WorldWideScience

Sample records for corrosion cracking examinations

  1. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  2. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  3. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...

  4. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  5. Failure analysis of corrosion cracking and simulated testing for a fluid catalytic cracking unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Chen; Xiaogang Li; Chaofang Dong; Ming Li; Jinwen Yang

    2005-01-01

    The failure of a fluid catalysis and cracking unit (FCCU) in a Chinese refinery was investigated by using nondestructive detection methods, fracture surface examination, hardness measurement, chemical composition and corrosion products analysis. The results showed that the failure was caused by the dew point nitrate stress corrosion cracking. For a long operation period, the wall temperature of the regenerator in the FCCU was below the fume dew point. As a result, an acid fume NOx-SOx-H2O medium presented on the surface, resulting in stress corrosion cracking of the component with high residual stress. In order to confirm the relative conclusion, simulated testing was conducted in laboratory, and the results showed similar cracking characteristics. Finally, some suggestions have been made to prevent the stress corrosion cracking of an FCCU from re-occurring in the future.

  6. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  7. Corrosion and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete has in recent years changed from being a deterministic modelling based on experience to be stochastic modelling based on sound and consistent physical, chemical and mechanical principles. In this paper is presented a brief review of modern mod...... for time to initial corrosion, time to initial cracking, and time to a given crack width may be obtained....

  8. Analytical Solutions for Corrosion-Induced Cohesive Concrete Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Peng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new analytical model to study the evolution of radial cracking around a corroding steel reinforcement bar embedded in concrete. The concrete cover for the corroding rebar is modelled as a thick-walled cylinder subject to axisymmetrical displacement constraint at the internal boundary generated by expansive corrosion products. A bilinear softening curve reflecting realistic concrete property, together with the crack band theory for concrete fracture, is applied to model the residual tensile stress in the cracked concrete. A governing equation for directly solving the crack width in cover concrete is established for the proposed analytical model. Closed-form solutions for crack width are then obtained at various stages during the evolution of cracking in cover concrete. The propagation of crack front with corrosion progress is studied, and the time to cracking on concrete cover surface is predicted. Mechanical parameters of the model including residual tensile strength, reduced tensile stiffness, and radial pressure at the bond interface are investigated during the evolution of cover concrete cracking. Finally, the analytical predictions are examined by comparing with the published experimental data, and mechanical parameters are analysed with the progress of reinforcement corrosion and through the concrete cover.

  9. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  10. A Calculation Model for Corrosion Cracking in RC Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Gang; Wei Jun; Zhang Keqiang; Zhou Xiwu

    2007-01-01

    A novel calculation model is proposed aiming at the problem of concrete cover cracking induced by reinforcement corrosion. In this article, the relationship between the corrosion depth of the bar and the thickness of the rust layer is established. By deducing the radial displacement expression of concrete, the formula for corrosion depth and corrosion pressure before cracking is proposed. The crack depth of cover in accordance with the maximum corrosion pressure is deduced; furthermore, the corrosion depth and corrosion pressure at the cracking time are obtained. Finally, the theoretical model is validated by several experiments, and the calculated values agree well with the experiment results.

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the differences between high pH and near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking ofpipeline steels, influencing factors, and mechanisms. The characteristics and historical information on both forms ofSCC are discussed. The prospect for research in the future is also presented.

  12. De-alloying and stress-corrosion cracking. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieradzki, K.

    1998-09-01

    This research program has had two major areas of focus that are related: (1) alloy corrosion and (2) the role of selective dissolution in the stress corrosion cracking of alloy systems. These interrelated issues were examined using model systems such as Ag-Au and Cu-Au by conventional electrochemical techniques, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS), ultrahigh speed digital photography of fracture events, and computer simulations. The STM and SANS work were specifically aimed at addressing a roughening transition known to occur in alloy systems undergoing corrosion at electrochemical potentials greater than the so-called critical potential. Analytical models of de-alloying processes including the roughening transition were developed that specifically include curvature effects that are important in alloy corrosion processes. Stress-corrosion experiments were performed on the same model systems using rapid optical and electrochemical techniques on 50 {micro}m--250 {micro}m thick sheets and small diameter wires. The primary goal of this work was to develop a fundamental understanding of the corrosion and electrochemistry of alloys and the stress-corrosion cracking processes these alloys undergo. Computer simulations and analytical work identified surface stress and an important parameter in environmentally assisted fracture. The major results of the research on this program since the summer of 1993 are briefly summarized.

  13. Sizing stress corrosion cracks using laser ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Hamood; McNealy, Rick; Fingerhut, Martin [Applus-RTD. Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Marvin; Ansari, Homayoon [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kania Richard [TransCanada. Calgary, AB (Canada); Rapp, Steve [Spectra Energy, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Despite various efforts, no reliable tools and techniques are available to enable an operator to quantify the impact of an SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) colony on the safety and integrity of a pipeline. Reliable non-destructive detection and measurement tools are not available either. There is therefore a large gap between current technology and the needs of the pipeline industry. Recent developments promise that with a concentrated effort, a comprehensive solution can be devised. This paper describes technical work performed to develop and validate both the inspection tool and the time of flight diffraction (TOFD) technique for sizing the depth of SCC. It also presents preliminary results of work on a closely related project that provides, on the basis of this technology, an integrated approach and tool for mapping, sizing, and evaluating SCC, through which significant cracks are filtered from more benign cracks within an SCC colony.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  15. Concrete cover cracking with localized corrosion of reinforcing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Acosta, A. A.; Sagues, A. A. [South Florida Univ., Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tampa FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The critical amount of steel corrosion needed for concrete cover cracking of a reinforced concrete element was measured, focusing on cases where only a fraction of the steel bar length is corroding. The amount of corrosion needed to crack the concrete cover was found to range between 49 micrometre to 137 micrometre in specimens of localized corrosion. In contrast, in cases of uniform corrosion of comparable systems the corrosion needed to crack the concrete cover varied from 15 micrometre to 75 micrometer. Based on this and previous work on this problem, an empirical equation is proposed for the critical amount of steel corrosion as a function of specimen dimensions. The model proposed for estimating the critical amount of steel corrosion showed reasonable agreement between estimates of the work of corrosion expansion and the energy required to crack the concrete. 23 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  16. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  17. Susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking of 254SMO SS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Micheli Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC of solubilized and sensitized 254SMO SS was studied in sodium chloride, and sodium fluoride solutions at 80 °C and sulfuric acid solutions in presence of sodium chloride at 25 °C. The influence of salt concentration, pH values and the addition of thiosulfate was examined. The susceptibility to SCC was evaluated by Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT, at 1.5 x 10-6 s-1 strain rate. The behavior of 254SMO was compared to those of AISI 316L SS and Hastelloy C276. 254SMO showed an excellent resistance to SCC in all conditions, except in the more acidic solutions (pH <= 1 where, in the sensitized conditions, intergranular stress corrosion cracking occurred.

  18. Corrosion-Fatigue Cracking in Al 7075 Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-09

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6355--14-9582 Corrosion -Fatigue Cracking in Al 7075 Alloys December 9, 2014 P.S. Pao...PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Corrosion -Fatigue Cracking in Al...Memorandum Report Corrosion -fatigue Aluminum alloys Environmental effect October 2011 – September 2014 63-2634-A4 Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified

  19. Transport and Corrosion Behavior of Cracked Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin

    to enter the concrete. This is, among others, important in the corrosion of reinforcing steel. When cracks protrude to the depth of reinforcing steel, liquids containing aggressive ions (i.e. chlorides associated with salts and sea water) may rapidly access and initiate corrosion of the reinforcing...... structures. These models currently lack some of the scientific validity to fully represent actual field structures, i.e. structures containing cracks. Further understanding, therefore is needed on the effect cracks have on transport and corrosion in reinforced concrete. The fundamental mechanisms...... of transport and corrosion in cracked, reinforced concrete are not yet fully understood. The scope of this study therefore is to develop a link between concrete cracks and the relevant transport mechanism(s) under particular environmental conditions. It is envisioned that a finite element model...

  20. Relationship among Parameters Evaluating Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The threshold stress, σc, for sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of seven pipeline steels and five other steels, the critical stress, SC, for seven pipeline steels and two drill rod steels with various strengths and the susceptibility to SCC, IRA or σf(SCC)/σf, for four pipeline steels, two drill rod steels and five other steels were measured. The results showed that there are no definite elationships among σc, SC and IRA or σf(SCC)/σf. The threshold stress for hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) during charging with loading in the H2SO4 solution, σc(H), decreased linearly with logarithm of the concentration of diffusible hydrogen c0, i.e., σC(H)=A-B Inc0 for four pipeline steels. σc(H) obtained with a special cathodic current ic, which was corresponding to the diffusible hydrogen concentration during immersing in the H2S solution, were consistent with σc for sulfide SCC for four pipeline steels.Therefore, σc for sulfide SCC can be measured using dynamically charging in the H2SO4 solution with the special cathodic current ic.

  1. Corrosion-Induced Concrete Cracking Model Considering Corrosion-Filled Paste

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yuxi; Wu, Yingyao; Jin, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    A TCP–TCL model is established to describe the relationship between the thickness of the corrosion-filled paste (CP) and that of the corrosion layer (CL). This model can describe the phenomenon that the corrosion filling in the concrete pores and accumulating at the steel/concrete interface occur synchronously. Based on the TCP–TCL model, a corrosion-induced concrete cracking model, which can quantitatively consider corrosion-filled paste at concrete/steel interface, is proposed. Combined wit...

  2. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Perez, S.; Rodrigo, P.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2011-01-01

    Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome...... the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect...

  3. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianghong; Xu, Fangyuan; Gao, Qian; Liu, Shenglin; Jin, Weiliang; Xu, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure. PMID:27428972

  4. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Mao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure.

  5. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianghong; Xu, Fangyuan; Gao, Qian; Liu, Shenglin; Jin, Weiliang; Xu, Yidong

    2016-07-14

    Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure.

  6. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  7. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-08-21

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

  8. Frequency dependence of fatigue and corrosion fatigue crack growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvasti, Mohammad Hassan; Chen, Weixing [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kania, Richard; Worthingham, Robert [TransCanada Pipelines Limited, Calgary, AB (Canada); Van Boven, Gregory [Spectra Energy Transmission Limited, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    It was in the mid-1980s that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was first found in near-neutral pH conditions on the TransCanada pipeline system. Since then, there have been many reports of pipeline cracking in Canada in these conditions. The huge quantity of pipelines in Canada and the number of failures have brought great interest in investigation of this cracking. A study was conducted on one X52 pipeline steel. It used compact tension specimens for corrosion fatigue and fatigue tests in air. The following conclusions were drawn: 1) crack growth in near-neutral pH conditions can be explained by a factor, which reflects the combined action of the mechanical driving force and the hydrogen effects; 2) mechanical dormancy can be common when oil and gas pipelines are in operation; 3) hydrogen is a determining factor of crack growth when pipeline steels are exposed to near-neutral pH conditions.

  9. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, Δt greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, Δx, decreased linearly with Δt. With Δt less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, Δx = Δx* which approached a limiting value of 1 μm. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  10. Some important considerations in the development of stress corrosion cracking test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Novak, S. R.; Williams, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of some of the precaution needs the development of fracture-mechanics based test methods for studying stress corrosion cracking involves. Following a review of pertinent analytical fracture mechanics considerations and of basic test methods, the implications for test corrosion cracking studies of the time-to-failure determining kinetics of crack growth and life are examined. It is shown that the basic assumption of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics analyses must be clearly recognized and satisfied in experimentation and that the effects of incubation and nonsteady-state crack growth must also be properly taken into account in determining the crack growth kinetics, if valid data are to be obtained from fracture-mechanics based test methods.

  11. Concrete cover cracking due to uniform reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica;

    2013-01-01

    is calculated using literature data on corrosion rate and Faraday’s law. The parameters varied comprise reinforcement diameter, concrete cover thickness and concrete material properties, viz. concrete tensile strength and ductility (plain concrete and fibre reinforced concrete). Results obtained from......Service life design (SLD) is an important tool for civil engineers to ensure that the structural integrity and functionality of the structure is not compromised within a given time frame, i.e. the service life. In SLD of reinforced concrete structures, reinforcement corrosion is of major concern...... and reinforcement de-passivation is a frequently used limit state. The present paper investigates an alternative limit state: corrosion-induced cover cracking. Results from numerical simulations of concrete cover cracking due to reinforcement corrosion are presented. The potential additional service life...

  12. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano-Perez, S., E-mail: sergio.lozano-perez@materials.ox.ac.u [University of Oxford, Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Rodrigo, P. [Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Dpto. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, c/ Tulipan s.n., 28933 Mostoles (Madrid) (Spain); Gontard, Lionel C. [Danish Technical University, Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Matematiktorvet Building 307, Room 115, 2800 Kogens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-01-31

    Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome this problem, different approaches to extract 3D information have been used in the recent years. In this work we will present the benefits of using 3D focused ion beam (FIB) slicing and electron tomography. 3D FIB slicing offers a fast and high throughput characterization while electron tomography offers the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect to the strain direction and grain boundary plane accurately measured.

  13. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela;

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...

  14. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  15. Smeared crack modelling approach for corrosion-induced concrete damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie Anusha; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    compared to experimental data obtained by digital image correlation and published in the literature. Excellent agreements between experimentally observed and numerically predicted crack patterns at the micro and macro scale indicate the capability of the modelling approach to accurately capture corrosion...

  16. Effect of hydrogen on stress corrosion cracking of copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jie QIAO

    2008-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior and susceptibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of pure copper were studied. SCC susceptibility of pure copper in a 1 M NaNO2 solution was increased by pre-charged hydrogen. The effect of hydrogen on the sus-ceptibility is more obvious in the low stress region due to the longer fracture time, which resulted in a longer time for more hydrogen to diffuse toward the crack tip. Synergistic effects of hydrogen and stress on corrosion and SCC pro-cesses were discussed. The results showed that an inter-action between stress and hydrogen at the crack tip could increase the anodic dissolution rate remarkably.

  17. Microbial Corrosion and Cracking in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1998-01-01

    and for recommendations in regards to electrochemical monitoring of MIC. The work presented here and further studies are also planned to lead to a Ph.D. thesis on "MIC monitoring based on mechanisms of corrosion".The results of laboratory experiments conducted in the period 1995 to 1997 are summarised. Conclusions...... will be based on results from the entire 3 year period, but only selected experimental data primarily from the latest experiments will be presented in detail here.Microbial corrosion of carbon steel under influence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is characterised by the formation of both biofilm...... and corrosion products (ferrous sulphides) on the metal surface. Experiments have been conducted on carbon steel exposed in near neutral (pH 6 to 8.5) saline hydrogen sulphide environment (0 to 100 mg/l total dissolved sulphide) for a period of 14 days. Furthermore coupons have been exposed in a bioreactor...

  18. Inhibiting Corrosion Cracking: Crack Tip Chemistry and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-14

    5 5. Swuzary 113 Rferences 114 wl NO 4L iv . List of Figuring 1. Microipette pulling machine . 29 2. Anodic polarization of 7075-T6 Al alloy in dilute...environment has a strong effect on microplastic behavior at the tip of a fatigue crack. Stolz and Pelloux suggest that nitrate ion competes with chloride...Crystalline Na2 N 20 29H20 precipitates when the filtrate is placed in a vacunm desiccator over sulfuric acid. The filtered precipitate is washed

  19. Microbial Corrosion and Cracking in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1998-01-01

    and corrosion products (ferrous sulphides) on the metal surface. Experiments have been conducted on carbon steel exposed in near neutral (pH 6 to 8.5) saline hydrogen sulphide environment (0 to 100 mg/l total dissolved sulphide) for a period of 14 days. Furthermore coupons have been exposed in a bioreactor...... for a period of up to 120 days in sulphide-producing environment controlled by biological activity of (SRB).Electrochemical studies have been conducted in order to characterise the electrochemical response of the biofilm / ferrous sulphide / metal interface and clarify whether the tested electrochemical...... and not electrochemically active film. The polarisation resistance increases with the film resistance and an small underestimation of corrosion rate is possible, if film resistance is large.· An electrochemically reactive film (ferrous sulphides) results in current contributions that will be added to the metal dissolution...

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  1. Application of new experimental methods to pipeline stress corrosion cracking. Annual report, March 1992-February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, C.G.; Kobayashi, T.; Becker, C.H.; Pound, B.G.; Simons, J.W.

    1993-04-01

    The objective of the investigation is to develop a physically based understanding of the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in pipeline steels by applying advanced fracture surface and electrochemical characterization techniques to samples taken from fielded pipeline. The investigations found that the effect of pressure fluctuations on the propagation of stress corrosion cracks was readily evident from an analysis of the topographies of conjugate fracture surfaces. Substantial crack blunting was produced under normal pipeline operating conditions. Corrosion deposits were removed from the fracture surfaces of a stress corrosion crack in a pipeline specimen recovered from service. The topography of the underlying metal surface appears to be preserved with little corrosion damage after crack formation. This allowed the cracking process to be reconstructed from the surface topography. In some cases, deposits on the fracture surfaces of stress corrosion cracks contain significant concentrations of metallic elements that are not found in pipeline steels but are likely to be commonplace in the surrounding environment.

  2. Cracking process of Fe-26Cr-1Mo during low cycle corrosion fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.Q.; Li, J.; Wang, Z.F.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Ke, W. (Academia Sinica, Shenyang (China). Corrosion Science Lab.); Zang, Q.S.; Wang, Z.G. (Academia Sinica, Shenyang (China). State Key Lab. for Fatigue and Fracture of Materials)

    1994-12-01

    The corrosion fatigue (CF) life has been divided classically into the initiation'' and propagation'' periods. Usually, the crack initiation process dominates the component lifetime under the low cycle CF condition because the crack propagates rapidly one initiated. Despite much work done on the research of the CF crack initiation mechanisms, however, a full understanding of crack initiation is still lacking. There are some limitations in explaining the CF crack initiation in an aqueous solution using the above four mechanisms individually. And, it is difficult to conduct experiments in which one mechanism along can be examined. Although CF is complicated, it is possible to reproduce a specific experiment condition which will have the dominant factor affecting the CF crack initiation. Once the cracks initiate on the smooth metal surface, their coalescence, micropropagation and macropropagation will take place successively. The initiated cracks propagate first in the range of several grains, and the behavior of the microcrack propagation is different from that of macrocrack propagation. For Fe-26Cr-1Mo ferritic stainless steel, the fundamental research work of straining electrode has been done by many investigators, but the observation of the material surface at different deformation processes has not been reported. In the present study, the detailed observation of the cracking process of the material has been carried out in low cycle CF.

  3. The influence of loading on the corrosion of steel in cracked ordinary Portland cement and high performance concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Shahzma Jafferali

    Most studies that have examined chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete have focused on sound concrete. However, reinforced concrete is seldom uncracked and very few studies have investigated the influence of cracked concrete on rebar corrosion. Furthermore, the studies that have examined the relationship between cracks and corrosion have focused on unloaded or statically loaded cracks. However, in practice, reinforced concrete structures (e.g. bridges) are often dynamically loaded. Hence, the cracks in such structures open and close which could influence the corrosion of the reinforcing steel. Consequently, the objectives of this project were (i) to examine the effect of different types of loading on the corrosion of reinforcing steel, (ii) the influence of concrete mixture design on the corrosion behaviour and (iii) to provide data that can be used in service-life modelling of cracked reinforced concretes. In this project, cracked reinforced concrete beams made with ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPCC) and high performance concrete (HPC) were subjected to no load, static loading and dynamic loading. They were immersed in salt solution to just above the crack level at their mid-point for two weeks out of every four (wet cycle) and, for the remaining two weeks, were left in ambient laboratory conditions to dry (dry cycle). The wet cycle led to three conditions of exposure for each beam: (i) the non-submerged region, (ii) the sound, submerged region and (iii) the cracked mid-section, which was also immersed in the solution. Linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse techniques were used to monitor the corrosion in the three regions. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical current noise and concrete electrical resistance measurements were also performed. These measurements illustrated that (i) rebar corroded faster at cracks than in sound concrete, (ii) HPC was more protective towards the rebar than OPCC even at cracks and (iii) there

  4. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of brass in ammonia solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Brass foil with a protective layer formed on one side was deflected during corrosion in an ammonia solution under various applied potentials, and then corrosion-induced stress generated at brass/dezincification layer under different potentials could be measured. At the same time, susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking(SCC) of brass in the ammonia solution under various applied potentials was measured using a single-edge notched specimen. At open-circuit potential, both corrosion-induced tensile stress and susceptibility to SCC(Iσ) had a maximum value. Both tensile stress σp and susceptibility Iσ decreased slightly under anodic polarization, but reduced steeply with the decrease in potential of cathodic polarization. At the cathodic potential of -500  mV(vs SCE), corrosion-induced stress became compressive because of copper-plating layer, correspondingly, susceptibility to SCC was zero. Therefore, the variation of SCC susceptibility with potential is consistent with that of the corrosion-induced additive stress.

  6. Concrete Cracking Prediction Including the Filling Proportion of Strand Corrosion Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The filling of strand corrosion products during concrete crack propagation is investigated experimentally in the present paper. The effects of stirrups on the filling of corrosion products and concrete cracking are clarified. A prediction model of crack width is developed incorporating the filling proportion of corrosion products and the twisting shape of the strand. Experimental data on cracking angle, crack width, and corrosion loss obtained from accelerated corrosion tests of concrete beams are presented. The proposed model is verified by experimental data. Results show that the filling extent of corrosion products varies with crack propagation. The rust filling extent increases with the propagating crack until a critical width. Beyond the critical width, the rust-filling extent remains stable. Using stirrups can decrease the critical crack width. Stirrups can restrict crack propagation and reduce the rust filling. The tangent of the cracking angle increases with increasing corrosion loss. The prediction of corrosion-induced crack is sensitive to the rust-filling extent.

  7. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  8. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  10. Threshold Stress Intensity of Hydrogen-Induced Cracking and Stress Corrosion Cracking of High Strength Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The threshold stress intensity of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for 40CrMo steel in 3.5 % NaCl solution decreased exponentially with the increase of yield strength. The threshold stress intensity of hydrogen-induced cracking during dynamical charging for 40CrMo steel decreased linearly with the logarithm of the concentration of diffusible hydrogen. This equation was also applicable to SCC of high strength steel in aqueous solution. The critical hydrogen enrichment concentration necessary for SCC of high strength steel in water decreased exponentially with the increase of yield strength. Based on the results, the relationship between KISCC and σys could be deduced.

  11. FEM Modelling of the Evolution of Corrosion Cracks in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Corrosion cracks are caused by the increasing volume of corrosion products during the corrosion of the reinforcement. After corrosion initiation the rust products from the corroded reinforcement will initially fill the porous zone near the reinforcement and the result in an expansion of the concr...

  12. In Situ X-ray Microtomography of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2017-08-01

    Structural materials are subjected to combinations of stress and corrosive environments that work synergistically to cause premature failure. Therefore, studies on the combined effect of stress and corrosive environments on material behavior are required. Existing studies have been performed in two dimensions that are inadequate for full comprehension of the three-dimensional (3D) processes related to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion-fatigue (CF) behavior. Recently, x-ray synchrotron tomography has evolved as an excellent technique to obtain the microstructure in 3D. Moreover, being nondestructive in nature, x-ray synchrotron tomography is well suited to study the evolution of microstructure with time (4D, or fourth dimension in time). This article presents our recent 4D studies on SCC and CF of Al 7075 alloys using x-ray synchrotron tomography.

  13. A Fracture Probability Competition Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanliang HUANG

    2001-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel was studied via polarization,slow strain rate and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. Many SCC mechanisms have been proposed in which hydrogen embrittlement and passive film rupture-repassivation theories are generally accepted, but they can hardly explain the SCC mechanism of austenitic stainless steel in acidic chloride solution adequately, because the steel is in active dissolution state and cathodic polarization can prevent it from occurring. Our experiment shows that the anodic current increases the creep rate and decreases the plastic strength of the material on single smooth specimen as well as at the SCC crack tip. The fractured surface was characterized as brittle cleavage, while the surface crack of smooth specimen was almost vertical to the tensile strength, which can confirm that the cracks were caused by tensile stresses. A fracture probability competition mechanism of SCC was proposed on the basis of the experimental results combined with the viewpoint of ductile-brittle fracture competition. When the anodic dissolution current is increased to a certain degree, the probability of fracture by tensile stress will exceed that by shear stress, and the brittle fracture will occur. The proposed SCC mechanism can not only explain the propagation of SCC cracks but can explain the crack initiation as well. The strain on the surface distributes unevenly when a smooth specimen is deformed, so does the anodic current distribution. The crack will initiate at a point where the anodic current density is large enough to cause the material at a specific point to fracture in brittle manner.

  14. Penetration of corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Brad J.; Peterova, Adela;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current-induced c......This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current......-induced corrosion (10, 50, and 100 mu A/cm(2)). X-ray attenuation measurements and visual investigations provided both qualitative and quantitative information on the penetration of solid corrosion products into the surrounding cementitious matrix. X-ray attenuation measurements provided time- and location......-dependent concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used to measure corrosion-induced deformations including deformations between steel and cementitious matrix as well as formation and propagation of corrosion-induced cracks. Based on experimental...

  15. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  16. Hierarchical petascale simulation framework for stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashishta, P.; Kalia, R. K.; Nakano, A.; Kaxiras, E.; Grama, A.; Lu, G.; Eidenbenz, S.; Voter, A. F.; Hood, R. Q.; Moriarty, J. A.; Yang, L. H.

    2008-07-01

    We are developing a scalable parallel and distributed computational framework consisting of methods, algorithms, and integrated software tools for multi-terascle-to-petascale simulations of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) with quantum-level accuracy. We have performed multimillion- to billion-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of deformation, flow, and fracture in amorphous silica with interatomic potentials and forces validated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Optimized potentials have been developed to study sulfur embrittlement of nickel with multimillion-to-multibillion atom MD simulations based on DFT and temperature dependent model generalized pseudopotential theory. We have also developed a quasi-continuum method embedded with quantum simulations based on DFT to reach macroscopic length scales and an accelerated molecular dynamics scheme to reach macroscopic time scales in simulations of solid-fluid interfaces that are relevant to SCC. A hybrid MD and mesoscale lattice Boltzmann simulation algorithm is being designed to study fluid flow through cracks.

  17. Elasto-Plasticity Critical Corrosive Ratio Model for RC Structure Corrosive Expanding Crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yueshun; LU Yiyan; LIU Li

    2007-01-01

    The parameter of filling expanding ratio n, plasticity factor k1 and deformation parameter k2 is raised, and then the elasto-plasticity critical corrosive ratio model for RC structure corrosive expanding crack based on elasto-plasticity theory is constructed in this paper. The influences of parameters such as filling expansion ratio n, plasticity factor k1, deformation parameter k2, Poisson ratio of concrete v, diameter of reinforced bar d and protective layer thickness c on the critical corrosive ratio are researched by theory analysis and experiments. The experimental results validate the accuracy of the model. According to the experimental study, the least squares solution is calculated as n=1.8,k1 =0.61,k2 =0.5.

  18. Computer Simulation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking via Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.W.

    2000-04-01

    Computer simulation has been applied to the investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in Ni-based alloys based on a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The simulation employs computational modules that address (a) transport and reactions of aqueous species giving rise to hydrogen generation at the liquid-metal interface, (b) solid state transport of hydrogen via intergranular and transgranular diffusion pathways, and (c) fracture due to the embrittlement of metallic bonds by hydrogen. A key focus of the computational model development has been the role of materials microstructure (precipitate particles and grain boundaries) on hydrogen transport and embrittlement. Simulation results reveal that intergranular fracture is enhanced as grain boundaries are weakened and that microstructures with grains elongated perpendicular to the stress axis are more susceptible to cracking. The presence of intergranular precipitates may be expected to either enhance or impede cracking depending on the relative distribution of hydrogen between the grain boundaries and the precipitate-matrix interfaces. Calculations of hydrogen outgassing and in gassing demonstrate a strong effect of charging method on the fracture behavior.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking in canistered waste package containers: Welds and base metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.S.

    1998-03-01

    The current design of waste package containers include outer barrier using corrosion allowable material (CAM) such as A516 carbon steel and inner barrier of corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as alloy 625 and C22. There is concern whether stress corrosion cracking would occur at welds or base metals. The current memo documents the results of our analysis on this topic.

  20. Sensitization, intergranular attack, stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation effects on the corrosion of iron--chromium--nickel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.C.S.

    1978-04-01

    A literature review is presented on the sensitization, intergranular attack, and stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels with emphasis on dilute solutions at temperatures below the boiling point of water. An attempt is made to list the possible sources of contaminants during manufacture, shipping, construction and all phases of operation of the sodium containing components. The susceptibility of the different materials to stress corrosion cracking in the various contaminants is discussed and suggestions to prevent serious problems are made. (GHT)

  1. Relativity between corrosion-induced stress and stress corrosion cracking of brass in an ammonia solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass in an ammonia solution with various pH values or under various applied potentials was measured at slow strain rate tests. The additive stress in the same solution was measured using two methods. The results indicate that the variation of the susceptibility to SCC with pH value or with potential is in an excellent agreement with the corrosion (passive film or dezincification layer)-induced stress. When pH ? 7, the corrosion-induced tensile stress and the susceptibility to SCC have maximum values and hardly change with increasing the pH value. However, when pH < 7, both the corrosion-induced tensile stress and the susceptibility to SCC reduce rapidly with decreasing the pH value. Both the corrosion-induced tensile stress and the susceptibility to SCC have maximum values at the open-circuit potential, decrease slightly under the anodic polarization, and reduce gradually to zero under the cathodic polarization.

  2. Consideration on corrosion fatigue crack life assessment; Fushoku hiro kiretsu hassei jumyo hyoka ni kansuru ichikosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajima, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Saito, T. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Morita, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Discussions were given on corrosion fatigue crack life by using corrosion fatigue crack initiation test and analysis. The test used 13Cr-based stainless steel as a test material, and aquamarine at 60{degree}C as a corrosion environment. The fatigue test was performed under a tension loading condition with a stress ratio of 0.1 and an iterative velocity of 1.7 Hz by using a 10-tonf fatigue testing machine. In the corrosion fatigue crack initiation test, a pit has been generated on a boundary of an exposed part and a painted part for masking, hence direct observation was impossible on pit growth behavior. Therefore, an intrinsic crack model was introduced from pit dimensions as observed from a fracture face, and analysis was made on corrosion fatigue crack growth by using the linear fracture dynamics, wherein clarification was made on a phenomenon occurring after the crack growth passes the pit growth until the test piece is fractured. A proposal was made to define the time when fatigue crack initiates and grows from the bottom of a pit as a result of surpassing the growth of corrosion pit as the corrosion fatigue crack life. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking for 316 stainless steel clips in a condensate stabilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Awar, A.; Aldajah, S.; Harhara, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, P. O. Box 17555 Al-AIn 17555 (United Arab Emirates)

    2011-09-15

    In one of the gas processing facilities in Abu Dhabi, UAE; a case of 316L stainless steel material failure occurred in the fractionating column due to stress cracking corrosion twice in a cycle of less than 2 years. This paper studies the stress corrosion cracking behavior of the 316L stainless steel in an accelerated corrosion environment and compares it with a higher corrosion resistant nickel alloy (Inconel 625). The experimental work was designed according to ASTM G36 standard, the samples were immersed in a boiling magnesium chloride medium which provided the accelerated corrosion environment and the tested samples were shaped into U-bend specimens as they underwent both plastic and elastic stresses. The specimens were then tested to determine the time required for cracks to initiate. The results of the experimental work showed that the main mode of failure was stress corrosion cracking initiated by the proven presence of chlorides, hydrogen sulfide, and water at elevated temperatures. Inconel 625 samples placed in the controlled environment showed better corrosion resistance as it took them an average of 56 days to initiate cracks, whereas it took an average of 24 days to initiate cracks in the stainless steel 316L samples. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs showed that the cracks in the stainless steel 316L samples were longer, wider, and deeper compared to the cracks of Inconel 625. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Dissolution Condensation Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Liquid Metals: Driving Force and Crack Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Evgeny E.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous solution is driven by exothermic reactions of metal oxidation. This stimulus, as well as classical mechanisms of SCC, does not apply to SCC in liquid metals (LMs). In the framework of the dissolution-condensation mechanism (DCM), we analyzed the driving force and crack kinetics for this nonelectrochemical mode of SCC that is loosely called "liquid metal embrittlement" (LME). According to DCM, a stress-induced increase in chemical potential at the crack tip acts as the driving force for out-of-the-tip diffusion mass transfer that is fast because diffusion in LMs is very fast and surface energy at the solid-liquid interface is small. In this article, we review two versions of DCM mechanism, discuss the major physics behind them, and develop DCM further. The refined mechanism is applied then to the experimental data on crack velocity V vs stress intensity factor, the activation energy of LME, and alloying effects. It is concluded that DCM provides a good conceptual framework for analysis of a unified kinetic mechanism of LME and may also contribute to SCC in aqueous solutions.

  5. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-destructive test method to monitor the development of corrosion products as well as the corrosion-induced formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials. A parametric experimental investigation (utilizing x-ray attenuation measurement technique...

  7. Monitoring reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced cracking using non-destructive x-ray attenuation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2011-01-01

    To test the applicability of the x-ray attenuation method to monitor the movement of corrosion products as well as the formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials reinforced mortar samples were prepared and tested under accelerated corrosion conditions. It is evident from...

  8. Behavior of Stress Corrosion Cracking in a Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Renguo; YANG Fanger; BLAWERT Carsten; DIETZEL Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was employed to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of ZE41 magnesium alloy in 0.01 M NaCl solution. Smooth tensile specimens with different thicknesses were strained dynamically in both longitudinal and transverse direction under permanent immersions at a strain rate of 10-6 s-1. It is found that ZE41 magnesium alloy is susceptible to SCC in 0.01 M NaCl solution. The SCC susceptibility of the thinner specimen is lower than that of the thicker specimen. Also, the longitudinal specimens are slightly more susceptible to SCC than the transverse specimens. The SCC mechanism of magnesium alloy is attributed to the combination of anodic dissolution with hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of ferritic/martensitic steel in super critical pressurized water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, T. [Naka Fusion Research Institute, JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)]. E-mail: hirose.takanori@jaea.go.jp; Shiba, K. [Naka Fusion Research Institute, JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Enoeda, M. [Naka Fusion Research Institute, JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Fusion Research Institute, JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2007-08-01

    A water-cooled solid breeder (WCSB) blanket cooled by high temperature SCPW (super critical pressurized water) is a practical option of DEMO reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to check the compatibility of the steel with SCPW. In this work, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H has been tested through slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in 23.5 MPa SCPW. And weight change behavior was measured up to 1000 h. F82H did not demonstrated stress corrosion cracking and its weight simply increased with surface oxidation. The weight change of F82H was almost same as commercial 9%-Cr steels. According to a cross-sectional analysis and weight change behavior, corrosion rate of F82H in the 823 K SCPW is estimated to be 0.04 mm/yr.

  10. Equivalent Crack Size Modelling of Corrosion Pitting in an AA7050-T7451 Aluminium Alloy and its Implications for Aircraft Structural Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    provides a quantitative measurement of the spatial density of pits14 but there is no quantitative measurement of corrosion pit metrics without...and stress corrosion cracking in the 7075 T6 components of the RAAF C-130 Hercules...Post-Fracture Examination................................................................... 16 3.5.3 Surface Roughness Measurement

  11. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan

    Several studies have recently reported that cold working exacerbates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials in various environments, including those in which they were previously thought to be immune. While these studies usually consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, the presence of grain boundaries results in local strain concentrations that are inhomogeneously distributed within the microstructure. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms by which the local strains generated by cold work influences SCC, α-brass and Alloy 600 were used in this study. The microscopic changes in the local strains caused by cold work and by SCC were measured using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction (PXM). While the plastic strains were qualitatively expressed through the local misorientation calculated from the orientation data measured by both EBSD and PXM, the elastic strains were determined from the Laue patterns measured by PXM. The interaction between the local strains, and the crack initiation and propagation during SCC was studied by comparing the strain distribution from the same area measured before cold work, after cold work, and again after SCC. In this way, apart from obtaining insights on the interaction, the relative importance of pre-existing strain concentrations and those created by crack propagation can be identified. Additionally, statistical analysis of the EBSD data from uncracked and cracked grain boundaries in Alloy 600 showed the susceptibility of the boundaries to increase when they were surrounded by high local strain concentrations and when the grains sharing the boundary had similar deformation tendency, but to be independent of the grain boundary angle. Finally, one of the contributors for the changes in the strain distribution during SCC can be the corrosion process itself which was examined by intermittently measuring the changes in local strains caused by intergranular corrosion on an

  12. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  13. Evaluation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of type 316 stainless steel irradiated in FBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, T. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Jitsukawa, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shiba, K. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Sato, Y. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shibahara, I. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Nakajima, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1993-12-01

    Type 316 stainless steel from the core of the experimental fast breeder reactor (FBR) JOYO was examined by the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test in pure, oxygenated-water and air and by the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test to evaluate a susceptibility to the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and the radiation-induced segregation (RIS). The solution annealed and 20% cold-worked materials had been irradiated at 425 C to a neutron fluence of 8.3x10[sup 26] n/m[sup 2] (> 0.1 MeV) which is equivalent to 40 displacement per atom (dpa). Intergranular cracking was induced by the SSRT in water at 200 and 300 C, but was not observed on specimen tested in water at 60 C and in air at 300 C. This indicates that irradiation increased a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in water. After the EPR test, grain boundary etching was observed in addition to grain face etching. This suggests Cr depletion may have occurred both at grain boundary and at defect clusters during the irradiation. The results are compared with the behavior of similar materials irradiated with different neutron spectrum. (orig.)

  14. The mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking in 7075 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Various aspects of stress-corrosion cracking in 7075 aluminum alloy are discussed. A model is proposed in which the continuous anodic path along which the metal is preferentially attacked consists of two phases which alternate as anodes.

  15. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  16. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  17. Corrosion fatigue behavior of fastening hole structure and virtual crack propagation tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhong Zhang; Xinlong Chang; Guozhi Lv; Hui Wang; Zhong Li; Yueliang Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of the LY12CZ aluminum alloy fastener involving a central hole in air or in 3.5wt% NaC1 solution was investigated. The experimental results indicated that the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate decreased with the increasing loading frequency, and in a corrosive environment, the crack growth rate was slightly larger than that in air.Based on the experimental results, the virtual corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were investigated and the stochastic process method and the AFGROW simulation method were presented. The normal process and lognormal process were considered for the stochastic process method based on the numerically fitted Paris equation. The distribution of crack size and the corresponding prob-abilistic model of crack length distribution for a given number of cycles can be found by integrating the stochastic process over time.Using the AFGROW software, the virtual simulation was carried out to analyze the corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior and the predicted crack growth curve was in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of thick section high strength low alloy steel.

    OpenAIRE

    Needham, William Donald

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the corrosion performance of weldments of a high strength low alloy(HSLA) steel in a simulated seawater environment. This steel, designated HSLA80, was developed by the United States Navy for use in ship structural applications. Stress corrosion CRACKING(SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement(HEM) were investigated by conducting 42 Wedge-Opening load(WOL) tests as a function of stress intensity and corrosion potential and 33 Slow Strain Rate(SSR) tests...

  19. Effect of prior corrosion state on the fatigue small cracking behaviour of 6151-T6 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xudong [Department of Engineering Mechanics, AML, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Naval Aeronautical Engineering Academy Qingdao Branch, Qingdao 266000 (China); Wang Xishu, E-mail: xshwang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, AML, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ren Huaihui; Chen Yinlong [Department of Engineering Mechanics, AML, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mu Zhitao [Naval Aeronautical Engineering Academy Qingdao Branch, Qingdao 266000 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship of corrosion pit and fatigue crack is established based on SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An equivalent relationship between accelerated and natural corrosion is build up. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prior corrosion damage is crucial to the subsequent fatigue cracking behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prior corrosion fatigue crack growth rate is expressed by the term of k{sigma}{sub max}{sup n}a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion states such as SC15, are defined based on corrosion spectrum. - Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to estimate the reliable effect of prior corrosion state on fatigue micro crack initiation and early stage propagation behaviour of aluminum alloy based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in situ observation. Results indicated that multi-cracks initiation occurred almost at the corrosion pits and the early stage of fatigue micro crack propagation behaviour can be described by K{sub I}/K{sub II}-mixed mode. The importance of crack-face interaction via crack-face corrosion pits interlocking/bridging was emphasised in the mixed mode. The fatigue crack growth rate in the corrosion states can be empirically expressed by the term of k{sigma}{sub max}{sup n}a.

  20. Modeling Threshold of Stress Intensity Factor in Iodine Induced Stress Corrosion Crack of Zirconium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG; Xin-yuan; CHEN; Peng

    2013-01-01

    KISCC,which is the threshold of stress intensity factor of iodine induced stress corrosion crack(ISCC)of Zirconium,reflects the susceptibility of ISCC of zirconium.Once the stress intensity factor surpasses the threshold,the cracking propagation modality in material will transform to transgranular from intergranular immediately and the velocity of the cracking will increase rapidly.Four key factors that’s

  1. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  2. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  3. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  4. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  5. Precursor Evolution and Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Cold-Worked Alloy 690 in Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Toloczko, Mychailo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Kruska, Karen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Bruemmer, Stephen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.

    2017-05-22

    Stress corrosion crack initiation of two thermally-treated, cold-worked (CW) alloy 690 (UNS N06690) materials was investigated in 360oC simulated PWR primary water using constant load tensile (CLT) tests and blunt notch compact tension (BNCT) tests equipped with direct current potential drop (DCPD) for in-situ detection of cracking. SCC initiation was not detected by DCPD for either the 21% or 31%CW CLT specimens loaded at their yield stress after ~9,220 hours, however intergranular (IG) precursor damage and isolated surface cracks were observed on the specimens. The two 31%CW BNCT specimens loaded at moderate stress intensity after several cyclic loading ramps showed DCPD-indicated crack initiation after 10,400 hours of exposure at constant stress intensity, which was resulted from significant growth of IG cracks. The 21%CW BNCT specimens only exhibited isolated small IG surface cracks and showed no apparent DCPD change throughout the test. Post-test cross-section examinations revealed many grain boundary (GB) nano-cavities in the bulk of all the CLT and BNCT specimens particularly for the 31%CW materials. Cavities were also found along GBs extending to the surface suggesting an important role in crack nucleation. This paper provides an overview of the evolution of GB cavities and discusses their effects on crack initiation in CW alloy 690.

  6. Influence of oxide films on primary water stress corrosion cracking initiation of alloy 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, J.; Viguier, B.; Cloué, J.-M.; Foucault, M.; Combrade, P.; Andrieu, E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study alloy 600 was tested in simulated pressurised water reactor (PWR) primary water, at 360 °C, under an hydrogen partial pressure of 30 kPa. These testing conditions correspond to the maximum sensitivity of alloy 600 to crack initiation. The resulting oxidised structures (corrosion scale and underlying metal) were characterised. A chromium rich oxide layer was revealed, the underlying metal being chromium depleted. In addition, analysis of the chemical composition of the metal close to the oxide scale had allowed to detect oxygen under the oxide scale and particularly in a triple grain boundary. Implication of such a finding on the crack initiation of alloy 600 is discussed. Significant diminution of the crack initiation time was observed for sample oxidised before stress corrosion tests. In view of these results, a mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water was proposed.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanliang Huang

    2002-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution was studied by slow strain rate (SSR) technique and fracture mechanics method. The fractured surface was characterized by cleavage fracture. In order to clarify the SCC mechanism, the effects of inhibitor KI on SCC behaviour were also included in this paper. A study showed that the inhibition effects of KI on SCC were mainly attributed to the anodic reaction of the corrosion process. The results of strain distribution in front of the crack tip of the fatigue pre-cracked plate specimens in air, in the blank solution (acidic chloride solution without inhibitor KI) and in the solution added with KI measured by speckle interferometry (SPI) support the unified mechanism of SCC and corrosion fatigue cracking (CFC).

  8. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior at Notched Hole in 7075-T6 Under Biaxial and Uniaxial Fatigue with Different Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH DIFFERENT PHASES... CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH DIFFERENT PHASES THESIS...UNLIMITED AFIT-ENY-MS-15-S-065 CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH

  9. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  10. Environmental Cracking of Corrosion Resistant Alloys in the Chemical Process Industry - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    A large variety of corrosion resistant alloys are used regularly in the chemical process industry (CPI). The most common family of alloys include the iron (Fe)-based stainless steels, nickel (Ni) alloys and titanium (Ti) alloys. There also other corrosion resistant alloys but their family of alloys is not as large as for the three groups mentioned above. All ranges of corrosive environments can be found in the CPI, from caustic solutions to hot acidic environments, from highly reducing to highly oxidizing. Stainless steels are ubiquitous since numerous types of stainless steels exist, each type tailored for specific applications. In general, stainless steels suffer stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hot chloride environments while high Ni alloys are practically immune to this type of attack. High nickel alloys are also resistant to caustic cracking. Ti alloys find application in highly oxidizing solutions. Solutions containing fluoride ions, especially acid, seem to be aggressive to almost all corrosion resistant alloys.

