of use, have low permeability which may create freeze/thaw problems, poor...... study of MBC systems. Emphasis is placed on the cracking behavior of the MBC system used for shear strengthening of RC beams. Traditional foil strain gauges and photometric measurements have been used for monitoring of the cracking behavior. In this study it is shown that the use of mineral based shear...

  6. Fatigue crack propagation in neutron-irradiated ferritic pressure-vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a number of experiments dealing with fatigue crack propagation in irradiated reactor pressure-vessel steels are reviewed. The steels included ASTM alloys A302B, A533B, A508-2, and A543, as well as weldments in A543 steel. Fluences and irradiation conditions were generally typical of those experienced by most power reactors. In general, the effect of neutron irradiation on the fatigue crack propagation behavior of these steels was neither significantly beneficial nor significantly detrimental

  7. Simulation of crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete by fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Li, Victor C.

    2004-01-01

    Mode I crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is simulated by a fracture mechanics approach. A superposition method is applied to calculate the crack tip stress intensity factor. The model relies on the fracture toughness of hardened cement paste (K IC ) and the crack bridging law, so-called stress-crack width (σ-δ) relationship of the material, as the fundamental material parameters for model input. As two examples, experimental data from steel FRC beams under three-point bending load are analyzed with the present fracture mechanics model. A good agreement has been found between model predictions and experimental results in terms of flexural stress-crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) diagrams. These analyses and comparisons confirm that the structural performance of concrete and FRC elements, such as beams in bending, can be predicted by the simple fracture mechanics model as long as the related material properties, K IC and (σ-δ) relationship, are known

  8. Experimental investigation into the crack propagation in multiphase tantalum carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Bradford C. [Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, 301 7th Avenue, 116 Houser Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0202 (United States); Lee, HeeDong; Mogilevsky, Pavel [UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Road, Dayton, OH 45432-1894 (United States); Weinberger, Christopher R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, 1374 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Parthasarathy, Triplicane A. [UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Road, Dayton, OH 45432-1894 (United States); Matson, Lawrence E. [Air Force Research Laboratory Materials & Manufacturing Directorate, Structural Material Division (AFRL/RXLN), 2230 Tenth St., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 4543307817 (United States); Smith, Chase [Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, 301 7th Avenue, 116 Houser Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0202 (United States); Thompson, Gregory B., E-mail: gthompson@eng.ua.edu [Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, 301 7th Avenue, 116 Houser Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0202 (United States)

    2017-05-17

    Tantalum carbide ceramics with high volume fractions of the ζ-Ta{sub 4}C{sub 3} phase have been shown to exhibit high fracture strength and toughness as compared to those in absence of this phase. In this work, we investigated how microcracks propagated in this these high toughness ceramics using Knoop and Vickers microindentation. The Knoop indentations demonstrated that cracking preferentially occurred parallel to the lath structure in ζ-Ta{sub 4}C{sub 3}; however shorter cracks did form between the laths when a sufficient driving force was present. The resulting crack path was tortuous providing direct evidence for toughening through crack deflection; however, the microscale nature of the work cannot rule out crack bridging as a toughening mechanism as well. Plasticity is also observed under the indents, but is likely a result of the high confining pressures that occurred during indentation allowing for plastic flow.

  9. Hydrogen induced crack propagation in metal under plain-strain deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishgojt, A.V.; Kolachev, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    A model of subcritical crack propagation conditioned by the effect of dissolved hydrogen in the case of plane-strain deformation of high-strength materials, is suggested. It is supposed that diffusion takes place in the isotropic material and hydrogen diffuses in the region of tensile stress maximum before crack tip under the effect of the stress gradient. When hydrogen achieves the critical concentration, microcrack growth takes place. Values of crack growth rates experimentally obtained agree with values calculated according to the suggested formula. Calculation and experimental data on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, are presented [ru

  10. Hydrazine and hydrogen coinjection to mitigate stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in boiling water reactors (7). Effects of bulk water chemistry on ECP distribution inside a crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Ishida, Kazushige; Tachibana, Masahiko; Aizawa, Motohiro; Fuse, Motomasa