  11. Film-induced stress enhancing stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金许; 陈浩; 王燕斌; 乔利杰; 褚武扬

    2001-01-01

    A constant deflection device designed for use within a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to investigate the change in dislocation configuration ahead of a crack tip during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of type 310 austenitic stainless steel in a boiling MgCl2 solution, and the initiation process of stress corrosion microcrack. Results showed that corrosion process during SCC enhanced dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. Microcracks of SCC were initiated when the corrosion-enhanced dislocation emission and motion reached critical state.   A passive film formed during corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in the boiling MgCl2 solution generated a tensile stress. During SCC, the additive tensile stress generated at the metal/passive film interface helps enhance dislocation emission and motion.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloy 7000 series after two-step aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of one step-and a new (short two-step aging on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy 7000 series was investigated, using slow strain rate test and fracture mechanics method. Aging level in the tested alloy was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy and measurements of electrical resistivity. It was shown that the alloy after the new two-step aging is significantly more resistant to stress corrosion cracking. Values of tensile properties and fracture toughness are similar for both thermal states. Processes that take place at the crack tip have been considered. The effect of the testing solution temperature on the crack growth rate on the plateau was determined. Two values of the apparent activation energy were obtained. These values correspond to different processes that control crack growth rate on the plateau at higher and lower temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34028 i br. TR 34016

  13. Relationship between localized strain and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in an austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurtrey, M.D., E-mail: mdmcm@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Patrick, L.; Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-04-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Austenitic steel is more susceptible to intergranular corrosion after irradiation. {yields} Simulation and experiment used to study cracking in irradiated austentic steel. {yields} Cracking occurs at random high angle boundaries normal to the tensile stress. {yields} Cracking at boundaries with high normal stress and inability to accommodate strain. {yields} Boundary type, angle, and Taylor and Schmid factors affect strain accommodation. - Abstract: Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking may be linked to the local slip behavior near grain boundaries that exhibit high susceptibility to cracking. Fe-13Cr-15Ni austenitic steel was irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 360 deg. C to 5 dpa and strained in 288 deg. C simulated BWR conditions. Clusters of grains from the experiment were created in an atomistic simulation and then virtually strained using molecular dynamic simulation techniques. Cracking and grain orientation data were characterized in both the experiment and the simulation. Random high angle boundaries with high surface trace angles with respect to the tensile direction were found to be the most susceptible to cracking. Grain boundary cracking susceptibility was also found to correlate strongly with slip continuity, indicating that the strain accommodation at the boundary is related to cracking resistance. Higher cracking susceptibility was also found at grain boundaries adjacent to grains with low Schmid factor or high Taylor factor. The basic trends reported here are supported by both the experiments and the simulations.

  14. Effect of cold work on the growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in structural materials of nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Metallurgy

    1996-10-01

    The growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in austenitic stainless steels and nickel base alloy 600 exposed to simulated boiling water reactor coolant were measured by fracture mechanics testing techniques. Cold work may increase the crack growth rates up to one hundred times. In both, the annealed condition and the cold worked condition, the stress corrosion crack growth rates are independent of stress intensity over a wide K-range and crack growth rates correlate well with yield strength and hardness. In the annealed condition the fracture path is intergranular, but higher degrees of cold work introduce higher proportions of transgranular stress corrosion cracking.

  15. Development of chloride-induced corrosion in pre-cracked RC beams under sustained loading: Effect of load-induced cracks, concrete cover, and exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Linwen [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); François, Raoul, E-mail: raoul.francois@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Dang, Vu Hiep [Hanoi Architectural University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Hanoi (Viet Nam); L' Hostis, Valérie [CEA Saclay, CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gagné, Richard [Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    This paper deals with corrosion initiation and propagation in pre-cracked reinforced concrete beams under sustained loading during exposure to a chloride environment. Specimen beams that were cast in 2010 were compared to specimens cast in 1984. The only differences between the two sets of beams were the casting direction in relation to tensile reinforcement and the exposure conditions in the salt-fog chamber. The cracking maps, corrosion maps, chloride profiles, and cross-sectional loss of one group of two beams cast in 2010 were studied and their calculated corrosion rates were compared to that of beams cast in 1984 in order to investigate the factors influencing the natural corrosion process. Experimental results show that, after rapid initiation of corrosion at the crack tip, the corrosion process practically halted and the time elapsing before corrosion resumed depended on the exposure conditions and cover depth.

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  17. Corrosion of steel bars in cracked concrete made with ordinary portland, slag and fly ash cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, T.U.; Yamaji, T.; Hamada, H. [Port and Harbor Research Inst., Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (Japan); Aoyama, T. [PS Corp. (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A study was conducted in which the marine durability of ordinary portland cement, slag and fly ash cement was examined using 15 year old plain and reinforced concrete cylindrical specimens. The performance of these cements was then examined for pre-cracked reinforced concrete prism samples. The process of manufacturing cement emits huge amounts of carbon dioxide into the global atmosphere. Replacing a portion of the cement with by-products from the steel industry and thermal power plants (which are both huge emitters of carbon dioxide) can lower carbon dioxide emissions and also solve the disposal issue of slag and fly ash while increasing the long-term durability of concrete structures. In this study, concrete cylindrical specimens were made of ordinary portland cement, slag and fly ash cements. The specimens were 100 x 100 x 600 mm prisms of different types of cement. Water-to-cement ratios were 0.45 and 0.55. Both tap water and seawater were used as mixing water. The samples were exposed in tidal pools for 15 years to evaluate the compressive strength of the concrete, corrosion of the steel bars, and chloride-ion concentrations in the concrete. It was shown that, with the exception of fly ash cements, the compressive strength of most cements increased after 15 years of exposure compared to its 28 day strength. Type C slag cement demonstrated the best performance against chloride-ion at the surface of concrete made with slag and fly ash. Voids in the steel-concrete interface make it possible for corrosion pits to develop. The use of seawater as mixing water results in earlier strength development at 28 days and does not cause to the strength of the concrete to regress after 15-years of exposure, but it causes more corrosion of steel bars at a lower cover depth. Corrosion of steel bars is not an issue at deeper cover depths. 15 refs., 19 tabs., 13 figs.

  18. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-11-01

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In the present work, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. The cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  19. The design of an instrumented rebar for assessment of corrosion in cracked reinforced concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    An instrumented rebar is presented which was designed to have a realistic mechanical performance and to provide location dependent measurements to assess the environment with regards to reinforcement corrosion. The instrumented rebar was constructed from a hollowed 10 mm nominal diameter standard...... between the steel and concrete. Cracked beams with cast-in instrumented and standard rebars were ponded with a 10\\% chloride solution and the open circuit corrosion potential (OCP) of the 17 sensors was measured for up to 62 days. Measurements from the individual sensors indicate when and where active...... rebar with 17 electronically isolated corrosion sensors. Instrumented and standard rebars were cast into concrete beams and bending cracks were induced and held open using steel frames. Epoxy impregnation was used to assess and compare cracks in the concrete around the instrumented and standard rebar...

  20. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in stress corrosion cracking of weldments of advanced stainless steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Singh Raman

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of duplex stainless steels and their weldments in marine environments and the potential role of microbial activity in inducing SCC susceptibility. As a precursor to the topic the paper also reviews the performance of the traditional corrosion-resistant alloys and their weldments and the necessity of using duplex stainless steels (DSS), in order to alleviate corrosion problems in marine environments. Given that the performance of weldments of such steels is often unsatisfactory, this review also assesses the research needs in this area. In this context the paper also discusses the recent reports on the role of microorganisms in inducing hydrogen embrittlements and corrosion fatigue.

  1. Modeling the Time-to Corrosion Cracking of the Cover Concrete in Chloride Contaminated Reinforced Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Youping

    1996-01-01

    Significant factors on steel corrosion in chloride contaminated reinforced concrete and time-to-corrosion cracking were investigated in this study. Sixty specimens were designed with seven admixed chloride contents, three concrete cover depths, two reinforcing steel bar diameters, two exposure conditions, and a typical concrete with water to cement ratio of 0.45. Corrosion current density (corrosion rate), corrosion potential, ohmic resistance of concrete and temperature were measured monthly...

  2. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi, O.; Aghion, E. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Goldman, J., E-mail: jgoldman@mtu.edu [Biomedical Engineering Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, 49931 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg–6%Nd–2%Y–0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Here we have evaluated the corrosion resistance of a novel Mg alloy (EW62). • Rapid solidification reduces the hydrogen gas evolution and hydrogen embrittlement. • Rapid solidification increases the stress corrosion cracking resistance of EW62. • Improvement is due to enrichment with supersaturated Nd in the external oxide film. • Rapidly solidified and extruded EW62 may serve as a biodegradable medical implant.

  3. The Effect of Welding Residual Stress for Making Artificial Stress Corrosion Crack in the STS 304 Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion crack is one of the fracture phenomena for the major structure components in nuclear power plant. During the operation of a power plant, stress corrosion cracks are initiated and grown especially in dissimilar weldment of primary loop components. In particular, stress corrosion crack usually occurs when the following three factors exist at the same time: susceptible material, corrosive environment, and tensile stress (residual stress included. Thus, residual stress becomes a critical factor for stress corrosion crack when it is difficult to improve the material corrosivity of the components and their environment under operating conditions. In this study, stress corrosion cracks were artificially produced on STS 304 pipe itself by control of welding residual stress. We used the instrumented indentation technique and 3D FEM analysis (using ANSYS 12 to evaluate the residual stress values in the GTAW area. We used the custom-made device for fabricating the stress corrosion crack in the inner STS 304 pipe wall. As the result of both FEM analysis and experiment, the stress corrosion crack was quickly generated and could be reproduced, and it could be controlled by welding residual stress.

  4. Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Metallic Materials. Part III. Hydrogen Entry and Embrittlement in Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    Strength Steels," Stress Corrosion Cracking in High-Strength Steels and in Titanium and Altuninum Alloys, Naval Rasearch Laboratory, Washington, D.C...to pickling solutions. In all of these examples, the sulfide, cyanide, etc., caused a hydrogen-related problem that would not have existed in their...desorption reaction. In studying the pickling of low-carbon steel in various strong acids, Hudson’ 4 measured the corrosion rate and amount of hydr-ogen

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of X70 pipeline steel in near-neutral pH soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, B.Y.; Wang, J.Q.; Han, E.H.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Ke, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China). State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Inst. of Metal Research

    2004-07-01

    Near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is characterized by wide transgranular cracks with quasi-cleavage on the fracture surface, and there is usually little evidence of general or lateral corrosion. Near-neutral pH SCC is related to dissolution and hydrogen ingress into steel pipes because discharged atomic hydrogen can enter the steel so that cracks are initiated or grown by a combination of dissolution and hydrogen-embrittlement. In this study, the SCC cracking behaviour of an X70 pipeline was investigated using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and cyclic loading at high R and low frequency in a near-neutral pH soil solution saturated with 5 per cent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and 95 per cent nitrogen (N{sub 2}). Potentiodynamic polarization analyses and electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS) analyses were also conducted in order to examine the effect of the concentration of bicarbonate, bubbled gas and the addition of chloride ions on polarization behaviour. Results of the SSRT tests showed that transgranular SCC occurred in the soil solution. Crack initiation was associated with pitting. The pipe's susceptibility to SCC increased with decreases in applied electrochemical potential and strain rate. Cyclic loading tests showed that crack propagation processes were dominated by SCC. At high R and low frequencies, SCC was observed on fatigued, pre-cracked specimens. Results of the electrochemical tests showed that polarization behaviours were influenced by the concentrations of bicarbonate, bubbled gas, and the addition of chloride ions. It was concluded that the addition of chloride ion can influence film stability on pipeline specimen surfaces. 22 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  6. Probabilistic Lifetime Assessment of Marine Reinforced Concrete with Steel Corrosion and Cover Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chun-hua; JIN Wei-liang; LIU Rong-gui

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the durability behavior of marine reinforced concrete structure suffering from chloride attack, the structural service life is assumed to be divided into three critical stages, which can be characterized by steel corrosion and cover cracking. For each stage, a calculated model used to predict the lifetime is developed. Based on the definition of durability limit state, a probabilistic lifetime model and its time-dependent reliability analytical method are proposed considering the random natures of influencing factors. Then, the probabilistic lifetime prediction models are applied to a bridge pier located in the Hangzhou Bay with Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the time to corrosion initiation to follows a lognonnal distribution, while that the time from corrosion initiation to cover cracking t and the time for crack to develop from hairline crack to a limit crack width t can be described by Weibull distributions. With the permitted failure probability of 5.0%, it is also observed that the structural durability lifetime mainly depends on the durability life to and that the percentage of participation of tbe life t to the total service life grows from 61.5% to 83.6% when the cover thickness increases from 40 mm to 80 mm. Therefore, for any part of the marine RC bridge, the lifetime predictions and maintenance efforts should also be directed toward controlling the stage of corrosion initiation induced by chloride ion.

  7. Modeling time-dependent corrosion fatigue crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Mark E.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted with the susceptible S-L orientation of AA7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution, to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO. This environment enhances da/dN by five to ten-fold compared to fatigue in moist air. Time-based crack growth rates from quasi-static load experiments are an order of magnitude too small for accurate linear superposition prediction of da/dN for loading frequencies above 0.001 Hz. Alternate methods of establishing da/dt, based on rising-load or ripple-load-enhanced crack tip strain rate, do not increase da/dt and do not improve linear superposition. Corrosion fatigue is characterized by two regimes of frequency dependence; da/dN is proportional to f(exp -1) below 0.001 Hz and to F(exp 0) to F(exp -0.1) for higher frequencies. Da/dN increases mildly both with increasing hold-time at K(sub max) and with increasing rise-time for a range of loading waveforms. The mild time-dependence is due to cycle-time-dependent corrosion fatigue growth. This behavior is identical for S-L nd L-T crack orientations. The frequency response of environmental fatigue in several 7000 series alloys is variable and depends on undefined compositional or microstructural variables. Speculative explanations are based on the effect of Mg on occluded crack chemistry and embritting hydrogen uptake, or on variable hydrogen diffusion in the crack tip process zone. Cracking in the 7075/NaCl system is adequately described for life prediction by linear superposition for prolonged load-cycle periods, and by a time-dependent upper bound relationship between da/dN and delta K for moderate loading times.

  8. Study of the Effect of Swelling on Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the methodology used to study the effect of swelling on the crack growth rate of an irradiation-assisted stress corrosion crack that is propagating in highly irradiated stainless steel 304 material irradiated to 33 dpa in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. The material selection, specimens design, experimental apparatus and processes are described. The results of the current test are presented.

  9. Assessment of NDE Technologies for Detection and Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bond, Leonard J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2012-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in light water reactors (LWRs) has been a persistent form of degradation in the nuclear industry. Examples of SCC can be found for a range of materials in boiling and pressurized water reactor environments, including carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base stainless alloys. The evolution of SCC is often characterized by a long initiation stage followed by a phase of more rapid crack growth to failure. This provides a relatively short window of opportunity to detect the start of observable SCC, and it is conceivable that SCC could progress from initiation to failure between subsequent examinations when managed by applying periodic in-service inspection techniques. Implementation of advanced aging management paradigms in the current fleet of LWRs will require adaptation of existing measurement technologies and development of new technologies to perform on-line measurements during reactor operation to ensure timely detection of material degradation and to support the implementation of advanced diagnostics and prognostics. This paper considers several non-destructive examination (NDE) technologies with known sensitivity to detection of indicators for SCC initiation and/or propagation, and assesses these technologies with respect to their ability to detect and accurately characterize the significance of an SCC flaw. Potential strategies to improve SCC inspection or monitoring performance are offered to benefit management of SCC degradation in LWRs.

  10. A Study on the Residual Stress Improvement of PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) in DMW(Dissimilar Metal Weld)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Seung Gun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heung Bae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Since 2000s, most of the cracks are found in welds, especially in (DMW) dissimilar metal welds such as pressurizer safety relief nozzle, reactor head penetration, reactor bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI), and reactor nozzles. Even the cracks are revealed as a primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), it is difficult to find the cracks by current non destructive examination. The PWSCC is occurred by three incident factors, such as susceptible material, environmental corrosive condition, and welding residual stress. If one of the three factors can be erased or decreased, the PWSCC could be prevented. In this study, we performed residual stress analysis for DMW and several residual stress improvement methods. As the preventive methods of PWSCC, we used laser peening(IP) method, inlay weld(IW) method, and induction heating stress improvement(IHSI) method. The effect of residual stress improvement for preventive methods was compared and discussed by finite element modeling and residual stress of repaired DMW

  11. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  12. Crack Tip Plasticity Associated with Corrosion Assisted Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-15

    growing. The model presented is very similar to those previously developed by Antolovich , Saxena and I Chanani[83 and by Lanteigne and BailonE9] but...in crack tip plasticity associated with environment. The model used here is conceptually similar to those formulated by * Antolovich , et al,[ and...Lankford, J. ’Fatigue-Crack-Tip I Plastic Strains by the Stereoimaging Technique’ Exp. Mech. 1980 20, 3 134-139. 8. Antolovich , S. D., Saxena, A., and

  13. Fundamental understanding and life prediction of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs and energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States). Corporate Research and Development Center

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an approach for design and lifetime evaluation of environmental cracking based on experimental and fundamental modeling of the underlying processes operative in crack advance. In detailed this approach and its development and quantification for energy (hot water) systems, the requirements for a life prediction methodology will be highlighted and the shortcomings of the existing design and lifetime evaluation codes reviewed. Examples are identified of its use in a variety of cracking systems, such as stainless steels, low alloy steels, nickel base alloys, and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor (BWR) water, as well as preliminary use for low alloy steel and Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and turbine steels in steam turbines. Identification of the common aspects with environmental cracking in other hot water systems provides a secure basis for its extension to related energy systems. 166 refs., 49 figs.

  14. Research on mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, D.B.; Pelloux, R.M.

    1981-06-01

    The results of internal gas pressurization tests, primarily at 320/sup 0/C, on cladding tubes from two suppliers, Supplier A and Supplier B, are presented. The two lots show a substantial difference in iodine SCC susceptibility so a test matrix is used to resolve the relative contributions of surface condition, residual stress, and texture. Additional tests with constant deflection split-ring specimens and with unstressed cladding segments are used to understand crack initiation and the early crack growth stages of SCC. The difference in SCC susceptibility is due to crystallographic texture. Other variables such as surface finish, stress relief temperature, and residual stress have little or no effect. Mechanical properties, crack initiation, and crack propagation all depend on texture. Both initiation and propagation features are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A mechanism for crack initiation consistent with most observations in this study and with the work of other investigators is proposed. At 320/sup 0/C, lifetime is crack initiation limited while several tests at 390/sup 0/C indicate that lifetime is less initiation limited at higher temperature. 31 figures, 9 tables.

  15. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  16. A Global Refiability Assessment Method on Aging Offshore Platforms with Corrosion and Cracks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Chun-yan; LI Shan-shan; CHEN Ming-lu

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion and fatigue cracks are major threats to the structural integrity of aging offshore platforms.For the rational estimation of the safety levels of aging platforms,a global reliability assessment approach for aging offshore platforms with corrosion and fatigue cracks is presented in this paper.The base shear capacity is taken as the global ultimate strength of the offshore plaffoms,it is modeled as a random process that decreases with time in the presence of corrosion and fatigue crack propagation.And the corrosion and fatigue crack growth rates in the main members and key joints are modeled as random variables.A simulation method of the extreme wave loads which are applied to the structures of offshore platforms is proposed too.Furthermore,the statistics of global base shear capacity and extreme wave loads are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation method.On the basis of the limit state equation of global failure mode,the instantaneous reliability and time dependent reliability assessment methods are both presented in this paper.Finally the instantaueous reliability index and time dependent failure probability of a jacket platform are estimated with different ages in the demonstration example.

  17. Modeling of concrete cracking due to corrosion process of reinforcement bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossio, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.bossio@unina.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, I-80125 Italy (Italy); Monetta, Tullio, E-mail: monetta@unina.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, I-80125 Italy (Italy); Bellucci, Francesco, E-mail: bellucci@unina.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, I-80125 Italy (Italy); Lignola, Gian Piero, E-mail: glignola@unina.it [Department of Structures for Engineering and Architecture, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Prota, Andrea, E-mail: aprota@unina.it [Department of Structures for Engineering and Architecture, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    The reinforcement corrosion in Reinforced Concrete (RC) is a major reason of degradation for structures and infrastructures throughout the world leading to their premature deterioration before design life was attained. The effects of corrosion of reinforcement are: (i) the reduction of the cross section of the bars, and (ii) the development of corrosion products leading to the appearance of cracks in the concrete cover and subsequent cover spalling. Due to their intrinsic complex nature, these issues require an interdisciplinary approach involving both material science and structural design knowledge also in terms on International and National codes that implemented the concept of durability and service life of structures. In this paper preliminary FEM analyses were performed in order to simulate pitting corrosion or general corrosion aimed to demonstrate the possibility to extend the results obtained for a cylindrical specimen, reinforced by a single bar, to more complex RC members in terms of geometry and reinforcement. Furthermore, a mechanical analytical model to evaluate the stresses in the concrete surrounding the reinforcement bars is proposed. In addition, a sophisticated model is presented to evaluate the non-linear development of stresses inside concrete and crack propagation when reinforcement bars start to corrode. The relationships between the cracking development (mechanical) and the reduction of the steel section (electrochemical) are provided. Finally, numerical findings reported in this paper were compared to experimental results available in the literature and satisfactory agreement was found.

  18. Methodology to evaluate the crack growth rate by stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metals weld in simulated environment of PWR nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Rabelo, Emerson G., E-mail: raphaelmecanica@gmail.com, E-mail: caf@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Inconel alloys weld metal is widely used to join dissimilar metals in nuclear reactors applications. It was recently observed failures of weld components in plants, which have triggered an international effort to determine reliable data on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of this material in reactor environment. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to determine the crack growth rate caused by stress corrosion in Inconel alloy 182, using the specimen (Compact Tensile) in simulated PWR environment. (author)

  19. Mechanical factors in primary water stress corrosion cracking of cold-worked stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammadi, Rashid Al, E-mail: rashid.alhammadi@fanr.gov.ae [Nuclear Security Division, Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Yi, Yongsun, E-mail: yongsun.yi@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Zaki, Wael, E-mail: wael.zaki@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cho, Pyungyeon, E-mail: pyungyeon.cho@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Jang, Changheui, E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • PWSCC of cold-worked austenitic stainless steel was studied. • Finite element analysis was performed on a compact tension specimen. • Mechanical fields near a crack tip were evaluated using FEA. • The dependence of mechanical factors on K{sub I} and yield stress was investigated. • The crack tip normal stress was identified as a main factor controlling PWSCC. - Abstract: Finite element analysis was performed on a compact tension specimen to determine the stress and strain distributions near a crack tip. Based on the results, the crack tip stain rates by crack advance and creep rates near crack tip were estimated. By comparing the dependence of the mechanical factors on the stress intensity factor and yield stress with that of the SCC crack growth rates, it was tried to identify the main mechanical factor for the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels. The analysis results showed that the crack tip normal stress could be the main mechanical factor controlling the PWSCC, suggesting that the internal oxidation mechanism might be the most probable PWSCC mechanism of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels.

  20. Detection of corrosion processes and fatigue cracks by means of acoustic emission monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagenbrein, Andreas; Tscheliesnig, Peter [TUEV Austria Services GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Wachsmuth, Janne; Bohse, Juergen [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes for structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars, and ships. Within the 7{sup th} EC framework programme the aim of project CORFAT is to develop a new monitoring technology based on acoustic emission testing (AT) of the structural integrity in terms of proceeding degradation. Differentiation of acoustic emission (AE) signals of real degradation processes by fatigue crack growth or active corrosion from operational or environmental background noise requires the signal classification using also pattern recognition. Therefore, a data base of AE signals related to the different source mechanisms was built up experimentally. In this article selected results of corrosion and fatigue tests in the laboratory as well as results of monitoring background noise during moving of a road tanker are described. (orig.)

  1. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  2. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Acid Soil Environment with SRB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Xie, Fei; Wu, Ming; Liu, Guangxin; Zong, Yue; Li, Xue

    2017-06-01

    Self-designed experimental device was adopted to ensure the normal growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sterile simulated Yingtan soil solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X80 pipeline steel in simulated acid soil environment was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, slow strain rate test, and scanning electron microscope. Results show that the presence of SRB could promote stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. In a growth cycle, polarization resistance first presents a decrease and subsequently an increase, which is inversely proportional to the quantities of SRB. At 8 days of growth, SRB reach their largest quantity of 1.42 × 103 cells/g. The corrosion behavior is most serious at this time point, and the SCC mechanism is hydrogen embrittlement. In other SRB growth stages, the SCC mechanism of X80 steel is anodic dissolution. With the increasing SRB quantities, X80 steel is largely prone to SCC behavior, and the effect of hydrogen is considerably obvious.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Multipass TIG-Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy in 3.5 wt pct NaCl Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, A.; Sreekumar, K.; Raja, V. S.

    2012-09-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the AA2219 aluminum alloy in the single-pass (SP) and multipass (MP) welded conditions was examined and compared with that of the base metal (BM) in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution using a slow-strain-rate technique (SSRT). The reduction in ductility was used as a parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of both the BM and welded joints. The results showed that the ductility ratio ( ɛ NaCl/( ɛ air) was 0.97 and 0.96, respectively, for the BM and MP welded joint, and the same was marginally reduced to 0.9 for the SP welded joint. The fractographic examination of the failed samples revealed a typical ductile cracking morphology for all the base and welded joints, indicating the good environmental cracking resistance of this alloy under all welded conditions. To understand the decrease in the ductility of the SP welded joint, preexposure SSRT followed by microstructural observations were made, which showed that the decrease in ductility ratio of the SP welded joint was caused by the electrochemical pitting that assisted the nucleation of cracks in the form of corrosion induced mechanical cracking rather than true SCC failure of the alloy. The microstructural examination and polarization tests demonstrated a clear grain boundary (GB) sensitization of the PMZ, resulting in severe galvanic corrosion of the SP weld joint, which initiated the necessary conditions for the localized corrosion and cracking along the PMZ. The absence of PMZ and a refined fusion zone (FZ) structure because of the lesser heat input and postweld heating effect improved the galvanic corrosion resistance of the MP welded joint greatly, and thus, failure occurred along the FZ.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking in low-pressure turbine discs in an NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Itoh [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Research and Development Center (Japan); Takashi, Momoo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Machinery Works (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    From past research, it is known that stress corrosion cracking in low-pressure turbine discs occurs in an environment near that of deaerated pure water. Nevertheless, in units with molar ratio control, there is a possibility of NaCl concentrating as an impurity in the dry/wet boundary region. Long-term immersion tests were conducted at 373 K to 473 K with the NaCl concentration predicted to become 5%. It was found that, when FeCl{sub 3} or other oxidizer was added, corrosion increased remarkably and SCC was initiated. When cracks were initiated, they were primarily transgranular; as the test temperature was decreased, initiation was accelerated but conversely crack propagation was reduced. (author)

  6. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, O; Aghion, E; Goldman, J

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd2O3 content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications.

  7. Characterizing the effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking of cold worked Alloy 690 in supercritical water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lefu; Chen, Kai; Du, Donghai; Gao, Wenhua; Andresen, Peter L.; Guo, Xianglong

    2017-08-01

    The effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by measuring crack growth rates (CGRs) of 30% cold worked (CW) Alloy 690 in supercritical water (SCW) and inert gas environments at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 550 °C. The SCC crack growth rate under SCW environments can be regarded as the cracking induced by the combined effect of corrosion and creep, while the CGR in inert gas environment can be taken as the portion of creep induced cracking. Results showed that the CW Alloy 690 sustained high susceptibility to intergranular (IG) cracking, and creep played a dominant role in the SCC crack growth behavior, contributing more than 80% of the total crack growth rate at each testing temperature. The temperature dependence of creep induced CGRs follows an Arrhenius dependency, with an apparent activation energy (QE) of about 225 kJ/mol.

  8. A Fundamental study of remedial technology development to prevent stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Gyu; Lee, Chang Soon [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    Most of the PWR Steam generators with tubes in Alloy 600 alloy are affected by Stress Corrosion Cracking, such as PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) and ODSCC(Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking). This study was undertaken to establish the background for remedial technology development to prevent SCC. in the report are included the following topics: (1) General: (i) water chemistry related factors, (ii) Pourbaix(Potential-pH) Diagram, (iii) polarization plot, (iv) corrosion mode of Alloy 600, 690, and 800, (v) IGA/SCC growth rate, (vi) material suspetibility of IGA/SCC, (vii) carbon solubility of Alloy 600 (2) Microstructures of Alloy 600 MA, Alloy 600 TT, Alloy 600 SEN Alloy 690 TT(Optical, SEM, and TEM) (3) Influencing factors for PWSCC initiation rate of Alloy 600: (i) microstructure, (ii) water chemistry(B, Li), (iii) temperature, (iv) plastic deformation, (v) stress relief annealing (4) Influencing factors for PWSCC growth rate of Alloy 600: (i) water chemistry(B, Li), (ii) Scott Model, (iii) intergranular carbide, (iv) temperature, (v) hold time (5) Laboratory conditions for ODSCC initiation rate: 1% NaOH, 316 deg C; 1% NaOH, 343 deg C; 50% NaOH, 288 deg C; 10% NaOH, 302 deg C; 10% NaOH, 316 deg C; 50% NaOH, 343 deg C (6) Sludge effects for ODSCC initiation rate: CuO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (7) Influencing factors for PWSCC growth rate of Alloy 600: (i) Caustic concentration effect, (ii) carbonate addition effect (8) Sulfate corrosion: (i) sulfate ratio and pH effect, (ii) wastage rate of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (9) Crevice corrosion: (i) experimental setup for crevice corrosion, (ii) organic effect, (iii) (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + NaOH) effect (10) Remedial measures for SCC: (i) Inhibitors, (ii) ZnO effect. (author). 30 refs., 174 figs., 51 tabs.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of soil stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of API grade steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, A.H.S.; Castro, B.B.; Ponciano, J.A.C. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). COPPE

    2004-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in carbon steels is a form of deterioration that can occur during the service life of a pipeline that is exposed to mechanical stress and strains. A study was conducted to investigate SCC and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of API grade steels in contact with soil. The physical, chemical and bacteriological characteristics of different soil samples were determined. Slow strain rate tests were performed using electrolytes obtained in the soil samples taken from different points near buried pipelines. Stress versus strain curves were obtained at different electrode potentials for API X46, X60 and X80 steels. The results showed the conjoint incidence of SCC and HE, depending on the potential imposed. It was revealed that HE contributes to the initiation of cracking and crack propagation. Cracking morphology was similar to the SCC found in field situations where transgranular cracking was detected in a pipeline that had collapsed as a result of land creeping. The material exhibited signs of secondary cracking and lower ductility, even under cathodic potentials. It was noted that the methodology used in this study was not able to reproduce the possible effect of microbial induced corrosion. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. Hydrogen-related stress corrosion cracking in line pipe steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between hydrogen concentration (C0) and the critical stress intensity factor for propagation of hydrogen-related cracks has been established by fracture mechanical testing of CT-specimens for the heat affected zone of an X-70 pipeline steel. This has been compared with field...

  11. Inhibition of Ce3+ on Stress Corrosion Crack of High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Wen-ting

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibility of 7A04 high strength aluminum alloy in 3.5% (mass fraction NaCl solution and the Ce3+ inhibition of SCC were investigated by slow stress rate test(SSRT, using constant current polarization, electrochemical noise (ECN and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques. The inhibition mechanism of Ce3+ ions on the initiation and propagation of cracking was also analyzed. The results indicate that both anodic and cathodic galvanostatic polarizations can accelerate the SCC of 7A04, the former increases anodic dissolution but the latter accelerates hydrogen embrittlement of crack tip. SCC susceptibility of 7A04 can be reduced effectively by the addition of cerium ions, the fracture time is delayed and slowed down, but only during the initiation other than the propagation stage of cracking. Ce3+ ions can restrain the initiation of metastable pitting on the surface of 7A04 specimen, which therefore increase the induction time of the cracking since that the micro pits are usually the source of cracking.However, once the crack begins to propagate or the specimen is notched, the addition of cerium ions can rarely inhibit the cracking process. This is possibly attributed to that the radius of Ce3+ ion is too large to diffuse into the crack tip or it is hard to form protective CeO2 layer, Ce3+ ion therefore fails to rehabilitate the active alloy at the crack tip and further reduce the SCC developing rate of 7A04. SEM also indicates that the crack initiation of smooth 7A04 specimens is mainly induced by metastable or stable pits.

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  13. Chloride stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in boric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, Ph. [Electricite de France, 92 - Paris la Defense (France); Noel, D.; Gras, J.M.; Prieux, B. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret-sur-Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-10-01

    The high nickel austenitic alloys are generally considered to have good resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking. In the standard boiling magnesium chloride solution tests, alloys with more than 40% nickel are immune. Nevertheless, more recent data show that cracking can occur in both Alloys 600 and 690 if the solution is acidified. In other low pH media, such as boric acid solution at 100 deg C, transgranular and intergranular cracking are observed in Alloy 600 in the presence of minor concentrations of sodium chloride (2g/I). In concentrated boric acid at higher temperatures (250 and 290 deg C), intergranular cracking also occurs, either when the chloride concentration is high, or at low chloride contents and high oxygen levels. The role of pH and a possible specific action of boric acid are discussed, together with the influence of electrochemical potential. (author) 21 refs.

  14. Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steel by sulfur-containing compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.; Kendig, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in thiosulfate solutions has been studied using constant extension rate tests. Very low concentrations of about 6.10/sup -7/M Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (0.1ppm) gave cracking. With boric acid added, higher concentrations (1ppm) were required. The SCC was shown to be electrochemically controlled. Below -0.5v/sub SCE/ (-0.75/sub SHE/) no SCC took place; above this potential the rate of SCC increased with potential. An induction period was required before SCC continued above -0.5v if the potential was held at or below this value for extended times. This period was associated with the build up of an aggressive solution of thiosulfate decomposition products within the crack. The cracking process has been considered to be controlled by rupture of a salt layer and not a passivating oxide.

  15. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2017-07-01

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation of three mill-annealed (MA) alloy 600 heats in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water has been investigated using constant load tests equipped with in-situ direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurement capabilities. SCC initiation times were greatly reduced by a small amount of cold work. Shallow intergranular (IG) attack and/or cracks were found on most high-energy grain boundaries intersecting the surface with only a small fraction evolving into larger cracks and IGSCC growth. Crack depth profiles were measured and related to DCPD-detected initiation response. Processes controlling the SCC initiation in MA alloy 600 are discussed. IN PRESS, CORRECTED PROOF, 05/02/2017 - mfl

  16. Uncertainty quantification methodologies development for stress corrosion cracking of canister welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This letter report presents a probabilistic performance assessment model to evaluate the probability of canister failure (through-wall penetration) by SCC. The model first assesses whether environmental conditions for SCC – the presence of an aqueous film – are present at canister weld locations (where tensile stresses are likely to occur) on the canister surface. Geometry-specific storage system thermal models and weather data sets representative of U.S. spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage sites are implemented to evaluate location-specific canister surface temperature and relative humidity (RH). As the canister cools and aqueous conditions become possible, the occurrence of corrosion is evaluated. Corrosion is modeled as a two-step process: first, pitting is initiated, and the extent and depth of pitting is a function of the chloride surface load and the environmental conditions (temperature and RH). Second, as corrosion penetration increases, the pit eventually transitions to a SCC crack, with crack initiation becoming more likely with increasing pit depth. Once pits convert to cracks, a crack growth model is implemented. The SCC growth model includes rate dependencies on both temperature and crack tip stress intensity factor, and crack growth only occurs in time steps when aqueous conditions are predicted. The model suggests that SCC is likely to occur over potential SNF interim storage intervals; however, this result is based on many modeling assumptions. Sensitivity analyses provide information on the model assumptions and parameter values that have the greatest impact on predicted storage canister performance, and provide guidance for further research to reduce uncertainties.

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Aluminum Alloys in Saline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, N. J. Henry; Scamans, G. M.

    2013-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu (AA7xxx) aluminum alloys exposed to saline environments at temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) has been reviewed with particular attention to the influences of alloy composition and temper, and bulk and local environmental conditions. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates at room temperature for peak- and over-aged tempers in saline environments are minimized for Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys containing less than ~8 wt pct Zn when Zn/Mg ratios are ranging from 2 to 3, excess magnesium levels are less than 1 wt pct, and copper content is either less than ~0.2 wt pct or ranging from 1.3 to 2 wt pct. A minimum chloride ion concentration of ~0.01 M is required for crack growth rates to exceed those in distilled water, which insures that the local solution pH in crack-tip regions can be maintained at less than 4. Crack growth rates in saline solution without other additions gradually increase with bulk chloride ion concentrations up to around 0.6 M NaCl, whereas in solutions with sufficiently low dichromate (or chromate), inhibitor additions are insensitive to the bulk chloride concentration and are typically at least double those observed without the additions. DCB specimens, fatigue pre-cracked in air before immersion in a saline environment, show an initial period with no detectible crack growth, followed by crack growth at the distilled water rate, and then transition to a higher crack growth rate typical of region 2 crack growth in the saline environment. Time spent in each stage depends on the type of pre-crack ("pop-in" vs fatigue), applied stress intensity factor, alloy chemistry, bulk environment, and, if applied, the external polarization. Apparent activation energies ( E a) for SCC growth in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys exposed to 0.6 M NaCl over the temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) for under-, peak-, and over-aged low-copper-containing alloys (alloys (>~0.8 wt pct), they are typically

  19. Modeling of Stress Corrosion Cracking for High Level Radioactive-Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, S C; Gordon, G M; Andresen, P L; Herrera, M L

    2003-06-20

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model has been adapted for performance prediction of high level radioactive-waste packages to be emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive-waste repository. SCC is one form of environmentally assisted cracking due to three factors, which must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. For waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository, the outer barrier material is Alloy 22, a highly corrosion resistant alloy, the environment is represented by the water film present on the surface of the waste package from dripping or deliquescence of soluble salts present in any surface deposits, and the stress is principally the weld induced residual stress. SCC has historically been separated into ''initiation'' and ''propagation'' phases. Initiation of SCC will not occur on a smooth surface if the surface stress is below a threshold value defined as the threshold stress. Cracks can also initiate at and propagate from flaws (or defects) resulting from manufacturing processes (such as welding). To account for crack propagation, the slip dissolution/film rupture (SDFR) model is adopted to provide mathematical formulas for prediction of the crack growth rate. Once the crack growth rate at an initiated SCC is determined, the time to through-wall penetration for the waste package can be calculated. The SDFR model relates the advance (or propagation) of cracks, subsequent to the crack initiation from bare metal surface, to the metal oxidation transients that occur when the protective film at the crack tip is continually ruptured and repassivated. A crack, however, may reach the ''arrest'' state before it enters the ''propagation'' phase. There exists a threshold stress intensity factor, which provides a criterion for determining if an initiated crack or pre

  20. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended form of Dirichlet energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harry Yosh

    2013-12-01

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the variational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed with extended forms of Dirichlet energy, and Dirichlet principle is applied to them to solve the variational problem that represents SCC and normal extension on pipe surface. Based on the model and the maximum entropy principle, the statistical nature of SCC colony is discussed and it is indicated that the crack has discrete energy and length under ideal isotropy of materials and thermal equilibrium.

  1. Corrosion-Fatigue Cracking in HY-80 and HY-130 Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-22

    on HY80 steel and HY-130 steel are shown in Fig. A-13 through A-16 for various specimens tested at different load ratios and environments. Because...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6355--15-9584 Corrosion-Fatigue Cracking in HY-80 and HY-130 Steels January 22, 2015 P.S...Cracking in HY-80 and HY-130 Steels P.S. Pao and R.L. Holtz Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375-5328 Office of Naval

  2. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress..., appendix A3, and remediate the threat in accordance with ASME/ANSI B31.8S, appendix A3, section A3.4....

  3. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  4. An Industrial Perspective on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Some Commercially Used Carbon Steels and Corrosion-Resistant Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Yugo; Daigo, Yuzo; Sugahara, Katsuo

    2017-08-01

    Commercial metals and alloys like carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-based super alloys frequently encounter the problem of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) and resulting failure in engineering components. This article aims to provide a perspective on three critical industrial applications having EAC issues: (1) corrosion and cracking of carbon steels in automotive applications, (2) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in salt production and processing, and (3) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water. The review focuses on current industrial-level understanding with respect to corrosion fatigue, hydrogen-assisted cracking, or stress corrosion cracking, as well as the dominant factors affecting crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, some ongoing industrial studies and directions of future research are also discussed.

  5. SRNL SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SCC STUDIES AT ROOM TEMPERTURE [stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2014-11-12

    Phase II, Series 2 corrosion testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy 3013 container has been completed. The corrosion tests are part of an integrated plan conducted jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Savannah River Site. SRNL was responsible for conducting corrosion studies in small-scale vessels to address the influence of salt composition, water loading, and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and on the resulting corrosion of Type 304L and 316L stainless steel (304L and 316L). This testing was conducted in two phases: Phase I evaluated a broad spectrum of salt compositions and initial water loadings on the salt mixtures exposed to 304L and 316L and the resulting corrosion; Phase II evaluated the corrosion of 304L at specific water loadings and a single salt composition. During Phase I testing at high initial moisture levels (0.35 to 1.24 wt%)a, the roomtemperature corrosion of 304L exposed to a series of plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures ranged from superficial staining to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). 304L teardrop coupons that exhibited SCC were directly exposed to a mixture composed of 98 wt % PuO2, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl2. Cracking was not observed in a 316L teardrop coupon. Pitting was also observed in this environment for both 304L and 316L with depths ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Neither pitting nor SCC was observed in mixtures with a greater chloride salt concentration (5 and 28 wt%). These results demonstrated that for a corrosive solution to form a balance existed between the water loading and the salt chloride concentration. This chloride solution results from the interaction of loaded water with the hydrating CaCl2 salt. In Phase II, Series 1 tests, the SCC results were shown to be reproducible with cracking occurring in as little as 85 days. The approximate 0.5 wt% moisture level was found to

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Alloy 22 in Multi-Ionic Aqueous Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.J. King; J.C. Estill; R.B. Rebak

    2002-07-15

    The US Department of Energy is characterizing a potential repository site for nuclear waste in Yucca Mountain (NV). In its current design, the nuclear waste containers consist of a double metallic layer. The external layer would be made of NO6022 or Alloy 22 (Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W-3Fe). Since over their lifetime, the containers may be exposed to multi-ionic aqueous environments, a potential degradation mode of the outer layer could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In general, Alloy 22 is extremely resistant to SCC, especially in concentrated chloride solutions. Current results obtained through slow strain rate testing (SSRT) shows that Alloy 22 may suffer SCC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at applied potentials approximately 400 mV more anodic than the corrosion potential (E{sub rr}).

  7. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  8. Near-neutral pH Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation under Simulated Coating Disbondment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Abdoulmajid

    This research is aimed at understanding near-neutral pH SCC initiation under disbonded coatings of pipeline steels, and the effect of different environmental and operational factors on crack initiation. Understanding near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking (SCC) could answer many of the primary questions on crack initiation of SCC which have not yet been answered. It could also assist the development of effective mitigative measures dealing with thousands of kilometer of pipelines containing this form of cracking, in addition to preventive action for future pipeline installations. Near-neutral pH SCC usually occurs under polyethylene tape (PE tape) coated pipelines, at locations where the coating becomes disbonded and/or damaged. Ground water can then penetrate under the damaged/disbonded coating, become trapped and form a suitable environment for corrosion and cracking. Despite extensive studies on this topic the details of crack initiation mechanisms in addition to the exact role of environmental and operational factors on crack initiation are not thoroughly understood. Most previous laboratory tests have been done in aggressive loading conditions and ignored the effect of coatings and cathodic protections (CP). In order to simulate the conditions responsible for crack initiation, a novel testing setup capable of simulating the synergistic effects of coating disbondment, cathodic protection and cyclic loading was implemented. Using this setup and long term laboratory tests near-neutral pH SCC initiation mechanisms and the effect of some environmental and operational factors on crack initiation were investigated. It was found that near-neutral pH SCC initiation does not necessarily occur in near-neutral pH environments as commonly believed. Depending on the level of CP and CO2 in the underground environment, different localized environments with varying pH values from near-neutral to high values above 10 can form under the disbonded coatings. This significantly

  9. Electro chemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution, part I: As received samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to Concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were con ducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electro chemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarization resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the in crease of the stress state promoted the in crease of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks in creased with the growth of the stress value.

  10. Crack Initiation and Growth Behavior at Corrosion Pit in 7075-T6 High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    was not used to measure the transition from corrosion pit to long crack [25]. . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.1 Composition of a typical sample of 7075 -T6...lives. 24 III. Methodology 3.1 Material Research was conducted using 7075 -T6 aluminum. This alloy is commonly used in aerospace applications and as a... material properties of this alloy. It is important to note that these properties were also used in all finite element models. Table 3.1: Composition of

  11. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  12. Study on Localized Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 using EN-DCPD Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeonju; Kim, Sungwoo; Kim, Hongpyo; Hwang, Seongsik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The object of this work is to establish an electrochemical noise(EN) measurement technique combined with a direct current potential drop(DCPD) method for monitoring of localized corrosion cracking of nickel-based alloy, and to analyze its mechanism. The electrochemical current and potential noises were measured under various conditions of applied stress to a compact tension specimen in a simulated primary water chemistry of a pressurized water reactor. The amplitude and frequency of the EN signals were evaluated in both time and frequency domains based on a shot noise theory, and then quantitatively analyzed using statistical Weibull distribution function. From the spectral analysis, the effect of the current application in DCPD was found to be effectively excluded from the EN signals generated from the localized corrosion cracking. With the aid of a microstructural analysis, the relationship between EN signals and the localized corrosion cracking mechanism was investigated by comparing the shape parameter of Weibull distribution of a mean time-to-failure.

  13. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  14. Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Behavior of Titanium Alloy/Bioactive Glasses Sandwiches in Simulated Human Physiological Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on a series of newly developed bioactive glasses having suitable thermo-mechanical properties to allow application as fixation agents between bone and titanium alloy biomedical implants, the stress corrosion crack growth(SCCG) behavior of their interfaces with Ti6Al4V was investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF) with the objectiveof discerning the salient mechanisms of crack advance and to assess the reliability of the bonds. Results indicatedthat crack growth rates in Ti6Al4V/glass/Ti6Al4V sandwich specimens were nearly the same as or slightly lowerthan those in the bulk glasses at comparable stress intensities; indeed, cracks would prefer to propagate off theinterface, suggesting that the Ti6Al4V/glass interface has relatively good crack-growth resistance. Mechanistically,interfacial crack growth appears to be controlled by the classic stress corrosion mechanisms for silicate glasses, withno discernible effect of bioactivity on the SCCG behavior being observed.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking and its anisotropy of a PZT ferroelectric ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a PZT ferroelectric ceramics in various media, such as moist atmosphere, silicon oil, methanol, water and formamide, and its anisotropy have been investigated at constant load test using a single-edge notched tensile specimen. The results showed that SCC could occur in all media, and the threshold stress intensity factor of SCC in water and formamide, KISCC, revealed anisotropy. The KISCC for poling direction parallel to the crack plane, was greater than that perpendicular to the crack plane, similar to the anisotropy of fracture toughness KIC; however, the anisotropy factor of KISCC, which was =1.8 (in formamide) and 2.1 (in water), was larger than that of KIC, which is =1.4. The stress-induced 90° domain switching causes the anisotropy of KIC and KISCC, besides, the resistance of SCC also has anisotropy.

  16. Fundamental aspects of stress corrosion cracking of copper relevant to the Swedish deep geologic repository concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Ganesh; Carcea, Anatolie; Ulaganathan, Jagan; Wang, Shengchun; Huang, Yin; Newman, Roger C. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Phosphorus-doped oxygen-free copper will be used as the outer barrier in canisters that will contain spent nuclear fuel in the proposed Swedish underground repository. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a concern, in view of isolated reports of cracking or intergranular corrosion of pure copper in sulfide solutions. This concern was addressed in the present work using copper tensile specimens provided by SKB. Methods included slow strain rate testing, constant strain tensile testing, electrochemical and surface analytical studies of corrosion products, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of grain orientation effects on corrosion. The base solutions were prepared from NaCl or synthetic sea water with addition of varying amounts of sodium sulfide at room temperature and 80 degree Celsius. No SCC was found in any of the testing, for a range of sulfide concentrations from 5-50 mM at room temperature or 8 C, including tests where small anodic or cathodic potential displacements were applied from the open-circuit (corrosion) potential. Neither was SCC found in constant-strain immersion testing with very large strain. The Cu2S corrosion product is generally very coarse, fragile, and easily spalled off in severe corrosion environments, i.e. high sulfide concentration, high temperature, less perfect de aeration, etc. But it could also consist of very fine grains, relatively compact and adherent, on particular grain orientations when it was formed on an electro polished surface in a very well-deaerated solution. These orientations have not yet been identified statistically, although some preference for thin, adherent films was noted on orientations close to (100). The notion that the corrosion reaction is always controlled by inward aqueous-phase diffusion of sulfide may thus not be unconditionally correct for this range of sulfide concentrations; however it is hard to distinguish the role of diffusion within pores in the film. In the actual

  17. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  18. Microstructural investigation of vintage pipeline steels highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Monica

    The use of pipelines for the transmission of gas offers not only efficiency, but a number of economic advantages. Nevertheless, pipelines are subject to aggressive operating conditions and environments which can lead to in-service degradation [1] and thus to failures. These failures can have catastrophic consequences, such as environmental damage and loss of life [2]. One of the most dangerous threats to pipeline integrity is stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Despite the substantial progress that has been achieved in the field, due to the complex nature of this phenomenon there is still not a complete understanding of this form of external corrosion. This makes its detection and prevention a challenge and therefore a risk to pipeline integrity, and most importantly, to the safety of the population. SCC cracks are the result of the interaction between a corrosive environment, applied stresses, and a susceptible microstructure. To date, what defines a susceptible microstructure remains ambiguous, as SCC has been observed in a range of steel grades, microstructures, chemical composition, and grain sizes. Therefore, in order to be able to accurately predict and prevent this hazardous form of corrosion, it is imperative to advance our knowledge on the subject and gain a better understanding on the microstructural features of highly susceptible pipeline materials, especially in the subsurface zone where crack nucleation must take place. Therefore, a microstructural characterization of the region near the surface layer was carried-out utilizing TEM. TEM analysis revealed the dislocation character, ferrite morphology, and apparent carbide precipitation in some grain boundaries. Furthermore, light microscopy, SEM, and hardness testing were performed to expand our knowledge on the microscopical features of highly SCC susceptible service components. This investigation presents a new approach to SCC characterization, which exposed the sub-surface region microscopical

  19. Effect of layerwise structural inhomogeneity on stress- corrosion cracking of steel tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu A.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Morozov, N. S.; Fesenko, V. A.; Ryakhovskikh, I. V.; Esiev, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    Based on X-ray texture and structure analysis data of the material of main gas pipelines it was shown that the layerwise inhomogeneity of tubes is formed during their manufacturing. The degree of this inhomogeneity affects on the tendency of tubes to stress- corrosion cracking under exploitation. Samples of tubes were cut out from gas pipelines located under various operating conditions. Herewith the study was conducted both for sections with detected stress-corrosion defects and without them. Distributions along tube wall thickness for lattice parameters and half-width of X-ray lines were constructed. Crystallographic texture analysis of external and internal tube layers was also carried out. Obtained data testifies about considerable layerwise inhomogeneity of all samples. Despite the different nature of the texture inhomogeneity of gas pipeline tubes, the more inhomogeneous distribution of texture or structure features causes the increasing of resistance to stress- corrosion. The observed effect can be explained by saturation with interstitial impurities of the surface layer of the hot-rolled sheet and obtained therefrom tube. This results in rising of lattice parameters in the external layer of tube as compared to those in underlying metal. Thus, internal layers have a compressive effect on external layers in the rolling plane that prevents cracks opening at the tube surface. Moreover, the high mutual misorientation of grains within external and internal layers of tube results in the necessity to change the moving crack plane, so that the crack growth can be inhibited when reaching the layer with a modified texture.

  20. Prevention of stress-corrosion cracking in nuclear waste storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R S

    1984-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has occurred in the early versions of carbon steel primaries of nuclear waste tanks at the Savannah River Plant. (Secondary containment was provided by a vessel surrounding the lower portion of the primary tank.) Evaporated alkaline nitrate wastes in the form of crystallized salts are being dissolved from some of these tanks for transfer to new tanks of a different design. To prevent the SCC sequence from occurring during salt dissolution, the levels of inhibitors required to prevent cracking at yield stresses were determined. Special statistically designed experiments were performed to evaluate the probability of cracking under the combined influences of nitrate, nitrite, hydroxide, and temperature. Experimentlly, samples were tested by a potentially controlled constant extension rate test and by wedge opening loaded samples. Two equations were derived by multivariable regression analyses that correlated probability of cracking as the dependent variable to nitrate, nitrite, and hydroxide concentrations and temperature as the independent variables. From these equations, simple operating standards were developed by setting the probability of cracking equal to zero and solving for the four independent variables. 15 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

  1. Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in HAZ for super-martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Yukio; Kimura, Mitsuo [Tubular Products and Casting Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Nakamichi, Haruo; Sato, Kaoru [Analysis and Characterization Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Minamiwatarida-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Itakura, Noritsugu [Products Service and Development Dept., Chita Works, JFE Steel Corporation. 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Masamura, Katsumi [Tubular Products Business Planning Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 2-2-3, Uchisaiwai-sho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) for heat affected zone (HAZ) of super-martensitic stainless steel was studied using two types of the steel. One was a lean grade, which was Mo free and low Ni, and the other was a high grade, which was Mo added and high Ni. Specimens received heat treatments simulating welding thermal cycles were applied to SCC tests. Cracks were observed in some specimens after U-bend SCC test under low pH environments. Thermal cycle conditions with sensitization were verified from the results. No crack was observed in the specimen with the thermal cycle simulating post welding heat treatment (PWHT) after sensitizing conditions. Therefore, PWHT was clarified to be effective to prevent the cracking. Cr carbides were observed along prior austenite grain boundary intermittently, and Cr depleted zone was confirmed on the grain boundary adjacent to carbides that precipitated on the grain boundary. It is, therefore, concluded that the cracking results from Cr depletion on prior austenite grain boundary accompanied by precipitation of Cr carbides under specific welding conditions. (authors)

  2. Corrosion and cracking behaviour of steel and alloys in liquid H{sub 2}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longaygue, X. [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1 et 4 avenue de Bois Preau 92852 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Duval, S. [Institut Francais du Petrole, BP no 3, 69390 Vernaison (France)

    2004-07-01

    When oil and gas wells with very high partial pressure of H{sub 2}S, e.g. H{sub 2}S-rich gas, are under production, the presence of liquid H{sub 2}S is highly probable in the process operations. Until now, corrosion engineers and materials designers have paid little attention to this situation because it is rarely encountered in practice. However, such a scenario recently met an increasing interest in the context of the Sprex development, a new H{sub 2}S pre-extraction process used for the treatment of very sour natural gases, which produces the separated acid gases as a liquid phase for re-injection to a disposal reservoir. It is generally accepted that pure liquid H{sub 2}S is not corrosive by itself towards carbon or low alloy steels, but the presence of water in production and reservoir fluids could make this medium much more corrosive, although this latter assumption is poorly documented. The aim of this paper is to present the corrosion and cracking behaviour of a pipeline carbon steel and of corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) (with Cr > 16%) after exposure to the following media: i) liquid H{sub 2}S saturated with water, and ii) liquid H{sub 2}O saturated with H{sub 2}S. For both solutions, the addition of solid sulphur on some specimens was considered to take into account the possible introduction of oxygen into the system, followed by a reaction with H{sub 2}S. The tests were performed at 80 deg. C in a laboratory autoclave where both phases coexisted, using U-bend specimens as well as rectangular corrosion coupons. The main conclusion of this study is that liquid H{sub 2}S is rather less critical for corrosion and cracking of construction alloys than 'classical' sour solutions, like H{sub 2}S-saturated water. As a consequence, the materials selection will be governed by the same criteria, with the following alternatives: i) use of carbon steels in conjunction with corrosion inhibitors, e.g. higher operation expense; or ii) selection of a CRA

  3. Aircraft corrosion and crack inspection using advanced magneto-optic imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, David K.; Fitzpatrick, Gerald L.; Skaugset, Richard L.; Shih, William C.

    1996-11-01

    A next generation magneto-optic imaging system, the MOI 303, has recently been introduced with the ability to generate real-time, complete, 2D eddy current images of cracks and corrosion in aircraft. The new imaging system described features advanced, digital remote control operation and on- screen display of setup parameters for ease of use. This instrument gives the inspector the capability to more rapidly scan large surfaces areas. The magneto-optic/eddy current imaging technology has already been formally approved for inspection of surface cracking on an aircraft fuselage. The improved magneto-optic imager is now poised to aid rapid inspection for corrosion and subsurface cracking. Previous magneto-optic imaging systems required the inspector to scan the surface twice for complete inspection coverage: a second scan was necessary with the imager rotated about 90 degrees from the orientation of the first pass. However, by providing eddy current excitation simultaneously from two orthogonal directions, complete, filled-in magneto-optic images are now generated regardless of the orientation of the imager. THese images are considerably easier to interpret and evaluate. In addition, there is a synergism obtained in applying eddy current excitation simultaneously in multiple directions: better penetration is obtained and the resulting images have better signal to noise levels compared to those produced with eddy current excitation applied only in one direction. Examples of these improved images are presented.

  4. Mitigation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Mg by Electrochemical Potential Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M. E.; Scully, J. R.; Burns, J. T.

    2017-08-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the Al-Mg alloy AA5456-H116 is suppressed via cathodic polarization in 0.6 M NaCl, saturated (5.45 M) NaCl, 2 M MgCl2, and saturated (5 M) MgCl2. Three zones of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IG-SCC) susceptibility correlate with pitting potentials of unsensitized AA5456-H116 and pure β phase (Al3Mg2) in each solution. These critical potentials reasonably describe the influence of α Al matrix and β phase dissolution rates on IG-SCC severity. Complete inhibition occurred at applied potentials of -1.0 V and -1.1 V versus saturated calomel electrode ( V SCE) in 0.6 M NaCl. Whereas only partial mitigation of IG-SCC was achieved at -0.9 V SCE in 0.6 M NaCl and at -0.9, -1.0, and -1.1 V SCE in the more aggressive environments. Correlation of pitting potentials in bulk environments with IG-SCC behavior suggests an effect of bulk environment [Cl-] and pH on the stabilized crack tip chemistry.

  5. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of incoloy-800 in caustic solution. Part II: Precracking samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a caustic medium may affect the secondary circuit tubing of a CANDU NPP cooled with river water, due to an accidental formation of a concentrated alkaline environment in the areas with restricted circulation, as a result of a leakage of cooling water from the condenser. To evaluate the susceptibility of Incoloy-800 (used to manufacture steam generator tubes for CANDU NPP to SCC, some accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in an alkaline solution (10% NaOH, pH = 13. These experiments were performed at ambient temperature and 85 °C. We used the potentiodynamic method and the potentiostatic method, simultaneously monitoring the variation of the open circuit potential during a time period (E corr/time curve. The C-ring method was used to stress the samples. In order to create stress concentrations, mechanical precracks with a depth of 100 or 250 μm were made on the outer side of the C-rings. Experimental results showed that the stressed samples were more susceptible to SCC than the unstressed samples whereas the increase in temperature and crack depth lead to an increase in SCC susceptibility. Incipient micro cracks of a depth of 30 μm were detected in the area of the highest peak of the mechanical precrack.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  7. Hydrogen-increased dezincification layer-induced stress and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of brass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李会录; 高克玮; 褚武扬; 刘亚萍; 乔利杰

    2003-01-01

    Dezincification layer formed during corrosion or stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass in an ammonia solution could induce an additive stress. The effect of hydrogen on the dezincification layer-induced stress and the susceptibility to SCC were studied. The dezincification layer-induced stress was measured using the deflection method and the flowing stress differential method, respectively. The latter measures the difference between the flowing stress of a specimen before unloading and the yield stress of the same specimen after unloading and forming a dezincification layer. The susceptibility to SCC was measured using slow strain rate test. Results show that both the dezincification layer-induced stress and the susceptibility to SCC increase with increasing hydrogen concentration in a specimen. This implies that hydrogen-enhanced dezincification layer-induced stress is consistence with the hydrogen-increased susceptibility to SCC of brass in the ammonia solution.

  8. Diffusion-Coupled Cohesive Interface Simulations of Stress Corrosion Intergranular Cracking in Polycrystalline Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Chao; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Yanli; Sham, T.-L.

    2017-09-01

    To study the stress corrosion intergranular cracking mechanism, a diffusion-coupled cohesive zone model (CZM) is proposed for the simulation of the stress-assisted diffusional process along grain boundaries and the mechanical response of grain boundary sliding and separation. This simulation methodology considers the synergistic effects of impurity diffusion driven by pressure gradient and degradation of grain boundary strength by impurity concentration. The diffusion-coupled CZM is combined with crystal plasticity finite element model (CPFEM) to simulate intergranular fracture of polycrystalline material under corrosive environment. Significant heterogeneity of the stress field and extensive impurity accumulation is observed at grain boundaries and junction points. Deformation mechanism maps are constructed with respect to the grain boundary degradation factor and applied strain rate, which dictate the transition from internal to near-surface intergranular fracture modes under various strain amplitudes and grain sizes.

  9. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended form of Dirichlet energy: Part 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HARRY YOSH

    2016-10-01

    In the previous paper ({\\it Pramana – J. Phys.} 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall statistically. It reveals that SCC growth distribution is described with Cauchy problem of time-dependent first-order partial differential equation characterized by the convolution of the initial distribution of SCC over time. We also discuss the extension of the above results to the SCC in two-dimensional space and its statistical features with a simple example.

  10. INHIBITION OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL STORAGE TANKS AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-31

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of A537 tank steel was investigated in a series of environments designed to simulate the chemistry of legacy nuclear weapons production waste. Tests consisted of both slow strain rate tests using tensile specimens and constant load tests using compact tension specimens. Based on the tests conducted, nitrite was found to be a strong SCC inhibitor. Based on the test performed and the tank waste chemistry changes that are predicted to occur over time, the risk for SCC appears to be decreasing since the concentration of nitrate will decrease and nitrite will increase.

  11. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of welded ferritic stainless steels in high temperature aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuzuka, Toshio; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo (Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan). Central Research and Development Lab.); Kanda, Masao

    1982-07-01

    In considering the application of ferritic stainless steels to heat exchanger tubing materials for moisture separator-reheaters in LWRs, the effects of environmental conditions (temperature, chloride, dissolved oxygen, pH), thermal history, and steel composition (content of C, N, Cr and Ti) on the Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) in high temperature aqueous environments, were studied. The IGSCC was proved to depend on steel composition and thermal history rather than environment. From these results, a steel was designed to prevent IGSCC of the welding HAZ for 18Cr and 13Cr steels.

  12. High-Performance Laser Peening for Effective Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackel, L; Hao-Lin, C; Wong, F; Hill, M

    2002-10-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the Yucca Mountain waste package closure welds is believed to be the greatest threat to long-term containment. Use of stress mitigation to eliminate tensile stresses resulting from welding can prevent SCC. A laser technology with sufficient average power to achieve high throughput has been developed and commercially deployed with high peak power and sufficiently high average power to be an effective laser peening system. An appropriately applied version of this process could be applied to eliminate SCC in the waste package closure welds.

  13. Effect of proton irradiation on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Ok; Hwang, Mi Jin; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) involves the cracking and failure of materials under irradiation environment in nuclear power plant water environment. The major factors and processes governing an IASCC are suggested by others. The IASCC of the reactor core internals due to the material degradation and the water chemistry change has been reported in high stress stainless steel components, such as fuel elements (Boiling Water Reactors) in the 1960s, a control rod in the 1970s, and a baffle former bolt in recent years of light water reactors (Pressurized Water Reactors). Many irradiated stainless steels that are resistant to inergranular cracking in 288 .deg. C argon are susceptible to IG cracking in the simulated BWR environment at the same temperature. Under the circumstances, a lot works have been performed on IASCC in BWR. Recent efforts have been devoted to investigate an IASCC in a PWR, but the mechanism in a PWR is not fully understood yet as compared with that in a BWR owing to a lack of data from laboratories and fields. Therefore, it is strongly necessary to review and analyze recent researches of an IASCC in both BWR and PWR for establishing a proactive management technology for the IASCC of core internals in Korean PWRs. The objective of this research to find IASCC behavior of proton irradiated 316 stainless steels in a high-temperature water chemistry environment. The IASCC initiation susceptibility on 1, 3, 5 DPA proton irradiated 316 austenite stainless steel was evaluated in PWR environment. SCC area ratio on the fracture surface was similar regardless of irradiation level. Total crack length on the irradiated surface increases in order of specimen 1, 3, 5 DPA. The total crack length at the side surface is a better measure in evaluating IASCC initiation susceptibility for proton-irradiated samples.

  14. Lead-induced stress-corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in plausible steam generator crevice environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Manolescu, A. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mirzai, M. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-03-01

    Laboratory stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) test environments were developed to simulate crevice chemistries representative of Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (BNPD A) steam generators (SGs); these test environments were used to determine the susceptibility of Alloy 600 to lead-induced SCC under plausible SG conditions. Test environments were based on plant SG hideout return data and analysis of removed tubes and deposits. Deviations from the normal near-neutral crevice pH environment were considered to simulate possible faulted excursion crevice chemistry and to bound the postulated crevice pH range of 3 to 9 (at temperature). The effect of lead contamination up to 1000 ppm, but with an emphasis on the 100- to 500-ppm range, was determined. SCC susceptibility was investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests and encapsulated C-ring tests. CERT tests were performed at 305 degrees C on tubing representative of BNPD A SG U-bends. The C-ring test method allowed a wider test matrix, covering 3 temperatures (280 degrees C, 304 degrees C and 315 degrees C), 3 strain levels (0.2%, 2% and 4%), and tubing representative of U-bends plus tubing given a simulated stress relief to represent material at the tube sheet. The results of this test program confirmed that in the absence of lead contamination, cracking does not occur in these concentrated, 3.3 to 8.9 pH range, crevice environments. Also, it appears that the concentrated crevice environments suppress lead-induced cracking relative to that seen in all-volatile-treatment (AVT) water. For the (static) C-ring tests, lead-induced SCC was only produced in the near-neutral crevice environment and was more severe at 500 ppm than at 100 ppm PbO. This trend was also observed in CERT tests, but some cracking-grain boundary attack occurred in acidic (pH 3.3) and alkaline (pH 8.9) environments. The C-ring tests indicated that a certain amount of resistance to cracking was imparted by simulated stress relief of

  15. Development of Modified 304 Stainless Steel Resistant to Stress Corrosion Cracking in Chloride Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This was a feasibility study for a modified 304 steel resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous environment containing chloride. SCC tests were conducted potentiostaticaly with spot-welded specimens, which had both crevice and residual stress, mainly in 3 % NaCl solution at various temperatures to determine the critical temperature for SCC at and below which the steel would not suffer from SCC. The effects of individual alloying element of silicon, manganese and copper on SCC of 18Cr-14Ni steels which phosphor content is 0.002 % and molybdenum content is 0.01 % were examined. Addition of 1 or 2 % of copper has beneficial effect on resistance to SCC, while increasing silicon or manganese content has no significant effect. Critical temperature of the steel with 0.002 % of phosphor and 2 % of copper is 150 ℃, which is markedly higher than 50 ℃ of 304L steel. However, the beneficial effect of copper is reduced with increasing phosphor content. From practical viewpoint, the modified steel with good SCC resistance should have 0.01 %-0.015 % of phosphor and 0.3 % or more of molybdenum, because it is very difficult to reduce phosphor content below 0.008 % industrially and such molybdenum content is inevitably introduced through cost-saving melting process using return steel. Aluminium is to be added as another alloying element and 3 % of aluminium combined with 2 % of copper has been found to negate the deleterious effects of increased phosphor and molybdenum content. As a candidate steel at this stage, 14Cr-16Ni-0.013P-2Cu-1Al-(0.3-1)Mo steel has critical temperature of 110 ℃.

  16. Origins of Negative Strain Rate Dependence of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation in Alloy 690, and Intergranular Crack Formation in Thermally Treated Alloy 690

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-09-01

    We show that enhanced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation in cold-rolled Alloy 690 with decreasing strain rate is related to the rate of short-range ordering (SRO) but not to the time-dependent corrosion process. Evidence for SRO is provided by aging tests on cold-rolled Alloy 690 at 623 K and 693 K (350 °C and 420 °C), respectively, which demonstrate its enhanced lattice contraction and hardness increase with aging temperature and time, respectively. Secondary intergranular cracks formed only in thermally treated and cold-rolled Alloy 690 during SCC tests, which are not SCC cracks, are caused by its lattice contraction by SRO before SCC tests but not by the orientation effect.

  17. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials.

  18. Electrochemical investigation on the hydrogen permeation behavior of 7075-T6 Al alloy and its influence on stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chuan-bo; Yan, Bing-hao; Zhang, Ke; Yi, Guo

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen permeation behavior and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of precharged 7075-T6 Al alloy were investigated in this paper. Devanthan-Stachurski (D-S) cell tests were used to measure the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and hydrogen permeation current density of specimens immersed in 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Electrochemical experiment results show that the SCC susceptibility is low during anodic polarization. Both corrosion pits and hydrogen-induced cracking are evident in scanning electron microscope images after the specimens have been charging for 24 h.

  19. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of annealed and cold worked 316L stainless steel in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The alloy 316L is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water. • The susceptibility of alloy 316L increases with temperature and plastic deformation. • Dynamic strain ageing processes may be active in the material. - Abstract: The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the more promising designs considered by the Generation IV International Forum due to its high thermal efficiency and improving security. To build this reactor, standardized structural materials used in light water reactors (LWR), like austenitic stainless steels, have been proposed. These kind of materials have shown an optimum behavior to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under LWR conditions except when they are cold worked. It is known that physicochemical properties of water change sharply with pressure and temperature inside of the supercritical region. Owing to this situation, there are several doubts about the behavior of candidate materials like austenitic stainless steel 316L to SCC in the SCWR conditions. In this work, alloy 316L was studied in deaerated SCW at two different temperatures (400 °C and 500 °C) and at 25 MPa in order to determine how changes in this variable influence the resistance of this material to SCC. The influence of plastic deformation in the behavior of alloy 316L to SCC in SCW was also studied at both temperatures. Results obtained from these tests have shown that alloy 316L is susceptible to SCC in supercritical water reactor conditions where the susceptibility of this alloy increases with temperature. Moreover, prior plastic deformation of 316L SS increased its susceptibility to environmental cracking in SCW.

  1. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic weld deposits in a salt spray environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J. B.; Yu, C.; Shiue, R. K.; Tsay, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as the filler metals for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the welds in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ) caused the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the weld. The FZ in the cold-rolled condition showed the longest single crack length in the U-bend tests. Moreover, sensitization treatment at 650 °C for 10 h promoted the formation of numerous fine cracks, which resulted in a high SCC susceptibility. The weight loss of the deposits was consistent with the SCC susceptibility of the welds in a salt spray. The 309LMo deposit was superior to the 308L deposit in the salt spray.

  3. Numerical investigation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of dissimilar weld joints in pressurized water reactor plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been incidents recently where stress corrosion cracking (SCC observed in the dissimilar metal weld (DMW joints connecting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV nozzle with the hot leg pipe. Due to the complex microstructure and mechanical heterogeneity in the weld region, dissimilar metal weld joints are more susceptible to SCC than the bulk steels in the simulated high temperature water environment of pressurized water reactor (PWR. Tensile residual stress (RS, in addition to operating loads, has a great contribution to SCC crack growth. Limited experimental conditions, varied influence factors and diverging experimental data make it difficult to accurately predict the SCC behavior of DMW joints with complex geometry, material configuration, operating loads and crack shape. Based on the film slip/dissolution oxidation model and elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM, an approach is developed to quantitatively predict the SCC growth rate of a RPV outlet nozzle DMW joint. Moreover, this approach is expected to be a pre-analytical tool for SCC experiment of DMW joints in PWR primary water environment.

  4. Public inquiry concerning stress corrosion cracking on Canadian oil and gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollman, K.W.; Cote-Verhaaf, A.; Illing, R.

    1996-11-01

    An comprehensive inquiry was conducted into the serious problem of near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Canada`s buried oil and gas pipelines. The inquiry was prompted by evidence of the widespread nature of SCC and awareness that research was producing new insights into the problem. Two major ruptures and fires occurred on the TransCanada system in February and July of 1995. The July rupture was in a location where it was believed SCC could not occur. SCC on pipelines occurs when small cracks develop on the outside surface of the buried pipeline. With time the cracks grow large enough until the pipeline fails or ruptures. SCC results from an interaction of the following three conditions: a potent environment at the pipe surface, a susceptible pipe material, and a tensile stress. Recommendations to resolve the problem included implementation of an SCC management program by pipeline companies, changes to the design of the pipeline, continued research, establishment of an SCC database, improved emergency response practices, and information sharing. 84 refs., 8 tabs., 67 figs.

  5. Microstructural and Stress Corrosion Cracking Characteristics of Austenitic Stainless Steels Containing Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Peter L.; Chou, Peter H.; Morra, Martin M.; Lawrence Nelson, J.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2009-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) core internal components in nuclear light water reactors (LWRs) are susceptible to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). One of the effects of irradiation is the hardening of the SS and a change in the dislocation distribution in the alloy. Irradiation may also alter the local chemistry of the austenitic alloys; for example, silicon may segregate and chromium may deplete at the grain boundaries. The segregation or depletion phenomena at near-grain boundaries may enhance the susceptibility of these alloys to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the present work was to perform laboratory tests in order to better understand the role of Si in the microstructure, properties, electrochemical behavior, and susceptibility to EAC of austenitic SSs. Type 304 SS can dissolve up to 2 pct Si in the bulk while maintaining a single austenite microstructure. Stainless steels containing 12 pct Cr can dissolve up to 5 pct bulk Si while maintaining an austenite structure. The crack growth rate (CGR) results are not conclusive about the effect of the bulk concentration of Si on the EAC behavior of SSs.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Effect of cold work and processing orientation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshier, W.C.; Brown, C.M.

    2000-03-01

    Cold work accelerates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) growth rates in Alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, the variation in crack growth rates generated from cold-worked material has been significant, and the effect has been difficult to quantify. A study was performed in hydrogenated water adjusted to pH 10.2 to evaluate systematically the effect of cold work on Alloy 600 as a function of temperature, amount of cold work, stress intensity factor, and processing orientation. Cold work was introduced into the material by tensile prestraining or cold-rolling plate product. Crack growth rates were determined between 252 C and 360 C, stress intensity factors between 21 MPa{radical}m and 55 MPa{radical}m, and yield strengths between 201 MPa and 827 MPa. The material with the highest yield strength was cold-rolled and tested in the longitudinal-transverse (LT) and short-transverse (ST) orientations. Crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature, stress intensity factor, and yield strength. Furthermore, crack growth rates were a strong function of the processing orientation in the cold-rolled plate, with growth rates approximately an order of magnitude greater in the ST orientation compared to the LT orientation. Crack growth rates in the LT orientation were measured between 0.003 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and 1.95 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and between 0.066 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s and 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s in the ST orientation. Activation energies were slightly greater in the ST orientation, ranging from 154 kcal/mol to 191 kcal/mol, compared to activation energies between 126 kJ/mol and 157 kJ/mol in the LT orientation. Results of this study demonstrated that, although cold work can be used to accelerate SCC, the orientation of crack growth significantly can affect the results and must be taken into account when analyzing data from cold-worked material.

  8. In vivo oxide-induced stress corrosion cracking of Ti-6Al-4V in a neck-stem modular taper: Emergent behavior in a new mechanism of in vivo corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Mali, Sachin; Urban, Robert M; Silverton, Craig D; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2012-02-01

    In vivo modular taper corrosion in orthopedic total joint replacements has been documented to occur for head-neck tapers, modular-body tapers, and neck-stem tapers. While the fretting corrosion mechanism by which this corrosion occurs has been described in the literature, this report shows new and as yet unreported mechanisms at play. A retrieved Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V neck-stem taper interface, implanted for 6 years is subjected to failure analysis to document taper corrosion processes that lead to oxide driven crack formation on the medial side of the taper. Metallurgical sectioning techniques and scanning electron microscopy analysis are used to document the taper corrosion processes. The results show large penetrating pitting attack of both sides of the taper interface where corrosion selectively attacks the beta phase of the microstructure and eventually consumes the alpha phase. The pitting attack evolves into plunging pits that ultimately develop into cracks where the crack propagation process is one of corrosion resulting in oxide formation and subsequent reorganization. This process drives open the crack and advances the front by a combination of oxide-driven crack opening stresses and corrosion attack at the tip. The oxide that forms has a complex evolving structure including a network of transport channels that provide access of fluid to the crack tip. This emergent behavior does not appear to require continued fretting corrosion to propagate the pitting and cracking. This new mechanism is similar to stress corrosion cracking where the crack tip stresses arise from the oxide formation in the crack and not externally applied tensile stresses.

  9. POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

    2010-04-26

    The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The

  10. Effect of Repair Welding on Electrochemical Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of TIG Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy in 3.5 Wt Pct NaCl Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, A.; Sreekumar, K.; Raja, V. S.

    2010-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of AA2219 aluminum alloy in the as-welded (AW) and repair-welded (RW) conditions was examined and compared with that of the base metal (BM) in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). The reduction in ductility was used as a parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of both BM and welded joints. The results show that the ductility ratio ( ɛ NaCl/( ɛ air)) of the BM was close to one (0.97) and reduced to 0.9 for the AW joint. This value further reduced to 0.77 after carrying out one repair welding operation. However, the RW specimen exhibited higher ductility than the single-weld specimens even in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution. SSRT results obtained using pre-exposed samples followed by post-test metallographic observations clearly showed localized pitting corrosion along the partially melted zone (PMZ), signifying that the reduction in ductility ratio of both the AW and RW joints was more due to mechanical overload failure, caused by the localized corrosion and a consequent reduction in specimen thickness, than due to SCC. Also, the RW joint exhibited higher ductility than the AW joint both in air and the environment, although SCC index (SI) for the former is lower than that of the latter. Fractographic examination of the failed samples, in general, revealed a typical ductile cracking morphology for all the base and welded joints, indicating the good environmental cracking resistance of this alloy. Microstructural examination and polarization tests further demonstrate grain boundary melting along the PMZ, and that provided the necessary electrochemical condition for the preferential cracking on that zone of the weldment.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour in welded X-70 linepipe steel under near-neutral pH conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeleke, A.H.; Luo, J.L.; Ivey, D.G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2005-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between the near neutral pH stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance and the yield strength of pipelines steels. In particular, double-edge-notched flat tensile samples of X70 steel were used for both slow strain-rate testing (SSRT) and cyclic loading testing with the notch located in the zone of interest. This included the weld metal (WM), base metal (BM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ). In all samples, the mode of failure was mostly transgranular with cleavage facets around the edges of the fracture surface. One of the objectives of this study was to better understand the microstructural effect of the relationship. The 3 main parameters that were used to assess the SCC susceptibility in a near-neutral pH environment were the elongation ratio, the estimated percentage of the fracture surface that showed brittle fractures, and the relative crack growth at a given exposure time. It was shown that resistance to near-neutral pH SCC depends greatly on the microstructure of the pipeline steels. Fine-grained bainite and ferrite structured steels were found to have a much better combination of strength and SCC resistance compared to ferrite and pearlite structures. The high-to-low sensitivity ranking of the X70 linepipe steel to SCC was established to be: WM is greater than HAZ which is greater than BM. 20 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  12. The influence of cracks on chloride-induced corrosion of reinforced concrete structures - development of the experimental set-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blagojevic, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Walraven, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is one of the major threats to durability of reinforced concrete structures in aggressive environmental conditions. When the steel reinforcement starts to corrode, structures gradually lose integrity and service life is shortened. Cracks are inevitab

  13. Strain energy density-distance criterion for the initiation of stress corrosion cracking of alloy X-750

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.M. Jr.; Symons, D.M.

    1996-05-01

    A strain energy density-distance criterion was previously developed and used to correlate rising-load K{sub c} initiation data for notched and fatigue precracked specimens of hydrogen precharged Alloy X-750. This criterion, which was developed for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) cracking, is used here to correlate static-load stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation times obtained for smooth geometry, notched and fatigue precracked specimens. The onset of SCC crack growth is hypothesized to occur when a critical strain, which is due to environment-enhanced creep, is attained within the specimen interior. For notched and precracked specimens, initiation is shown by analysis to occur at a variable distance from notch and crack tips. The initiation site varies from very near the crack tip, for highly loaded sharp cracks, to a site that is one grain diameter from the notch, for lower loaded, blunt notches. The existence of hydrogen gradients, which are due to strain-induced hydrogen trapping in the strain fields of notch and crack tips, is argued to be controlling the site for initiation of cracking. By considering the sources of the hydrogen, these observations are shown to be consistent with those from the previous HE study, in which the characteristic distance for crack initiation was found to be one grain diameter from the notch tip, independent of notch radius, applied stress intensity factor and hydrogen level.

  14. Research of stress corrosion cracking of T225NG titanium alloy in loop water of high temperature and high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jijin; Yan Keng; Chen Ligong; Jiang Chengyu

    2006-01-01

    Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were used to research the stress corrosion cracking of T225NG titanium alloy in loop water of high temperature and high pressure. DCB specimens were forced pre-stress, put into high pressure autoclave, and the stress corrosion and crack expansion of specimens were observed and measured in 500 h, 1 000 h and 2 000h respectively. The results show that small expansion occurred along the direction of pre-cracking. According to calculation,the speed of cracking expansion is lower than 10 -9 m/s in 500 h and the value of KIscc/KI is higher than 0. 75, which proves that T225NG has an excellent corrosion resistance in loop water. The main reason is that there is an oxide film on the surface of specimens. According to the analysis of energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), the oxide film consists of TiO2. Therefore, the oxide film at the crack tip impedes the hydrogen separating out from the cathode to penetrate into titanium alloy and resists hydrogen embrittlement.

  15. Investigation into the stress corrosion cracking properties of AA2099, an aluminum-lithium-copper alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Barbara Nicole

    Recently developed Al-Li-Cu alloys show great potential for implementation in the aerospace industry because of the attractive mix of good mechanical properties and low density. AA2099 is an Al-Li-Cu alloy with the following composition Al-2.69wt%Cu-1.8wt%Li-0.6wt%Zn-0.3wt%Mg-0.3wt%Mn-0.08wt%Zr. The environmental assisted cracking and localized corrosion behavior of the AA2099 was investigated in this thesis. The consequences of uncontrolled grain boundary precipitation via friction stir welding on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of AA2099 was investigated first. Using constant extension rate testing, intergranular corrosion immersion experiments, and potentiodynamic scans, the heat-affected zone on the trailing edge of the weld (HTS) was determined to be most susceptible of the weld zones. The observed SCC behavior for the HTS was linked to the dissolution of an active phase (Al2CuLi, T1) populating the grain boundary. It should be stated that the SCC properties of AA2099 in the as-received condition were determined to be good. Focus was then given to the electrochemical behavior of precipitate phases that may occupy grain and sub-grain boundaries in AA2099. The grain boundary micro-chemistry and micro-electrochemistry have been alluded to within the literature as having significant influence on the SCC behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Major precipitates found in this alloy system are T1 (Al 2CuLi), T2 (Al7.5Cu4Li), T B (Al6CuLi3), and theta (Al2 Cu). These phases were produced in bulk form so that the electrochemical nature of each phase could be characterized. It was determined T1 was most active electrochemically and theta was least. When present on grain boundaries in the alloy, electrochemical behavior of the individual precipitates aligned with the observed corrosion behavior of the alloy (e.g. TB was accompanied by general pitting corrosion and T 1 was accompanied by intergranular corrosion attack). In addition to the electrochemical behavior of

  16. Misunderstanding and Understanding of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Structural Components in the Primary System of PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Dae Whan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    All the structural components in the primary system of pressurized water reactors that are in contact with primary water are made of austenitic Ni-Cr-Fe alloys which are known to be corrosion resistant. Nevertheless, these Ni-Cr-Fe alloys such as Alloy 600, weld 182/82, austenitic stainless steels suffer from intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) after their 10 year operation in reactors although the environment to which they have been exposed is almost pure water of pH 6.9 to 7.2, which is called primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Given that the underlying mechanism of PWSCC remains unidentified so far, there are many misunderstandings related to PWSCC of the structural components, which may lead to unreasonable mitigation measures. The aim of this work is to highlight understanding and misunderstanding of PWSCC related to austenitic Ni-Cr-Fe alloys.

  17. Modelling of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Kleczek, M. R.; Shaheen, K.; Juhas, M.; Iglesias, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is a recognized factor for fuel-element failure in the operation of nuclear reactors requiring the implementation of mitigation measures. I-SCC is believed to depend on certain factors such as iodine concentration, oxide layer type and thickness on the fuel sheath, irradiation history, metallurgical parameters related to sheath like texture and microstructure, and the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys. This work details the development of a thermodynamics and mechanistic treatment accounting for the iodine chemistry and kinetics in the fuel-to-sheath gap and its influence on I-SCC phenomena. The governing transport equations for the model are solved with a finite-element technique using the COMSOL Multiphysics® commercial software platform. Based on this analysis, this study also proposes potential remedies for I-SCC.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF SOFTWARE SYSTEM FOR MONITORING OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF THE PIPELINE UNDER TENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. K. Abaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The software and hardware development tendency, providing the automated monitoring and control of basic and auxiliary technological processes of gas transportation via system of main gas pipelines has been revealed. The article discusses the stages of creation of the software of system of monitoring corrosion cracking under tension (SCC. The new useful adequate regression models development determining the risk level of LCC is shown. A ranking sections algorithm of main gas pipeline (MG on the propensity to SCC is presented. Adequate developed regression equation determining the LCC risk level has been developed. To count the main gas pipeline lifetime the variable rank of the danger of SCC (RSCC on the basis of methods of fuzzy logic is proposed to use. Implementation of the fuzzy model was carried out using the graphical tools developed in MATLAB using the expansion pack Fuzzy Logic Toolbox. The working algorithm of developed program and the screen forms are presented.

  19. Localized Deformation as a Primary Cause of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Was

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine whether deformation mode is a primary factor in the mechanism of irradiation assisted intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in light watert reactor core components. Deformation mode will be controlled by both the stacking fault energy of the alloy and the degree of irradiation. In order to establish that localized deformation is a major factor in IASCC, the stacking fault energies of the alloys selected for study must be measured. Second, it is completely unknown how dose and SFE trade-off in terms of promoting localized deformation. Finally, it must be established that it is the localized deformation, and not some other factor that drives IASCC.

  20. Characterization of the Resistance of Alloy 22 to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, K J; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2002-05-30

    In its current design, the high-level nuclear waste containers include an external layer of Alloy 22 (Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W-3Fe). Since over their lifetime, the containers may be exposed to multi-ionic aqueous environments, a potential degradation mode of the outer layer could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the effect of applied potential and temperature on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to EAC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) using the slow strain rate test (SSRT). Results show that Alloy 22 may suffer EAC at applied potentials approximately 400 mV more anodic than the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}).

  1. Researches on corrosion cracking phenomenonthat occurs on welded of agricultural equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sărăcin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded construction equipments for agriculture are strongly stressed in terms of mechanics, but also in terms of environmental action and thus in many cases appears their wear by corrosion cracking phenomenon. After research it was noted that after a certain period of use of equipment, metallographic structure of welded steel structures has changed substantially and at the same time a change in the chemical composition of steel was also observed. In terms of chemical composition a reduction in carbon content was mainly observed, and an increase in sulfur content,determined mainly by the presence of large quantities of sulfur in the atmosphere. This sulfur in the atmosphere at the same time determines the acid action on metallic materials, by forming with water from precipitation of H2S.

  2. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  3. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  4. Fracture model for predicting concrete cover-cracking induced by steel corrosion based on interface bond state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-li; ZHENG Jian-jun; WU Zhi-min

    2009-01-01

    Time-to-cracking of the concrete cover induced by the steel corrosion is one of the critical problems faced by engineers, operators and asset managers in making strategies for the maintenance and repairs of reinforced concrete (RC)structures affected by corrosion. In this paper, a theoretical model for predicting the time-to-cracking is derived by assuming the bond between the steel bar and the concrete as a linear combination of perfectly smooth and bonded. The model takes into account the characteristics of existing exiguous flaws and initial cracks in the concrete before the load acting on RC structures. The validity of the proposed model is preliminarily verified by comparing the obtained results with the available experimental results. A remarkable advantage of the proposed method is its application to the prediction of the service life of RC structures, made of the deformed steel bars as well as the round bars. By determining an experimental constant α, which is related to the interface bond state between the steel bar and the concrete, the service life of RC structures can be predicted using the proposed scheme. Analysis of major factors affecting the time-to-cracking demonstrates that the length of the initial crack affects the service life of RC structures significantly. Moreover, the larger cover thickness and the smaller diameter of the steel bar within a certain range are beneficial to prolonging the time-to-cracking.

  5. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  6. Corrosion Behavior of Steel Reinforcement in Concrete with Recycled Aggregates, Fly Ash and Spent Cracking Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebé Gurdián

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The main strategy to reduce the environmental impact of the concrete industry is to reuse the waste materials. This research has considered the combination of cement replacement by industrial by-products, and natural coarse aggregate substitution by recycled aggregate. The aim is to evaluate the behavior of concretes with a reduced impact on the environment by replacing a 50% of cement by industrial by-products (15% of spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst and 35% of fly ash and a 100% of natural coarse aggregate by recycled aggregate. The concretes prepared according to these considerations have been tested in terms of mechanical strengths and the protection offered against steel reinforcement corrosion under carbonation attack and chloride-contaminated environments. The proposed concrete combinations reduced the mechanical performance of concretes in terms of elastic modulus, compressive strength, and flexural strength. In addition, an increase in open porosity due to the presence of recycled aggregate was observed, which is coherent with the changes observed in mechanical tests. Regarding corrosion tests, no significant differences were observed in the case of the resistance of these types of concretes under a natural chloride attack. In the case of carbonation attack, although all concretes did not stand the highly aggressive conditions, those concretes with cement replacement behaved worse than Portland cement concretes.

  7. Corrosion resistance of a steel under an oxidizing atmosphere in a fluid catalytic cracking regenerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieda Caminha

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the corrosion resistance of an ASTM A 387 G11 steel was evaluated under two conditions: an oxidizing atmosphere in a fluid catalytic cracking regenerator of a petroleum processing unit and a simulated atmosphere in the laboratory, at temperatures of 650 °C and 700 °C. The characterization of the phases present in the oxidized layer was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD, optical microscopy (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDS. Severe corrosion was observed after exposure to both the real and simulated conditions, with formation of several iron oxides (Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and FeO in the product scale layer, as well as a slight inner oxidation and sulfidation of chromium in the substrate. Internal nitridation of the silicon and the manganese was observed only in the real condition, probably related to the long-term exposure inside the regenerator.

  8. Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

    2008-01-01

    A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and

  9. Effect of Nanostructure Changes on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Proton Irradiated Nuclear Energy Structural Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Lunika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless alloys are used extensively as structural materials in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC is main degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to radiation. The existing data on proton irradiated austenitic alloys were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose on IASCC susceptibility of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of deformation nanostructure and stacking fault energy (SFE changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. Results show that the IASCC susceptibility of the alloys increases with increasing irradiation dose and decreasing stacking fault energy. IASCC tends to initiate at locations where slip dislocation channels intersect grain boundaries. Localized deformation in the form of grain boundary sliding due to the interaction of slip channels and grain boundaries is likely the primary cause of the observed cracking initiation. It may play a key role in the underlying mechanism of IASCC in light water reactor core components.

  10. Reconstruction of stress corrosion cracks using signals of pulsed eddy current testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xie, Shejuan; Chen, Zhenmao; Li, Yong; Wang, Xiaowei; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    A scheme to apply signals of pulsed eddy current testing (PECT) to reconstruct a deep stress corrosion crack (SCC) is proposed on the basis of a multi-layer and multi-frequency reconstruction strategy. First, a numerical method is introduced to extract conventional eddy current testing (ECT) signals of different frequencies from the PECT responses at different scanning points, which are necessary for multi-frequency ECT inversion. Second, the conventional fast forward solver for ECT signal simulation is upgraded to calculate the single-frequency pickup signal of a magnetic field by introducing a strategy that employs a tiny search coil. Using the multiple-frequency ECT signals and the upgraded fast signal simulator, we reconstructed the shape profiles and conductivity of an SCC at different depths layer-by-layer with a hybrid inversion scheme of the conjugate gradient and particle swarm optimisation. Several modelled SCCs of rectangular or stepwise shape in an SUS304 plate are reconstructed from simulated PECT signals with artificial noise. The reconstruction results show better precision in crack depth than the conventional ECT inversion method, which demonstrates the validity and efficiency of the proposed PECT inversion scheme.

  11. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS DURING SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, K

    2007-10-18

    Aluminum is a principal element in alkaline nuclear sludge waste stored in high level waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site. The mass of sludge in a HLW tank can be reduced through the caustic leaching of aluminum, i.e. converting aluminum oxides (gibbsite) and oxide-hydroxides (boehmite) into soluble hydroxides through reaction with a hot caustic solution. The temperature limits outlined by the chemistry control program for HLW tanks to prevent caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC) in concentrated hydroxide solutions will potentially be exceeded during the sludge mass reduction (SMR) campaign. Corrosion testing was performed to determine the potential for CSCC under expected conditions. The experimental test program, developed based upon previous test results and expected conditions during the current SMR campaign, consisted of electrochemical and mechanical testing to determine the susceptibility of ASTM A516 carbon steel to CSCC in the relevant environment. Anodic polarization test results indicated that anodic inhibition at the temperatures and concentrations of interest for SMR is not a viable, consistent technical basis for preventing CSCC. However, the mechanical testing concluded that CSCC will not occur under conditions expected during SMR for a minimum of 35 days. In addition, the stress relief for the Type III/IIIA tanks adds a level of conservatism to the estimates. The envelope for corrosion control is recommended during the SMR campaign is shown in Table 1. The underlying assumption is that solution time-in-tank is limited to the SMR campaign. The envelope recommends nitrate/aluminate intervals for discrete intervals of hydroxide concentrations, although it is recognized that a continuous interval may be developed. The limits also sets temperature limits.

  12. A comparison of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of commercially pure titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and in distilled water: a fracture mechanics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael D; Williamson, R Scott; Thomas, Joseph A; Griggs, Jason A; Zardiackas, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    From the results of laboratory investigations reported in the literature, it has been suggested that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms may contribute to early failures in titanium alloys that have elevated oxygen concentrations. However, the susceptibility of titanium alloys to SCC in physiological environments remains unclear. In this study, a fracture mechanics approach was used to examine the SCC susceptibility of CP titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and distilled de-ionized (DI) water, at 37°C. The study duration was 26 weeks, simulating the non-union declaration of a plated fracture. Four wedge loads were used corresponding to 86-95% of the alloy's ligament yield load. The longest cracks were measured to be 0.18 mm and 0.10 mm in Ringer's solution and DI water, respectively. SEM analysis revealed no evidence of extensive fluting and quasi-cleavage fracture features which, in literature reports, were attributed to SCC. We thus postulate that the Ringer's solution accelerated the wedge-loaded crack growth without producing the critical stresses needed to change the fracture mechanism. Regression analysis of the crack length results led to a significant best-fit relationship between crack growth velocity (independent variable) and test electrolyte, initial wedge load, and time of immersion of specimen in electrolyte (dependent variables).

  13. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.

    2009-10-15

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests.

  14. The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Abosdell, Alajale M.; Raddad, Bashir S.

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT's were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations.

  15. The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Raddad, Bashir S. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering/Tripoli University, Tripoli (Libya); Abosdell, Alajale M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering/Mergeb University, Garaboli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT’s were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of welded joints of super-martensitic stainless steel in H{sub 2}S free environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerner, Bertrand; Bayle, Bernard; Delafosse, David [Centre Science des Materiaux et des Structures - URA CNRS 5146, ENS Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 02 (France); Ligier, Vincent [CRMC, INDUSTEEL Creusot, 56, rue Clemenceau, BP 56 - 71 202 Le Creusot Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    Due to their combination of good weldability and good mechanical properties, low carbon super-martensitic stainless steels are good candidates for oil and gas flow line applications. These alloys have already been used in slightly sour environments containing chlorides, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. The properties of a welded joint whose composition is matching or superduplex that of the base metal are investigated. The base material is the super-martensitic stainless steels medium alloy: 13Cr-4.5Ni-1.5Mo. The Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of girth welds may be sensitive to stress corrosion cracking and presents distinct features intergranular cracking when tested in four-point bending in a sour deaerated environment at temperatures around 100 deg. C. The electrochemical properties of the medium alloy and the matching welded joint + HAZ were determined in a chloride-containing environment without H{sub 2}S. A passive film is formed on polished samples. This film is less protective for the welded joint + HAZ samples than in the base metal. Moreover, the pitting corrosion resistance is strongly decreased in the HAZ. Slow strain rate tensile tests were conducted in a de-aerated solution without H{sub 2}S. They reproduce the same type of cracking as was observed in four point bending tests in a sour environment: initiation in the HAZ and an intergranular crack with a very brittle aspect and no significant trace of corrosion. The presence H{sub 2}S is not the prevailing factor for the occurrence of cracking. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have a specific surface condition for crack initiation to occur in slow strain rate tension, as it is the case four point bend tests where initiation appears to be controlled by the surface condition (chemical and / or geometrical). Finally, a simulated PWHT strongly increase the resistance to SSC. (authors)

  17. Influence factors on stress corrosion cracking of P110 tubing steel under CO2 injection well annulus environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘然克; 贾静焕; 杜翠薇; 李晓刚

    2016-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of P110 tubing steel in simulated CO2 injection well annulus environments was investigated through three-point bent tests, potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements. The results demonstrate that SCC of P110 tubing steel could occur in acidulous simulated environment, and the sensitivity of SCC increases with the decrease of pH, as well as increase of sulfide concentration and total environmental pressure. Both anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement make contributions to the SCC. Adequate concentration of corrosion inhibitor can inhibit the occurrence of SCC on account of the inhibition of localized anodic dissolution and cathodic hydrogen evolution.

  18. Role of {delta}-ferrite in stress corrosion cracking retardation near fusion boundary of 316NG welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi.abe@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Watanabe, Yutaka [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) near the fusion boundary of a 316NG stainless steel (SS) welded joint in high-temperature water was investigated with emphasis on the relation to the microstructural characteristics. {delta}-Ferrite islands were distributed on the crack paths (grain boundary in the partially melted zone and cell boundary in the unmixed zone) near the fusion boundary of 316NG SS piping. SCC retardation near the fusion boundary was clearly observed in our experiments. The relative crack growth rate (CGR) at the {delta}-{gamma} interface was estimated to be 0.043 times lower than that at the {gamma}-{gamma} interface. The cracks remained for a considerable period of time just after they reached the {delta}-ferrite islands. Even those cracks that passed through an initial set of {delta}-ferrite islands were retarded when they encountered a subsequent set of {delta}-ferrite islands. High corrosion resistance due to the presence of large amounts of Cr and the island-shaped morphology of {delta}-ferrite are dominant factors in SCC retardation.

  19. Layer texture of hot-rolled BCC metals and its significance for stress-corrosion cracking of main gas pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Morozov, N. S.

    2016-10-01

    Based on data of X-ray texture analysis of hot-rolled BCC materials it was shown that the layerwise texture inhomogeneity of products is formed during their manufacturing. The effect can be explained by saturation with interstitial impurities of the surface layer, resulting in dynamical deformation aging (DDA). DDA prevents the dislocation slip under rolling and leads to an increase of lattice parameters in the external layer. The degree of arising inhomogeneity correlates with the tendency of hot-rolled sheets and obtained therefrom tubes to stress-corrosion cracking under exploitation, since internal layers have a compressive effect on external layers, and prevents opening of corrosion cracks at the tube surface.

  20. Quantitative characterization of initiation and propagation in stress corrosion cracking. An approach of a phenomenological model; Caracterisation quantitative de l`amorcage et de la propagation en corrosion sous contrainte. Approche d`une modelisation phenomenologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raquet, O.

    1994-11-25

    A purely phenomenological study of stress corrosion cracking was performed using the couple Z2CN 18.10 (304L) austenitic stainless steel/boiling MgCl{sub 2} aqueous solution. The exploitation of the morphological information (shape of the cracks and size distribution) available after constant elongation rate tests led to the proposal of an analytical expression of the crack initiation and growth rates. This representation allowed to quantitatively characterize the influence of the applied strain rate as well as the effect of corrosion inhibitors on the crack initiation and propagation phases. It can be used in the search for the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms as a `riddle` for the determination of the rate controlling steps. As a matter of fact, no mechanistic hypothesis has been used for its development. (author).

  1. Effect of solution pH on the electrochemical polarization and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690 in 5 M NaCl at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chou, L.B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Shih, H.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: hcshih@mse.nthu.edu.tw

    2005-04-15

    The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical polarization and stress corrosion cracking behaviors of the nickel-based Alloy 690 were investigated in this paper. An experimental, potential-pH diagram was constructed for Alloy 690 in a concentrated (5 M) sodium chloride (NaCl) solution at room temperature ({approx}25 deg. C), using a cyclic polarization method. The domains of immunity, general corrosion, passivation, and pitting in 5 M NaCl solutions were defined. At pH >4, the passive region subdivided into areas of perfect passivation, imperfect passivation, and pitting. After anodic polarization, the surface of each specimen was carefully examined metallographically. Pitting corrosion was observed over the entire pH range investigated (0.3-8.52) but general corrosion predominated at lower pH values (<3). On the other hand, the mechanical properties, such as ultimate tensile strength (UTS), fracture strain (FS) and the reduction in area (RA) measured by the slow strain rate test (SSRT), decreased significantly at pH <3. The SSRT results are consistent with fractography and side-view observations of the tested specimens by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  2. The susceptibility of 90Cu-10Ni alloy to stress corrosion cracking in seawater polluted by sulfide ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domiaty, A. El; Alhajji, J. N.

    1997-08-01

    Electrochemical polarization measurements and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of a 90Cu-10Ni alloy in highly sulfide polluted seawater were conducted to investigate stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior. The severity of the SCC depends on the sulfide concentration in the seawater. The severity increases as the concentration increases. Because the major time in SCC is spent in the initiation process of the propagating crack, the fracture toughness has only a minor effect in the component life failed by SCC. The SCC behavior of CDA706 is strictly linked to sulfide concentration in the range of 100 to 1000 ppm. The general corrosion of Cu-Ni alloys in low (100 ppm) sulfide polluted seawater increases due to the selective copper dissolution. Cyclic polarization measurements confirmed that the corrosion rate decreases slightly as the sulfide concentration increases. Pitting tendency was high in the low concentration range of sulfide and low in the high concentration range. The presence of stresses in SCC removes the protective layer as it increases during testing of the specimen or during the actual service of a component. The authors propose that film rupture occurred, and two proposed SCC mechanisms were operational, namely sulfide stress cracking associated with the anodic dissolution in the low sulfide concentration range and hydrogen embrittlement, which was dominant in the high sulfide concentration range. It was found that a synergism exists between sulfide and stress that enhances the effect of the latter.

  3. The effects of cold rolling orientation and water chemistry on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated PWR water environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjie; Lu, Zhanpeng; Xiao, Qian; Ru, Xiangkun; Han, Guangdong; Chen, Zhen; Zhou, Bangxin; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behaviors of one-directionally cold rolled 316L stainless steel specimens in T-L and L-T orientations were investigated in hydrogenated and deaerated PWR primary water environments at 310 °C. Transgranular cracking was observed during the in situ pre-cracking procedure and the crack growth rate was almost not affected by the specimen orientation. Locally intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in the hydrogenated PWR water. Extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in deaerated PWR water. More extensive cracks were found in specimen T-L orientation with a higher crack growth rate than that in the specimen L-T orientation with a lower crack growth rate. Crack branching phenomenon found in specimen L-T orientation in deaerated PWR water was synergistically affected by the applied stress direction as well as the preferential oxidation path along the elongated grain boundaries, and the latter was dominant.

  4. Dynamical observations on the crack tip zone and stress corrosion of two-dimensional MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Zhao, Jiong; Cichocka, Magdalena Ola; Li, Lain-Jong; Lee, Young Hee

    2017-01-01

    Whether and how fracture mechanics needs to be modified for small length scales and in systems of reduced dimensionality remains an open debate. Here, employing in situ transmission electron microscopy, atomic structures and dislocation dynamics in the crack tip zone of a propagating crack in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer MoS2 membrane are observed, and atom-to-atom displacement mapping is obtained. The electron beam is used to initiate the crack; during in situ observation of crack propagation the electron beam effect is minimized. The observed high-frequency emission of dislocations is beyond previous understanding of the fracture of brittle MoS2. Strain analysis reveals dislocation emission to be closely associated with the crack propagation path in nanoscale. The critical crack tip plastic zone size of nearly perfect 2D MoS2 is between 2 and 5 nm, although it can grow to 10 nm under corrosive conditions such as ultraviolet light exposure, showing enhanced dislocation activity via defect generation.

  5. Dynamical observations on the crack tip zone and stress corrosion of two-dimensional MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Ly, Thuc Hue

    2017-01-18

    Whether and how fracture mechanics needs to be modified for small length scales and in systems of reduced dimensionality remains an open debate. Here, employing in situ transmission electron microscopy, atomic structures and dislocation dynamics in the crack tip zone of a propagating crack in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer MoS2 membrane are observed, and atom-to-atom displacement mapping is obtained. The electron beam is used to initiate the crack; during in situ observation of crack propagation the electron beam effect is minimized. The observed high-frequency emission of dislocations is beyond previous understanding of the fracture of brittle MoS2. Strain analysis reveals dislocation emission to be closely associated with the crack propagation path in nanoscale. The critical crack tip plastic zone size of nearly perfect 2D MoS2 is between 2 and 5 nm, although it can grow to 10 nm under corrosive conditions such as ultraviolet light exposure, showing enhanced dislocation activity via defect generation.

  6. Strain-induced corrosion cracking in ferritic components of BWR primary circuits; Risskorrosion in druckfuehrenden ferritischen Komponenten des Primaerkreislaufes von Siedewasserreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.-P.; Ritter, S.; Ineichen, U.; Tschanz, U.; Gerodetti, B

    2003-04-01

    The present final report of the RIKORR project is a summary of a literature survey and of the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) and dynamic strain ageing (DSA) susceptibility of low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature (HT) water. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials has been investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The strain-induced corrosion cracking (SICC) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (CF) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels under simulated transient and stationary BWR/NWC conditions was characterized by slow rising load / low-frequency corrosion fatigue and constant load / periodical partial unloading / ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated HT water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 {sup o}C. Modern high-temperature water loops, on-line crack growth monitoring and fractographic analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to quantify the cracking response. (author)

  7. A state of the art on primary side stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. P.; Kim, J. S.; Han, J. H.; Lee, D. H.; Lim, Y. S.; Suh, J. H.; Hwang, S. S.; Hur, D. H

    1999-09-01

    A state of art on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of alloy 600 used as steam generator tubing of nuclear power plant and remedial action on the PWSCC were reviewed and analyzed. One of the major metallurgical factors which have effect on PWSCC is Cr carbide distribution. A semicontinuous intergranular Cr carbide distribution enhance PWSCC of alloy 600. PWSCC rate is reported to be reported to be proportional to exp(-50 cal/RT) {sigma}{sup 4}. PWSCC rate also increase with increase in hydrogen partial pressure from 0 to 150 ppm and then decreased with further increase in hydrogen partial pressure to 757 ppm. Development of PWSCC prediction technology which takes into account tubing material, fabrication process and operating history of steam generator is needed to manage PWSCC of domestic nuclear power plant. PWSCC has mainly occurred at expansion irregularities within tubesheet, expansion transitions, dented tube support plate intersections and transition and apex of U bend. Remedial actions to PWSCC are sleeving, plugging, temperature reduction, Ni plating, Ni sleeving, shot peening and steam generator replacement in worst case. Option to remedial actions depend on plant specific such as plant age, leak rate from primary to secondary, density and progression of PWSCC. Ni sleeving developed in Framatome seems to be a powerful method because it never subject to PWSCC. Remedial action should be developed and evaluated for possible PWSCC of domestic nuclear power plant. (author)

  8. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    CERN Document Server

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement, grain boundary segregation, and stress corrosion cracking of alloy X-750 in low- and high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, W. J.; Lebo, M. R.; Kearns, J. J. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The nature of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of alloy X-750 was characterized in low- and high-temperature water by testing as-notched and precracked fracture mechanics specimens. Materials given the AH, BH, and HTH heat treatments were studied. While all heat treatments were susceptible to rapid low-temperature crack propagation (LTCP) below 150 C, conditions AH and BH were particularly susceptible. Low-temperature tests under various loading conditions (e.g., constant displacement, constant load, and increasing load) revealed that the maximum stress intensity factors (K{sub P{sub max}}) from conventional rising load tests provide conservative estimates of the critical loading conditions in highly susceptible heats, regardless of the load path history. For resistant heats, K{sub P{sub max}} provides a reasonable, but not necessarily conservative, estimate of the critical stress intensity factor for LTCP. Testing of as-notched specimens showed that LTCP will not initiate at a smooth surface or notch, but will readily occur if a cracklike defect is present. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that LTCP is associated with hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The stress corrosion crack initiation and growth does occur in high-temperature water (>250 C), but crack growth rates are orders of magnitude lower than LTCP rates. The SCC resistance of HTH heats is far superior to that of AH heats as crack initiation times are two to three orders of magnitude greater and growth rates are one to two orders of magnitude lower.

  10. Parameters influencing the transgranular stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in systems conveying reactor coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, R.; Wesseling, U. [Framatome ANP (Germany); Wachter, O. [E.ON Kernkraft (Germany); Widera, M. [RWE Power (Germany); Brummer, G. [HEW - (Germany); Ilg, U. [EnBW - (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    During replacement of an auxiliary system in the German PWR KKS (NPP Stade) a damage was detected in a valve housing and in the connected piping both made from stabilised austenitic stainless steel. During operation stagnant conditions are present in this area. Based on the failure analysis chloride induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was found as the dominating root cause. In the open literature many cases of corrosion observed in the water/steam interface in valve components as well as in adjacent portions of auxiliary circuits made of un-stabilized stainless steels are mentioned. A common feature of the reported cases is that transgranular cracking was found. Extensive laboratory investigations revealed that non-stabilised austenitic stainless steels are also sensitive to transgranular cracking in boric acid solutions particularly in concentrated solutions. Often these solutions are contaminated with chlorides and/or oxygen is present. Taking into account the literature data the question could arise whether the above mentioned cracking may be also caused by boric acid attack. Thus, for stabilised stainless steels laboratory exposure tests at 80 C in saturated aerated boric acid solution and at 300 C in (at 100 C) saturated, oxygen free boric acid solution have been performed. Double-U-bend specimens and wedge loaded 1T-CT specimens made of Ti- and Nb-stabilised austenitic stainless steels were used. The results revealed no evidence of crack initiation and crack growth. Based on the laboratory results and the literature data an attempt is undertaken to separate parameters influencing chloride induced SCC from the effect of boric acid. (authors)

  11. Recent progress to understand stress corrosion cracking in sodium borosilicate glasses: linking the chemical composition to structural, physical and fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Cindy L.

    2017-08-01

    This topical review is dedicated to understanding stress corrosion cracking in oxide glasses and specifically the SiO_2{\\text-B_2O_3{\\text-}Na_2O} (SBN) ternary glass systems. Many review papers already exist on the topic of stress corrosion cracking in complex oxide glasses or overly simplified glasses (pure silica). These papers look at how systematically controlling environmental factors (pH, temperature...) alter stress corrosion cracking, while maintaining the same type of glass sample. Many questions still exist, including: What sets the environmental limit? What sets the velocity versus stress intensity factor in the slow stress corrosion regime (Region I)? Can researchers optimize these two effects to enhance a glass’ resistance to failure? To help answer these questions, this review takes a different approach. It looks at how systemically controlling the glass’ chemical composition alters the structure and physical properties. These changes are then compared and contrasted to the fracture toughness and the stress corrosion cracking properties. By taking this holistic approach, researchers can begin to understand the controlling factors in stress corrosion cracking and how to optimize glasses via the initial chemical composition.

  12. Electrochemical and Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of Tubing Steels in a H2S/CO2 Annular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Y.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, R. K.; Du, C. W.; Li, X. G.

    2014-04-01

    The electrochemical and sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) behaviors of 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel were investigated in a simulated acidic annular environment with low-temperature and high-pressure H2S/CO2 using electrochemical methods, U-bend immersion tests, and scanning electron microscopy. In the solution containing high pressure CO2, 13Cr, and P110 steels exhibited general corrosion and severe pitting, respectively. Compared with sweet corrosion, additional H2S in the solution enhanced the corrosion of 13Cr steel but inhibited the corrosion of P110 steel. By contrast, in a solution containing 4 MPa CO2 and different (0-0.3 MPa), the susceptibility of both 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel toward SSCC was significantly promoted by increases in H2S partial pressure. The 13Cr stainless steel exhibited higher susceptibility toward SSCC than P110 steel under a H2S/CO2 environment but lower susceptibility under a pure CO2 environment.

  13. Electrochemical investigation of crack initiation during corrosion fatigue of stainless steels in the passive state. Elektrochemische Untersuchung der Rissbildung bei Schwingungsrisskorrosion im stabil-passiven Werkstoffzustand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaehn, R. (Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-03-01

    The corrosion fatigue behaviour of three stainless steels - ferritic (12% Cr), austenitic (type 316 Ti) and austenitic-ferritic (type 31803; Duplex stainless steel) - was studied under rotating bending moments in aqueous sulphuric acid of 30deg C. An instrumental set-up for recording the transient currents of specimens during potentiostatically controlled corrosion fatigue is described. Based on this transient current signal technique, three stages on the corrosion fatigue process can be discerned. In the incubation period, small stochastic current transients are caused by the response of the passive layer to alternating stresses and environmental conditions. The appearance of sinusoidal current signals indicates crack initiation whereas the phase angle between a fixed marker - i.e. a light barrier signal -, and the anodic amplitude represents the site of initiating cracks. Finally, the crack growth period is characterized by an increasing cell current and steadily growing sinusoidal current signals caused by the interplay of microplastic and repassivation processes at the crack tip. (orig.).

  14. H2S Stress Corrosion Tests of Welded Joint for X65 Pipeline Steel and Finite Element Numerical Analysis of Crack Tip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓军; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 白秉仁; 李小巍; 曹军

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure of welded joint is surveyed and the mechanical properties of X65 pipeline steel are studied in this paper, which provides experimental basis of performance effect on stress corrosion. H2S stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests on the steel are carried out in the environment based on NACE TM-01-77 solution. The threshold stress intensity factor and crack propagation velocity for base metal and HAZ are obtained. The susceptibility of welded joint for X65 pipeline steel to H2S stress corrosion cracking is investigated. The programming package ANSYS of finite element model (FEM) is used to perform the three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of WOL specimens. Stress field and concentration of hydrogen distribution property of the crack tip are obtained.

  15. Effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry on corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys and welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2001-04-01

    Reactor vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. The objective of this work is to evaluate and compare the resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 and their welds, such as Alloys 82, 182, 52, and 152, to EAC in simulated light water reactor environments. The existing crack growth rate (CGR) data for these alloys under cyclic and constant loads have been evaluated to establish the effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry. The experimental fatigue CGRs are compared with CGRs that would be expected in air under the same mechanical loading conditions to obtain a qualitative understanding of the degree and range of conditions for significant environmental enhancement in growth rates. The existing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) data on Alloys 600 and 690 and Alloy 82, 182, and 52 welds have been compiled and analyzed to determine the influence of key parameters on growth rates in simulated PWR and BWR environments. The SCC data for these alloys have been evaluated with correlations developed by Scott and by Ford and Andresen.

  16. The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of a novel alumina-forming austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongying; Yang, Haijie; Wang, Man; Giron-Palomares, Benjamin; Zhou, Zhangjian; Zhang, Lefu; Zhang, Guangming

    2017-02-01

    The general corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of Fe-27Ni-15Cr-5Al-2Mo-0.4Nb alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steel were investigated in supercritical water under different conditions. A double layer oxide structure was formed: a Fe-rich outer layer (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) and an Al-Cr-rich inner layer. And the inner layer has a low growth rate with exposing time, which is good for improvement of corrosion resistance. Additionally, some internal nodular Al-Cr-rich oxides were also observed, which resulted in a local absence of inner layer. Stress corrosion specimens exhibited a combination of high strength, good ductility and low susceptibility. The stress strength and elongation was reduced by increasing temperature and amount of dissolved oxygen. In addition, the corresponding susceptibility was increased with decreased temperatures and increased oxygen contents.

  17. Dissolution of copper in chloride/ammonia mixtures and the implications for the stress corrosion cracking of copper containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Greidanus, G.; Jobe, D.J

    1999-05-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is a possible failure mechanism for copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. One species known to cause the stress corrosion of copper alloys is ammonia. It is conceivable that ammonia could be produced in a disposal vault under certain, very specific conditions. There are a number of conditions, however, that mitigate against container failure by stress corrosion, one of which is the presence of chloride ions in deep Canadian Shield groundwaters. There are a number of reports in the literature that suggest that Cl{sup -} has an inhibitive effect on the stress corrosion of Cu alloys in ammonia solutions. The electrochemical behaviour of Cu in Cl{sup -}/ammonia solutions has been studied as a function of ammonia concentration, pH, the rate of mass transport and electrochemical potential. In particular, the effects of these parameters on the formation Of Cu{sub 2}O films and the steady-state dissolution behaviour have been determined. All experiments were carried out in 0.1 mol{center_dot}dm{sup -3} NaC1 as a base solution. A series of aqueous speciation and equilibrium potential/pH diagrams are also presented for the quaternary system Cu-C1{sup -}NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4{sup +}}H{sub 2}O. These diagrams are used to interpret the results of the electrochemical experiments reported here. In addition, it is demonstrated how these diagrams could be used to predict the time-dependence of the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of Cu containers in a disposal vault. (author)

  18. Hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking of high alloyed austenitic materials; Wasserstoffversproedung und wasserstoffinduzierte Spannungsrisskorrosion hochlegierter austenitischer Werkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mummert, K.; Uhlemann, M.; Engelmann, H.J. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The susceptiblity of high alloyed austenitic steels and nickel base alloys to hydrogen-induced cracking is particularly determined by 1. the distribution of hydrogen in the material, and 2. the microstructural deformation behaviour, which last process is determined by the effects of hydrogen with respect to the formation of dislocations and the stacking fault energy. The hydrogen has an influence on the process of slip localization in slip bands, which in turn affects the microstructural deformation behaviour. Slip localization increases with growing Ni contents of the alloys and clearly reduces the ductility of the Ni-base alloy. Although there is a local hydrogen source involved in stress corrosion cracking, emanating from the corrosion process at the cathode, crack growth is observed only in those cases when the hydrogen concentration in a small zone ahead of the crack tip reaches a critical value with respect to the stress conditions. Probability of onset of this process gets lower with growing Ni content of the alloy, due to increasing diffusion velocity of the hydrogen in the austenitic lattice. This is why particularly austenitic steels with low Ni contents are susceptible to transcrystalline stress corrosion cracking. In this case, the microstructural deformation process at the crack tip is also influenced by analogous processes, as could be observed in hydrogen-loaded specimens. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Empfindlichkeit von hochlegierten austentischen Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen gegen wasserstoffinduziertes Risswachstum wird im wesentlichen bestimmt durch 1. die Verteilung von Wasserstoff im Werkstoff und 2. das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten. Das mikrostrukturelle Deformationsverhalten ist wiederum durch den Einfluss von Wasserstoff auf die Versetzungsbildung und die Stapelfehlerenergie charakterisiert. Das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten wird durch wasserstoffbeeinflusste Gleitlokalisierung in Gleitbaendern bestimmt. Diese nimmt mit

  19. Embrittlement and anodic process in stress corrosion cracking: study of the influent micro-mechanical parameters; Fragilisation et processus anodiques en corrosion sous contrainte: etude des parametres micro-mecaniques influents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinnes, J.Ph

    2006-11-15

    We study the influence of local mechanical parameters on crack propagation in Stress Corrosion Cracking, at the scale of the microstructure. Two systems are compared: the CuAl{sub 9}Ni{sub 3}Fe{sub 2} copper-aluminium alloy in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization, where the crack propagation mechanism is related to strain-assisted anodic dissolution, and the 316L austenitic stainless steel in MgCl{sub 2} solution, where embrittlement mechanisms related to hydrogen effects prevail. We use micro-notched tensile specimen that allow to study isolated short cracks. These experiments are modelled by means of finite elements calculations, and further characterized by Electron Back scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in the case of the 316L alloy. In terms of the local mechanical parameters that control propagation, fundamental differences are outlined between the two systems. They are discussed from the viewpoint of the available models of Stress Corrosion Cracking. (author)

  20. Influence of nitrogen on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of austenitic stainless steels in chloride environment; Influence de l'azote sur la resistance a la corrosion sous contrainte d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu chlorure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, S

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of nitrogen additions on the Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) resistance of austenitic stainless steel in chloride environment. The investigation was carried out in two part: first, an experimental investigation with model industrial steels was carried out and secondly, numerical simulations based on the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model were developed. Both slow strain rate tensile tests and constant load test of the different steels in boiling MgCl{sub 2} (153 deg C) at free potential show that, for a given plastic strain rate, nitrogen addition increases the critical stress for crack initiation without influencing the crack propagation rate. We observed that the creep rate under constant load was affected by the nitrogen content. As a consequence, the SCC behaviour (cracks density and propagation rate) depends on the nitrogen content. We thus confirm that the nitrogen content influences the corrosion - deformation interaction mechanisms via its positive contribution to the flow stress. These experimental results are reproduced semi-quantitatively by means of numerical simulations at the scale of crack. - dislocation interactions. The presence of nitrogen is modelled by an increased lattice friction stress, which in turn affects the dynamics of crack tip shielding by dislocation pile-ups. We conclude that nitrogen addition in austenitic stainless steels increases the SC crack initiation stress in proportion of the increased flow stress, without penalty in terms of SC crack propagation rate. (author)

  1. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  2. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  3. Stress corrosion cracking in the vessel closure head penetrations of French PWR`s; Fissuration par corrosion sous contrainte de penetrations de couvercle de cuve de reacteur nucleaire francais a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buisine, D.; Cattant, F.; Champredonde, J.; Pichon, C.; Benhamou, C.; Gelpi, A.; Vaindirlis, M.

    1994-01-01

    During a hydrotest in September 1991, part of the statutory decennial in-service inspection, a leak was detected on the vessel head of Bugey 3, which is one of the first 900 MW 3-loop PWR`s in France. This leak was due to a cracked penetration used for a control rod drive mechanism. The investigations performed identified Primary Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 as being the origin of this degradation. So a lot of the same design PWR`s are a concern due to this generic problem. In this case, PWSCC was linked to: - hot temperature of the vessel head; - high residual stresses due to the welding process between peripherical penetrations and the vessel head; - sensitivity of forged Alloy 600 used for penetration manufacturing. This following paper will present the cracked analysis based, in particular, on the main results obtained in France on each of these items. These results come from the operating experience, the destructive examinations and the programs which are running on stress analysis and metallurgical characterizations. (authors). 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Effect of cracking and randomness of inputs on corrosion initiation of reinforced concrete bridge decks exposed to chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Konecny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed at the indicative evaluation of the effect of random scatter of input parameters in case of durability of reinforced concrete bridge deck. The time to onset of corrosion of steel reinforcement of concrete bridge deck exposed to chloride is evaluated. The effect of cracking in concrete onto chloride ingress is considered. The selected steel reinforcement protection strategies are: unprotected steel reinforcement, epoxy-coated steel reinforcement and water-proof barrier bellow asphalt overlay. The preliminary model for damage effect on chloride ion ingress through water proof membrane under penetrable asphalt overlay is used. 2-D finite element chloride ingress model is combined with Monte Carlo simulation technique. The innovative crack effect modeling via highly penetrable elements is applied. Deterministic and probabilistic calculations are compared.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of a high strength Mg-7%Gd-5%Y-1%Nd-0.5%Zr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.D. Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through performing the tensile tests with different strain rates in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior and the effect of strain rate on the SCC susceptibility of an extruded Mg-7%Gd-5%Y-1%Nd-0.5%Zr (EW75 alloy have been investigated. Results demonstrate that the alloy is susceptible to SCC when the strain rate is lower than 5 × 10−6 s−1. At the strain rate of 1 × 10−6 s−1, the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC is 0.96 and the elongation-to-failure (εf is only 0.11%. Fractography indicates that the brittle quasi-cleavage feature is very obvious and become more pronounced with decreasing the strain rate. Further analysis confirms that the cracking mode is predominantly transgranular, but the partial intergranular cracking at some localized area can also occur. Meanwhile, it seems that the crack propagation path is unrelated to the existing phase particles.

  6. Assessment of ultrasonic techniques for characterization of stress corrosion cracks in SG partition stubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartre, B.; Banchet, J. [AREVA NP, Saint-Marcel (France); Moras, D.; Bastin, P. [Intercontrole, Rungis (France); Beroni, C. [EDF/CEIDRE, Saint-Denis (France)

    2006-07-01

    Studies by EDF and AREVA NP on Inconel zones have identified the Inconel 600 partition stubs of steam generators as potential areas of SCC, on the hot leg side. Decision was made to perform an expert assessment using ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques to be applied on the whole area of the stub showing penetrant testing (PT) techniques indications. UT techniques, probes and tools were then developed for that purpose. The aim is to size shallow defects, sizing capacity being maintained for defects propagated to a half-thickness. Although no formal qualification was required, the development was performed in view of a performance demonstration. Three mock-ups were manufactured by AREVA NP: two welded mock-ups with machined defects, surface condition and geometry representative of the ''envelope'' of situations likely to be found on the SG; one mock-up, with representative corrosion cracks Development was carried out in two phases: development of techniques and specification of probes and tooling, then development of tools, industrialization of probes, development of procedures, personnel training and performance demonstration. The basic inspection relied on TOFDT, with a contact probe; frequencies, PCS and dimensions were optimised using the results from the mock-ups. Three sets of transducers were defined: a HF transducer for flaw sizes close to the critical size, another HF transducer, with lower PCS for smaller defects, both transducers for material whose permeability was equivalent to that of the mock-ups; anticipating less permeable materials, a MF probe was added. Tests having shown that these transducers did not cover the whole plate thickness, a back-up phased-array probe was selected to scan the plate beyond halfthickness. For a better access under the TSP, a focused transducer was also added to complete the previous set. All of these transducers were operated in immersion, with the same tool: a COBRA type arm which positioned the probes

  7. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  8. Time-dependent corrosion fatique crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research is to characterize environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth for the susceptible short-longitudinal orientation of aluminum alloy 7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution. This work is necessary in order to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA-FLAGRO (NASGRO). This effort concentrates on determining relevant inputs to a superposition model in order to more accurately model environmental fatigue crack propagation.

  9. Effect of Sensitization on Corrosion-Fatigue Cracking in Al 5083 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-21

    1% NaCl solution, the observed environmental effects on fatigue crack growth can be explained by the hydrogen embrittlement mechanism and are...using a superposition model and a two-parameter approach to environment- assisted cracking . The superposition model is essentially a summation of...Metall. Trans. A. Vol. 11A, 1980, pp. 151-158. 15. A. Bonakdar, F. Wang, J.J. Williams, and N. Chawla, “ Environmental Effects on Fatigue Crack

  10. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking of α-brass in Mattsson's solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan, E-mail: jagan.ulaganathan@mail.utoronto.ca; Newman, Roger C., E-mail: roger.newman@utoronto.ca

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic strain rate ahead of a crack tip formed during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a static load is assumed to arise from the crack propagation. The strain surrounding the crack tip would be redistributed as the crack grows, thereby having the effect of dynamic strain. Recently, several studies have shown cold work to cause accelerated crack growth rates during SCC, and the slip-dissolution mechanism has been widely applied to account for this via a supposedly increased crack-tip strain rate in cold worked material. While these interpretations consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, dislocations are generated inhomogeneously within the microstructure during cold work. The presence of grain boundaries results in dislocation pile-ups that cause local strain concentrations. The local strains generated from cold working α-brass by tensile elongation were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The role of these local strains in SCC was studied by measuring the strain distributions from the same regions of the sample before cold work, after cold work, and after SCC. Though, the cracks did not always initiate or propagate along boundaries with pre-existing local strains from the applied cold work, the local strains surrounding the cracked boundaries had contributions from both the crack propagation and the prior cold work. - Highlights: • Plastic strain localization has a complex relationship with SCC susceptibility. • Surface relief created by cold work creates its own granular strain localization. • Cold work promotes crack growth but several other factors are involved.

  11. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    of high-strength pipeline steel and the concentration of hydrogen present in the steel. B. Determine the degree hydrogen absorption by cathodically protected steel exposed in natural soil sediment, which include activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). C. Compare the above points with fracture......An effort has been undertaken in order to develop a concept for evaluation of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking in cathodically protected gas transmission pipelines. The effort was divided into the following subtasks: A. Establish a correlation between the fracture mechanical properties...... in this steel....

  12. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  13. Analysis of Cracking Mode of Anchor Structure of Underground Engineering Induced by Reinforcement Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wantao Ding

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on elastic theory and assumption of maximum tensile-stress failure criterion, together with construction process of anchor structure and rust expansion critical process, this study proposed a simplified reinforcement rust expansion mechanical model of anchor structure system. Elastic criterion of different initial cracking mode was rewarded under different stress ratios. According to analysis of critical cracking mode of different medium, cracking order of mortar and surrounding rock depended on their material parameters, in-situ stress and thickness of mortar cover. Critical cracking conditions of different medium without effect of in-situ stress was the same as that of considering in-situ stress while k is equal to 3 or 1/3. And engineering example shows that three different cracking modes exist under different stress ratios. The result provides a useful reference for analysis of mechanical deterioration mechanism of anchor structure and design of support structure of underground engineering.

  14. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in high temperature pure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, T.K. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y.; Tsai, C.H. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarizations, electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted to investigate the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics of Type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. A number of thermally sensitized specimens were prepared and were pre-oxidized in a 288 C environment with the presence of 300 ppb dissolved oxygen for 360 hours. Most of the specimens were then treated with various chemicals including powdered zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}), powdered titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), and zirconyl nitrate [ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] via static immersion at 90 C, 150 C, and 200 C. Test environments were specifically designed in a circulation loop to create a dissolved oxygen concentration of 300 ppb. Test results showed that the corrosion current densities of all treated specimens were lower than that of the untreated, pre-oxidized specimen at ambient temperature in a solution mixed with 1 mM K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} and 1 mM K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6}. The ECPs of the treated specimens could be lower or higher than that of the pre-oxidized one at 288 C, depending upon the type of treating chemical and the treating temperature. In addition, IGSCC was observed on all specimens (treated or untreated) in the same environment. However, the untreated specimen exhibited lower elongation, shorter failure time, and more secondary cracks on the side surfaces. It was therefore suggested that inhibitive chemicals such as ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} did provide a certain degree of enhancement in improving the mechanical behavior of the treated specimens and in prolonging the IGSCC initiation time. (authors)

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMAT IN-LINE INSPECTION SYSTEM FOR DETECTION, DISCRIMINATION, AND GRADING OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Aron; Jon Gore, Roger Dalton; Stuart Eaton; Adrian Bowles; Owen Thomas; Tim Jarman

    2003-07-01

    This report describes progress, experiments, and results for a project to develop a pipeline inline inspection tool that uses electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) to detect and grade stress corrosion cracking (SCC). There is a brief introduction that gives background material about EMATs and relevant previous Tuboscope work toward a tool. This work left various choices about the modes and transducers for this project. The experimental section then describes the lab systems, improvements to these systems, and setups and techniques to narrow the choices. Improvements, which involved transducer matching networks, better magnetic biasing, and lower noise electronics, led to improved signal to noise (SNR) levels. The setups permitted transducer characterizations and interaction measurements in plates with man-made cracks, pipeline sections with SCC, and a full pipe with SCC. The latter were done with a moveable and compact EMAT setup, called a lab mouse, which is detailed. Next, the results section justifies the mode and transducer choices. These were for magnetostrictive EMATs and the use of EMAT launched modes: SH0 (at 2.1 MHz-mm) and SV1 (at 3.9 MHz-mm). This section then gives details of measurements on these modes. The measurements consisted of signal to noise ratio, insertion loss, magnetic biasing sensitivities crack reflection and transmission coefficients, beam width, standoff and tilt sensitivities. For most of the measurements the section presents analysis curves, such as reflection coefficient versus crack depth. Some notable results for the chosen modes are: that acceptable SNRs were generated in a pipe with magnetostrictive EMATs, that optimum bias for magnetostrictive transmitters and receivers is magnetic saturation, that crack reflection and transmission coefficients from crack interactions agree with 2 D simulations and seem workable for crack grading, and that the mouse has good waveform quality and so is ready for exhaustive measurement EMAT

  16. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  17. Corrosion of steel in cracked concrete: Chloride microanalysis and service life predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco Farias, J.

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement corrosion is frequently considered as the predominant degradation mechanism affecting reinforced concrete structures. Reinforced concrete structures are commonly subject to harsh environmental and loading conditions in which aggressive species can penetrate. Chlorides, present in

  18. Corrosion of steel in cracked concrete: Chloride microanalysis and service life predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco Farias, J.

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement corrosion is frequently considered as the predominant degradation mechanism affecting reinforced concrete structures. Reinforced concrete structures are commonly subject to harsh environmental and loading conditions in which aggressive species can penetrate. Chlorides, present in seaw

  19. Fatigue Crack Extension Model of Aluminium Alloy with Prior Corrosion Damage Based on Localised Corrosion Damage%基于局部腐蚀损伤的铝合金预腐蚀疲劳裂纹扩展模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔光明; 李旭东; 穆志韬

    2014-01-01

    目的:建立铝合金预腐蚀疲劳裂纹扩展模型。方法采用表征局部环境腐蚀损伤影响程度的参数孔蚀率对腐蚀疲劳裂纹扩展速率进行修正。结果修正后的腐蚀铝合金试件的疲劳裂纹扩展速率与试验结果吻合程度良好。结论修正后的铝合金预腐蚀疲劳裂纹扩展速率模型合理有效,试验数据和预测模型可为海军飞机结构的损伤容限设计提供参考。%Objective To establish a modified model for pre-corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum alloy. Methods Considering that the local damage around the crack tip was more reasonable for accelerating crack growth rate in corrosive environment, the pitting rate, which was a parameter characterizing the influence of corrosion in local environ-ment, was used to correct the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate. Results The experimental results were in good agreement with predictions of the amended fatigue crack growth rate model for corroded aluminum alloy specimens. Conclusion The corrected aluminum alloy pre-corrosion fatigue crack growth rate model was reasonable and effective, and the test data and the prediction model could provide a reference for the damage tolerance design of navy aircraft structure.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of X80 Pipeline Steel in Near-Neutral pH Environment under Constant Load Tests with and without Preload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Z. Jia; J.Q. Wang; E.H. Han; W. Ke1

    2011-01-01

    Constant load tests in NS4 solution purged with N2-5%CO2 gas mixture were conducted on American Petroleum Institute (API) X80 pipeline steel applied in the 2nd West-East (;as Pipeline project with and without preload. The results show that cracks could initiate and propagate in X80 pipeline steel in near-neutral pH environment under a constant load condition. The life of crack initiation and propagation increased with decreasing applied stress. Preload did not change its corrosion behavior obviously. However, preload reduced the time for crack initiation.

  1. Laser Peening for Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking at Welds in Marine Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Second Reader: Joseph C. Farmer THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden...Advisor Joseph C. Farmer Second Reader Knox Millsaps Chair, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering iv THIS PAGE...Cruisers, in Defense News2010. p. 4. [4] K. N. Tran, M. R. Hill, et al., Welding Journal, 85 (2006) 28. [5] M. G. Fontana , Stress Corrosion, in Corrosion

  2. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling; Prise en compte de l`etat de surface dans la modelisation de la fissuration par corrosion sous contrainte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Gelpi, A. [FRAMATOME, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France)

    1997-12-31

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor`s primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author). 14 refs.

  3. Multifunctional Integrated Optic Sensor for Detection of Cracks and Corrosion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a new nondestructive inspection sensor system, capable of simultaneously measuring strain-based load and detecting crack,...

  4. Use of electrochemical potential noise to detect initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks in a 17-4 PH steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G. [UAEM, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Garcia-Ochoa, E. [Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco (Mexico). Dept. de Fisicoquimica Aplicada; Diaz-Sanchez, A. [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Toluca (Mexico). Dept. de Materiales

    1997-09-01

    Corrosion potential transients were associated with nucleation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks in a 17-4 precipitation-hardenable (PH) martensitic stainless steel (SS) during slow strain rate tests (SSRT) at 90 C in deaerated sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions, Test solutions included 20 wt% NaCl at pH 3 and 7, similar to normal and faulted steam turbine environments, respectively. Time series were analyzed using the fast Fourier transform method. At the beginning of straining, the consistent noise behavior was perturbed with small potential transients, probably associated with rupture of the surface oxide layer. After yielding, these transients increased in intensity. At maximum load, the transients were still higher in intensity and frequency. These potential transients were related to crack nucleation and propagation. When the steel did not fail by stress corrosion cracking (SCC), such transients were found only at the beginning of the test. The power spectra showed some differences in all cases in roll-off slope and voltage magnitude, but these were not reliable tools to monitor the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks.

  5. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials. In support of this research, efforts are currently underway to arrange shipment of “free” high fluence austenitic alloys available through Électricité de France (EDF) for post irradiation testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and IASCC testing at the University of Michigan. These high fluence materials range in damage values from 45 to 125 displacements per atom (dpa). The samples identified for transport to the United States, which include nine, no-cost, 304, 308 and 316 tensile bars, were relocated from the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia, and received at the Halden Reactor in Halden, Norway, on August 23, 2016. ORNL has been notified that a significant amount of work is required to prepare the samples for further shipment to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The

  6. Effect of a novel three-step aging on strength, stress corrosion cracking and microstructure of AA7085

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈送义; 陈康华; 董朋轩; 叶升平; 黄兰萍; 阳代军

    2016-01-01

    The influence of a novel three-step aging on strength, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and microstructure of AA7085 was investigated by tensile testing and slow strain rate testing combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that with the increase of second-step aging time of two-step aging, the mechanical properties increase first and then decrease, while the SCC resistance increases. Compared with two-step aging, three-step aging treatment improves SCC resistance and the strength increases by about 5%. The effects of novel three-step aging on strength and SCC resistance are explained by the role of matrix precipitates and grain boundary precipitates, respectively.

  7. Principles of inhibiting of corrosion-static crack growth in constructional steels caused by hydrogen embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaniv, O.N.; Nikiforchin, G.N.; Tsirul' nik, A.T.

    1987-11-01

    The effectiveness of a range of organic and inorganic corrosion inhibitors was studied on a series of structural chromium steels--including 45KhN2MFA, 60KhS, and 30KhGSN2A--of different strength levels and certain principles are formulated for developing and selecting inhibitors based on the hydrogen mechanism of corrosive media. The inhibitors tested include monoethanol amine, urotropin, sodium benzoate, thiourea, sodium phosphates and chromates, various nitrates, and the IRT range of inhibitors.

  8. Effects of cold work on stress corrosion cracking of type 316L stainless steel in hot lithium hydroxide solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, J.H.; Bogaerts, W.F. (Univ. of Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) has ben chose as the lithium compound to be used in the Aqueous Lithium Salt Blanket (ALSB) concept that has been proposed as a possible driver blanket for the Next European Torus (NET), the next generation of fusion testing devices in Europe, as well as for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor program (ITER). The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cold-worked AISI type 316L stainless steel (SS) in a concentrated lithium salt solution at elevated temperature was investigated. Using the slow strain rate technique, SCC experiments were carried out on 20% and 40% cold-worked materials in a solution of 10g lithium hydroxide and 100 cm[sup 3]H[sub 2]O at 95C under conditions with controlled electrochemical potential. Observation of the fracture surfaces by scanning electron microscope indicated the SCC behavior of the cold-worked steel was essentially different from that of the solution-annealed steel. A ductile fracture of cold-worked samples occurred under open-circuit conditions ([approximately][minus]280 mV) and at 200 mV. Slight intergranular attack was found in the region near the surface of cold-worked specimens when the electrochemical potential was controlled at [minus]120 mV. SCC was observed when the experiments were conducted at +100mV. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of solution-annealed material changed into a mixed SCC mode, or a dominant transgranular SCC (TGSCC) with an increase of cold work to 20% and 40%. Compared to the SCC behavior of the solution-annealed 316L, the results showed cold work improved significantly the resistance of 316L SS to IGSCC in the hot LiOH environment. Susceptibility to TGSCC of cold-worked 316L SS increased with increasing extent of cold working. These effects were reviewed with respect to electrochemical and microstructural phenomena.

  9. Corrosion problems and solutions in oil refining and petrochemical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses corrosion problems and their solutions at facilities in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, including cooling water and boiler feed water units. Further, it describes and analyzes corrosion control actions, corrosion monitoring, and corrosion management. Corrosion problems are a perennial issue in the oil refining and petrochemical industry, as they lead to a deterioration of the functional properties of metallic equipment and harm the environment – both of which need to be protected for the sake of current and future generations. Accordingly, this book examines and analyzes typical and atypical corrosion failure cases and their prevention at refineries and petrochemical facilities, including problems with: pipelines, tanks, furnaces, distillation columns, absorbers, heat exchangers, and pumps. In addition, it describes naphthenic acid corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen damages, sulfidic corrosion, microbiologically induced corrosion, erosion-corrosion, and corrosion...

  10. The Effect of Sensitization on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloy 5456

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    electrochemically active particles. (From Jones, [26]) ....................................23 Figure 16. Illustration of corrosion tunnel model. (a) Schematic of...46 Table 6. Grinding and Polishing Conditions...approaches continuity along grain boundaries. The β phase is more anodic than the surrounding material matrix and therefore is electrochemically more

  11. Effect of pH Value on Stress Corrosion Cracking of X70 Pipeline Steel in Acidic Soil Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyong LIU; Cuiwei DU; Xin ZHANG; Fuming WANG; Xiaogang LI

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH value on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of API X70 pipeline steel in simulated acidic soil solutions was investigated by using slow strain rate test,electrochemical polarization curves,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,and scanning electron microscopy.pH plays an important role in the susceptibility and electrochemical mechanism of SCC.The pH higher than 5 has no significant effect on electrochemical processes.By contrast,the pH lower than 5 intensifies cathodic hydrogen evolution reactions,thus increasing the cathodic current and corrosion potential.Under different pH values,the SCC mechanism of X70 pipeline steel varies among anodic dissolution (AD),hydrogen embrittlement (HE),and the combination of AD and HE (AD + HE) with variations of applied potential.At-850 mVSCE,the SCC mechanism is HE if pH is less than 4 or AD + HE if pH value is more positive.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-07-01

    SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 C (statically loaded U-bend specimens) is dependent on microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures (optical metallography). In CWA tubing materials, one crack dominated and grew to a visible size. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (<925 C) and final anneals at 1010-1065 C developed both large cracks (similar to those in CWA materials) and small intergranular microcracks detectable only by destructive metallography. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (>980 C) and a high-temperature final anneal (>1040 C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks in all specimens. These materials did not develop large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 C for 7h), which reduces or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in high temperature processed HWA materials. Conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) were done on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behavior. Major difference between high-temperature HWA and low-temperature HWA and CWA materials was that the high temperature processing and final annealing produced predominantly ``semi-continuous`` dendritic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides along grain boundaries with a minimal amount of intragranular carbides. Lower temperature processing produced intragranular M7C3 carbides, with less intergranular carbides.

  13. Numerical simulation of the detection of crack in reinforced concrete structures of NPP due to expansion of reinforcing corrosive products using Impact-Echo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morávka Š.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy boom is starting nowadays. But also current nuclear power plants (NPP are duty to certify their security for regular renewal of their operating licenses. NPP security can be significantly affected by defects of large amount of ageing reinforced concrete structures. Advanced Impact-Echo method seams to be very hopeful to cooperate at performing in-service inspections such structures. Just these in-service inspections are included in the first priority group of specific technical issues according to the recommendations of OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency, Commission on Safety of Nuclear Installation in the field of ageing management.This paper continues of extensive project dealing with Impact-Echo method application. It will present method description and main results of numerical modeling of detection and localization of crack caused by corrosive product expansion. Steel reinforcing rods are subjected to corrosion due to diffusion of corrosive agents from structure surface. Corrosive products have up to 7-times larger volume than pure steel. Raised strain can cad lead up to concrete failure and crack development. We investigate whether it is possible to detect these growing cracks by Impact-Echo method in time.Experimental verification of our numerical predictions is prepared on Civil Faculty in Brno.

  14. Preliminary study for extension and improvement on modeling of primary water stress corrosion cracking at control rod drive mechanism nozzles of pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: ofaly@ipen.br, e-mail: mmattar@ipen.br; Schvartzman, Monica M.M.A.M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: monicas@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    This study is for to extend, to improve the existing models, and to propose a local approach to assess the primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel-based components. It is includes a modeling of new data for Alloy 182 and new considerations about initiation and crack growth according a developing method based on EPRI-MRP-115 (2004), and USNRC NUREG/CR-6964 (2008). The experimental data is obtained from CDTN-Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center, by tests through slow strain rate test (SSRT) equipment. The model conception assumed is a built diagram which indicates a thermodynamic condition for the occurrence of corrosion submodes in essayed materials, through Pourbaix diagrams, for Nickel Alloys in high temperature primary water. Over them, are superimposed different models, including a semi-empiric-probabilistic one to quantify the primary water stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, and a crack growth model. These constructed models shall be validated with the experimental data. This development aims to extent some of the models obtained to weld metals like the Alloy 182, and to improve the originals obtained according methodologies exposed in above referred reports. These methodologies comprise laboratory testing procedures, data collecting, data screening, modeling procedures, assembling of data from some laboratories in the world, plotting of results, compared analysis and discussion of these results. Preliminary results for Alloy 182 will be presented. (author)

  15. The effects of thermomechanical processing and annealing on the microstructural evolution and stress corrosion cracking of alloy 690

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cody A.

    The effects of short-range order (SRO), long-range order (LRO), and plastic strain on the microstructure and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 690 have been investigated in detail. First, the presence of 1/3{422} and 1/2{311} diffuse intensities in B=[111] and B=[112] selected area diffraction patterns (SADPs), previously believed to indicate the presence of SRO, has been examined in Alloy 690, a Ni-Cr binary alloy, and a number of FCC materials in an effort to determine their source. It is shown that these intensities are not due to SRO, although their source remains somewhat unclear. However, an experiment was conducted that tracked the strong {111} reflections in a B=[112] SADP as the sample was tilted (19°) towards a B=[111] zone axis. Significantly, it was noted that the {111} intensities never fully disappear and that they fall in the 1/3{422} positions within the B=[111] SADP. This indicates that these diffuse intensities are related to reflections that lie in the first order Laue zone (FOLZ) when the zone is aligned along B=[111], although theoretical calculations indicate scattering from these planes into the zero order Laue zone used to form the SADP should not occur. Thus, while calculations are inconsistent with the behavior expected, the diffuse intensities observed in a number of high index zones are consistent with projections of higher order Laue zone reflections into the zero layer, suggesting that the theory is in need of reassessment. Second, the stability of the gamma'-Ni2Cr LRO phase present on the Ni-Cr phase diagram was examined in a Ni-55Cr binary alloy. The results indicate that the gamma'-Ni2Cr phase is indeed metastable, and that the two-phase gamma-Ni + alpha-Cr phase field extends all the way to room temperature. Likewise, the sluggish formation of the gamma'-Ni 2Cr phase appears to occur only over a narrow composition and temperature range. It is speculated that this important phase in more complex

  16. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in High Strength Steels and in Titanium and Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    widely throughout the technical community and is not available in collected form, the authors of the chapter on titanium have included a much higher...Elements................ 22 Derivation of KI by Specimen Compliance.............. 23 Experiental Determination of Comll-!hlncc........... 24 Theoretical...101. R. T. Ault, Republic Steel Corp., private communication . 102. S. R. Novak and S. T. Rolfe, Kt, Stress-Corrosion Tests of l2Ni-5Cr-3Mo and l8Ni

  17. The Role of Stress in the Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    orthogonal to the other two directions. This system is used for sheet, extrusions , and forgings with nonsymmetrical grain flow [18]. All testing...around the constituent particles and then spreads to the grain boundaries. It is not possible to determine from the present results if the IGC...International, 2011, pp.1-8. [30] J. R. Scully et al., " Spreading of intergranular corrosion on the surface of sensitized Al-4.4Mg alloys: A general finding

  18. Study of alloy 600`S stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water; Etude des mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte de l`alliage 600 dans l`eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, R.

    1994-06-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600`s stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies : hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens` fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author). 113 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs., 4 annexes.

  19. Critical issues in De-alloying and transcrystalline stress-corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieradzki, K.; Wagner, J.W.

    1992-03-01

    This report describes our progress since the last reporting reporting period (March 1991) and details the third year research plans on the program. The three major components of the program relate to (1) kinetic aspects of the selective dissolution in alloys and the coarsening of de-alloyed layers, (2) measurements of crack dynamics during film induced cleavage processes, and (3) mechanical properties of the intrinsic de-alloyed layers responsible for film-induced cleavage events. We discuss progress in each of these areas below.

  20. Estimation of elastic modulus of reinforcement corrosion products using inverse analysis of digital image correlation measurements for input in corrosion-induced cracking model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Michel, Alexander; Thybo, Anna Emilie A.;

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental and numerical approach for estimating the elastic modulus of reinforcement corrosion products is presented. Deformations between steel and mortar were measured using digital image correlation during accelerated corrosion testing at 100 μA/cm2 (~1.16 mm/year). Measured...... deformations were compared to a numerical corrosion model that considers electrochemical, transport, and mechanical processes, including penetration of corrosion products into a ‘corrosion-accommodating region,’ provided by the mortar’s capillary porosity, directly surrounding the steel. Comparing model...... and experimental results provides an order-of-magnitude approximation of corrosion product stiffness of 2.0 GPa....

  1. Assessment of stress-corrosion cracking in a water-cooled ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1989-04-01

    Water-cooled, near-term reactors will operate under conditions at which SCC is possible; however, control of material purity and processing and coolant chemistry can either eliminate or greatly reduce the probability of this type of structural failure. This evaluation has focused on an assessment of water impurity effects on SCC of austenitic stainless steel at temperatures below 100{degree}C and on the conditions controlling sensitization in the fusion heat of Type 316 SS and the fusion materials heat of modified Type 316 SS designated as PCA. This assessment identifies the dominant effect of small concentrations of impurities in high-purity water on SCC such that crack growth rates at 25--75{degree}C in water with as little as 5--15 ppM Cl{sup {minus}} are equal to the crack growth rates at 200--300{degree}C in high-purity water. These effects are primarily for sensitized Type 304 SS, so analysis of sensitization behavior of fusion austenitic alloys was also undertaken. An SSDOS model developed at PNL was used to make these assessments, and correlation to experimental results for Type 316 SS was very good. Both the fusion heat of Type 316 SS and PCA can be severely sensitized but with proper thermal treatment it should be possible to avoid sensitization. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  3. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  4. Analysis on the internal cracking of concrete cover due to rebar uniform corrosion%混凝土保护层均匀锈胀内裂分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜慧; 喻孟雄; 刘荣桂

    2014-01-01

    钢筋锈蚀是影响钢筋混凝土结构使用寿命的重要因素,混凝土保护层锈胀内裂加速整个混凝土保护层的开裂。假定混凝土满足最大伸长线应变破坏准则,利用圆孔扩张理论对铁锈自由膨胀充满混凝土与钢筋交界面空隙后混凝土保护层内裂进行分析,建立了锈胀内裂时刻的钢筋锈蚀深度计算式。针对计算式主要影响参数的分析表明:钢筋锈蚀深度与水泥石中毛细孔体积、钢筋直径、混凝土极限拉应变成正相关,与铁锈体积膨胀率成负相关。%Rebar corrosion is an important factor affecting the service life of reinforced concrete structures.Concrete cover internal cracking induced by reinforcement corrosion accelerates cracking of all cover.Based on the assumption of concrete meet the maximum ten-sional strain failure criterion,one equation for predicting the reinforcement corrosion depth from corrosion initiation to cover internal cracking was established according to the cylindrical cavity expansion theory.By analyzing main parameters of the equation ,the results showed that the reinforcement corrosion depth was positive correlation with cement stone pore volume,diameter of rebar,concrete ulti-mate tensile strain,and negative correlation with rust rate of volume expansion.

  5. Corrosion rate of steel embedded in blended Portland and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payá, J.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of the corrosion levels in steel bars embedded in mortars made with a blend of Portland cement and (0-20% spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R, with a variable (0.3-0.7 water/binder (w/b ratio. The specimens were stored in the following conditions: relative humidity of 40, 80 or 100% and CO2 concentrations of 5 and 100%. The steel corrosion rate was measured with polarization resistance techniques. In the absence of aggressive agents, the steel was found to remain duly passivated in mortars with an FC3R content of up to 15% under all the conditions of relative humidity tested. The reinforcement corrosion level in mortars with a w/b ratio of 0.3 and 15% FC3R subjected to accelerated carbonation was similar to the level observed in the unblended Portland cement control mortar.En este trabajo se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosión de barras de acero embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland con relación agua/material cementante (a/mc variable (0,3-0,7, en los que parte del cemento (0-20% se sustituyó por catalizador de craqueo usado (FC3R. Las condiciones de conservación de las probetas elaboradas fueron las siguientes: distintas humedades relativas (40, 80 y 100% y dos concentraciones de CO2 (5 y 100%. La velocidad de corrosión de los aceros se midió mediante la técnica de resistencia de polarización. Se ha podido determinar que, bajo las distintas condiciones de humedad relativa y ausencia de agresivo, los aceros se mantuvieron correctamente pasivados en los morteros con contenidos de FC3R de hasta el 15%. El nivel de corrosión que presenta el refuerzo embebidos en morteros con sustitución de un 15% de cemento por FC3R y relación a/mc 0,3, al ser sometidos a un proceso de carbonatación acelerada, era muy similar al mostrado por el mortero patrón, sin FC3R.

  6. Standard Practice for Use of Mattsson's Solution of pH 7.2 to Evaluate the Stress- Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Copper-Zinc Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the preparation and use of Mattsson's solution of pH 7.2 as an accelerated stress-corrosion cracking test environment for brasses (copper-zinc base alloys). The variables (to the extent that these are known at present) that require control are described together with possible means for controlling and standardizing these variables. 1.2 This practice is recommended only for brasses (copper-zinc base alloys). The use of this test environment is not recommended for other copper alloys since the results may be erroneous, providing completely misleading rankings. This is particularly true of alloys containing aluminum or nickel as deliberate alloying additions. 1.3 This practice is intended primarily where the test objective is to determine the relative stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of different brasses under the same or different stress conditions or to determine the absolute degree of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, if any, of a particular brass or brass component ...

  7. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651 and titanium 6Al-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 7) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity), and demineralized distilled water. Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, titanium stressed specimens showed no reactions to its environment. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 and aluminum 2014-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl), while aluminum 2219-T87 seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in sodium chloride at three levels of stress (25%, 50%, and 75% Y.S.). In organic fluids of methyl, ethyl, and iso-propyl alcohol, 2014-T6 and 7075-T651 did not fail by SCC; but 2014-T651 was susceptible to SCC in methly alcohol, but resistant in ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  8. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 7075-T651 and titanium 6A1-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 6) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity). Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, a similar observation was not noted for titanium stressed specimens. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl); while they (both alloys) seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol, and demineralized distilled water. Titanium 6A1-4V showed some evidence of susceptibility to SCC in methanol, while no such susceptibility was exhibited in ethanol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  9. Cracking and Corrosion of Composite Tubes in Black Liquor Recovery Boiler Primary Air Ports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, James R.; Singbeil, Douglas L.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Kish, Joseph R.; Yuan, Jerry; Frederick, Laurie A.; Choudhury, Kimberly A.; Gorog, J. Peter; Jetté, Francois R.; Hubbard, Camden R.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Singh, Prett M.; Maziasz, Phillip J.

    2006-10-01

    Black liquor recovery boilers are an essential part of kraft mills. Their design and operating procedures have changed over time with the goal of providing improved boiler performance. These performance improvements are frequently associated with an increase in heat flux and/or operating temperature with a subsequent increase in the demand on structural materials associated with operation at higher temperatures and/or in more corrosive environments. Improvements in structural materials have therefore been required. In most cases the alternate materials have provided acceptable solutions. However, in some cases the alternate materials have solved the original problem but introduced new issues. This report addresses the performance of materials in the tubes forming primary air port openings and, particularly, the problems associated with use of stainless steel clad carbon steel tubes and the solutions that have been identified.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMAT IN-LINE INSPECTION SYSTEM FOR DETECTION, DISCRIMINATION, AND GRADING OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Aron; Jeff Jia; Bruce Vance; Wen Chang; Raymond Pohler; Jon Gore; Stuart Eaton; Adrian Bowles; Tim Jarman

    2005-02-01

    This report describes prototypes, measurements, and results for a project to develop a prototype pipeline in-line inspection (ILI) tool that uses electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) to detect and grade stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The introduction briefly provides motivation and describes SCC, gives some background on EMATs and guided ultrasonic waves, and reviews promising results of a previous project using EMATs for SCC. The experimental section then describes lab measurement techniques and equipment, the lab mouse and prototypes for a mule, and scan measurements made on SCC. The mouse was a moveable and compact EMAT setup. The prototypes were even more compact circuits intended to be pulled or used in an ILI tool. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the best modes, transduction, and processing to use, to characterize the transducers, and to prove EMATs and mule components could produce useful results. Next, the results section summarizes the measurements and describes the mouse scans, processing, prototype circuit operating parameters, and performance for SH0 scans. Results are given in terms of specifications--like SNR, power, insertion loss--and parametric curves--such as signal amplitude versus magnetic bias or standoff, reflection or transmission coefficients versus crack depth. Initially, lab results indicated magnetostrictive transducers using both SH0 and SV1 modes would be worthwhile to pursue in a practical ILI system. However, work with mule components showed that SV1 would be too dispersive, so SV1 was abandoned. The results showed that reflection measurements, when normalized by the direct arrival are sensitive to and correlated with SCC. This was not true for transmission measurements. Processing yields a high data reduction, almost 60 to 1, and permits A and C scan display techniques and software already in use for pipeline inspection. An analysis of actual SH0 scan results for SCC of known dimensions showed that length

  11. Effects of Nitrogen and Tensile Direction on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Ni-Free FeCrMnC-Based Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Sangshik

    2017-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Ni-free duplex stainless steels containing N and C (Febalance-19Cr-8Mn-0.25C-(0.03, 0.21)N, in wt %) was investigated by using a slow strain rate test (SSRT) in air and aqueous NaCl solution with different tensile directions, including parallel (longitudinal) and perpendicular (transverse) to the rolling direction. It was found that alloying N was effective in increasing the resistance to SCC, while it was higher along the longitudinal direction than the transverse direction. The SCC susceptibility of the two alloys was assessed based on the electrochemical resistance to pitting corrosion, the corrosion morphology, and the fractographic analysis. PMID:28772651

  12. Environmental and Material Influences on the Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Steel in H2O–CO–CO2 Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. van der Merwe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress-corrosion cracking of A516 pressure vessel steel was investigated by the use of slow strain-rate tests. The orientation of samples to the rolling direction was investigated, and it was found that samples machined longitudinal to the rolling direction showed a slightly increased sensitivity to stress corrosion. The temperature variation showed that for different gas mixtures, the maximum sensitivity to stress corrosion was in the region of 45° to 55°C for the 25% CO gas mixture, whereas with higher CO concentrations, this temperature region of maximum sensitivity moved to higher temperatures. Surface finish showed a slight increase in sensitivity to cracking with increased surface roughness. The most significant increase was found with increased total gas pressures and when samples have been exposed to the environment for an extended period. This was as a result of the inhibition of the corrosion reaction by the passivation of the carbon monoxide, which is a time-dependent process.

  13. Atmospheric-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Grade 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel—Effects of 475 °C Embrittlement and Process Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Örnek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 475 °C embrittlement and microstructure process orientation on atmospheric-induced stress corrosion cracking (AISCC of grade 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. AISCC tests were carried out under salt-laden, chloride-containing deposits, on U-bend samples manufactured in rolling (RD and transverse directions (TD. The occurrence of selective corrosion and stress corrosion cracking was observed, with samples in TD displaying higher propensity towards AISCC. Strains and tensile stresses were observed in both ferrite and austenite, with similar magnitudes in TD, whereas, larger strains and stresses in austenite in RD. The occurrence of 475 °C embrittlement was related to microstructural changes in the ferrite. Exposure to 475 °C heat treatment for 5 to 10 h resulted in better AISCC resistance, with spinodal decomposition believed to enhance the corrosion properties of the ferrite. The austenite was more susceptible to ageing treatments up to 50 h, with the ferrite becoming more susceptible with ageing in excess of 50 h. Increased susceptibility of the ferrite may be related to the formation of additional precipitates, such as R-phase. The implications of heat treatment at 475 °C and the effect of process orientation are discussed in light of microstructure development and propensity to AISCC.

  14. Effect of deteriorated microstructures on stress corrosion cracking of X70 pipeline steel in acidic soil environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X70 pipeline steel and its weld joint area in acidic soil environmeat in China,two simulating methods were used: one was to obtain bad mierostructures in heat affected zone by annealing at 1300℃ for 10 rain and then,quenching in water; the other was to get different simulating solutions of acidic soil in Yingtan in southeast China.The SCC susceptibilities of X70 pipeline steel before and after quenching in the simulating solutions were analyzed using slow stain rate test (SSRT) and poteatiodynamic polarization technique to investigate the SCC electrochemical mechanism of different mierostruetures further.The results show that SCC appears in the original mierostrueture and the quenched mierostructure as the polarization potential decreases.Hydrogen revolution accelerates SCC of the two tested materials within the range of-850 mV to -1200 mV vs.SCE.Microstructural hardening and grain coarsening also increase SCC.The SCC mechanisms are different,anodic dissolution is the key of causing SCC as the polarization potential is higher than the null eurreat potential,and hydrogen embrittlemeat will play a more important role to SCC as the polarization potential lower than the null current potential.

  15. The influence of long term use of inhibitors in hydrochloric acid pickling baths on hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feser, R.; Friedrich, A.; Scheide, F. [Fachhochschule Suedwestfalen, University of Applied Science, Frauenstuhlweg 31, D-58644 Iserlohn (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    The influence of commercially available inhibitors on the absorption of hydrogen by steel (St 52, StE 460, StE 690, 42CrMo4) in 15% hydrochloric acid was studied. The pickling bath aged continuously due to the chemical reaction with oxidized steel sheets. The H{sup +}- and inhibitor concentration decreased with time. The influence of this ageing process on hydrogen-induced stress corrosion cracking was tested by in-situ tensile tests in the bath solution. With increasing ageing of the bath, the reduction in fracture area was reduced and approached the values measured for non-inhibited acid baths. Furthermore hydrogen permeation was investigated. Permeation current densities rose with increasing ageing of the pickling solution. (Abstract Copyright[2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Der Einfluss von kommerziell erhaeltlichen Inhibitoren auf die Wasserstoffabsorption von Stahl (St 52, StE 460, StE 690, 42CrMo4) wurde in Salzsaeure untersucht. Die Beizbaeder wurden kontinuierlich durch die chemische Reaktion mit oxidierten Stahlblechen gealtert. Die H{sup +}- und Inhibitorkonzentration nahm mit der Zeit ab. Der Einfluss dieses Alterungsprozesses auf die wasserstoffinduzierte Spannungsrisskorrosion wurde durch in-situ Zugversuche mit Badloesung untersucht. Mit zunehmender Alterung des Bades nahm die Brucheinschnuerung ab und erreichte Werte wie sie auch in der nicht inhibierten Saeure erreicht werden. Weiterhin wurde die Wasserstoff-Permeation untersucht. Die Permeationsstromdichte steigt mit zunehmender Alterung der Beizloesung. (Abstract Copyright[2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Benefits of thread rolling process to the stress corrosion cracking and fatigue resistance of high strength fasteners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kephart, A.R.; Hayden, S.Z.

    1993-05-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cut (machined) vice thread rolled Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625 fasteners in a simulated high temperature primary water environment has been evaluated. SCC testing at 360 and 338C included 157 small and 40 large 60{degree} Vee thread studs. Thread rolled fasteners had improved resistance relative to cut fasteners. Tests of fatigue resistance in air at room temperature and both air and primary water at 315C were conducted on smaller studs with both cut and rolled threads. Results showed rolled threads can have significantly improved fatigue lives over those of cut threads in both air and primary water. Fasteners produced by two different thread rolling methods, in-feed (radial) and through-feed (axial), revealed similar SCC initiation test results. Testing of thread rolled fasteners revealed no significant SCC or fatigue growth of rolling induced thread crest laps typical of the thread rolling process. While fatigue resistance differed between the two rolled thread supplier`s studs, neither of the suppliers studs showed SCC initiation at exposure times beyond that of cut threads with SCC. In contrast to rolling at room temperature, warm rolled (427C) threads showed no improvement over cut threads in terms of fatigue resistance. The observed improved SCC and fatigue performance of rolled threads is postulated to be due to interactive factors, including beneficial residual stresses in critically stressed thread root region, reduction of plastic strains during loading and formation of favorable microstructure.

  17. Effects of applied potential on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy in acid and alkaline chloride solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Song, Ren-guo; Sun, Bin; Lu, Hai; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Potentiodynamic polarization tests and slow strain rate test (SSRT) in combination with fracture morphology observations were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy (AA7003) in acid and alkaline chloride solutions under various applied potentials ( E a). The results show that AA7003 is to a certain extent susceptible to SCC via anodic dissolution (AD) at open-circuit potential (OCP) and is highly susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) at high negative E a in the solutions with pH levels of 4 and 11. The susceptibility increases with negative shift in the potential when E a is less than -1000 mV vs. SCE. However, the susceptibility distinctly decreases because of the inhibition of AD when E a is equal to -1000 mV vs. SCE. In addition, the SCC susceptibility of AA7003 in the acid chloride solution is higher than that in the alkaline solution at each potential. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen on SCC increases with increasing hydrogen ion concentration.

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, The Waste Package Outer Barrier and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stephen

    2000-04-17

    One of the potential failure modes of the drip shield (DS), the waste package (WP) outer barrier, and the stainless structural material is the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced by the WP environment and various types of stresses that can develop in the DSs or the WPs. For the current design of the DS and WP, however, the DS will be excluded from the SCC evaluation because stresses that are relevant to SCC are insignificant in the DS. The major sources of stresses in the DS are loadings due to backfill and earthquakes. These stresses will not induce SCC because the stress caused by backfill is generally compressive stress and the stress caused by earthquakes is temporary in nature. The 316NG stainless steel inner barrier of the WP will also be excluded from the SCC evaluation because the SCC performance assessment will not take credit from the inner barrier. Therefore, the purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of the material (i.e., Alloy 22) used for the WP outer barrier subjected to the effects of SCC. As already mentioned in the development plan for the WP PMR (CRWMS M and O 1999e), this Analyses and Models Report (AMR) is to serve as a feed to the Waste Package Degradation (WPD) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) and Process Model Report (PMR).

  19. Electrochemical properties and stress corrosion cracking of alloys 600, 690, and 800 in solutions containing boric acid and chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, J. H.; Won, C. H. [Chungnam Nation Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, E. H.; Kim, H. P.; Kim, W. C. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-10-01

    Electrochemical characteristics and stress corrosion cracking(SCC)of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and Alloy 800 have been studied in boric acid solution with chloride. Electrochemical characteristics were measured in mixed solution of 3% H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and 0.2g/l Cl{sup -} at 320 .deg. C. SCC resistance was predicted with Parameter(P{sub SCC}) including current density ratio obtained at two different scan rates. P{sub SCC} increased with a following sequence: Alloy 600MA, 600TT, 690TT and Alloy 800. SCC test was carried out with C-ring specimens and reverse U-bend(RUB) specimens at 320 .deg. C and 350 .deg. C. Test solutions were mixture of 3% H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and 0.2g/l Cl{sup -} at 320 .deg. C and mixture of 27% H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and 2g/l Cl{sup -} at 350 .deg. C. C-ring specimens test in the solution of 3% H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and 0.2g/l Cl{sup -} at 320 .deg. C for 2400hrs did not show SCC. RUB specimen of Alloy600MA and 600TT showed SCC after 1920 hours exposure to the solution of 27% H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and 0.2g/l Clat 350 .deg. C.

  20. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  1. Microstructure, mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking of Al–Zn–Mg–Zr alloy sheet with trace amount of Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin, E-mail: pql1964@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Zhiming; Huang, Zhiqi [Guangdong Fenglu Aluminum Co., Ltd, Foshan 528133 (China); Yin, Zhimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-11-25

    Microstructural and property evolution of the Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy sheet during its preparation were investigated in detail by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Vickers micro-hardness test and room temperature tensile test. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy under different heat treatments was studied using slow strain rate test. The results showed that serious dendritic segregation existed in as-cast condition. The suitable homogenization treatment for Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy was 470 °C/24 h. After homogenization treatment, dissoluble Zn and Mg enriched non-equilibrium phases dissolved into α-Al matrix completely. The suitable solid solution-aging treatment for Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy was solution treated at 470 °C for 60 min, followed by water quenching and then aged at 120 °C for 24 h. Under this aging temper, the grain structures were composed of sub-grains, η′ phases and nanometer-sized, spherical Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles. Grain boundary precipitates (GBPs) area fraction was found to be an important parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility. The improved corrosion resistance from increasing aging temperature or prolonging aging time was due to the discontinuous η precipitates along the grain boundary and the high area fraction of GBPs. The main strengthening mechanisms of Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy are precipitation strengthening derived from η′ precipitates, dispersion strengthening, sub-grain strengthening and grain refinement caused by coherent Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles. - Highlights: • The suitable homogenization treatment of the alloy has been identified. • Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties is investigated. • Strengthening mechanisms of the alloy has been established. • The basic mechanism has

  2. Effects of Surface State and Applied Stress on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 690TT in Lead-containing Caustic Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Zhang; Jianqiu Wang; En-Hou Han; Wei Ke

    2012-01-01

    The effects of surface state and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 in 10 wt% NaOH solution with 100 mg/L litharge at 330 ℃ were investigated using C-ring samples with four kinds of surface states and two different stress levels. Sample outer surfaces of the first three kinds were ground to 400 grit (ground), shot-peened (SP) and electro-polished (EP) and the last one was used as the as-received state. Two samples of every kind were stressed to 100% and 200% yield stress of Alloy 690TT, respectively. The results showed that the oxide film consisted of three layers whereas continuous layer rich in Cr was not found. The poor adhesive ability indicated that the oxide film could not protect the matrix from further corrosion. Lead was found in the oxide film and the oxides at the crack paths and accelerated the dissolution of thermodynamically unstable Cr in these locations and also in the matrix. The crack initiation and propagation on Alloy 690TT were effectively retarded by SP and EP treatments but were enhanced by grinding treatment, compared with the cracks on the as-received surface. The cracking severity was also enhanced by increasing the externally applied stress. The accelerated dissolution of Cr and the local tensile stress concentration in the near-surface layer caused by cold-working and higher applied stress reduced the SCC-resistance of Alloy 690TT in the studied solution.

  3. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  4. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  5. Materials Reliability Program Resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 690, 52, and 152 in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H. [Framatome ANP, Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Fyfitch, S. [Framatome ANP, Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Scott, P. [Framatome ANP, SAS, Paris (France); Foucault, M. [Framatome ANP, SAS, Le Creusot (France); Kilian, R. [Framatome ANP, GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Winters, M. [Framatome ANP, GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. Repairs and replacements have generally utilized wrought Alloy 690 material and its compatible weld metals (Alloy 152 and Alloy 52), which have been shown to be very highly resistant to PWSCC in laboratory experiments and have been free from cracking in operating reactors over periods already up to nearly 15 years. It is nevertheless prudent for the PWR industry to attempt to quantify the longevity of these materials with respect to aging degradation by corrosion in order to provide a sound technical basis for the development of future inspection requirements for repaired or replaced component items. This document first reviews numerous laboratory tests, conducted over the last two decades, that were performed with wrought Alloy 690 and Alloy 52 or Alloy 152 weld materials under various test conditions pertinent to corrosion resistance in PWR environments. The main focus of the present review is on PWSCC, but secondary-side conditions are also briefly considered.

  6. A phenomenological study of initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks. Application to AISI 304L stainless steel in magnesium chloride; Etude phenomenologique de l`amorcage et de la propagation de fissures de corrosion sous contraintes. Application a l`acier inoxydable Z 2CN 18.10 dans le chlorure de magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrat, C.; Raquet, O.; Helie, M.; Santarini, G. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Service de la Corrosion, d`Electrochimie et Chimie des Fluides

    1999-04-01

    A purely phenomenological study of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) was performed using the couple AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel/boiling magnesium chloride aqueous solution. The exploitation of the morphological information (shape of the cracks and size distribution) available after constant elongation rate tests led to the apparent initiation of the cracks and to their growth rate. A law for the real initiation is proposed too and the elongation rate effect in quantitatively characterized. (authors) 8 refs.

  7. The Influence of Composition upon Surface Degradation and Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys in Wet Hydrofluoric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crook, P; Meck, N S; Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    At concentrations below 60%, wet hydrofluoric acid (HF) is extremely corrosive to steels, stainless steels and reactive metals, such as titanium, zirconium, and tantalum. In fact, only a few metallic materials will withstand wet HF at temperatures above ambient. Among these are the nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) and nickel-chromium-molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys. Previous work has shown that, even with these materials, there are complicating factors. For example, under certain conditions, internal attack and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are possible with the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, and the Ni-Cu materials can suffer intergranular attack when exposed to wet HF vapors. The purpose of this work was to study further the response of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to HF, in particular their external corrosion rates, susceptibility to internal attack and susceptibility to HF-induced SCC, as a function of alloy composition. As a side experiment, one of the alloys was tested in two microstructural conditions, i.e. solution annealed (the usual condition for materials of this type) and long-range ordered (this being a means of strengthening the alloy in question). The study of external corrosion rates over wide ranges of concentration and temperature revealed a strong beneficial influence of molybdenum content. However, tungsten, which is used as a partial replacement for molybdenum in some Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, appears to render the alloys more prone to internal attack. With regard to HF-induced SCC of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, this study suggests that only certain alloys (i.e., those containing tungsten) exhibit classical SCC. It was also discovered that high external corrosion rates inhibit HF-induced SCC, presumably due to rapid progression of the external attack front. With regard to the effects of long-range ordering, these were only evident at the highest test temperatures, where the ordered structure exhibited much higher external corrosion rates than the annealed structure.

  8. The Influence of Composition upon Surface Degradation and Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys in Wet Hydrofluoric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crook, P; Meck, N S; Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    At concentrations below 60%, wet hydrofluoric acid (HF) is extremely corrosive to steels, stainless steels and reactive metals, such as titanium, zirconium, and tantalum. In fact, only a few metallic materials will withstand wet HF at temperatures above ambient. Among these are the nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) and nickel-chromium-molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys. Previous work has shown that, even with these materials, there are complicating factors. For example, under certain conditions, internal attack and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are possible with the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, and the Ni-Cu materials can suffer intergranular attack when exposed to wet HF vapors. The purpose of this work was to study further the response of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to HF, in particular their external corrosion rates, susceptibility to internal attack and susceptibility to HF-induced SCC, as a function of alloy composition. As a side experiment, one of the alloys was tested in two microstructural conditions, i.e. solution annealed (the usual condition for materials of this type) and long-range ordered (this being a means of strengthening the alloy in question). The study of external corrosion rates over wide ranges of concentration and temperature revealed a strong beneficial influence of molybdenum content. However, tungsten, which is used as a partial replacement for molybdenum in some Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, appears to render the alloys more prone to internal attack. With regard to HF-induced SCC of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, this study suggests that only certain alloys (i.e., those containing tungsten) exhibit classical SCC. It was also discovered that high external corrosion rates inhibit HF-induced SCC, presumably due to rapid progression of the external attack front. With regard to the effects of long-range ordering, these were only evident at the highest test temperatures, where the ordered structure exhibited much higher external corrosion rates than the annealed structure.

  9. The stress corrosion cracking behaviour of heat-treated Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy in modified salt spray fog testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J. [Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    The stress corrosion cracking behaviour of 7075 (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) alloy have been studied in a salt spray fog chamber with two vapourised aqueous solutions (0 and 5% NaCl). The paper analyses the stress corrosion resistance of 7075 aluminium alloy with several precipitation-ageing heat treatments. The results are compared with that obtained in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution at 20 C. The salt spray fog testing has permitted a good evaluation of SCC susceptibility in 7075 alloy. All temper conditions studied were susceptible to SCC in the different environments tested. 7075-T6 temper was the most susceptible, while in all the cases studied 7075-T73 temper was the least susceptible. Compared to 7075-T6, 7075-RRA temper improved the resistance against the SCC process, but the mechanical properties obtained were lower. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Online stress corrosion crack and fatigue usages factor monitoring and prognostics in light water reactor components: Probabilistic modeling, system identification and data fusion based big data analytics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jagielo, Bryan J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States); Iverson, William I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL (United States); Bhan, Chi Bum [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Soppet, William S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Nuclear reactors in the United States account for roughly 20% of the nation's total electric energy generation, and maintaining their safety in regards to key component structural integrity is critical not only for long term use of such plants but also for the safety of personnel and the public living around the plant. Early detection of damage signature such as of stress corrosion cracking, thermal-mechanical loading related material degradation in safety-critical components is a necessary requirement for long-term and safe operation of nuclear power plant systems.

  11. Microstructure and stress corrosion cracking of the fusion boundary region in an alloy 182-A533B low alloy steel dissimilar weld joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Juan [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-01, Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai City 980-8579 (Japan); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Peng, Qunjia, E-mail: qpeng@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.j [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-01, Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai City 980-8579 (Japan); Takeda, Yoichi; Kuniya, Jiro; Shoji, Tetsuo [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-01, Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai City 980-8579 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} High-angle misorientation at FB, type-II and type-I boundaries. {yields} Highest residual strain and hardness in the zone between FB and type-II boundary. {yields} Type-II and type-I boundaries had lower resistance to SCC growth than the FB. {yields} Crack growth blunted by pitting at the FB. {yields} Reactivation of crack growth from the pitting by oxidation along the grain boundary. - Abstract: Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the fusion boundary (FB) region of an Alloy 182-A533B low alloy steel (LAS) dissimilar weld joint in high temperature water doped with sulfate was studied following a microstructure characterization of the FB region. The microstructure characterization suggested the type-II and type-I boundaries in the dilution zone (DZ) adjacent to the FB had lower resistance to SCC growth than the FB. Crack propagating perpendicular to the FB in the DZ was observed to be blunted by pitting at the FB, followed by the reactivation from the pitting by localized oxidation along the grain boundary in LAS.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of valves in underground district heating networks; Randbedingungen fuer Spannungsrisskorrosion in Armaturen. Erdverlegte Fernwaermenetze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, N. [Fernwaerme Wien GmbH (Austria); Prost, J.; Matthias, H.-B. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria)

    2002-09-01

    In 1994-1996, Fernwaerme Wien GmbH began to develop an area of South-East Vienna which is almost wholly used by market gardeners. Self-prestressing preinsulated bonded pipes in accordance with EN 253 with diameters DN 50 to 600 were cold-laid. In 1999, the leak detection system indicated faults in four isolating valves on branch connections. Several ball valves (material St37) cut out of the pipe following detection of one or more leaks were subjected to closer examination at the Technical University of Vienna. Several cracks extending from the inside outwards were found in the vicinity of the fillet weld on the tapered part of the casing pipe of the ball valves with a cold-formed tubular casing. Several cracks in the vicinity of the orbital weld were distributed around the entire circumference of the casing pipe of the ball valves with a straight casing. The Technical University of Vienna was commissioned to measure the loads affecting the valves during operation. Strain gauges and a temperature sensor were fitted to the pipe in the vicinity of the joint after the ball valves had been replaced. Measurement cables were connected externally through an opening in the joint shell and the joint then packed with foam material. Expansion and the system temperature and pressure of the domestic connection were recorded throughout several temperature cycles. (orig.) [German] Bei einem erdverlegten Fernwaermenetz im Suedosten von Wien trat vermehrt Spannungsrisskorrosion an Armaturen auf. Die Technische Universitaet Wien wurde beauftragt, die Schaeden zu untersuchen und Spannungsmessungen durchzufuehren. Im folgenden Beitrag werden die vorgenommenen Untersuchungen beschrieben und die Ergebnisse dokumentiert. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of the resistance of API 5L-X80 girth welds to sulphide stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forero, Adriana [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ponciano, Jose A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia; Bott, Ivani de S. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia

    2009-07-01

    The susceptibility of pipeline steels to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) depends on a series of factors ranging from the manufacture of the steel, the pipe fabrication and the assembly of the pipeline to the type of substances to be transported. The welding procedures adopted during the production and construction of the pipelines (field welding), can modify the properties of the base metal in the heat affected zone (HAZ), potentially rendering this region susceptible to SCC. This study evaluates the resistance of girth welds, in API 5L X80 pipes, to hydrogen embrittlement and to stress corrosion cracking in the presence of sulphides. The evaluation was performed according to NACE TM0177/96, Method A, applying the criterion of fracture/no fracture, and Slow Strain Rate Tensile tests (SSRT) were undertaken using a sodium thiosulphate solution according to the ASTM G129-00 Standard. According NACE requirements, the base metal was approved. The weld metal exhibited susceptibility to SCC in the presence of sulphides, failing in a period of less than 720h. This was confirmed by SSR tensile tests, where a significant decrease in the ultimate tensile strength, the elongation and the time to fracture were observed. The mechanism of fracture was transgranular. (author)

  14. Microstructure, local mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of an SA508-52M-316LN safe-end dissimilar metal weld joint by GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Hongliang; Zhu, Ruolin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Zhiming [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Jianqiu, E-mail: wangjianqiu@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Han, En.-Hou.; Ke, Wei [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Su, Mingxing [Shanghai Research Center for Weld and Detection Engineering Technique of Nuclear Equipment, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2016-07-04

    The microstructure, local mechanical properties and local stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of an SA508-52M-316LN domestic dissimilar metal welded safe-end joint used for AP1000 nuclear power plant prepared by automatic gas tungsten arc welding was studied in this work by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (with electron back scattering diffraction and an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy system), micro-hardness testing, local mechanical tensile testing and local slow strain rate tests. The micro-hardness, local mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility across this dissimilar metal weld joint vary because of the complex microstructure across the fusion area and the dramatic chemical composition change across the fusion lines. Briefly, Type I boundaries and Type II boundaries exist in 52Mb near the SA508-52Mb interface, a microstructure transition was found in SA508 heat affected zone, the residual strain and grain boundary character distribution changes as a function of the distance from the fusion boundary in 316LN heat affected zone, micro-hardness distribution and local mechanical properties along the DMWJ are heterogeneous, and 52Mw-316LN interface has the highest SCC susceptibility in this DMWJ while 316LN base metal has the lowest one.

  15. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  16. Review on Stress Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Failure of Centrifugal Compressor Impeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jiao; CHEN Songying; QU Yanpeng; LI Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  17. The role of Hydrogen and Creep in Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water Environments ? a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; Hua, F H

    2004-07-12

    Intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 in PWR steam generator environment has been extensively studied for over 30 years without rendering a clear understanding of the essential mechanisms. The lack of understanding of the IGSCC mechanism is due to a complex interaction of numerous variables such as microstructure, thermomechanical processing, strain rate, water chemistry and electrochemical potential. Hydrogen plays an important role in all these variables. The complexity, however, significantly hinders a clearer and more fundamental understanding of the mechanism of hydrogen in enhancing intergranular cracking via whatever mechanism. In this work, an attempt is made to review the role of hydrogen based on the current understanding of grain boundary structure and chemistry and intergranular fracture of nickel alloys, effect of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (e.g. the passive film stability, polarization behavior and open-circuit potential) and effect of hydrogen on PWSCC behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Mechanistic studies on the PWSCC are briefly reviewed. It is concluded that further studies on the role of hydrogen on intergranular cracking in both inert and primary side environments are needed. These studies should focus on the correlation of the results obtained at different laboratories by different methods on materials with different metallurgical and chemical parameters.

  18. Standard test method for evaluating stress-corrosion cracking of stainless alloys with different nickel content in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in an acidified boiling sodium chloride solution. This test method is performed in 25% (by mass ) sodium chloride acidified to pH 1.5 with phosphoric acid. This test method is concerned primarily with the test solution and glassware, although a specific style of U-bend test specimen is suggested. 1.2 This test method is designed to provide better correlation with chemical process industry experience for stainless steels than the more severe boiling magnesium chloride test of Practice G36. Some stainless steels which have provided satisfactory service in many environments readily crack in Practice G36, but have not cracked during interlaboratory testing using this sodium chloride test method. 1.3 This boiling sodium chloride test method was used in an interlaboratory test program to evaluate wrought stainless steels, including duplex (ferrite-austenite) stainless and an alloy with up to about 33% nickel. It may also b...

  19. Technical justification for ASME code section xi crack detection by visual examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E. [Applied Science and Technology, Poway, CA (United States); Rashid, Y.R. [ANATECH Corp., San Diego (United States)

    2001-07-01

    A critical technical element of nuclear power plant license renewal in the United States is the demonstration that the effects of aging do not compromise the intended safety function(s) of a system, structure, or component during the extended term of operation. The demonstration may take either of two forms. First, it can be shown that the design basis for the system, structure, or component is sufficiently robust that the aging effects have been insignificant through the current license term, and will continue to be insignificant through the extended term. Alternatively, it can be shown that, while the aging effects may be potentially significant, those effects can be managed and functionality maintained by defined programmatic activities during the extended term of operation. The first of the two approaches is generally provided by the construction basis, such as construction in accordance with the ASME Code Section III and other consensus codes and standards. The second of the two approaches is often provided by periodic inservice inspection and testing, in accordance with the ASME Code Section XI. The purpose of the ASME Section XI inspections and tests is to assure that systems, components, and structures are fit for continued service until the next scheduled inspection or test. The purpose of this paper is to document the effectiveness of the current ASME Code Section XI visual examination procedures in detecting the effects of aging for systems, structures, and components that are tolerant of mature cracks. (author)

  20. Hydrogen diffusion into fatigue cracks of aluminium alloy 6013 in a corrosive environment; Wasserstoffeinlagerung an Ermuedungsrissen der Aluminiumlegierung 6013 unter korrosiver Umgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenk, Christian Alexander

    2009-08-13

    The author attempted a time-resolved detection of raised hydrogen concentrations in the plastic deformation region of fatigue cracks in an aluminium test piece deformed by cyclic stress in a corrosive environment. Mechanical material parameters like the crack propagation velocity under cyclic stress change dramatically in a corrosive environment. This is assumed to be caused by hydrogen diffusion, but so far there is no method that reliably measures additional hydrogen from the corrosive environment. For this reason, a special analytical configuration was set up which makes use of the thermal desorption method. First, chips with a thickness of about 20 micrometers are sawed out of the test specimen in high-vacuum conditions. The chips fall into a hot melting vessel in a UHV chamber, where the hydrogen contained in the chips is released. The resulting pressure increase is recorded by a mass spectrometer. A hydrogen profile of the test specimen is obtained by assigning the chip position to the signal. For the corrosive medium in which the test specimen is immersed during crack initiation, i.e. NaCl solution, heavy water was used. This makes it possible to distinguish between the hydrogen contained in a piece of technical aluminium alloy (AA6013) and the deuterium diffusing in from the corrosive fluid. The deuterium is found exclusively in the test piece volume in the strongly plastically deformed region surrounding the fatigue crack. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit besteht im ortsaufgeloesten Nachweis einer erhoehten Wasserstoffkonzentration im plastisch deformierten Bereich von Ermuedungsrissen einer unter korrosiver Umgebung zyklisch verformten Aluminiumprobe. Mechanische Materialparameter wie z.B. die Rissausbreitungsgeschwindigkeit unter zyklischer Belastung aendern sich drastisch in korrosiver Umgebung. Als Ursache fuer dieses Verhalten wird eine Eindiffusion von Wasserstoff vermutet, jedoch gibt es bisher keine Messung die den zusaetzlichen

  1. A novel technique for measuring stress-corrosion crack-growth rates in single-crystal experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichter, B.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)]|[Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Flanagan, W.F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Crack-growth occurs discontinuously in oriented copper-gold single-crystals during slow-strain rate experiments performed under anodic polarization in aqueous NaCl solutions. Crack advance between major crack arrests is accompanied by load-drops and current-transients which can be quantitatively related to the length of the advance as well as yielding the average instantaneous rate of advance. Two independent but self-consistent methods are used: (1) mechanical analysis of the load-drops, taking into account the elastic displacement of the load-train and of the specimen, due to both the load and the crack advance, and (2) analysis of the current-transients in which it is argued that the current is proportional to the rate of new surface production. Results show that the crack velocity is on the order of 50--400{mu}/s, depending on the environment and potential, too slow to be explained by a running brittle crack, and too fast to be explained by Faradaic dissolution.

  2. Research on Aluminized Steel for Resisting Stress Corrosion Cracking and Hydrogen Embrittlement%渗铝钢抗应力腐蚀开裂及抗氢脆性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴昊; 李华飞

    2016-01-01

    以30CrMo钢为母体,对30CrMo钢及其渗铝钢分别进行抗硫化氢应力腐蚀开裂实验、抗氯离子应力腐蚀开裂实验,采用Devanathan双电池技术测量氢的扩散系数。实验结果表明:30CrMo钢渗铝后比渗铝前具有更好的抗硫化氢应力腐蚀开裂、抗氢脆性能;单一氯离子对30CrMo钢及其渗铝钢应力腐蚀开裂性能影响较小。%Using 30CrMo steel as the matrix, resistance to hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking test and resistance to chloride ion stress corrosion cracking test were carried out respectively for 30CrMo steel and its aluminized steel.Using Devanathan double cell technology, and we measured hydrogen diffusion coefficient.Experimental results show that, aluminized steel of 30CrMo has better resistance to hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking and hy-drogen embrittlement, and single chloride ion has little influence on the stress corrosion cracking for 30CrMo steel and its aluminized steel.

  3. TEM characterisation of stress corrosion cracks in nickel based alloys: effect of chromium content and chemistry of environment; Caracterisation par MET de fissures de corrosion sous contrainte d'alliages a base de nickel: influence de la teneur en chrome et de la chimie du milieu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabrouille, F

    2004-11-15

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damaging mode of alloys used in pressurized water reactors, particularly of nickel based alloys constituting the vapour generator tubes. Cracks appear on both primary and secondary sides of the tubes, and more frequently in locations where the environment is not well defined. SCC sensitivity of nickel based alloys depends of their chromium content, which lead to the replacement of alloy 600 (15 % Cr) by alloy 690 (30 % Cr) but this phenomenon is not yet very well understood. The goal of this thesis is two fold: i) observe the effect of chromium content on corrosion and ii) characterize the effect of environment on the damaging process of GV tubes. For this purpose, one industrial tube and several synthetic alloys - with controlled chromium content - have been studied. Various characterisation techniques were used to study the corrosion products on the surface and within the SCC cracks: SIMS; TEM - FEG: thin foil preparation, HAADF, EELS, EDX. The effect of chromium content and surface preparation on the generalised corrosion was evidenced for synthetic alloys. Moreover, we observed the penetration of oxygen along triple junctions of grain boundaries few micrometers under the free surface. SCC tests show the positive effect of chromium for contents varying from 5 to 30 % wt. Plastic deformation induces a modification of the structure, and thus of the protective character, of the internal chromium rich oxide layer. SCC cracks which developed in different chemical environments were characterised by TEM. The oxides which are formed within the cracks are different from what is observed on the free surface, which reveals a modification of medium and electrochemical conditions in the crack. Finally we were able to evidence some structural characteristics of the corrosion products (in the cracks and on the surface) which turn to be a signature of the chemical environment. (author)

  4. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor; Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, F.J. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fuentes C, P. [ITT, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fjmc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  5. Effect of Pre-aging on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Spray-formed 7075 Alloy in Retrogression and Re-aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rui-ming; Qu, Ying-dong; You, Jun-hua; de Li, Rong-

    2015-11-01

    The effects of pre-aging in retrogression and re-aging (RRA) treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of spray-formed 7075 aluminum alloy were investigated by tensile test, slow strain rate test, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the under aging (120 °C for 16 h) as the pre-aging in RRA treatment can vastly improve the mechanical properties and the SCC resistance of the alloy, compared with early aging (120 °C for 8 h), peak aging (120 °C for 24 h), and over aging (120 °C for 32 h) treatments, the ultimate tensile strength of the alloy is 782 MPa, which is higher than that for peak aging or conventional RRA treatment; and the SCC resistance of the alloy is also excellent after RRA with under aging as pre-aging.

  6. Improved Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance and Strength of a Two-Step Aged Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy Using Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lianghua; Liu, Zhiyi; Ying, Puyou; Liu, Meng

    2015-12-01

    Multi-step heat treatment effectively enhances the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance but usually degrades the mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys. With the aim to enhance SCC resistance as well as strength of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, we have optimized the process parameters during two-step aging of Al-6.1Zn-2.8Mg-1.9Cu alloy by Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. In this work, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to find out the significant heat treatment parameters. The slow strain rate testing combined with scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope was employed to study the SCC behaviors of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy. Results showed that the contour map produced by ANOVA offered a reliable reference for selection of optimum heat treatment parameters. By using this method, a desired combination of mechanical performances and SCC resistance was obtained.

  7. Development of Eddy Current Test Procedure for Non-destructive Detection of Fatigue Cracks and Corrosion in Rivets of Air-intake Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sasi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive detection of defects in countersunk of rivets in multi-layer air-intake structures is essential for ensuring structural integrity and flight safety. This paper presents an eddy current test procedure developed for reliable detection of simulated fatigue cracks and corrosion products in rivets of air-intake structures. This procedure is capable of reliably detecting 0.25 mm deep defects in 4 mm dia rivets and 0.75 mm deep defects in 5 mm dia rivets. Further, it is not influenced by thickness of the multilayers.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(2, pp.106-112, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1497

  8. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 1. Investigation and evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in piping of boiling water reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    IGSCC in BWR piping is occurring owing to a combination of material, environment, and stress factors, each of which can affect both the initiation of a stress-corrosion crack and the rate of its subsequent propagation. In evaluating long-term solutions to the problem, one needs to consider the effects of each of the proposed remedial actions. Mitigating actions to control IGSCC in BWR piping must be designed to alleviate one or more of the three synergistic factors: sensitized material, the convention BWR environment, and high tensile stresses. Because mitigating actions addressing each of these factors may not be fully effective under all anticipated operating conditions, mitigating actions should address two and preferably all three of the causative factors; e.g., material plus some control of water chemistry, or stress reversal plus controlled water chemistry.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking in repair-welded 3.5 NiCrMoV steel in an actual turbine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Itoh; Takashi, Shige [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Research and Development Center (Japan); Takashi, Momoo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Machinery Works (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Temporary welding repairs are sometimes needed when damage occurs at the teeth of blade grooves in a low-pressure turbine rotor operated at the dry/wet boundary region. When repair welding has been performed for the 3,5 NiCrMoV steel used in low-pressure turbines, the soundness of the weld must be confirmed. For this reason, a laboratory investigation of susceptibility for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was conducted for test specimens taken from simulated welds, and then an exposure test was conducted in an actual turbine environment for approximately 7,000 hours. As no SCC initiation was detected and also the propagation was extremely small, repair welding is deemed to be applicable. (author)

  10. TEST PLAN AND PROCEDURE FOR THE EXAMINATION OF TANK 241-AY-101 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WYRWAS RB; PAGE JS; COOKE GS

    2012-04-19

    This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

  11. Effect of cold work hardening on stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in primary water of pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raquet, O.; Herms, E. [CEA/Saclay, DEN/DPC, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Vaillant, F.; Couvant, T.; Boursier, J.M. [EDF/Les Renardieres, R and D/MMC, 77250 Moret sur Loing (France)

    2004-07-01

    A R and D program is carried out in CEA and EDF laboratories to investigate separately the effects of factors which could contribute to IASCC mechanism. In the framework of this study, the influence of cold work on SCC of ASSs in primary water is studied to supply additional knowledge concerning the contribution of radiation hardening on IASCC of ASSs. Solution annealed ASSs, essentially of type AISI 304(L) and AISI 316(L), are generally considered very resistant to SCC in nominal primary water. However, Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERTs), performed on cold pressed humped specimens in nominal primary water at 360 deg. C, reveal that these materials can exhibit a high SCC susceptibility: deepest cracks reach 1 mm (mean crack growth rate about 1 {mu}m.h{sup -1}) and propagation is mainly intergranular for 304L and mainly transgranular for 316L. Indeed, work hardening in conjunction with high localized deformation can promote SCC. The influence of the nature of the cold work (shot peening, reaming, cold rolling, counter sinking, fatigue work hardening and tensile deformation) is investigated by means of screening CERTs performed with smooth specimens in 304L at 360 deg. C. For a given cold work hardening level, the susceptibility to crack initiation strongly depends on the cold working process, and no propagation is observed for a hardness level lower than 300 {+-}10 HV(0.49N). The propagation of cracks is observed only for dynamic loadings like CERT, traction/relaxation tests and crack growth rate tests performed with CT specimens under trapezoidal loading. Although crack initiation is observed for constant load and constant deformation tests, crack propagation do not seem to occur under these mechanical solicitations for 17000 hours of testing, even for hardness levels higher than 450 HV(0.49N). The mean crack growth rate increases when the hardness increases. An important R and D program is in progress to complement these results and to develop a SCC model for

  12. Crack Initiation and Growth Behavior at Corrosion Pit in 7075-T6 Under Biaxial and Uniaxial Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-19

    general conical , hemispherical, and roughly saucer-shaped for steel and many alloys [41], as shown in Figure 2.2. Pits usually nucleate at chemical or...performed in a piezoelectric resonance system. Their results indicated that the presence of corrosion pits notably reduces the fatigue life of the

  13. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  14. Effect of ETA treatment on corrosion fatigue in rotors and blades and stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 NiCrMoV steel low-pressure turbine discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Itoh [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Research and Development Center (Japan); Takashi, Momoo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Machinery Works (Japan); Takayuki, Shiomi [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In recent years, to increase the reliability and reduce the amount of feed water iron to prevent of fouling of steam generator tubes, ethanolamine (ETA) treatment has been adopted into the secondary system. In this investigation, the authors verified that ethanolamine treatment does not adversely affect the susceptibility of either stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the turbine discs that are the principal units in the secondary system or corrosion fatigue (CF) in rotors and blades. In the first stage, a laboratory investigation was made of (1) SCC initiation and propagation in 3,5 NiCrMoV steel and (2) CF in 3,5 NiCrMoV steel and blade steels, in both cases using deaerated water to which had been added ethanolamine with few organic acids that is 10 times the estimated concentration. It was confirmed that the ethanolamine treatment had almost no effect. In the second stage, test pieces (removed from the disc steel inserted into the turbine extraction chamber before the ethanolamine treatment was started) were used to observe the initiation and propagation of SCC. Even after long-term observation, ethanolamine treatment into the secondary system was found to have almost no effect on the susceptibility of SCC in discs. (author)

  15. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of {+-} 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs.

  16. Investigations of the corrosion fatigue behaviour at a super pure martensitic stainless steel X5CrNiCuNb 17 4 PH in comparison to the soft martensitic stainless steel X4CrNiMo 16 5 1 ESR in chloride containing aqueous media. Pt. 2. Corrosion fatigue tests and crack initiation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K.G.; Happle, T.; Wunderlich, R.

    1989-07-01

    The following report concerns the study of the corrosion fatigue behaviour of the soft martensitic steel X4CrNiMo 16 5 1 ESR and the precipitation hardened X5CrNiCuNb 17 4 PH in sodium solution in the temperature range between 20/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C and the determination of their general corrosion properties and the mechanism of crack propagation. Their corrosion fatigue limits were compared with each other. A comparison was also made between an electro-slag-remelted soft martensitic steel and a charge without an ESR aftertreatment. Microfractographical fracture and crack path investigation were carried out for interpretation of the experimental results. It was observed that in both super pure steels (soft martensitic and precipitation hardened) the oxidic inclusions are not responsible for the crack initiation, as it was found in the non ESR treated steels. In the 17-4 PH steel copper containing inclusions in the crack initiation areas were observed. In concentrated sodium solution pitting corrosion was found at both steels. (orig.).

  17. Corrosion Failures in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krishnan

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description of typical marine environments and the most common form of corrosion of materials used in this environment. Some typical case histories of failures pertaining to pitting, bimetallic corrosion, dealloying, cavitation and stress corrosion cracking are illustrated as typical examples of corrosion failures.

  18. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  19. Influence of plastic strain localization on the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; Influence de la localisation de la deformation plastique sur la CSC d'aciers austenitiques inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisse, S.; Tanguy, B. [CEA Saclay, DEN, SEMI, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Andrieu, E.; Laffont, L.; Lafont, M.Ch. [Universite de Toulouse. CIRIMAT, UPS/INPT/CNRS, 31 - Toulous (France)

    2010-03-15

    The authors present a research study of the role of strain localization on the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of vessel steel in PWR-type (pressurized water reactor) environment. They study the interaction between plasticity and intergranular corrosion and/or oxidation mechanisms in austenitic stainless steels with respect to sublayer microstructure transformations. The study is performed on three austenitic stainless grades which have not been sensitized by any specific thermal treatment: the A286 structurally hardened steel, and the 304L and 316L austenitic stainless steels

  20. Improvement of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance by cyclic pre-straining of 316L austenitic stainless steel in an aqueous boiling MgCl{sub 2} solution; Amelioration de la tenue a la corrosion sous contrainte (CSC) de l'acier inoxydable austenitique 316L en solution bouillante de MgCl{sub 2} par application d'une predeformation cyclique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiere, I. de; Bayle, B.; Magnin, Th. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, URA CNRS 1884, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France)

    2000-07-01

    Improving the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has become a topic of wide interest for theoretical, engineering and financial reasons. The aim of this paper is to propose a process to delay the SCC damage. Recent studies of 316L austenitic stainless steel in boiling MgCl{sub 2} solutions show an improvement in SCC resistance by cyclic pre-straining in low cycle fatigue. This improvement consists of an increase in both strain to failure and crack initiation strain, during Slow Rate Tensile (SSRT) tests in aqueous solution. This paper analyses the effect of pre-fatigue in 316L on its mechanical and electrochemical responses to better understand the delay of SCC damage in boiling MgCl{sub 2}. The explanation for this beneficial effect is related to a modification of both surface electrochemical reactions kinetics and corrosion/plasticity interactions at the crack tip, due to the particular dislocation structure. (authors)

  1. The effects of pitting on fatigue crack nucleation in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, LI; Hoeppner, David W.

    1994-01-01

    A high-strength aluminum alloy, 7075-T6, was studied to quantitatively evaluate chemical pitting effects of its corrosion fatigue life. The study focused on pit nucleation, pit growth, and fatigue crack nucleation. Pitting corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted in 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution under constant amplitude sinusoidal loading at two frequencies, 5 and 20 Hz. Smooth and unnotched specimens were used in this investigation. A video recording system was developed to allow in situ observation of the surface changes of the specimens during testing. The results indicated that pitting corrosion considerably reduces the fatigue strength by accelerating fatigue crack nucleation. A metallographic examination was conducted on the specimens to evaluate the nature of corrosion pits. First, the actual shapes of the corrosion pits were evaluated by cross-sectioning the pits. Secondly, the relation between corrosion pits and microstructure was also investigated. Finally, the possibility of another corrosion mechanism that might be involved in pitting was explored in this investigation. The fractography of the tested specimens showed that corner corrosion pits were responsible for fatigue crack nucleation in the material due to the associated stress concentration. The pits exhibited variance of morphology. Fatigue life for the experimental conditions appeared to be strongly dependent on pitting kinetics and the crack nucleation stage.

  2. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  3. Critical issues in De-alloying and transcrystalline stress-corrosion cracking. Progress report, March 1, 1991--February 28, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieradzki, K.; Wagner, J.W.

    1992-03-01

    This report describes our progress since the last reporting reporting period (March 1991) and details the third year research plans on the program. The three major components of the program relate to (1) kinetic aspects of the selective dissolution in alloys and the coarsening of de-alloyed layers, (2) measurements of crack dynamics during film induced cleavage processes, and (3) mechanical properties of the intrinsic de-alloyed layers responsible for film-induced cleavage events. We discuss progress in each of these areas below.

  4. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions.

  5. Assessment of copper resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in nitrite solutions by means of joint analysis of acoustic emission measurements, deformation diagrams, qualitative and quantitative fractography, and non-linear fracture mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanzhin, V.G.; Nikulin, S.A. [Moscow State Inst. of Steel and Alloys (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    A study of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper in 0.1M NaNO{sub 2} aqueous solution is presented. The fracture kinetics was monitored by measuring the acoustic emission (AE) signals. Macro- and micro-fractography analysis, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was employed to investigate the fracture mechanisms. Estimates of stress intensity factor, KI, and J-integral were derived in order to assess the resistance of copper to stress corrosion cracking. Two kinds of SCC tests under continuous circulation of the corrosive solution were employed in the present study: 1. Constant extension rate (2x10{sup -6}/s) tests on pre-cracked, middle tension (MT) panel specimens. 2. Tests on pre-cracked, compact tension (CT) specimens at a fixed (by a fixing bolt) opening of the crack walls ({delta} = 0.3 mm, K{sub i} = 27 MPax{radical}m). The time base for these tests was about two months. After the completion of the SCC test, the CT specimen was additionally tested, under a constant-rate (0.02 mm/s) off-center extension. In the both kinds of tests, the SCC fracture kinetics is found to exhibit two typical stages: Stage 1: SCC initiation stage (after a certain incubation period, T{sub i}, measured to be T{sub i} {approx_equal} 3-4 hours for MT specimens under constant extension, the corresponding stress was {sigma} {approx_equal} 40-70 MPa, and T{sub i} {approx_equal} 200 hours for CT specimens under a fixed crack wall opening). Stage 2: Active fracture process (SCC macro-fracture) distinguished by strong AE pulses (which are registered after time T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 8 hours for MT specimens and T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 800 hours for CT specimens). Fractography analysis has shown that the zone of SCC fracture in MT specimens extends to approximately 1,500 {mu}m. A 400-700 {mu}m deep zone of brittle transgranular fracture, which included small areas showing characteristic SCC 'striations', was observed adjacent to the fatigue pre-crack area. At higher

  6. AZ31B镁合金TIG焊接件应力腐蚀性能研究%Research on the Properties of Stress Corrosion Cracking for Tungsten Inert-Gas Arc Welded AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛茂忠; 项建云; 张永康

    2013-01-01

    为了研究AZ31B镁合金钨极氩弧焊接件应力腐蚀性能,室温下采用三点加载的方式,在去离子水中对试样进行应力腐蚀试验.利用光学显微镜(OM)观测试样微观结构,利用扫描电镜(SEM)观测应力腐蚀断口,利用X-350A型X射线应力仪和CHI660B型电化学工作站分别测定试样表面残余应力和动电位极化曲线.试验结果表明:采用单面焊双面成型工艺,在45~50 A的焊接电流及合适的焊接速度条件下,焊接2.2 mm厚AZ31B镁合金薄板时,钨极氩弧焊能够获得理想的焊接接头,抗拉强度达到209 MPa;焊接件热影响区表面残余拉应力为60 MPa;同母材相比,焊接件自腐蚀电位减小27 mV,腐蚀电流增大了41.4%,从而增加焊接件腐蚀倾向;AZ31B焊接件在去离子水中浸没192 h后出现应力腐蚀开裂,属于穿晶型脆性断裂,这表明AZ31B镁合金焊接件在去离子水中具有很高的应力腐蚀敏感性.%In order to study the properties of the stress corrosion cracking (SCO for the tungsten inert-gas (TIG) arc welded AZ31B magnesium alloy sheets, the SCC susceptibility of the welded samples was assessed by three points loading method in deionized water at room temperature. The microstructure of specimens and fracture surfaces were analyzed by OM and SEM, respectively. Surface residual stress and potentiodynamic polarization behaviors of the welded samples were examined by using X-ray diffraction technology and a CHI660B electrochemical workstation, respectively. The results show that when TIG arc welding was used to weld AZ31B Mg alloy plates with the thickness of 2. 2 mm by using single-side welding double-side molding process, the ideal welding joints can be obtained at the welding current range from 45 A to 50 A and appropriate welding speed, the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints is 209 Mpa; The residual tensile stress is 60 Mpa in the surface of heat effected zone of the welded joints; corrosion potential

  7. Corrosion and Corrosion Control in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Barry M.

    2013-08-01

    Serious corrosion problems have plagued the light water reactor (LWR) industry for decades. The complex corrosion mechanisms involved and the development of practical engineering solutions for their mitigation will be discussed in this article. After a brief overview of the basic designs of the boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR), emphasis will be placed on the general corrosion of LWR containments, flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon steel components, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in BWRs, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in PWRs, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in both systems. Finally, the corrosion future of both plants will be discussed as plants extend their period of operation for an additional 20 to 40 years.

  8. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  9. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  10. Study of the sulphide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) resistance of API SL GR B and X60 pipeline steels. Evaluacion de la resistencia al agrietamiento por corrosion-tension en medios sulfhidricos (SSCC) de aceros para tuberias Calidad API 5L Grados B y X60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao-Iturbe, C. (Babcock and Wilcox Espaola. S.A. Bilbao (Spain)); Gutierrez de Saiz-Solabarria (Univ. Pais Vasco. Departamento Ingenieria Metalurgica y Control de Materiales. Bilbao (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    A study of the sulphide stress corrosion cracking resistance at room temperature of API 5L Cr B and X60 pipeline steels has been carried out. The theoretical mechanisms in order to explain these phenomena and several operational failures of pipeline steel due to SSCC have been reviewed and the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) standard concerning SSCC has been described. The main factors of influence of the SSCC have been analysed, results are presented and conclusions are elaborated. (Author) 32 ref.

  11. 裂缝对混凝土内氯离子扩散和钢筋锈蚀的影响%INFLUENCE OF CRACKS ON CHLORIDE DIFFUSION AND REINFORCEMENT CORROSION IN CONCRETE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张邵峰; 陆春华; 陈妤; 刘荣桂; 崔钊玮

    2012-01-01

    To study the influence of load-induced cracks on chloride diffusion and reinforcement corrosion in reinforced concrete (RC), eight RC beams with pre-cracks or flexural cracks were immersed in chloride solution with the condition of a dry-wet cycle. Then a half-cell potential method and a RCT (Rapid Chloride Test) were used to evaluate reinforcement corrosion and chloride concentration. Finally, the finite element analysis software ADINA was used to simulate the two-dimensional diffusion of chloride in cracked concrete. Results showed that: 1) Cracks accelerated the chloride penetration in concrete, which will lead to the premature corrosion of rebar and provided conditions for the local two-dimensional diffusion of chloride; 2) The wider the crack width or the smaller the spacing is, the greater effective it did to the chloride-induced corrosion of rebar; 3) Simulation results agree well with experimental results.%为了研究受力裂缝对混凝土内氯离子扩散的影响,对8根开裂(预制裂缝和受弯裂缝)的钢筋混凝土梁试件进行了盐溶液干湿循环试验;并采用半电池电位法和RCT(快速氯离子含量检测)法,分别对梁内钢筋的锈蚀状态以及各裂缝处氯离子含量进行了检测;最后采用ADINA有限元软件对开裂混凝土内氯离子的二维扩散行为进行模拟分析.试验和模拟结果表明:1)裂缝加速了氯离子的侵入,导致钢筋过早的开始锈蚀,且为局部氯离子的二维扩散提供了条件;2)裂缝宽度越大或间距越小,其对氯离子侵入引起的钢筋锈蚀影响程度越大;3)有限元模型的计算与试验结果吻合较好.

  12. Preliminary stress corrosion cracking modeling study of a dissimilar material weld of alloy (INCONEL) 182 with Stainless Steel 316

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel, E-mail: ofaly@ipen.br, E-mail: mmattar@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M., E-mail: monicas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Dissimilar welds (DW) are normally used in many components junctions in structural project of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactors) in Nuclear Plants. One had been departed of a DW of a nozzle located at a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a PWR reactor, that joins the structural vessel material with an A316 stainless steel safe end. This weld is basically done with Alloy 182 with a weld buttering of Alloy 82. It had been prepared some axial cylindrical specimens retired from the Alloy 182/A316 weld end to be tested in the slow strain rate test machine located at CDTN laboratory. Based in these stress corrosion susceptibility results, it was done a preliminary semi-empirical modeling application to study the failure initiation time evolution of these specimens. The used model is composed by a deterministic part, and a probabilistic part according to the Weibull distribution. It had been constructed a specific Microsoft Excel worksheet to do the model application of input data. The obtained results had been discussed according with literature and also the model application limits. (author)

  13. Investigation of the Use of Laser Shock Peening for Enhancing Fatigue and Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Nuclear Energy Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Vijay K. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Jackson, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alexandreanu, Bogdan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Yiren [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-07

    The objective of this project, which includes close collaboration with scientists from INL and ANL, is to investigate and demonstrate the use of advanced mechanical surface treatments like laser shock peening (LSP) and ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) and establish baseline parameters for enhancing the fatigue properties and SCC resistance of nuclear materials like nickel-based alloy 600 and 304 stainless steel. The research program includes the following key elements/tasks: 1) Procurement of Alloy 600 and 304 SS, heat treatment studies; 2) LSP and UNSM processing of base metal and welds/HAZ of alloys 600 and 304; (3) measurement and mapping of surface and sub-surface residual strains/stresses and microstructural changes as a function of process parameters using novel methods; (4) determination of thermal relaxation of residual stresses (macro and micro) and microstructure evolution with time at high temperatures typical of service conditions and modeling of the kinetics of relaxation; (5) evaluation of the effects of residual stress, near surface microstructure and temperature on SCC and fatigue resistance and associated microstructural mechanisms; and (6) studies of the effects of bulk and surface grain boundary engineering on improvements in the SCC resistance and associated microstructural and cracking mechanisms

  14. Stress corrosion cracking tests for low and high alloy steels in sour oilfield service. Tests performed at VTT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, K. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity; Haemaelaeinen, E. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Engineering Materials

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the studies was to validate the usefulness of the proposed NACE slow strain rate testing method and compare it with the EFC document. In the NACE document the testing takes place at a temperature of 177 deg C, the test solution contains 20 wt% NaCl, the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S varies between 14 and 28 bar and the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} between 14 and 55 bar. In the NACE document the strain rate is determined as 4 x 10{sup -6} 1/s and in the EFC document 1 x 10{sup -6} 1/s. The results showed brittle behaviour for the test material in all of the test environments, and in each case the elongation was less than 5%. For comparison purposes the SSRT was conducted with the test material also in an inert environment (N{sub 2} gas), where the fracture was ductile and elongation 65%. The tests conducted with different strain rates gave the same result, which shows that the difference between EFC and NACE documents within the strain rate is not significant in the environments studied. However, since the alloy 654 SMO, which is considered to have a high resistance to corrosion, failed the SSRT test in the environments determined in the NACE document, the NACE document can be considered too severe for testing of austenitic stainless steels. Since contrary to the NACE document the EFC document does not determine levels for hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide, the EFC document can be considered more suitable than the NACE document for testing of austenitic stainless steels for sour service. (author)

  15. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing; Analyse der Schallemissionssignale aus Ermuedungsrisswachstum und Korrosionsprozessen. Untersuchung der Moeglichkeiten fuer die kontinuierliche Zustandsueberwachung von Transportbehaeltern mittels Schallemissionspruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-05-01

    generated application oriented, on plates within the heat affected zone of a weld. Their AE signals were recorded with resonant sensors. On the one hand resonant sensors are very sensitive and able to detect small displacements on huge structures, which makes them applicable for condition monitoring. On the other hand, resonant sensors have a great influence on the AE signals and hinder signal analyses and pattern recognition. Pure fatigue crack growth, fatigue crack growth in a corrosive environment and pure corrosion were applied. Signal groups of the damage mechanisms were compared by their AE features. Differences between signal groups could be made after wave mode analysis, despite the spectral influence of the AE sensors. The damage condition of the test plates is investigated with the combination of AE features of the signal groups and fracture mechanic parameters. Furthermore, two methods of unsupervised pattern recognition of the AE signals are being performed: A commercial classification system, where mainly frequency based features are generated, and an AE feature based method. In the latter, classification takes place after the frequency distributions of the AE features of the signals from the examined damage mechanisms. Both methods result in an accurate classification for the AE signals, especially originating from corrosion damage mechanisms, in the correct damage class. Concluding, the detectability of AE events, the results of pattern recognition of AE signals in metal structures and the prospects and risks of condition monitoring by means of acoustic emission testing are discussed. Therefore, monitoring tests on a tank car and results from cyclic and static loading are consulted. An assessment for the selection of the monitoring method according to the cost effectiveness of dangerous goods transportation is made.

  16. An elucidation of the corrosion mechanism using metallographic and fractographic methods on rolled AlZnMgCu1.5 sheets; Abklaerung des Korrosionsmechanismus mittels metallographischer und fraktographischer Methoden an gewalzten AlZnMgCu1.5 Blechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, R.; Faller, M.; Zgraggen, M. [EMPA - Eidgenoessische Materialpruefungs und Forschungsanstalt, Abt. Kurrosion und Werkstoffintegritaet, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2006-07-15

    Various corrosion mechanisms can result in the failure of components in high-strength aluminium alloys, depending on the states of the materials and/or environmental conditions. Those are layer corrosion, intergranular corrosion cracking, and stress corrosion cracking. For a prevention of future failure, it is necessary to elucidate the corrosion type in damaged components. Therefore, all results obtained from various examination methods require to be gathered in many cases to allow for an interpretation. The present case reports about a damage caused by corrosion to a rolled sheet made of the Al alloy 7075 (T6 condition). The suspicion that the delamination of the metal sheets was due to layer corrosion was not confirmed by metallographic examinations. The corrosive attack occurred along the grain boundaries. Likewise, intergranular corrosion cracking was successfully excluded by microfractographic examinations on the tip of the crack in a scanning electron microscope. It was only by combining the metallographic and fractographic examination methods that stress corrosion cracking was clearly proved to be the damage mechanism. (orig.)

  17. Pattern recognition model to estimate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at crevices and pit sites of 304 SS in BWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna [Penn State University, 212 Earth-Engineering Science Building, University Park, PA 16801 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Many publications have shown that crack growth rates (CGR) due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metals is dependent on many parameters related to the manufacturing process of the steel and the environment to which the steel is exposed. Those parameters include, but are not restricted to, the concentration of chloride, fluoride, nitrates, and sulfates, pH, fluid velocity, electrochemical potential (ECP), electrolyte conductivity, stress and sensitization applied to the steel during its production and use. It is not well established how combinations of each of these parameters impact the CGR. Many different models and beliefs have been published, resulting in predictions that sometimes disagree with experimental observations. To some extent, the models are the closest to the nature of IGSCC, however, there is not a model that fully describes the entire range of observations, due to the difficulty of the problem. Among the models, the Fracture Environment Model, developed by Macdonald et al., is the most physico-chemical model, accounting for experimental observations in a wide range of environments or ECPs. In this work, we collected experimental data on BWR environments and designed a data mining pattern recognition model to learn from that data. The model was used to generate CGR estimations as a function of ECP on a BWR environment. The results of the predictive model were compared to the Fracture Environment Model predictions. The results from those two models are very close to the experimental observations of the area corresponding to creep and IGSCC controlled by diffusion. At more negative ECPs than the potential corresponding to creep, the pattern recognition predicts an increase of CGR with decreasing ECP, while the Fracture Environment Model predicts the opposite. The results of this comparison confirm that the pattern recognition model covers 3 phenomena: hydrogen embrittlement at very negative ECP, creep at intermediate ECP, and IGSCC

  18. Examination of cracks and fractures on operationally stressed turbine blades; Untersuchung von Rissen und Bruechen an betriebsbeanspruchten Turbinenschaufeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodopivec, F. [Inst. of Metals and Technologies, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vrbic, V.S. [Electric Power Work Nikola Tesla, Obrenovac (Yugoslavia); Ule, B. [Inst. of Metals and Technologies, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zvokelj, J. [Inst. of Metals and Technologies, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vehovar, L. [Inst. of Metals and Technologies, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarises the results of mechanical and fractographic examinations which had been carried out on fractures on the low-pressure blades of a 300 MW steam turbine. The crack-affected turbine blades had been removed, partly during inspections and partly after turbine breakdowns, in contrast to the fractured blades which had been extracted without exception following turbine breakdowns. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im vorliegenden Beitrag werden die Ergebnisse der mechanischen und fraktographischen Untersuchungen zusammengefasst, die an Bruechen von ND-Schaufeln einer 300-MW-Dampfturbine durchgefuehrt wurden. Die rissbehafteten Turbinenschaufeln wurden teilweise waehrend Revisionen und teilweise nach Turbinenversagen entnommen, im Gegensatz zu den gebrochenen Schaufeln, die ausnahmslos nach Turbinenausfall ausgebaut wurden. (orig.)

  19. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP{sup R)} or underwater laser beam welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick, Grendys; Marc, Piccolino; Cunthia, Pezze [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, New York (United States); Badlani, Manu [Nu Vision Engineering, New York (United States)

    2009-04-15

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP{sup R)}, depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development.

  20. Simulation Analysis of Whole Cracking Process due to Reinforcement Corrosion in Concrete Structures%钢筋混凝土结构锈胀开裂全过程仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐港; 徐可; 王青; 王谊敏

    2012-01-01

    利用大型有限元软件DIANA,详细分析了绣蚀导致混凝土保护层开裂的全过程.仿真分析表明:混凝土保护层的锈胀开裂过程可分为内裂、扩展、外裂和内外裂缝贯通4个阶段;锈蚀产物膨胀率一定时,混凝土保护层内侧裂缝的产生主要与混凝土抗拉强度相关,其他因素影响甚微;混凝土保护层表面锈胀开裂及其裂缝贯通主要与相对保护层厚度有关,该值越大,裂缝越不容易发展;提高混凝土抗拉强度,能有效延缓锈胀裂缝的产生和发展;在相同条件下,混凝土保护层非均匀锈胀开裂时的钢筋锈蚀率较均匀锈胀开裂时低;混凝土保护层剥落的特征主要与钢筋净间距和保护层厚度的比值相关,当该值较大(>3)时,仅角区保护层发生局部剥落,否则保护层将整体剥落.%By the large-scale finite element software DIANA, the whole splitting process of concrete protective cover layer due to reinforcement corrosion was analyzed in detail. The simulation analysis shows that the whole cracking process can be divided into four steps, that is, internal cracking, crack growth, external cracking, and penetration cracking. At a certain level of the volumetric expansion ratio of corroded products, the internal cracks initiation at internal side of the concrete protective layer around the steel bar is mainly related to the tensile strength of concrete, and other factors have little effect on it. External cracking as well as penetration cracking are related to the ratio of protective layer thickness to bar diameter. The larger the ratio is, the more difficultly the crack propagation occurs. It is effective to improve the tensile strength of concrete by delaying crack initiation and propagation) under the same conditions, the critical corrosion ratio of reinforcing bar at cracking in non-uniform corrosion is lower than thBt in uniform corrosioni the spalling patterns of concrete protective layer are mainly

  1. Characterization of Cracking and Crack Growth Properties of the C5A Aircraft Tie-Box Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed destructive examinations were conducted to characterize the integrity and material properties of two aluminum alloy (7075-T6) horizontal stabilizer tie box forgings removed.from US. Air Force C5A and C5B transport aircraft. The C5B tie box forging was,found to contain no evidence of cracking. Thirteen cracks were found in the CSA,forging. All but one of the cracks observed in the C5A component were located along the top cap region (one crack was located in the bottom cap region). The cracks in the C5A component initiated at fastener holes and propagated along a highly tunneled intergranular crack path. The tunneled crack growth configuration is a likelv result of surface compressive stress produced during peening of the .forging suijace. The tie box forging ,fatigue crack growth, fracture and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties were characterized. Reported herein are the results of laboratory air ,fatigue crack growth tests and 95% relative humidity SCC tests conducted using specimens machined from the C5A ,forging. SCC test results revealed that the C5A ,forging material was susceptible to intergranular environmental assisted cracking: the C5A forging material exhibited a SCC crack-tip stress-intensity factor threshold of less than 6 MPadn. Fracture toughness tests revealed that the C5A forging material exhibited a fracture toughness that was 25% less than the C5B forging. The C5A forging exhibited rapid laboratory air fatigue crack growth rates having a threshold crack-tip stress-intensity factor range of less than 0.8 MPa sup m. Detailed fractographic examinations revealed that the ,fatigue crack intergranular growth crack path was similar to the cracking observed in the C5A tie box forging. Because both fatigue crack propagation and SCC exhibit similar intergranular crack path behavior, the damage mechanism resulting in multi-site cracking of tie box forgings cannot be determined unless local cyclic stresses can be quantified.

  2. Extended Finite Element Numerical Analysis of Cracking Propagation due to Reinforcement Corrosion in Concrete Structures%混凝土结构锈胀开裂的扩展有限元数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱杰; 方从启

    2013-01-01

    依据非均匀锈胀理论提出钢筋锈胀作用的计算方法,应用扩展有限元法(XFEM)建立了钢筋锈胀保护层开裂的有限元模型.数值分析表明:采用XFEM与混凝土黏聚力模型能有效模拟混凝土开裂及裂纹扩展,避免了网格重剖分的问题;预裂纹的存在抑制了混凝土裂纹萌生,却加速了裂纹扩展贯通保护层,且萌生始于预裂纹尖端,而非钢筋-混凝土锈蚀层界面处;初始无损伤结构裂纹萌生位置对称分布于锈蚀层界面一定范围内,裂尖距交界面距离越大,单元受锈胀影响越小,最终贯通保护层主要是锈胀位移与锈蚀产物渗入裂缝产生作用力共同作用的结果,且裂纹扩展角趋于120°;提高混凝土等级和增大保护层厚度能有效延缓锈胀裂缝的产生与发展,有利于提高结构耐久性.%Based on the theory of non-uniform corrosion expansion, a method for calculating the effect of reinforcement rust expansion was given. Also, a finite element model for simulating cracking propagation of the protection layer on the base of extended finite element method(XFEM) was established. The simulation analysis shows that implementation of XFEM and cohesive crack model for the analysis of concrete fracture and propagation are effective, and capable of simulating crack initiation and extension path without remeshing. Existence of pre-crack restrains crack initiation, which begins in the pre-crack tips instead of the interface of reinforcement and concrete, accelerates crack propagation through the cover. Nevertheless, the positions of crack initiation are distributed in the interface symmetrically within a certain distance for the non-defective structures. The greater of distance between crack tips and interface is, the weaker of damage of concrete element around the crack-tips. Furthermore, the rust expansion and forces produced by the infiltration into crack of the corrosion products coefficiently lead to the breakthrough of

  3. Cl-浓度对超级13Cr油管钢应力腐蚀开裂行为的影响%Effects of Cl- Concentration on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of Super 13Cr Tubing Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚小飞; 谢发勤; 吴向清; 王毅飞

    2012-01-01

    Effects of Cl concentration on the stress corrosion cracking behaviors of super 13Cr tubing steels were investigated in different concentration of NaCl solution, that tensile strength, elongation rate, cracking time, stress corrosion cracking susceptibility (kscc) and fracture morphology were analyzed by the experimental method of slow strain rate tension (SSRT) stress corrosion cracking (SCO, δε curves, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the degree of stress corrosion was light at below 15% NaCl solution and was severe at the concentration above 25% NaCl solution. With Cl- concentration of solution increased, super 13Cr tubing steels mechanics properties reduced, SCC resistance properties reduced, the tendency of stress corrosion cracking increased, the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility kδ and kε both increased, and the increased tendency of kε were more obviously than kδ, effects of Cl- concentration on the plastic deformation of super 13Cr tubing steels were more significantly than tensile strength.%采用慢应变速率拉伸(SSRT)应力腐蚀开裂(SCC)的实验方法,通过应力应变(σ-ε)曲线、扫描电镜( SEM)、能谱分析(EDS)和X射线衍射分析(XRD)等手段分析了超级13Cr油管钢在NaCl溶液中的抗拉强度、延伸率、断裂时间、应力腐蚀开裂敏感性指数(kscc)和断口形貌,研究了Cl-浓度对其应力腐蚀开裂行为的影响.结果显示:当NaCl溶液浓度低于15%时,超级13Cr油管钢应力腐蚀的程度较轻,抗应力腐蚀开裂性能较好;而当NaCl溶液浓度大于25%时,其应力腐蚀的程度严重,抗应力腐蚀开裂性能较差;随溶液Cl-浓度的增大,超级13Cr油管钢的力学性能降低、抗SCC性能降低、应力腐蚀开裂的倾向增大、应力腐蚀开裂敏感性指数kσ和kε均呈现增大的趋势,且kε比kσ增大的趋势更明显;Cl浓度对超级13

  4. Exfoliation corrosion susceptibility of 8090 Al-Li alloy examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡超; 李劲风; 郑子樵; 张昭

    2004-01-01

    The exfoliation corrosion susceptibility and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS) of rolled and peak-aged 8090 Al-Li alloys in EXCO solution were studied, and the EIS after exfoliation was simulated. Once exfoliation occurs, two capacitive arcs appear in the EIS at high-mediate frequency and mediate-low frequency respective ly. The exfoliation-attacked alloy surface consists of two parts, an original flat alloy surface and a new inter-face exposed to EXCO solution due to the exfoliation. The capacitance corresponding to the new exfoliation inter-face in creases approximately linearly with time at early exfoliation stage, due to the enlargement of the new inter-face. Then it maintains stable, due to the corrosion product covering on the new inter-face. The exfoliation susceptibility can be judged through the average slope of the capacitance vs time curve of the early exfoliation stage. This average slope of the rolled 8090 alloy is much higher than that of the peak-aged 8090 alloy, accordingly the rolled 8090 alloy is more susceptible to exfoliation than the peak-aged 8090 alloy.

  5. Corrosion Fatigue in District Heating Water Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1996-01-01

    Three candidate materials for construction of buffer tanks for district heating water have been tested for corrosion fatigue properties in a district heating water environment. The investigation included Slow Strain Rate Testing of plain tensile specimens, crack initiation testing by corrosion...... fatigue of plain tensile specimens and crack growth rate determination for Compact Tensile Specimens under corrosion fatigue conditions. The three materials are equal with respect to stress corrosion sensibility and crack initiation. Crack growth rate is increased with a factor of 4-6 relative to an inert...

  6. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  7. Review of Environmentally Assisted Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    Many efforts have been made in the past by several researchers to arrive at some unifying principles governing the embrittlement phenomena. An inescapable conclusion reached by all these efforts was that the behavior is very complex. Hence, recognizing the complexity of material/environment behavior, we focus our attention here only in extracting some similarities in the experimental trends to arrive at some generic principles of behavior. Crack nucleation and growth are examined under static load in the presence of internal and external environments. Stress concentration, either pre-existing or in-situ generated, appears to be a requirement for embrittlement. A chemical stress concentration factor is defined for a given material/environment system as the ratio of failure stress with and without the damaging chemical environment. All factors that affect the buildup of the required stress concentration, such as planarity of slip, stacking fault energy, etc., also affect the stress-corrosion behavior. The chemical stress concentration factor is coupled with the mechanical stress concentration factor. In addition, generic features for all systems appear to be (a) an existence of a threshold stress as a function of concentration of the damaging environment and flow properties of the material, and (b) an existence of a limiting threshold as a function of concentration, indicative of a damage saturation for that environment. Kinetics of crack growth also depends on concentration and the mode of crack growth. In general, environment appears to enhance crack tip ductility on one side by the reduction of energy for dislocation nucleation and glide, and to reduce cohesive energy for cleavage, on the other. These two opposing factors are coupled to provide environmentally induced crack nucleation and growth. The relative ratio of these two opposing factors depends on concentration and flow properties, thereby affecting limiting thresholds. The limiting concentration or

  8. Chemical and metallurgical aspects of environmentally assisted fatigue crack growth in 7075-T651 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Wei, R. P.; Pao, P. S.

    1988-07-01

    A comprehensive study has been carried out on a 7075-T651 alloy to examine the influence of water vapor on fatigue crack growth. The kinetics of fatigue crack growth were determined as a function of water vapor pressure at room temperature and at 353 K. Detailed fractographic analyses and surface chemistry studies were carried out to identify the micromechanisms and to quantify the chemical interactions for corrosion fatigue crack growth in this alloy. Experiments were also carried out in ultra-high vacuum and in oxygen to provide for comparisons. Two regions of fatigue crack growth response were identified. In the low pressure region (below 67 Pa at 5 Hz), crack growth is controlled by the rate of transport of water vapor to the crack tip, and the response can be described by a model for transport controlled crack growth. At pressures above 67 Pa, additional increases in crack growth rate occurred, which are attributed to the further reactions of water vapor with segregated magnesium in this alloy. Different micromechanisms for crack growth have been identified for vacuum, oxygen, and water vapor. These micromechanisms are considered in relation to the environmental parameters through a modified superposition model for corrosion fatigue.

  9. CIRCUMFERENTIAL MFL IN-LINE INSPECTION FOR CRACKS IN PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.B. Nestleroth

    2003-06-01

    Circumferential MFL is a new implementation of a widely used technology that has potential to provide improved detection and quantification of axially oriented defects such as cracks, seam weld defects, mechanical damage, and groove corrosion. This implementation works by orienting the magnetic field around the pipe rather that along the axis. By orienting the magnetic field around the pipe (the circumferential direction), the axial defects that were magnetically transparent can disrupt more of the magnetic field and can be more easily detected. Initial implementations of circumferential MFL have found that flux leakage from cracks at the interior of the pipe is small, and the signals from cracks are difficult to detect. The objective of this project is to improve detection of cracks by changing the implementation along with using data from overlapping and complementary inspection techniques. Two technology enhancements were investigated: Combining high- and low-magnetization technology for stress detection; and Combining axial and circumferential MFL methods. Although a method combining high- and low-magnetization technology showed promise for characterizing gouges cause by third party excavation equipment, its commercial development was not successful for two reasons. First, the stress diminishes the crack signal, while the opening of the crack increases the signal. The stress-induced changes in flux leakage around cracks were small and any critical information on the severity of cracks and crack-like defects is difficult to distinguish from changes caused by the crack opening and other inspection variables. Second, it is difficult to magnetize pipe material in the circumferential direction. A relatively low, non-uniform magnetization level produced by the circumferential magnetizer makes detection of changes due to stress extremely difficult. This project also examined combining axial and circumferential MFL to improve crack detection and distinguish cracks for

  10. 氢腐蚀分层对换热器筒体承载能力的影响%Influence of bearing capacity of heat exchanger shell caused by hydrogen corrosion delaminating crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何家胜; 李超; 朱晓明; 陈伟; 路远明; 杨峰

    2013-01-01

    To explore the influence of hydrogen corrosion delaminating crack on the mechanical properties and bearing capacity in operation of the layered heat exchanger shell, the material capability of layered heat exchanger shell was analyzed by using chemical constituents analysis, hardness test, tensile tests, Charpy V-notch pendulum impact test. The finite element method was used to calculate the stress distribution of heat exchanger shell and to discuss the stress intensity factors of crack tip. The results show that the Mn element is lower in the chemical constituents, other elements accord with the National Standards; the material hardness meets the requirements, but the toughness declines obviously. The material of heat layered exchanger shell is deteriorated by the hydrogen corrosion, which destroys the continuity and uniformity of the material, decreases the ultimate strength, but increases the yield-strength ratio. The film stress state is destroyed, and material resistance to crack growth decreases. The hydrogen corrosion delaminating crack causes biggish partial stress and makes bearing capacity of the heat exchanger shell decrease.%为了解换热器筒体发生氢腐蚀分层后,其简体局部材料的性能发生的变化及对换热器运行中的承载能力带来的影响,采用化学成分分析、硬度测试、拉伸试验、夏比V口冲击韧性试验等方法对换热器筒体材料的性能进行了分析;运用有限元分析方法计算了简体分层处的应力分布,并探讨了裂纹尖端应力强度因子的变化情况.研究结果表明:材料化学成分中除Mn元素的含量偏低外,其它元素含量符合国家标准;材料的硬度符合要求,材料的强度极限降低,屈强比上升,韧性明显降低.氢腐蚀分层使换热器筒体材料局部劣化,破坏了材料的均匀性和连续性,破坏了简体的薄膜应力状态,产生了较大的局部应力,使换热器筒体承载能力下降.

  11. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  12. Stress Corrosion - Induced Cracking and Failure Analysis of Tubing Coupling at Oil Well%P110E油管接箍应力腐蚀开裂失效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩燕; 谢俊峰; 赵密锋; 宋文文; 蔡锐

    2013-01-01

    西部油田某井油管因接箍开裂而落井.通过宏观分析、理化性能检测、金相显微镜、扫描电镜(SEM)、能谱仪、X射线衍射仪(XRD)等对该井开裂接箍进行了失效分析.结果表明:接箍开裂属于硫化物应力腐蚀开裂,该井硫化氢含量较高是接箍开裂的主要原因,此接箍材料不适宜在含硫环境下使用.%String falling was caused at an oil well of Tarim Oilfield by tubing coupling cracking. Thus macro - observation and physical-chemical property monitoring were combined with analyses by metallograpriic microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectrometer and X - ray diffractometer to seek for the causes leading to failure of the broken tubing coupling. Results indicate that the cracking of the tubing coupling is mainly due to sulfide stress corrosion, and a high content of hydrogen sulfide in the oil well accounts for the cracking of the tubing coupling, which means that relevant tubing coupling material is unsuitable for use in S-containing environment.

  13. Solution chemistry effects on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 2090 (Al-Li-Cu) and alloy 2024 (Al-Cu-Mg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James P.; Stoner, Glenn E.

    1989-01-01

    The SCC initiation behavior of alloys 2090 and 2024 is examined in various NaCl-based environments. The pre-exposure and bulk/local solution chemistry effects discovered by Holroyd et al. (1986) are investigated, with emphasis on the effect of bulk solution chemistries and atmospheric CO2 on the occluded cell environment and the role of the occluded environment in the crack initiation and early-stage propagation processes. It was found that constant immersion in NaCl does not promote SCC in alloy 2090 or alloy 2024. Upon removal from NaCl, SCC is quickly facilitated, but only in the presence of atmospheric CO2. The need for CO2 is attributed to an increase in carbonate concentrations, eventually allowing passivation of blunted fissures by precipitation of Li2CO3. It is inferred that any effects due to aging are small in magnitude, relative to the effects of subtle changes in the bulk/local solution chemistries.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking in the fusion boundary region of an alloy 182 - A533B low alloy steel dissimilar weld joint in high temperature oxygenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Q.; Xue, H.; Hou, J.; Takeda, Y.; Kuniya, J.; Shoji, T. [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    In this work, following a microstructural characterization of the fusion boundary (FB) region in an Alloy 182 - A533B LAS dissimilar weld joint, the SCC growth behaviour in the FB region of the dissimilar weld joint in 288 C degrees water was investigated by employing crevice bent beam (CBB) and crack growth rate (CGR) testing, in conjunction with a simulation by finite element method (FEM). The microstructure characterization showed that there is a narrow high hardness zone (HHZ) in the dilution zone (DZ) of the weld metal adjacent to the FB. Further, a sharp increase of the hardness was observed immediately adjacent to the FB, suggesting the existence of a hardness gradient in the HHZ. FEM simulation of the growth of a crack perpendicular to the FB in the DZ showed that there is a drop in crack tip strain rate as the crack entered the HHZ, suggesting a decreased crack growth rate can be expected for a crack propagating perpendicular to the FB in the high hardness zone where a continuous increase of the hardness with crack growth may exist. Cracking path observation on the cross-section of the CBB specimen suggested that a SCC propagating perpendicular to the FB in the DZ was blunted by pitting after it reached the FB, indicating that the FB is a barrier to SCC growth. However, reactivation of crack growth from the pitting in LAS by preferential oxidation along the grain boundary was observed as well, suggesting a combined effect of microstructure and the high sulphate concentration in the water used for the test. The effects of sulphate doping and DO on CGR in the DZ and FB region were further clarified by the results of the SCC-CGR test. At a DO of 0.25 ppm, the SCC growth rate was low in the FB region even with a sulphate addition of up to 50 ppb in water. The crack growth, however, was reactivated by increasing the DO to 2 ppm at both sulphate concentrations of 50 ppb and 20 ppb, indicating an important role of DO in SCC growth in the DZ. The existence of a

  15. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  16. Applied Stress Affecting the Environmentally Assisted Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, A. K.

    2013-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is affected by the mode of applied stress, i.e., tension, compression, or torsion. The cracking is measured in terms of initiation time to nucleate a crack or time to failure. In a simple uniaxial loading under tension or compression, it is observed that the initiation time can vary in orders of magnitude depending on the alloy and the environment. Fracture can be intergranular or transgranular or mixed mode. Factors that affect SCC are solubility of the metal into surrounding chemical solution, and diffusion rate (like hydrogen into a tensile region) of an aggressive element into the metal and liquid metallic elements in the grain boundaries. Strain hardening exponent that affects the local internal stresses and their gradients can affect the diffusion kinetics. We examine two environments (Ga and 3.5 pct NaCl) for the same alloy 7075-T651, under constant uniaxial tension and compression load. These two cases provide us application to two different governing mechanisms namely liquid metal embrittlement (7075-Ga) and hydrogen-assisted cracking (7075-NaCl). We note that, in spite of the differences in their mechanisms, both systems show similar behavior in the applied K vs crack initiation time plots. One common theme among them is the transport mechanism of a solute element to a tensile-stress region to initiate fracture.

  17. Formation of Chromium Coating and Comparative Examination on Corrosion Resistance with 13Cr Steel in CO2-SATURATED Simulated Oilfield Brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiaojuan; Xie, Faqin; Lin, Naiming; Yao, Xiaofei; Tian, Wei; Tang, Bin

    2013-07-01

    In order to enhance the surface properties of P110 oil casing tube steel and increase its usage during operation, chromium coating was fabricated by pack cementation. Scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, element distribution and phase constitutions of the coating. Comparative examinations on corrosion resistance between chromium coating and 13Cr stainless steel in CO2-saturated simulated oilfield brine were carried out via electrochemical measurements. The results showed that the obtained coating was uniform and compact, mainly consisted of CrxCy and doped with minor Cr2N. Chromizing treatment made it possible to create on the working surface of P110 steel with enhanced corrosion resistance, and the chromium coating indicated lower pitting corrosion sensitivity than that of 13Cr stainless steel.

  18. Understanding the Risk of Chloride Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Interim Storage Containers for the Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Evolution of Brine Chemistry on the Container Surface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enos, David; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-10-01

    Although the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking is well known, uncertainties exist in terms of the environmental conditions that exist on the surface of the storage containers. While a diversity of salts is present in atmospheric aerosols, many of these are not stable when placed onto a heated surface. Given that the surface temperature of any container storing spent nuclear fuel will be well above ambient, it is likely that salts deposited on its surface may decompose or degas. To characterize this effect, relevant single and multi-salt mixtures are being evaluated as a function of temperature and relative humidity to establish the rates of degassing, as well as the likely final salt and brine chemistries that will remain on the canister surface.

  19. 钢筋锈胀引发混凝土保护层开裂破坏的细观数值研究%Meso-scale numerical study on cracking of concrete cover due to steel reinforcement corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜修力; 金浏

    2015-01-01

    钢筋锈蚀膨胀引起保护层混凝土开裂是影响钢筋混凝土结构耐久性和服役寿命的重要因素。考虑到混凝土细观结构组成对保护层破坏模式的影响,从细观角度出发,将混凝土看作由骨料、砂浆基质及两者间界面过渡区组成的三相复合材料,建立了描述钢筋锈胀力学行为的混凝土随机骨料模型。采用塑性损伤本构关系模型来表征砂浆基质和过渡区界面的力学行为,假定钢筋均匀锈蚀,对钢筋锈胀引起的混凝土保护层开裂破坏过程进行了细观数值研究。对比了宏观均匀模型与细观非均质模型下获得的保护层破坏模式,探讨了径厚比(c/d)、钢筋位置(中部和角区)及混凝土拉伸强度对保护层破坏模式及保护层胀裂时钢筋锈蚀水平的影响,得到了一些有益结论。%Concrete cover cracking induced by corrosion of steel reinforcement is a major influencing factor for durability and service-ability of reinforced concrete (RC)structures.Here in the study,the influence of concrete meso-structure on the failure pattern of concrete cover is accounted for.At the meso-scale, the concrete is assumed to be a three-phase composite composed of aggregate,mortar matrix and the interfacial transition zone (ITZ).A random aggregate structure of concrete is established for the study on the mechanical behavior of cover subjected to corrosion expansion of steel reinforcement.In the simulations,the plasticity damaged model is used to describe the mechanical behavior of the mortar matrix and the ITZ,and it is assumed that the corrosion of steel reinforcement is uniform.Based on the above assumptions,the cracking of concrete cover due to steel reinforcement corrosion is numerically simulated.The failure patterns obtained from the macro-scale homogeneous model and the present meso-scale heterogeneous model are compared.The effects of the ratio of cover thickness and reinforce-ment diameter (i

  20. Standard guide for corrosion-related failure analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers key issues to be considered when examining metallic failures when corrosion is suspected as either a major or minor causative factor. 1.2 Corrosion-related failures could include one or more of the following: change in surface appearance (for example, tarnish, rust, color change), pin hole leak, catastrophic structural failure (for example, collapse, explosive rupture, implosive rupture, cracking), weld failure, loss of electrical continuity, and loss of functionality (for example, seizure, galling, spalling, swelling). 1.3 Issues covered include overall failure site conditions, operating conditions at the time of failure, history of equipment and its operation, corrosion product sampling, environmental sampling, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, morphology (mode) or failure, and by considering the preceding, deducing the cause(s) of corrosion failure. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibili...

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracks Initiation Process Model Involving Repetition of Growth and Breaking of Oxide Passive Film or Hydride Layer on Stainless Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, G.; Sakakibara, Y. [Research Laboratory, IHI Corporation (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    The surface of stainless alloy is covered with oxide film such as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and is passivated in neutral aqueous solution. This film attains a thickness that may be expressed in micro meter units({mu}m) and may undergo partial rupture physically in a high-temperature oxygen enriched water environment. Crack propagation occurs through repeated growth and rupture of the oxide film; the rupturing process is designated as tarnish rupture type SCC. Individual cracks are initiated randomly for film of uniform thickness and this process may be described by the stochastic model. Hydride layer formation occurs on the alloy surface under the proper conditions, using titanium in a reducing neutral water environment. Crack initiation may thus also be described by a model similar to that for film rupture. (authors)

  2. Fatigue crack initiation and propagation in steels exposed to inert and corrosive environments. Final report, May 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youseffi, K.; Finnie, I.

    1978-02-01

    The fatigue crack initiation life of AISI 1018 steel was investigated using compact tension specimens having sharp notch root radii. The data were analyzed using two methods for predicting initiation in strain cycling experiments. Also, another approach in which initiation is related to the stress intensity factor was developed. The next phase, that of propagation, was studied using AISI 1018 steel and a new high strength steel HY-180. The crack propagation data obtained for both steels tested in air can be described accurately by the power law first suggested by Paris, da/dN = C(..delta..K)/sup n/, where a is the crack length, N the number of cycles, and C and n are material constants. However, the exponent n was found to be two times larger for AISI 1018 steel than HY-180 steel.

  3. Cold work effects on sulfide stress cracking of pipeline steel exposed to sour environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Shaw, W.J.D. (Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Cold work effects on sulfide stress cracking of a pipeline steel were examined for exposure to a sour gas environment. Cold worked steel was found to be sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement. The fracture toughness decreases with increasing cold work. Sufficiently low values of fracture toughness may be achieved to promote plane strain fracture even in relatively thin laboratory specimens after a steady state level of hydrogen has occurred in the material. Sulfide stress cracking failure of steel with low amounts of cold work (<30%) is by transgranular cleavage fracture, while heavily cold worked steel shows secondary cracks and microvoid coalescence. The results indicate that sulfide stress cracking of the steel is a mixture of anodic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement. The anodic SCC mechanism is mainly promoted by carbon dioxide and a high level of chloride. (author).

  4. Effect of high energy shot peening pressure on the stress corrosion cracking of the weld joint of 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiming, Lu, E-mail: lzm@zjut.edu.cn; Laimin, Shi, E-mail: 810050107@qq.com; Shenjin, Zhu, E-mail: 523469865@qq.com; Zhidong, Tang, E-mail: 466054569@qq.com; Yazhou, Jiang, E-mail: 191268219@qq.com

    2015-06-18

    The weld joint of 304 stainless steel is treated using high energy shot peening(HESP) with various shot peening pressures. The grain size and metallographic microstructure of the specimen surface layer are analyzed using the X-ray diffraction method, and the surface hardness is measured. Slow strain rate tension tests are then performed to investigate the effect of shot peening pressure on the stress corrosion sensitivity. The results show that in the surface layer of the specimen, the grain refinement, hardness and the strain-induced plastic deformation all increase with the increasing shot peening pressure. Martensitic transformation is observed in the surface layer after being treated with HESP. The martensite phase ratio is found to increase with increasing shot peening pressure. The result also shows that the effects of the shot peening treatment on the stress corrosion sensitivity index depend on the shot peening pressure. When the shot peening pressure is less than 0.4 MPa, the grain refinement effect plays the main role, and the stress corrosion sensitivity index decreases with the increasing shot peening pressure. In contrast, when the shot peening pressure is higher than 0.4 MPa, the martensite transformation effect plays the main role, the stress corrosion sensitivity index increases with increasing shot peening pressure.

  5. Metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling alloy 718 stress corrosion cracking resistance in PWR primary water; Facteurs metallurgiques et mecaniques controlant l'amorcage de defauts de corrosion sous contrainte dans l'alliage 718 en milieu primaire des reacteurs a eau sous pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleume, J

    2007-11-15

    Improving the performance and reliability of the fuel assemblies of the pressurized water reactors requires having a perfect knowledge of the operating margins of both the components and the materials. The choice of alloy 718 as reference material for this study is justified by the industrial will to identify the first order parameters controlling the excellent resistance of this alloy to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). For this purpose, a specific slow strain rate (SSR) crack initiation test using tensile specimen with a V-shaped hump in the middle of the gauge length was developed and modeled. The selectivity of such SSR tests in simulated PWR primary water at 350 C was clearly established by characterizing the SCC resistance of nine alloy 718 thin strip heats. Regardless of their origin and in spite of a similar thermo-mechanical history, they did not exhibit the same susceptibility to SCC crack initiation. All the characterized alloy 718 heats develop oxide scale of similar nature for various exposure times to PWR primary medium in the temperature range [320 C - 360 C]. {delta} phase precipitation has no impact on alloy 718 SCC initiation behavior when exposed to PWR primary water, contrary to interstitial contents and the triggering of plastic instabilities (PLC phenomenon). (author)

  6. 核电汽轮机转子结构应力腐蚀裂纹扩展研究%Study on Stress Corrosion Cracking Growth of Turbine Rotor in Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦广臣; 王炜哲; 蒋浦宁; 刘应征

    2013-01-01

    建立二维轴对称转子模型,有限元计算转子结构的应力场和稳态温度场.以这些计算结果为基础,采用Clark裂纹扩展模型和Paris裂纹扩展模型分析在不同的裂纹尺寸下转子结构中某点的应力腐蚀裂纹扩展速率,比较两种模型在工程实际应用中的优劣.%The stress fields and steady temperature fields are obtained by calculating the rotor model of 2D axisymmetric model by using the finite element analysis ( FEA). Based on the numerical results, the stress corrosion crack ( SCC ) growths at a certain point of the model are calculated by using the Clark model and the Paris model, and the comparative analysis of the results of two crack growth model is made for advantage in practical application.

  7. Reliability Model of Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Evaluation of LD10CS Aluminum Alloy%LD10CS腐蚀疲劳裂纹扩展速率评价的可靠性模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾明明; 李旭东; 吕航

    2014-01-01

    腐蚀损伤会加速疲劳载荷下的飞机铝合金结构裂纹的萌生和扩展,威胁结构安全性。针对腐蚀影响下的疲劳裂纹扩展的随机性本质,对预腐蚀 LD10CS 合金的预腐蚀疲劳试验进行了数据分析,提出了基于可靠性的腐蚀裂纹扩展速率表征方法,与试验结果对比表明,该方法可以给出 LD10CS 腐蚀疲劳裂纹扩展速率的上下限,进而给出该种材料铝合金构件的疲劳裂纹扩展寿命的上下限,为评估铝合金构件的寿命提供了依据。%Fatigue loadings and environmental corrosion damage can decrease the mechanical properties of LD10CS alu-minum alloy.The paper made a research on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCG)of AA LD10CS with corrosion damage, and proposed a reliability-based method to evaluate FCG.Compare of predicted FCG and experimental results indicated that the proposed method was able to give the lower and upper limit of FCG of LD10CS with corrosion damage,which provided the basis of aluminum alloy component safe life prediction.

  8. 当量加速腐蚀条件下7 B04-T6高强度铝合金疲劳裂纹扩展规律研究%The fatigue crack growth rule of 7B04-T6 high strength aluminum alloy under equivalently accelerated corrosion environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭晓明; 王海东; 王刚

    2015-01-01

    Based on an accelerated corrosion testing spectrum complicated for the servicing field environment, the equivalently accelerated corrosion testing of high strength aluminum alloy 7B04-T6 specimens for critical structure were carried out. Corrosion damage under the field environment was successfully simulated and reappeared, and corrosion damage evolvement rule was obtained. By prior⁃corrosion fatigue testing and fractography quantitative analysis, the fatigue crack length (a) and fatigue cycles (N) were gotten, and relationship between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and stress intensify factors rang (ΔK) was analyzed. Moreover the effect of different corrosion damage on fatigue crack growth behavior was quantitatively characterized. The result shows that there is obvious short crack growth behavior during early corrosion stage, the fatigue crack growth rate increases when the corrosion damage is more serious, and the fatigue performance is greatly degraded.%基于编制的机场环境加速试验谱,针对关键结构高强度铝合金件进行当量腐蚀试验,在实验室条件下成功地模拟和再现了服役环境条件的腐蚀损伤,借助复型法观测得到了腐蚀损伤的演化规律;通过预腐蚀疲劳试验和疲劳断口扫描电镜定量分析,得到了裂纹长度a与循环次数N数据集,分析了裂纹扩展速率da/dN与应力强度因子幅值ΔK的对应关系,定量表征了不同程度腐蚀损伤对疲劳裂纹扩展行为的影响规律。结果表明,在腐蚀初期,疲劳裂纹扩展过程中有经典的小裂纹扩展阶段;随着腐蚀损伤的加重,小裂纹行为不明显;腐蚀损伤越严重,疲劳裂纹扩展速率越快,结构抗疲劳性能显著退化。

  9. A STRUCTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF FLAWS DETECTED DURING ULTRASONIC EXAMINATION OF TANK 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B; James Elder, J

    2008-08-21

    Ultrasonic (UT) inspection of Tank 15 was conducted between April and July 2007 in accordance with the Tank 15 UT inspection plan. This was a planned re-inspection of this tank, the previous one was performed in 2002. Ten cracks were characterized in the previous examination. The re-inspection was performed to verify the present models and understanding for stress corrosion cracking. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack <25% through wall' in 2002, was clearly shown not to be a crack. Additionally, examination of a new area immediately adjacent to other cracks along a vertical weld revealed three new cracks. It is not known when these new cracks formed as they could very well have been present in 2002 as well. Therefore, a total of twelve cracks were evaluated during the re-examination. A critical review of the information describing stress corrosion crack behavior for the SRS waste tanks, as well as a summary review of the service history of Tank 15, was performed. Each crack was then evaluated for service exposure history, consistency of the crack behavior with the current understanding of stress corrosion cracking, and present and future impact to the structural integrity of the tank. Crack instability calculations were performed on each crack for a bounding waste removal loading condition in Tank 15. In all cases, the crack behavior was determined to be consistent with the previous understanding of stress corrosion cracking in the SRS waste tank environment. The length of the cracks was limited due to the short-range nature of the residual stresses near seam, repair and attachment welds. Of the twelve cracks, nine were located in the vapor space above the sludge layer, including the three new cracks. Comparison of the crack lengths measured in 2002 and 2007 revealed that crack growth had occurred in four of the six previously measured vapor space cracks. However, the growth remained

  10. Dynamic Strain and Crack Monitoring Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a new automated vehicle health monitoring sensor system capable of measuring loads and detecting crack, corrosion, and...

  11. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  12. 低碳-低锰系油井套管用钢抗硫化氢应力腐蚀开裂性能%Hydrogen Sulfide Resistant Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low C-Mn Steels for Oil Well Casing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺飞; 尚成嘉; 张峰; 毕宗岳

    2013-01-01

    对621 MPa(90ksi)级抗硫化氢腐蚀油井套管用钢的合金设计、热处理工艺以及组织和性能关系进行了研究,分别设计了0.08C-0.8Mn和0.20C-0.8Mn 2种低碳-低锰试验钢,并重点研究了经调质处理后试验钢的位错、析出物和碳化物对SSCC性能的影响.研究结果表明,采用低碳-低锰,结合Nb、V、Ti和B的微合金设计,通过适当的调质热处理工艺可以获得优良的力学性能、韧性和抗硫化氢应力腐蚀开裂性能,满足相关标准的要求.研究结果还表明,不共平面的位错群、细小的析出物以及弥散的高球化率碳化物,可以使钢具有很好的抗硫化氢应力腐蚀开裂性能.%Alloy design, heat treatment process and microstructure and properties relationship of 621 MPa(90ksi) grade oil well casing steels of H2S resistant corrosion were studied. Such two kinds as 0. 08C-0. 8Mn and 0. 20C-0. 8Mn of low C-Mn tested steels were designed, respectively. And the effect of dislocation, precipitation and carbide of tested steels after heat treatment on SSCC performance was investigated. The results show that the low C-Mn and Nb-V-Ti-B micro-alloy design has excellent mechanical properties, toughness and resistance to H2S stress corrosion cracking performance through proper quenching and tempering heat treatment process, to meet the requirements of the relevant standards. The results also show that the un-coplanar dislocation group, fine precipitates and dispersive high sphericity carbide would be beneficial to excellent hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking resistance.

  13. Description of a disposition line on the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of ferritic reactor pressure vessel steels under BWR-conditions; Beschreibung einer einhuellenden Risswachstumskurve zum Spannungsrisskorrosionsverhalten von ferritischen Reaktordruckbehaelter (RDB)-Staehlen unter Siedewasserreaktor (SWR)-Bedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, G. [HEW, Hamburg (Germany); Hoffmann, H. [VGB-GS, Essen (Germany); Ilg, U. [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Philippsburg (Germany); Wachter, O. [E.ON-Kernkraft, Hannover (Germany); Widera, M. [RWE Power, Essen (Germany); Roth, A. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel of BWR reactors is lined with a welded, corrosion-resistant steel liner. In an assumed case of liner rupture down to the low-alloy ferritic base material, an integrity assessment of the pressure vesssel in consideration of the effects of reactor coolant is of utmost importance, and research in this field has been going on for more than ten years now. An analysis of the available data shows that it is now possible to describe a disposition line on the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of ferritic reactor pressure vessel steels in BWR conditions. Crack growth rates of a stress intensity factor corresponding to a T/4 wall defect (i.e. 25 percent of the wall thickness) are technically not relevant. This scientific finding is supported by measurements of about 450 reactor operation years of all German LWR reactor plants, none of which showed crack initiation in the reactor pressure vessel. [German] Die mediumberuehrte Innenoberflaeche des Reaktordruckbehaelters (RDB) von Siedewasserreaktoren (SWR) ist mit einer korrosionsbestaendigen austenitischen Schweissplattierung versehen. Fuer den unterstellten Fall einer bis auf den niedriglegierten, ferritischen Grundwerkstoff durchgerissenen Pattierung ist fuer die Beurteilung der Integritaet des RDB unter Beruecksichtigung der Einwirkung des Reaktorkuehlmittels die Klaerung der Frage eines korrosionsgestuetzten Risswachstums von grosser Bedeutung. Dieses Thema ist daher bereits seit mehr als 10 Jahren Gegenstand umfangreicher Forschungsaktivitaeten. Ende der 80er- und Anfang der 90er-Jahre wurden fuer ferritische RDB-Staehle von SWR-Anlagen Risswachstumsgeschwindigkeiten veroeffentlicht, die binnen weniger als einem Jahr zum Durchriss der drucktragenden Wand eines RDB gefuehrt haetten. Daraufhin wurden internationale Forschungsaktivitaeten zur Ermittlung zuverlaessiger und reproduzierbarer Risswachstumsdaten initiiert, deren Ergebnisse zusammenfassend dargestellt werden. Die

  14. Corrosion Rate of Hydrogenation to C110 Casing in High H2S Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi; LI Changjin; ZHANG Jiyin; SHI Taihe

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of C110 bushing at high temperature and high pressure with a high H2S / CO2 was studied,and a basis for the materials selection of sour gas well bushing was provided in H2S,CO2 and saline coexisting environment.Under acidic condiction,hydrogen atoms greatly entered into the material and caused the material properties changed.Weight loss method was used to study the corrosion rate of hydrogen charging samples and original untreated samples in simulated oil field environment.PAR2273 electrochemical workstation was used to examine the electrochemical performance of samples untreated,hydrogen charging after reacting in autoclave.The corrosion product film was observed through SEM.The experimental results show that sample with hydrogen charging has a much more obvious partial corrosion and pitting corrosion than the untreated blank sample even the downhole corrosion speed of bushing is increased after being used for a period of time.Polarization curve shows the corrosion tendency is the same between sample with or without hydrogen charging and corrosion tendency is reduced by corrosion product film.A layer of dense product film formed on the surface of samples provides a certain protective effect to the matrix,but cracked holes which will accelerate partial corrosion of the sample were also observed.

  15. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  16. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. Fundamental studies on the electrochemical behaviour of carbon steel exposed in sulphide and sulphate-reducing environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rischel Hilbert, Lisbeth

    1998-08-01

    The aim of the report is to give a fundamental understanding of the response of different electrochemical techniques on carbon steel in a sulphide environment as well as in a biologically active sulphate-reducing environment (SRB). This will form the basis for further studies and for recommendations in regards to electrochemical monitoring of MIC. The work presented here and further studies are also planned to lead to a Ph.D. thesis on `MIC monitoring based on mechanisms on corrosion`. The results of laboratory experiments conducted in the period 1995 to 1997 are summarised. Conclusions will be based on results from the entire 3 year period, but only selected experimental data primarily from the latest experiments will be presented in detail here. Microbial corrosion of carbon steel under influence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is characterised by the formation of both biofilm and corrosion products (ferrous sulphides) on the metal surface. Experiments have been conducted on carbon steel exposed in near neutral (pH 6 to 8.5) saline hydrogen sulphide environment (0 to 100 mg/l total dissolved sulphide) for a period of 14 days. Furthermore coupons have been exposed in a bioreactor for a period of up to 120 days in sulphide-producing environment controlled by biological activity of (SRB). (au)

  17. Effects of Temperature on the Slow Strain Rate Tension Stress Corrosion Cracking of Super 13Cr Tubing Steel%温度对超级13Cr油管钢慢拉伸应力腐蚀开裂的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚小飞; 谢发勤; 吴向清; 王毅飞

    2012-01-01

    Effects of temperature on the stress corrosion cracking of super 13Cr tubing steel were investigated in 3. 5% NaCl,that tensile strength and elongation and cracking time and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility index kscc and fracture morphology were analyzed by slow strain rate tensile stress corrosion cracking (SSRT) experiment method and σ-ε curve and SEM. The results shows that the degree of stress corrosion were lesser at below 60℃ and were severe at higher 80 ℃. With the rise of temperature, the super 13Cr tubing steel tensile strength decreased,e-longation rate decreased, contraction ratio decreases, breaking time was reduced, stress corrosion cracking tendency of increase, the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility index kσ and kε are increasing, and the increased trend of kε were obviously than kσ, effects of temperature on the plastic deformation of super 13Cr tubing steel were greater than the tensile strength.%采用慢应变速率拉伸(SSRT)应力腐蚀开裂试验方法,通过σ-ε曲线和SEM等分析了超级13Cr油管钢抗拉强度、延伸率、断裂时间、应力腐蚀开裂敏感性指数(kSCC)和断口形貌;研究了温度对其在3.5% NaCl溶液中应力腐蚀开裂(SCC)的影响.结果表明:当温度<60℃时应力腐蚀的程度较轻;当温度>80℃时应力腐蚀的程度严重;随温度的升高,超级13Cr油管钢的抗拉强度降低,延伸率减小,断面收缩率减小,断裂时间减小,应力腐蚀开裂的倾向性增大,应力腐蚀开裂敏感性指数kσ和kε均呈现增大的趋势,且kε比kσ增大的趋势更显著;温度对超级13Cr油管钢的塑性变形性的影响比对抗拉强度的影响更大.

  18. Aqueous sodium chloride induced intergranular corrosion of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Daeschner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Two methods have been explored to assess the susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys to intergranular corrosion in aqueous sodium chloride solution. They are: (1) constant extension rate testing with and without alternate-immersion preexposure and (2) metallographic examination after exposure to a NaCl-H2O2 corrosive solution per Mil-H-6088F. Intergranular corrosion was found to occur in both powder and ingot metallurgy alloys of similar composition, using both methods. Underaging rendered the alloys most susceptible. The results correlate to stress-corrosion data generated in conventional time-to-failure and crack growth-rate tests. Alternate-immersion preexposure may be a reliable means to assess stress corrosion susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys.

  19. Exfoliation corrosion of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr alloy containing Sc examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Y.P.; Liu, X.Y.; He, Y.B.; Li, C.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha (China); Pan, Q.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha (China); The Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Materials Science and Engineering of Ministry of Education, Changsha (China); Li, W.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha (China); School of Civil Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang (China)

    2012-02-15

    The exfoliation corrosion behavior of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr alloy containing Sc artificially aged at 120 C for 24 h is studied by macroscopic observation techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. After 48 h immersion, the blisters start bursting and delamination initiates, along with the appearance of two time constants in the impedance diagrams. According to the simulation by equivalent circuit, the corrosion rate decreases sharply and then reaches a steady state, which is due to the change of the solution pH and oxide layer thickness, as well as the accumulation of corrosion products. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Effect of sensitization and cold work on stress corrosion susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, H.; Aho-Mantila, I.

    1981-05-01

    The influence of metallurgical variables on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels, in particular AISI 304 and OX18H10T, was examined in O/sub 2/ enriched BWR conditions (8 ppm O/sub 2/) and in typical PWR conditions. Cracking susceptibility in BWR conditions is especially sensitive to alpha martensite content and sensitization. Cracking in alpha martensite compounds is intergranular and transgranular and it can not be related to sensitization. Sensitization induces cracking only in creviced conditions (double U-bend specimens) in AISI 304 steels. In creviced conditions OX18H10T steel exhibits cracking in solution annealed, stabilized and sensitized conditions. The sensitized material is most susceptible. Cracking in solution annealed and stabilized OX18H10T steel is intergranular and transgranular. In PWR conditions (O/sub 2/ content 2 ppb) no cracking is observed. (ESA)

  1. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  2. In-situ crack repair by laser cladding

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available sealing is achieved, an overlay layer of typically 1 mm thickness is cladded for improved pitting corrosion resistance. Crack sealing is considered to be a temporary repair technique. In-situ repair requires that the equipment should be mobile... 10 2 3 9 10 deg 10 deg 10 deg Table 1: Typical process parameters for crack sealing 2.2 Overlay cladding Overlay cladding of the sealed cracks is required to improve pitting corrosion...

  3. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic piping materials in BWR conditions. Research results - Phase 4: Crack growth; Interkristalline Spannungsrisskorrosion austenitischer Rohrleitungswerkstoffe unter SWR-Bedingungen. Ergebnisse der Forschungsvorhaben - Phase 4: Risswachstum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, R. [Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Bruemmer, G. [Hamburgische Electricitaetswerke AG, Hamburg (Germany); Hoffmann, H. [VGB, Essen (Germany); Ilg, U. [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Philippsburg (Germany); Maier, V. [Bayernwerk Kernenergie GmbH, Muenchen (Germany); Wachter, O. [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Widera, M. [RWE Energie AG, Essen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    A charge of Ti-stabilised austenitic steel 1.4541 and three charges of Ni-stabilised steel 1.4550 with different carbon concentrations and stabilisation ratios were selected as samples. Water chemical boundary conditions and the material state were varied during the crack growth experiments. Apart from the basic material in the sensitised and solution-annealed state, also HAZ states of specially produced welds were investigated. [German] Als Probenmaterial wurde eine Charge des Titan-stabilisierten austenitischen Stahles W.-Nr. 1.4541 und drei Chargen des Niob-stabilisierten Stahles W.-Nr. 1.4550 mit unterschiedlichen Kohlenstoffgehalten und Stabilisierungsverhaeltnissen ausgewaehlt. Neben wasserchemischen Randbedingungen wurde bei den Risswachstumsversuche vor allem der Parameter Werkstoffzustand variiert. Neben dem Grundwerkstoff im sensibilisierten und loesungsgegluehten Zustand - wurden auch Waermeeinflusszonen-Zustaende von speziell hierfuer hergestellten Schweissnaehten geprueft. (orig.)

  4. A Review Corrosion of TI Grade 7 and Other TI Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-05-11

    Titanium alloy degradation modes are reviewed in relation to their performance in repository environments. General corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking, microbially influenced corrosion, and radiation-assisted corrosion of Ti alloys are considered. With respect to the Ti Grade 7 drip shields selected for emplacement in the repository at Yucca Mountain, general corrosion, hydrogen induced cracking, and radiation-assisted corrosion will not lead to failure within the 10,000 year regulatory period; stress corrosion cracking (in the absence of disruptive events) is of no consequence to barrier performance; and localized corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion are not expected to occur. To facilitate the discussion, Ti Grades 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, and 24 are included in this review.

  5. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  6. Towards a quantification of stress corrosion mechanisms: numerical simulations of hydrogen-dislocations at the very crack tip; Vers une quantification des mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte: simulations numeriques des interactions hydrogene-dislocations en pointe de fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chateau, J.P

    1999-01-05

    We discuss the respective roles played by anodic dissolution and hydrogen in SCC mechanisms of f.c.c. materials, by studying the fracture of copper in nitrite for which we compare the results with that previously obtained in 316L steel in hot chloride. It is surprising to note that even the crystallographies at the scale of the micron are different, the macroscopic inclination of the fracture surfaces are the same. In the case of 316L steel, the formation of strong pile-ups in the presence of hydrogen leads to a zigzag fracture along alternated slip planes in the most general case. In the absence of hydrogen, as in copper, this mechanism effectively disappears. Furthermore, numerical simulations of crack shielding by dislocations emitted on one plane predict the macroscopic inclination. It shows that it is due to the mere dissolution which confines slip activity at the very crack tip in f.c.c. materials. In order to quantify the mechanism involved in 316L steel, we developed simulations which numerically solve the coupled diffusion and elasticity equations for hydrogen in the presence of a crack and shielding dislocations. They reproduce the mechanisms of hydrogen segregation on edge dislocations and of a localised softening effect by decreasing pair interactions. These mechanisms lead to i) a localisation of hydrogen embrittlement along the activated slip planes, ii) an increase of the dislocation density in pile-ups, and iii) a decrease of the cross slip probability. These three factors enhance micro-fracture at the head of a pile-up, which is responsible of thezigzag fracture. Introducing the free surface effects for hydrogen, we point out a new mechanism: the inhibition of dislocation sources at the crack tip, which is relevant with the brittle fracture surfaces observed in some cases in 316L steel. The quantification of these different mechanisms allows to give a relation between the local fracture possibility and the macroscopic parameters. A general law for

  7. Effect of sensitization and cold work on stress corrosion susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in BWR and PWR conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, H.; Aho-Mantila, I.

    1981-05-01

    The influence of metallurgical variables on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels, in particular AISI 304 and OX18H10T, has been examined both in O2-enriched BWR-conditions (8 ppm O2) and in typical PWR-conditions.

  8. FEM analysis on the crack process of concrete cover induced by non-uniform corrosion of re-bar%钢筋不均匀锈蚀引起的混凝土保护层开裂有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦俊; 孟浩; 薛圣广

    2011-01-01

    钢筋发生锈蚀,将导致混凝土保护层受拉而开裂,严重影响混凝土结构的耐久性.针对自然环境下混凝土构件中的钢筋往往是非均匀锈蚀,利用ABAQUS有限元软件,采用对钢筋周围混凝土施加不均匀锈胀位移的方法模拟钢筋非均匀锈蚀情况下保护层的开裂过程,基于有限元分析结果,得到保护层胀裂破坏时临界径向位移计算公式;以此为基础,推导了钢筋非均匀锈蚀时保护层开裂时钢筋锈蚀率的计算公式.最后,通过试验验证了本文提出的锈蚀率计算公式的合理性.%Occurrence of re-bar corrosion will lead to the concrete cover cracking, which seriously affect the durability of concrete structures. In dealing with the non-uniform corrosion of re-bar in concrete components under natural environment, the paper simulates the cracking process of concrete cover using a finite-element based method with ABAQUS software. Based on the FEM analysis results, the formula of the critical radial displacement at the cracking time is used to predict the corrosion ratio at the cracking time of cover concrete. Finally, the analytical corrosion ratio formula presented herein is verified with the laboratory test.

  9. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  10. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  11. Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Microscopic Investigation of Cracks in ERCuNi Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corrosion resistant CuNi cladding was deposited on SM45C (equivalent to AI5I1045) substrate by DC inverse arcwelding. During the welding process, a three channel acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system was applied to detectthe crack signals generating from both the cladding process and after cladding. Characteristics of the welding cracksignal and noise signal had been analyzed systematically. Based on the record time of the signal, the solidificationcrack and delayed crack were distinguished. By two-dimensional AE source location, the crack position was located,and then investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the AE system could detect thewelding crack with high sensitivity and the two-dimensional source location could accurately determine the crackposition. Microstructures of the cladding and heat affected zone (HAZ) were examined. Dendrites in the claddingand coarse grains in the HAZ were found.

  12. Uncertainty Evaluation of Weibull Estimators through Monte Carlo Simulation: Applications for Crack Initiation Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Phil Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The typical experimental procedure for testing stress corrosion cracking initiation involves an interval-censored reliability test. Based on these test results, the parameters of a Weibull distribution, which is a widely accepted crack initiation model, can be estimated using maximum likelihood estimation or median rank regression. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate number of test specimens and censoring intervals required to obtain sufficiently accurate Weibull estimators. In this study, we compare maximum likelihood estimation and median rank regression using a Monte Carlo simulation to examine the effects of the total number of specimens, test duration, censoring interval, and shape parameters of the true Weibull distribution on the estimator uncertainty. Finally, we provide the quantitative uncertainties of both Weibull estimators, compare them with the true Weibull parameters, and suggest proper experimental conditions for developing a probabilistic crack initiation model through crack initiation tests.

  13. Accelerated corrosion testing results for specimens containing uncoated reinforcing steel and corrosion inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratova, I. L.; Montes, P.; Bremner, T. W. [New Brunswick Univ., Dept, of Civil Engineering, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Concrete mixtures (water-cement ratios of 0.25, 0.40. or 0.60) containing uncoated reinforcing bars with a simulated crack, formed transverse to the axis of the bar, and with three commercial corrosion inhibitors added for corrosion protection (organic corrosion inhibitor,calcium nitrate-based corrosion inhibitor, and migratory corrosion inhibitor), were tested for corrosion damage. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the different corrosion inhibitors in uncracked and cracked concrete slabs in a simulated marine environment. The specimens were placed in an accelerated exposure cabinet with four cycles of wetting and drying per day in simulated seawater, and corrosion rates measured using the linear polarization technique. Water-soluble chloride content in the rebars was analyzed at the end of the exposure period. The three corrosion inhibitors were found to show a wide variation in performance. There was a direct correlation between their effectiveness and addition rate. All three appeared to be more effective in reducing corrosion rate in a higher water-to-cement ratio concrete. Consistent performance was provided only by calcium nitrate at an addition rate of 25 litre/cu m of concrete, with water-to-cement ratios of 0.60 and 0.40. Pitting corrosion was observed in all pre-cracked high performance concrete specimens; the depth of the pit tended to be deeper when a corrosion inhibitor was used. 6 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  14. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  15. Potential corrosion and degradation mechanisms of Zircaloy cladding on spent nuclear fuel in a tuff repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, A.J.

    1984-09-01

    A literature review and analysis were made of corrosion and degradation processes applicable to Zircaloy cladding on spent nuclear fuel in a tuff repository. In particular, lifetime sought for the Zircaloy is 10,000 years. Among the potential failure mechanisms examined were: oxidation by steam, air, and water, including the effects of ions whose presence is anticipated in the water; mechanical overload; stress (creep) rupture; stress-corrosion cracking (SCC); and delayed failure due to hydride cracking. The conclusion is that failure due to oxidation is not credible, although a few experiments are suggested to confirm the effect of aqueous fluoride on the Zircaloy cladding. Mechanical overload is not a problem, and failure from stress-rupture does not appear likely based on a modified Larson-Miller analysis. Analysis shows that delayed hydride cracking is not anticipated for the bulk of spent fuel pins. However, for a minority of pins under high stress, there is some uncertainty in the analysis as a result of: (1) uncertainty about crack depths in spent fuel claddings and (2) the effect of slow cooling on the formation of radially oriented hydride precipitates. Experimental resolution is called for. Finally, insufficient information is currently available on stress-corrosion cracking. While evidence is presented that SCC failure is not likely to occur, it is difficult to demonstrate this conclusively because the process is not clearly understood and data are limited. Further experimental work on SCC susceptibility is especially needed.

  16. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface....

  17. Severe Environmental Corrosion Erosion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany, OR, allows researchers to safely examine the performance of materials in highly corrosive or erosive...

  18. Maintainability Improvement Through Corrosion Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    potential, current, pH, and chloride ion concentration were made along a simulated corrosion fatigue crack for HY80 (UNS K31820) steel in seawater...frequency range of 0.05-50 Hz, a 7075-T6 aluminium alloy and 304 and 316L stainless steels were fatigue tested in 3.0% NaCl solution. The increments...DESCRIPTORS: Conference Paper; Aluminum base alloys- Mechanical properties; Austenitic stainless steels - Mechanical properties; Corrosion fatigue

  19. Contribution of the low cycle fatigue on ultra high purity Ni-Cr-Fe alloys and on Ni monocrystals to the understanding of the hydrogen role in stress corrosion cracking for the alloys 600 and 690; Apport de la fatigue oligocyclique sur alliages Ni-Cr-Fe d'ultra haute purete et sur monocristaux de Ni a la comprehension sous contrainte des alliages 600 et 69O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaudot, N

    1999-06-01

    We discuss the role of hydrogen in cracking of Ni base alloys used for pressurised water reactor (PWR) primary tubes (alloy 600 and 690). Cracking can be explained by a Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) phenomenon. For this purpose, Low cycle fatigue (R = - 1) under cathodic charging at room temperature is conducted to study hydrogen effects on propagation of cracks mechanically initiated by the formation of Persistent Slip Bands (PSB). Low cycle fatigue on Ultra High Purity specimens (Ni, alloy 600 and 690) reveals the very important hydrogen effect on crack propagation rate, whatever the Cr content in the Ni base alloy. If Cr seems to have an effect over-hydrogen penetration in specimens (by a protective film formation), it have no beneficial effect when hydrogen have diffused ahead of a crack tip. Propagation rates (transgranular or intergranular) are highly increased, no matter of the absence of impurities like sulphur. Then, in PWR, the difference in the behaviour of alloy 600 and 690 could be due to a slower microcrack propagation rate for alloy 690. Protective films could play an important role in this difference, which is to study. Low cycle fatigue on Ni single crystals oriented for single slip shows, for the first time on bulk specimen, a macroscopic softening which can be explained. by hydrogen-dislocation interactions. Moreover, a simple quantitative model based on these interactions results in the same softening as the one observed experimentally. These results allow to validate experimentally one of the most important steps in the 'Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity (CEP) model', i.e. the softening ahead of a stress corrosion crack tip by hydrogen dislocation interactions. This is of importance because this model can explain cracking in numerous FCC materials-environment couple. (author)

  20. Effect of Additional Sulfide and Thiosulfate on Corrosion of Q235 Carbon Steel in Alkaline Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian Li Quan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of additional sulfide and thiosulfate on Q235 carbon steel corrosion in alkaline solutions. Weight loss method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electrochemical measurements were used in this study to show the corrosion behavior and electrochemistry of Q235 carbon steel. Results indicate that the synergistic corrosion rate of Q235 carbon steel in alkaline solution containing sulfide and thiosulfate is larger than that of sulfide and thiosulfate alone, which could be due to redox reaction of sulfide and thiosulfate. The surface cracks and pitting characteristics of the specimens after corrosion were carefully examined and the corrosion products film is flake grains and defective. The main corrosion products of specimen induced by S2− and S2O32- are FeS, FeS2, Fe3O4, and FeOOH. The present study shows that the corrosion mechanism of S2− and S2O32- is different for the corrosion of Q235 carbon steel.

  1. Assessment of concrete damage and strength degradation caused by reinforcement corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Jaya; Chen, Hua-Peng

    2015-07-01

    Structural performance deterioration of reinforced concrete structures has been extensively investigated, but very limited studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of reinforcement corrosion on time-dependent reliability with consideration of the influence of mechanical characteristics of the bond interface due to corrosion. This paper deals with how corrosion in reinforcement creates different types of defects in concrete structure and how they are responsible for the structural capacity deterioration of corrosion affected reinforced concrete structures during their service life. Cracking in cover concrete due to reinforcement corrosion is investigated by using rebar-concrete model and realistic concrete properties. The flexural strength deterioration is analytically predicted on the basis of bond strength evolution due to reinforcement corrosion, which is examined by the experimental data available. The time-dependent reliability analysis is undertaken to calculate the life time structural reliability of corrosion damaged concrete structures by stochastic deterioration modelling of reinforced concrete. The results from the numerical example show that the proposed approach is capable of evaluating the damage caused by reinforcement corrosion and also predicting the structural reliability of concrete structures during their lifecycle.

  2. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  3. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  4. Fatigue Crack Nucleation Studies on Sulfuric Acid Anodized 7075-T73 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas, Terence P.; Earthman, James C.

    2014-06-01

    The influence of a sulfuric acid anodic coating process on the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of 7075-T73 aluminum alloy was investigated. Silicone surface replication in combination with carbon sputter coating and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) allowed for in situ monitoring of the number of cycles for crack nucleation. A single edge circular notch (SECN) coupon was designed for the present study to localize fatigue damage thus enhancing fatigue crack detection and capture the effects of multiaxial stress conditions indicative of a majority engineering applications. Linear elastic finite element modeling of the SECN coupon was performed to quantify the von Mises equivalent stress distribution and the stress concentration factor of the notched region. The experimental results indicate that the presence of localized pitting corrosion initiated during the anodic coating pretreatment process had an adverse effect on fatigue performance. Specifically, multiple crack nucleation sites were evident as opposed to a single crack origin for the untreated specimens. Post-cycling SEM surface examinations displayed networks of micro-cracks in the anodic coating emanating from the pits although these were not found to be fatigue crack origin sites during post SEM fractographic exams. Thus, the stress concentration effect of the corrosion pits was found to be predominant. The total cycles to failure on average was reduced by approximately 60% for the anodic coated versus untreated specimens. A strategy is also discussed on how to mitigate accelerated crack nucleation by controlled surface pretreatment and use of a chromated chemical conversion coating in lieu of an anodic coating for selective applications.

  5. Review of studies on corrosion of magnesium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rong-chang; ZHANG jin; HUANG Wei-jiu; W. DIETZEL; K. U. KAINER; C. BLAWERT; KE Wei

    2006-01-01

    This review provided some recent progress of the research on corrosion mechanisms of magnesium and its alloys and a basis for follow-on research. Galvanic corrosion,pitting corrosion,intergranular corrosion (IGC),filiform corrosion,crevice corrosion,stress corrosion cracking (SCC),and corrosion fatigue (CF) were discussed. The influence of metallurgical factors such as alloying elements,microstructure and secondary phases,processing factors such as heat treatment and weld,and environmental factors including temperature,relative humidity,solution pH values and concentration on corrosion were discussed. In particular,a mechanism of pitting corrosion caused by AlMn particles was proposed. The corrosion properties of AZ91D weld material were investigated.

  6. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  7. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  8. Analysis of cracked core spray injection line piping from the Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1983-12-01

    Elbow assemblies and adjacent piping from the loops A and B core spray injection lines of Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors have been examined in order to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages and flaw indications detected during hydrostatic tests and subsequent ultrasonic inspections. The elbow assemblies were found to contain multiple intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zones. The cracking was predominantly axial in orientation in the forged elbow and wedge components, whereas mixed axial and circumferential cracking was seen in the wrought piping pieces. In at least two instances, axial cracks completely penetrated the circumferential weld joining adjacent components. Based upon the observations made in the present study, the failures were attributed to intergranular stress corrosion cracking caused by the weld-induced sensitized microstructure and residual stresses present; dissolved oxygen in the reactor coolant apparently served as the corrosive species. The predominantly axial orientation of the cracks present in the forged components is believed to be related to the banded microstructure present in these components. The metallographic studies reported are supplemented by x-radiography, chemical analysis and mechanical test results, determinations of the degree of sensitization present, and measurements of weld metal delta ferrite content.

  9. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water; Influence de la localisation de la deformation sur la corrosion sous contrainte de l'acier inoxydable austenitique A-286 en milieu primaire des REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoie, M

    2007-01-15

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is known to be a critical issue for structural components of nuclear reactor cores. The deformation of irradiated austenitic stainless steels is extremely heterogeneous and localized in deformation bands that may play a significant role in IASCC. In this study, an original approach is proposed to determine the influence of localized deformation on austenitic stainless steels SCC in simulated PWR primary water. The approach consists in (i) performing low cycle fatigue tests on austenitic stainless steel A-286 strengthened by {gamma}' precipitates Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al) in order to shear and dissolve the precipitates in intense slip bands, leading to a localization of the deformation within and in (ii) assessing the influence of these {gamma}'-free localized deformation bands on A-286 SCC by means of comparative CERT tests performed on specimens with similar yield strength, containing or not {gamma}'-free localized deformation bands. Results show that strain localization significantly promotes A-286 SCC in simulated PWR primary water at 320 and 360 C. Moreover, A-286 is a precipitation-hardening austenitic stainless steel used for applications in light water reactors. The second objective of this work is to gain insights into the influence of heat treatment and metallurgical structure on A-286 SCC susceptibility in PWR primary water. The results obtained demonstrate a strong correlation between yield strength and SCC susceptibility of A-286 in PWR primary water at 320 and 360 C. (author)

  10. Differential potential noise measurement during crack initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettiarachchi, S. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Sunol, California (United States)]. E-mail: samson.hettiarachchi@gene.ge.com

    2007-07-01

    Electrochemical potential and current noise have been used over the past two decades as methods of detecting general corrosion, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, corrosion in concrete and corrosion under coatings. The methods involved the use of self-generated potential noise/current noise or both, of the material of choice in a given environment. In a variety of these studies, data processing involved techniques such as fast fourier transforms (FFT) to generate the power spectrum that provided the unique signature associated with the type of the corrosion process. This paper deals with a more simplistic method of monitoring differential potential noise measured between two identical slow strain rate test (SSRT) specimens placed close to each other, in a high temperature aqueous environment, while one is being subjected to dynamic strain and the other maintained under static conditions. The differential potential noise (DPN) was monitored as the applied load increased on the slow strain rate test specimen. Unlike self-generated noise, differential potential noise is less affected by electrical noise in the surroundings, and is able to signal the point of oxide film cracking or crack initiation more conveniently without extensive data processing. This method also allows the in-situ detection of crack initiation without interruption of the SSRT test. The DPN signal at the crack initiation stage is different from the signals acquired as cracking progressed due to continuing dynamic strain. Furthermore, the nature of the DPN signal response depends on the type of material used in this study, Type 304 stainless steel or Inconel 182. (author)

  11. Crack of a first stage blade in a steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nurbanasari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The failure of the first stage blade in a steam turbine of 55 MW was investigated. The blade was made of 17-4 PH stainless steel and has been used for 12 years before failure. The current work aims to find out the main cause of the first stage blade failure. The methods for investigation were metallurgical analysis, chemical composition test, and hardness measurement. The result showed that there was no evidence the blade failure was due to material. The damage found on the blade namely crack on the blade root. Two locations of the crack observed at the blade root, which was at the tang and the fillet, with different failure modes. In general, the damage of the blade was started by the corrosion occurred on the blade root. The crack at the blade root tang was due to corrosion fatigue and the crack occurred at the blade root fillet owing to stress corrosion cracking.

  12. An evaluation of the susceptibility of V-4Cr-4Ti to stress corrosion cracking in room temperature DIII-D water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, W.R.

    1997-04-01

    Two fatigue precracked compact tension (CT) specimens of V-4Cr-4Ti were statically loaded to a stress intensity factor of about 30 MPa{radical}m in room temperature DIII-D water. The first specimen was tested for a period of about 30 days and the second specimen for about 54 days. At the conclusion of each test the specimens were fractured, and the fracture surfaces examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine if SCC had occurred. No SCC was found in either test specimen.

  13. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  14. An overview of materials degradation by stress corrosion in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P. M. [Framatome ANP, Tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    The aging of water cooled and moderated nuclear steam supply systems has given rise to many material corrosion problems of which stress corrosion cracking has proved to be one of the most serious. The aim of this paper is to review some examples of corrosion and particularly stress corrosion problems from the author's experience of interpreting and modelling these phenomena in PWR systems. Examples of stress corrosion cracking in PWR systems described include the major issue of Alloy 600 intergranular cracking in primary PWR coolants, for which it is generally perceived that both adequate life prediction models and remedial measures now exist. Intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes that occur in occluded superheated crevices on the secondary side of steam generators due to hide-out and concentration of water borne impurities are also addressed. Rather less extensive or well known examples are discussed such as the stress corrosion cracking of carbon and low alloy steels and of stainless steels in occluded dead-leg situations where it is sometimes difficult to guarantee adequate control of water chemistry, particularly at plant start-up. Reference is also be made to the use of high strength fastener materials in PWR systems as well as to the emerging issue of the effect of high neutron doses on the stress corrosion resistance of core structural components fabricated from austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  15. Knuckle Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask The Expert Ask a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the ... Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers Knuckle Cracking Q & A September 10, ...

  16. 3013 DE INNER CONTAINER CLOSURE WELD CORROSION EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2013-09-30

    Destructive evaluation (DE) of 3013 containers is one part of the U. S. Department of Energy Integrated Surveillance Program. During standard DE of 3013 containers, visual examinations for pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are performed on the accessible surfaces of the outer, inner, and convenience containers, which make up the 3013 container. As a result of 3013 DE additional analysis, the area near the inner container closure weld has been identified as being a region of increased corrosion susceptibility, which may provide a pathway for corrosive gases to the outer container. This area has a higher residual stress, an altered microstructure, and less corrosion resistant weld oxides as a result of the welding process as well as a lower temperature than other areas of the container, which may increase the absorption of moisture on the surface. The deposition of moisture in this stressed region could lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. During FY2013, the inner container closure weld area was more closely evaluated on several archived samples from DE containers. These containers included FY09 DE2, FY12 DE4, FY12 DE6 and FY12 DE7 and the Hanford High Moisture Container. The additional examinations included visual observations with a stereomicroscope, scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and serial metallography of the sidewall and lid that are part of the inner container closure weld region. Pitting was observed in all the samples taken from the closure weld regions of the examined inner containers. This pitting was generally less 20 μm with most less than 5m. These pits were similar in depth to those observed in the vapor exposed surfaces of teardrops in the shelf life corrosion testing. Cracking was not observed on either the vapor-exposed surfaces of the teardrop coupons or the inner container closure weld region. Further testing is necessary to determine if the conditions

  17. Review of Corrosion Modes for Alloy 22 Regarding Lifetime Expectancy of Nuclear Waste Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; Estill, J C

    2002-11-15

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) was selected to fabricate the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container for nuclear waste at the designated repository site in Yucca Mountain in Nevada (USA). A testing program is underway to characterize and quantify three main modes of corrosion that may occur at the site. Current results show that the containers would perform well under general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). For example, the general corrosion rate is expected to be below 100 nm/year and the container is predicted to be outside the range of potential for localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  18. Flexural behavior of bonded post-tensioned concrete beams under strand corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuhui [College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Xiangtan University, 411105 Xiangtan (China); School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Wang, Lei, E-mail: leiwlei@hotmail.com [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Zhang, Jianren; Ma, Yafei [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Liu, Yongming [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85281 Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Flexural behavior of bonded PT beams with strand corrosion is experimental tested. • Cracking, stiffness, ultimate strength, failure & ductility of beams are clarified. • A coefficient is proposed to measure incompatible strain between strand & concrete. - Abstract: An experimental test is performed to investigate the flexural behavior of bonded post-tensioned concrete beams under strand corrosion. Eight beams are designed and subjected to accelerated method to different corrosion levels. The initial stiffness of beams is observed by cyclic loading-unloading test during the corrosion procedure. Corrosion effects on concrete cracking, post-cracking stiffness, ultimate strength, failure mode and ductility are then clarified by the flexural test. And, a coefficient is introduced to quantify the incompatible strain between corroded strand and concrete. Results show that the prestress force loss of strand has almost the linear relation with corrosion loss. Strand corrosion affects slightly the initial stiffness of beam before flexural cracking, but degrades significantly the post-cracking stiffness of beam as the corrosion loss exceeds 27.0%. Slight corrosion of strand has little effects on beams flexural behavior. The severe corrosion, however, decreases the number of crack, changes the failure mode form the concrete crushing to strand rupture, degrades the ductility and the ultimate strength of beams, and leads to the incompatible strain between strand and concrete. In the present test, the incompatible strain decreases about 20% of the flexural strength as the corrosion loss exceeds 27.0%.

  19. Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of a Wind Turbine Blade in Flapwise Direction and Examining the Effect of Crack Propagation on the Blade Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khudairi, Othman; Hadavinia, Homayoun; Little, Christian; Gillmore, Gavin; Greaves, Peter; Dyer, Kirsten

    2017-10-03

    In this paper, the sensitivity of the structural integrity of wind turbine blades to debonding of the shear web from the spar cap was investigated. In this regard, modal analysis, static and fatigue testing were performed on a 45.7 m blade for three states of the blade: (i) as received blade (ii) when a crack of 200 mm was introduced between the web and the spar cap and (iii) when the crack was extended to 1000 mm. Calibration pull-tests for all three states of the blade were performed to obtain the strain-bending moment relationship of the blade according to the estimated target bending moment (BM) which the blade is expected to experience in its service life. The resultant data was used to apply appropriate load in the fatigue tests. The blade natural frequencies in flapwise and edgewise directions over a range of frequency domain were found by modal testing for all three states of the blade. The blade first natural frequency for each state was used for the flapwise fatigue tests. These were performed in accordance with technical specification IEC TS 61400-23. The fatigue results showed that, for a 200 mm crack between the web and spar cap at 9 m from the blade root, the crack did not propagate at 50% of the target BM up to 62,110 cycles. However, when the load was increased to 70% of target BM, some damages were detected on the pressure side of the blade. When the 200 mm crack was extended to 1000 mm, the crack began to propagate when the applied load exceeded 100% of target BM and the blade experienced delaminations, adhesive joint failure, compression failure and sandwich core failure.

  20. Understanding the corrosion phenomena to organize the nondestructive evaluation programs in the nuclear power plants; Connaitre les phenomenes de corrosion pour organiser les programmes d'end dans les centrales nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, J.Ph. [Federation Europeenne de Corrosion, 75 - Paris (France); Samman, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. du Production Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    The french nuclear power plants used PWR which components revealed many corrosion defects of different shapes as stress corrosion cracks or pits. Understanding the corrosion processes will help the inspection of in service power plants. The following examples describe some corrosion cases and present the corresponding developed control methods: corrosion on condenser, secondary circuit pipes and corrosion-erosion, steam generator pipes, vessels head penetration. (A.L.B.)

  1. Assessing Level and Effectiveness of Corrosion Education in the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwee Ling Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of corrosion can be minimized by an engineering workforce well trained in corrosion fundamentals and management. Since the United Arab Emirates incurs the second highest cost of corrosion after Saudi Arabia, this paper examined the quality of corrosion education in the UAE. Surveys with academia and industry respondents showed that dedicated corrosion courses and engineering courses that integrated corrosion into the curricula were available in UAE universities, but graduates had insufficient knowledge of corrosion engineering and superficial understanding of corrosion in real-life design contexts. The effectiveness of corrosion education is determined by both competence in corrosion knowledge/skills and availability of resources (faculty and research. Though most departments would not hire new corrosion-specialist faculty, department research efforts and industry partnerships in corrosion research were present. The paper concluded with recommendations for improving knowledge and skills of future engineers in corrosion and enhancing corrosion instruction to better meet industry needs.

  2. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) ( 301 ) 342-8069 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2012/206 ii...observations. In his study on SCC of AISI 304 stainless steel, Roychowdhury[3] detected no apparent SCC in solutions containing 1 ppm thiosulfate and...gradual SCC with increasing thiosulfate concentration. Trabanelli[15] found no evidence of SCC of AISI 304 stainless steel in 10-5 M NaF solution but

  3. Electrochemical Noise Analysis During Stress Corrosion cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    4.6ElectrochemicalNoiseAnalysisDuringStressCorrosionCrackingLiuXinghua;ChengWenhua;DuChengrui;ZhangWeiguoMuchattentionhasbeen...

  4. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hicks, K. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  5. Experimental methods for consideration of concrete cracking in service life design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    .e., concrete with cracks at start of service) and to more accurately estimate time-to-cracking due to reinforcement corrosion based on experimental measurements. This paper presents two non-destructive measurement techniques with potential to quantify the impact concrete cracks have on service life...

  6. Assessment of cracks in reinforced concrete by means of electrical resistance and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Šavija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Polder, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    The durability of cracked reinforced concrete is a serious concern in the construction industry. Cracks represent fast routes for chloride penetration, which can result in reinforcement corrosion. Bending or tapered cracks have the characteristic of being wider at the surface and becoming narrower t

  7. Hydrogen cracking and stress corrosion of pipeline steels. Contribution of the cracking mechanisms study to the understanding of the in-service damage and to the definition of a ranking test; Fissuration assistee par l'hydrogene et corrosion sous contrainte des aciers de pipelines. Apports de l'etude des mecanismes de fissuration a la comprehension de l'endommagement de service et a la definition d'un test de classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Friant, D.

    2000-12-19

    This work is based on the study of the cracking of a French oil transmission pipeline protected by a cathodic protection system. The objective is to identify field parameters, which contribute to the cracks propagation, and to assess changes in the operating conditions, which could lead to a mitigation of the phenomenon. We have focused on the study of the micro-mechanisms by means of slow strain rate tests. Then, cyclic loading tests were carried out to investigate cracks propagation mechanisms. Smooth and pre-notched specimens were tested at free and cathodic potential. Hydrogen is responsible for crack advance through changes in the local steels properties. Such effects take place when two phenomenons occur: favourable conditions for hydrogen entry and, a localisation of hydrogen and its effects. In particular, we have shown the essential role of a dynamic loading in promoting hydrogen entry into the steel (especially at the very crack tip). At cathodic potential, hydrogen-related effects are exacerbated by the presence of MnS inclusions which leads to the initiation of internal cracks (HIC) and to a SOHIC-like crack morphology. At free potential, the lesser amount of available hydrogen give localisation-related effects a greater importance. Cracking is then related to a hydrogen-induced SCC mechanism. Three parameters are involved in the field cracking: operating pressure variations, period of over-protection and a sensitive steels microstructure (MnS). Cathodic protection appears to be the most efficient field parameter to mitigate the phenomenon: it requires a better control of the polarisation level. Finally, a ranking test is outlined from the study of the cracking mechanisms. (author)

  8. The corrosion protection of aluminum by various anodizing treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion protection to 6061-T6 aluminum, afforded by both teflon-impregnated anodized coats (Polylube and Tufram) and hard-anodized coats (water sealed and dichromate sealed), was studied at both pH 5.5 and pH 9.5, with an exposure period of 28 days in 3.5 percent NaCl solution (25 C) for each specimen. In general, corrosion protection for all specimens was better at pH 9.5 than at pH 5.5. Protection by a Tufram coat proved superior to that afforded by Polylube at each pH, with corrosion protection by the hard-anodized, water-sealed coat at pH 9.5 providing the best protection. Electrochemical work in each case was corroborated by microscopic examination of the coats after exposure. Corrosion protection by Tufram at pH 9.5 was most comparable to that of the hard-anodized samples, although pitting and some cracking of the coat did occur.

  9. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  10. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  11. Characterization of the Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 Regarding its Lifetime Performance as a Potential Nuclear Waste Container Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; McCright, D

    2002-06-04

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) was proposed for the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container for nuclear waste at the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada (USA). A testing program is underway to characterize and quantify three main modes of corrosion that may occur at the site. Current results show that the containers would perform well under general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). For example, the general corrosion rate is expected to be below 100 nm/year and the container is predicted to be outside the range of potential for localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  12. Corrosion studies in brines of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.P.; McCawley, F.X.; Cramer, S.D.; Needham, P.B. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Toward the goal of maximizing minerals and metals recovery from domestic resources, the Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, has conducted in situ corrosion studies at the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) in the Imperial Valley, Calif., to evaluate and characterize materials of construction for geothermal resources recovery plants. General-, pitting, and crevice-corrosion characteristics of 13 commercially available alloys were investigated for periods of 15 and 30 days in seven process environments expected to be found in typical geothermal resources plants. Stainless steel alloy 29-4, Inconel 625, and the Hastelloys G, S, and C-276 were the most resistant to general corrosion, did not pit, and exhibited little susceptibility to crevice corrosion. Stainless steel alloys 430, E-Brite 26-1, and 6X had low general corrosion rates, but pitted and were susceptible to crevice corrosion. Stainless steel alloy 316 L had a low corrosion rate, but corroded intergranularly, pitted, and was susceptible to crevice corrosion and to stress-corrosion cracking. Titanium--1.5 nickel and TiCode-12 had low corrosion rates, did not pit, and were not susceptible to crevice corrosion. Carbon and 4130 steels had high corrosion rates, pitted, and had high susceptibilities to crevice corrosion. The major scale-forming mineral on the corrosion samples in most of the process environments studied was galena mixed with lesser amounts of other minerals.

  13. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  14. Corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  15. Effect of inhibitors and coatings on rebar corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saricimen, H.; Ashiru, O.A.; Jarrah, N.R.; Quddus, A.; Shameem, M. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Research Inst.

    1997-12-01

    Chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel is a major cause of deterioration of concrete structures in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Two of the practical ways of preventing or retarding corrosion of reinforcing steel bars in concrete are by using (a) inhibitor in concrete mix, and (b) coating either on the rebars or on external surfaces of concrete structures. The objective of this study has been to evaluate the effect of two inhibitors, three concrete coatings, and two barrier coatings on corrosion of reinforcing steel bars. Reinforced concrete specimens were monitored by AC and DC electrochemical techniques while undergoing free and accelerated corrosion. Accelerated corrosion tests were performed under 4V impressed anodic potential. Corrosion of the steel bars were evaluated by measuring anodic current, time-to-cracking of concrete specimens, and corrosion rates of the steel bars. The results showed that the specimens with the concrete surface coatings did not perform better than the control specimens. Time-to-cracking was shorter and corrosion rate of steel bars was higher in specimens coated with concrete coatings. The inhibitors and rebar surface coatings reduced the corrosion rate of steel bars significantly and improved the time-to-cracking of the specimens in comparison to control specimens.

  16. Crack branching in carbon steel. Fracture mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syromyatnikova, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Levin, A. I.; Lyglaev, A. V.

    2010-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of pressure vessels made of carbon steel that form during crack branching propagation are examined by fractography. Crack branching is found to occur at a crack velocity higher than a certain critical value V > V c . In this case, the material volume that is involved in fracture and depends on the elastoplastic properties of the material and the sample width has no time to dissipate the energy released upon crack motion via the damage mechanisms intrinsic in the material under given deformation conditions (in our case, via cracking according to intragranular cleavage).

  17. White-Etching Matter in Bearing Steel. Part I: Controlled Cracking of 52100 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Alvarez, W.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Although most of the research performed in bearing steel metallurgy aims to prevent crack nucleation and propagation, some applications require the exact opposite in order to study the role that disconnected surfaces inside the bulk material play when load is applied, or when fluids entrapped in surface cracks propagate tensile stresses or exacerbate corrosion. Four heat treatments have been designed to create controlled arrays of crack types and distributions in quenched and untempered steel normally used in the manufacture of bearings. The varieties of cracks studied include sparsely distributed martensite-plate cracks, fine-grain-boundary cracks, abundant martensite-plate cracks, and surface cracks. The intention was to create samples which can then be subjected to appropriate mechanical testing so that phenomena such as the appearance of "white-etching areas" or "white-etching cracks," crack-lubricant interactions, or hydrogen trapping can be studied further.

  18. Corrosion behavior of corrosion resistant alloys in stimulation acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheldi, Tiziana [ENI E and P Division, 20097 San Donato Milanese Milano (Italy); Piccolo, Eugenio Lo; Scoppio, Lucrezia [Centro Sviluppo Materiali, via Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    In the oil and gas industry, selection of CRAs for downhole tubulars is generally based on resistance to corrosive species in the production environment containing CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, chloride and in some case elemental sulphur. However, there are non-production environments to which these materials must also be resistant for either short term or prolonged duration; these environments include stimulation acids, brine and completion fluids. This paper reports the main results of a laboratory study performed to evaluate the corrosion and stress corrosion behaviour to the acidizing treatments of the most used CRAs for production tubing and casing. Laboratory tests were performed to simulate both 'active' and 'spent' acids operative phases, selecting various environmental conditions. The selected steel pipes were a low alloyed steel, martensitic, super-martensitic, duplex 22 Cr, superduplex 25 Cr and super-austenitic stainless steels (25 Cr 35 Ni). Results obtained in the 'active' acid environments over the temperature range of 100-140 deg. C, showed that the blend acids with HCl at high concentration and HCl + HF represented too much severe conditions, where preventing high general corrosion and heavy localised corrosion by inhibition package becomes very difficult, especially for duplex steel pipe, where, in some case, the specimens were completely dissolved into the solution. On the contrary, all steels pipes were successfully protected by inhibitor when organic acid solution (HCOOH + CH{sub 3}COOH) were used. Furthermore, different effectiveness on corrosion protection was showed by the tested inhibitors packages: e.g. in the 90% HCl at 12% + 10 CH{sub 3}COOH acid blend. In 'spent' acid environments, all steel pipes showed to be less susceptible to the localised and general corrosion attack. Moreover, no Sulphide Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) was observed. Only one super-austenitic stainless steel U-bend specimen showed

  19. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felice, Maria V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR, United Kingdom and Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol BS34 7QE (United Kingdom); Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K. [Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol BS34 7QE (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  20. Round robin analysis on stress intensity factor of inner surface cracks in welded stainless steel pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chang Gi; Chang, Yoon Suk [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Maan Won [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs) are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs) were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  1. Round Robin Analyses on Stress Intensity Factors of Inner Surface Cracks in Welded Stainless Steel Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Gi Han

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  2. High-resolution imaging of complex crack chemistry in reactor steels by NanoSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano-Perez, S. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Sergio.lozano-perez@materials.ox.ac.uk; Kilburn, M.R. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley 6009 WA (Australia); Yamada, T.; Terachi, T. [Institute of Nuclear Safety Systems Inc, 64 Sata, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); English, C.A. [Nexia Solutions, Harwell Business Centre, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RA (United Kingdom); Grovenor, C.R.M. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-29

    High-resolution analysis using a Cameca NanoSIMS 50 has been used to map the oxide chemistry in intergranular cracks in stainless steels. The technique has proven ideal for this type of sample, as it is able to discern between the different oxide layers and clarify the role of minor segregants such as boron and sulphur. Results are compared with analysis of the same sample by scanning auger microscopy and its interpretation discussed. The short time required to prepare and examine multiple regions present the NanoSIMS as an optimum tool for corrosion characterization.

  3. The role of iron in sulfide induced corrosion of sewer concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangming; Wightman, Elaine; Donose, Bogdan C; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L; Keller, Jurg

    2014-02-01

    The sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete sewer is a widespread and expensive problem for water utilities worldwide. Fundamental knowledge of the initiation and propagation of sewer corrosion, especially the interactions between chemical reactions and physical structure changes, is still largely unknown. Advanced mineral analytical techniques were applied to identify the distribution of corrosion products and the micro-cracking that developed along the corrosion boundary. It was found that sewer concrete corrosion caused by reactions with sulfuric acid progressed uniformly in the cement of concrete. In contrast to conventional knowledge, iron rust rather than gypsum and ettringite was likely the factor responsible for cracking ahead of the corrosion front. The analysis also allowed quantitative determination of the major corrosion products, i.e., gypsum and ettringite, with the latter found closer to the corrosion front. The conceptual model based on these findings clearly demonstrated the complex interactions among different chemical reactions, diffusion, and micro-structure changes.

  4. Corrosion and Maintenance Data Sharing (Partage des Donnees de Corrosion et de Maintenance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    contamination and the effects of high relative humidity by means of a barrier material. This is the case for Nitrogen Purging Packaging (NPP) System...Effect of Environmental Species and Metallurgical Structure on the Hydrogen Entry into Steel” – Stress Corrosion Cracking and Hydrogen Embrittlement of...destructive testing can be useful in detecting surface cracks and discontinuities in a failed component. Magnetic-particle inspection, liquid -penetrant

  5. Monitoring corrosion in reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Many defects can cause deterioration and cracks in concrete; these are results of poor concrete mix, poor workmanship, inadequate design, shrinkage, chemical and environmental attack, physical or mechanical damage, and corrosion of reinforcing steel (RS). We want to develop a suite of sensors and systems that can detect that corrosion is taking place in RS and inform owners how serious the problem is. By understanding the stages of the corrosion process, we can develop special a sensor that detects each transition. First, moisture ingress can be monitored by a fiber optics humidity sensor, then ingress of Chloride, which acts as a catalyst and accelerates the corrosion process by converting iron into ferrous compounds. We need a fiber optics sensor which can quantify Chloride ingress over time. Converting ferric to ferrous causes large volume expansion and cracks. Such pressure build-up can be detected by a fiber optic pressure sensor. Finally, cracks emit acoustic waves, which can be detected by a high frequency sensor made with phase-shifted gratings. This paper will discuss the progress in our development of these special sensors and also our plan for a field test by the end of 2014. We recommend that we deploy these sensors by visually inspecting the affected area and by identifying locations of corrosion; then, work with the designers to identify spots that would compromise the integrity of the structure; finally, drill a small hole in the concrete and insert these sensors. Interrogation can be done at fixed intervals with a portable unit.

  6. Accelerated corrosion testing, evaluation and durability design of bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Pereira, Ruben Mario

    2003-06-01

    In the last few years, the effectiveness of cement grout in galvanized or polyethylene ducts, the most widely used corrosion protection system for multistrand bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons, has been under debate, due to significant tendon corrosion damage, several reported failures of individual tendons as well as a few collapses of non-typical structures. While experience in the USA has been generally good, some foreign experience has been less than satisfactory. This dissertation is part of a comprehensive research program started in 1993, which has the objectives to examine the use of post-tensioning in bridge substructures, identify durability concerns and existing technology, develop and carry out an experimental testing program, and conclude with durability design guidelines. Three experimental programs were developed: A long term macrocell corrosion test series, to investigate corrosion protection for internal tendons in precast segmental construction; a long term beam corrosion test series, to examine the effects of post-tensioning on corrosion protection as affected by crack width; and, a long term column corrosion test series, to examine corrosion protection in vertical elements. Preliminary design guidelines were developed previously in the overall study by the initial researchers, after an extensive literature review. This dissertation scope includes continuation of exposure testing of the macrocell, beam and column specimens, performing comprehensive autopsies of selected specimens and updating the durability design guidelines based on the exposure testing and autopsy results. After autopsies were performed, overall findings indicate negative durability effects due to the use of mixed reinforcement, small concrete covers, galvanized steel ducts, and industry standard or heat-shrink galvanized duct splices. The width of cracks was shown to have a direct negative effect on specimen performance. Grout voids were found to be detrimental to the

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Porous Layer-enhanced Dislocation Emission and Crack Propagation in Iron Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Li; F.Y. Meng; X.Q. Ma; L.J. Qiao; W.Y. Chu

    2011-01-01

    The internal stress induced by a porous layer or passive layer can assist the applied stress to promote dislocation emission and crack propagation, e.9. when the pipeline steel is buried in the soil containing water, resulting in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed to study the process of dislocation emission and crack propagation in a slab of Fe crystal with and without a porous layer on the surface of the crack. The results show that when there is a porous layer on the surface of the crack, the tensile stress induced by the porous layer can superimpose on the external applied stress and then assist the applied stress to initiate crack tip dislocation emission under lowered stress intensity KI, or stress. To respond to the corrosion accelerated dislocation emission and motion, the crack begins to propagate under lowered stress intensity KI, resulting in SCC.

  8. Alternating grain orientation and weld solidification cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, S.; Le, Y.

    1985-10-01

    A new mechanism for reducing weld solidification cracking was proposed, based on the concept of the crack path and resistance to crack propagation, and its effectiveness was verified in magnetically oscillated GTA welds of a rather crack susceptible material 2014 aluminum alloy. This mechanism, i.e., alternating grain orientation, was most pronounced in welds made with transverse arc oscillation of low frequency and high amplitude, and solidification cracking was dramatically reduced in these welds. The effect of the arc oscillation pattern, amplitude, and frequency on the formation of alternating columnar grains and the reduction of solidification cracking in GTA welds of 2014 aluminum alloy was examined and explained. The present study demonstrated for the first time that columnar grains can, in fact, be very effective in reducing solidification cracking, provided that they are oriented favorably.

  9. Comparison of microstructure and corrosion properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys 7150 and 7010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-chang; FAN Xi-gang; REN Shi-yu; ZHANG Xin-mei; ZHANG Bao-you

    2006-01-01

    The influence of coarse Cu-bearing particles, matrix and subgrain boundary precipitates on the stress corrosion susceptibility of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys was investigated. The strength of 7150 alloy is about 15 MPa higher than that of 7010 alloy.The 7010 alloy exhibits higher resistance to stress corrosion cracking as compared with the 7150 alloy. The coarse Cu-bearing particles are detrimental to the resistance to stress corrosion cracking. The increase of size of matrix and subgrain boundary precipitates decreases the susceptibility of stress corrosion. The anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement govern the cracking process. The severity of stress corrosion cracking is shown to be related to the coarse Cu-bearing particles, matrix and subgrain precipitates in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys.

  10. Subcritical crack growth in a chemically reactive environment-implications for caprock integrity for CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Z.; Eichhubl, P.; Callahan, O. A.; Major, J. R.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    Seal integrity of cap-rock is a critical constraint on the long term performance of CO2 containment site. During fluid migration, the coupled geochemical reaction of minerals and geomechanical deformation of rock matrix may affect the seal integrity. The potential leakage of injected CO2 from cap-rock through preexisting fractures/faults represents a major concern associated with geological storage of CO2. To address the fundamental question of CO2 leakage through subcritical growth of fractures driven by chemically reactive fluid across caprocks, we build a Dugdale cohesive model. Ahead of the physical crack tip, a narrow band of cohesive zone is assumed to exist with the upper and lower cohesive surfaces held by the cohesive traction. In the vicinity of the crack tip, minerals dissolve due to the acidic environment and migrate from the physical crack tip into the cohesive zone causing damage of rock matrix in the form of a reduction of cohesive traction.Focusing on the dissolution of calcite and following the stress corrosion theory, we assume the degradation of cohesive traction is linearly proportional to the concentration of Ca2+whose evolution follows the reactive diffusion equation. Using a critical crack opening displacement criterion, the subcritical propagation behavior of crack due to stress corrosion is captured and the rate-limiting effects including the chemical reactions to produce the Ca2+ and the transport of minerals along the newly generated fracture cohesive zone are incorporated. Subcritical crack growth rate under different chemical environment conditions is examined and compared with the experimental fracture mechanics testing.

  11. Hydroxyapatite/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) double coating on magnesium for enhanced corrosion resistance and coating flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ji-Hoon; Li, Yuanlong; Kim, Sae-Mi; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite was deposited on pure magnesium (Mg) with a flexible poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer to reduce the corrosion rate of Mg and enhance coating flexibility. The poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer was uniformly coated on Mg by a spraying method, followed by hydroxyapatite deposition on the poly(ε-caprolactone) using an aerosol deposition method. In scanning electron microscopy observations, inorganic/organic composite-like structure was observed between the hydroxyapatite and poly(ε-caprolactone) layers, resulting from the collisions of hydroxyapatite particles into the poly(ε-caprolactone) matrix at the initial stage of the aerosol deposition. The corrosion resistance of the coated Mg was examined using potentiodynamic polarization tests. The hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating remarkably improved the corrosion resistance of Mg in Hank's solution. In the in vitro cell tests, the coated Mg showed better cell adhesion compared with the bare Mg due to the reduced corrosion rate and enhanced biocompatibility. The stability and flexibility of hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy inspections after the coated Mg was deformed. The hydroxyapatite coating on the poly(ε-caprolactone) interlayer revealed enhanced coating stability and flexibility without cracking or delamination during bending and stretching compared with the hydroxyapatite single coating. These results demonstrated that the hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) double coating significantly improved the surface corrosion resistance of Mg and enhanced coating flexibility for use of Mg as a biodegradable implant.

  12. Propagation of steel corrosion in concrete: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Otieno, M.; Stang, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program included....... The numerical model was, furthermore, used to identify electrochemical parameters, which are independent of concrete cover thickness and crack width and at the same time allow for determination of the corrosion current density and corrosion potential of concrete structures within an acceptable error.Very good...... comparisons between the experimentally measured and numerically simulated corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials were found for the various RC specimens. Anodic and cathodic Tafel constant between 0.01 and 0.369 V/dec and 0.01 and 0.233 V/dec, respectively, were found in the present study...

  13. Advanced modelling of concrete deterioration due to reinforcement corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isgor, O.B. [Carleton Univ., Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Razaqpur, A.G. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-06-15

    A comprehensive model is presented for predicting the rate of steel corrosion in concrete structures and the consequent formation and propagation of cracks around the steel reinforcement. The corrosion model considers both the initiation and the propagation stages of corrosion. Processes commencing in the initiation stage, such as the transport of chloride ions and oxygen within the concrete and variation in temperature and moisture, are assumed to continue in the propagation stage while active corrosion is occurring contemporaneously. This allows the model to include the effects of changes in exposure conditions on the corrosion rate and the effects of the corrosion reactions on the transport properties of concrete. The corrosion rates are calculated by applying the finite-element solution of the Laplace equation for electrochemical potential, with appropriate boundary conditions. Because these boundary conditions are nonlinear, a nonlinear solution algorithm is used. The results of the analysis are compared with available test data, and the comparison is found to be satisfactory. (author)

  14. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  15. Innovative Approach to Establish Root Causes for Cracking in Aggressive Reactor Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.; Vetrano, John S.; Simonen, Edward P.

    2003-10-31

    The research focuses on the high-resolution characterization of degradation microstructures and microchemistries in specimens tested under controlled conditions for the environment and for the material where in-service complexities can be minimized. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of crack-tip processes is employed to analyze corrosion-induced structures and gain insights into degradation mechanisms. Novel mechanistic ''fingerprinting'' of crack-tip structures is used to isolate causes of environmental cracking in tandem with quantitative measurements of crack growth. Sample preparation methods and advanced analytical techniques are used to characterize corrosion/oxidation reactions and crack-tip structures at near atomic dimensions in order to gain insight into fundamental environmental cracking mechanisms. Reactions at buried interfaces, not accessible by conventional approaches, are being systematically interrogated. Crack-growth experiments in high-temperature water environments are evaluating and isolating the effects of material condition (matrix strength, grain boundary composition and precipitation) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The fundamental understanding of crack advance mechanisms will establish the basis to design new corrosion-resistant alloys for current light-water reactors and advanced reactor systems.

  16. Technical Letter Report - Analysis of Ultrasonic Data on Piping Cracks at Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant Before and After Applying a Mechanical Stress Improvement Process, JCN-N6319, Task 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2008-02-26

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in piping systems previously analyzed for leak-before-break (LBB). Part of this work involves determining whether inspections alone are sufficient or if inspections plus mitigation techniques are needed. The work described in this report addresses the reliability of ultrasonic phased-array (PA) examinations for inspection of cracks that have been subjected to the mitigation method of mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). It is believed that stresses imparted during MSIP may make ultrasonic crack responses in piping welds more difficult to detect and accurately characterize. To explore this issue, data were acquired, both before and after applying MSIP, and analyzed from cracked areas in piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. This work was performed under NRC Project JCN-N6319, PWSCC in Leak-Before-Break Systems.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  18. Theoretical Analysis of Reinforcement Tunnel Lining Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhiQiang Zhangand

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of ageing damage in reinforced concrete structures is reinforcement corrosion. Damage can be detected visually as coincident cracks along the reinforcement bar, which are significant of both reduction of the re-bar, cross-section and loss of bond strength for reinfor