    2007-01-01

    Water chemistry in a simulated crack (crack) has been studied to understand the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor environment. Electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) in a crack made in an austenite type 304 stainless steel specimen was measured. The ECP distribution along the simulated crack was strongly affected by bulk water chemistry and bulk flow. When oxygen concentration was high in the bulk water, the potential difference between the crack tip and the outside of the crack (ΔE), which must be one motive force for crack growth, was about 0.3V under a stagnant condition. When oxygen was removed from the bulk water, ECP inside and outside the crack became low and uniform and ΔE became small. The outside ECP was also lowered by depositing platinum on the steel specimen surface and adding stoichiometrically excess hydrogen to oxygen to lower ΔE. This was effective only when bulk water did not flow. Under the bulk water flow condition, water-borne oxygen caused an increase in ECP on the untreated surface inside the crack. This also caused a large ΔE. The ΔE effect was confirmed by crack growth rate measurements with a catalyst-treated specimen. Therefore, lowering the bulk oxidant concentration by such measures as hydrazine hydrogen coinjection, which is currently under development, is important for suppressing the crack growth. (author)

  11. Numerical modelling of crack initiation and propagation in concrete structure under hydro-mechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian, H.B.; Jia, Y.; Shao, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. This subject is devoted to numerical analysis of crack initiation and propagation in concrete structures due to hydro-mechanical coupling processes. When the structures subjected to the variation in hydraulic conditions, fractures occur as a consequence of coalescence of diffuse damage. Consequently, the mechanical behaviour of concrete is described by an isotropic damage model. Once the damage reaches a critical value, a macroscopic crack is initiated. In the framework of extended Finite Element Method (XFEM), the propagation of localized crack is studied in this paper. Each crack is then considered as a discontinuity surface of displacement. According to the determination of crack propagation orientations, a tensile stress-based criterion is used. Furthermore, spatial variations of mechanical properties of concrete are also taken into account using the Weibull distribution function. Finally, the proposed model is applied to numerical analysis of a concrete liner in the context of feasibility studies for geological storage of radioactive wastes. The numerical results show that the proposed approach is capable to reproduce correctly the initiation and propagation crack process until the complete failure of concrete structures during hydro-mechanical loading. The concrete is most widely used construction material in many engineering applications. It is generally submitted to various environmental loading: such as the mechanical loading, the variation of relative humidity and the exposure to chemical risk, etc. In order to evaluate the safety and durability of concrete structures, it is necessary to get a good knowledge on the influence of loading path on the concrete behaviour. The objective of this paper is to study numerically the crack propagation in concrete structure under hydro-mechanical loading,.i.e. the mechanical behaviour of concrete subjected to drying process. The drying process leads to desiccation

  12. Effects of metallurgical factors on stress corrosion cracking of Ni-base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Sasaguri, N.; Onimura, K.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel-base Alloy 600 is the principal material used for the steam generator tubes of PWRs. Generally, this alloy has been proven to be satisfactory for this application, however when it is subjected to extremely high stress level in PWR primary water, it may suffer from stress corrosion cracking. The authors have systematically studied the effects of test temperature and such metallurgical factors as cold working, chemical composition and heat treatment on the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water, and also on that of Alloy 690 which is a promising material for the tubes and may provide improved crrosion resistance for steam generators. The test materials, the stress corrosion cracking test and the test results are reported. When the test temperature was raise, the stress corrosion cracking of the nickel-base alloys was accelerated. The time of stress corrosion cracking occurrence decreased with increasing applied stress, and it occurred at the stress level higher than the 0.2 % offset proof stress of Alloy 600. In Alloy 690, stress corrosion cracking was not observed at such stress level. Cold worked Alloy 600 showed higher resistance to stress corrosion cracking than the annealed alloy. (Kako, I.)

  13. Crack propagation tests on the fundamental structure under cyclic thermal transients. Results of nondestructive inspection for cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Horikiri, M.

    2001-06-01

    This report shows the results of crack inspection in crack propagation tests that were carried out at the Air-cooling Thermal Transient Test Facility (ATTF). Test specimens were made of 304 type austenitic stainless steel, and they were the same cylindrical shape, 1,500 mm in height, 130 mm in outer diameter and 30 mm in thickness. And they had initial slits machined on inner surfaces. Firstly the specimens were heated up to 650degC in a furnace, then cooled by pressurized air blowing through the specimen for 90 seconds. These cyclic changes of temperature gradients in the wall of specimens were loaded. Specimens were tested for several years. The specimen No. CPTT-102 with machined two circumferential slits and two semi-elliptical slits was tested up to 10,000 cycles. And the specimen No. CPTT-103 with machined six semi-elliptical slits of different length respectively was tested up to 5,000 cycles. Cracks of specimens were inspected nondestructively for a giving cycle in these tests. Applied inspection methods were ultra-sonic testing, potential-drop method and inner surface observation. Ultra-sonic testing was carried out by applying the pulse-echo method. Potential-drop testing was carried out by measurement of localized constant direct current beyond cracks. Photographs of the inner surface of specimens were taken using a bore-scope. The results of ultra-sonic testing have been close to destructive test results. The depth of crack by the potential-drop method was almost corresponding to destructive test results, too. Photographs of the inner surface were synthesized by the computer, and connection between main crack and hair crack was observed. (author)

  14. Prediction of crack due to corrosion of reinforcing bar in low alkali concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Nobufumi; Iriya, Keishiro; Hitomi, Takashi; Konishi, Kazuhiro; Kurihara, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    Steel-reinforced low alkaline concrete containing pozzolan has been examined for application in high level radioactive waste disposal. Marine exposure examinations a period of six years were performed for concrete with 30% water-cement ratio, and the reduction in its compressive strength, the intrusion depth of chloride ions, and the corrosion of the reinforcing bar were investigated. On the basis of these results, the progress of corrosion of the reinforcing bar and the outbreak time of a corrosion crack in the reinforcing bar were predicted. The following results are obtained. 1) There was no decrease in the compressive strength of the test pieces during the marine exposure examinations. 2) There was little penetration of the chloride ions in comparison with ordinary Portland cement. 3) Although the corrosion of the reinforcing bar commenced at an early stage with a little quantity of chloride ion intrusion, the progress over the period of six years was extremely small. 4) The corrosion rate of the reinforcing bar in groundwater including sea water was estimated as 0.30-0.55 mg/(cm 2 ·year). In the case of a reinforcing bar with a thickness of 100 mm and diameter of 22 mm, the outbreak time of the reinforcing corrosion crack was predicted as 50-100 years after construction. (author)

  15. Optimization of the dissolved hydrogen level in PWR to mitigate stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys. Bibliographic review, modelling and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labousse, M.; Deforge, D.; Gressier, F.; Taunier, S.; Le Calvar, M.

    2012-09-01

    Nickel based alloys Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) has been a major concern for the Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) utilities since more than 40 years. At EDF, this issue led to the replacement of all upper vessel heads and of most of the steam generators with Alloy 600 MA tubes. Under the scope of plant lifetime extension, there is some concerns about the behaviour of Bottom Mounted Instrumentation Nozzles (BMI) made of Alloy 600 welded with Alloy 182 and a few vessel dissimilar metal welds made of Alloy 82, for only three 1450 MWe plants. It is considered for long that Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) is influenced by the dissolved hydrogen (DH) level in primary coolant. Now, the whole community clearly understands that there is a hydrogen level corresponding to a maximum in terms of SCC susceptibility. Many experimental studies were done worldwide to optimize the hydrogen level in primary water during power operation, both in terms of SCC initiation and propagation. From these studies, most of American plants decided to increase the dissolved hydrogen level in order to mitigate crack propagation. Conversely, in Japan, based on crack initiation data, it is thought that drastically decreasing the hydrogen content would rather be beneficial. In order to consolidate EDF position, a review of laboratory tests data was made. Studies on the influence of hydrogen on nickel alloys 600 and 182 PWSCC were compiled and rationalized. Data were collapsed using a classical Gaussian model, such as initially proposed by Morton et al. An alternative model based on more phenomenological considerations was also proposed. Both models lead to similar results. The maximum susceptibility to SCC cracking appears to be rather consistent with the Ni/NiO transition, which was not taken as an initial hypothesis. Regarding crack initiation, an inverse Gaussian model was proposed. Based on the current hydrogen concentration range during power operation and considering components

  16. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in Mode III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F. A.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (RB88, 590 MN/m2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) IIIcan be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔKIII for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation