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Sample records for correlations 31ar deduced

  1. Multi-particle Emission from $^{31}$Ar at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Marroquin, I; Ciemny, A A; de Witte, H; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Garzón-Camacho, A; Howard, A; Johansson, H; Jonson, B; Kirsebom, O S; Koldste, G T; Lica, R; Lund, M V; Madurga, M; Mazzocchi, C; Mihai, C; Munch, M; Nae, S A; Nacher, E; Negret, A; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Refsgaard, J; Riisager, K; Rapisarda, E; Sotty, C; Stanoiu, M; Tengblad, O; Turturica, A E; Vedia, M V

    2016-01-01

    A multi-particle decay experiment was successfully performed at the ISOLDE Decay Station. In this new permanent station, devoted to\\break $\\beta$-decay studies, the novel MAGISOL Si-Plugin Chamber was installed to study the exotic decay modes of the proton drip-line nucleus ${^{31}}$Ar. The motivation was to search for $\\beta3p$ and $\\beta3p\\gamma$ channels, as well as to provide information on resonances in ${^{30}}$S and ${^{29}}$P relevant for the astrophysical\\break rp-process. Description of the experimental set-up and preliminary results are presented.

  2. Spectroscopy of light neutron deficient nuclei: 31Ar and 27S decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrel, V.

    1991-01-01

    Light neutron-deficient nuclei exhibit several interesting decay modes. In some cases, beta-delayed alpha emission becomes possible, and beta-delayed three-proton emission can be allowed. The energy spectra of the emitted protons should give informations on the position of the isobaric analog state and on its deexcitation modes. Experimental results obtained at GANIL with the LISE spectrometer on the decay of the isotopes 31 Ar and 27 S are presented. These data are discussed and compared with the predicted isobaric analog state excitation energies and with shell-model calculations. (G.P.) 13 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Studies of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission : The cases of $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca

    CERN Multimedia

    Riisager, K; Jokinen, A; Canchel, G; Heinz, A M; Jonson, B N G; Dominguez reyes, R R; Koldste, G T; Fraile prieto, L M; Nilsson, T; Audirac, L L

    2008-01-01

    We propose to perform detailed studies of the decays of the two dripline nuclei $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca. This will allow an in-depth study in the process of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission ($\\beta$2p); as well as provide important information on resonances in $^{30}$S and $^{34}$Ar relevant for the astrophysical rp-process.

  4. $\\beta$3$p$-spectroscopy and proton-$\\gamma$ width determination in the decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to perform a detailed study of the $\\beta$-decay of the dripline nucleus $^{31}$Ar. This will allow a detailed study of the $\\beta$-delayed 3$p$-decay as well as provide important information on the resonances of $^{30}$S and $^{29}$P, in particular the ratio between the $p$- and $\\gamma$- partial widths relevant for astrophysics.

  5. Search for β-2He, β-pα and β-3p decay modes in the proton-rich nucleus 31Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, D.; Dufour, J.P.; Fleury, A.

    1991-01-01

    The allowed decay modes of 31 Ar from the isobaric analog state of 31 Cl are investigated by means of a new silicon detector telescope. The data recorded by this detector are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations, and lead to the observation of β-delayed 2-proton emission with no indication of a β- 2 He process, and to strong evidences of β-delayed 3-proton radioactivity observed here for the first time. None of the others possible decay modes (β-p, β-α and β-pα) is observed. (G.P.) 7 refs.; 10 figs

  6. Deducing magnetic resonance neuroimages based on knowledge from samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuwei; Liu, Feng; Fan, Mingxia; Li, Xuzhou; Zhao, Zhiyong; Zeng, Zhaoling; Wang, Yi; Xu, Dongrong

    2017-12-01

    Because individual variance always exists, using the same set of predetermined parameters for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not be exactly suitable for each participant. We propose a knowledge-based method that can repair MRI data of undesired contrast as if a new scan were acquired using imaging parameters that had been individually optimized. The method employed a strategy called analogical reasoning to deduce voxel-wise relaxation properties using morphological and biological similarity. The proposed framework involves steps of intensity normalization, tissue segmentation, relaxation time deducing, and image deducing. This approach has been preliminarily validated using conventional MRI data at 3T from several examples, including 5 normal and 9 clinical datasets. It can effectively improve the contrast of real MRI data by deducing imaging data using optimized imaging parameters based on deduced relaxation properties. The statistics of deduced images shows a high correlation with real data that were actually collected using the same set of imaging parameters. The proposed method of deducing MRI data using knowledge of relaxation times alternatively provides a way of repairing MRI data of less optimal contrast. The method is also capable of optimizing an MRI protocol for individual participants, thereby realizing personalized MR imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Atmospheric response to Saharan dust deduced from ECMWF reanalysis increments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishcha, P.; Alpert, P.; Barkan, J.; Kirchner, I.; Machenhauer, B.

    2003-04-01

    This study focuses on the atmospheric temperature response to dust deduced from a new source of data - the European Reanalysis (ERA) increments. These increments are the systematic errors of global climate models, generated in reanalysis procedure. The model errors result not only from the lack of desert dust but also from a complex combination of many kinds of model errors. Over the Sahara desert the dust radiative effect is believed to be a predominant model defect which should significantly affect the increments. This dust effect was examined by considering correlation between the increments and remotely-sensed dust. Comparisons were made between April temporal variations of the ERA analysis increments and the variations of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer aerosol index (AI) between 1979 and 1993. The distinctive structure was identified in the distribution of correlation composed of three nested areas with high positive correlation (> 0.5), low correlation, and high negative correlation (Forecast(ECMWF) suggests that the PCA (NCA) corresponds mainly to anticyclonic (cyclonic) flow, negative (positive) vorticity, and downward (upward) airflow. These facts indicate an interaction between dust-forced heating /cooling and atmospheric circulation. The April correlation results are supported by the analysis of vertical distribution of dust concentration, derived from the 24-hour dust prediction system at Tel Aviv University (website: http://earth.nasa.proj.ac.il/dust/current/). For other months the analysis is more complicated because of the essential increasing of humidity along with the northward progress of the ITCZ and the significant impact on the increments.

  8. Temporal variability of TEC deduced from groundbased measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosert, M.; Ezquer, R.G.; Jadur, C.; Radicella, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the behaviour of the integrated total electron content (ITEC) deduced from electron density profiles of two Argentine stations: Tucuman (26.9 S; 294.6 E) and San Juan (31.5 S; 290.4 E). The ITEC values have been obtained by the technique proposed by Reinisch and Huang (2000). The database includes electron density profiles derived from ionograms recorded at 4 typical hours of the day (00.00, 06.00, 12.00 and 18.00 LT) during different seasonal and solar activity conditions. An analysis of the day to day variability of ITEC has also been done. (author)

  9. Deducing Energy Consumer Behavior from Smart Meter Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebeid, Emad Samuel Malki; Heick, Rune; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg

    2017-01-01

    The ongoing upgrade of electricity meters to smart ones has opened a new market of intelligent services to analyze the recorded meter data. This paper introduces an open architecture and a unified framework for deducing user behavior from its smart main electricity meter data and presenting...... the results in a natural language. The framework allows a fast exploration and integration of a variety of machine learning algorithms combined with data recovery mechanisms for improving the recognition’s accuracy. Consequently, the framework generates natural language reports of the user’s behavior from...

  10. Systematics of criticality data of special actinide nuclides deduced through the Trombay criticality formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.; SubbaRao, K.; Garg, S.B.; Acharya, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a number of interesting systematics and correlations deduced by analyzing the criticality data of special actinide nuclides using concepts embodied in the Trombay critically formula (TCF). The κ ∞ of fast metal actinide nuclides gives a remarkable linear correlation with the fissility parameter Z 2 /A. The neutron leakage probability of all fast metal cores characterized using a constant parameter σ std enables computation of the critical mass value of any unknown fissile nuclide knowing only its Z 2 /A value. Since the neutron leakage probability from dilute fissile solutions is primarily governed by the scattering/slowing down properties of the hydrogen present in water, critical masses and subcritical limits can be predicted for any water-reflected system at any specified hydrogen-to-actinide atomic ratio knowing only the κ ∞ value of the given fissile solution

  11. Atmospheric response to Saharan dust deduced from ECMWF reanalysis (ERA) temperature increments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishcha, P.; Alpert, P.; Barkan, J.; Kirchner, I.; Machenhauer, B.

    2003-09-01

    This study focuses on the atmospheric temperature response to dust deduced from a new source of data the European Reanalysis (ERA) increments. These increments are the systematic errors of global climate models, generated in the reanalysis procedure. The model errors result not only from the lack of desert dust but also from a complex combination of many kinds of model errors. Over the Sahara desert the lack of dust radiative effect is believed to be a predominant model defect which should significantly affect the increments. This dust effect was examined by considering correlation between the increments and remotely sensed dust. Comparisons were made between April temporal variations of the ERA analysis increments and the variations of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer aerosol index (AI) between 1979 and 1993. The distinctive structure was identified in the distribution of correlation composed of three nested areas with high positive correlation (>0.5), low correlation and high negative correlation (Forecast (ECMWF) suggest that the PCA (NCA) corresponds mainly to anticyclonic (cyclonic) flow, negative (positive) vorticity and downward (upward) airflow. These findings are associated with the interaction between dust-forced heating/cooling and atmospheric circulation. This paper contributes to a better understanding of dust radiative processes missed in the model.

  12. Physics-based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-07

    knowledge and capabilities in the use and development of inverse problem techniques to deduce atmospheric parameters. WORK COMPLETED The research completed...please find the Final Technical Report with SF 298 for Dr. Erin E. Hackett’s ONR grant entitled Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine...From- To) 07/03/2017 Final Technica l Dec 2012- Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine

  13. Deducing Electronic Unit Internal Response During a Vibration Test Using a Lumped Parameter Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    During random vibration testing of electronic boxes there is often a desire to know the dynamic response of certain internal printed wiring boards (PWBs) for the purpose of monitoring the response of sensitive hardware or for post-test forensic analysis in support of anomaly investigation. Due to restrictions on internally mounted accelerometers for most flight hardware there is usually no means to empirically observe the internal dynamics of the unit, so one must resort to crude and highly uncertain approximations. One common practice is to apply Miles Equation, which does not account for the coupled response of the board in the chassis, resulting in significant over- or under-prediction. This paper explores the application of simple multiple-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter modeling to predict the coupled random vibration response of the PWBs in their fundamental modes of vibration. A simple tool using this approach could be used during or following a random vibration test to interpret vibration test data from a single external chassis measurement to deduce internal board dynamics by means of a rapid correlation analysis. Such a tool might also be useful in early design stages as a supplemental analysis to a more detailed finite element analysis to quickly prototype and analyze the dynamics of various design iterations. After developing the theoretical basis, a lumped parameter modeling approach is applied to an electronic unit for which both external and internal test vibration response measurements are available for direct comparison. Reasonable correlation of the results demonstrates the potential viability of such an approach. Further development of the preliminary approach presented in this paper will involve correlation with detailed finite element models and additional relevant test data.

  14. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the LewisX antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poveda, Ana; Asensio, Juan Luis; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus

    1997-01-01

    1 H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-α-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-β-galactopyranosyl-(1 → 4)[3-O-α-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, 13 C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The 1 H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The 13 C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the 1 H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS 2 . Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data

  15. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the Lewis{sup X} antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poveda, Ana [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion (Spain); Asensio, Juan Luis; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Instituto de Quimica Organica, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain)

    1997-07-15

    {sup 1}H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-{alpha}-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-(1{sup {yields}}4)[3-O-{alpha}-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, {sup 13}C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The {sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The{sup 13}C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the{sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS{sup 2}. Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Deducing T, C, and P invariance for strong interactions in topological particle theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown here how the separate discrete invariances [time reversal (T), charge conjugation (C), and parity (P)] in strong interactions can be deduced as consequences of other S-matrix requirements in topological particle theory

  17. Isolated ionospheric disturbances as deduced from global GPS network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Afraimovich

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate an unusual class of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances of the nonwave type, isolated ionospheric disturbances (IIDs that manifest themselves in total electron content (TEC variations in the form of single aperiodic negative TEC disturbances of a duration of about 10min (the total electron content spikes, TECS. The data were obtained using the technology of global detection of ionospheric disturbances using measurements of TEC variations from a global network of receivers of the GPS. For the first time, we present the TECS morphology for 170 days in 1998–2001. The total number of TEC series, with a duration of each series of about 2.3h (2h18m, exceeded 850000. It was found that TECS are observed in no more than 1–2% of the total number of TEC series mainly in the nighttime in the spring and autumn periods. The TECS amplitude exceeds the mean value of the "background" TEC variation amplitude by a factor of 5–10 as a minimum. TECS represent a local phenomenon with a typical radius of spatial correlation not larger than 500km. The IID-induced TEC variations are similar in their amplitude, form and duration to the TEC response to shock-acoustic waves (SAW generated during rocket launchings and earthquakes. However, the IID propagation velocity is less than the SAW velocity (800–1000m/s and are most likely to correspond to the velocity of background medium-scale acoustic-gravity waves, on the order of 100–200m/s. Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities, instruments and techniques - Radio science (ionospheric propagation

  18. Nuclear structure of light thallium isotopes as deduced from laser spectroscopy on a fast atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounds, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    After optimizing the system by experiments on /sup 201,203,205/Tl, the neutron-deficient isotopes 189-193 Tl have been studied using the collinear fast atom beam laser spectroscopy system at UNISOR on-line to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. A sensitive system for the measurements was developed since the light isotopes were available in mass-separated beams of only 7 x 10 4 to 4 x 10 5 atoms per second. By laser excitation of the 535 nm atomic transitions of atoms in the beam, the 6s 2 7s 2 S/sub 1/2/ and 6s 2 6s 2 P/sub 3/2/ hyperfine structures were measured, as were the isotope shifts of the 535 nm transitions. From these, the magnetic dipole moments, spectroscopic quadrupole moments and isotopic changes in mean-square charge radius were deduced. The magnetic dipole moments are consistent with previous data. The /sup 190,192/Tl isotopes show a considerable difference in quadrupole deformations as well as an anomalous isotope shift with respect to 194 Tl. A large isomer shift in 193 Tl is observed implying a larger deformation in the 9/2 - isomer than in the 1/2 + ground state. The /sup 189,191,193/Tl isomers show increasing deformation away from stability. A deformed shell model calculation indicates that this increase in deformation can account for the dropping of the 9/2 - band in these isotopes while an increase in neutron pairing correlations, having opposite and compensating effects on the rotational moment of inertia, maintains the 9/2 - strong-coupled band structure. 105 refs., 27 figs

  19. Superadditive correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, B.G.; Heumann, J.M.; Lapedes, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The fact that correlation does not imply causation is well known. Correlation between variables at two sites does not imply that the two sites directly interact, because, e.g., correlation between distant sites may be induced by chaining of correlation between a set of intervening, directly interacting sites. Such 'noncausal correlation' is well understood in statistical physics: an example is long-range order in spin systems, where spins which have only short-range direct interactions, e.g., the Ising model, display correlation at a distance. It is less well recognized that such long-range 'noncausal' correlations can in fact be stronger than the magnitude of any causal correlation induced by direct interactions. We call this phenomenon superadditive correlation (SAC). We demonstrate this counterintuitive phenomenon by explicit examples in (i) a model spin system and (ii) a model continuous variable system, where both models are such that two variables have multiple intervening pathways of indirect interaction. We apply the technique known as decimation to explain SAC as an additive, constructive interference phenomenon between the multiple pathways of indirect interaction. We also explain the effect using a definition of the collective mode describing the intervening spin variables. Finally, we show that the SAC effect is mirrored in information theory, and is true for mutual information measures in addition to correlation measures. Generic complex systems typically exhibit multiple pathways of indirect interaction, making SAC a potentially widespread phenomenon. This affects, e.g., attempts to deduce interactions by examination of correlations, as well as, e.g., hierarchical approximation methods for multivariate probability distributions, which introduce parameters based on successive orders of correlation. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  20. Method of estimating horizontal vectors of ionospheric electric field deduced from HF Doppler data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, M.; Ogawa, T.; Kamide, Y.; Kroehl, H.W.; Hausman, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    An HF Doppler method for estimating the time variations of the horizontal electric field in the ionosphere is presented which takes into account, for long-lasting variations in the electric field, the effect of electron decay due to attachment and/or recombination processes. The method is applied to an isolated substorm event, using equivalent ionospheric current systems deduced from worldwide magnetometer data in the estimations. The present results are found to agree with data deduced from current systems and high latitude electrojet activity. 18 references

  1. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  2. CONSISTENT USE OF THE KALMAN FILTER IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS (CTMS) FOR DEDUCING EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past research has shown that emissions can be deduced using observed concentrations of a chemical, a Chemical Transport Model (CTM), and the Kalman filter in an inverse modeling application. An expression was derived for the relationship between the "observable" (i.e., the con...

  3. Heavy-ion optical potential for sub-barrier fusion deduced from a dispersion relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.T.; Kim, H.C.; Park, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    The heavy-ion energy-dependent optical potentials for the 16 O+ 208 Pb system are deduced from a dispersion relation. These potentials are used to analyze the elastic scattering, fusion, and spin distributions of compound nuclei for the system in a unified way based on the direct reaction theory. It turns out that the energy dependence of the optical potential is essential in explaining the data at near- and sub-barrier energies. The real part of the energy-dependent optical potential deduced was also used in calculating the elastic and fusion cross sections by the conventional barrier penetration model using an incoming wave boundary condition. The predictions of the elastic scattering, fusion cross sections, and the spin distributions of compound nuclei are not satisfactory compared with those from the direct reaction approach. It seems to originate from the fact that this model neglects absorption around the Coulomb barrier region

  4. On the influence of neutral turbulence on ambipolar diffusivities deduced from meteor trail expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    Full Text Available By measuring fading times of radar echoes from underdense meteor trails, it is possible to deduce the ambipolar diffusivities of the ions responsible for these radar echoes. It could be anticipated that these diffusivities increase monotonically with height akin to neutral viscosity. In practice, this is not always the case. Here, we investigate the capability of neutral turbulence to affect the meteor trail diffusion rate.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence

  5. On the influence of neutral turbulence on ambipolar diffusivities deduced from meteor trail expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available By measuring fading times of radar echoes from underdense meteor trails, it is possible to deduce the ambipolar diffusivities of the ions responsible for these radar echoes. It could be anticipated that these diffusivities increase monotonically with height akin to neutral viscosity. In practice, this is not always the case. Here, we investigate the capability of neutral turbulence to affect the meteor trail diffusion rate.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence

  6. Comparisons of Satellite-Deduced Overlapping Cloud Properties and CALIPSO CloudSat Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fu-Lung; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Sun-Mack, Sunny

    2010-01-01

    Introduction to the overlapped cloud properties derived from polar-orbiting (MODIS) and geostationary (GOES-12, -13, Meteosat-8, -9, etc.) meteorological satellites, which are produced at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) cloud research & development team (NASA lead scientist: Dr. Patrick Minnis). Comparison of the LaRC CERES MODIS Edition-3 overlapped cloud properties to the CALIPSO and the CloudSat active sensing data. High clouds and overlapped clouds occur frequently as deduced by CALIPSO (44 & 25%), CloudSat (25 & 4%), and MODIS (37 & 6%). Large fractions of optically-thin cirrus and overlapped clouds are deduced from CALIPSO, but much smaller fractions are from CloudSat and MODIS. For overlapped clouds, the averaged upper-layer CTHs are about 12.8 (CALIPSO), 10.9 (CloudSat) and 10 km (MODIS), and the averaged lower-layer CTHs are about 3.6 (CALIPSO), 3.2 (CloudSat) and 3.9 km (MODIS). Based on comparisons of upper and lower-layer cloud properties as deduced from the MODIS, CALIPSO and CloudSat data, more enhanced passive satellite methods for retrieving thin cirrus and overlapped cloud properties are needed and are under development.

  7. Coupling constants deduced for the resonances in kaon photo-production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheoun, M. K.; Kim, K. S.; Choi, T. K.

    2004-01-01

    We deduced the coupling constants of nucleon and hyperon resonances, which participate in kaon productions as intermediate states that are formed by electro-magnetic probes and that finally decay into hadronic final states. We used an isobaric model based on an effective Lagrangian approach to describe the processes, in which relevant coupling constants regarding related resonances are effectively determined by fitting available experimental data. Our scheme to deduce the coupling constants was as follows: First, we calculated the lower and the upper limits on the coupling constants by using the experimental decay data available until now and/or theoretical predictions, such as those from quark models and SU(3) symmetry. Second, we exploited those limits as physical constraints on our fitting scheme for the kaon photo-production data. Finally, the deduced values and regions of the coupling constants, which satisfy not only the reaction data but also the decay data, are presented as figures with respect to the strong and the electro-magnetic coupling constants, and their multiplicative values. Our results for the coupling constants give physical values that are more restricted than those allowed by the experimental data nowadays.

  8. The DEDUCE Guided Query tool: providing simplified access to clinical data for research and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M; Winfield, Stephanie; Evans, Steve; Slopek, Steve; Shang, Howard; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    In many healthcare organizations, comparative effectiveness research and quality improvement (QI) investigations are hampered by a lack of access to data created as a byproduct of patient care. Data collection often hinges upon either manual chart review or ad hoc requests to technical experts who support legacy clinical systems. In order to facilitate this needed capacity for data exploration at our institution (Duke University Health System), we have designed and deployed a robust Web application for cohort identification and data extraction--the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE). DEDUCE is envisioned as a simple, web-based environment that allows investigators access to administrative, financial, and clinical information generated during patient care. By using business intelligence tools to create a view into Duke Medicine's enterprise data warehouse, DEDUCE provides a Guided Query functionality using a wizard-like interface that lets users filter through millions of clinical records, explore aggregate reports, and, export extracts. Researchers and QI specialists can obtain detailed patient- and observation-level extracts without needing to understand structured query language or the underlying database model. Developers designing such tools must devote sufficient training and develop application safeguards to ensure that patient-centered clinical researchers understand when observation-level extracts should be used. This may mitigate the risk of data being misunderstood and consequently used in an improper fashion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intrinsic neutrino properties: As deduced from cosmology, astrophysics, accelerator and non-accelerator experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    I review the intrinsic properties of neutrinos as deduced from cosmological, astrophysical, and laboratory experiments. Bounds on magnetic moments and theoretical models which yield large moments but small masses are briefly discussed. The MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem is reviewed in light of the existing data from the 37 Cl and Kamiokande II experiments. The combined data disfavor the adiabatic solution and tend to support either the large angle solution or the nonadiabatic one. In the former case the 71 Ga signal will be suppressed by the same factor as for 37 Cl, and in the latter case the suppression factor could be as large as 10 or more. 41 refs

  10. Dotaciones para la recuperación de activos revertibles como deducibles del impuesto sobre sociedades

    OpenAIRE

    Duplá Marín, María José

    2001-01-01

    El objetivo final que nos propusimos con este trabajo de investigación fue profundizar en el estudio jurídico-tributario de las dotaciones al fondo de reversión como gasto deducible para determinar la base imponible del impuesto sobre sociedades, en aquellas sociedades concesionarias de servicios públicos con cláusula de reversión de activos, partiendo de su realidad contable.En consecuencia el trabajo se ciñe al estudio crítico de la regulación jurídica del fondo de reversión como gasto fisc...

  11. Deducing the kinetics of protein synthesis in vivo from the transition rates measured in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Rudorf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular machinery of life relies on complex multistep processes that involve numerous individual transitions, such as molecular association and dissociation steps, chemical reactions, and mechanical movements. The corresponding transition rates can be typically measured in vitro but not in vivo. Here, we develop a general method to deduce the in-vivo rates from their in-vitro values. The method has two basic components. First, we introduce the kinetic distance, a new concept by which we can quantitatively compare the kinetics of a multistep process in different environments. The kinetic distance depends logarithmically on the transition rates and can be interpreted in terms of the underlying free energy barriers. Second, we minimize the kinetic distance between the in-vitro and the in-vivo process, imposing the constraint that the deduced rates reproduce a known global property such as the overall in-vivo speed. In order to demonstrate the predictive power of our method, we apply it to protein synthesis by ribosomes, a key process of gene expression. We describe the latter process by a codon-specific Markov model with three reaction pathways, corresponding to the initial binding of cognate, near-cognate, and non-cognate tRNA, for which we determine all individual transition rates in vitro. We then predict the in-vivo rates by the constrained minimization procedure and validate these rates by three independent sets of in-vivo data, obtained for codon-dependent translation speeds, codon-specific translation dynamics, and missense error frequencies. In all cases, we find good agreement between theory and experiment without adjusting any fit parameter. The deduced in-vivo rates lead to smaller error frequencies than the known in-vitro rates, primarily by an improved initial selection of tRNA. The method introduced here is relatively simple from a computational point of view and can be applied to any biomolecular process, for which we have

  12. Relations between correlation functions in gauge field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, Yu. A.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    1997-01-01

    Exact relations between vacuum correlations of non-Abelian field strengths are obtained. With the aid of exterior differentiation, the invariant parts of a given correlation function are expressed in terms of higher order correlation functions. The corollaries of these relations for the behavior of nonperturbative correlation functions at small and large distances are deduced

  13. Vortex magnetic structure in circularly magnetized microwires as deduced from magneto-optical Kerr measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2014-02-14

    The magneto-optic Kerr effect has been employed to determine the magnetization process and estimate the domain structure of microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy. The diameter of microwires was 8 μm, and pieces 2 cm long were selected for measurements. The analysis of the local surface longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops has allowed us to deduce a vortex magnetic structure with axial core and circular external shell. Moreover, a bamboo-like surface domain structure is confirmed with wave length of around 10 to 15 μm and alternating chirality in adjacent circular domains. The width of the domain wall is estimated to be less than 3 μm. Finally, closure domain structures with significant helical magnetization component are observed extending up to around 1000 μm from the end of the microwire.

  14. Deducing the pathogenic contribution of recessive ABCA4 alleles in an outbred population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Emily I; Nylen, Erik L; Ko, Audrey C; Affatigato, Louisa M; Heggen, Andrew C; Wang, Kai; Sheffield, Val C; Stone, Edwin M

    2010-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenic effects of specific genotypes is important for the design and execution of clinical trials as well as for meaningful counseling of individual patients. However, for many autosomal recessive diseases, it can be difficult to deduce the relative pathogenic contribution of individual alleles because relatively few affected individuals share the same two disease-causing variations. In this study, we used multiple regression analysis to estimate the pathogenicity of specific alleles of ABCA4 in patients with retinal phenotypes ranging from Stargardt disease to retinitis pigmentosa. This analysis revealed quantitative allelic effects on two aspects of the visual phenotype, visual acuity (P disease and will also aid in the optimal selection of subjects for clinical trials of new therapies.

  15. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Samuel D; Prideaux, Gavin J

    2016-02-15

    The marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, was the largest-ever marsupial carnivore, and is one of the most iconic extinct Australian vertebrates. With a highly-specialised dentition, powerful forelimbs and a robust build, its overall morphology is not approached by any other mammal. However, despite >150 years of attention, fundamental aspects of its biology remain unresolved. Here we analyse an assemblage of claw marks preserved on surfaces in a cave and deduce that they were generated by marsupial lions. The distribution and skewed size range of claw marks within the cave elucidate two key aspects of marsupial lion biology: they were excellent climbers and reared young in caves. Scrutiny of >10,000 co-located Pleistocene bones reveals few if any marsupial lion tooth marks, which dovetails with the morphology-based interpretation of the species as a flesh specialist.

  16. Vortex magnetic structure in circularly magnetized microwires as deduced from magneto-optical Kerr measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.; del Real, R. P.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Vá zquez, M.

    2014-01-01

    The magneto-optic Kerr effect has been employed to determine the magnetization process and estimate the domain structure of microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy. The diameter of microwires was 8 μm, and pieces 2 cm long were selected for measurements. The analysis of the local surface longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops has allowed us to deduce a vortex magnetic structure with axial core and circular external shell. Moreover, a bamboo-like surface domain structure is confirmed with wave length of around 10 to 15 μm and alternating chirality in adjacent circular domains. The width of the domain wall is estimated to be less than 3 μm. Finally, closure domain structures with significant helical magnetization component are observed extending up to around 1000 μm from the end of the microwire.

  17. Utilization of metabonomics to identify serum biomarkers in murine H22 hepatocarcinoma and deduce antitumor mechanism of Rhizoma Paridis saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Peiyu; Man, Shuli; Yang, He; Fan, Wei; Yu, Peng; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-08-25

    Murine H22 hepatocarcinoma model is so popular to be used for the preclinical anticancer candidate's evaluation. However, the metabolic biomarkers of this model were not identified. Meanwhile, Rhizoma Paridis saponins (RPS) as natural products have been found to show strong antitumor activity, while its anti-cancer mechanism is not clear. To search for potential metabolite biomarkers of this model, serum metabonomics approach was applied to detect the variation of metabolite biomarkers and the related metabolism genes and signaling pathway were used to deduce the antitumor mechanisms of RPS. As a result, ten serum metabolites were identified in twenty-four mice including healthy mice, non-treated cancer mice, RPS-treated cancer mice and RPS-treated healthy mice. RPS significantly decreased tumor weight correlates to down-regulating lactate, acetate, N-acetyl amino acid and glutamine signals (p < 0.05), which were marked metabolites screened according to the very important person (VIP), loading plot and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) tests. For the analysis of metabolic enzyme related genes, RPS reversed the aerobic glycolysis through activating tumor suppressor p53 and PTEN, and suppressed FASN to inhibit lipogenesis. What's more, RPS repressed Myc and GLS expression and decreased glutamine level. The regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR and HIF-1α/Myc/Ras networks also participated in these metabolic changes. Taken together, RPS suppressed ATP product made the tumor growth slow, which indicated a good anti-cancer effect and new angle for understanding the mechanism of RPS. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the utility of (1)H NMR metabolic profiles taken together with tumor weight and viscera index was a promising screening tool for evaluating the antitumor effect of candidates. In addition, RPS was a potent anticancer agent through inhibiting cancer cellular metabolism to suppress proliferation in hepatoma H22 tumor murine, which promoted the

  18. Radial plasma drifts deduced from VLF whistler mode signals - A modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, E. M.; Andrews, M. K.; Bailey, G. J.; Moffett, R. J.

    1984-05-01

    VLF whistler mode signals have previously been used to infer radial plasma drifts in the equatorial plane of the plasmasphere and the field-aligned ionosphere-protonosphere coupling fluxes. Physical models of the plasmasphere consisting of O(+) adn H(+) ions along dipole magnetic field lines, and including radial E x B drifts, are applied to a mid-latitude flux tube appropriate to whistler mode signals received at Wellington, New Zealand, from the fixed frequency VLF transmitter NLK (18.6 kHz) in Seattle, U.S.A. These models are first shown to provide a good representation of the recorded Doppler shift and group delay data. They are then used to simulate the process of deducing the drifts and fluxes from the recorded data. Provided the initial whistler mode duct latitude and the ionospheric contributions are known, the drifts at the equatorial plane can be estimated to about + or - 20 m/s (approximately 10-15 percent), and the two hemisphere ionosphere-protonosphere coupling fluxes to about + or - 10 to the 12th/sq m-sec (approximately 40 percent).

  19. Geodynamical behavior of some active area in Egypt, as deduced from geodetic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issawy, E.; Mrlina, J.; Radwan, A.; Mahmoud, S.; Rayan, A.

    2009-04-01

    Temporal gravity variation in parallel with the space geodetic technique (GPS) had been started in Egypt for real campaigns in 1997. The geodetic networks around the High Dam, Aswan area was the first net to be measured. More than five measurement epochs were performed. The results had a considerable limit of coincidence between gravity and GPS observations. The trend of gravity changes indicated a positive stress and had the vertical displacement observed for leveling points. The lowest gravity changes along Kalabsha fault reflect extensional and/or strike component of the stress field. Also, the areas around Cairo (Greater Cairo) and due to the occurrence of an earthquake of 1992, such type of measurements were useful for monitoring the recent activity. The data of the geodetic network around Cairo after 5 campaigns showed that, the estimated horizontal velocities for almost all points are 5.5± mm/year in approximately NW-SE direction. The non-tidal changes can explain the dynamic process within the upper crust related to the development of local stress conditions. The trends of gravity changes are more or less coincident with that deduced from GPS deformation analysis and the occurrence of the main shocks in the area. In additions, in 2005 the geodetic network around the southern part of Sinai and the Gulf of Suez were established. One campaign of measurements had been performed and the gravity values were obtained.

  20. Epitopes of human testis-specific lactate dehydrogenase deduced from a cDNA sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millan, J.L.; Driscoll, C.E.; LeVan, K.M.; Goldberg, E.

    1987-01-01

    The sequence and structure of human testis-specific L-lactate dehydrogenase [LDHC 4 , LDHX; (L)-lactate:NAD + oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27] has been derived from analysis of a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone comprising the complete protein coding region of the enzyme. From the deduced amino acid sequence, human LDHC 4 is as different from rodent LDHC 4 (73% homology) as it is from human LDHA 4 (76% homology) and porcine LDHB 4 (68% homology). Subunit homologies are consistent with the conclusion that the LDHC gene arose by at least two independent duplication events. Furthermore, the lower degree of homology between mouse and human LDHC 4 and the appearance of this isozyme late in evolution suggests a higher rate of mutation in the mammalian LDHC genes than in the LDHA and -B genes. Comparison of exposed amino acid residues of discrete anti-genic determinants of mouse and human LDHC 4 reveals significant differences. Knowledge of the human LDHC 4 sequence will help design human-specific peptides useful in the development of a contraceptive vaccine

  1. Modal effects on amplitude perturbations on subionospheric signals (trimpis) deduced from two-frequency measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowden, R.L.; Adams, C.D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Interference between the first two modes of Earth-ionosphere waveguide propagation at the high end of the VLF band (> 18 kHz) increases with distance from the transmitter out to very large distances and can add amplitude perturbations to the phase perturbations (trimpis) produced by lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) on the great circle path. Since the two modes have slightly different phase velocities, an interference pattern or standing wave is formed which is shifted slightly along the propagation path by the LEP-induced change in differential phase velocity. The model effect at the receiver depends on the local gradient (along the great circle path) of amplitude with respect to the differential phase. Since this differential or mode beat phase varies with frequency, measurement of the resultant amplitude at two close frequencies enables an estimation of the modal effects. In this study, measurements were made at Dunedin at the two MSK frequencies, 22,250 Hz and 22,350 Hz, of the transmitter NWC, during a night of frequent one-dimensional trimpis (i.e., those produced by large-area LEP occurring close to the great circle path) and of strong and varying modal interference. Modal generation or modification of trimpi amplitude was related to the local gradient of amplitude as expected. From these results it was deduced that modal modification of echo trimpis (those produced by small area LEP occurring well off the great circle path), even under extreme conditions, is insignificant

  2. F-region Pedersen conductivity deduced using the TIMED/GUVI limb retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As a proxy of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate for equatorial plasma bubbles, we investigate the flux-tube integrated F-region Pedersen conductivity (ΣPF using the electron density profiles (EDPs provided by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI on board the Thermosphere Ionosphere and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED satellite. The investigation is conducted using the EDPs obtained in the Atlantic sector at 19:00-22:00 LT during 4–17 August and 6-16 December 2002. The seasonal difference of the strength and location of the equatorial ionization anomalies (EIAs induces a significant difference in the deduced ΣPF. Much stronger EIAs are created at higher altitudes and latitudes in December rather than in August. At 19:00–20:00 LT, the peak value of the ΣPF has 23 mhos at 1100 km apex height during 14–16 December and 18mhos at 600 km during 15–17 August. The ΣPF decreases as local time progresses. Therefore, ΣPF provides a preferred condition for the growth of bubbles to higher altitudes at 19:00-20:00 LT than at later hours, in December rather than in August in the Atlantic sector.

  3. Supercritical fluid in the mantle transition zone deduced from H-D interdiffusion of wadsleyite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yoshino, Takashi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of water in the Earth's mantle is key to understanding the mantle convection and geochemical evolution of the Earth. As wadsleyite and ringwoodite can incorporate large amounts of water in their crystal structures, proton conduction has been invoked to account for the widespread conductive anomalies observed in the mantle wedge, where descending slab stagnates at the transition zone. However, there is a lot of controversy on whether proton conduction by itself is able to explain such anomalies, because of large discrepancy in the extent of the water effect deduced from previous electrical conductivity measurements on hydrous polycrystalline wadsleyite and ringwoodite. Here we report the hydrogen self-diffusion coefficient obtained from H-D interdiffusion experiments in wadsleyite single-crystal couples. Our results demonstrate that the effect of water on the electrical conductivity of wadsleyite is limited and hydrous wadsleyite by itself is unable to explain conductive anomalies in the transition zone. In contrast, the expected hydrogen effective diffusion does not allow the wide propagation of water between the stagnant slab and surrounding mantle, probably leading to persistence of local water saturation and continuous release of supercritical fluids at the stagnant slab roof on geological time scales. This phenomenon provides an alternative explanation for both the high-conductivity and seismic-velocity anomalies observed in the mantle wedge at the transition-zone depth.

  4. A unitary correlation operator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Neff, T.; Roth, R.; Schnack, J.

    1997-09-01

    The short range repulsion between nucleons is treated by a unitary correlation operator which shifts the nucleons away from each other whenever their uncorrelated positions are within the repulsive core. By formulating the correlation as a transformation of the relative distance between particle pairs, general analytic expressions for the correlated wave functions and correlated operators are given. The decomposition of correlated operators into irreducible n-body operators is discussed. The one- and two-body-irreducible parts are worked out explicitly and the contribution of three-body correlations is estimated to check convergence. Ground state energies of nuclei up to mass number A=48 are calculated with a spin-isospin-dependent potential and single Slater determinants as uncorrelated states. They show that the deduced energy-and mass-number-independent correlated two-body Hamiltonian reproduces all ''exact'' many-body calculations surprisingly well. (orig.)

  5. A novel computational framework for deducing muscle synergies from experimental joint moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantharaman eGopalakrishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior experimental studies have hypothesized the existence of a ‘muscle synergy’ based control scheme for producing limb movements and locomotion in vertebrates. Such synergies have been suggested to consist of fixed muscle grouping schemes with the co-activation of all muscles in a synergy resulting in limb movement. Quantitative representations of these groupings (termed muscle weightings and their control signals (termed synergy controls have traditionally been derived by the factorization of experimentally measured EMG. This study presents a novel approach for deducing these weightings and controls from inverse dynamic joint moments that are computed from an alternative set of experimental measurements – movement kinematics and kinetics. This technique was applied to joint moments for healthy human walking at 0.7 and 1.7 m/s, and two sets of ‘simulated’ synergies were computed based on two different criteria (1 synergies were required to minimize errors between experimental and simulated joint moments in a musculoskeletal model (pure-synergy solution (2 along with minimizing joint moment errors, synergies also minimized muscle activation levels (optimal-synergy solution. On comparing the two solutions, it was observed that the introduction of optimality requirements (optimal-synergy to a control strategy solely aimed at reproducing the joint moments (pure-synergy did not necessitate major changes in the muscle grouping within synergies or the temporal profiles of synergy control signals. Synergies from both the simulated solutions exhibited many similarities to EMG derived synergies from a previously published study, thus implying that the analysis of the two different types of experimental data reveals similar, underlying synergy structures.

  6. Characteristics of Turbulent Airflow Deduced from Rapid Surface Thermal Fluctuations: An Infrared Surface Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2017-12-01

    The intermittent nature of turbulent airflow interacting with the surface is readily observable in fluctuations of the surface temperature resulting from the thermal imprints of eddies sweeping the surface. Rapid infrared thermography has recently been used to quantify characteristics of the near-surface turbulent airflow interacting with the evaporating surfaces. We aim to extend this technique by using single-point rapid infrared measurements to quantify properties of a turbulent flow, including surface exchange processes, with a view towards the development of an infrared surface anemometer. The parameters for the surface-eddy renewal (α and β ) are inferred from infrared measurements of a single-point on the surface of a heat plate placed in a wind tunnel with prescribed wind speeds and constant mean temperatures of the surface. Thermally-deduced parameters are in agreement with values obtained from standard three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer measurements close to the plate surface (e.g., α = 3 and β = 1/26 (ms)^{-1} for the infrared, and α = 3 and β = 1/19 (ms)^{-1} for the sonic-anemometer measurements). The infrared-based turbulence parameters provide new insights into the role of surface temperature and buoyancy on the inherent characteristics of interacting eddies. The link between the eddy-spectrum shape parameter α and the infrared window size representing the infrared field of view is investigated. The results resemble the effect of the sampling height above the ground in sonic anemometer measurements, which enables the detection of larger eddies with higher values of α . The physical basis and tests of the proposed method support the potential for remote quantification of the near-surface momentum field, as well as scalar-flux measurements in the immediate vicinity of the surface.

  7. Comparison of transcripts in Phalaenopsis bellina and Phalaenopsis equestris (Orchidaceae) flowers to deduce monoterpene biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Kuoh, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Tian-Hsiang; Wang, Hei-Chia; Wu, Tian-Shung; Leu, Yann-Lii; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2006-07-13

    Floral scent is one of the important strategies for ensuring fertilization and for determining seed or fruit set. Research on plant scents has hampered mainly by the invisibility of this character, its dynamic nature, and complex mixtures of components that are present in very small quantities. Most progress in scent research, as in other areas of plant biology, has come from the use of molecular and biochemical techniques. Although volatile components have been identified in several orchid species, the biosynthetic pathways of orchid flower fragrance are far from understood. We investigated how flower fragrance was generated in certain Phalaenopsis orchids by determining the chemical components of the floral scent, identifying floral expressed-sequence-tags (ESTs), and deducing the pathways of floral scent biosynthesis in Phalaneopsis bellina by bioinformatics analysis. The main chemical components in the P. bellina flower were shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to be monoterpenoids, benzenoids and phenylpropanoids. The set of floral scent producing enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to geraniol and linalool were recognized through data mining of the P. bellina floral EST database (dbEST). Transcripts preferentially expressed in P. bellina were distinguished by comparing the scent floral dbEST to that of a scentless species, P. equestris, and included those encoding lipoxygenase, epimerase, diacylglycerol kinase and geranyl diphosphate synthase. In addition, EST filtering results showed that transcripts encoding signal transduction and Myb transcription factors and methyltransferase, in addition to those for scent biosynthesis, were detected by in silico hybridization of the P. bellina unigene database against those of the scentless species, rice and Arabidopsis. Altogether, we pinpointed 66% of the biosynthetic steps from G3P to geraniol, linalool and their derivatives. This systems biology program combined

  8. The Sidebands of the Equatorial Electrojet: General Characteristic of the Westward Currents, as Deduced From CHAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun-Liang; Lühr, Hermann; Alken, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    Based on 5 years (2001-2005) of magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite, latitudinal profiles of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) have been derived. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the reverse current EEJ sidebands. These westward currents peak at ±5° quasi-dipole latitude with typical amplitudes of 35% of the main EEJ. The diurnal amplitude variation is quite comparable with that of the EEJ. Similarly to the EEJ, the intensity is increasing with solar EUV flux, but with a steeper slope, indicating that not only the conductivity plays a role. For the longitude distribution we find, in general, larger amplitudes in the Western than in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is presently a common understanding that the reverse current EEJ sidebands are generated by eastward zonal winds at altitudes above about 120 km. In particular, a positive vertical gradient of wind speed generates westward currents at magnetic latitudes outside of 2° dip latitude. Interesting information about these features can be deduced from the sidebands' tidal characteristics. The longitudinal variation of the amplitude is dominated by a wave-1 pattern, which can primarily be attributed to the tidal components SPW1 and SW3. In case of the hemispheric amplitude differences these same two wave-1 components dominate. The ratio between sideband amplitude and main EEJ is largely controlled by the tidal features of the EEJ. The longitudinal patterns of the latitude, where the sidebands peak, resemble to some extent those of the amplitude. Current densities become larger when the peaks move closer to the magnetic equator.

  9. Comparison of transcripts in Phalaenopsis bellina and Phalaenopsis equestris (Orchidaceae flowers to deduce monoterpene biosynthesis pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tian-Shung

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Floral scent is one of the important strategies for ensuring fertilization and for determining seed or fruit set. Research on plant scents has hampered mainly by the invisibility of this character, its dynamic nature, and complex mixtures of components that are present in very small quantities. Most progress in scent research, as in other areas of plant biology, has come from the use of molecular and biochemical techniques. Although volatile components have been identified in several orchid species, the biosynthetic pathways of orchid flower fragrance are far from understood. We investigated how flower fragrance was generated in certain Phalaenopsis orchids by determining the chemical components of the floral scent, identifying floral expressed-sequence-tags (ESTs, and deducing the pathways of floral scent biosynthesis in Phalaneopsis bellina by bioinformatics analysis. Results The main chemical components in the P. bellina flower were shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to be monoterpenoids, benzenoids and phenylpropanoids. The set of floral scent producing enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P to geraniol and linalool were recognized through data mining of the P. bellina floral EST database (dbEST. Transcripts preferentially expressed in P. bellina were distinguished by comparing the scent floral dbEST to that of a scentless species, P. equestris, and included those encoding lipoxygenase, epimerase, diacylglycerol kinase and geranyl diphosphate synthase. In addition, EST filtering results showed that transcripts encoding signal transduction and Myb transcription factors and methyltransferase, in addition to those for scent biosynthesis, were detected by in silico hybridization of the P. bellina unigene database against those of the scentless species, rice and Arabidopsis. Altogether, we pinpointed 66% of the biosynthetic steps from G3P to geraniol, linalool and their derivatives

  10. Active deformation processes of the Northern Caucasus deduced from the GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyukov, Vadim; Mironov, Alexey; Rogozhin, Eugeny; Steblov, Grigory; Gabsatarov, Yury

    2015-04-01

    The Northern Caucasus, as a part of the Alpine-Himalayan mobile belt, is a zone of complex tectonics associated with the interaction of the two major tectonic plates, Arabian and Eurasian. The first GPS study of the contemporary geodynamics of the Caucasus mountain system were launched in the early 1990s in the framework of the Russia-US joint project. Since 2005 observations of the modern tectonic motion of the Northern Caucasus are carried out using the continuous GPS network. This network encompasses the territory of three Northern Caucasian Republics of the Russian Federation: Karachay-Cherkessia, Kabardino-Balkaria, and North Ossetia. In the Ossetian part of the Northern Caucasus the network of GPS survey-mode sites has been deployed as well. The GPS velocities confirm weak general compression of the Northern Caucasus with at the rate of about 1-2 mm/year. This horizontal motion at the boundary of the Northern Caucasus with respect to the Eurasian plate causes the higher seismic and tectonic activity of this transition zone. This result confirms that the source of deformation of the Northern Caucasus is the sub-meridional drift of the Arabian plate towards the adjacent boundary of the Eastern European part of the Eurasian lithospheric plate. The concept of such convergence implies that the Caucasian segment of the Alpine-Himalayan mobile belt is under compression, the layers of sedimentary and volcanic rocks are folded, the basement blocks are subject to shifts in various directions, and the upper crust layers are ruptured by reverse faults and thrusts. Weak deviation of observed velocities from the pattern corresponding to homogeneous compression can also be revealed, and numerical modeling of deformations of major regional tectonic structures, such as the Main Caucasus Ridge, can explain this. The deformation tensor deduced from the velocity field also exhibits the sub-meridional direction of the major compressional axes which coincides with the direction of

  11. CMB and the elementary particles structure deduced from QFT of non-dot model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    In my paper ‘Planck Constant Deduced from Metrical Results of Doppler Effect of Moving Particle —Uncertainty Principle Caused by Collision of a Particle with CMB Photons and Virtual Photons (H05-0036-10)’ the absolute velocity is decided by CMB which as a mark of the vacuum. CMB come from the thermal radiation of stars via gravitational redshift about 10 (13) year (E14- 0032-08). In my paper ‘Quanta turn-advance ism, China Science && Technology Overview 131 192-210 (2011)’, QFT four-dimensional uncertainty principle and momentum-energy conservation law had been generalized as a five-dimensional equations: de Broglie wavelength as a position vector \\underline{q}= (i c t, r, s), momentum \\underline{P} = (i E / c, P, U c), \\underline{q} = i h / \\underline{P}, \\underline{q} \\underline{q} = 0, \\underline{P} \\underline{P} = 0, Sigma∑ \\underline{P} = \\underline{P} (0) . The five-dimensional time-space-spin had been quantized as a non-dot model basic cell, the lowest energy state vertical polarized left spin 1/2 neutrino and right spin 1/2 antineutrino are just the left, right advance unit quanta _{0}nuυ, nuυ _{0} and left, right back unit quanta (0) nuυ, nuυ (0) , it again compose into spin 1 unit advance photons _{0}nuυnuυ _{0} and back (0) nuυnuυ (0) , spin 0 unit rest mass nuυ _{0}nuυ (0) and anti-mass _{0}nuυ (0) nuυ, spin 0 unit positive charge _{0}nuυnuυ (0) and negative charge nuυ _{0} (0) nuυ. It accord to the high energy physics experimental results of the transformation among the photons, masses quanta and charges quanta. The physical vacuum is the even collocation of non-combinational nuυ _{0} or _{0}nuυ. QFT is no longer with divergence difficulty by the non-dot model. It is mathematically easy that from five-dimensional equations deduce out the Dirac, Klein-Gordan, Maxwell equations and Lorentz force formula, but appear some new results. The interactions between _{0}nuυ, nuυ _{0}, (0) nuυ, nuυ (0) , i.e., force f

  12. Late Holocene tectonic implications deduced from tidal notches in Leukas and Meganisi islands (Ionian Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evelpidou, N.; Karkani, A.; Pirazzoli, P.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the tectonic behavior of Leukas and Meganisi islands (Ionian Sea) is examined through underwater research carried out in both islands. A possible Late Holocene correlation between coseismic subsidences is attempted and evidenced by submerged tidal notches in both islands. These subsidence events probably occurred after the uplift that affected the northernmost part of Leukas around 4 to 5ka BP. In conclusion, although the whole area was affected by a similar tectonic strain, certain coseismic events were only recorded in one of the two islands and in some cases they affected only part of the study area.

  13. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, C.; Luhr, H.; Ma, S. Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload) fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). We filtered the FGM data by using bandpasses with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different......). Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence...

  14. Late Holocene tectonic implications deduced from tidal notches in Leukas and Meganisi islands (Ionian Sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evelpidou, N.; Karkani, A.; Pirazzoli, P.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper the tectonic behavior of Leukas and Meganisi islands (Ionian Sea) is examined through underwater research carried out in both islands. A possible Late Holocene correlation between coseismic subsidences is attempted and evidenced by submerged tidal notches in both islands. These subsidence events probably occurred after the uplift that affected the northernmost part of Leukas around 4 to 5ka BP. In conclusion, although the whole area was affected by a similar tectonic strain, certain coseismic events were only recorded in one of the two islands and in some cases they affected only part of the study area.

  15. The magnetization of the lunar crust as deduced from orbital surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.; Russell, C. T.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A two-dimensional magnetic anomaly map of a region of intense crustal magnetization near Van de Graaff crater has been constructed from Apollo 15 and 16 subsatellite vector magnetometer observations. The mapping method used limits coverage to relatively low altitudes (65-80 km) over the Van de Graaff region along the Apollo 15 track and over the central far side highlands along the Apollo 16 track; a simple differencing technique was used to remove external noise contributions. An approximate inversion of this map using a surface plate model for source region geometry has revealed at least four different sources. No correlation between the lateral locations of these source regions and surface morphology was found; the directions of magnetization seem to be unrelated except for a strong north-south depletion. A rough antipodal correlation of the two most strongly magnetized regions yet mapped on the moon with the Imbrium and Orientale basins gives mild support to the ejecta deposit hypothesis suggested by Strangway et al. (1973) for formation of anomaly source regions.

  16. A proxy late Holocene climatic record deduced from northwest Alaskan beach ridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, O.K.; Jordan, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A climatically-sensitive, oscillatory pattern of progradation and erosion is revealed in late Holocene accretionary sand ridge and barrier island complexes of Seward Peninsula, northwest Alaska. Archaeological and geological radiocarbon dates constrain the authors chronology for the Cape Espenberg beach ridge plain and the Shishmaref barrier islands, 50 km to the southwest. Cape Espenberg, acts as the depositional sink for the northeastward longshore transport system and contains the oldest sedimentary deposits: based on 3700±90 B.P. (β-23170) old grass from a paleosol capping a low dune facies. The oldest date on the Shishmaref barrier islands is 1550±70 B.P. (β-23183) and implies that the modem barrier is a comparatively recent phenomenon. Late Holocene sedimentation varies between intervals of erosion and rapid progradation. During erosional periods higher dunes are built atop beach ridges: as between 3000-2000 yrs. BP and intermittently from 1000 BP to the present. At other times, rapid progradation predominated, generating wide swales and low beach ridges without dunes. Tentatively, dune formation is correlative with the Neo-glacial and Little Ice Age glacial advances and increased alluviation in north Alaska. Rapid progradation is contemporaneous with warmer intervals of soil and peat formation atop alluvial terraces, dated to ca. 4000-3500 and 2000-1000 yrs. B.P. In the record of the last 1000 years, dune building is correlative with heightened storminess, as reflected in northwest Alaska tree-ring chronologies and weather anomalies such as spring dust storms and winter thunderstorms in East Asian locations

  17. Changes in electron precipitation inferred from spectra deduced from D region electron densities during a post--magnetic storm effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montbriand, L.E.; Belrose, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    The occurrence of enhanced ionization after geomagnetic storms, commonly referred to as storm aftereffect, is investigated on the hypothesis that the enhancement is due to a 'drizzle' of energetic electrons from the radiation belts. The study utilized electron density-height profiles obtained from the partial reflection experiment at Ottawa and available information on the height profile of the steady state loss coefficient for energetic electron events in combination with the ion pair production treatments of Ress (1963) and Berger et al. (1974) to deduce two-component differential energy spectra of the electron drizzle. The period studied, December 13--20, 1970, was unique for examining poststorm effects in that the geomagnetic storm on December 14--15 was intense and brief, and it was preceded and followed by periods of geomagnetic calm. The results indicate that the drizzle deduced was minimal before the storm and on the storm day and maximized 2--3 days after the peak of the storm at a time when geomagnetic activity had returned to calm. The results also suggest that the spectrum was hardest shortly after the drizzle maximized. No satisfactory source for the enhanced ionization during the poststorm other than particle drizzle could be found that would produce both the magnitude and the diurnal variation of the effect observed, a conclusion which establishes the validity of the hypothesis made

  18. Historical record of concentrations of atmospheric trace components deduced from a glacier in the Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doescher, A.

    1996-07-01

    A 109 m ice core from a high-alpine glacier (Colle Gnifetti, Monte Rosa massif, 4440 m a.s.l., Switzerland) was used to reconstruct the history of atmospheric trace components. Concentrations of the anions chloride, nitrate, sulfate and the cations sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium were measured with 2.5-5.0 cm resolution in the top 70 m of a 109 m long of the ice core. Dating of the ice core was performed using stratigraphic markers such as historically known Saharan dust events, the atomic bomb horizon and volcanic eruptions and supplemented with the 210 Pb nuclear dating. The record covers the time period from about 1755-1981. The concentrations of nitrate and sulfate show an exponential increase from 1930 and 1870 until 1965, respectively. The factors of increase were 2.3±0.3 and 5.8±0.9, respectively. The chloride concentrations remained constant during this period. A good agreement between the concentrations of sulfate, which were corrected for the contribution of seasalt and mineral dust and the European SO 2 -emissions was found for the last 100 years. The concentrations of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium did not show a trend. The concentrations of ammonium increased exponentially between 1870 and 1960 by a factor of 2.2±0.4. The different sources of the trace components were identified using correlation analysis. Sodium and chloride originated from seasalt, magnesium and calcium from geologic erosion. For both, the industrial and pre-industrial period, the dominant source of ammonium and nitrate was conversion of the gaseous precursors NH 3 and HNO 3 . Sulfate concentrations in the industrial period originated from the anthropogenically emitted SO 2 , whereas in the pre-industrial period the geologic source dominated. The Colle Gnifetti accumulates mainly summer snow, and therefore, several test drillings were performed to find a new site with higher accumulation rate. (author) figs., 17 tabs., 50 refs

  19. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xiong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload fluxgate magnetometer (FGM data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs. We filtered the FGM data by using band-passes with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different maximum spatial scale sizes in the meridional plane ranging from 76–608 km. Associated with the EPB observations at about 400 km, the typical altitude of CHAMP during the year 2000–2005, we also investigate the post-sunset equatorial vertical plasma drift data from ROCSAT-1 (Republic of China Satellite 1. Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010. Small-scale EPB structures are observed by CHAMP when the irregularities reach apex heights of 800 km and more. Such events are encountered primarily in the Brazilian sector during the months around November, when the post-sunset vertical plasma drift is high.

  20. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, C.; Lühr, H.; Ma, S. Y.; Stolle, C.; Fejer, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload) fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). We filtered the FGM data by using band-passes with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different maximum spatial scale sizes in the meridional plane ranging from 76-608 km. Associated with the EPB observations at about 400 km, the typical altitude of CHAMP during the year 2000-2005, we also investigate the post-sunset equatorial vertical plasma drift data from ROCSAT-1 (Republic of China Satellite 1). Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010). Small-scale EPB structures are observed by CHAMP when the irregularities reach apex heights of 800 km and more. Such events are encountered primarily in the Brazilian sector during the months around November, when the post-sunset vertical plasma drift is high.

  1. Palaeoclimatic trends deduced from the hydrochemistry of a Triassic sandstone aquifer, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, A.H.; Edmunds, W.M.; Andrews, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed geochemical study (elemental, isotopic and dissolved inert gases) of unconfined and confined sections of the Triassic non-marine sandstone aquifer in eastern England has been undertaken. Aspects of the recharge history of this aquifer over the past 40,000 years are revealed by examination of the data. 14 C activity and delta 13 C values show downgradient decrease and increase, respectively, the latter from -12 to -13 per mille (PDB) at outcrop to -8.5 per mille in deep confined groundwaters, indicating a continuing reaction between water and carbonate mineral phases. Although the bulk carbonate contained in sandstone samples gives delta 13 C around -7 per mille, modelling of the carbon isotopic evolution and consideration of the resulting 14 C age corrections suggest that a carbonate with delta 13 C closer to 0 per mille has played a major role in at least the earlier stages of hydrochemical evolution. The corrected radiocarbon age ranges, generated by the computer program WATEQF-ISOTOP, are used as a framework in which the palaeo-environmental information from oxygen and hydrogen isotope data, inert gas contents, and chloride levels are discussed. The measurement of dissolved helium levels demonstrates an excess of 4 He in many samples, which correlates with radiocarbon ages. The assumption of bulk chemical and physical properties for the aquifer rock allows independent 'excess 4 He' ages to be computed, which are mostly in excess of the corrected 14 C ages. The trend of delta 18 O is from about -8 per mille at outcrop to -9.7 per mille (SMOW) downgradient, which is significantly more depleted than has been found in previous studies of UK basins. The delta 2 H and delta 18 O values are related by the regression line delta 2 H=6.6delta 18 O+1; data from other UK studies also lie close to this trend

  2. The Hengill geothermal area, Iceland: Variation of temperature gradients deduced from the maximum depth of seismogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, G. R.

    1995-04-01

    Given a uniform lithology and strain rate and a full seismic data set, the maximum depth of earthquakes may be viewed to a first order as an isotherm. These conditions are approached at the Hengill geothermal area S. Iceland, a dominantly basaltic area. The likely strain rate calculated from thermal and tectonic considerations is 10 -15 s -1, and temperature measurements from four drill sites within the area indicate average, near-surface geothermal gradients of up to 150 °C km -1 throughout the upper 2 km. The temperature at which seismic failure ceases for the strain rates likely at the Hengill geothermal area is determined by analogy with oceanic crust, and is about 650 ± 50 °C. The topographies of the top and bottom of the seismogenic layer were mapped using 617 earthquakes located highly accurately by performing a simultaneous inversion for three-dimensional structure and hypocentral parameters. The thickness of the seismogenic layer is roughly constant and about 3 km. A shallow, aseismic, low-velocity volume within the spreading plate boundary that crosses the area occurs above the top of the seismogenic layer and is interpreted as an isolated body of partial melt. The base of the seismogenic layer has a maximum depth of about 6.5 km beneath the spreading axis and deepens to about 7 km beneath a transform zone in the south of the area. Beneath the high-temperature part of the geothermal area, the maximum depth of earthquakes may be as shallow as 4 km. The geothermal gradient below drilling depths in various parts of the area ranges from 84 ± 9 °Ckm -1 within the low-temperature geothermal area of the transform zone to 138 ± 15 °Ckm -1 below the centre of the high-temperature geothermal area. Shallow maximum depths of earthquakes and therefore high average geothermal gradients tend to correlate with the intensity of the geothermal area and not with the location of the currently active spreading axis.

  3. Coronal mass ejection kinematics deduced from white light (Solar Mass Ejection Imager) and radio (Wind/WAVES) observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M. J.; Jackson, B. V.; Webb, D. F.; Mizuno, D. R.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2005-09-01

    White-light and radio observations are combined to deduce the coronal and interplanetary kinematics of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that was ejected from the Sun at about 1700 UT on 2 November 2003. The CME, which was associated with an X8.3 solar flare from W56°, was observed by the Mauna Loa and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large-Angle Spectrometric Coronograph (LASCO) coronagraphs to 14 R⊙. The measured plane-of-sky speed of the LASCO CME was 2600 km s-1. To deduce the kinematics of this CME, we use the plane-of-sky white light observations from both the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) all-sky camera on board the Coriolis spacecraft and the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph, as well as the frequency drift rate of the low-frequency radio data and the results of the radio direction-finding analysis from the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft. In agreement with the in situ observations for this event, we find that both the white light and radio observations indicate that the CME must have decelerated significantly beginning near the Sun and continuing well into the interplanetary medium. More specifically, by requiring self-consistency of all the available remote and in situ data, together with a simple, but not unreasonable, assumption about the general characteristic of the CME deceleration, we were able to deduce the radial speed and distance time profiles for this CME as it propagated from the Sun to 1 AU. The technique presented here, which is applicable to mutual SMEI/WAVES CME events, is expected to provide a more complete description and better quantitative understanding of how CMEs propagate through interplanetary space, as well as how the radio emissions, generated by propagating CME/shocks, relate to the shock and CME. This understanding can potentially lead to more accurate predictions for the onset times of space weather events, such as those that were observed during this unique period of intense solar activity.

  4. Use of activity measurements in the plume from Chernobyl to deduce fuel state before, during and after the accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longworth, J.P.; Tobias, A.

    1986-07-01

    Work performed at Berkely Nuclear Laboratories both prior to the meeting in Vienna at which USSR gave full details of the Chernobyl accident and after that meeting is recorded. Plume data from Western Europe were used to deduce the likely damage to the fuel and its previous irradiation history. The note concludes that the source to the environment consisted of an initial dispersion of fuel particulate followed by a prolonged release at a lower rate, the total release being some 3% of the core inventory of fuel. Early and late in the release period it was enhanced in volatile species. Damage to the fuel was thus due both to mechanical disruption and to high temperatures. During the early dispersive event high temperatures (probably approaching fuel melting) were reached in some of the core, though the proportion of the fuel affected may have been small. (UK)

  5. Fracture-mechanics data deduced from thermal-shock and related experiments with LWR pressure-vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Canonico, D.A.; Iskander, S.K.; Bolt, S.E.; Holz, P.P.; Nanstad, R.K.; Stelzman, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are susceptible to certain types of hypothetical accidents that can subject the reactor pressure vessel to severe thermal shock, that is, a rapid cooling of the inner surface of the vessel wall. The thermal-shock loading, coupled with the radiation-induced reduction in the material fracture toughness, introduces the possibility of propagation of preexistent flaws and what at one time were regarded as somewhat unique fracture-oriented conditions. Several postulated reactor accidents have been analyzed to discover flaw behavior trends; seven intermediate-scale thermal-shock experiments with steel cylinders have been conducted; and corresponding materials characterization studies have been performed. Flaw behavior trends and related fracture-mechanics data deduced from these studies are discussed

  6. Deducing 2D Crystal Structure at the Solid/Liquid Interface with Atomic Resolution by Combined STM and SFG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Arthur; Ahn, Seokhoon; Matzger, Adam J.; Chen, Zhan

    2009-03-01

    Supplemented by computed models, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) can provide detailed structure of 2D crystals formed at the liquid/solid interface with atomic resolution. However, some structural information such as functional group orientations in such 2D crystals needs to be tested experimentally to ensure the accuracy of the deduced structures. Due to the limited sensitivity, many other experimental techniques such as Raman and infrared spectroscopy have not been allowed to provide such structural information of 2D crystals. Here we showed that Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (SFG) can measure average orientation of functional groups in such 2D crystals, or physisorbed monolayers, providing key experimental data to aid in the modeling and interpretation of the STM images. The usefulness of combining these two techniques is demonstrated with a phthalate diesters monolayer formed at the 1-phenyloctane/ highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) interface. The spatial orientation of the ester C=O of the monolayer was successfully determined using SFG.

  7. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Building information deduced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Myrup Jensen, Morten; Beetz, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, Building Information Models have become commonplace in building profession. The extensive use and increasing experience with BIM models offers new perspectives and potentials for design and planning. A recent stakeholder study conducted by the authors of this paper show that in p......In recent years, Building Information Models have become commonplace in building profession. The extensive use and increasing experience with BIM models offers new perspectives and potentials for design and planning. A recent stakeholder study conducted by the authors of this paper show...... that in practice models are no longer solely observed as culmination of knowledge in a 3d representation of future built structures, but as a source of information in itself. Experienced users of BIM want to Find Information within a model or across a set of these and Compare models in order to evaluate states...... of a model, differences in separate models or models from different point of time. Current BIM tools support both modes only in a rudimentary form. This paper discusses current modes of information query within and across BIM models, shows beneficial scenarios for building and planning practice through...

  9. cDNA, deduced polypeptide structure and chromosomal assignment of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid, SPL(pVal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.C.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.; Whitsett, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    In hyaline membrane disease of premature infants, lack of surfactant leads to pulmonary atelectasis and respiratory distress. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins of M/sub r/ = 5000-14,000 have been isolated from mammalian surfactants which enhance the rate of spreading and the surface tension lowering properties of phospholipids during dynamic compression. The authors have characterized the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of pulmonary proteolipids from ether/ethanol extracts of bovine, canine, and human surfactant. Two distinct peptides were identified and termed SPL(pVal) and SPL(Phe). An oligonucleotide probe based on the valine-rich amino-terminal amino acid sequence of SPL(pVal) was utilized to isolate cDNA and genomic DNA encoding the human protein, termed surfactant proteolipid SPL(pVal) on the basis of its unique polyvaline domain. The primary structure of a precursor protein of 20,870 daltons, containing the SPL(pVal) peptide, was deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNAs. Hybrid-arrested translation and immunoprecipitation of labeled translation products of human mRNA demonstrated a precursor protein, the active hydrophobic peptide being produced by proteolytic processing. Two classes of cDNAs encoding SPL(pVal) were identified. Human SPL(pVal) mRNA was more abundant in the adult than in fetal lung. The SPL(pVal) gene locus was assigned to chromosome 8

  10. Deducing the temporal order of cofactor function in ligand-regulated gene transcription: theory and experimental verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Edward J; Guo, Chunhua; Simons, S Stoney; Chow, Carson C

    2012-01-01

    Cofactors are intimately involved in steroid-regulated gene expression. Two critical questions are (1) the steps at which cofactors exert their biological activities and (2) the nature of that activity. Here we show that a new mathematical theory of steroid hormone action can be used to deduce the kinetic properties and reaction sequence position for the functioning of any two cofactors relative to a concentration limiting step (CLS) and to each other. The predictions of the theory, which can be applied using graphical methods similar to those of enzyme kinetics, are validated by obtaining internally consistent data for pair-wise analyses of three cofactors (TIF2, sSMRT, and NCoR) in U2OS cells. The analysis of TIF2 and sSMRT actions on GR-induction of an endogenous gene gave results identical to those with an exogenous reporter. Thus new tools to determine previously unobtainable information about the nature and position of cofactor action in any process displaying first-order Hill plot kinetics are now available.

  11. Nucleotide sequence of a cDNA for branched chain acyltransferase with analysis of the deduced protein structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, K.B.; Litwer, S.; Bradford, A.P.; Aitken, A.; Danner, D.J.; Yeaman, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence was determined for a 1.6-kilobase human cDNA putative for the branched chain acyltransferase protein of the branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. Translation of the sequence reveals an open reading frame encoding a 315-amino acid protein of molecular weight 35,759 followed by 560 bases of 3'-untranslated sequence. Three repeats of the polyadenylation signal hexamer ATTAAA are present prior to the polyadenylate tail. Within the open reading frame is a 10-amino acid fragment which matches exactly the amino acid sequence around the lipoate-lysine residue in bovine kidney branched chain acyltransferase, thus confirming the identity of the cDNA. Analysis of the deduced protein structure for the human branched chain acyltransferase revealed an organization into domains similar to that reported for the acyltransferase proteins of the pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. This similarity in organization suggests that a more detailed analysis of the proteins will be required to explain the individual substrate and multienzyme complex specificity shown by these acyltransferases

  12. Deducing hybrid performance from parental metabolic profiles of young primary roots of maize by using a multivariate diallel approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Feher

    Full Text Available Heterosis, the greater vigor of hybrids compared to their parents, has been exploited in maize breeding for more than 100 years to produce ever better performing elite hybrids of increased yield. Despite extensive research, the underlying mechanisms shaping the extent of heterosis are not well understood, rendering the process of selecting an optimal set of parental lines tedious. This study is based on a dataset consisting of 112 metabolite levels in young roots of four parental maize inbred lines and their corresponding twelve hybrids, along with the roots' biomass as a heterotic trait. Because the parental biomass is a poor predictor for hybrid biomass, we established a model framework to deduce the biomass of the hybrid from metabolite profiles of its parental lines. In the proposed framework, the hybrid metabolite levels are expressed relative to the parental levels by incorporating the standard concept of additivity/dominance, which we name the Combined Relative Level (CRL. Our modeling strategy includes a feature selection step on the parental levels which are demonstrated to be predictive of CRL across many hybrid metabolites. We demonstrate that these selected parental metabolites are further predictive of hybrid biomass. Our approach directly employs the diallel structure in a multivariate fashion, whereby we attempt to not only predict macroscopic phenotype (biomass, but also molecular phenotype (metabolite profiles. Therefore, our study provides the first steps for further investigations of the genetic determinants to metabolism and, ultimately, growth. Finally, our success on the small-scale experiments implies a valid strategy for large-scale experiments, where parental metabolite profiles may be used together with profiles of selected hybrids as a training set to predict biomass of all possible hybrids.

  13. Exospheric Neutral Density at the Earth's subsolar magnetopause deduced from the XMM-Newton X-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, H. K.; Carter, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Soft X-rays can be emitted when highly charged solar wind ions and exospheric neutrals exchange electrons. Astrophysics missions, such as XMM-Newton and ROSAT X-ray telescopes, have found that such solar wind charge exchange happens at the Earth's exosphere. The Earth's magnetosphere can be imaged via soft X-rays in order to understand its interaction with solar wind. Consequently, two soft X-ray telescope missions (CuPID and SMILE) are scheduled to launch in 2019 and 2021. They will provide wide field-of-view soft X-ray images of the Earth's dayside magnetosphere. The imagers will track the location and movement of the cusps, magnetopause, and bow shock in response to solar wind variations. To support these missions, an understanding of exospheric neutral density profile is needed. The neutral density is one of the controlling factors of soft X-ray signals. Strong neutral density can help to obtain high-resolution and high-cadence of soft X-ray images. In this study, we estimate the exospheric neutral density at 10 RE subsolar point using XMM X-ray observations, Cluster plasma observations, and OpenGGCM global magnetosphere - ionosphere MHD model. XMM-Newton observes line-of-sight, narrow field-of-view, integrated soft X-ray emissions when it looks through the dayside magnetosphere. OpenGGCM reproduces soft X-ray signals seen by the XMM spacecraft, assuming exospheric neutral density as a function of the neutral density at the 10RE subsolar point and the radial distance. Cluster observations are used to confirm OpenGGCM plasma results. Finally, we deduce the neutral density at 10 RE subsolar point by adjusting the model results to the XMM-Newton soft X-ray observations.

  14. Deeply bound π- states in 207Pb formed in the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction. II. Deduced binding energies and widths and the pion-nucleus interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itahashi, K.; Oyama, K.; Hayano, R. S.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.; Knülle, M.; Münch, M.; Schott, W.; Kienle, P.; Geissel, H.; Iwasa, N.; Münzenberg, G.; Hirenzaki, S.; Toki, H.; Yamazaki, T.

    2000-08-01

    We find a remarkable agreement of the excitation energy spectrum of the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction measured at Td=600 MeV near the π- production threshold with its theoretical prediction. Their comparison leads us to assign the distinct narrow peak observed at about 5 MeV below the threshold to the formation of bound pionic states π-⊗207Pb of the quasisubstitutional configurations (2p)π-(3p3/2,3p1/2)-1n. A small bump observed on the tail of the peak is assigned to the pionic 1s state. The binding energies (Bnl) and the widths (Γnl) of the pionic orbitals are deduced to be B2p=5.13+/-0.02 (stat)+/-0.12 (syst) MeV and Γ2p=0.43+/-0.06 (stat)+/-0.06 (syst) MeV by decomposing the experimental spectrum into the pionic 1s and 2p components. While B2p and Γ2p are determined with small ambiguity, B1s and Γ1s are strongly correlated with each other, and are affected by the relative 1s/2p cross section ratio assumed, since the 1s component is observed only as an unresolved bump. Thus, we have to allow large uncertainties 6.6 MeVdeduce the effective π- mass in the nuclear medium.

  15. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: The Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M.; Rusincovitch, Shelley A.; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C.; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Methods Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of “smart dimensions”, and dynamically-generated user interfaces. Results DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort “join” functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Conclusions Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source

  16. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M

    2014-12-01

    Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of "smart dimensions", and dynamically-generated user interfaces. DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort "join" functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source system changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  17. Global significance of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high-resolution seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, K.; Tittgemeyer, M.; Ryberg, T.; Wenzel, F.; Mooney, W.

    2002-01-01

    an on-going processes; nevertheless, the derived quantitative estimates of the SMBL properties provide important constraints for any hypothesis on scale-forming processes. Models to be tested by future numerical and field experiments are, for example, repeated subduction-convection stretching of oceanic lithosphere (marble-cake model) and schlieren formation at mid-ocean ridges. It is also proposed that the modeling of the observed blocking of Sn and Pn propagation at active plate margins offers a new tool to study the depth range of tectonics below the crust-mantle boundary. Finally, the deduced schlieren structure of the SMBL closes an important scale gap of three to four orders of magnitude between structural dimensions studied in petrological analysis of mantle samples (xenoliths or outcrop of oceanic lithosphere) and those imaged in classical seismological studies of the lithosphere.

  18. Comparison of GOME tropospheric NO2 columns with NO2 profiles deduced from ground-based in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, D.; Boersma, K. F.; Kaiser, J. W.; Weiss, A. K.; Folini, D.; Eskes, H. J.; Buchmann, B.

    2006-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical tropospheric column densities (VTCs) retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) are compared to coincident ground-based tropospheric NO2 columns. The ground-based columns are deduced from in situ measurements at different altitudes in the Alps for 1997 to June 2003, yielding a unique long-term comparison of GOME NO2 VTC data retrieved by a collaboration of KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute) and BIRA/IASB (Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy) with independently derived tropospheric NO2 profiles. A first comparison relates the GOME retrieved tropospheric columns to the tropospheric columns obtained by integrating the ground-based NO2 measurements. For a second comparison, the tropospheric profiles constructed from the ground-based measurements are first multiplied with the averaging kernel (AK) of the GOME retrieval. The second approach makes the comparison independent from the a priori NO2 profile used in the GOME retrieval. This allows splitting the total difference between the column data sets into two contributions: one that is due to differences between the a priori and the ground-based NO2 profile shapes, and another that can be attributed to uncertainties in both the remaining retrieval parameters (such as, e.g., surface albedo or aerosol concentration) and the ground-based in situ NO2 profiles. For anticyclonic clear sky conditions the comparison indicates a good agreement between the columns (n=157, R=0.70/0.74 for the first/second comparison approach, respectively). The mean relative difference (with respect to the ground-based columns) is -7% with a standard deviation of 40% and GOME on average slightly underestimating the ground-based columns. Both data sets show a similar seasonal behaviour with a distinct maximum of spring NO2 VTCs. Further analysis indicates small GOME columns being systematically smaller than the ground-based ones. The influence of different shapes in the a priori and

  19. Comparison of GOME tropospheric NO2 columns with NO2 profiles deduced from ground-based in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schaub

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 vertical tropospheric column densities (VTCs retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME are compared to coincident ground-based tropospheric NO2 columns. The ground-based columns are deduced from in situ measurements at different altitudes in the Alps for 1997 to June 2003, yielding a unique long-term comparison of GOME NO2 VTC data retrieved by a collaboration of KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute and BIRA/IASB (Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy with independently derived tropospheric NO2 profiles. A first comparison relates the GOME retrieved tropospheric columns to the tropospheric columns obtained by integrating the ground-based NO2 measurements. For a second comparison, the tropospheric profiles constructed from the ground-based measurements are first multiplied with the averaging kernel (AK of the GOME retrieval. The second approach makes the comparison independent from the a priori NO2 profile used in the GOME retrieval. This allows splitting the total difference between the column data sets into two contributions: one that is due to differences between the a priori and the ground-based NO2 profile shapes, and another that can be attributed to uncertainties in both the remaining retrieval parameters (such as, e.g., surface albedo or aerosol concentration and the ground-based in situ NO2 profiles. For anticyclonic clear sky conditions the comparison indicates a good agreement between the columns (n=157, R=0.70/0.74 for the first/second comparison approach, respectively. The mean relative difference (with respect to the ground-based columns is −7% with a standard deviation of 40% and GOME on average slightly underestimating the ground-based columns. Both data sets show a similar seasonal behaviour with a distinct maximum of spring NO2 VTCs. Further analysis indicates small GOME columns being systematically smaller than the ground-based ones. The influence of different shapes in the a

  20. Nuclear disassembly time scales using space time correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, D.; Colin, J.; Lecolley, J.F.; Meslin, C.; Aboufirassi, M.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Bilwes, B.; Cosmo, F. [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France); Galin, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); and others

    1996-09-01

    The lifetime, {tau}, with respect to multifragmentation of highly excited nuclei is deduced from the analysis of strongly damped Pb+Au collisions at 29 MeV/u. The method is based on the study of space-time correlations induced by `proximity` effects between fragments emitted by the two primary products of the reaction and gives the time between the re-separation of the two primary products and the subsequent multifragment decay of one partner. (author). 2 refs.

  1. Nuclear disassembly time scales using space time correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, D.; Colin, J.; Lecolley, J.F.; Meslin, C.; Aboufirassi, M.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Galin, J.; and others.

    1996-01-01

    The lifetime, τ, with respect to multifragmentation of highly excited nuclei is deduced from the analysis of strongly damped Pb+Au collisions at 29 MeV/u. The method is based on the study of space-time correlations induced by 'proximity' effects between fragments emitted by the two primary products of the reaction and gives the time between the re-separation of the two primary products and the subsequent multifragment decay of one partner. (author)

  2. Nucleotide sequence of Phaseolus vulgaris L. alcohol dehydrogenase encoding cDNA and three-dimensional structure prediction of the deduced protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelia, Kassim; Khor, Chin Yin; Shah, Farida Habib; Bhore, Subhash J

    2015-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are widely consumed as a source of proteins and natural products. However, its yield needs to be increased. In line with the agenda of Phaseomics (an international consortium), work of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) generation from bean pods was initiated. Altogether, 5972 ESTs have been isolated. Alcohol dehydrogenase (AD) encoding gene cDNA was a noticeable transcript among the generated ESTs. This AD is an important enzyme; therefore, to understand more about it this study was undertaken. The objective of this study was to elucidate P. vulgaris L. AD (PvAD) gene cDNA sequence and to predict the three-dimensional (3D) structure of deduced protein. positive and negative strands of the PvAD cDNA clone were sequenced using M13 forward and M13 reverse primers to elucidate the nucleotide sequence. Deduced PvAD cDNA and protein sequence was analyzed for their basic features using online bioinformatics tools. Sequence comparison was carried out using bl2seq program, and tree-view program was used to construct a phylogenetic tree. The secondary structures and 3D structure of PvAD protein were predicted by using the PHYRE automatic fold recognition server. The sequencing results analysis showed that PvAD cDNA is 1294 bp in length. It's open reading frame encodes for a protein that contains 371 amino acids. Deduced protein sequence analysis showed the presence of putative substrate binding, catalytic Zn binding, and NAD binding sites. Results indicate that the predicted 3D structure of PvAD protein is analogous to the experimentally determined crystal structure of s-nitrosoglutathione reductase from an Arabidopsis species. The 1294 bp long PvAD cDNA encodes for 371 amino acid long protein that contains conserved domains required for biological functions of AD. The predicted deduced PvAD protein's 3D structure reflects the analogy with the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana s-nitrosoglutathione reductase. Further study is required

  3. Characterization of pavement texture by means of height difference correlation and relation to wet skid resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Torbruegge

    2015-04-01

    We deduce within this article the correlation between classical surface roughness parameters and the parameter set of self-affine surfaces. These parameters allow for a detailed understanding of the relationship between pavement texture and its wet skid resistance. We present wet skid resistance measurements with the British pendulum and a linear friction tester device on different pavement textures. We demonstrate that the so-called estimated texture depth does not correlate to the surface skid resistance measured with the British pendulum. Finally, we deduce a dependency of wet skid resistance on pavement texture which is supported by current models for hysteresis friction.

  4. Ionospheric Response to the Total Solar Eclipse of 22 July 2009 as Deduced from VLBI and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Shu, F. C.; Zheng, W. M.; Kondo, T.; Ichikawa, R.; Hasegawa, S.; Sekido, M.

    2010-01-01

    A total solar eclipse occurred over China at latitudes of about 30 N on the morning of 22 July 2009, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the influence of the sun on the earth's upper ionosphere. GPS observations from Shanghai GPS Local Network and VLBI observations from stations Shanghai, Urumqi, and Kashima were used to observe the response of TEC to the total solar eclipse. From the GPS data reduction, the sudden decrease of TEC at the time of the eclipse, amounting to 2.8 TECU, and gradual increase of TEC after the eclipse were found by analyzing the diurnal variations. More distinctly, the variations of TEC were studied along individual satellite passes. The delay in reaching the minimum level of TEC with the maximum phase of eclipse was 5-10 min. Besides, we also compared the ionospheric activity derived from different VLBI stations with the GPS results and found a strong correlation between them.

  5. Fourth-Order Spatial Correlation of Thermal Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Feng; Zhang Xun; Sun Jia; Song Jian-Ping; Zhang Yan-Peng; Xue Xin-Xin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the fourth-order spatial correlation properties of pseudo-thermal light in the photon counting regime, and apply the Klyshko advanced-wave picture to describe the process of four-photon coincidence counting measurement. We deduce the theory of a proof-of-principle four-photon coincidence counting configuration, and find that if the four randomly radiated photons come from the same radiation area and are indistinguishable in principle, the fourth-order correlation of them is 24 times larger than that when four photons come from different radiation areas. In addition, we also show that the higher-order spatial correlation function can be decomposed into multiple lower-order correlation functions, and the contrast and visibility of low-order correlation peaks are less than those of higher orders, while the resolutions all are identical. This study may be useful for better understanding the four-photon interference and multi-channel correlation imaging

  6. A Hypothesis: Life Initiated from Two Genes, as Deduced from the RNA World Hypothesis and the Characteristics of Life-Like Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Kawamura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available RNA played a central role in the emergence of the first life-like system on primitive Earth since RNA molecules contain both genetic information and catalytic activity. However, there are several drawbacks regarding the RNA world hypothesis. Here, I briefly discuss the feasibility of the RNA world hypothesis to deduce the RNA functions that are essential for forming a life-like system. At the same time, I have conducted a conceptual analysis of the characteristics of biosystems as a useful approach to deduce a realistic life-like system in relation to the definition of life. For instance, an RNA-based life-like system should possess enough stability to resist environmental perturbations, by developing a cell-like compartment, for instance. Here, a conceptual viewpoint is summarized to provide a realistic life-like system that is compatible with the primitive Earth environment and the capabilities of RNA molecules. According to the empirical and conceptual analysis, I propose the hypothesis that the first life-like system could have initiated from only two genes.

  7. Atmospheric CO2 variations over the last three glacial-interglacial climatic cycles deduced from the Dome Fuji deep ice core, Antarctica using a wet extraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kenji; Nakazawa, Takakiyo; Aoki, Shuji

    2003-01-01

    A deep ice core drilled at Dome Fuji, East Antarctica was analyzed for the CO 2 concentration using a wet extraction method in order to reconstruct its atmospheric variations over the past 320 kyr, which includes three full glacial-interglacial climatic cycles, with a mean time resolution of about 1.1 kyr. The CO 2 concentration values derived for the past 65 kyr are very close to those obtained from other Antarctic ice cores using dry extraction methods, although the wet extraction method is generally thought to be inappropriate for the determination of the CO 2 concentration. The comparison between the CO 2 and Ca 2+ concentrations deduced from the Dome Fuji core suggests that calcium carbonate emitted from lands was mostly neutralized in the atmosphere before reaching the central part of Antarctica, or that only a small part of calcium carbonate was involved in CO 2 production during the wet extraction process. The CO 2 concentration for the past 320 kyr deduced from the Dome Fuji core varies between 190 and 300 ppmv, showing clear glacial-interglacial variations similar to the result of the Vostok ice core. However, for some periods, the concentration values of the Dome Fuji core are higher by up to 20 ppmv than those of the Vostok core. There is no clear indication that such differences are related to variations of chemical components of Ca 2+ , microparticle and acidity of the Dome Fuji core

  8. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2016-01-26

    It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event-the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids-as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches.

  9. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Ikehara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event—the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids—as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches.

  10. Coulomb correlation effects in YBaCuO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa-quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Munoz, J.S.; Sanchez, A.; Balle, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this work, the authors apply a mean field potential deduced from the multiband Hubbard Hamiltonian in order to obtain the lower and upper strongly correlated bands. They have obtained the total and partial density of states for U d = O and U d = 4 eV. The results show that the density of states calculated with U d = 4 eV at E F is lesser than that obtained with U d = 0. A small peak above E F arising from the strong correlated bands appears in the dDOS calculated with U d = 4 eV and this is in agreement with the experimental data

  11. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Ákos K.; Rauch, Edgar F.; Lábár, János L.

    2016-01-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. - Highlights: • We propose a novel technique to image the structure of polycrystalline TEM-samples. • Correlation coefficients maps highlights the evolution of the diffracting signal. • 3D views of grain boundaries are provided for nano-particles or polycrystals.

  12. Geometry of duskside equatorial current during magnetic storm main phase as deduced from magnetospheric and low-altitude observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dubyagin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a coordinated study of the moderate magnetic storm on 22 July 2009. The THEMIS and GOES observations of magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere were complemented by energetic particle observations at low altitude by the six NOAA POES satellites. Observations in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit revealed a relatively thin (half-thickness of less than 1 RE and intense current sheet in the dusk MLT sector during the main phase of the storm. The total westward current (integrated along the z-direction on the duskside at r ~ 6.6 RE was comparable to that in the midnight sector. Such a configuration cannot be adequately described by existing magnetic field models with predefined current systems (error in B > 60 nT. At the same time, low-altitude isotropic boundaries (IB of > 80 keV protons in the dusk sector were shifted ~ 4° equatorward relative to the IBs in the midnight sector. Both the equatorward IB shift and the current strength on the duskside correlate with the Sym-H* index. These findings imply a close relation between the current intensification and equatorward IB shift in the dusk sector. The analysis of IB dispersion revealed that high-energy IBs (E > 100 keV always exhibit normal dispersion (i.e., that for pitch angle scattering on curved field lines. Anomalous dispersion is sometimes observed in the low-energy channels (~ 30–100 keV. The maximum occurrence rate of anomalous dispersion was observed during the main phase of the storm in the dusk sector.

  13. Correlation spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B [Albuquerque, NM; Pfeifer, Kent B [Los Lunas, NM; Flemming, Jeb H [Albuquerque, NM; Jones, Gary D [Tijeras, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  14. Change of the Asian dust source region deduced from the composition of anthropogenic radionuclides in surface soil in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Igarashi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent climate change, especially during the 2000s, may be the primary reason for the expansion of the Asian dust source region. The change in the dust source region was investigated by examining anthropogenic radionuclides contained in surface soil samples from Mongolia. Surface soil was globally labeled by radioactive fallout from nuclear testing during the late 1950s and early 1960s, but there are no current direct sources for anthropogenic radionuclides in the air (before the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011. Radionuclides in the atmosphere are therefore carried mainly by wind-blown dust from surface soil, that is, aeolian dust. Asian dust carries traces of 90Sr, 137Cs, and other anthropogenic radionuclides; the heaviest deposition occurs in spring and has been recorded in Japan since the early 1990s. The composition of anthropogenic radionuclides in atmospheric depositions would be affected by a change in the dust source. Previous studies of atmospheric deposition at long-term monitoring sites (e.g. in Tsukuba, Japan have detected changes in the 137Cs/90Sr ratio and in the specific activity of the radionuclides. These changes in the composition of observed atmospheric depositions are supposed to reflect changes in the climatic conditions of the dust source region. To investigate this dust source change, we conducted a field survey of radionuclides (90Sr and 137Cs in surface soil samples in September 2007 in the eastern and southern regions of Mongolia, where dust storms have occurred more frequently since 2000. The specific activities of both radionuclides as well as the 137Cs/90Sr ratio in the surface soil were well correlated with annual average precipitation in the Mongolian desert-steppe zone. Higher specific activities and a higher 137Cs/90Sr ratio were found in grassland regions that experienced greater

  15. Changing seasonality patterns in Central Europe from Miocene Climate Optimum to Miocene Climate Transition deduced from the Crassostrea isotope archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Piller, Werner E.; Müllegger, Stefan; Grunert, Patrick; Micheels, Arne

    2011-03-01

    The Western Tethyan estuarine oyster Crassostrea gryphoides is an excellent climate archive due to its large size and rapid growth. It is geologically long lived and allows a stable isotope-based insight into climatic trends during the Miocene. Herein we utilised the climate archive of 5 oyster shells from the Miocene Climate Optimum (MCO) and the subsequent Miocene Climate Transition (MCT) to evaluate changes of seasonality patterns. MCO shells exhibit highly regular seasonal rhythms of warm-wet and dry-cool seasons. Optimal conditions resulted in extraordinary growth rates of the oysters. δ 13C profiles are in phase with δ 18O although phytoplankton blooms may cause a slight offset. Estuarine waters during the MCO in Central Europe display a seasonal temperature range of c. 9-10 °C. Absolute water temperatures have ranged from 17 to 19 °C during cool seasons and up to 28 °C in warm seasons. Already during the early phase of the MCO, the growth rates are distinctly declining, although gigantic and extremely old shells have been formed at that time. Still, a very regular and well expressed seasonality is dominating the isotope profiles, but episodically occurring extreme climate events influence the environments. The seasonal temperature range is still c. 9 °C but the cool season temperature seems to be slightly lower (16 °C) and the warm season water temperature does not exceed c. 25 °C. In the later MCT at c. 12.5-12.0 Ma the seasonality pattern is breaking down and is replaced by successions of dry years with irregular precipitation events. No correlation between δ 18O and δ 13C is documented maybe due to a suboptimal nutrition level which would explain the low growth rates and small sizes. The amplitude of seasonal temperature range is decreasing to 5-8 °C. No clear cooling trend can be postulated for that time as the winter season water temperatures range from 15 to 20 °C. This may point to unstable precipitation rhythms on a multi-annual to

  16. Evolutionary history of Calosomina ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Carabinae) of the world as deduced from sequence comparisons of the mitochondrial ND 5 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhi-Hui; Imura, Yûki; Osawa, Syozo

    2005-11-07

    We deduced the phylogenetic relationships of 54 individuals representing 27 species of the Calosomina (Coleoptera, Carabidae) from various regions of the world from the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND 5) gene sequences. The results suggest that these Calosomina radiated into 17 lineages within a short time about 30 million years ago (Mya). Most of the lineages are composed of a single genus containing only one or a few species. In some cases, several species classified into the same genus (e.g., Calosoma maximowiczi, Calos. inquisitor and Calos. frigidum) appear separately in independent lineages, while in others a series of species classified into different genera fall into one lineage (e.g., Chrysostigma calidum, Blaptosoma chihuahua, Microcallisthenes wilkesi and Callisthenes spp.). Based on this molecular phylogeny and morphological data, the probable evolutionary history and mode of morphological differentiation of the Calosomina are discussed.

  17. Two particle correlations at mid-rapidity in Si+A and Au+Au from E859/E866

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    Two particle correlation measurements for Si-A and Au- Au collisions from Brookhaven E859 and E866 are discussed. These measurements allow us, with some interpretation, to deduce the size of the participant region in a heavy ion collision. We show that various source parameterizations yield consistent results and we explore the dependence of the apparent source size on the pion yield

  18. Variation and correlation of hydrologic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Hydrological properties vary within a given geological formation and even more so among different soil and rock media. The variance of the saturated permeability is shown to be related to the variance of the pore-size distribution index of a given medium by a simple equation. This relationship is deduced by comparison of the data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Peters et al., 1984), Las Cruces, New Mexico (Wierenga et al., 1989), and Apache Leap, Arizona (Rasmussen et al., 1990). These and other studies in different soils and rocks also support the Poiseuille-Carmen relationship between the mean value of saturated permeability and the mean value of capillary radius. Correlations of the mean values and variances between permeability and pore-geometry parameters can lead us to better quantification of heterogeneous flow fields and better understanding of the scaling laws of hydrological properties.

  19. The four hexamerin genes in the honey bee: structure, molecular evolution and function deduced from expression patterns in queens, workers and drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Juliana R; Nunes, Francis M F; Cristino, Alexandre S; Simões, Zilá L P; Bitondi, Márcia M G

    2010-03-26

    Hexamerins are hemocyanin-derived proteins that have lost the ability to bind copper ions and transport oxygen; instead, they became storage proteins. The current study aimed to broaden our knowledge on the hexamerin genes found in the honey bee genome by exploring their structural characteristics, expression profiles, evolution, and functions in the life cycle of workers, drones and queens. The hexamerin genes of the honey bee (hex 70a, hex 70b, hex 70c and hex 110) diverge considerably in structure, so that the overall amino acid identity shared among their deduced protein subunits varies from 30 to 42%. Bioinformatics search for motifs in the respective upstream control regions (UCRs) revealed six overrepresented motifs including a potential binding site for Ultraspiracle (Usp), a target of juvenile hormone (JH). The expression of these genes was induced by topical application of JH on worker larvae. The four genes are highly transcribed by the larval fat body, although with significant differences in transcript levels, but only hex 110 and hex 70a are re-induced in the adult fat body in a caste- and sex-specific fashion, workers showing the highest expression. Transcripts for hex 110, hex 70a and hex70b were detected in developing ovaries and testes, and hex 110 was highly transcribed in the ovaries of egg-laying queens. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that HEX 110 is located at the most basal position among the holometabola hexamerins, and like HEX 70a and HEX 70c, it shares potential orthology relationship with hexamerins from other hymenopteran species. Striking differences were found in the structure and developmental expression of the four hexamerin genes in the honey bee. The presence of a potential binding site for Usp in the respective 5' UCRs, and the results of experiments on JH level manipulation in vivo support the hypothesis of regulation by JH. Transcript levels and patterns in the fat body and gonads suggest that, in addition to their primary

  20. The four hexamerin genes in the honey bee: structure, molecular evolution and function deduced from expression patterns in queens, workers and drones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Juliana R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hexamerins are hemocyanin-derived proteins that have lost the ability to bind copper ions and transport oxygen; instead, they became storage proteins. The current study aimed to broaden our knowledge on the hexamerin genes found in the honey bee genome by exploring their structural characteristics, expression profiles, evolution, and functions in the life cycle of workers, drones and queens. Results The hexamerin genes of the honey bee (hex 70a, hex 70b, hex 70c and hex 110 diverge considerably in structure, so that the overall amino acid identity shared among their deduced protein subunits varies from 30 to 42%. Bioinformatics search for motifs in the respective upstream control regions (UCRs revealed six overrepresented motifs including a potential binding site for Ultraspiracle (Usp, a target of juvenile hormone (JH. The expression of these genes was induced by topical application of JH on worker larvae. The four genes are highly transcribed by the larval fat body, although with significant differences in transcript levels, but only hex 110 and hex 70a are re-induced in the adult fat body in a caste- and sex-specific fashion, workers showing the highest expression. Transcripts for hex 110, hex 70a and hex70b were detected in developing ovaries and testes, and hex 110 was highly transcribed in the ovaries of egg-laying queens. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that HEX 110 is located at the most basal position among the holometabola hexamerins, and like HEX 70a and HEX 70c, it shares potential orthology relationship with hexamerins from other hymenopteran species. Conclusions Striking differences were found in the structure and developmental expression of the four hexamerin genes in the honey bee. The presence of a potential binding site for Usp in the respective 5' UCRs, and the results of experiments on JH level manipulation in vivo support the hypothesis of regulation by JH. Transcript levels and patterns in the fat body

  1. The four hexamerin genes in the honey bee: structure, molecular evolution and function deduced from expression patterns in queens, workers and drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Hexamerins are hemocyanin-derived proteins that have lost the ability to bind copper ions and transport oxygen; instead, they became storage proteins. The current study aimed to broaden our knowledge on the hexamerin genes found in the honey bee genome by exploring their structural characteristics, expression profiles, evolution, and functions in the life cycle of workers, drones and queens. Results The hexamerin genes of the honey bee (hex 70a, hex 70b, hex 70c and hex 110) diverge considerably in structure, so that the overall amino acid identity shared among their deduced protein subunits varies from 30 to 42%. Bioinformatics search for motifs in the respective upstream control regions (UCRs) revealed six overrepresented motifs including a potential binding site for Ultraspiracle (Usp), a target of juvenile hormone (JH). The expression of these genes was induced by topical application of JH on worker larvae. The four genes are highly transcribed by the larval fat body, although with significant differences in transcript levels, but only hex 110 and hex 70a are re-induced in the adult fat body in a caste- and sex-specific fashion, workers showing the highest expression. Transcripts for hex 110, hex 70a and hex70b were detected in developing ovaries and testes, and hex 110 was highly transcribed in the ovaries of egg-laying queens. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that HEX 110 is located at the most basal position among the holometabola hexamerins, and like HEX 70a and HEX 70c, it shares potential orthology relationship with hexamerins from other hymenopteran species. Conclusions Striking differences were found in the structure and developmental expression of the four hexamerin genes in the honey bee. The presence of a potential binding site for Usp in the respective 5' UCRs, and the results of experiments on JH level manipulation in vivo support the hypothesis of regulation by JH. Transcript levels and patterns in the fat body and gonads suggest that

  2. Relativistic nuclear physics: symmetry and the correlation depletion principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The author's view on the role of symmetry in fundamental physics is presented. The concept of the 'symmetry of solutions' is analyzed. It is stressed that it is impossible to deduce the basic laws of relativistic nuclear physics from the QCD Lagrangians without recourse to additional hypotheses about the symmetry of solutions (Green functions). The test of these hypotheses is the major prospect of the study of hadron and nuclear collisions. Special importance is given to the Correlation Depletions Principle that makes it possible to construct mathematical models of relativistic nuclear physics, and analyze, by using simple terms, topologically complicated events of nucleus-nucleus collisions. 15 refs., 4 figs

  3. Deduced sequences of the membrane fusion and attachment proteins of canine distemper viruses isolated from dogs and wild animals in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chae-Wun; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Nak-Hyung; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Choi, In-Soo

    2013-08-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes highly contagious respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological diseases in wild and domestic animal species. Despite a broad vaccination campaign, the disease is still a serious problem worldwide. In this study, six field CDV strains were isolated from three dogs, two raccoon dogs, and one badger in Korea. The full sequence of the genes encoding fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) proteins were compared with those of other CDVs including field and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis for the F and H genes indicated that the two CDV strains isolated from dogs were most closely related to Chinese strains in the Asia-1 genotype. Another four strains were closely related to Japanese strains in the Asia-2 genotype. The six currently isolated strains shared 90.2-92.1% and 88.2-91.8% identities with eight commercial vaccine strains in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the F protein, respectively. They also showed 90.1-91.4% and 87.8-90.7% identities with the same vaccine strains in their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the H protein, respectively. Different N-linked glycosylation sites were identified in the F and H genes of the six isolates from the prototype vaccine strain Onderstepoort. Collectively, these results demonstrate that at least two different CDV genotypes currently exist in Korea. The considerable genetic differences between the vaccine strains and wild-type isolates would be a major factor of the incomplete protection of dogs from CDV infections.

  4. cDNA and deduced primary structure of basic phospholipase A2 with neurotoxic activity from the venom secretion of the Crotalus durissus collilineatus rattlesnake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H.R. Fagundes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To illustrate the construction of precursor complementary DNAs, we isolated mRNAs from whole venom samples. After reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, we amplified the cDNA coding for a neurotoxic protein, phospholipase A2 D49 (PLA2 D49, from the venom of Crotalus durissus collilineatus (Cdc PLA2. The cDNA encoding Cdc PLA2 from whole venom was sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of this cDNA has high overall sequence identity with the group II PLA2 protein family. Cdc PLA2 has 14 cysteine residues capable of forming seven disulfide bonds that characterize this group of PLA2 enzymes. Cdc PLA2 was isolated using conventional Sephadex G75 column chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The molecular mass was estimated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We tested the neuromuscular blocking activities on chick biventer cervicis neuromuscular tissue. Phylogenetic analysis of Cdc PLA2 showed the existence of two lines of N6-PLA2, denominated F24 and S24. Apparently, the sequences of the New World’s N6-F24-PLA2 are similar to those of the agkistrodotoxin from the Asian genus Gloydius. The sequences of N6-S24-PLA2 are similar to the sequence of trimucrotoxin from the genus Protobothrops, found in the Old World.

  5. Metabolic switches and adaptations deduced from the proteomes of Streptomyces coelicolor wild type and phoP mutant grown in batch culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Louise; Hodgson, David A; Wentzel, Alexander; Nieselt, Kay; Ellingsen, Trond E; Moore, Jonathan; Morrissey, Edward R; Legaie, Roxane; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Martín, Juan F; Burroughs, Nigel J; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Smith, Margaret C M

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria in the genus Streptomyces are soil-dwelling oligotrophs and important producers of secondary metabolites. Previously, we showed that global messenger RNA expression was subject to a series of metabolic and regulatory switches during the lifetime of a fermentor batch culture of Streptomyces coelicolor M145. Here we analyze the proteome from eight time points from the same fermentor culture and, because phosphate availability is an important regulator of secondary metabolite production, compare this to the proteome of a similar time course from an S. coelicolor mutant, INB201 (ΔphoP), defective in the control of phosphate utilization. The proteomes provide a detailed view of enzymes involved in central carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Trends in protein expression over the time courses were deduced from a protein abundance index, which also revealed the importance of stress pathway proteins in both cultures. As expected, the ΔphoP mutant was deficient in expression of PhoP-dependent genes, and several putatively compensatory metabolic and regulatory pathways for phosphate scavenging were detected. Notably there is a succession of switches that coordinately induce the production of enzymes for five different secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways over the course of the batch cultures.

  6. Predictable 'meta-mechanisms' emerge from feedbacks between transpiration and plant growth and cannot be simply deduced from short-term mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, François; Parent, Boris

    2017-06-01

    Growth under water deficit is controlled by short-term mechanisms but, because of numerous feedbacks, the combination of these mechanisms over time often results in outputs that cannot be deduced from the simple inspection of individual mechanisms. It can be analysed with dynamic models in which causal relationships between variables are considered at each time-step, allowing calculation of outputs that are routed back to inputs for the next time-step and that can change the system itself. We first review physiological mechanisms involved in seven feedbacks of transpiration on plant growth, involving changes in tissue hydraulic conductance, stomatal conductance, plant architecture and underlying factors such as hormones or aquaporins. The combination of these mechanisms over time can result in non-straightforward conclusions as shown by examples of simulation outputs: 'over production of abscisic acid (ABA) can cause a lower concentration of ABA in the xylem sap ', 'decreasing root hydraulic conductance when evaporative demand is maximum can improve plant performance' and 'rapid root growth can decrease yield'. Systems of equations simulating feedbacks over numerous time-steps result in logical and reproducible emergent properties that can be viewed as 'meta-mechanisms' at plant level, which have similar roles as mechanisms at cell level. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Hemispheric Asymmetry in Transition from Equatorial Plasma Bubble to Blob as Deduced from 630.0 nm Airglow Observations at Low Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeheung; Martinis, Carlos R.; Luehr, Hermann; Pfaff, Robert F.; Kwak, Young-Sil

    2016-01-01

    Transitions from depletions to enhancements of 630.0 nm nighttime airglow have been observed at Arecibo. Numerical simulations by Krall et al. (2009) predicted that they should occur only in one hemisphere, which has not yet been confirmed observationally. In this study we investigate the hemispheric conjugacy of the depletion-to-enhancement transition using multiple instruments. We focus on one event observed in the American longitude sector on 22 December 2014: 630.0 nm airglow depletions evolved into enhancements in the Northern Hemisphere while the evolution did not occur in the conjugate location in the Southern Hemisphere. Concurrent plasma density measured by low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites and 777.4 nm airglow images support that the depletions and enhancements of 630.0 nm night time airglow reflect plasma density decreases and increases (blobs), respectively. Characteristics of the airglow depletions, in the context of the LEO satellite data, further suggest that the plasma density depletion deduced from the airglow data represents equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) rather than medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances from midlatitudes. Hence, the event in this study can be interpreted as EPB-to-blob transition.

  8. Assessment of volatile compound profiles and the deduced sensory significance of virgin olive oils from the progeny of Picual×Arbequina cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Ana G; de la Rosa, Raúl; Pascual, Mar; Sánchez-Ortiz, Araceli; Romero-Segura, Carmen; León, Lorenzo; Sanz, Carlos

    2016-01-08

    Volatile compounds are responsible for most of the sensory qualities of virgin olive oil and they are synthesized when enzymes and substrates come together as olive fruit is crushed during the industrial process to obtain the oil. Here we have studied the variability among the major volatile compounds in virgin olive oil prepared from the progeny of a cross of Picual and Arbequina olive cultivars (Olea europaea L.). The volatile compounds were isolated by SPME, and analyzed by HRGC-MS and HRGC-FID. Most of the volatile compounds found in the progeny's oil are produced by the enzymes in the so-called lipoxygenase pathway, and they may be clustered into different groups according to their chain length and polyunsaturated fatty acid origin (linoleic and linolenic acids). In addition, a group of compounds derived from amino acid metabolism and two terpenes also contributed significantly to the volatile fraction, some of which had significant odor values in most of the genotypes evaluated. The volatile compound content of the progeny was very varied, widely transgressing the progenitor levels, suggesting that in breeding programs it might be more effective to consider a larger number of individuals within the same cross than using different crosses with fewer individuals. Multivariate analysis allowed genotypes with particularly interesting volatile compositions to be identified and their flavor quality deduced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlated binomial models and correlation structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisakado, Masato; Kitsukawa, Kenji; Mori, Shintaro

    2006-01-01

    We discuss a general method to construct correlated binomial distributions by imposing several consistent relations on the joint probability function. We obtain self-consistency relations for the conditional correlations and conditional probabilities. The beta-binomial distribution is derived by a strong symmetric assumption on the conditional correlations. Our derivation clarifies the 'correlation' structure of the beta-binomial distribution. It is also possible to study the correlation structures of other probability distributions of exchangeable (homogeneous) correlated Bernoulli random variables. We study some distribution functions and discuss their behaviours in terms of their correlation structures

  10. Long term carbon dioxide exchange above a mixed forest in the Belgian Ardennes: evaluation of different approaches to deduce total ecosystem respiration from Eddy covariance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jérôme, Elisabeth; Aubinet, Marc; Heinesch, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    The general aim of this research is to analyze inter annual variability of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes exchanged by a mixed forest located at the Vielsalm experimental site in Belgium. At this site, CO2 flux measurements started in 1996 and are still going on. Thirteen complete years of measurements are thus available. Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) inter annual variability may be driven by gross primary productivity (GPP) or Total Ecosystem Respiration (TER), which should thus be both quantified. Using flux partitioning methods, TER is deduced from NEE measurements. GPP is then obtained by subtracting TER from NEE. Initially, a robust estimation of TER is required. This work seeks to compare two independent approaches to assess TER in order to quantify the implications on inter-annual variability. The comparison was performed on twelve complete years. TER estimates can be deduced by extrapolating to the whole day NEE measurements taken during selected night or day periods. In both case, the extrapolation is performed by using a respiration response to temperature. The first approach, referred as the night-time approach, consisted in calculating TER using a temperature response function derived from night-time data sets (Reichstein et al., 2005). The second approach, referred as the daytime approach, consisted in assessing TER from the intercept of the NEE/Photosynthetically Photon Flux Density (PPFD) response (Wohlfahrt et al., 2005). For each approach, different modalities were compared: the use of long term (annual) or short term (15 days) data sets for the night-time approach and the use of different types of regression for the daytime approach. In addition, the impact of the temperature choice was studied for each of the approaches. For the night-time approach, main results showed that air temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration derived from annual data did not reflect the short-term air temperature sensitivity. Vielsalm is a summer active ecosystem

  11. The integration of gravity, magnetic and seismic data in delineating the sedimentary basins of northern Sinai and deducing their structural controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, El Sayed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The Sinai Peninsula is a part of the Sinai sub-plate that located between the southeast Nubian-Arabian shield and the southeastern Mediterranean northward. The main objectives of this investigation are to deduce the main sedimentary basin and its subdivisions, identify the subsurface structural framework that affects the study area and determine the thickness of sedimentary cover of the basement surface. The total intensity magnetic map, Bouguer gravity map and seismic data were used to achieve the study aims. Structural interpretation of the gravity and magnetic data were done by applying advanced processing techniques. These techniques include; Reduce to the pole (RTP), Power spectrum, Tile derivative and Analytical Signal techniques were applied on gravity and magnetic data. Two dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling and interpretation of seismic sections were done to determine the thickness of sedimentary cover of the study area. The integration of our interpretation suggests that, the northern Sinai area consists of elongated troughs that contain many high structural trends. Four major structural trends have been identified, that, reflecting the influence of district regional tectonic movements. These trends are: (1) NE-SW trend; (2) NNW-SSE trend; (3) ENE-WSW trend and (4) WNW-ESE trend. There are also many minor trends, E-W, NW-SE and N-S structural trends. The main sedimentary basin of North Sinai is divided into four sub-basins; (1) Northern Maghara; (2) Northeastern Sinai; (3) Northwestern Sinai and (4) Central Sinai basin. The sedimentary cover ranges between 2 km and 7 km in the northern part of the study area.

  12. Coulomb correlation effects in YBaCuO system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J; Lopez-Aguilar, F; Munoz, J S; Sanchez, A [Dept. de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Balle, S [Dept. de Fisica, Univ. de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    1989-12-01

    In this work, we apply a mean field potential deduced from the multiband Hubbard hamiltonian in order to obtain the lower and upper strongly correlated bands. We have obtained the total and partial density of states for U{sub d} = 0 and U{sub d} = 4 eV. The results show that the density of states calculated with U{sub d} = 4 eV at E{sub F} is lesser than that obtained with U{sub d} = 0. A small peak above E{sub F} arising from the strong correlated bands appears in the dDOS calculated with U{sub d} = 4 eV and this is in agreement with the experimental data. (orig.).

  13. Carbon buildup monitoring using RBS: Correlation with secondary electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, E.F.; Rosales, P.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Murillo, G.; Fernandez, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    The RBS technique is applied to solve the problem of on-line monitoring of the carbon deposited on a thin backed foil under ion bombardment. An iterative method is used to reliably extract quantities such as number of projectiles and target thickness in spite of beam energy changes and detector unstabilities. Experimental values for secondary electron yields are also deduced. Results are reported for the thickness variation of thin carbon foils bombarded with carbon ions of energies between 8.95 and 13 MeV. A linear correlation of this variation is found with both, the ion fluence at target and the number of secondary electrons emitted. The correlation exists even though a wide range of beam currents, beam energies and bombarding times was used during the experiment. The measured electron yields show evidence for a change in the emission process between the original foils and the deposited layer, possibly due to a texture change

  14. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum SOD and T-cell subsets distribution type after leukocyte-deduced red blood cell transfusion in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhengqin; Li Keqin; Xiang Hengquan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum SOD contents and T-cell subsets distribution type after leukocyte-deduced red blood cell transfusion in patients with lung cancer. Methods: Serum SOD levels was measured with RIA and T-cell subsets distribution type was detected with monoclonal antibody technic both before and after leukocyte-deduced red blood cell transfusion in 32 patients with lung cancer and 35 normal controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum levels of SOD and T-cell CIM/ CD8 value were significantly lower in the patients than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Determination of serum SOD level and T-cell subsets distribution type is clinically useful in the management of patients with lung cancer. (authors)

  15. Measurement of the electron-neutrino angular correlation in 6He decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Ban, G.; Durand, D.; Duval, F.; Flechard, X.; Herbane, M.; Labalme, M.; Lienard, E.; Mauger, F.; Mery, A.; Rodriguez-Rubiales, D.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the status of an experiment aiming to determine the angular correlation coefficient between the electron and the anti-neutrino in the pure Gamow-Teller decay of 6He. Such measurement is motivated by the search for the presence of tensor type contributions to the weak interaction. The experiment uses a setup where 6He ions are confined in a novel transparent Paul trap. Electrons and recoiling ions are detected in coincidence to deduce the angular correlation coefficient. First direct in trap decays have been recorded

  16. Two-particle correlations in 40Ar + 197Au at 60 MeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quebert, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two-particle correlations have been measured at GANIL with a multidetector array of 21 telescopes (a part of which was set-up in a close-packed geometry). Simultaneously a plastic wall, made of 96 scintillators, set-up at foward angles, was triggered either by coincidence events or single events. The correlation functions R, are measured for different sets of light particles. They are also studied versus collective data given by the plastic wall detection of each event. We deduce different informations concerning the spatial extent of the emitting source, as well as the population of particle unstable states of light nuclei

  17. Impact delivery of organic matter on the acapulcoite-lodranite parent-body deduced from C, N isotopes and nanostructures of carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, E.; Aléon, J.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Lodran. Carbon phases in Lodran would have been formed by the secondary carbonization of hydrocarbon fluids released during the primary carbonization of IOM. In the framework of this model, the C isotopic compositions can be reproduced using Rayleigh distillation at each carbonization step and the N isotopic compositions can be understood as resulting from the variable loss and preservation of 15N-rich nitriles (δ15N ∼ +800‰) and 15N-poor pyrroles (δ15N = -140‰) during carbonization. The combined interpretation of the temperatures deduced from this model, petrographic cooling rates, and thermochronological indicators suggest that the CI-CM IOM could have been introduced in the parent-body by an impact, about 10 Myr after solar system formation.

  18. Orthogonalization of correlated states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, S.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme for orthogonalizing correlated states while preserving the diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian is developed. Conventional perturbation theory can be used with the orthonormal correlated basis obtained from this scheme. Advantages of using orthonormal correlated states in calculations of the response function and correlation energy are discussed

  19. Geometric correlations and multifractals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amritkar, R.E.

    1991-07-01

    There are many situations where the usual statistical methods are not adequate to characterize correlations in the system. To characterize such situations we introduce mutual correlation dimensions which describe geometric correlations in the system. These dimensions allow us to distinguish between variables which are perfectly correlated with or without a phase lag, variables which are uncorrelated and variables which are partially correlated. We demonstrate the utility of our formalism by considering two examples from dynamical systems. The first example is about the loss of memory in chaotic signals and describes auto-correlations while the second example is about synchronization of chaotic signals and describes cross-correlations. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  20. Photon correlation holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ezawa, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-17

    Unconventional holography called photon correlation holography is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Using photon correlation, i.e. intensity correlation or fourth order correlation of optical field, a 3-D image of the object recorded in a hologram is reconstructed stochastically with illumination through a random phase screen. Two different schemes for realizing photon correlation holography are examined by numerical simulations, and the experiment was performed for one of the reconstruction schemes suitable for the experimental proof of the principle. The technique of photon correlation holography provides a new insight into how the information is embedded in the spatial as well as temporal correlation of photons in the stochastic pseudo thermal light.

  1. Hadron correlations from recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Rainer J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Quark recombination is a successful model to describe the hadronization of a deconfined quark gluon plasma. Jet-like dihadron correlations measured at RHIC provide a challenge for this picture. We discuss how correlations between hadrons can arise from correlations between partons before hadronization. An enhancement of correlations through the recombination process, similar to the enhancement of elliptic flow is found. Hot spots from completely or partially quenched jets are a likely source of such parton correlations.

  2. General correlation and partial correlation analysis in finding interactions: with Spearman rank correlation and proportion correlation as correlation measures

    OpenAIRE

    WenJun Zhang; Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Between-taxon interactions can be detected by calculating the sampling data of taxon sample type. In present study, Spearman rank correlation and proportion correlation are chosen as the general correlation measures, and their partial correlations are calculated and compared. The results show that for Spearman rank correlation measure, in all predicted candidate direct interactions by partial correlation, about 16.77% (x, 0-45.4%) of them are not successfully detected by Spearman rank correla...

  3. Two- and three-point energy correlations in hadronic e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, G.C.; Wolfram, S.

    1980-01-01

    Correlations between the energies incident on two or three detectors around e + e - annihilation events are considered as a probe of the QCD structure of the events. Practical methods for deducing two-detector energy correlations (which give the mean product of energies incident on two detectors as a function of their angular separation) from measured events are devised. Analytical formulae for energy correlations from QCD perturbation theory are given, but it is found that large corrections from hadron formation obscure these asymptotic predictions at available energies. Correlations between the final state and the incoming e + - beam direction are discussed, and observables are presented which measure the angular distributions of planes of final particles with respect to the beam axis (but do not require explicit determination of the planes). Finally, three-detector energy correlations and their moments are treated, and methods for investigating planar structures in e + e - annihilation events are devised. (orig.) 891 HSI/orig. 892 MKO

  4. Determination of lifetimes and nonadiabatic correlations from measured dipole polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Lorenzo J

    2007-01-01

    In atomic systems for which the total oscillator strength of excitations from the ground state is dominated by the transition to the lowest resonance level, the f-sum rule provides a bracketing inequality connecting the lifetime τ of that level to the dipole polarizability α d . This relationship has been used previously to deduce α d from τ. It is shown here that improved spectroscopic accuracies now permit this procedure to be inverted, with τ deduced from a value for α d obtained spectroscopically using the core polarization model. A similar quantitative relationship exists connecting the nonadiabatic correlation factor β to τ, and thus also to α d . The method is applied to a recent measurement of α d for Kr 6+ to obtain the values τ(4s4p 1 P 1 ) 0.096 ± 0.003 ns and β(Kr 6+ ) = 1.71 ± 0.03a 5 0 . It is shown that the use of this method to make precision lifetime determinations for a small number of ions in an isoelectronic sequence permits the exploitation of observed semiempirical regularities to specify the lifetimes of all ions in that sequence

  5. [Correlation coefficient-based classification method of hydrological dependence variability: With auto-regression model as example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu Xi; Xie, Ping; Sang, Yan Fang; Wu, Zi Yi

    2018-04-01

    Hydrological process evaluation is temporal dependent. Hydrological time series including dependence components do not meet the data consistency assumption for hydrological computation. Both of those factors cause great difficulty for water researches. Given the existence of hydrological dependence variability, we proposed a correlationcoefficient-based method for significance evaluation of hydrological dependence based on auto-regression model. By calculating the correlation coefficient between the original series and its dependence component and selecting reasonable thresholds of correlation coefficient, this method divided significance degree of dependence into no variability, weak variability, mid variability, strong variability, and drastic variability. By deducing the relationship between correlation coefficient and auto-correlation coefficient in each order of series, we found that the correlation coefficient was mainly determined by the magnitude of auto-correlation coefficient from the 1 order to p order, which clarified the theoretical basis of this method. With the first-order and second-order auto-regression models as examples, the reasonability of the deduced formula was verified through Monte-Carlo experiments to classify the relationship between correlation coefficient and auto-correlation coefficient. This method was used to analyze three observed hydrological time series. The results indicated the coexistence of stochastic and dependence characteristics in hydrological process.

  6. Pairing correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, C.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    There are many similarities between the properties of nucleons in nuclei and electrons in metals. In addition to the properties explainable in terms of independent particle motion, there are many important co-operative effects suggesting correlated motion. Pairing correlation which leads to superconductivity in metals and several important properties in nuclei , is an exmple of such correlations. An attempt has been made to review the effects of pairing correlations in nuclei. Recent indications of reduction in pairing correlations at high angular momenta is discussed. A comparision between pairing correlations in the cases of nuclei and electrons in metals is attempted. (author). 20 refs., 10 figs

  7. Investigation of correlations in the breakup of He8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, B.

    2007-11-01

    Correlations in light neutron-rich nuclei are of considerable importance in understanding their structure. In this context the breakup of He 8 into He 6 + 2n has been investigated at 15 MeV/nucleon. The measurements were undertaken using a setup composed of two detector arrays: CHARISSA to detect the charged fragments and DEMON to detect the neutrons. The interpretation of the results was facilitated using a Monte Carlo simulation which was developed to take into account the correlations, the reaction and the experimental setup. Two techniques were used to study the correlations in the breakup of He 8 . The first, intensity interferometry, provides, via the construction of the neutron-neutron correlation function, for a first estimate of the source size and thus the average separation between the neutrons. The second, using Dalitz plots, allows both the neutron-neutron and core-neutron correlations to be probed. Here, sequential decay via the ground state resonance of He 7 and has been found to dominate the dissociation of He 8 . The spatial and temporal characteristics of the breakup of He 8 have thus been deduced and a root-mean-square separation between the two valence neutrons in the continuum states was estimated to be (7.3 ± 0.6) fm with a time delay between their emission of (1000 ± 300) fm/c. (author)

  8. Fracture toughness correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, Kim

    1986-09-01

    In this study existing fracture parameter correlations are reviewed. Their applicability and reliability are discussed in detail. A new K IC -CVN-correlation, based on a theoretical brittle fracture model, is presented

  9. Angular correlation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, A.J.

    1974-01-01

    An outline of the theory of angular correlations is presented, and the difference between the modern density matrix method and the traditional wave function method is stressed. Comments are offered on particular angular correlation theoretical techniques. A brief discussion is given of recent studies of gamma ray angular correlations of reaction products recoiling with high velocity into vacuum. Two methods for optimization to obtain the most accurate expansion coefficients of the correlation are discussed. (1 figure, 53 references) (U.S.)

  10. Teager Correlation Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Tommy Kristensen; Hamila, R.; Gabbouj, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new correlation function called the Teager correlation function is introduced in this paper. The connection between this function, the Teager energy operator and the conventional correlation function is established. Two applications are presented. The first is the minimization of the Teager error...... norm and the second one is the use of the instantaneous Teager correlation function for simultaneous estimation of TDOA and FDOA (Time and Frequency Difference of Arrivals)....

  11. Correlation in photodetachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Electron correlation plays a major role in all aspects of the photodetachment of an electron from a negative ion. Photodetachment measurements are well suited to investigate the relatively short range forces associated with correlation due to the absence of the long range Coulomb interaction. Measurements of electron affinities, asymmetry parameters and cross sections are described to illustrate the influence of correlation on photodetachment

  12. Quantum perfect correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Masanao

    2006-01-01

    The notion of perfect correlations between arbitrary observables, or more generally arbitrary POVMs, is introduced in the standard formulation of quantum mechanics, and characterized by several well-established statistical conditions. The transitivity of perfect correlations is proved to generally hold, and applied to a simple articulation for the failure of Hardy's nonlocality proof for maximally entangled states. The notion of perfect correlations between observables and POVMs is used for defining the notion of a precise measurement of a given observable in a given state. A longstanding misconception on the correlation made by the measuring interaction is resolved in the light of the new theory of quantum perfect correlations

  13. Correlations in Werner States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Shunlong; Li Nan

    2008-01-01

    Werner states are paradigmatic examples of quantum states and play an innovative role in quantum information theory. In investigating the correlating capability of Werner states, we find the curious phenomenon that quantum correlations, as quantified by the entanglement of formation, may exceed the total correlations, as measured by the quantum mutual information. Consequently, though the entanglement of formation is so widely used in quantifying entanglement, it cannot be interpreted as a consistent measure of quantum correlations per se if we accept the folklore that total correlations are measured (or rather upper bounded) by the quantum mutual information.

  14. Mean vertical wind in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region (80–120 km deduced from the WINDII observations on board UARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fauliot

    Full Text Available The WINDII interferometer placed on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite measures temperature and wind from the O(1S green-line emission in the Earth's mesosphere and lower thermosphere. It is a remote-sensing instrument providing the horizontal wind components. In this study, the vertical winds are derived using the continuity equation. Mean wind annually averaged at equinoxes and solstices is shown. Ascendance and subsidence to the order of 1–2 cm s–1 present a seasonal occurrence at the equator and tropics. Zonal Coriolis acceleration and adiabatic heating and cooling rate associated to the mean meridional and vertical circulations are evaluated. The line emission rate measured together with the horizontal wind shows structures in altitude and latitude correlated with the meridional and vertical wind patterns. The effect of wind advection is discussed.

  15. Mean vertical wind in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region (80–120 km deduced from the WINDII observations on board UARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fauliot

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The WINDII interferometer placed on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite measures temperature and wind from the O(1S green-line emission in the Earth's mesosphere and lower thermosphere. It is a remote-sensing instrument providing the horizontal wind components. In this study, the vertical winds are derived using the continuity equation. Mean wind annually averaged at equinoxes and solstices is shown. Ascendance and subsidence to the order of 1–2 cm s–1 present a seasonal occurrence at the equator and tropics. Zonal Coriolis acceleration and adiabatic heating and cooling rate associated to the mean meridional and vertical circulations are evaluated. The line emission rate measured together with the horizontal wind shows structures in altitude and latitude correlated with the meridional and vertical wind patterns. The effect of wind advection is discussed.

  16. Polyakov loop and spin correlators on finite lattices. A study beyond the mass gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, J.; Neuhaus, T.

    1995-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for point-to-point correlation functions of the Polyakov loop based on the transfer matrix formalism. For the 2D Ising model we show that the results deduced from point-point spin correlators are coinciding with those from zero momentum correlators. We investigate the contributions from eigenvalues of the transfer matrix beyond the mass gap and discuss the limitations and possibilities of such an analysis. The finite size behaviour of the obtained 2D Ising model matrix elements is examined. The point-to-point correlator formula is then applied to Polyakov loop data in finite temperature SU(2) gauge theory. The leading matrix element shows all expected scaling properties. Just above the critical point we find a Debye screening mass μ D /T∼4, independent of the volume. ((orig.))

  17. Correlation in atomic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Correlation due to the Coulomb interactions between electrons in many-electron targets colliding with charged particles is formulated, and various approximate probability amplitudes are evaluated. In the limit that the electron-electron, 1/r/sub i//sub j/, correlation interactions are ignored or approximated by central potentials, the independent-electron approximation is obtained. Two types of correlations, or corrections to the independent-electron approximation due to 1/r/sub i//sub j/ terms, are identified: namely, static and scattering correlation. Static correlation is that contained in the asymptotic, e.g., bound-state, wave functions. Scattering correlation, arising from correlation in the scattering operator, is new and is considered in some detail. Expressions for a scattering correlation amplitude, static correlation or rearrangement amplitude, and independent-electron or direct amplitude are derived at high collision velocity and compared. At high velocities the direct and rearrangement amplitudes dominate. At very high velocities, ν, the rearrangement amplitude falls off less rapidly with ν than the direct amplitude which, however, is dominant as electron-electron correlation tends to zero. Comparisons with experimental observations are discussed

  18. Paleohydrology of tropical South America and paleoceanography of the tropical Atlantic as deduced from two new sediment cores on the Brazilian continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nace, T.; Baker, P. A.; Dwyer, G. S.; Silva, C. G.; Hollander, D. J.; Rigsby, C. A.; Giosan, L.; Burns, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Paleoclimate/paleoceanographic reconstructions of the Amazon Basin, Brazilian Nordeste, and western equatorial Atlantic have been undertaken on two new sediment cores located on the Brazilian continental slope (Core CDH-5 at 1708 mbsl, 4N, 48W, 32m long, ~30 ka record; Core CDH-86 at 3708 mbsl, 0N/S, 44W, 30m long, ~100ka record). High-resolution XRF analyses of Fe, Ti, and Ca are used to define the paleohydrologic history of the adjacent continent at both sites. Large and abrupt excursions of Ti/Ca ratios are observed in both cores, but are significantly better defined in the southern core, representative of Nordeste conditions. In this core there are a total of 9 Ti/Ca excursions, the oldest recovered dating to ~98ka. These excursions correlate well with Heinrich events from the North Atlantic. High-resolution stable oxygen isotopic analysis and Mg/Ca paleothermometry undertaken on the near-surface-dwelling planktic foraminiferal species Globierinoides ruber provide a picture of paleoceanographic forcings in the western equatorial Atlantic. The northern and southern cores respectively exhibit rapid warming of ~3C and ~3.5C between the last glacial maximum and the early Holocene. Furthermore, in almost all cases, during the last glacial stage, there was a 0.5C to 2C warming of the western equatorial Atlantic during the periods of high Ti/Ca ratios that correlate with Heinrich events. Thus, as observed in some previous studies, the western equatorial Atlantic was warm and the adjacent southern tropical continent was wet at the same time that the high-latitude North Atlantic was cold. The largely accepted paradigm is that Northern hemisphere cold events result in a southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), contributing to drier conditions at the northern extent of the ITCZ annual range (Cariaco Basin) and increased precipitation in the southern tropics of South America. The ITCZ appears to have been influenced by millennial variability of

  19. Pattern of morphological diversification in the Leptocarabus ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) as deduced from mitochondrial ND5 gene and nuclear 28S rDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C G; Zhou, H Z; Imura, Y; Tominaga, O; Su, Z H; Osawa, S

    2000-01-01

    Most of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) gene and a part of nuclear 28S ribosomal RNA gene were sequenced for 14 species of ground beetles belonging to the genus Leptocarabus. In both the ND5 and the 28S rDNA phylogenetic trees of Leptocarabus, three major lineages were recognized: (1) L. marcilhaci/L. yokoael/Leptocarabus sp. from China, (2) L. koreanus/L. truncaticollis/L. seishinensis/L. semiopacus/L. canaliculatus/L. kurilensis from the northern Eurasian continent including Korea and Hokkaido, Japan, and (3) all of the Japanese species except L. kurilensis. Clustering of the species in the trees is largely linked to their geographic distribution and does not correlate with morphological characters. The species belonging to different species groups are clustered in the same lineages, and those in the same species group are scattered among the different lineages. One of the possible interpretations of the present results would be that morphological transformations independently took place in the different lineages, sometimes with accompanying parallel morphological evolution, resulting in the occurrence of the morphological species belonging to the same species group (= type) in the different lineages.

  20. Quantifying the relationship between the plasmapause and the inner boundary of small-scale field-aligned currents, as deduced from Swarm observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Balázs; Lühr, Hermann

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the equatorward boundary of small-scale field-aligned currents (SSFACs) and investigates the relation between this boundary and the plasmapause (PP). The PP data used for validation were derived from in situ electron density observations of NASA's Van Allen Probes. We confirmed the findings of a previous study by the same authors obtained from the observations of the CHAMP satellite SSFAC and the NASA IMAGE satellite PP detections, namely that the two boundaries respond similarly to changes in geomagnetic activity, and they are closely located in the near midnight MLT sector, suggesting a dynamic linkage. Dayside PP correlates with the delayed time history of the SSFAC boundary. We interpreted this behaviour as a direct consequence of co-rotation: the new PP, formed on the night side, propagates to the dayside by rotating with Earth. This finding paves the way toward an efficient PP monitoring tool based on an SSFAC index derived from vector magnetic field observations at low-Earth orbit.

  1. Deduced amino acid sequence of the small hydrophobic protein of US avian pneumovirus has greater identity with that of human metapneumovirus than those of non-US avian pneumoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Abdul S; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Huang, Zhuhui; Samal, Siba K

    2003-05-01

    We report here the nucleotide and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus strain Colorado (APV/CO). The SH gene of APV/CO is 628 nucleotides in length from gene-start to gene-end. The longest ORF of the SH gene encoded a protein of 177 aas in length. Comparison of the deduced aa sequence of the SH protein of APV/CO with the corresponding published sequences of other members of genera metapneumovirus showed 28% identity with the newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV), but no discernable identity with the APV subgroup A or B. Collectively, this data supports the hypothesis that: (i) APV/CO is distinct from European APV subgroups and belongs to the novel subgroup APV/C (APV/US); (ii) APV/CO is more closely related to hMPV, a mammalian metapneumovirus, than to either APV subgroup A or B. The SH gene of APV/CO was cloned using a genomic walk strategy which initiated cDNA synthesis from genomic RNA that traversed the genes in the order 3'-M-F-M2-SH-G-5', thus confirming that gene-order of APV/CO conforms in the genus Metapneumovirus. We also provide the sequences of transcription-signals and the M-F, F-M2, M2-SH and SH-G intergenic regions of APV/CO.

  2. Correlation in photodetachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, D.J.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    Electron correlation plays a major role in all aspects of the photodetachment of an electron from a negative ion. Photodetachment measurements are well suited to investigate the relatively short range forces associated with correlation due to the absence of the long range Coulomb interaction. Measurements of electron affinities, asymmetry parameters and cross sections are described to illustrate the influence of correlation on photodetachment. 25 refs., 4 figs

  3. Intercorporate Security Event Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Kovalev

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Security controls are prone to false positives and false negatives which can lead to unwanted reputation losses for the bank. The reputational database within the security operations center (SOC and intercorporate correlation of security events are offered as a solution to increase attack detection fidelity. The theses introduce the definition and structure of the reputation, architectures of reputational exchange and the place of intercorporate correlation in overall SOC correlation analysis.

  4. RHIC Data Correlation Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michnoff, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Hoff, L.; MacKay, W.; Satogata, T.

    1999-01-01

    A requirement for RHIC data plotting software and physics analysis is the correlation of data from all accelerator data gathering systems. Data correlation provides the capability for a user to request a plot of multiple data channels vs. time, and to make meaningful time-correlated data comparisons. The task of data correlation for RHIC requires careful consideration because data acquisition triggers are generated from various asynchronous sources including events from the RHIC Event Link, events from the two Beam Sync Links, and other unrelated clocks. In order to correlate data from asynchronous acquisition systems a common time reference is required. The RHIC data correlation methodology will allow all RHIC data to be converted to a common wall clock time, while still preserving native acquisition trigger information. A data correlation task force team, composed of the authors of this paper, has been formed to develop data correlation design details and provide guidelines for software developers. The overall data correlation methodology will be presented in this paper

  5. Learning efficient correlated equilibria

    KAUST Repository

    Borowski, Holly P.; Marden, Jason R.; Shamma, Jeff S.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of distributed learning literature focuses on convergence to Nash equilibria. Correlated equilibria, on the other hand, can often characterize more efficient collective behavior than even the best Nash equilibrium. However, there are no existing distributed learning algorithms that converge to specific correlated equilibria. In this paper, we provide one such algorithm which guarantees that the agents' collective joint strategy will constitute an efficient correlated equilibrium with high probability. The key to attaining efficient correlated behavior through distributed learning involves incorporating a common random signal into the learning environment.

  6. Learning efficient correlated equilibria

    KAUST Repository

    Borowski, Holly P.

    2014-12-15

    The majority of distributed learning literature focuses on convergence to Nash equilibria. Correlated equilibria, on the other hand, can often characterize more efficient collective behavior than even the best Nash equilibrium. However, there are no existing distributed learning algorithms that converge to specific correlated equilibria. In this paper, we provide one such algorithm which guarantees that the agents\\' collective joint strategy will constitute an efficient correlated equilibrium with high probability. The key to attaining efficient correlated behavior through distributed learning involves incorporating a common random signal into the learning environment.

  7. Particle Correlations at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kress, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Particle correlations are extensively studied to obtain information about the dynamics of hadron production. From 1989 to 2000 the four LEP collaborations recorded more than 16 million hadronic Z0 decays and several thousand W+W- events. In Z0 decays, two-particle correlations were analysed in detail to study Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac correlations for various particle species. In fully-hadronic W+W- decays, particle correlations were used to study whether the two W bosons decay independently. A review of selected results is presented.

  8. Historical record of concentrations of atmospheric trace components deduced from a glacier in the Alps; Historische Entwicklung von atmosphaerischen Spurenstoffkonzentrationen rekonstruiert aus Firn und Eis alpiner Gletscher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doescher, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-07-01

    A 109 m ice core from a high-alpine glacier (Colle Gnifetti, Monte Rosa massif, 4440 m a.s.l., Switzerland) was used to reconstruct the history of atmospheric trace components. Concentrations of the anions chloride, nitrate, sulfate and the cations sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium were measured with 2.5-5.0 cm resolution in the top 70 m of a 109 m long of the ice core. Dating of the ice core was performed using stratigraphic markers such as historically known Saharan dust events, the atomic bomb horizon and volcanic eruptions and supplemented with the {sup 210}Pb nuclear dating. The record covers the time period from about 1755-1981. The concentrations of nitrate and sulfate show an exponential increase from 1930 and 1870 until 1965, respectively. The factors of increase were 2.3{+-}0.3 and 5.8{+-}0.9, respectively. The chloride concentrations remained constant during this period. A good agreement between the concentrations of sulfate, which were corrected for the contribution of seasalt and mineral dust and the European SO{sub 2}-emissions was found for the last 100 years. The concentrations of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium did not show a trend. The concentrations of ammonium increased exponentially between 1870 and 1960 by a factor of 2.2{+-}0.4. The different sources of the trace components were identified using correlation analysis. Sodium and chloride originated from seasalt, magnesium and calcium from geologic erosion. For both, the industrial and pre-industrial period, the dominant source of ammonium and nitrate was conversion of the gaseous precursors NH{sub 3} and HNO{sub 3}. Sulfate concentrations in the industrial period originated from the anthropogenically emitted SO{sub 2}, whereas in the pre-industrial period the geologic source dominated. The Colle Gnifetti accumulates mainly summer snow, and therefore, several test drillings were performed to find a new site with higher accumulation rate. figs., 17 tabs., 50 refs.

  9. New light on a dark subject: On the use of fluorescence data to deduce redox states of natural organic matter (NOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the use of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEMS), parallel factor statistical analysis (PARAFAC), and oxidation-reduction experiments to examine the effect of redox conditions on PARAFAC model results for aqueous samples rich in natural organic matter. Fifty-four aqueous samples from 11 different geographic locations and two plant extracts were analyzed untreated and after chemical treatments or irradiation were used in attempts to change the redox status of the natural organic matter. The EEMS spectra were generated and modeled using a PARAFAC package developed by Cory and McKnight (2005). The PARAFAC model output was examined for consistency with previously reported relations and with changes expected to occur upon experimental oxidation and reduction of aqueous samples. Results indicate the implied fraction of total sample fluorescence attributed to quinone-like moieties was consistent (0.64 to 0.78) and greater than that observed by Cory and McKnight (2005). The fraction of the quinone-like moieties that was reduced (the reducing index, RI) showed relatively little variation (0.46 to 0.71) despite attempts to alter the redox status of the natural organic matter. The RI changed little after reducing samples using zinc metal, oxidizing at high pH with air, or irradiating with a Xenon lamp. Our results, however, are consistent with the correlations between the fluorescence indices (FI) of samples and the ratio of PARAFAC fitting parameters suggested by Cory and McKnight (2005), though we used samples with a much narrower range of FI values.

  10. The LPCTrap experiment: measurement of the β-ν angular correlation in 6He using a transparent Paul trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lienard, E.; Ban, G.; Blieck, J.; Durand, D.; Duval, F.; Flechard, X.; Herbane, M.; Labalme, M.; Lemiere, Y.; Mauger, F.; Mery, A.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Rodriguez, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the status of the LPCTrap experiment, devoted to measure the β-ν angular correlation in the pure Gamow-Teller decay of 6 He. This measurement is motivated by the search for the presence of tensor type contributions to the weak interaction. The 6 He ions are confined in a novel transparent Paul trap. The β particles and the recoil ions are detected in coincidence to deduce the angular correlation parameter. The commissioning run performed in 2005 has given the proof of principle of this experiment. Up to 10 5 coincidences were recorded during a second run in 2006.

  11. Bose-Einstein correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalewski, Kacper

    2000-01-01

    The effect of Bose-Einstein correlations on multiplicity distributions of identical pions is discussed. It is found that these correlations affect significantly the observed multiplicity distributions, but Einstein's condensation is unlikely to be achieved, unless 'cold spots', i.e. regions, where groups of pions with very small relative momenta are produced, occur in high energy heavy-ion collisions

  12. Low Offset AC Correlator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This patent describes a low offset AC correlator avoids DC offset and low frequency noise by frequency operating the correlation signal so that low...noise, low level AC amplification can be substituted for DC amplification. Subsequently, the high level AC signal is demodulated to a DC level. (Author)

  13. Correlates of Academic Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Norman A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated concurrent correlates of academic procrastination in Israeli college preparatory students (n=113). Procrastination in one course of study was found to be moderately correlated with procrastination in another but not to procrastination in routine tasks of daily living. Procrastination was weakly related to emotional upset about it and…

  14. Spatiotemporal distribution of interplate slip following the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake deduced from ocean bottom pressure gauges and onland GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Ariyoshi, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2017-12-01

    The 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw 8.0) is an interplate earthquake along the Kurile trench. Its co- and post-seismic deformation has been observed by onland GNSS [e.g., Miyazaki et al. 2004] and modeled with afterslip and/or viscoelastic relaxation [e.g., Itoh and Nishimura 2016]. In the offshore region, two ocean bottom pressure gauges (OBPs) are operated by JAMSTEC since July 1999 [Hirata et al. 2002] and they have continuously observed the pre-, co- and post-seismic pressure change of the 2003 event [Baba et al. 2006]. The observed pressure change can be interpreted as vertical displacement, and the resolution of slip beneath the seafloor far from the land was improved by incorporating these pressure data into onland GNSS data [Baba et al. 2006]. However, no previous studies used postseismic pressure data for several years to estimate an interplate slip. Because, in this region, an M8 class event similar to the 2003 event has occurred in 1952, it is important to clarify a healing process of an interplate coupling which may lead to a next M8 class event in terms of the earthquake cycle. Itoh and Nishimura [2017, JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting] estimated it but used only onland GNSS data. In this study, we use both onland GNSS and OBP data. For OBP data analysis, we first removed the tidal component using BAYTAP08 [Tamura et al. 1991; Tamura and Agnew 2008]. Next, we corrected the temporal fluctuation of data correlating with temperature [Baba et al. 2006]. We estimated the linear trend before the 2003 event using the corrected time series from 2002 Jan. 1 to 2003 Sep. 1 and remove the estimated trend from the data after the 2003 event. Here, we assumed a non-linear drift could be ignored. Finally, we down-sampled the remained time series with an interval of 1 month. For the onland GNSS data, we used the same data set of Itoh and Nishimura [2017, JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting]. We constructed the model consisting of coseismic slip of the 2003 and M6-7 events in the postseismic

  15. Long sequence correlation coprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1994-09-01

    A long sequence correlation coprocessor (LSCC) accelerates the bitwise correlation of arbitrarily long digital sequences by calculating in parallel the correlation score for 16, for example, adjacent bit alignments between two binary sequences. The LSCC integrated circuit is incorporated into a computer system with memory storage buffers and a separate general purpose computer processor which serves as its controller. Each of the LSCC's set of sequential counters simultaneously tallies a separate correlation coefficient. During each LSCC clock cycle, computer enable logic associated with each counter compares one bit of a first sequence with one bit of a second sequence to increment the counter if the bits are the same. A shift register assures that the same bit of the first sequence is simultaneously compared to different bits of the second sequence to simultaneously calculate the correlation coefficient by the different counters to represent different alignments of the two sequences.

  16. Quantum correlation games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Azhar; Weigert, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to play games quantum mechanically is proposed. We consider two players who perform measurements in an EPR-type setting. The payoff relations are defined as functions of correlations, i.e. without reference to classical or quantum mechanics. Classical bi-matrix games are reproduced if the input states are classical and perfectly anti-correlated, that is, for a classical correlation game. However, for a quantum correlation game, with an entangled singlet state as input, qualitatively different solutions are obtained. For example, the Prisoners' Dilemma acquires a Nash equilibrium if both players apply a mixed strategy. It appears to be conceptually impossible to reproduce the properties of quantum correlation games within the framework of classical games

  17. The spatio-temporal characteristics of the wave structure excited by the solar terminator as deduced from TEC measurements at the global GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, E.

    2009-04-01

    using different methods of ionosphere radio sounding. The second type of the observed TEC disturbances is MS traveling wave packets (MS TWP) generated when the time derivative of TEC amount to its maximum. That ST-generated wave packets have been found for the first time. We have obtained the first data regarding the spatio-temporal characteristics and the statistics of MS TWP. There is no correlation between TWP amount and Dst-index value. We found that ST-generated wave packets have duration of about 1-2 hours and time shift of about 1.5-6 hours after the ST appearance at the altitude of 300 km. The TWP wave front extends almost along ST-line. The wavelength of ST-generated wave packets is about 100-300 km. The space image of MS TWP is characterized by pronounced anisotropy (the ratio between lengthwise and transversal scales exceeds 10) and high coherence over a long distance of about 2000 km. The work was supported by the SB RAS and FEB RAS collaboration project N 3.24, the RFBR-GFEN grant N 06-05-39026 and RFBR grant 07-05-00127.

  18. Pair correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi

    2009-01-01

    Except for the closed shell nuclei, almost all nuclei are in the superconducting state at their ground states. This well-known pair correlation in nuclei causes various interesting phenomena. It is especially to be noted that the pair correlation becomes weak in the excited states of nuclei with high angular momentum, which leads to the pair phase transition to the normal state in the high spin limit. On the other hand, the pair correlation becomes stronger in the nuclei with lower nucleon density than in those with normal density. In the region of neutron halo or skin state of unstable nuclei, this phenomenon is expected to be further enhanced to be observed compared to the ground state of stable nuclei. An overview of those interesting aspects caused via the pair correlation is presented here in the sections titled 'pair correlations in ground states', pair correlations in high spin states' and 'pair correlations in unstable nuclei' focusing on the high spin state. (S. Funahashi)

  19. Particle correlations at ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erazmus, B.; Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.; Martin, L.; Mikhailov, K.; Pluta, J.; Sinyukov, Yu.; Stavinsky, A.; Werner, K

    1998-12-31

    The ability of the ALICE detector for determination of the space-time characteristics of particle production in heavy-ion collisions at LHC from measurements of the correlation functions of identical and non-identical particles at small relative velocities is discussed. The possibility to use the correlations of non-identical particles for a direct determination of the delays in emission of various particle species at time scales as small as 10{sup -23} s is demonstrated. The influence of the multi-boson effects on pion multiplicities, single-pion spectra and two-pion correlation functions is discussed. (author) 63 refs.

  20. Spectral analysis by correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauque, J.M.; Berthier, D.; Max, J.; Bonnet, G.

    1969-01-01

    The spectral density of a signal, which represents its power distribution along the frequency axis, is a function which is of great importance, finding many uses in all fields concerned with the processing of the signal (process identification, vibrational analysis, etc...). Amongst all the possible methods for calculating this function, the correlation method (correlation function calculation + Fourier transformation) is the most promising, mainly because of its simplicity and of the results it yields. The study carried out here will lead to the construction of an apparatus which, coupled with a correlator, will constitute a set of equipment for spectral analysis in real time covering the frequency range 0 to 5 MHz. (author) [fr

  1. Interelement correlations in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, B.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of 25 elements in 4 plant species (Citrus aurantia, Brassica oleracea, Lycopersicon esculentum and Pinus strobus) were linearly correlated. For some element pairs (Ce-Fe, Ce-Ni, Ce-Sb, Ce-Sc, Ce-Zn, Fe-Sb, Fe-Sc, Fe-U, Fe-Zn, K-Cd, La-U, Ni-Sb, Sc-U and Sc-Zn) a high positive correlation coefficient (r = +1) was found. The element pairs Ca-Mg, Hg-U, Ni-Sr and Sr-Zn show a significant negative correlation (r = -1). Plants seem to process some constant interelement relations, independent of plant species. (orig.)

  2. Rotationally invariant correlation filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for analyzing and designing optical correlation filters that have tailored rotational invariance properties. The concept of a correlation of an image with a rotation of itself is introduced. A unified theory of rotation-invariant filtering is then formulated. The unified approach describes matched filters (with no rotation invariance) and circular-harmonic filters (with full rotation invariance) as special cases. The continuum of intermediate cases is described in terms of a cyclic convolution operation over angle. The angular filtering approach allows an exact choice for the continuous trade-off between loss of the correlation energy (or specificity regarding the image) and the amount of rotational invariance desired

  3. Entropic Nonsignaling Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Rafael; Budroni, Costantino

    2016-06-17

    We introduce the concept of entropic nonsignaling correlations, i.e., entropies arising from probabilistic theories that are compatible with the fact that we cannot transmit information instantaneously. We characterize and show the relevance of these entropic correlations in a variety of different scenarios, ranging from typical Bell experiments to more refined descriptions such as bilocality and information causality. In particular, we apply the framework to derive the first entropic inequality testing genuine tripartite nonlocality in quantum systems of arbitrary dimension and also prove the first known monogamy relation for entropic Bell inequalities. Further, within the context of complex Bell networks, we show that entropic nonlocal correlations can be activated.

  4. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  5. Electron spectroscopic evidence of electron correlation in Ni-Pt alloys: comparison with specific heat measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Nahm, T U; Kim, J Y; Oh, S J

    2003-01-01

    We have performed photoemission spectroscopy of Ni-Pt alloys to understand the origin of the discrepancy between the experimental linear coefficient of specific heat gamma and that predicted by band theory. We found that the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi level deduced from photoemission measurement is in agreement with the experimental value of gamma, if we include the electron correlation effect. It was also found that the Ni 2p core level satellite intensity increases as Ni content is reduced, indicating a strong electron correlation effect which can enhance the quasiparticle effective mass considerably. This supports our conclusion that electron correlation is the most probable reason of disagreement of gamma between experiment and band theory.

  6. Characteristic analysis on UAV-MIMO channel based on normalized correlation matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xi jun; Chen, Zi li; Hu, Yong Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional GBSBCM (geometrically based double bounce cylinder model) channel model of MIMO for unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), the simple form of UAV space-time-frequency channel correlation function which includes the LOS, SPE, and DIF components is presented. By the methods of channel matrix decomposition and coefficient normalization, the analytic formula of UAV-MIMO normalized correlation matrix is deduced. This formula can be used directly to analyze the condition number of UAV-MIMO channel matrix, the channel capacity, and other characteristic parameters. The simulation results show that this channel correlation matrix can be applied to describe the changes of UAV-MIMO channel characteristics under different parameter settings comprehensively. This analysis method provides a theoretical basis for improving the transmission performance of UAV-MIMO channel. The development of MIMO technology shows practical application value in the field of UAV communication.

  7. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  8. Correlations between the anatomical traits of Gymnocladus canadensis Lam. in heartwood and sapwood of early- and latewood zones of growth rings

    OpenAIRE

    Jokanović Dušan; Vilotić Dragica; Mitrović Suzana; Miljković Danijela; Rebić Milan; Stanković Dragica; Nikolić Vesna

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows correlations between vessel characteristics and differences in growth-ring width in heartwood and sapwood. Analyzed samples were from an iron-wood tree (Gymnocladus canadensis Lam.) that grew in the Mužljanski Rit area, of the Srpska Crnja municipality in Serbia. According to previous research, it was deduced that Gymnocladus canadensis Lam. belongs to ring-porous species with big vessel lumen in the earlywood zone and thicker cell walls in...

  9. Systematics of proton absorption deduced from ( p,p) and ( p,n) cross sectionsfor 2.0- to 6.7-MeV protons on /sup 107,109/Ag and 115In

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, R.L.; Flynn, D.S.; Gabbard, F.; Johnson, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    The ( p,p) and ( p,n) cross sections were measured to accuracies of +- 2% and +- 3%, respectively, for 2.0- to 6.7-MeV protons on /sup 107,109/Ag and 115 In. Hauser-Feshbach calculations, which included γ-ray emission channels, were used to convert the ( p,n) cross sections to proton absorption cross sections. Analysis of the ( p,p) and deduced proton absorption cross sections were made simultaneously using a conventional optical-model potential. The measured cross sections can be described using parameters extrapolated from the Sn region in a systematic way, except for a large increase required for the depth of the absorptive potential

  10. Extractable Work from Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Perarnau-Llobet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Work and quantum correlations are two fundamental resources in thermodynamics and quantum information theory. In this work, we study how to use correlations among quantum systems to optimally store work. We analyze this question for isolated quantum ensembles, where the work can be naturally divided into two contributions: a local contribution from each system and a global contribution originating from correlations among systems. We focus on the latter and consider quantum systems that are locally thermal, thus from which any extractable work can only come from correlations. We compute the maximum extractable work for general entangled states, separable states, and states with fixed entropy. Our results show that while entanglement gives an advantage for small quantum ensembles, this gain vanishes for a large number of systems.

  11. Multibin Correlations: A Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.; Zalewski, K.

    2011-01-01

    A recently proposed method of studying the long-range correlations in multiparticle production is described. It is explained how it can be used in practice to uncover the mechanisms of particle production in high energy collisions. (authors)

  12. Principles of correlation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of the various applications which have been made of correlation techniques in the field of nuclear physics, in particular for absolute counting. Whereas in most cases the usual coincidence method will be preferable for its simplicity, correlation counting may be the only possible approach in such cases where the two radiations of the cascade cannot be well separated or when there is a longliving intermediate state. The measurement of half-lives and of count rates of spurious pulses is also briefly discussed. The various experimental situations lead to different ways the correlation method is best applied (covariance technique with one or with two detectors, application of correlation functions, etc.). Formulae are given for some simple model cases, neglecting dead-time corrections

  13. Emerging Correlation Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Gbur, Gregory J.; Polyanskii, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting the state-of-the-art of correlation optics and showing synergetics between the theoretical background and experimental techniques.......This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting the state-of-the-art of correlation optics and showing synergetics between the theoretical background and experimental techniques....

  14. Galaxy correlations and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fall, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Correlations in the distribution of galaxies provide some important clues about the structure and evolution of the Universe on scales larger than individual galaxies. In recent years much effort has been devoted to estimating and interpreting galaxy correlations. This is a review of these efforts. It is meant to provide both an introductory overview of the subject and a critical assessment of some recent developments

  15. Exponential smoothing weighted correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, F.; Di Matteo, T.; Aste, T.

    2012-06-01

    In many practical applications, correlation matrices might be affected by the "curse of dimensionality" and by an excessive sensitiveness to outliers and remote observations. These shortcomings can cause problems of statistical robustness especially accentuated when a system of dynamic correlations over a running window is concerned. These drawbacks can be partially mitigated by assigning a structure of weights to observational events. In this paper, we discuss Pearson's ρ and Kendall's τ correlation matrices, weighted with an exponential smoothing, computed on moving windows using a data-set of daily returns for 300 NYSE highly capitalized companies in the period between 2001 and 2003. Criteria for jointly determining optimal weights together with the optimal length of the running window are proposed. We find that the exponential smoothing can provide more robust and reliable dynamic measures and we discuss that a careful choice of the parameters can reduce the autocorrelation of dynamic correlations whilst keeping significance and robustness of the measure. Weighted correlations are found to be smoother and recovering faster from market turbulence than their unweighted counterparts, helping also to discriminate more effectively genuine from spurious correlations.

  16. Structure correlation and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buergi, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    The main goal of crystal and molecular structure determination is to provide a starting point for understanding the physical, chemical and biological properties of matter. At present, results from nearly 300000 crystal structure studies are available in computer-readable form. Structure correlation attempts to extract knowledge and understanding from this body of information, which is not available from its parts. This article reviews some typical examples: libraries of prototypal molecular dimensions, mappings of chemical reaction pathways, correlations between structure on one hand and energy, reaction rate, catalytic activity or magnetism on the other. The knowledge gained from structure-correlation studies, together with quantum-chemical and other modeling techniques, provides conceptual and practical tools for designing molecules and materials with tailor-made properties. (orig.)

  17. Pair Correlation Function Integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; O'Connell, John P.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for extending radial distribution functions obtained from molecular simulations of pure and mixed molecular fluids to arbitrary distances. The method allows total correlation function integrals to be reliably calculated from simulations of relatively small systems. The long......-distance behavior of radial distribution functions is determined by requiring that the corresponding direct correlation functions follow certain approximations at long distances. We have briefly described the method and tested its performance in previous communications [R. Wedberg, J. P. O’Connell, G. H. Peters......, and J. Abildskov, Mol. Simul. 36, 1243 (2010); Fluid Phase Equilib. 302, 32 (2011)], but describe here its theoretical basis more thoroughly and derive long-distance approximations for the direct correlation functions. We describe the numerical implementation of the method in detail, and report...

  18. Correlation of the leptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finucane, F; Luan, J; Wareham, N

    2009-01-01

    (M/I) from hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp studies in 1,226 EGIR RISC participants. RESULTS: The LAR was highly correlated with HOMA-S in men (r = -0.58, p = 4.5 x 10(-33) and r = -0.65, p = 1.1 x 10(-66) within the Ely and EGIR RISC study cohorts, respectively) and in women (r = -0.51, p = 2.8 x...... 10(-36) and r = -0.61, p = 2.5 x 10(-73)). The LAR was also strongly correlated with the clamp M/I value (r = -0.52, p = 4.5 x 10(-38) and r = -0.47, p = 6.6 x 10(-40) in men and women, respectively), similar to correlations between HOMA-S and the M/I value. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The leptin...

  19. Correlated diffusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alexander; Glaister, Jeffrey; Cameron, Andrew; Haider, Masoom

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the male population. Fortunately, the prognosis is excellent if detected at an early stage. Hence, the detection and localization of prostate cancer is crucial for diagnosis, as well as treatment via targeted focal therapy. New imaging techniques can potentially be invaluable tools for improving prostate cancer detection and localization. In this study, we introduce a new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging, where the tissue being imaged is characterized by the joint correlation of diffusion signal attenuation across multiple gradient pulse strengths and timings. By taking into account signal attenuation at different water diffusion motion sensitivities, correlated diffusion imaging can provide improved delineation between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue when compared to existing diffusion imaging modalities. Quantitative evaluation using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tissue class separability analysis, and visual assessment by an expert radiologist were performed to study correlated diffusion imaging for the task of prostate cancer diagnosis. These results are compared with that obtained using T2-weighted imaging and standard diffusion imaging (via the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)). Experimental results suggest that correlated diffusion imaging provide improved delineation between healthy and cancerous tissue and may have potential as a diagnostic tool for cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. A new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI) was developed for the purpose of aiding radiologists in cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Preliminary results show CDI shows considerable promise as a diagnostic aid for radiologists in the detection and localization of prostate cancer

  20. Betting Against Correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asness, Clifford S.; Frazzini, Andrea; Gormsen, Niels Joachim

    We test whether the low-risk effect is driven by (a) leverage constraints and thus risk should be measured using beta vs. (b) behavioral effects and thus risk should be measured by idiosyncratic risk. Beta depends on volatility and correlation, where only volatility is related to idiosyncratic risk....... Hence, the new factor betting against correlation (BAC) is particularly suited to differentiating between leverage constraints vs. lottery explanations. BAC produces strong performance in the US and internationally, supporting leverage constraint theories. Similarly, we construct the new factor SMAX...

  1. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B [Los Lunas, NM; Rohde, Steven B [Corrales, NM

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  2. Atmospheric phenomena deduced from radiosonde and GPS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gation and atmospheric modeling studies. ... the earth. Atmosphere causes refraction of radio signals as it passes through it. This time ... from cloud, aerosol, precipitation and it provides ... in the troposphere have strong influence on tropical.

  3. Atmospheric phenomena deduced from radiosonde and GPS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tropopause height and tropopause temperature are sensitive to temperature changes in troposphere and stratosphere. These are the measures of global climatic variability. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, refractivity and water vapour are always needed for communication, navigation and atmospheric modeling ...

  4. Deducing the reachable space from fingertip positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai-Trieu Pham; Pathirana, Pubudu N

    2015-01-01

    The reachable space of the hand has received significant interests in the past from relevant medical researchers and health professionals. The reachable space was often computed from the joint angles acquired from a motion capture system such as gloves or markers attached to each bone of the finger. However, the contact between the hand and device can cause difficulties particularly for hand with injuries, burns or experiencing certain dermatological conditions. This paper introduces an approach to find the reachable space of the hand in a non-contact measurement form utilizing the Leap Motion Controller. The approach is based on the analysis of each position in the motion path of the fingertip acquired by the Leap Motion Controller. For each position of the fingertip, the inverse kinematic problem was solved under the physiological multiple constraints of the human hand to find a set of all possible configurations of three finger joints. Subsequently, all the sets are unified to form a set of all possible configurations specific for that motion. Finally, a reachable space is computed from the configuration corresponding to the complete extension and the complete flexion of the finger joint angles in this set.

  5. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In §2, we recall the definition of elliptic flow and explain the mechanism producing ..... Taking this effect into account, one is led to revise significantly the values of the ... non-flow correlations, one can show under very general assumptions that ...

  6. Clustering of correlated networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    We obtain the clustering coefficient, the degree-dependent local clustering, and the mean clustering of networks with arbitrary correlations between the degrees of the nearest-neighbor vertices. The resulting formulas allow one to determine the nature of the clustering of a network.

  7. Multiplicities and Correlations at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkisyan, E.K.G.

    2002-01-01

    A brief review on recent charge multiplicity and correlation measurements at LEP is given. The measurements of un biased gluon jet multiplicity are discussed. Recent results on charged particle Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac correlations at LEP1 are reported. New results on two-particle correlations of neutral pions are given. Correlations of more than two particles (high-order correlations) obtained using different methods are performed. Recent Bose-Einstein correlation measurements at LEP2 are discussed. (author)

  8. Multiplicities and correlations at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E

    2002-01-01

    A brief review on recent charge multiplicity and correlation measurements at LEP is given. The measurements of unbiased gluon jet multiplicity are discussed. Recent results on charged particle Bose- Einstein and Fermi-Dirac correlations at LEP1. are reported. New results on two-particle correlations of neutral pions are given. Correlations of more than two particles (high-order correlations) obtained using different methods are performed. Recent Bose-Einstein correlation measurements at LEP2 are discussed. (13 refs).

  9. Correlates of minimal dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leck, Kira

    2006-10-01

    Researchers have associated minimal dating with numerous factors. The present author tested shyness, introversion, physical attractiveness, performance evaluation, anxiety, social skill, social self-esteem, and loneliness to determine the nature of their relationships with 2 measures of self-reported minimal dating in a sample of 175 college students. For women, shyness, introversion, physical attractiveness, self-rated anxiety, social self-esteem, and loneliness correlated with 1 or both measures of minimal dating. For men, physical attractiveness, observer-rated social skill, social self-esteem, and loneliness correlated with 1 or both measures of minimal dating. The patterns of relationships were not identical for the 2 indicators of minimal dating, indicating the possibility that minimal dating is not a single construct as researchers previously believed. The present author discussed implications and suggestions for future researchers.

  10. Strain Induced Adatom Correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Kappus, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    A Born-Green-Yvon type model for adatom density correlations is combined with a model for adatom interactions mediated by the strain in elastic anisotropic substrates. The resulting nonlinear integral equation is solved numerically for coverages from zero to a limit given by stability constraints. W, Nb, Ta and Au surfaces are taken as examples to show the effects of different elastic anisotropy regions. Results of the calculation are shown by appropriate plots and discussed. A mapping to sup...

  11. Wind and Yaw correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    The report describes measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. A comparison between wind speed on the metmast and Nacelle Windspeed are made and the results are presented on graphs and in a table. The data used for the comparison are identical with the data used for the Risø-I-3246(EN) po......) power curve report. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1] and the wind and yaw correlation is analyzed in accordance to Ref. [2]....

  12. Clinicohistopathological correlation of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Shrestha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is a chronic infectious granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It is a spectral disease which is classified into five groups according to Ridley and Jopling based on clinical, histological, microbiological and immunological criteria. Adequate clinical information combined with bacilloscopy and histopathology is helpful not only in classification of different types of leprosy but also useful for management of the cases.METHOD: 50 cases of leprosy were examined and clinical data was recorded. Slit skin smears were stained with Ziehl Neelsen stain. Skin biopsy was stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin stain and Fite Farraco stain was performed to demonstrate acid fast bacilli. All patients were classified according to Ridley & Jopling classification. Clinico-histopathological correlation was done. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 16.0.RESULTS: Most common histological type of leprosy was tuberculoid leprosy seen in 19(38% cases followed by indeterminate leprosy. Overall clinico-histopathological correlation was seen in 39.58%. The correlation was highest in indeterminate and histoid leprosy (100% followed by lepromatous leprosy (66.66 %% and tuberculoid leprosy (50%. Slit skin smear showed bacilli in 12 out of 48 cases (25% while biopsy showed bacilli in 16 out of 48 cases (33.3%.CONCLUSION: In the present study, clinical diagnosis did not correlate with histopathological diagnosis significantly (p value=0.04159. The study emphasizes the role of histopathological and bacilloscopic examination to aid the clinical diagnosis for accurate typing of leprosy cases then better management of the patient.

  13. Perturbed angular correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The electric quadrupolar interaction in some hafnium complexes, measured at the metal nucleus level is studied. For that purpose, the technique of γ-γ perturbed angular correlation is used: the frequencies of quadrupolar interaction are compared with some hafnium α-hydroxicarboxilates, namely glycolate, lactate, mandelate and benzylate; the influence of the temperature on the quadrupolar coupling on the hafnium tetramandelate is studied; finally, the effects associated with the capture of thermal neutrons by hafnium tetramandelate are examined locally at the nuclear level. The first group of results shows significant differences in a series of complexes derived from glycolic acid. On the other hand, the substitution of the protons in hafnium tetramandelate structure by some alkaline cations permits to verify a correlation between the variations in the quadrupolar coupling and the electronegativities of the substituent elements. Measurements at high temperatures show that this complex is thermally stable at 100 and 150 0 C. It is possible to see the appearance of two distinct sites for the probe nucleus, after heating the sample at 100 0 C for prolonged time. This fact is attributed to a probable interconversion among the postulated structural isomers for the octacoordinated compounds. Finally, measurements of angular correlation on the irradiated complex show that there is an effective destruction of the target molecule by neutron capture [pt

  14. RELAP-7 Closure Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrs, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansel, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sharpe, J. P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johns, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5’s and TRACE’s capabilities and extends their analysis capabilities for all reactor system simulation scenarios. The RELAP-7 code utilizes the well-posed 7-equation two-phase flow model for compressible two-phase flow. Closure models used in the TRACE code has been reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past decades and provide a basis for the colure correlations implemented in the RELAP-7 code. This document provides a summary on the closure correlations that are currently implemented in the RELAP-7 code. The closure correlations include sub-grid models that describe interactions between the fluids and the flow channel, and interactions between the two phases.

  15. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.K.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with 13 C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system

  16. Neural Correlates of Gratitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Ryan Fox

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To this end, we conducted an experiment during which we induced gratitude in participants while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. We hypothesized that gratitude ratings would correlate with activity in brain regions associated with moral cognition, value judgment and theory of mind. The stimuli used to elicit gratitude were drawn from stories of survivors of the Holocaust, as many survivors report being sheltered by strangers or receiving lifesaving food and clothing, and having strong feelings of gratitude for such gifts. The participants were asked to place themselves in the context of the Holocaust and imagine what their own experience would feel like if they received such gifts. For each gift, they rated how grateful they felt. The results revealed that ratings of gratitude correlated with brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, in support of our hypotheses. The results provide a window into the brain circuitry for moral cognition and positive emotion that accompanies the experience of benefitting from the goodwill of others.

  17. Neural correlates of hate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semir Zeki

    Full Text Available In this work, we address an important but unexplored topic, namely the neural correlates of hate. In a block-design fMRI study, we scanned 17 normal human subjects while they viewed the face of a person they hated and also faces of acquaintances for whom they had neutral feelings. A hate score was obtained for the object of hate for each subject and this was used as a covariate in a between-subject random effects analysis. Viewing a hated face resulted in increased activity in the medial frontal gyrus, right putamen, bilaterally in premotor cortex, in the frontal pole and bilaterally in the medial insula. We also found three areas where activation correlated linearly with the declared level of hatred, the right insula, right premotor cortex and the right fronto-medial gyrus. One area of deactivation was found in the right superior frontal gyrus. The study thus shows that there is a unique pattern of activity in the brain in the context of hate. Though distinct from the pattern of activity that correlates with romantic love, this pattern nevertheless shares two areas with the latter, namely the putamen and the insula.

  18. Neural correlates of gratitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Glenn R; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To this end, we conducted an experiment during which we induced gratitude in participants while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. We hypothesized that gratitude ratings would correlate with activity in brain regions associated with moral cognition, value judgment and theory of mind. The stimuli used to elicit gratitude were drawn from stories of survivors of the Holocaust, as many survivors report being sheltered by strangers or receiving lifesaving food and clothing, and having strong feelings of gratitude for such gifts. The participants were asked to place themselves in the context of the Holocaust and imagine what their own experience would feel like if they received such gifts. For each gift, they rated how grateful they felt. The results revealed that ratings of gratitude correlated with brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, in support of our hypotheses. The results provide a window into the brain circuitry for moral cognition and positive emotion that accompanies the experience of benefitting from the goodwill of others.

  19. Theoretical assessment of the potential to deduce microphysical characteristics of ice clouds from polarimetric radar measurements at 95 GHz; Theoretische Untersuchungen zur Ableitung mikrophysikalischer Parameter von Eiswolken aus polarimetrischen Radarmessungen bei 95 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, H.M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    2000-07-01

    The potential of polarimetric radar measurements at 95 GHz to derive microphysical cloud characteristics is assessed. Scattering by atmospheric ice crystals is calculated applying the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) for single crystals of various shape, size, and orientation. The results are combined to acquire radar signals for collections of particles representing the radar volume. Expressing the particle size with respect to the radius of a volume equivalent sphere, the co-plar reflectivity is only slightly affected by particle shape variations. Thus, keeping the limitations of such an approach in mind, the simplified representation of crystals as spheres is applicable. On the other hand, the signal is strongly influenced by the particle size and the total ice water content. Polarimetric radar parameters like linear depolarisation ratio and differential reflectivity are almost independent of size and ice water content. They are predominantly affected by the crystal shape and orientation and therefore have a potential to deduce information about ice crystal habits. Unfortunately, to date such measurements are subject to technical restrictions. (orig.)

  20. Investigation of correlations in the breakup of He{sup 8}; Etude des correlations dans la dissociation de l'He{sup 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, B

    2007-11-15

    Correlations in light neutron-rich nuclei are of considerable importance in understanding their structure. In this context the breakup of He{sup 8} into He{sup 6} + 2n has been investigated at 15 MeV/nucleon. The measurements were undertaken using a setup composed of two detector arrays: CHARISSA to detect the charged fragments and DEMON to detect the neutrons. The interpretation of the results was facilitated using a Monte Carlo simulation which was developed to take into account the correlations, the reaction and the experimental setup. Two techniques were used to study the correlations in the breakup of He{sup 8}. The first, intensity interferometry, provides, via the construction of the neutron-neutron correlation function, for a first estimate of the source size and thus the average separation between the neutrons. The second, using Dalitz plots, allows both the neutron-neutron and core-neutron correlations to be probed. Here, sequential decay via the ground state resonance of He{sup 7} and has been found to dominate the dissociation of He{sup 8}. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the breakup of He{sup 8} have thus been deduced and a root-mean-square separation between the two valence neutrons in the continuum states was estimated to be (7.3 {+-} 0.6) fm with a time delay between their emission of (1000 {+-} 300) fm/c. (author)

  1. Investigation of correlations in the breakup of He{sup 8}; Etude des correlations dans la dissociation de l'He{sup 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, B

    2007-11-15

    Correlations in light neutron-rich nuclei are of considerable importance in understanding their structure. In this context the breakup of He{sup 8} into He{sup 6} + 2n has been investigated at 15 MeV/nucleon. The measurements were undertaken using a setup composed of two detector arrays: CHARISSA to detect the charged fragments and DEMON to detect the neutrons. The interpretation of the results was facilitated using a Monte Carlo simulation which was developed to take into account the correlations, the reaction and the experimental setup. Two techniques were used to study the correlations in the breakup of He{sup 8}. The first, intensity interferometry, provides, via the construction of the neutron-neutron correlation function, for a first estimate of the source size and thus the average separation between the neutrons. The second, using Dalitz plots, allows both the neutron-neutron and core-neutron correlations to be probed. Here, sequential decay via the ground state resonance of He{sup 7} and has been found to dominate the dissociation of He{sup 8}. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the breakup of He{sup 8} have thus been deduced and a root-mean-square separation between the two valence neutrons in the continuum states was estimated to be (7.3 {+-} 0.6) fm with a time delay between their emission of (1000 {+-} 300) fm/c. (author)

  2. Correlation between Morphological, Optical and Electrical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were employed for the surface morphological measurements. The charge carrier concentrations, mobilities and AC resistivities were deduced from Drude's model. The DC resistivities were determined from the four-point probe measurements.

  3. Wavelet Correlation Coefficient of 'strongly correlated' financial time series

    OpenAIRE

    Razdan, Ashok

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use wavelet concepts to show that correlation coefficient between two financial data's is not constant but varies with scale from high correlation value to strongly anti-correlation value This studies is important because correlation coefficient is used to quantify degree of independence between two variables. In econophysics correlation coefficient forms important input to evolve hierarchial tree and minimum spanning tree of financial data.

  4. Biological Correlates of Empathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Timucin Oral

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Empathy can be defined as the capacity to know emotionally what another is experiencing from within the frame of reference of that other person and the capacity to sample the feelings of another or it can be metaphorized as to put oneself in another’s shoes. Although the concept of empathy was firstly described in psychological theories, researches studying the biological correlates of psychological theories have been increasing recently. Not suprisingly, dinamically oriented psychotherapists Freud, Kohut, Basch and Fenichel had suggested theories about the biological correlates of empathy concept and established the basis of this modality decades ago. Some other theorists emphasized the importance of empathy in the early years of lifetime regarding mother-child attachment in terms of developmental psychology and investigated its role in explanation of psychopathology. The data coming from some of the recent brain imaging and animal model studies also seem to support these theories. Although increased activity in different brain regions was shown in many of the brain imaging studies, the role of cingulate cortex for understanding mother-child relationship was constantly emphasized in nearly all of the studies. In addition to these studies, a group of Italian scientists has defined a group of neurons as “mirror neurons” in their studies observing rhesus macaque monkeys. Later, they also defined mirror neurons in human studies, and suggested them as “empathy neurons”. After the discovery of mirror neurons, the hopes of finding the missing part of the puzzle for understanding the biological correlates of empathy raised again. Although the roles of different biological parameters such as skin conductance and pupil diameter for defining empathy have not been certain yet, they are going to give us the opportunity to revise the inconsistent basis of structural validity in psychiatry and to stabilize descriptive validity. In this review, the

  5. The isotope correlation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.; Schoof, S.

    1983-01-01

    The ESARDA working group on Isotopic Correlation Techniques, ICT and Reprocessing Input Analysis performed an Isotope Correlation Experiment, ICE with the aim to check the feasibility of the new technique. Ten input batches of the reprocessing of the KWO fuel at the WAK plant were analysed by 4 laboratories. All information to compare ICT with the gravimetric and volumetric methods was available. ICT combined with simplified reactor physics calculation was included. The main objectives of the statistical data evaluation were detection of outliers, the estimation of random errors and of systematic errors of the measurements performed by the 4 laboratories. Different methods for outlier detection, analysis of variances, Grubbs' analysis for the constant-bias model and Jaech's non-constant-bias model were applied. Some of the results of the statistical analysis may seem inconsistent which is due to the following reasons. For the statistical evaluations isotope abundance data (weight percent) as well as nuclear concentration data (atoms/initial metal atoms) were subjected to different outlier criteria before being used for further statistical evaluations. None of the four data evaluation groups performed a complete statistical data analysis which would render possible a comparison of the different methods applied since no commonly agreed statistical evaluation procedure existed. The results prove that ICT is as accurate as conventional techniques which have to rely on costly mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. The potential of outlier detection by ICT on the basis of the results from a single laboratory is as good as outlier detection by costly interlaboratory comparison. The application of fission product or Cm-244 correlations would be more timely than remeasurements at safeguards laboratories

  6. Bootstrapped Deattenuated Correlation: Nonnormal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Veprinsky, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Correlation attenuation due to measurement error and a corresponding correction, the deattenuated correlation, have been known for over a century. Nevertheless, the deattenuated correlation remains underutilized. A few studies in recent years have investigated factors affecting the deattenuated correlation, and a couple of them provide alternative…

  7. Strain induced adatom correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    A Born-Green-Yvon type model for adatom density correlations is combined with a model for adatom interactions mediated by the strain in elastic anisotropic substrates. The resulting nonlinear integral equation is solved numerically for coverages from zero to a limit given by stability constraints. W, Nb, Ta and Au surfaces are taken as examples to show the effects of different elastic anisotropy regions. Results of the calculation are shown by appropriate plots and discussed. A mapping to superstructures is tried. Corresponding adatom configurations from Monte Carlo simulations are shown.

  8. Pairing correlations around scission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krappe, H.J.; Fadeev, S.

    2001-01-01

    To describe pairing correlations in a fissioning system one commonly projects the BCS wave function separately onto good particle numbers in each fragment in the exit channel, but only onto the total number of particles in the parent system. We propose to interpolate between these limiting situations by the generator-coordinate method with the particle-number difference between the nascent fragments as the generator coordinate. Model calculations are presented for the Hill-Wheeler-box potential with a δ-function diaphragm to mimic scission

  9. Grayscale Optical Correlator Workbench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, Jay; Zhou, Hanying; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    Grayscale Optical Correlator Workbench (GOCWB) is a computer program for use in automatic target recognition (ATR). GOCWB performs ATR with an accurate simulation of a hardware grayscale optical correlator (GOC). This simulation is performed to test filters that are created in GOCWB. Thus, GOCWB can be used as a stand-alone ATR software tool or in combination with GOC hardware for building (target training), testing, and optimization of filters. The software is divided into three main parts, denoted filter, testing, and training. The training part is used for assembling training images as input to a filter. The filter part is used for combining training images into a filter and optimizing that filter. The testing part is used for testing new filters and for general simulation of GOC output. The current version of GOCWB relies on the mathematical software tools from MATLAB binaries for performing matrix operations and fast Fourier transforms. Optimization of filters is based on an algorithm, known as OT-MACH, in which variables specified by the user are parameterized and the best filter is selected on the basis of an average result for correct identification of targets in multiple test images.

  10. Hexagonalization of correlation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleury, Thiago [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP - University Estadual Paulista,ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research,Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Komatsu, Shota [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline St N Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2017-01-30

    We propose a nonperturbative framework to study general correlation functions of single-trace operators in N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at large N. The basic strategy is to decompose them into fundamental building blocks called the hexagon form factors, which were introduced earlier to study structure constants using integrability. The decomposition is akin to a triangulation of a Riemann surface, and we thus call it hexagonalization. We propose a set of rules to glue the hexagons together based on symmetry, which naturally incorporate the dependence on the conformal and the R-symmetry cross ratios. Our method is conceptually different from the conventional operator product expansion and automatically takes into account multi-trace operators exchanged in OPE channels. To illustrate the idea in simple set-ups, we compute four-point functions of BPS operators of arbitrary lengths and correlation functions of one Konishi operator and three short BPS operators, all at one loop. In all cases, the results are in perfect agreement with the perturbative data. We also suggest that our method can be a useful tool to study conformal integrals, and show it explicitly for the case of ladder integrals.

  11. Cluster-cluster correlations and constraints on the correlation hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.; Gott, J. R., III

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that galaxies cluster around clusters at least as strongly as they cluster around galaxies imposes constraints on the hierarchy of correlation amplitudes in hierachical clustering models. The distributions which saturate these constraints are the Rayleigh-Levy random walk fractals proposed by Mandelbrot; for these fractal distributions cluster-cluster correlations are all identically equal to galaxy-galaxy correlations. If correlation amplitudes exceed the constraints, as is observed, then cluster-cluster correlations must exceed galaxy-galaxy correlations, as is observed.

  12. Developments for the 6He beta - nu angular correlation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumwalt, David W.

    This thesis describes developments toward the measurement of the angular correlation between the beta and the antineutrino in the beta decay of 6He. This decay is a pure Gamow-Teller decay which is described in the Standard Model as a purely axial vector weak interaction. The angular correlation is characterized by the parameter abetanu = -1/3 in the Standard Model. Any deviation from this value would be evidence for tensor components in the weak interaction and would constitute new physics. A new method will be used to measure the parameter a betanu from 6He decays, featuring a magneto-optical trap that will measure the beta particle in coincidence with the recoiling 6Li daughter ion. This neutral atom trapping scheme provides cold, tightly confined atoms which will reduce systematic uncertainties related to the initial position of the decay. By knowing the initial position of the decay and measuring the time of flight of the recoiling 6Li daughter ion in coincidence with the beta, the angular correlation between the beta and the antineutrino can be deduced. We aim to measure a betanu first to the level of 1%, and eventually to the 0.1% level, which would represent an order of magnitude improvement in precision over past experiments. Towards this goal, we have designed, built, and successfully tested a liquid lithium target to provide >2×10. {10} 6He atoms/sto a low-background environment, which is the most intense source of 6He presently available. This allowed for an additional measurement of the 6He half-life (806.89 +/- 0.11stat +0.23-0.19syst ms) to be made with unprecedented precision, resolving discrepancies in past measurements. We have also tested our trapping and detection apparatus and have begun to record preliminary coincidence events.

  13. Paths correlation matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Weixian; Zhou, Xiaojun; Lu, Yingcheng; Xu, Jiang

    2015-09-15

    Both the Jones and Mueller matrices encounter difficulties when physically modeling mixed materials or rough surfaces due to the complexity of light-matter interactions. To address these issues, we derived a matrix called the paths correlation matrix (PCM), which is a probabilistic mixture of Jones matrices of every light propagation path. Because PCM is related to actual light propagation paths, it is well suited for physical modeling. Experiments were performed, and the reflection PCM of a mixture of polypropylene and graphite was measured. The PCM of the mixed sample was accurately decomposed into pure polypropylene's single reflection, pure graphite's single reflection, and depolarization caused by multiple reflections, which is consistent with the theoretical derivation. Reflection parameters of rough surface can be calculated from PCM decomposition, and the results fit well with the theoretical calculations provided by the Fresnel equations. These theoretical and experimental analyses verify that PCM is an efficient way to physically model light-matter interactions.

  14. Correlates of physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauman, Adrian E; Reis, Rodrigo S; Sallis, James F

    2012-01-01

    that age, sex, health status, self-efficacy, and motivation are associated with physical activity. Ecological models take a broad view of health behaviour causation, with the social and physical environment included as contributors to physical inactivity, particularly those outside the health sector...... effective programmes will target factors known to cause inactivity. Research into correlates (factors associated with activity) or determinants (those with a causal relationship) has burgeoned in the past two decades, but has mostly focused on individual-level factors in high-income countries. It has shown......, such as urban planning, transportation systems, and parks and trails. New areas of determinants research have identified genetic factors contributing to the propensity to be physically active, and evolutionary factors and obesity that might predispose to inactivity, and have explored the longitudinal tracking...

  15. Packing force data correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiman, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the issues facing valve maintenance personnel today deals with an appropriate methodology for installing and setting valve packing that will minimize leak rates, yet ensure functionality of the the valve under all anticipated operating conditions. Several variables can affect a valve packing's ability to seal, such as packing bolt torque, stem finish, and lubrication. Stem frictional force can be an excellent overall indicator of some of the underlying conditions that affect the sealing characteristics of the packing and the best parameter to use when adjusting the packing. This paper addresses stem friction forces, analytically derives the equations related to these forces, presents a methodology for measuring these forces on valve stems, and attempts to correlate the data directly to the underlying variables

  16. Correlation monitor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    This task has been established with the explicit purpose of ensuring the continued availability of the pedigreed and extremely well-characterized material now required for inclusion in all additional and future surveillance capsules in commercial light-water reactors. During this reporting period, concrete was poured and pallets storage racks were installed to provide adequate room for the storage of the correlation monitor material being transferred from its location at the Y-12 Plant to its archival storage location at ORNL. The racks came from surplus material storage at ORNL and hence were obtained at no cost to the HSSI Program. Inquiries into cost-effective means of sheltering the blocks of correlation monitor materials from further weather-related deteriorization were initiated. The most likely approach would be to procure a turn-key sheet metal building installed over the storage racks by an outside contractor to minimize costs. Most of the material has now been transferred from Y-12 to the ORNL storage area. It has been repositioned on new storage pallets and placed into the storage racks, An update of the detailed material inventory was initiated to ascertain the revised location of all blocks. Pieces of HSST plate O3 were distributed to participants in the ASTM cross-comparison exercise on subsize specimen testing technology. The use of the HSST O3 will provide for data from the many varieties of tests to be performed to be compared with the standardized data previously developed. The testing techniques will focus on ways to measure transition temperature and fracture toughness

  17. Clinicopathological correlates of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-10-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder with potential complications on the skeletal, renal, neurocognitive and cardiovascular systems. While most cases (95%) occur sporadically, about 5% are associated with a hereditary syndrome: multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes (MEN-1, MEN-2A, MEN-4), hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT), familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH-1, FHH-2, FHH-3), familial hypercalciuric hypercalcaemia, neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism and isolated familial hyperparathyroidism. Recently, molecular mechanisms underlying possible tumour suppressor genes (MEN1, CDC73/HRPT2, CDKIs, APC, SFRPs, GSK3β, RASSF1A, HIC1, RIZ1, WT1, CaSR, GNA11, AP2S1) and proto-oncogenes (CCND1/PRAD1, RET, ZFX, CTNNB1, EZH2) have been uncovered in the pathogenesis of hyperparathyroidism. While bi-allelic inactivation of CDC73/HRPT2 seems unique to parathyroid malignancy, aberrant activation of cyclin D1 and Wnt/β-catenin signalling has been reported in benign and malignant parathyroid tumours. Clinicopathological correlates of primary hyperparathyroidism include parathyroid adenoma (80-85%), hyperplasia (10-15%) and carcinoma (hyperparathyroidism generally presents with diffuse parathyroid hyperplasia, whereas tertiary hyperparathyroidism reflects the emergence of autonomous parathyroid hormone (PTH)-producing neoplasm(s) from secondary parathyroid hyperplasia. Surgical resection of abnormal parathyroid tissue remains the only curative treatment in primary hyperparathyroidism, and parathyroidectomy specimens are frequently encountered in this setting. Clinical and biochemical features, including intraoperative PTH levels, number, weight and size of the affected parathyroid gland(s), are crucial parameters to consider when rendering an accurate diagnosis of parathyroid proliferations. This review provides an update on the expanding knowledge of hyperparathyroidism and highlights the clinicopathological correlations of this prevalent

  18. Protecting Quantum Correlation from Correlated Amplitude Damping Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhang, Cai

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of quantum correlation measured by measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) and local quantum uncertainty (LQU) in correlated amplitude damping (CAD) channel. We find that the memory parameter brings different influences on MIN and LQU. In addition, we propose a scheme to protect quantum correlation by executing prior weak measurement (WM) and post-measurement reversal (MR). However, better protection of quantum correlation by the scheme implies a lower success probability (SP).

  19. Lagged correlation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curme, Chester

    Technological advances have provided scientists with large high-dimensional datasets that describe the behaviors of complex systems: from the statistics of energy levels in complex quantum systems, to the time-dependent transcription of genes, to price fluctuations among assets in a financial market. In this environment, where it may be difficult to infer the joint distribution of the data, network science has flourished as a way to gain insight into the structure and organization of such systems by focusing on pairwise interactions. This work focuses on a particular setting, in which a system is described by multivariate time series data. We consider time-lagged correlations among elements in this system, in such a way that the measured interactions among elements are asymmetric. Finally, we allow these interactions to be characteristically weak, so that statistical uncertainties may be important to consider when inferring the structure of the system. We introduce a methodology for constructing statistically validated networks to describe such a system, extend the methodology to accommodate interactions with a periodic component, and show how consideration of bipartite community structures in these networks can aid in the construction of robust statistical models. An example of such a system is a financial market, in which high frequency returns data may be used to describe contagion, or the spreading of shocks in price among assets. These data provide the experimental testing ground for our methodology. We study NYSE data from both the present day and one decade ago, examine the time scales over which the validated lagged correlation networks exist, and relate differences in the topological properties of the networks to an increasing economic efficiency. We uncover daily periodicities in the validated interactions, and relate our findings to explanations of the Epps Effect, an empirical phenomenon of financial time series. We also study bipartite community

  20. Standard Errors for Matrix Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Derives the asymptotic standard errors and intercorrelations for several matrix correlations assuming multivariate normality for manifest variables and derives the asymptotic standard errors of the matrix correlations for two factor-loading matrices. (SLD)

  1. On the Kendall Correlation Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we first discuss the Kendall rank correlation coefficient. In continuous case, we define the Kendall rank correlation coefficient in terms of the concomitants of order statistics, find the expected value of the Kendall rank correlation coefficient and show that the later is free of n. We also prove that in continuous case the Kendall correlation coefficient converges in probability to its expected value. We then propose to consider the expected value of the Kendall rank ...

  2. Hadron correlations in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, Charles Felix

    2012-01-01

    The measurements of the anisotropic flow of single particles and particle pairs have provided some of the most compelling evidence for the creation of a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) in relativistic heavy ion collisions, first at RHIC, and more recently at the LHC. Using PbPb collision data taken in the 2010 and 2011 heavy ion runs at the LHC, the CMS experiment has investigated a broad scope of these flow phenomena. The $v_2$ elliptic flow coefficient has been extracted with four different methods to cross-check contributions from initial state fluctuations and non-flow correlations. The measurements of the $v_2$ elliptic anisotropy have been extended to a transverse momentum of 60 GeV/c, which will enable the placement of new quantitative constraints on parton energy loss models as a function of path length in the sQGP medium. Additionally, for the first time at the LHC, the CMS experiment has extracted precise elliptic anisotropy coefficients for the neutral $\\pi$ meson ($\\pi^0$) in the c...

  3. Relativistic correlations in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, K.

    1987-01-01

    Atoms are particularly well-suited objects when it comes to testing certain concepts of many-body theories. They play a unique role in this respect because of two constructively interfering reasons: first of all, the laws describing the interactions of their constituents are the ones best known in all of Physics; secondly, their structure is comparatively simple and amenable to concise theoretical treatment. Because of these two reasons, physically motivated many-body approximation schemes, ordered in a systematic hierarchy of precision, can be carefully tested; discrepancies between theory and experiment are due to many-body effects and are never masked by uncertainties in the constituent-interaction (needless to say, the very small hadronic contributions to atomic structure is left out. Many-body effects in atoms are solely produced by the electron-electron interaction which derives from the laws of Quantum Electrodynamics or, in a very good approximation from the repulsive Coulomb potential; in the general nomenclature they are named correlations. The material is organized in two chapters: chapter 1 deals with a general introduction and discussion of g-Hartree mean-field theories, chapter 2 deals with applications. The role of vacuum fluctuations and deformations of the Dirac sea in a consistent construction of mean-fields is emphasized and their explicit form in the g-Hartree theory is given. 21 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  4. Smile detectors correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Kivanc; Chang, Xin; Skarbek, Władysław

    2017-08-01

    The novel smile recognition algorithm is presented based on extraction of 68 facial salient points (fp68) using the ensemble of regression trees. The smile detector exploits the Support Vector Machine linear model. It is trained with few hundreds exemplar images by SVM algorithm working in 136 dimensional space. It is shown by the strict statistical data analysis that such geometric detector strongly depends on the geometry of mouth opening area, measured by triangulation of outer lip contour. To this goal two Bayesian detectors were developed and compared with SVM detector. The first uses the mouth area in 2D image, while the second refers to the mouth area in 3D animated face model. The 3D modeling is based on Candide-3 model and it is performed in real time along with three smile detectors and statistics estimators. The mouth area/Bayesian detectors exhibit high correlation with fp68/SVM detector in a range [0:8; 1:0], depending mainly on light conditions and individual features with advantage of 3D technique, especially in hard light conditions.

  5. Correlates of Sensitive Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Paul [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-04-22

    By “Quantitative Empirical Analysis” (QEA) is intended the use of statistical methods to infer, from data that often tend to be of a historical nature, the characteristics of states that correlate with some designated dependent variable (e.g. proliferation of nuclear weapons). QEA is a well-established approach in the social sciences, but is not notably well-known among physical scientists, who tend to think of the social sciences as inherently qualitative. This article attempts to provide a snapshot of research, most of which has evolved over the past decade, involving the application of QEA to issues in which the dependent variable of interest is intended as some measure of nuclear proliferation. Standard practices in QEA are described, especially as they relate to data collection. The QEA approach is compared and contrasted to other quantitative approaches to studying proliferation-related issues, including a “figure of merit” approach that has largely been developed within the DOE complex, and two distinct methodologies termed in a recent US National Academy of Sciences study as “case by case” and “predefined framework.” Sample results from QEA applied to proliferation are indicated, as are doubts about such quantitative approaches. A simplistic decision-theoretic model of the optimal time for the international community to intervene in a possible proliferation scenario is used to illustrate the possibility of synergies between different approaches

  6. Correlates of Sensitive Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    By 'Quantitative Empirical Analysis' (QEA) is intended the use of statistical methods to infer, from data that often tend to be of a historical nature, the characteristics of states that correlate with some designated dependent variable (e.g. proliferation of nuclear weapons). QEA is a well-established approach in the social sciences, but is not notably well-known among physical scientists, who tend to think of the social sciences as inherently qualitative. This article attempts to provide a snapshot of research, most of which has evolved over the past decade, involving the application of QEA to issues in which the dependent variable of interest is intended as some measure of nuclear proliferation. Standard practices in QEA are described, especially as they relate to data collection. The QEA approach is compared and contrasted to other quantitative approaches to studying proliferation-related issues, including a 'figure of merit' approach that has largely been developed within the DOE complex, and two distinct methodologies termed in a recent US National Academy of Sciences study as 'case by case' and 'predefined framework.' Sample results from QEA applied to proliferation are indicated, as are doubts about such quantitative approaches. A simplistic decision-theoretic model of the optimal time for the international community to intervene in a possible proliferation scenario is used to illustrate the possibility of synergies between different approaches

  7. Correlations in the Grover search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Jian; Fan Heng

    2010-01-01

    The Grover search is a well-known quantum algorithm that outperforms any classical search algorithm. It is known that quantum correlations such as entanglement are responsible for the power of some quantum information protocols. But entanglement is not the only kind of quantum correlations. Other quantum correlations such as quantum discord are also useful to capture some important properties of the nonclassical correlation. Also there is no well-accepted and clear distinction between quantum correlations and classical correlations. In this paper, we systematically investigate several kinds of correlations including both quantum and classical in the whole process of the Grover search algorithm. These correlations are the concurrence, entanglement of formation, quantum discord, classical correlation and mutual information. The behaviors of quantum discord, classical correlation and mutual information are almost the same while the concurrence is different in the qubit-qubit case. For the qubit partition 1: n case, the behaviors of all correlations are qualitative the same. When the search is over, all kinds of correlations are zero, we argue that this is necessary for the final step in the search.

  8. Professional correlates of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Damien; Massuel, Marie-Anne; Metlaine, Arnaud

    2006-02-01

    Insomnia is a highly prevalent disorder that affects daytime functioning, behavior, and quality of life. Several reports have shown that insomnia impacts on the workforce and is associated with an increased risk of absenteeism. However, few workplace studies have been performed. Our study attempted to evaluate the professional correlates of insomnia by comparing a group of workers with insomnia to a matched group of good sleepers. The main objective measure was absenteeism. Accidents, self-esteem at work, job satisfaction, and efficiency at work were also investigated. Pairs of workers with insomnia (according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition definition) and good sleepers, matched by age, sex, and occupational status, were interviewed by their occupational physician and also answered a self-administered questionnaire on work-related criteria. Objective data on absenteeism (number of days absent from work) were provided by the employers' health resource databases. Paris and the Ile de France region (France). Seven hundred eighty-five subjects completed the questionnaire. We retained 369 pair (ie, 738 subjects) for analysis. Insomniacs missed work twice as often as good sleepers. The difference between insomniacs and good sleepers in terms of absenteeism was particularly high for blue-collar workers (odds ratio = 3.0) and men (odds ratio = 2.31). Insomniacs had also a higher accident rate while driving and, strikingly, a 3-fold greater risk of having 2 or 3 serious road accidents. They also reported poor self-esteem at work, less job satisfaction, and less efficiency at work, compared with good sleepers. Our study found an objective increase in absenteeism in insomniacs compared with good sleepers.

  9. Octupole correlations in 225Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.R.

    1989-12-01

    The nuclear structure of 225 Th has been studied using the reaction 226 Ra(α, 5n) 225 Th at a beam energy of 50 MeV. In-beam γ-γ, e - -n, e - e - and e - γ coincidences have been measured, using the TESSA3 array at the Daresbury NSF and the Double Orange spectrometer at the University of Bonn Cyclotron. γ-ray and electron energies and intensities, γ-ray angular distribution ratios and electron subshell ratios and conversion coefficients have been used to establish a decay scheme up to spin (39/2) ℎ and excitation energy E x ≅ 2.5 MeV. The decay scheme is found to be characterised by two ΔJ = 1 rotational bands, and these are classified in terms of the simplex quantum number, s, which is expected to be conserved for an octupole nucleus. No band crossings are observed up to a rotational frequency of ℎw ≅ 0.21 and 0.18 MeV in the s = -i and +i bands, respectively. Parity doublets have been observed, with enhanced E1 transitions linking states of opposite parity. γ-branching ratios have been measured and an average value of | Q 1 | Q 2 | (0.51±0.06) x 10 -3 ; fm -1 has been deduced. The results are compared with various calculations incorporating odd multipole degrees of freedom in the description of the nuclear shape. (author)

  10. Ion track etching revisited: I. Correlations between track parameters in aged polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, D.; Muñoz H., G.; García A., H.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Kiv, A.; Alfonta, L.

    2018-04-01

    Some yet poorly understood problems of etching of pristine and swift heavy ion track-irradiated aged polymers were treated, by applying conductometry across the irradiated foils during etching. The onset times of etchant penetration across pristine foils, and the onset times of the different etched track regimes in irradiated foils were determined for polymers of various proveniences, fluences and ages, as well as their corresponding etching speeds. From the results, correlations of the parameters with each other were deduced. The normalization of these parameters enables one to compare irradiated polymer foils of different origin and treatment with one another. In a number of cases, also polymeric gel formation and swelling occur which influence the track etching behaviour. The polymer degradation during aging influences the track etching parameters, which differ from each other on both sides of the foils. With increasing sample age, these differences increase.

  11. Exact results relating spin-orbit interactions in two-dimensional strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucska, Nóra; Gulácsi, Zsolt

    2018-06-01

    A 2D square, two-bands, strongly correlated and non-integrable system is analysed exactly in the presence of many-body spin-orbit interactions via the method of Positive Semidefinite Operators. The deduced exact ground states in the high concentration limit are strongly entangled, and given by the spin-orbit coupling are ferromagnetic and present an enhanced carrier mobility, which substantially differs for different spin projections. The described state emerges in a restricted parameter space region, which however is clearly accessible experimentally. The exact solutions are provided via the solution of a matching system of equations containing 74 coupled, non-linear and complex algebraic equations. In our knowledge, other exact results for 2D interacting systems with spin-orbit interactions are not present in the literature.

  12. Formation of heavy compound nuclei, their survival and correlation with longtime-scale fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.; Yakushev, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion of two massive nuclei with formation of super-heavy compound nucleus (CN) is driven by the potential energy gradient, as follows from the analysis of nuclear reaction cross-sections. The conservative energy of the system is deduced in simple approximation using regularized nuclear mass and interaction barrier values. Different reactions for the synthesis of Z c 110-118 nuclei are compared and the favourable conditions are found for fusion of the stable (W-Pt) isotopes with radioactive fission fragment projectiles, like 94 Kr or 100 Sr. Thus, the cold fusion method can be extended for a synthesis of elements with Z > 113. Survival of the evaporation residue is defined by the neutron-to-fission probability ratio and by the successful emission of gammas at the final step of the reaction. Numerical estimates are presented. Fixation of evaporation residue products must correlate with longtime-scale fission and available experimental results are discussed

  13. Correlation Structures of Correlated Binomial Models and Implied Default Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mori; K. Kitsukawa; M. Hisakado

    2006-01-01

    We show how to analyze and interpret the correlation structures, the conditional expectation values and correlation coefficients of exchangeable Bernoulli random variables. We study implied default distributions for the iTraxx-CJ tranches and some popular probabilistic models, including the Gaussian copula model, Beta binomial distribution model and long-range Ising model. We interpret the differences in their profiles in terms of the correlation structures. The implied default distribution h...

  14. Correlation Structures of Correlated Binomial Models and Implied Default Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shintaro; Kitsukawa, Kenji; Hisakado, Masato

    2008-11-01

    We show how to analyze and interpret the correlation structures, the conditional expectation values and correlation coefficients of exchangeable Bernoulli random variables. We study implied default distributions for the iTraxx-CJ tranches and some popular probabilistic models, including the Gaussian copula model, Beta binomial distribution model and long-range Ising model. We interpret the differences in their profiles in terms of the correlation structures. The implied default distribution has singular correlation structures, reflecting the credit market implications. We point out two possible origins of the singular behavior.

  15. From micro-correlations to macro-correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2016-01-01

    Random vectors with a symmetric correlation structure share a common value of pair-wise correlation between their different components. The symmetric correlation structure appears in a multitude of settings, e.g. mixture models. In a mixture model the components of the random vector are drawn independently from a general probability distribution that is determined by an underlying parameter, and the parameter itself is randomized. In this paper we study the overall correlation of high-dimensional random vectors with a symmetric correlation structure. Considering such a random vector, and terming its pair-wise correlation “micro-correlation”, we use an asymptotic analysis to derive the random vector’s “macro-correlation” : a score that takes values in the unit interval, and that quantifies the random vector’s overall correlation. The method of obtaining macro-correlations from micro-correlations is then applied to a diverse collection of frameworks that demonstrate the method’s wide applicability.

  16. Correlations Between Sea-Surface Salinity Tendencies and Freshwater Fluxes in the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Adamec, David

    2007-01-01

    Temporal changes in sea-surface salinity (SSS) from 21 years of a high resolution model integration of the Pacific Ocean are correlated with the freshwater flux that was used to force the integration. The correlations are calculated on a 1 x10 grid, and on a monthly scale to assess the possibility of deducing evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) fields from the salinity measurements to be taken by the upcoming Aquarius/SAC-D mission. Correlations between the monthly mean E-P fields and monthly mean SSS temporal tendencies are mainly zonally-oriented, and are highest where the local precipitation is relatively high. Nonseasonal (deviations from the monthly mean) correlations are highest along mid-latitude storm tracks and are relatively small in the tropics. The response of the model's surface salinity to surface forcing is very complex, and retrievals of freshwater fluxes from SSS measurements alone will require consideration of other processes, including horizontal advection and vertical mixing, rather than a simple balance between the two.

  17. Effects of pair correlation functions on intermolecular nuclear relaxation by translational and rotational diffusion in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, P.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study the intermolecular relaxation due to magnetic dipolar interactions, we calculate the spectral densities resulting from random translational and rotational motions of spherical molecules carrying off-centre spins. The relative translational motion is treated in the frame-work of a general diffusion equation (the Smoluchowski equation) which takes into account the existence of effective forces between the molecules. This model implies a pair correlation function. i.e. a non unifom relative distribution of the molecules. The analytical calculations are carried out by taking correctly into account the hard sphere boundary conditions for the molecules. Explicit numerical calculations of the spectral densities are performed using finite difference methods and the pair correlation function of Verlet and Weiss obtained by computer experiments. The resulting calculations allow one to interpret the relaxation exhibited by benzene and some of its monohalogen derivatives which has been measured by Jonas et al. at various pressures. The effects of pair correlation and eccentricity contribute to a noticeable enhancement of the spectral densities, especially as the frequency increases. The translational correlation times calculated from the Stokes formula and those deduced from intermolecular relaxation studies are compared. It is shown that in order to distinguish which of the dynamical models is appropriate, measurements must be made as a function of frequency [fr

  18. Electronic Correlation Strength of Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, A.; C. Albers, R.; E. Christensen, N.

    2013-01-01

    A new electronic quantity, the correlation strength, is defined as a necessary step for understanding the properties and trends in strongly correlated electronic materials. As a test case, this is applied to the different phases of elemental Pu. Within the GW approximation we have surprisingly...... found a "universal" scaling relationship, where the f-electron bandwidth reduction due to correlation effects is shown to depend only upon the local density approximation (LDA) bandwidth and is otherwise independent of crystal structure and lattice constant....

  19. Intermittency analysis of correlated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the method of the analysis of the dependence of the factorial moments on the bin size in which the correlations between the moments computed for different bin sizes are taken into account. For large multiplicity nucleus-nucleus data inclusion of the correlations does not change the values of the slope parameter, but gives errors significantly reduced as compared to the case of fits with no correlations. (author)

  20. Correlated electrons and generalized statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.A.

    2003-01-01

    Several important generalizations of Fermi-Dirac distribution are compared to numerical and experimental results for correlated electron systems. It is found that the quantum distributions based on incomplete information hypothesis can be useful for describing this kind of systems. We show that the additive incomplete fermion distribution gives very good description of weakly correlated electrons and that the non-additive one is suitable to very strong correlated cases. (author)

  1. Multiview Bayesian Correlated Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamronn, Simon Due; Poulsen, Andreas Trier; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2015-01-01

    are identical. Here we propose a hierarchical probabilistic model that can infer the level of universality in such multiview data, from completely unrelated representations, corresponding to canonical correlation analysis, to identical representations as in correlated component analysis. This new model, which...... we denote Bayesian correlated component analysis, evaluates favorably against three relevant algorithms in simulated data. A well-established benchmark EEG data set is used to further validate the new model and infer the variability of spatial representations across multiple subjects....

  2. A default Bayesian hypothesis test for correlations and partial correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.; Wagenmakers, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a default Bayesian hypothesis test for the presence of a correlation or a partial correlation. The test is a direct application of Bayesian techniques for variable selection in regression models. The test is easy to apply and yields practical advantages that the standard frequentist tests

  3. Mechanical shape correlation : a novel integrated digital image correlation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinendorst, S.M.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Geers, M.G.D.; Lamberti, L.; Lin, M.-T.; Furlong, C.; Sciammarella, C.

    2018-01-01

    Mechanical Shape Correlation (MSC) is a novel integrated digital image correlation technique, used to determine the optimal set of constitutive parameters to describe the experimentally observed mechanical behavior of a test specimen, based on digital images taken during the experiment. In contrast

  4. Closed sets of nonlocal correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allcock, Jonathan; Linden, Noah; Brunner, Nicolas; Popescu, Sandu; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Vertesi, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    We present a fundamental concept - closed sets of correlations - for studying nonlocal correlations. We argue that sets of correlations corresponding to information-theoretic principles, or more generally to consistent physical theories, must be closed under a natural set of operations. Hence, studying the closure of sets of correlations gives insight into which information-theoretic principles are genuinely different, and which are ultimately equivalent. This concept also has implications for understanding why quantum nonlocality is limited, and for finding constraints on physical theories beyond quantum mechanics.

  5. Correlation measurement of squeezed light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krivitsky, Leonid; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Dong, R.

    2009-01-01

    We study the implementation of a correlation measurement technique for the characterization of squeezed light which is nearly free of electronic noise. With two different sources of squeezed light, we show that the sign of the covariance coefficient, revealed from the time-resolved correlation data......, is witnessing the presence of squeezing in the system. Furthermore, we estimate the degree of squeezing using the correlation method and compare it to the standard homodyne measurement scheme. We show that the role of electronic detector noise is minimized using the correlation approach as opposed to homodyning...

  6. Evaluation of Little Ice Age cooling in Western Central Andes, suggested by paleoELAs, in contrast with global warming since late 19th century deduced from instrumental records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David; Campos, Néstor; Giraldez, Claudia; García, Eduardo; Quiros, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate climate cooling (°C) during the glacial expansion phases using the product GTV•ΔELA, where GTV is the vertical air temperature gradient (°C/m) and ΔELA (m) the difference in level observed between the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) reconstructions for current and past glaciers. With this aim the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio-(AABR) method was used to produce reconstructions of present ELAs (2002-2010) and paleoELAs corresponding to the last glacier advance phase. The reconstructions were produced in three study areas located along a N-S transect of the western cordillera in the Central Andes: the south-western sector of the Nevado Hualcán (9°S, 77°W; Giráldez 2011); the southern slope of the Cordillera Pariaqaqa (12°S, 76°W; Quirós, 2013) and the NW, NE, SE and SW quadrants of the Nevado Coropuna (16°S, 72°W; García 2013; Úbeda 2011; Campos, 2012). The three mountains exceed 6000 m altitude, their summit areas are covered by glaciers, and on their slopes there are existing well-conserved moraines deposited by the last advances near the present front of the ice masses. Although there are no absolute dates to confirm this hypothesis, it has been assumed that the last glacial advances occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which the oxygen isotopes of the Nevado Huascarán (9°S, 77°W) date to the period 1500-1890. For the Hualcán and Pariaqaqa the mean global value of the Earth's GTV (6.5°C/km) was used, considered valid for the Tropics. On the Coropuna a GTV=8.4°C/km was used, based on high resolution sensors installed in situ since 2007 (Úbeda 2011). This gradient is approaching the upper limit of the dry adiabatic gradient (9.8°C/km), as the Coropuna region is more arid than the other case study areas. The climate cooling estimates deduced from the product GTV•ΔELA were compared with the global warming shown by the 1880-2012 series, ΔT=0.85°C, and 1850/1900-2003/2012, ΔT=0.78°C. The differences are

  7. Measurement of electric field gradient at {sup 117}In on the Cu-site in mavicyanin by perturbed angular correlation of {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, A., E-mail: yokoyama@cacheibm.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Hashimoto, T.; Ihara, K.; Kikunaga, H.; Kinoshita, N.; Yamazaki, I.; Kataoka, K.; Yanase, M.; Takata, M. [Kanazawa University, Faculty of Science and Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology (Japan); Murakami, Y.; Takamiya, K.; Tanigaki, M.; Ohkubo, Y. [Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    The structure around the metal site of mavicyanin, a protein molecule with a copper site, was investigated in solution by using time-differential perturbed angular correlation of {sup 117}In. The electric field gradient (EFG) of the metal site was deduced from the measurement. It demonstrated that the site in a mutant-type mavicyanin, Thr15Ala-Mav, gives an EFG different from that in the wild-type mavicyanin does. The pH dependence of the EFG was also observed for both proteins.

  8. EPR correlations and EPW distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    In the case of two free spin-zero particles, the wave function originally considered by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen to exemplify EPR correlations has a non-negative Wigner distribution. This distribution gives an explicitly local account of the correlations. For an irreducible non-locality, more elaborate wave functions are required, with Wigner distributions which are not non-negative. (author)

  9. Some techniques of correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allas, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Some general remarks concerning correlation techniques are made. Most of the remarks are limited to correlated pairs of charged particles. The relatively simple system 3 He + 3 H → A + B + C, where all possible charged particle pairs A,B are detected and particle C is left undetected either charged or neutral, is considered. (G.T.H.)

  10. Software Correlator for Radioastron Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhachev, Sergey F.; Kostenko, Vladimir I.; Girin, Igor A.; Andrianov, Andrey S.; Rudnitskiy, Alexey G.; Zharov, Vladimir E.

    In this paper, we discuss the characteristics and operation of Astro Space Center (ASC) software FX correlator that is an important component of space-ground interferometer for Radioastron project. This project performs joint observations of compact radio sources using 10m space radio telescope (SRT) together with ground radio telescopes at 92, 18, 6 and 1.3 cm wavelengths. In this paper, we describe the main features of space-ground VLBI data processing of Radioastron project using ASC correlator. Quality of implemented fringe search procedure provides positive results without significant losses in correlated amplitude. ASC Correlator has a computational power close to real time operation. The correlator has a number of processing modes: “Continuum”, “Spectral Line”, “Pulsars”, “Giant Pulses”,“Coherent”. Special attention is paid to peculiarities of Radioastron space-ground VLBI data processing. The algorithms of time delay and delay rate calculation are also discussed, which is a matter of principle for data correlation of space-ground interferometers. During five years of Radioastron SRT successful operation, ASC correlator showed high potential of satisfying steady growing needs of current and future ground and space VLBI science. Results of ASC software correlator operation are demonstrated.

  11. Heteronuclear Long-Range Correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole W.

    The lecture will cover heteronuclear long-range correlation techniques like HMBC, H2BC, and HAT HMBC with the emphasis on determining the number of covalent bonds between two spins being correlated. H2BC and HMBC spectra are quite complementary as a peak can be strong in one of the two spectra...

  12. Correlations and Correlated Responses in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echekwu, CA.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant breeders must be concerned with the total array of economic characters in their efforts to develop a crop variety acceptable to farmers. Their selection endeavours must therefore take into consideration how changes in one trait affect, simultaneously changes in other economic attributes. The importance of correlations and correlated responses is therefore self evident in plant breeding endeavours. In this study F3 progenies from a cross between two cotton lines SAMCOT-9 x Y422 were evaluated for two years and performance data were used to obtain correlations between nine agronomic and fibre quality traits in upland cotton. The results indicated that plant helght was significantly and positively correlated with seed cotton yield, number of sympodial and monopodial branches, seed index, fibre length and micronaire index. Positive and significant correlations were also obtained between : seed cotton yield, tint percent and fibre strength and fibre length. Significant negative correlations were obtained between : plant height and lint percent ; number of monopodial branches, sympodial branches and lint percent ; fibre length, fibre strength and micronaire index. The correlated responses in the other eight traits when selection was practiced for seed cotton yield in the present study shows that it might be more profitable to practice direct selection for seed cotton yield compared to selecting for seed cotton yield through any of the other traits.

  13. Correlation Functions and Power Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The present lecture note is a supplement to the textbook Digital Signal Processing by J. Proakis and D.G. Manolakis used in the IMM/DTU course 02451 Digital Signal Processing and provides an extended discussion of correlation functions and power spectra. The definitions of correlation functions...... and spectra for discrete-time and continuous-time (analog) signals are pretty similar. Consequently, we confine the discussion mainly to real discrete-time signals. The Appendix contains detailed definitions and properties of correlation functions and spectra for analog as well as discrete-time signals....... It is possible to define correlation functions and associated spectra for aperiodic, periodic and random signals although the interpretation is different. Moreover, we will discuss correlation functions when mixing these basic signal types. In addition, the note include several examples for the purpose...

  14. Cross-correlation of long-range correlated series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arianos, Sergio; Carbone, Anna

    2009-01-01

    A method for estimating the cross-correlation C xy (τ) of long-range correlated series x(t) and y(t), at varying lags τ and scales n, is proposed. For fractional Brownian motions with Hurst exponents H 1 and H 2 , the asymptotic expression for C xy (τ) depends only on the lag τ (wide-sense stationarity) and scales as a power of n with exponent H 1 +H 2 for τ→0. The method is illustrated on: (i) financial series, to show the leverage effect; (ii) genomic sequences, to estimate the correlations between structural parameters along the chromosomes

  15. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Sakaki, Michiko; Ezaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takamitsu

    2018-01-01

    Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other) measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node) are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients were strongly

  16. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Masuda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients

  17. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Sakaki, Michiko; Ezaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takamitsu

    2018-01-01

    Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other) measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node) are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients were strongly

  18. Superconductivity, Antiferromagnetism, and Kinetic Correlation in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ground state of two-dimensional Hubbard model on the basis of the variational Monte Carlo method. We use wave functions that include kinetic correlation and doublon-holon correlation beyond the Gutzwiller ansatz. It is still not clear whether the Hubbard model accounts for high-temperature superconductivity. The antiferromagnetic correlation plays a key role in the study of pairing mechanism because the superconductive phase exists usually close to the antiferromagnetic phase. We investigate the stability of the antiferromagnetic state when holes are doped as a function of the Coulomb repulsion U. We show that the antiferromagnetic correlation is suppressed as U is increased exceeding the bandwidth. High-temperature superconductivity is possible in this region with enhanced antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation and pairing interaction.

  19. 25 ns software correlator for photon and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magatti, Davide; Ferri, Fabio

    2003-02-01

    A 25 ns time resolution, multi-tau software correlator developed in LABVIEW based on the use of a standard photon counting unit, a fast timer/counter board (6602-PCI National Instrument) and a personal computer (PC) (1.5 GHz Pentium 4) is presented and quantitatively discussed. The correlator works by processing the stream of incoming data in parallel according to two different algorithms: For large lag times (τ⩾100 μs), a classical time-mode (TM) scheme, based on the measure of the number of pulses per time interval, is used; differently, for τ⩽100 μs a photon-mode (PM) scheme is adopted and the time sequence of the arrival times of the photon pulses is measured. By combining the two methods, we developed a system capable of working out correlation functions on line, in full real time for the TM correlator and partially in batch processing for the PM correlator. For the latter one, the duty cycle depends on the count rate of the incoming pulses, being ˜100% for count rates ⩽3×104 Hz, ˜15% at 105 Hz, and ˜1% at 106 Hz. For limitations imposed by the fairly small first-in, first-out (FIFO) buffer available on the counter board, the maximum count rate permissible for a proper functioning of the PM correlator is limited to ˜105 Hz. However, this limit can be removed by using a board with a deeper FIFO. Similarly, the 25 ns time resolution is only limited by maximum clock frequency available on the 6602-PCI and can be easily improved by using a faster clock. When tested on dilute solutions of calibrated latex spheres, the overall performances of the correlator appear to be comparable with those of commercial hardware correlators, but with several nontrivial advantages related to its flexibility, low cost, and easy adaptability to future developments of PC and data acquisition technology.

  20. High accurate volume holographic correlator with 4000 parallel correlation channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kai; Qu, Zongyao; Cao, Liangcai; Su, Ping; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2008-03-01

    Volume holographic correlator allows simultaneously calculate the two-dimensional inner product between the input image and each stored image. We have recently experimentally implemented in VHC 4000 parallel correlation channels with better than 98% output accuracy in a single location in a crystal. The speckle modulation is used to suppress the sidelobes of the correlation patterns, allowing more correlation spots to be contained in the output plane. A modified exposure schedule is designed to ensure the hologram in each channel with unity diffraction efficiency. In this schedule, a restricted coefficient was introduced into the original exposure schedule to solve the problem that the sensitivity and time constant of the crystal will change as a time function when in high-capacity storage. An interleaving method is proposed to improve the output accuracy. By unifying the distribution of the input and stored image patterns without changing the inner products between them, this method could eliminate the impact of correlation pattern variety on calculated inner product values. Moreover, by using this method, the maximum correlation spot size is reduced, which decreases the required minimum safe clearance between neighboring spots in the output plane, allowing more spots to be parallely detected without crosstalk. The experimental results are given and analyzed.

  1. Two pion correlation from SPACER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csoergoe, T.; Zimanyi, J.; Pratt, S.

    1989-12-01

    The correlation function for neutral and negative pions produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions was calculated without free parameters based on a space-time version of the LUND model, called SPACER: Simulation of Phase space distribution of Atomic nuclear Collisions in Energetic Reactions. This method includes the effect of Bose correlations for the emitted pion pair. Effects arising from correlations between space-time and momentum space distributions are investigated. The results are compared to the data of two different experiments. The role and interpretation of the chaocity parameter are discussed. (D.G.) 14 refs.; 4 figs

  2. Correlation and simple linear regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Kelly H; Tuncali, Kemal; Silverman, Stuart G

    2003-06-01

    In this tutorial article, the concepts of correlation and regression are reviewed and demonstrated. The authors review and compare two correlation coefficients, the Pearson correlation coefficient and the Spearman rho, for measuring linear and nonlinear relationships between two continuous variables. In the case of measuring the linear relationship between a predictor and an outcome variable, simple linear regression analysis is conducted. These statistical concepts are illustrated by using a data set from published literature to assess a computed tomography-guided interventional technique. These statistical methods are important for exploring the relationships between variables and can be applied to many radiologic studies.

  3. Nonidentical particle correlations in STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Erazmus, B; Renault, G; Retière, F; Szarwas, P; 10.1556/APH.21.2004.2-4.33

    2004-01-01

    The correlation function of nonidentical particles is sensitive to the relative space-time asymmetries in particle emission. Analysing pion-kaon, pion-proton and kaon-proton correlation functions, measured in the Au+Au collisions by the STAR experiment at RHIC, we show that pions, kaons and protons are not emitted at the same average space-time coordinates. The shifts between pion, kaon and proton sources are consistent with the picture of a transverse collective flow. Results of the first measurement of proton-lambda correlations at STAR are in agreement with recent CERN and AGS data.

  4. Ring correlations in random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M F

    2016-12-01

    We examine the correlations between rings in random network glasses in two dimensions as a function of their separation. Initially, we use the topological separation (measured by the number of intervening rings), but this leads to pseudo-long-range correlations due to a lack of topological charge neutrality in the shells surrounding a central ring. This effect is associated with the noncircular nature of the shells. It is, therefore, necessary to use the geometrical distance between ring centers. Hence we find a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law out to larger distances, with the correlations between rings decaying away when two rings are more than about three rings apart.

  5. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H, E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  6. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H

    2011-01-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  7. Correlator bank detection of gravitational wave chirps--False-alarm probability, template density, and thresholds: Behind and beyond the minimal-match issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croce, R.P.; Demma, Th.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I.M.; Longo, M.; Marano, S.; Matta, V.

    2004-01-01

    The general problem of computing the false-alarm probability vs the detection-threshold relationship for a bank of correlators is addressed, in the context of maximum-likelihood detection of gravitational waves in additive stationary Gaussian noise. Specific reference is made to chirps from coalescing binary systems. Accurate (lower-bound) approximants for the cumulative distribution of the whole-bank supremum are deduced from a class of Bonferroni-type inequalities. The asymptotic properties of the cumulative distribution are obtained, in the limit where the number of correlators goes to infinity. The validity of numerical simulations made on small-size banks is extended to banks of any size, via a Gaussian-correlation inequality. The result is used to readdress the problem of relating the template density to the fraction of potentially observable sources which could be dismissed as an effect of template space discreteness

  8. First Measurements of Spin Correlation Using Semi-leptonic $t\\bar{t}$ Events at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lemmer, Boris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The top quark decays before it hadronizes. Before its spin state can be changed in a process of strong interaction, it is directly transferred to the top quark decay products. The top quark spin can be deduced by studying angular distributions of the decay products. The Standard Model predicts the top/anti-top quark ($t\\bar{t}$) pairs to have correlated spins. The degree is sensitive to the spin and the production mechanisms of the top quark. Measuring the spin correlation allows to test the predictions. New physics effects can be reflected in deviations from the prediction. The measurement of the spin correlation of $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, produced at the LHC with a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV and reconstructed with the ATLAS detector, is presented. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 $\\textrm{fb}^{-1}$. $t\\bar{t}$ pairs are reconstructed in the $\\ell$+jets channel using a kinematic likelihood fit offering the identification of light up- and down-type quarks from the $t \\righ...

  9. Investigation of correlations in light neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, G.

    2004-10-01

    Correlations play a crucial role in understanding the structure of light nuclei at and beyond the neutron drip-line. In this context, the two-neutron halo nucleus He 6 and the unbound systems H 5 , He 7,9 and Li 10 have been studied via measurements of the breakup of beams of He 6 and Be 11,12 . The CHARISSA and DEMON detector arrays were employed. The interpretation was facilitated by a simulation code (SILLAGE) which provided for the setup. In the case of He 7 , the existence of an excited state with E r ∼ 1 MeV and gamma ∼ 0.75 MeV was confirmed. The virtual character of the s-wave ground state of Li 10 was also confirmed and a scattering length of as ∼ -16 fm deduced. The results obtained for He 9 suggest that a virtual s-wave state may exist just above threshold. The study of the three-body breakup of He 6 found that the decay of the first 2+ state is essentially direct, while the decay of the remaining continuum strength is sequential - passage via He 5 . Using the technique of intensity interferometry an rms separation between the halo neutrons of 7.7 +- 0.8 fm was derived. This result was confirmed by a complementary method utilizing Dalitz plots. In the case of H 5 , the invariant mass spectrum was found to exhibit a broad (gamma ∼ 2 MeV) structure some 1.8 MeV above threshold. Comparison with recent three-body model calculations suggest that this corresponds to the predicted 1/2+ ground state. An rms valence neutron separation of some 5.5 fm was estimated. A search was also carried out for the 4n system using the Be 12* (2 alpha + Xn decay channel). No signal was observed beyond that expected on the basis of the known background processes. (author)

  10. Weak Measurement and Quantum Correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Kumar Pati

    Entanglement: Two quantum systems can be in a strongly correlated state even if .... These are resources which can be used to design quantum computer, quantum ...... Weak measurements have found numerous applications starting from the ...

  11. Jet-quenching and correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... pseudorapidity (ridge) correlations in small systems. Section 7 ... words of 'jet' and 'parton' are often used interchangeably. ...... [118] STAR Collaboration: Joshua Konzer, Poster presentation at Quark Matter 2012 (2012).

  12. Frequency-Modulation Correlation Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, J. S.; Martonchik, J. V.

    1985-01-01

    New type of correlation spectrometer eliminates need to shift between two cells, one empty and one containing reference gas. Electrooptical phase modulator sinusoidally shift frequencies of sample transmission spectrum.

  13. Pooling and correlated neural activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rosenbaum

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Correlations between spike trains can strongly modulate neuronal activity and affect the ability of neurons to encode information. Neurons integrate inputs from thousands of afferents. Similarly, a number of experimental techniques are designed to record pooled cell activity. We review and generalize a number of previous results that show how correlations between cells in a population can be amplified and distorted in signals that reflect their collective activity. The structure of the underlying neuronal response can significantly impact correlations between such pooled signals. Therefore care needs to be taken when interpreting pooled recordings, or modeling networks of cells that receive inputs from large presynaptic populations. We also show that the frequently observed runaway synchrony in feedforward chains is primarily due to the pooling of correlated inputs.

  14. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case

  15. Integrated Factors Correlating Undergraduate Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrated Factors Correlating Undergraduate Academic Achievement in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. ... AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities ... Thus, it is study investigated the integrated factors determining academic performance of students in public secondary schools in Bayelsa State, Nigeria.

  16. Reliable computation from contextual correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestereich, André L.; Galvão, Ernesto F.

    2017-12-01

    An operational approach to the study of computation based on correlations considers black boxes with one-bit inputs and outputs, controlled by a limited classical computer capable only of performing sums modulo-two. In this setting, it was shown that noncontextual correlations do not provide any extra computational power, while contextual correlations were found to be necessary for the deterministic evaluation of nonlinear Boolean functions. Here we investigate the requirements for reliable computation in this setting; that is, the evaluation of any Boolean function with success probability bounded away from 1 /2 . We show that bipartite CHSH quantum correlations suffice for reliable computation. We also prove that an arbitrarily small violation of a multipartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger noncontextuality inequality also suffices for reliable computation.

  17. Default probabilities and default correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Erlenmaier, Ulrich; Gersbach, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Starting from the Merton framework for firm defaults, we provide the analytics and robustness of the relationship between default correlations. We show that loans with higher default probabilities will not only have higher variances but also higher correlations between loans. As a consequence, portfolio standard deviation can increase substantially when loan default probabilities rise. This result has two important implications. First, relative prices of loans with different default probabili...

  18. Quantum games with correlated noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Ahmad; Toor, A H

    2006-01-01

    We analyse quantum games with correlated noise through a generalized quantization scheme. Four different combinations on the basis of entanglement of initial quantum state and the measurement basis are analysed. It is shown that the quantum player only enjoys an advantage over the classical player when both the initial quantum state and the measurement basis are in entangled form. Furthermore, it is shown that for maximum correlation the effects of decoherence diminish and it behaves as a noiseless game

  19. Retention capacity of correlated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrenk, K J; Araújo, N A M; Ziff, R M; Herrmann, H J

    2014-06-01

    We extend the water retention model [C. L. Knecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045703 (2012)] to correlated random surfaces. We find that the retention capacity of discrete random landscapes is strongly affected by spatial correlations among the heights. This phenomenon is related to the emergence of power-law scaling in the lake volume distribution. We also solve the uncorrelated case exactly for a small lattice and present bounds on the retention of uncorrelated landscapes.

  20. Retention capacity of correlated surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Schrenk, K. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Ziff, R. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    We extend the water retention model [C. L. Knecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045703 (2012)] to correlated random surfaces. We find that the retention capacity of discrete random landscapes is strongly affected by spatial correlations among the heights. This phenomenon is related to the emergence of power-law scaling in the lake volume distribution. We also solve the uncorrelated case exactly for a small lattice and present bounds on the retention of uncorrelated landscapes.

  1. Generating series for GUE correlators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovin, Boris; Yang, Di

    2017-11-01

    We extend to the Toda lattice hierarchy the approach of Bertola et al. (Phys D Nonlinear Phenom 327:30-57, 2016; IMRN, 2016) to computation of logarithmic derivatives of tau-functions in terms of the so-called matrix resolvents of the corresponding difference Lax operator. As a particular application we obtain explicit generating series for connected GUE correlators. On this basis an efficient recursive procedure for computing the correlators in full genera is developed.

  2. Rapidity correlations test stochastic hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zin, C; Gavin, S; Moschelli, G

    2017-01-01

    We show that measurements of the rapidity dependence of transverse momentum correlations can be used to determine the characteristic time τ π that dictates the rate of isotropization of the stress energy tensor, as well as the shear viscosity ν = η/sT . We formulate methods for computing these correlations using second order dissipative hydrodynamics with noise. Current data are consistent with τ π /ν ∼ 10 but targeted measurements can improve this precision. (paper)

  3. Manifold Regularized Correlation Object Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Hongwei; Ma, Bo; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a manifold regularized correlation tracking method with augmented samples. To make better use of the unlabeled data and the manifold structure of the sample space, a manifold regularization-based correlation filter is introduced, which aims to assign similar labels to neighbor samples. Meanwhile, the regression model is learned by exploiting the block-circulant structure of matrices resulting from the augmented translated samples over multiple base samples cropped fr...

  4. Correlated Default and Financial Intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory Phelan

    2015-01-01

    Financial intermediation naturally arises when knowledge about the aggregate state is valuable for managing investments and lenders cannot easily observe the aggregate state. I show this using a costly enforcement model in which lenders need ex-post incentives to enforce payments from defaulted loans and borrowers' payoffs are correlated. When projects have correlated outcomes, learning the state of one project (via enforcement) provides information about the states of other projects. A large...

  5. Long-range correlated percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinrib, A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a study of the percolation problem with long-range correlations in the site or bond occupations. An extension of the Harris criterion for the relevance of the correlations is derived for the case that the correlations decay as x/sup -a/ for large distances x. For a d the correlations are relevant if dν-2<0. Applying this criterion to the behavior that results when the correlations are relevant, we argue that the new behavior will have ν/sub long/ = 2/a. It is shown that the correlated bond percolation problem is equivalent to a q-state Potts model with quenched disorder in the limit q→1. With the use of this result, a renormalization-group study of the problem is presented, expanding in epsilon = 6-d and in delta = 4-a. In addition to the normal percolation fixed point, we find a new long-range fixed point. The crossover to this new fixed point follows the extended Harris criterion, and the fixed point has exponents ν/sub long/ = 2/a (as predicted) and eta/sub long/ = (1/11)(delta-epsilon). Finally, several results on the percolation properties of the Ising model at its critical point are shown to be in agreement with the predictions of this paper

  6. Generalized drift-flux correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Young, M.Y.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional drift-flux model with five conservation equations is frequently employed in major computer codes, such as TRAC-PD2, and in simulator codes. In this method, the relative velocity between liquid and vapor phases, or slip ratio, is given by correlations, rather than by direct solution of the phasic momentum equations, as in the case of the two-fluid model used in TRAC-PF1. The correlations for churn-turbulent bubbly flow and slug flow regimes were given in terms of drift velocities by Zuber and Findlay. For the annular flow regime, the drift velocity correlations were developed by Ishii et al., using interphasic force balances. Another approach is to define the drift velocity so that flooding and liquid hold-up conditions are properly simulated, as reported here. The generalized correlation is used to reanalyze the MB-2 test data for two-phase flow in a large-diameter pipe. The results are applied to the generalized drift flux velocity, whose relationship to the other correlations is discussed. Finally, the generalized drift flux correlation is implemented in TRAC-PD2. Flow reversal from countercurrent to cocurrent flow is computed in small-diameter U-shaped tubes and is compared with the flooding curve

  7. Multiplicity correlations of intermediate-mass fragments with pions and fast protons in 12C + 197AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turzo, K.; Begemann-Blaich, M.L.; Auger, G.

    2003-12-01

    Low-energy π + (E π 12 C+ 197 Au collisions at incident energies from 300 to 1800 MeV per nucleon were detected with the Si-Si(Li)-CsI(Tl) calibration telescopes of the INDRA multidetector. The inclusive angular distributions are approximately isotropic, consistent with multiple rescattering in the target spectator. The multiplicity correlations of the low-energy pions and of energetic protons (E p >or ≤ 150 MeV) with intermediate-mass fragments were determined from the measured coincidence data. The deduced correlation functions 1 + R ∼ 1.3 for inclusive event samples reflect the strong correlations evident from the common impact-parameter dependence of the considered multiplicities. For narrow impact-parameter bins (based on charged-particle multiplicity), the correlation functions are close to unity and do not indicate strong additional correlations. Only for pions at high particle multiplicities (central collisions) a weak anticorrelation is observed, probably due to a limited competition between these emissions. Overall, the results are consistent with the equilibrium assumption made in statistical multifragmentation scenarios. Predictions obtained with intranuclear cascade models coupled to the statistical multifragmentation model are in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  8. Spin correlations in quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2015-04-01

    We consider theoretically spin correlations in a one-dimensional quantum wire with Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction (RDI). The correlations of noninteracting electrons display electron spin resonance at a frequency proportional to the RDI coupling. Interacting electrons, upon varying the direction of the external magnetic field, transit from the state of Luttinger liquid (LL) to the spin-density wave (SDW) state. We show that the two-time total-spin correlations of these states are significantly different. In the LL, the projection of total spin to the direction of the RDI-induced field is conserved and the corresponding correlator is equal to zero. The correlators of two components perpendicular to the RDI field display a sharp electron-spin resonance driven by the RDI-induced intrinsic field. In contrast, in the SDW state, the longitudinal projection of spin dominates, whereas the transverse components are suppressed. This prediction indicates a simple way for an experimental diagnostic of the SDW in a quantum wire. We point out that the Luttinger model does not respect the spin conservation since it assumes the infinite Fermi sea. We propose a proper cutoff to correct this failure.

  9. Community Detection for Correlation Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mel MacMahon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A challenging problem in the study of complex systems is that of resolving, without prior information, the emergent, mesoscopic organization determined by groups of units whose dynamical activity is more strongly correlated internally than with the rest of the system. The existing techniques to filter correlations are not explicitly oriented towards identifying such modules and can suffer from an unavoidable information loss. A promising alternative is that of employing community detection techniques developed in network theory. Unfortunately, this approach has focused predominantly on replacing network data with correlation matrices, a procedure that we show to be intrinsically biased because of its inconsistency with the null hypotheses underlying the existing algorithms. Here, we introduce, via a consistent redefinition of null models based on random matrix theory, the appropriate correlation-based counterparts of the most popular community detection techniques. Our methods can filter out both unit-specific noise and system-wide dependencies, and the resulting communities are internally correlated and mutually anticorrelated. We also implement multiresolution and multifrequency approaches revealing hierarchically nested subcommunities with “hard” cores and “soft” peripheries. We apply our techniques to several financial time series and identify mesoscopic groups of stocks which are irreducible to a standard, sectorial taxonomy; detect “soft stocks” that alternate between communities; and discuss implications for portfolio optimization and risk management.

  10. Correlated ion stopping in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicknagel, G.; Deutsch, C.

    1997-01-01

    The basic features of correlated ion stopping in plasmas are demonstrated by employing two opposite extremes of cluster structures, a statistical model with a spatial ion distribution of Gaussian shape and the highly regular configuration of N-ion chains and cubic boxes. In the case of the ion chains the resonant character of correlated stopping due to the interference of the excited wake fields is discussed in detail. The general behavior of correlation effects is summarized and its dependence on the ratio of cluster size and interion spacing to the screening length in the plasma, as well as the ratio of the cluster velocity to the mean electron velocity in the target, is stressed out. The validity and applicability of the dielectric response formalism used for describing correlated stopping is critically reviewed. A scheme is presented to extend the linear formalism to weak nonlinear situations that occur, in particular, for small highly charged clusters at moderate or low velocities. For the Gaussian cluster a fit formula is given, which allows a fast and accurate calculation of the enhancement of stopping due to correlation effects and applies for all degrees of degeneracy of the electrons and arbitrary cluster velocities. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  11. Community Detection for Correlation Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, Mel; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-04-01

    A challenging problem in the study of complex systems is that of resolving, without prior information, the emergent, mesoscopic organization determined by groups of units whose dynamical activity is more strongly correlated internally than with the rest of the system. The existing techniques to filter correlations are not explicitly oriented towards identifying such modules and can suffer from an unavoidable information loss. A promising alternative is that of employing community detection techniques developed in network theory. Unfortunately, this approach has focused predominantly on replacing network data with correlation matrices, a procedure that we show to be intrinsically biased because of its inconsistency with the null hypotheses underlying the existing algorithms. Here, we introduce, via a consistent redefinition of null models based on random matrix theory, the appropriate correlation-based counterparts of the most popular community detection techniques. Our methods can filter out both unit-specific noise and system-wide dependencies, and the resulting communities are internally correlated and mutually anticorrelated. We also implement multiresolution and multifrequency approaches revealing hierarchically nested subcommunities with "hard" cores and "soft" peripheries. We apply our techniques to several financial time series and identify mesoscopic groups of stocks which are irreducible to a standard, sectorial taxonomy; detect "soft stocks" that alternate between communities; and discuss implications for portfolio optimization and risk management.

  12. Library correlation nuclide identification algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, William R.

    2007-01-01

    A novel nuclide identification algorithm, Library Correlation Nuclide Identification (LibCorNID), is proposed. In addition to the spectrum, LibCorNID requires the standard energy, peak shape and peak efficiency calibrations. Input parameters include tolerances for some expected variations in the calibrations, a minimum relative nuclide peak area threshold, and a correlation threshold. Initially, the measured peak spectrum is obtained as the residual after baseline estimation via peak erosion, removing the continuum. Library nuclides are filtered by examining the possible nuclide peak areas in terms of the measured peak spectrum and applying the specified relative area threshold. Remaining candidates are used to create a set of theoretical peak spectra based on the calibrations and library entries. These candidate spectra are then simultaneously fit to the measured peak spectrum while also optimizing the calibrations within the bounds of the specified tolerances. Each candidate with optimized area still exceeding the area threshold undergoes a correlation test. The normalized Pearson's correlation value is calculated as a comparison of the optimized nuclide peak spectrum to the measured peak spectrum with the other optimized peak spectra subtracted. Those candidates with correlation values that exceed the specified threshold are identified and their optimized activities are output. An evaluation of LibCorNID was conducted to verify identification performance in terms of detection probability and false alarm rate. LibCorNID has been shown to perform well compared to standard peak-based analyses

  13. THE PEAK ENERGY-DURATION CORRELATION AND POSSIBLE IMPLICATIONS ON GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon-Young Chang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the correlation between the peak energy and the burst duration using available long GRB data with known redshift, whose circumburst medium type has been suggested via afterglow light curve modeling. We find that the peak energy and the burst duration of the observed GRBs are correlated both in the observer frame and in the GRB rest frame. For our total sample we obtain, for instance, the Spearman rank-order correlation values sim 0.75 and sim 0.65 with the chance probabilities P=1.0 times 10^{-3} and P=6.0 times 10^{-3} in the observer frame and in the GRB rest frame, respectively. We note that taking the effects of the expanding universe into account reduces the value a bit. We further attempt to separate our GRB sample into the ``ISM'' GRBs and the ``WIND'' GRBs according to environment models inferred from the afterglow light curves and apply statistical tests, as one may expect that clues on the progenitor of GRBs can be deduced directly from prompt emission properties other than from the ambient environment surrounding GRBs. We find that two subsamples of GRBs show different correlation coefficients. That is, the Spearman rank-order correlation are sim 0.65 and sim 0.57 for the ``ISM'' GRBs and ``WIND'' GRBs, respectively, after taking the effects of the expanding universe into account. It is not yet, however, statistically very much significant that the GRBS in two types of circumburst media show statistically characteristic behaviors, from which one may conclude that all the long bursts are not originated from a single progenitor population. A larger size of data is required to increase the statistical significance.

  14. Correlation-Preserving Photo Collage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingjie; Zhang, Hongjie; Jing, Guangmei; Guo, Yanwen; Chen, Zhonggui; Wang, Wenping

    2017-05-12

    A new method is presented for producing photo collages that preserve content correlation of photos. We use deep learning techniques to find correlation among given photos to facilitate their embedding on the canvas, and develop an efficient combinatorial optimization technique to make correlated photos stay close to each other. To make efficient use of canvas space, our method first extracts salient regions of photos and packs only these salient regions. We allow the salient regions to have arbitrary shapes, therefore yielding informative, yet more compact collages than by other similar collage methods based on salient regions. We present extensive experimental results, user study results, and comparisons against the state-of-the-art methods to show the superiority of our method.

  15. Flooding correlations in narrow channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Baek, W. P.; Chang, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    Heat transfer in narrow gap is considered as important phenomena in severe accidents in nuclear power plants. Also in heat removal of electric chip. Critical heat flux(CHF) in narrow gap limits the maximum heat transfer rate in narrow channel. In case of closed bottom channel, flooding limited CHF occurrence is observed. Flooding correlations will be helpful to predict the CHF in closed bottom channel. In present study, flooding data for narrow channel geometry were collected and the work to recognize the effect of the span, w and gap size, s were performed. And new flooding correlations were suggested for high-aspect-ratio geometry. Also, flooding correlation was applied to flooding limited CHF data

  16. Manifold Regularized Correlation Object Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongwei; Ma, Bo; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a manifold regularized correlation tracking method with augmented samples. To make better use of the unlabeled data and the manifold structure of the sample space, a manifold regularization-based correlation filter is introduced, which aims to assign similar labels to neighbor samples. Meanwhile, the regression model is learned by exploiting the block-circulant structure of matrices resulting from the augmented translated samples over multiple base samples cropped from both target and nontarget regions. Thus, the final classifier in our method is trained with positive, negative, and unlabeled base samples, which is a semisupervised learning framework. A block optimization strategy is further introduced to learn a manifold regularization-based correlation filter for efficient online tracking. Experiments on two public tracking data sets demonstrate the superior performance of our tracker compared with the state-of-the-art tracking approaches.

  17. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Sinem K.; Vogts, Angela; Kröhnert, Katharina; Hillion, François; Rizzoli, Silvio O.; Wessels, Johannes T.

    2014-04-01

    The isotopic composition of different materials can be imaged by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In biology, this method is mainly used to study cellular metabolism and turnover, by pulsing the cells with marker molecules such as amino acids labelled with stable isotopes (15N, 13C). The incorporation of the markers is then imaged with a lateral resolution that can surpass 100 nm. However, secondary ion mass spectrometry cannot identify specific subcellular structures like organelles, and needs to be correlated with a second technique, such as fluorescence imaging. Here, we present a method based on stimulated emission depletion microscopy that provides correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy (COIN) images. We use this approach to study the protein turnover in different organelles from cultured hippocampal neurons. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy can be applied to a variety of biological samples, and should therefore enable the investigation of the isotopic composition of many organelles and subcellular structures.

  18. Correlations in charged bosons systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Caparica, A. de.

    1985-02-01

    The two and three-dimensional charge Bose gas have been studied. In the bidimensional case two different types of interaction were considered: l/r and l n(r). The method of self-consistent-field was applied to these systems, which takes into account the short range correlations between the bosons through a local-field correction. By using self-consistent numerical calculations, the structure factor S(k → ) was determined. The pair-correlation function, the ground-state energy, the pressure of the gas and the spectrum of elementary excitations were obtained from S (k → ). The screening density induced by a fixed charged impurity was calculated. In the high-density limit our calculations reproduce the results given by Bogoliubov's perturbation theory. In the intermediate-density region, corresponding to the strongly coupled systems, the results are in very good agreement with calculations based on HNC approximation as well as Monte Carlo method. The results are compared in several situations with RPA results showing that the self-consistent method is much more accurate. The two-dimensional systems showed to be more correlated than the three-dimensional systems showed to be more correlated than the three-dimensional one; the gas with interaction l/r is also more correlated than the logarithmic one at high densities, but it begins to be less correlated than this one in the low-density region. The thermodynamic functions of the two and three-dimensional systems at finite temperatures near absolute zero are calculated based upon the gas excitation spectra at zero temperature. (author)

  19. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    OpenAIRE

    Shengjun Wu; Zhihao Ma; Zhihua Chen; Sixia Yu

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches ...

  20. Kinetic equations with pairing correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauser, R.

    1995-12-01

    The Gorkov equations are derived for a general non-equilibrium system. The Gorkov factorization is generalized by the cumulant expansion of the 2-particle correlation and by a generalized Wick theorem in the case of a perturbation expansion. A stationary solution for the Green functions in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism is presented taking into account pairing correlations. Especially the effects of collisional broadening on the spectral functions and Green functions is discussed. Kinetic equations are derived in the quasi-particle approximation and in the case of particles with width. Explicit expressions for the self-energies are given. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear correlations and structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Guoju; Irvine, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    It is argued that the search for a mass number dependence of the nuclear structure function per nucleon is profitably directed to the region of Bjorken scaling variable x > 1. We show that in the convolution model of the nuclear structure function the nuclear momentum distribution and energy spectrum generated by cluster expansion techniques, here realised in the correlated basis function method, invoking tensor correlations and short-range density-dependent repulsions adequately describes the structure function for 12 C in the region x > 1. The results of structure functions for a number of light-, medium- and heavy-mass nuclei are presented. (author)

  2. Variable Selection via Partial Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Runze; Liu, Jingyuan; Lou, Lejia

    2017-07-01

    Partial correlation based variable selection method was proposed for normal linear regression models by Bühlmann, Kalisch and Maathuis (2010) as a comparable alternative method to regularization methods for variable selection. This paper addresses two important issues related to partial correlation based variable selection method: (a) whether this method is sensitive to normality assumption, and (b) whether this method is valid when the dimension of predictor increases in an exponential rate of the sample size. To address issue (a), we systematically study this method for elliptical linear regression models. Our finding indicates that the original proposal may lead to inferior performance when the marginal kurtosis of predictor is not close to that of normal distribution. Our simulation results further confirm this finding. To ensure the superior performance of partial correlation based variable selection procedure, we propose a thresholded partial correlation (TPC) approach to select significant variables in linear regression models. We establish the selection consistency of the TPC in the presence of ultrahigh dimensional predictors. Since the TPC procedure includes the original proposal as a special case, our theoretical results address the issue (b) directly. As a by-product, the sure screening property of the first step of TPC was obtained. The numerical examples also illustrate that the TPC is competitively comparable to the commonly-used regularization methods for variable selection.

  3. Hadron Correlations and Parton Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, R.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)]. E-mail: rjfries@comp.tamu.edu

    2007-02-15

    Parton recombination has been found to be an extremely useful model to understand hadron production at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. It is particularly important to explore its connections with hard processes. This article reviews some of the aspects of the quark recombination model and places particular emphasis on hadron correlations.

  4. Correlations among static quark masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, K.; Motz, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonrelativistic heavy quarkonia potentials with Coulomb and linearly rising limiting behaviour are correlated additively by Taylor expansion extracting the limiting structure and a constant term. Relations between fit parameters of different potentials including the quark masses m b and m c , are obtained. The known stability of the difference m b -m c , appears as direct consequence of flavour invariance of the potentials

  5. Illusory correlation and social anxiety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, P.J.; Boegels, S.; Kindt, M.; Merckelbach, H.

    1998-01-01

    An illusory correlation (IC) experiment examined the presence of a phobia-relevant covariation bias in the context of social anxiety. 60 female college students (28 with low and 32 with high social anxiety) were shown a series of slides comprising pictures of angry, happy, and neutral faces which

  6. Spin squeezing and quantum correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2 states. A coherent spin-s state. (CSS) θ φ can then be thought of as having no quantum correlations as the constituent. 2s elementary spins point in the same direction ˆn(θ φ) which is the mean spin direction. 2. State classification and squeezing. In order to discuss squeezing, we begin with the squeezing condition itself.

  7. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions

  8. Echoes in correlated neural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helias, M; Tetzlaff, T; Diesmann, M

    2013-01-01

    Correlations are employed in modern physics to explain microscopic and macroscopic phenomena, like the fractional quantum Hall effect and the Mott insulator state in high temperature superconductors and ultracold atoms. Simultaneously probed neurons in the intact brain reveal correlations between their activity, an important measure to study information processing in the brain that also influences the macroscopic signals of neural activity, like the electroencephalogram (EEG). Networks of spiking neurons differ from most physical systems: the interaction between elements is directed, time delayed, mediated by short pulses and each neuron receives events from thousands of neurons. Even the stationary state of the network cannot be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we develop a quantitative theory of pairwise correlations in finite-sized random networks of spiking neurons. We derive explicit analytic expressions for the population-averaged cross correlation functions. Our theory explains why the intuitive mean field description fails, how the echo of single action potentials causes an apparent lag of inhibition with respect to excitation and how the size of the network can be scaled while maintaining its dynamical state. Finally, we derive a new criterion for the emergence of collective oscillations from the spectrum of the time-evolution propagator. (paper)

  9. Correlation order, merging and diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhaene, J.; Denuit, M.; Vanduffel, S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the dependence between random losses on the shortfall and on the diversification benefit that arises from merging these losses. We prove that increasing the dependence between losses, expressed in terms of correlation order, has an increasing effect on the shortfall,

  10. Correlation Dimension-Based Classifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiřina, Marcel; Jiřina jr., M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 12 (2014), s. 2253-2263 ISSN 2168-2267 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12020 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : classifier * multidimensional data * correlation dimension * scaling exponent * polynomial expansion Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.469, year: 2014

  11. Correlation Dimension Estimation for Classification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiřina, Marcel; Jiřina jr., M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 3 (2006), s. 547-557 ISSN 1895-8648 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : correlation dimension * probability density estimation * classification * UCI MLR Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  12. Programming services with correlation sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesi, Fabrizio; Carbone, Marco

    2011-01-01

    -oriented systems, such as distribution, loose coupling, open-endedness and integration. Distinguishing features of our approach are the notion of correlation aliases and an asynchronous communication model. Our language is equipped with formal syntax, semantics, and a typing system for ensuring desirable...

  13. Dynamics of electricity market correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Escarela-Perez, R.; Espinosa-Perez, G.; Urrea, R.

    2009-06-01

    Electricity market participants rely on demand and price forecasts to decide their bidding strategies, allocate assets, negotiate bilateral contracts, hedge risks, and plan facility investments. However, forecasting is hampered by the non-linear and stochastic nature of price time series. Diverse modeling strategies, from neural networks to traditional transfer functions, have been explored. These approaches are based on the assumption that price series contain correlations that can be exploited for model-based prediction purposes. While many works have been devoted to the demand and price modeling, a limited number of reports on the nature and dynamics of electricity market correlations are available. This paper uses detrended fluctuation analysis to study correlations in the demand and price time series and takes the Australian market as a case study. The results show the existence of correlations in both demand and prices over three orders of magnitude in time ranging from hours to months. However, the Hurst exponent is not constant over time, and its time evolution was computed over a subsample moving window of 250 observations. The computations, also made for two Canadian markets, show that the correlations present important fluctuations over a seasonal one-year cycle. Interestingly, non-linearities (measured in terms of a multifractality index) and reduced price predictability are found for the June-July periods, while the converse behavior is displayed during the December-January period. In terms of forecasting models, our results suggest that non-linear recursive models should be considered for accurate day-ahead price estimation. On the other hand, linear models seem to suffice for demand forecasting purposes.

  14. Correlation between active layer thickness and ambient gas stability in IGZO thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xu; Mao, Bao-Hua; Wang, Sui-Dong; Lin, Meng-Fang; Shimizu, Maki; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Ou-Yang, Wei; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Nabatame, Toshihide; Liu, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the active layer thickness has been recently reported as an alternative way to achieve fully depleted oxide thin-film transistors for the realization of low-voltage operations. However, the correlation between the active layer thickness and device resistivity to environmental changes is still unclear, which is important for the optimized design of oxide thin-film transistors. In this work, the ambient gas stability of IGZO thin-film transistors is found to be strongly correlated to the IGZO thickness. The TFT with the thinnest IGZO layer shows the highest intrinsic electron mobility in a vacuum, which is greatly reduced after exposure to O 2 /air. The device with a thick IGZO layer shows similar electron mobility in O 2 /air, whereas the mobility variation measured in the vacuum is absent. The thickness dependent ambient gas stability is attributed to a high-mobility region in the IGZO surface vicinity with less sputtering-induced damage, which will become electron depleted in O 2 /air due to the electron transfer to adsorbed gas molecules. The O 2 adsorption and deduced IGZO surface band bending is demonstrated by the ambient-pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy results. (paper)

  15. Multi-particle correlations and KNO scaling in the medium-induced jet evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo, Miguel A.; Iancu, Edmond [Institut de physique théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA,F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-12-20

    We study the gluon distribution produced via successive medium-induced branchings by an energetic jet propagating through a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma. We show that under suitable approximations the evolution of the jet can be described as a classical stochastic process, which is exactly solvable. For this process, we construct exact analytic solutions for all the n-point correlation functions (the n-body densities in the space of energy). The corresponding results for the one-point and the two-point functions were already known, but those for the higher-point functions are new. These results demonstrate strong correlations associated with the existence of common ancestors in the branching process. By integrating these n-point functions over the gluon energies, we deduce the mean gluon multiplicity 〈N〉 as well as the higher moments 〈N{sup p}〉 with p≥2. We find that the multiplicities of the soft gluons are parametrically large and show a remarkable regularity, known as Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling: the reduced moments 〈N{sup p}〉/〈N〉{sup p} are pure numbers, independent of any of the physical parameters of the problem. We recognize a special negative binomial distribution which is characterized by large statistical fluctuations. These predictions can be tested in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC, via event-by-event measurements of the di-jet asymmetry.

  16. What affects the predictability of evolutionary constraints using a G-matrix? The relative effects of modular pleiotropy and mutational correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebib, Jobran; Guillaume, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    Phenotypic traits do not always respond to selection independently from each other and often show correlated responses to selection. The structure of a genotype-phenotype map (GP map) determines trait covariation, which involves variation in the degree and strength of the pleiotropic effects of the underlying genes. It is still unclear, and debated, how much of that structure can be deduced from variational properties of quantitative traits that are inferred from their genetic (co) variance matrix (G-matrix). Here we aim to clarify how the extent of pleiotropy and the correlation among the pleiotropic effects of mutations differentially affect the structure of a G-matrix and our ability to detect genetic constraints from its eigen decomposition. We show that the eigenvectors of a G-matrix can be predictive of evolutionary constraints when they map to underlying pleiotropic modules with correlated mutational effects. Without mutational correlation, evolutionary constraints caused by the fitness costs associated with increased pleiotropy are harder to infer from evolutionary metrics based on a G-matrix's geometric properties because uncorrelated pleiotropic effects do not affect traits' genetic correlations. Correlational selection induces much weaker modular partitioning of traits' genetic correlations in absence then in presence of underlying modular pleiotropy. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Effects of Mutations and Ligands on the Thermostability of the l-Arginine/Agmatine Antiporter AdiC and Deduced Insights into Ligand-Binding of Human l-Type Amino Acid Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Ilgü

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The l-arginine/agmatine transporter AdiC is a prokaryotic member of the SLC7 family, which enables pathogenic enterobacteria to survive the extremely acidic gastric environment. Wild-type AdiC from Escherichia coli, as well as its previously reported point mutants N22A and S26A, were overexpressed homologously and purified to homogeneity. A size-exclusion chromatography-based thermostability assay was used to determine the melting temperatures (Tms of the purified AdiC variants in the absence and presence of the selected ligands l-arginine (Arg, agmatine, l-arginine methyl ester, and l-arginine amide. The resulting Tms indicated stabilization of AdiC variants upon ligand binding, in which Tms and ligand binding affinities correlated positively. Considering results from this and previous studies, we revisited the role of AdiC residue S26 in Arg binding and proposed interactions of the α-carboxylate group of Arg exclusively with amide groups of the AdiC backbone. In the context of substrate binding in the human SLC7 family member l-type amino acid transporter-1 (LAT1; SLC7A5, an analogous role of S66 in LAT1 to S26 in AdiC is discussed based on homology modeling and amino acid sequence analysis. Finally, we propose a binding mechanism for l-amino acid substrates to LATs from the SLC7 family.

  18. Effects of Mutations and Ligands on the Thermostability of the l-Arginine/Agmatine Antiporter AdiC and Deduced Insights into Ligand-Binding of Human l-Type Amino Acid Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgü, Hüseyin; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Colas, Claire; Ucurum, Zöhre; Schlessinger, Avner; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2018-03-20

    The l-arginine/agmatine transporter AdiC is a prokaryotic member of the SLC7 family, which enables pathogenic enterobacteria to survive the extremely acidic gastric environment. Wild-type AdiC from Escherichia coli, as well as its previously reported point mutants N22A and S26A, were overexpressed homologously and purified to homogeneity. A size-exclusion chromatography-based thermostability assay was used to determine the melting temperatures ( T m s) of the purified AdiC variants in the absence and presence of the selected ligands l-arginine (Arg), agmatine, l-arginine methyl ester, and l-arginine amide. The resulting T m s indicated stabilization of AdiC variants upon ligand binding, in which T m s and ligand binding affinities correlated positively. Considering results from this and previous studies, we revisited the role of AdiC residue S26 in Arg binding and proposed interactions of the α-carboxylate group of Arg exclusively with amide groups of the AdiC backbone. In the context of substrate binding in the human SLC7 family member l-type amino acid transporter-1 (LAT1; SLC7A5), an analogous role of S66 in LAT1 to S26 in AdiC is discussed based on homology modeling and amino acid sequence analysis. Finally, we propose a binding mechanism for l-amino acid substrates to LATs from the SLC7 family.

  19. Respiratory correlated cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Zijp, Lambert; Remeijer, Peter; Herk, Marcel van

    2005-01-01

    A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner integrated with a linear accelerator is a powerful tool for image guided radiotherapy. Respiratory motion, however, induces artifacts in CBCT, while the respiratory correlated procedures, developed to reduce motion artifacts in axial and helical CT are not suitable for such CBCT scanners. We have developed an alternative respiratory correlated procedure for CBCT and evaluated its performance. This respiratory correlated CBCT procedure consists of retrospective sorting in projection space, yielding subsets of projections that each corresponds to a certain breathing phase. Subsequently, these subsets are reconstructed into a four-dimensional (4D) CBCT dataset. The breathing signal, required for respiratory correlation, was directly extracted from the 2D projection data, removing the need for an additional respiratory monitor system. Due to the reduced number of projections per phase, the contrast-to-noise ratio in a 4D scan reduced by a factor 2.6-3.7 compared to a 3D scan based on all projections. Projection data of a spherical phantom moving with a 3 and 5 s period with and without simulated breathing irregularities were acquired and reconstructed into 3D and 4D CBCT datasets. The positional deviations of the phantoms center of gravity between 4D CBCT and fluoroscopy were small: 0.13±0.09 mm for the regular motion and 0.39±0.24 mm for the irregular motion. Motion artifacts, clearly present in the 3D CBCT datasets, were substantially reduced in the 4D datasets, even in the presence of breathing irregularities, such that the shape of the moving structures could be identified more accurately. Moreover, the 4D CBCT dataset provided information on the 3D trajectory of the moving structures, absent in the 3D data. Considerable breathing irregularities, however, substantially reduces the image quality. Data presented for three different lung cancer patients were in line with the results obtained from the phantom study. In

  20. Pion production and particle correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristiansson, P.

    1985-10-01

    Intermediate energy heavy ion collisions have been studied using the carbon-beam produced at the CERN SC-accelerator. Cross-sections for π + and π - have been measured over a wide range of large angles at 60, 75 and 86 MeV/nucleon. The yields and shapes are compared to a nucleon-nucleon scattering approach, which underestimates the yields by orders of magnitude. The π - /π + -ratio observed is close to unity for 12 C + 12 C, but the enhancement for 12 C + 208 Pb is much larger than expected from the neutron excess in 208 Pb. Large-angle light-particle correlations for 86 MeV/nucleon carbon induced reactions on different targets (C, Al, Cu, Au) have been studied. An excess of correlations is observed in the particle-particle scattering plane. The strength of this effect increases with observed particle mass and decreases with target mass. (author)

  1. CMS results on multijet correlations

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00008500

    2015-04-10

    We present recent measurements of multijet correlations using forward and low-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ jets performed by the CMS collaboration at the LHC collider. In pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV, azimuthal correlations in dijets separated in rapidity by up to 9.4 units were measured. The results are compared to BFKL- and DGLAP-based Monte Carlo generator and analytic predictions. In pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV, cross sections for jets with $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ > 21 GeV and |y| 1 GeV (minijets) are presented. The minijet results are sensitive to the bound imposed by the total inelastic cross section, and are compared to various models for taming the growth of the $2 \\rightarrow 2$ cross section at low $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$.

  2. Strongly Correlated Systems Theoretical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Avella, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern theoretical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciates consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as po...

  3. Strongly correlated systems numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern numerical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and material science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciate consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as possi...

  4. Correlated uncertainties in integral data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    The use of correlated uncertainties in calculational data is shown in cases investigated to lead to a reduction in the uncertainty of calculated quantities of importance to reactor design. It is stressed however that such reductions are likely to be important in a minority of cases of practical interest. The effect of uncertainties in detector cross-sections is considered and is seen to be, in some cases, of equal importance to that in the data used in calculations. Numerical investigations have been limited by the sparse information available on data correlations; some comparisons made of these data reveal quite large inconsistencies for both detector cross-sections and cross-section of interest for reactor calculations

  5. Correlated electrons in quantum matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fulde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the effects of electronic correlations in quantum systems is one of the most challenging problems in physics, partly due to the relevance in modern high technology. Yet there exist hardly any books on the subject which try to give a comprehensive overview on the field covering insulators, semiconductors, as well as metals. The present book tries to fill that gap. It intends to provide graduate students and researchers a comprehensive survey of electron correlations, weak and strong, in insulators, semiconductors and metals. This topic is a central one in condensed matter and beyond that in theoretical physics. The reader will have a better understanding of the great progress which has been made in the field over the past few decades.

  6. Bootstrapping N=2 chiral correlators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Madalena; Liendo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We apply the numerical bootstrap program to chiral operators in four-dimensional N=2 SCFTs. In the first part of this work we study four-point functions in which all fields have the same conformal dimension. We give special emphasis to bootstrapping a specific theory: the simplest Argyres-Douglas fixed point with no flavor symmetry. In the second part we generalize our setup and consider correlators of fields with unequal dimension. This is an example of a mixed correlator and allows us to probe new regions in the parameter space of N=2 SCFTs. In particular, our results put constraints on relations in the Coulomb branch chiral ring and on the curvature of the Zamolodchikov metric.

  7. Health correlates of workplace bullying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Gullander, Maria; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2016-01-01

    -labelled bullying at baseline using logistic regression. RESULTS: Reports of bullying were persistent across four years in 22.2% (57/257) of employees who initially reported bullying. Baseline associations between self-labelled bullying and sick-listing, poor self-rated health, poor sleep, and depressive symptoms...... were significant with adjusted odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.8 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-2.4] for poor sleep quality among those bullied "now and then" to 6.9 (95% CI 3.9-12.3) for depression among those reporting being bullied on a daily to monthly basis. In longitudinal analyses...... adjusting for bullying during follow-up, all health correlates except poor sleep quality persisted up to four years. CONCLUSION: Self-reported health correlates of workplace bullying including sick-listing, poor self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and a diagnosis of depression tend to persist...

  8. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  9. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  10. Bootstrapping N=2 chiral correlators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, Madalena [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Liendo, Pedro [Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany). IMIP

    2015-12-15

    We apply the numerical bootstrap program to chiral operators in four-dimensional N=2 SCFTs. In the first part of this work we study four-point functions in which all fields have the same conformal dimension. We give special emphasis to bootstrapping a specific theory: the simplest Argyres-Douglas fixed point with no flavor symmetry. In the second part we generalize our setup and consider correlators of fields with unequal dimension. This is an example of a mixed correlator and allows us to probe new regions in the parameter space of N=2 SCFTs. In particular, our results put constraints on relations in the Coulomb branch chiral ring and on the curvature of the Zamolodchikov metric.

  11. Bootstrapping N=2 chiral correlators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, Madalena [DESY Hamburg, Theory Group,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Liendo, Pedro [IMIP, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, IRIS Adlershof,Zum Großen Windkanal 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-01-07

    We apply the numerical bootstrap program to chiral operators in four-dimensional N=2 SCFTs. In the first part of this work we study four-point functions in which all fields have the same conformal dimension. We give special emphasis to bootstrapping a specific theory: the simplest Argyres-Douglas fixed point with no flavor symmetry. In the second part we generalize our setup and consider correlators of fields with unequal dimension. This is an example of a mixed correlator and allows us to probe new regions in the parameter space of N=2 SCFTs. In particular, our results put constraints on relations in the Coulomb branch chiral ring and on the curvature of the Zamolodchikov metric.

  12. Correlation dimension of financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chun-Xiao

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, correlation dimension is applied to financial data analysis. We calculate the correlation dimensions of some real market data and find that the dimensions are significantly smaller than those of the simulation data based on geometric Brownian motion. Based on the analysis of the Chinese and US stock market data, the main results are as follows. First, by calculating three data sets for the Chinese and US market, we find that large market volatility leads to a significant decrease in the dimensions. Second, based on 5-min stock price data, we find that the Chinese market dimension is significantly larger than the US market; this shows a significant difference between the two markets for high frequency data. Third, we randomly extract stocks from a stock set and calculate the correlation dimensions, and find that the average value of these dimensions is close to the dimension of the original set. In addition, we analyse the intuitional meaning of the relevant dimensions used in this paper, which are directly related to the average degree of the financial threshold network. The dimension measures the speed of the average degree that varies with the threshold value. A smaller dimension means that the rate of change is slower.

  13. Fibroadenomas: Sonographic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sung; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Eun Ah; Lee, Sun Wha; Sung, Soon Hee

    1999-01-01

    To correlate sonographic appearance and histopathologic findings of fibroadenomas. Forty-one biopsy-proven fibroadenomas were retrospectively evaluate for sonographic-pathologic correlation. The fibroadenomas were histologically classified into sclerotic, myxoid, glandular and mixed type. The stromal cellularity and fibrosis were also classified into mild and severe. The internal echotexture and posterior acoustic enhancement of mass in ultrasonogram were correlated with histopathologic findings. The pathologic types of fibroadenomas were sclerotic in sixteen, myxoid in thirteen, and glandular or mixed in each of six cases. Most of the sclerotic type showed hypoechoic internal echotexture (68.8%) and myxoid and glandular types showed isoechoic internal echotexture (84.6%, 83.3% respectively). The hypoechoic masses showed 12 cases of mild (75.0%) and 4 cases of severe (25.0%) in cellularity and 3 cases of mild (18.7%) and 13 cases (81.3%) of sever degree in fibrosis. Most of the myxoid type (77%) showed posterior enhancement, and most of the sclerotic type (87.5%) did not show posterior enhancement on ultrasonogram. Posterior enhancement was absent in 22 cases, in which 4 cases (18.2%) showed mild and 18 cases (81.2%) showed severe degree of fibrosis. Sclerotic type with mild cellularity and severe fibrosis on histopathology showed hypoechogenicity on ultrasonogram; whereas myxoid and glandular types were predominantly isoechoic. Most of the myxoid type showed posterior enhancement. Sclerotic type with mild cellularity and severe fibrosis did not show posterior enhancement.

  14. Correlated Temporal and Spectral Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Jean H.

    2007-01-01

    The variability of neutron star and black hole X-ray sources has several dimensions, because of the roles played by different important time-scales. The variations on time scales of hours, weeks, and months, ranging from 50% to orders of magnitude, arise out of changes in the flow in the disk. The most important driving forces for those changes are probably various possible instabilities in the disk, though there may be effects with other dominant causes. The changes in the rate of flow appear to be associated with changes in the flow's configuration, as the accreting material approaches the compact object, for there are generally correlated changes in both the Xray spectra and the character of the faster temporal variability. There has been a lot of progress in tracking these correlations, both for Z and Atoll neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and for black hole binaries. I will discuss these correlations and review briefly what they tell us about the physical states of the systems.

  15. Wolfram syndrome: a clinicopathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilson, Justin B; Merchant, Saumil N; Adams, Joe C; Joseph, Jeffrey T

    2009-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome or DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy as well as diabetes insipidus and deafness in many cases. We report the post-mortem neuropathologic findings of a patient with Wolfram syndrome and correlate them with his clinical presentation. In the hypothalamus, neurons in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei were markedly decreased and minimal neurohypophyseal tissue remained in the pituitary. The pontine base and inferior olivary nucleus showed gross shrinkage and neuron loss, while the cerebellum was relatively unaffected. The visual system had moderate to marked loss of retinal ganglion neurons, commensurate loss of myelinated axons in the optic nerve, chiasm and tract, and neuron loss in the lateral geniculate nucleus but preservation of the primary visual cortex. The patient's inner ear showed loss of the organ of Corti in the basal turn of the cochleae and mild focal atrophy of the stria vascularis. These findings correlated well with the patient's high-frequency hearing loss. The pathologic findings correlated closely with the patient's clinical symptoms and further support the concept of Wolfram syndrome as a neurodegenerative disorder. Our findings extend prior neuropathologic reports of Wolfram syndrome by providing contributions to our understanding of eye, inner ear and olivopontine pathology in this disease.

  16. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  17. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J M

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  18. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J M

    1997-10-22

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular `mock-up` reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent`s efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author) 128 refs.

  19. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  20. Structure and electron-ion correlation in liquid Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Shuta [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yokota, Yukinobu [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-15

    For liquid Mg at 700 deg. C, structure factors were obtained from both neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements. The bond angle and coordination number distributions were derived from the reverse Monte Carlo analysis. By a combination of both structure factors, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor were deduced.

  1. Electron-gamma directional correlations; Correlations directionnelles electron-gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerholm, T R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-10-01

    The theory of the angular correlation between conversion electrons and gamma rays is briefly outlined. The experimental methods used for the study of the electron-gamma correlation are described. The effects of the formation of a hole and the hyperfine structure magnetic coupling dependent on time are then considered. The experimental results showed that the attenuations found for different metallic media plainly conform to a simple quadrupolar interaction mechanism. For a source surrounded by an insulator, however, the results show that a rapidly disappearing coupling occurs as a supplement to the quadrupolar interaction mechanism. This coupling attenuates the angular correlation by about 75% of the non-perturbed value. It was concluded that for an intermediate half life of the level of the order of the nanosecond, the attenuations produced by the secondary effects of the hole formation can not be completely neglected. The metallic media considered were Ag, Au, Al, and Ga. In the study of E2 conversion processes, the radical matrix elements governing the E2 conversion process in the 412-KeV transition of {sup 198}Hg were determined. The results exclude the presence of dynamic contributions within the limits of experimental error. The values b{sub 2} (E2) and {alpha}-k (E2) obtained indirectly from the experimentally determined b{sub 4} particle parameter are in complete agreement with the theoretical values obtained by applying the corrections due to the shielding effect and to the finite dimension of the nucleus and excluding the dynamic contributions. The value for the internal conversion coefficient was also in good agreement. Experimental results from the intensity ratios between the peak and the continuum, however, seem to show significant deviations with respect to other experimental and theoretical values. There is good agreement between experimental and theoretical results on the internal conversion of {sup 203}Tl, {sup 201}Tl, and {sup 181}Ta. The theory

  2. Differential modulation of binding loop flexibility and stability by Arg50 and Arg52 in Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V deduced by trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, M; Huang, Y; Prakash, O; Wen, L; Dunkelbarger, S P; Huang, J K; Liu, J; Krishnamoorthi, R

    1996-04-16

    The side chains of Arg50 and Arg52 iin Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V (CMTI-V) anchor the binding loop to the scaffold region [Cai, M., Gong, Y., Kao, J.L-F., & Krishnamoorthi, R. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 5201-5211]. The consequences of these hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions on the conformational flexibility and stability of the binding loop were evaluated by trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of CMTI-V mutants, in which each of the arginines was individually replaced with Ala, Lys, or Gln by genetic engineering methods. All mutants exhibited significantly increased vulnerability to the protease attack at many sites, including the reactive-site (Lys44-Asp45 peptide bond), with the R50 mutants showing much more pronounced effects than the R52 counterparts. For CmTI-V and the mutants studied, a qualitative correlation was inferred between binding loop flexibility and retention time on a reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography C-18 column. The R50 mutants were found to be more flexible than the corresponding R52 versions. These results demonstrate that Arg50 contributes more to the stability and function of CMTI-V. The differing strengths of the hydrogen bonds made by Arg50 and Arg52 were characterized by determining the internal dynamics of their side chains at pH 5.0 and 2.5: 15N NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and 15N-1H nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) enhancements were measured for the main-chain and side-chain NH groups in 15N-labeled recombinant CMTI-V (rCMTI-V) and the model-free parameters [Lipari, G., & Szabo, A.(1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104, 4546-59; 4559-4570] were calculated. At both pH 5.0 and 2.5, the arginines at positions 26, 47, 58 and 66 are found to be highly mobile, as the caluculated general order parameters, S2 values, of their NepsilonH groups fall in the range 0.03-0.18. The corresponding values for Arg50 amd Arg52 are 0.73 and 0.63, respectively, at pH 5.0, thus confirming that the two arginines are

  3. Organizational Design Correlates of Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lyngsie, Jacob; Zahra, Shaker A.

    2015-01-01

    Extant research offers relatively little insight into the organizational design correlates of entrepreneurship in established firms. We argue on theoretical grounds that the same organizational designs support the realization as well as the discovery of opportunities. Specifically, decentralized...... these organizational design variables are related to opportunity discovery. We find similar effects. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of our reasoning and results, such as implications for the idea in the innovation and organizational learning literatures that optimal performance over time...... requires that firms either vacillate between organizational designs or adopt ambidextrous designs....

  4. Correlations between interacting Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Braun, Christoph; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a short introduction to Rydberg physics and quantum nonlinear optics using Rydberg atoms. It has been prepared as a compliment to a series of lectures delivered during the Latin American School of Physics "Marcos Moshinsky" 2017. We provide a short introduction to the properties...... of individual Rydberg atoms and discuss in detail how the interaction potential between Rydberg atom pairs is calculated. We then discuss how this interaction gives rise to the Rydberg blockade mechanism. With the aid of hallmark experiments in the field applications of the blockade for creating correlated...

  5. Electron correlations in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, Denver Leonard John

    2001-01-01

    Quantum dot structures confine electrons in a small region of space. Some properties of semiconductor quantum dots, such as the discrete energy levels and shell filling effects visible in addition spectra, have analogies to those of atoms and indeed dots are sometimes referred to as 'artificial atoms'. However, atoms and dots show some fundamental differences due to electron correlations. For real atoms, the kinetic energy of electrons dominates over their mutual Coulomb repulsion energy and for this reason the independent electron approximation works well. For quantum dots the confining potential may be shallower than that of real atoms leading to lower electron densities and a dominance of mutual Coulomb repulsion over kinetic energy. In this strongly correlated regime the independent electron picture leads to qualitatively incorrect results. This thesis concentrates on few-electron quantum dots in the strongly correlated regime both for quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional dots in a square confining potential. In this so-called 'Wigner' regime the ground-state electronic charge density is localised near positions of classical electrostatic minima and the interacting electronic spectrum consists of well separated spin multiplets. In the strongly correlated regime the structure of low-energy multiplets is explained by mapping onto lattice models with extended-Hubbard and Heisenberg effective Hamiltonians. The parameters for these effective models are calculated within a Hartree approximation and are shown to reproduce well the exact results obtained by numerical diagonalisation of the full interacting Hamiltonian. Comparison is made between square dots and quantum rings with full rotational symmetry. In the very low-density regime, direct diagonalisation becomes impractical due to excessive computer time for convergence. In this regime a numerical renormalisation group method is applied to one-dimensional dots, enabling effective spin-interactions to be

  6. BMN correlators by loop equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eynard, Bertrand; Kristjansen, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    In the BMN approach to N=4 SYM a large class of correlators of interest are expressible in terms of expectation values of traces of words in a zero-dimensional gaussian complex matrix model. We develop a loop-equation based, analytic strategy for evaluating such expectation values to any order in the genus expansion. We reproduce the expectation values which were needed for the calculation of the one-loop, genus one correction to the anomalous dimension of BMN-operators and which were earlier obtained by combinatorial means. Furthermore, we present the expectation values needed for the calculation of the one-loop, genus two correction. (author)

  7. Correlator optical wavefront sensor COWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the significant upgrades and improvements made to the correlator optical wavefront sensor (COWS) optical bench during this phase of the program. Software for the experiment was reviewed and documented. Flowcharts showing the program flow are included as well as documentation for programs which were written to calculate and display Zernike polynomials. The system was calibrated and aligned and a series of experiments to determine the optimum settings for the input and output MOSLM polarizers were conducted. In addition, design of a simple aberration generation is included.

  8. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  9. The dynamics of correlated novelties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tria, F; Loreto, V; Servedio, V D P; Strogatz, S H

    2014-07-31

    Novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called "expanding the adjacent possible". The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological, or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit events of Wikipedia pages, the emergence of tags in annotation systems, the sequence of words in texts, and listening to new songs in online music catalogues. By quantifying the dynamics of correlated novelties, our results provide a starting point for a deeper understanding of the adjacent possible and its role in biological, cultural, and technological evolution.

  10. Correlation Models for Temperature Fields

    KAUST Repository

    North, Gerald R.

    2011-05-16

    This paper presents derivations of some analytical forms for spatial correlations of evolving random fields governed by a white-noise-driven damped diffusion equation that is the analog of autoregressive order 1 in time and autoregressive order 2 in space. The study considers the two-dimensional plane and the surface of a sphere, both of which have been studied before, but here time is introduced to the problem. Such models have a finite characteristic length (roughly the separation at which the autocorrelation falls to 1/e) and a relaxation time scale. In particular, the characteristic length of a particular temporal Fourier component of the field increases to a finite value as the frequency of the particular component decreases. Some near-analytical formulas are provided for the results. A potential application is to the correlation structure of surface temperature fields and to the estimation of large area averages, depending on how the original datastream is filtered into a distribution of Fourier frequencies (e.g., moving average, low pass, or narrow band). The form of the governing equation is just that of the simple energy balance climate models, which have a long history in climate studies. The physical motivation provided by the derivation from a climate model provides some heuristic appeal to the approach and suggests extensions of the work to nonuniform cases.

  11. Perturbed angular correlations and distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makaryunas, K.

    1976-01-01

    The present index comprises original works and review papers on the perturbed angular correlations (PAC) and distributions (PAD). The articles published in the Soviet and foreign journals as well as the materials of conferences, monographs and collections published in the USSR and abroad, the preprints produced by various institutes and abstracts of disertations are included from 1948 up to 1973. The whole material compiled in this index is divided into three parts. Part one is a bibliographic index. All papers in this part are divided into three sections. Section one comprises the papers devoted to the theoretical works on PAC, review papers, monographs, materials of conferences. Section two deals with the works of methodical character where correlation spectrometers as well as the treatment of experimental data are described. In section three experimental works with concrete nuclei are compiled. Part two gives the characteristic of works performed with concrete nuclei. This part is presented in the form of the table in which the works are systematized according to the chemical elements and isotopes. The table shows the characteristics of the nuclear levels used in the investigations by PAC as well as brief characteristics of experiments and results obtained. Part three - appendix contains alphabetic index of the authors, the list of the used editions with the abbreviations of the titles of these editions. The lists indicating the dynamic of the quantity of works on PAC and the distribution according to the literature sources are also given

  12. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  13. Correlation Models for Temperature Fields

    KAUST Repository

    North, Gerald R.; Wang, Jue; Genton, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents derivations of some analytical forms for spatial correlations of evolving random fields governed by a white-noise-driven damped diffusion equation that is the analog of autoregressive order 1 in time and autoregressive order 2 in space. The study considers the two-dimensional plane and the surface of a sphere, both of which have been studied before, but here time is introduced to the problem. Such models have a finite characteristic length (roughly the separation at which the autocorrelation falls to 1/e) and a relaxation time scale. In particular, the characteristic length of a particular temporal Fourier component of the field increases to a finite value as the frequency of the particular component decreases. Some near-analytical formulas are provided for the results. A potential application is to the correlation structure of surface temperature fields and to the estimation of large area averages, depending on how the original datastream is filtered into a distribution of Fourier frequencies (e.g., moving average, low pass, or narrow band). The form of the governing equation is just that of the simple energy balance climate models, which have a long history in climate studies. The physical motivation provided by the derivation from a climate model provides some heuristic appeal to the approach and suggests extensions of the work to nonuniform cases.

  14. The Neurogenetic Correlates of Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, John K.

    2013-09-01

    The neurogenetic correlates of consciousness (NgCC) is a new field of consciousness studies that focuses on genes that have an effect on or are involved in the continuum of neuron-based consciousness. A framework of consciousness based on the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) has already been established by Francis Crick and Christof Kock. In this work I propose that there are NgCC underlying the NCC which are both active during the conscious experience. So how are genes involved? There are two significant connections between DNA and neurons that are involved in the conscious experience. First, any brain system can be adversely affected by underlying genetic abnormalities which can be expressed in an individual at birth, in adulthood, or later in life. Second, the DNA molecule does not lay dormant while the neuron runs on autopilot. DNA is active in translating and transcribing RNA and protein products that are utilized during neuron functioning. Without these products being continuously produced by the DNA during a conscious experience the neurons would cease to function correctly and be rendered unable to provide a continuum of human consciousness. Consequently, in addition to NCC, NgCC must be factored in when appreciating a conscious event. In this work I will discuss and explain some NgCC citing several examples.

  15. Significance and properties of internucleon correlation functions

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Y.; Horiuchi, W.

    2008-01-01

    We show that a nuclear Hamiltonian and a set of internucleon correlation functions is in a one-to-one correspondence. The correlation functions for $s$-shell nuclei interacting via the two-nucleon interaction of AV8$^\\prime$ type are calculated to exhibit the importance of tensor correlations as well as short-range central correlation. The asymptotic behavior of the correlation functions is also discussed.

  16. Estimation of Correlation Functions by Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    This paper illustrates how correlation functions can be estimated by the random decrement technique. Several different formulations of the random decrement technique, estimating the correlation functions are considered. The speed and accuracy of the different formulations of the random decrement...... and the length of the correlation functions. The accuracy of the estimates with respect to the theoretical correlation functions and the modal parameters are both investigated. The modal parameters are extracted from the correlation functions using the polyreference time domain technique....

  17. Partial distance correlation with methods for dissimilarities

    OpenAIRE

    Székely, Gábor J.; Rizzo, Maria L.

    2014-01-01

    Distance covariance and distance correlation are scalar coefficients that characterize independence of random vectors in arbitrary dimension. Properties, extensions, and applications of distance correlation have been discussed in the recent literature, but the problem of defining the partial distance correlation has remained an open question of considerable interest. The problem of partial distance correlation is more complex than partial correlation partly because the squared distance covari...

  18. On soft limits of large-scale structure correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale structure surveys have the potential to become the leading probe for precision cosmology in the next decade. To extract valuable information on the cosmological evolution of the Universe from the observational data, it is of major importance to derive accurate theoretical predictions for the statistical large-scale structure observables, such as the power spectrum and the bispectrum of (dark) matter density perturbations. Hence, one of the greatest challenges of modern cosmology is to theoretically understand the non-linear dynamics of large-scale structure formation in the Universe from first principles. While analytic approaches to describe the large-scale structure formation are usually based on the framework of non-relativistic cosmological perturbation theory, we pursue another road in this thesis and develop methods to derive generic, non-perturbative statements about large-scale structure correlation functions. We study unequal- and equal-time correlation functions of density and velocity perturbations in the limit where one of their wavenumbers becomes small, that is, in the soft limit. In the soft limit, it is possible to link (N+1)-point and N-point correlation functions to non-perturbative 'consistency conditions'. These provide in turn a powerful tool to test fundamental aspects of the underlying theory at hand. In this work, we first rederive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times by using the so-called eikonal approximation. The main appeal of the unequal-time consistency conditions is that they are solely based on symmetry arguments and thus are universal. Proceeding from this, we direct our attention to consistency conditions at equal times, which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We explore the existence and validity of equal-time consistency conditions within and beyond perturbation theory. For this purpose, we investigate the predictions for the soft limit of the

  19. On soft limits of large-scale structure correlation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2016-08-15

    Large-scale structure surveys have the potential to become the leading probe for precision cosmology in the next decade. To extract valuable information on the cosmological evolution of the Universe from the observational data, it is of major importance to derive accurate theoretical predictions for the statistical large-scale structure observables, such as the power spectrum and the bispectrum of (dark) matter density perturbations. Hence, one of the greatest challenges of modern cosmology is to theoretically understand the non-linear dynamics of large-scale structure formation in the Universe from first principles. While analytic approaches to describe the large-scale structure formation are usually based on the framework of non-relativistic cosmological perturbation theory, we pursue another road in this thesis and develop methods to derive generic, non-perturbative statements about large-scale structure correlation functions. We study unequal- and equal-time correlation functions of density and velocity perturbations in the limit where one of their wavenumbers becomes small, that is, in the soft limit. In the soft limit, it is possible to link (N+1)-point and N-point correlation functions to non-perturbative 'consistency conditions'. These provide in turn a powerful tool to test fundamental aspects of the underlying theory at hand. In this work, we first rederive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times by using the so-called eikonal approximation. The main appeal of the unequal-time consistency conditions is that they are solely based on symmetry arguments and thus are universal. Proceeding from this, we direct our attention to consistency conditions at equal times, which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We explore the existence and validity of equal-time consistency conditions within and beyond perturbation theory. For this purpose, we investigate the predictions for the soft limit of the

  20. Investigation of correlations in light neutron-rich nuclei; Etude des correlations dans les noyaux legers riches en neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, G

    2004-10-01

    Correlations play a crucial role in understanding the structure of light nuclei at and beyond the neutron drip-line. In this context, the two-neutron halo nucleus He{sup 6} and the unbound systems H{sup 5}, He{sup 7,9} and Li{sup 10} have been studied via measurements of the breakup of beams of He{sup 6} and Be{sup 11,12}. The CHARISSA and DEMON detector arrays were employed. The interpretation was facilitated by a simulation code (SILLAGE) which provided for the setup. In the case of He{sup 7}, the existence of an excited state with E{sub r} {approx} 1 MeV and gamma {approx} 0.75 MeV was confirmed. The virtual character of the s-wave ground state of Li{sup 10} was also confirmed and a scattering length of as {approx} -16 fm deduced. The results obtained for He{sup 9} suggest that a virtual s-wave state may exist just above threshold. The study of the three-body breakup of He{sup 6} found that the decay of the first 2+ state is essentially direct, while the decay of the remaining continuum strength is sequential - passage via He{sup 5}. Using the technique of intensity interferometry an rms separation between the halo neutrons of 7.7 +- 0.8 fm was derived. This result was confirmed by a complementary method utilizing Dalitz plots. In the case of H{sup 5}, the invariant mass spectrum was found to exhibit a broad (gamma {approx} 2 MeV) structure some 1.8 MeV above threshold. Comparison with recent three-body model calculations suggest that this corresponds to the predicted 1/2+ ground state. An rms valence neutron separation of some 5.5 fm was estimated. A search was also carried out for the 4n system using the Be{sup 12*} (2 alpha + Xn decay channel). No signal was observed beyond that expected on the basis of the known background processes. (author)

  1. Correlation between acoustical and structural properties of glasses: Extension of Abd El-Moneim model for bioactive silica based glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Moneim, Amin, E-mail: aminabdelmoneim@hotmail.com

    2016-04-15

    Correlation between room temperature ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the most significant structural parameters has been studied in the bioactive silica based glasses, for the first time. The correlation has been carried out in the quaternary SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass system using the two semi-empirical formulas, which have been presented recently by the author. Changes in the elastic properties, related to the substitution of SiO{sub 2} by alkali Na{sub 2}O and alkaline earth CaO oxides, have also been deduced by evaluating the mean atomic volume, packing density, fractal bond connectivity and density of the analogous crystalline structure. Furthermore, values of the theoretical elastic moduli have been calculated on the basis of Makishima-Mackenzie theory and compared with the corresponding observed values. Results show that the correlation between ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the oxygen density, average atomic ring size, first-order stretching force constant and experimental bulk modulus was achieved at 5 MHz frequency. Values of the theoretically calculated shear modulus are in excellent correlation (C. R. ≻95%) with the corresponding experimental ones. The divergence between the theoretical and experimental values of bulk modulus has been discussed. - Highlights: • Abd El-Moneim model was extended for bioactive glasses. • Ultrasonic attenuation was correlated with structural parameters. • Correlation was carried out in Si–Na–Ca–P glasses. • The model is valid for all investigated glass samples. • Agreement between theoretical and experimental elastic moduli was studied.

  2. Nonclassical correlations in superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliore, Rosanna [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); CNR-INFM, UdR CNISM di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Scala, Matteo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Guccione, Marina; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Messina, Antonino [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    A key step on the road map to solid-state quantum information processing (and to a deeper understanding of many counterintuitive aspects of quantum mechanics) is the generation and manipulation of nonclassical correlations between different quantum systems. Within this framework, we analyze the possibility of generating maximally entangled states in a system of two superconducting flux qubits, as well as the effectof their own environments on the entanglement dynamics. The analysis reported here confirms that the phenomena of sudden birth and sudden death of the entanglement do not depend on the particular measure of the entanglement adopted (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Correlations In Confined Quantum Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufty, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  4. Correlations between interacting Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Braun, Christoph; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2018-04-01

    This paper is a short introduction to Rydberg physics and quantum nonlinear optics using Rydberg atoms. It has been prepared as a compliment to a series of lectures delivered during the Latin American School of Physics "Marcos Moshinsky" 2017. We provide a short introduction to the properties of individual Rydberg atoms and discuss in detail how the interaction potential between Rydberg atom pairs is calculated. We then discuss how this interaction gives rise to the Rydberg blockade mechanism. With the aid of hallmark experiments in the field applications of the blockade for creating correlated quantum systems are discussed. Our aim is to give an overview of this exciting and rapidly evolving field. The interested reader is referred to original work and more comprehensive reviews and tutorials for further details on these subjects.

  5. Health correlates of workplace bullying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Gullander, Maria; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the course of workplace bullying and health correlates among Danish employees across a four-year period. METHODS: In total, 7502 public service and private sector employees participated in a 3-wave study from 2006 through 2011. Workplace bullying over the past......-labelled bullying at baseline using logistic regression. RESULTS: Reports of bullying were persistent across four years in 22.2% (57/257) of employees who initially reported bullying. Baseline associations between self-labelled bullying and sick-listing, poor self-rated health, poor sleep, and depressive symptoms...... were significant with adjusted odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.8 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-2.4] for poor sleep quality among those bullied "now and then" to 6.9 (95% CI 3.9-12.3) for depression among those reporting being bullied on a daily to monthly basis. In longitudinal analyses...

  6. Neuroanatomical correlates of perceived usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vi, Chi Thanh; Hornbæk, Kasper; Subramanian, Sriram

    2017-01-01

    Usability has a distinct subjective component, yet surprisingly little is known about its neural basis and relation to the neuroanatomy of aesthetics. To begin closing this gap, we conducted two functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in which participants were shown static webpages (in...... the first study) and videos of interaction with webpages (in the second study). The webpages were controlled so as to exhibit high and low levels of perceived usability and perceived aesthetics. Our results show unique links between perceived usability and brain areas involved in functions such as emotional...... processing (left fusiform gyrus, superior frontal gyrus), anticipation of physical interaction (precentral gyrus), task intention (anterior cingulate cortex), and linguistic processing (medial and bilateral superior frontal gyri). We use these findings to discuss the brain correlates of perceived usability...

  7. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  8. Surface correlation effects in two-band strongly correlated slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, D Nasr; Covaci, L; Peeters, F M

    2014-02-19

    Using an extension of the Gutzwiller approximation for an inhomogeneous system, we study the two-band Hubbard model with unequal band widths for a slab geometry. The aim is to investigate the mutual effect of individual bands on the spatial distribution of quasi-particle weight and charge density, especially near the surface of the slab. The main effect of the difference in band width is the presence of two different length scales corresponding to the quasi-particle profile of each band. This is enhanced in the vicinity of the critical interaction of the narrow band where an orbitally selective Mott transition occurs and a surface dead layer forms for the narrow band. For the doped case, two different regimes of charge transfer between the surface and the bulk of the slab are revealed. The charge transfer from surface/center to center/surface depends on both the doping level and the average relative charge accumulated in each band. Such effects could also be of importance when describing the accumulation of charges at the interface between structures made of multi-band strongly correlated materials.

  9. OPTIMAL CORRELATION ESTIMATORS FOR QUANTIZED SIGNALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M. D.; Chou, H. H.; Gwinn, C. R., E-mail: michaeltdh@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: cgwinn@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    Using a maximum-likelihood criterion, we derive optimal correlation strategies for signals with and without digitization. We assume that the signals are drawn from zero-mean Gaussian distributions, as is expected in radio-astronomical applications, and we present correlation estimators both with and without a priori knowledge of the signal variances. We demonstrate that traditional estimators of correlation, which rely on averaging products, exhibit large and paradoxical noise when the correlation is strong. However, we also show that these estimators are fully optimal in the limit of vanishing correlation. We calculate the bias and noise in each of these estimators and discuss their suitability for implementation in modern digital correlators.

  10. OPTIMAL CORRELATION ESTIMATORS FOR QUANTIZED SIGNALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M. D.; Chou, H. H.; Gwinn, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Using a maximum-likelihood criterion, we derive optimal correlation strategies for signals with and without digitization. We assume that the signals are drawn from zero-mean Gaussian distributions, as is expected in radio-astronomical applications, and we present correlation estimators both with and without a priori knowledge of the signal variances. We demonstrate that traditional estimators of correlation, which rely on averaging products, exhibit large and paradoxical noise when the correlation is strong. However, we also show that these estimators are fully optimal in the limit of vanishing correlation. We calculate the bias and noise in each of these estimators and discuss their suitability for implementation in modern digital correlators.

  11. The Effect of Error Correlation on Interfactor Correlation in Psychometric Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Peter H.; Henning, Kevin S. S.; Howell, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how interfactor correlation is affected by error correlations. Theoretical and practical justifications for error correlations are given, and a new equivalence class of models is presented to explain the relationship between interfactor correlation and error correlations. The class allows simple, parsimonious modeling of error…

  12. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope 177 Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  13. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope 177 Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  14. Modeling conditional correlations of asset returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvennoinen, Annastiina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new multivariate GARCH model with time-varying conditional correlation structure. The time-varying conditional correlations change smoothly between two extreme states of constant correlations according to a predetermined or exogenous transition variable. An LM-test is d......In this paper we propose a new multivariate GARCH model with time-varying conditional correlation structure. The time-varying conditional correlations change smoothly between two extreme states of constant correlations according to a predetermined or exogenous transition variable. An LM......-test is derived to test the constancy of correlations and LM- and Wald tests to test the hypothesis of partially constant correlations. Analytical expressions for the test statistics and the required derivatives are provided to make computations feasible. An empirical example based on daily return series of five...

  15. Local Descriptors of Dynamic and Nondynamic Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Matito, Eduard

    2017-06-13

    Quantitatively accurate electronic structure calculations rely on the proper description of electron correlation. A judicious choice of the approximate quantum chemistry method depends upon the importance of dynamic and nondynamic correlation, which is usually assesed by scalar measures. Existing measures of electron correlation do not consider separately the regions of the Cartesian space where dynamic or nondynamic correlation are most important. We introduce real-space descriptors of dynamic and nondynamic electron correlation that admit orbital decomposition. Integration of the local descriptors yields global numbers that can be used to quantify dynamic and nondynamic correlation. Illustrative examples over different chemical systems with varying electron correlation regimes are used to demonstrate the capabilities of the local descriptors. Since the expressions only require orbitals and occupation numbers, they can be readily applied in the context of local correlation methods, hybrid methods, density matrix functional theory, and fractional-occupancy density functional theory.

  16. Generalized canonical correlation analysis with missing values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van de Velden (Michel); Y. Takane

    2012-01-01

    textabstractGeneralized canonical correlation analysis is a versatile technique that allows the joint analysis of several sets of data matrices. The generalized canonical correlation analysis solution can be obtained through an eigenequation and distributional assumptions are not required. When

  17. Analytic matrix elements with shifted correlated Gaussians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.......Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics....

  18. Spatial photon correlations in multiple scattering media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Muskens, O.; Lagendijk, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first angle-resolved measurements of spatial photon correlations that are induced by multiple scattering of light. The correlation relates multiple scattered photons at different spatial positions and depends on incident photon fluctuations.......We present the first angle-resolved measurements of spatial photon correlations that are induced by multiple scattering of light. The correlation relates multiple scattered photons at different spatial positions and depends on incident photon fluctuations....

  19. Local quantum channels preserving classical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhihua; Cao Huaixin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss local quantum channels that preserve classical correlations. First, we give two equivalent characterizations of classical correlated states. Then we obtain the relationships among classical correlation-preserving local quantum channels, commutativity-preserving local quantum channels and commutativity-preserving quantum channels on each subsystem. Furthermore, for a two-qubit system, we show the general form of classical correlation-preserving local quantum channels. (paper)

  20. Pion correlations in heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, L.

    1991-01-01

    Charged π-correlations are a well established experimental technique to obtain information about π-source sizes. This is, however, not the case for π 0 's, as they decay into photons, resulting in measurements of 4 photon correlations. Here is described what these correlations are, what the problems are to detect and interpret them. These correlations are an additional way to get more information out of the heavy ion collisions. (orig.)

  1. Geometrical optics in correlated imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Dezhong; Xiong Jun; Wang Kaige

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the geometrical optics of correlated imaging for two kinds of spatial correlations corresponding, respectively, to a classical thermal light source and a quantum two-photon entangled source. Due to the different features in the second-order spatial correlation, the two sources obey different imaging equations. The quantum entangled source behaves as a mirror, whereas the classical thermal source looks like a phase-conjugate mirror in the correlated imaging

  2. Robust canonical correlations: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, JA; Croux, Christophe; Filzmoser, P; Oliveira, MR

    2005-01-01

    Several approaches for robust canonical correlation analysis will be presented and discussed. A first method is based on the definition of canonical correlation analysis as looking for linear combinations of two sets of variables having maximal (robust) correlation. A second method is based on alternating robust regressions. These methods axe discussed in detail and compared with the more traditional approach to robust canonical correlation via covariance matrix estimates. A simulation study ...

  3. Correlation coefficients in neutron β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, J.

    1978-01-01

    The various angular and polarisation coefficients in neutron decay are the principal sources of information on the β-interaction. Measurements of the electron-neutrino angular correlation coefficient (a), the neutron-spin-electron-momentum correlation coefficient (A), the neutron-spin-neutrino-momentum correlation coefficient (B), and the triple correlation coefficient D and time-reversal invariance are reviewed and the results discussed. (U.K.)

  4. PSYCHOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anida Fazlagić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV, postpartum depression may include any nonpsychotic depressive disorder during the first four weeks of postpartum, according to research criteria during the first year after birth. The exact cause of postpartum depression is not yet known, and most researchers believe that postpartum depression is a bio-psycho-social problem. So far, the biological aspect of the disease is explained by changing the levels of estrogen and progesterone during pregnancy, and by decrease of hormone levels after birth. Psychological correlates are often associated with low selfesteem, pessimism as a personality trait, bad strategies of coping with stress, mood swings and emotional reactions. The social aspect of the disease is associated with the existential conditions of pregnant woman, support of partners and education level. This paper will include issues like hereditary causes and possible psychological factors of postpartum depression prevention. Nowadays, it is estimated that on average 15% of women, regardless of the pregnancy outcome, are suffering from postpartum depression. However, this information includes only those women who were diagnosed with postpartum depression and who themselves reported about it. Almost every woman receives basic care during pregnancy to prevent complications in the physiological level. This paper has shown possible psychological factors of postpartum depression prevention, the impact of optimism, self-esteem and coping skills.

  5. Cluster Correlation in Mixed Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, A.; Bonometto, S. A.; Murante, G.; Yepes, G.

    2000-10-01

    We evaluate the dependence of the cluster correlation length, rc, on the mean intercluster separation, Dc, for three models with critical matter density, vanishing vacuum energy (Λ=0), and COBE normalization: a tilted cold dark matter (tCDM) model (n=0.8) and two blue mixed models with two light massive neutrinos, yielding Ωh=0.26 and 0.14 (MDM1 and MDM2, respectively). All models approach the observational value of σ8 (and hence the observed cluster abundance) and are consistent with the observed abundance of damped Lyα systems. Mixed models have a motivation in recent results of neutrino physics; they also agree with the observed value of the ratio σ8/σ25, yielding the spectral slope parameter Γ, and nicely fit Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS) reconstructed spectra. We use parallel AP3M simulations, performed in a wide box (of side 360 h-1 Mpc) and with high mass and distance resolution, enabling us to build artificial samples of clusters, whose total number and mass range allow us to cover the same Dc interval inspected through Automatic Plate Measuring Facility (APM) and Abell cluster clustering data. We find that the tCDM model performs substantially better than n=1 critical density CDM models. Our main finding, however, is that mixed models provide a surprisingly good fit to cluster clustering data.

  6. Correlates of oral contraception continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewer, P A; Gibbs, J O

    1971-05-01

    A sample of 139 predominantly black, young, low-income patients who had accepted oral contraception at a publicly supported family planning clinic has been analyzed for correlates of oral contraception continuation. Interviews were conducted 10-12 months after the clinic visit; at this time 38% of the patients continued taking oral contraceptives. It was found that patients with the highest continuation rates were 18-24 years old, in the 2-3 parity group, living with their husbands, had low-parity mothers, and were able to fill prescriptions in less time with more convenient methods of transportation. Discontinuers tended to have high-parity mothers, live with parents or head their own households, and to be in the 13-17 or 25-45 year old age groups. Fear of long-term use of oral contraceptives and perceived side effects appeared to be implicated in discontinuation. The rate of discontinuation may be associated with irregular coital experience and less consistent exposure to pregnancy.

  7. Teaching Principal Components Using Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Peter H; Arias, Andrea L; Fulton, Lawrence V

    2017-01-01

    Introducing principal components (PCs) to students is difficult. First, the matrix algebra and mathematical maximization lemmas are daunting, especially for students in the social and behavioral sciences. Second, the standard motivation involving variance maximization subject to unit length constraint does not directly connect to the "variance explained" interpretation. Third, the unit length and uncorrelatedness constraints of the standard motivation do not allow re-scaling or oblique rotations, which are common in practice. Instead, we propose to motivate the subject in terms of optimizing (weighted) average proportions of variance explained in the original variables; this approach may be more intuitive, and hence easier to understand because it links directly to the familiar "R-squared" statistic. It also removes the need for unit length and uncorrelatedness constraints, provides a direct interpretation of "variance explained," and provides a direct answer to the question of whether to use covariance-based or correlation-based PCs. Furthermore, the presentation can be made without matrix algebra or optimization proofs. Modern tools from data science, including heat maps and text mining, provide further help in the interpretation and application of PCs; examples are given. Together, these techniques may be used to revise currently used methods for teaching and learning PCs in the behavioral sciences.

  8. Correlation functions of warped CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Xu, Jianfei

    2018-04-01

    Warped conformal field theory (WCFT) is a two dimensional quantum field theory whose local symmetry algebra consists of a Virasoro algebra and a U(1) Kac-Moody algebra. In this paper, we study correlation functions for primary operators in WCFT. Similar to conformal symmetry, warped conformal symmetry is very constraining. The form of the two and three point functions are determined by the global warped conformal symmetry while the four point functions can be determined up to an arbitrary function of the cross ratio. The warped conformal bootstrap equation are constructed by formulating the notion of crossing symmetry. In the large central charge limit, four point functions can be decomposed into global warped conformal blocks, which can be solved exactly. Furthermore, we revisit the scattering problem in warped AdS spacetime (WAdS), and give a prescription on how to match the bulk result to a WCFT retarded Green's function. Our result is consistent with the conjectured holographic dualities between WCFT and WAdS.

  9. Oscillatory correlates of autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Dorosheva, Elena A; Tamozhnikov, Sergey S; Saprigyn, Alexander E

    2015-03-01

    Recollection of events from one's own life is referred to as autobiographical memory. Autobiographical memory is an important part of our self. Neuroimaging findings link self-referential processes with the default mode network (DMN). Much evidence coming primarily from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies shows that autobiographical memory and DMN have a common neural base. In this study, electroencephalographic data collected in 47 participants during recollection of autobiographical episodes were analyzed using temporal and spatial independent component analyses in combination with source localization. Autobiographical remembering was associated with an increase of spectral power in alpha and beta and a decrease in delta band. The increase of alpha power, as estimated by sLORETA, was most prominent in the posterior DMN, but was also observed in visual and motor cortices, prompting an assumption that it is associated with activation of DMN and inhibition of irrelevant sensory and motor areas. In line with data linking delta oscillations with aversive states, decrease of delta power was more pronounced in episodes associated with positive emotions, whereas episodes associated with negative emotions were accompanied by an increase of delta power. Vividness of recollection correlated positively with theta oscillations. These results highlight the leading role of alpha oscillations and the DMN in the processes accompanying autobiographical remembering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Angular correlation in positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arponen, J.; Pajanne, E.

    1978-01-01

    The angular correlation of the two gamma quanta emitted when a thermalized positron annihilates with metallic conduction electrons is investigated by applying the newly developed theory of electron gas as a system of interacting collective excitations. The method leads in a natural way to the appearance of high-momentum components (i.e. pair momentum p>psub(F) in the annihilation radiation already in the case of annihilation with conduction electrons only. The amount of these components is significant approximately (10 %) in a dilute electron gas (like alkali metals), but fairly irrelevant for higher densities. The momentum-dependence of the enhancement factor for a dense system (with rsub(s) approximately equal to 2) agrees well both with the earlier theories due to Kahana and others, and also with recent accurate experimental observations. As rsub(s) increases into the alkali-metal region, the enhancement factor for p< psub(F) becomes relatively more and more constant, in contrast with the trend in the Kahana theory. In this density regime the experimental results seem to vary widely, although most of them desagree with the present prediction. We discuss the possible discrepancy and try to account for the effects of the core annihilation by a simple model. (author)

  11. Information-causality and extremal tripartite correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Tzyh Haur; Cavalcanti, Daniel; Almeida, Mafalda L; Teo, Colin; Scarani, Valerio

    2012-01-01

    We study the principle of information-causality (IC) in the presence of extremal no-signaling correlations on a tripartite scenario. We prove that all, except one, of the non-local correlations lead to violation of IC. The remaining non-quantum correlation is shown to satisfy any bipartite physical principle. (paper)

  12. RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MODELS WITH CORRELATION INTEGRAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Kolomiets

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article offers one of possible approaches to the use of the classical correlation concept in Rayleigh scattering models. Classical correlation in contrast to three types of correlations corresponding to stochastic point flows opens the door to the efficient explanation of the interaction between periodical structure of incident radiation and discreet stochastic structure of distributed scatters typical for Rayleigh problems.

  13. Functional Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Heungsun; Jung, Kwanghee; Takane, Yoshio; Woodward, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose functional multiple-set canonical correlation analysis for exploring associations among multiple sets of functions. The proposed method includes functional canonical correlation analysis as a special case when only two sets of functions are considered. As in classical multiple-set canonical correlation analysis, computationally, the…

  14. Correlation Coefficients: Appropriate Use and Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Patrick; Boer, Christa; Schwarte, Lothar A

    2018-05-01

    Correlation in the broadest sense is a measure of an association between variables. In correlated data, the change in the magnitude of 1 variable is associated with a change in the magnitude of another variable, either in the same (positive correlation) or in the opposite (negative correlation) direction. Most often, the term correlation is used in the context of a linear relationship between 2 continuous variables and expressed as Pearson product-moment correlation. The Pearson correlation coefficient is typically used for jointly normally distributed data (data that follow a bivariate normal distribution). For nonnormally distributed continuous data, for ordinal data, or for data with relevant outliers, a Spearman rank correlation can be used as a measure of a monotonic association. Both correlation coefficients are scaled such that they range from -1 to +1, where 0 indicates that there is no linear or monotonic association, and the relationship gets stronger and ultimately approaches a straight line (Pearson correlation) or a constantly increasing or decreasing curve (Spearman correlation) as the coefficient approaches an absolute value of 1. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals can be used to address the statistical significance of the results and to estimate the strength of the relationship in the population from which the data were sampled. The aim of this tutorial is to guide researchers and clinicians in the appropriate use and interpretation of correlation coefficients.

  15. Using correlation functions as free decays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Amador, Sandro; Juul, Martin

    It is a general assumption in OMA that correlation functions are free decays. In multiple input OMA this assumption also implies that any column in the correlation function matrix is to be considered as multiple output free decays. This assumption is discussed in this paper together with issues...... concerning estimation and application of correlations functions in OMA....

  16. Multiparty correlation measure based on the cumulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, D. L.; Zeng, B.; Xu, Z.; You, L.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a genuine multiparty correlation measure for a multiparty quantum system as the trace norm of the cumulant of the state. The legitimacy of our multiparty correlation measure is explicitly demonstrated by proving it satisfies the five basic conditions required for a correlation measure. As an application we construct an efficient algorithm for the calculation of our measures for all stabilizer states

  17. Correlation Measurements on Small Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Here, analysis of the antenna correlation at the design stage is done, with focus on measurement techniques. Various theoretical definitions of correlations are used with the corresponding measured data required. The problems related to the coaxial measurement cables, when calculating correlation...

  18. Structures Deduced From Gravity Data In The Lower Niger Benue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on a recent gravity data collected over the area, the Lower Niger and Lower Benue basins are interpreted to comprise five major structural zones. The locations, trends, extent and relationships between most previously known structures in the area are confirmed and detailed by the data. However, the structure ...

  19. Deducing Electron Properties from Hard X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E. P.; Brown, J. C.; Emslie, A. G.; Hajdas, W.; Holman, G. D.; Hurford, G. J.; Kasparova, J.; Mallik, P. C. V.; Massone, A. M.; McConnell, M. L.; hide

    2011-01-01

    X-radiation from energetic electrons is the prime diagnostic of flare-accelerated electrons. The observed X-ray flux (and polarization state) is fundamentally a convolution of the cross-section for the hard X-ray emission process(es) in question with the electron distribution function, which is in turn a function of energy, direction, spatial location and time. To address the problems of particle propagation and acceleration one needs to infer as much information as possible on this electron distribution function, through a deconvolution of this fundamental relationship. This review presents recent progress toward this goal using spectroscopic, imaging and polarization measurements, primarily from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Previous conclusions regarding the energy, angular (pitch angle) and spatial distributions of energetic electrons in solar flares are critically reviewed. We discuss the role and the observational evidence of several radiation processes: free-free electron-ion, free-free electron-electron, free-bound electron-ion, photoelectric absorption and Compton backscatter (albedo), using both spectroscopic and imaging techniques. This unprecedented quality of data allows for the first time inference of the angular distributions of the X-ray-emitting electrons and improved model-independent inference of electron energy spectra and emission measures of thermal plasma. Moreover, imaging spectroscopy has revealed hitherto unknown details of solar flare morphology and detailed spectroscopy of coronal, footpoint and extended sources in flaring regions. Additional attempts to measure hard X-ray polarization were not sufficient to put constraints on the degree of anisotropy of electrons, but point to the importance of obtaining good quality polarization data in the future.

  20. 350 Year Cloud Reconstruction Deduced from Northeast Caribbean Coral Proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, A.; Sammarco, P. W.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Jury, M.; Zanchettin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Clouds are a major factor influencing the global climate and its response to external forcing through their implications for the global hydrological cycle, and hence for the planetary radiative budget. Clouds also contribute to regional climates and their variability through, e.g., the changes they induce in regional precipitation patterns. There have been very few studies of decadal and longer-term changes in cloud cover in the tropics and sub-tropics, both over land and the ocean. In the tropics, there is great uncertainty regarding how global warming will affect cloud cover. Observational satellite data are too short to unambiguously discern any temporal trends in cloud cover. Corals generally live in well-mixed coastal regions and can often record environmental conditions of large areas of the upper ocean. This is particularly the case at low latitudes. Scleractinian corals are sessile, epibenthic fauna, and the type of environmental information recorded at the location where the coral has been living is dependent upon the species of coral considered and proxy index of interest. Skeletons of scleractinian corals are considered to provide among the best records of high-resolution (sub-annual) environmental variability in the tropical and sub-tropical oceans. Zooxanthellate hermatypic corals in tropical and sub-tropical seas precipitate CaCO3 skeletons as they grow. This growth is made possible through the manufacture of CaCO3crystals, facilitated by the zooxanthellae. During the process of crystallization, the holobiont binds carbon of different isotopes into the crystals. Stable carbon isotope concentrations vary with a variety of environmental conditions. In the Caribbean, d13C in corals of the species Montastraea faveolata can be used as a proxy for changes in cloud cover. In this contribution, we will demonstrate that the stable isotope 13C varies concomitantly with cloud cover for the northeastern Caribbean region. Using this proxy we have been able to reconstruct cloud cover conditions back to the year 1760 and thus determine historical cloud cover prior to the recent use of instrumental records. We will also discuss how our coral proxy record of cloud cover compares to paleo-climate model runs for the same time period.

  1. Deducing trapdoor primitives in public key encryption schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandra

    2005-03-01

    Semantic security of public key encryption schemes is often interchangeable with the art of building trapdoors. In the frame of reference of Random Oracle methodology, the "Key Privacy" and "Anonymity" has often been discussed. However to a certain degree the security of most public key encryption schemes is required to be analyzed with formal proofs using one-way functions. This paper evaluates the design of El Gamal and RSA based schemes and attempts to parallelize the trapdoor primitives used in the computation of the cipher text, thereby magnifying the decryption error δp in the above schemes.

  2. Using register data to deduce patterns of social exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Fredrik

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a novel method for deducting propensities for social exchange between individuals based on the choices they make, and based on factors such as country of origin, sex, school grades and socioeconomic background. The objective here is to disentangle the effect of social ties from the other factors, in order to find patterns of social exchange. This is done through a control-treatment design on analysing available data, where the 'treatment' is similarity of choices between socially connected individuals, and the control is similarity of choices between non-connected individuals. Structural dependencies are controlled for and effects from different classes are pooled through a mix of methods from network and meta-analysis. The method is demonstrated and tested on Swedish register data on students at upper secondary school. The results show that having similar grades is a predictor of social exchange. Also, previous results from Norwegian data are replicated, showing that students cluster based on country of origin.

  3. The origin of hailstone embryos deduced from isotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federer, B.; Thalmann, B.; Oesch, A.; Brichet, N.; Waldvogel, A.; Jouzel, J.; Merlivat, L.

    1980-07-01

    A refined interpretation of the growth history of 30 hailstones is presented. The stones are analysed by the simultaneous determination of D and O 18 on the same samples, the application of a new isotopic cloud model and a more accurate determination of the isotope content of vapor at cloud base (R 0 ). Three questions are specifically addressed. 1) Are the frequently observed big-drop hailstones embryos a) merely melted and recirculated graupel, or b) drops grown by the coalescence process. Evidence is provided by the isotope measurements that interpretation b) is more likely. 2) What is the extent of recirculation of hailstones in severe storms. It is shown that by combining isotope, radar and crystallographic measurements, the presence or absence of recirculation can be demonstrated and consistent trajectories and updrafts can be obtained. 3) What are the temperatures of origin of graupel and drop embryos. By comparing the time sequence of these temperatures in hailstones fallen before and after seeding in the same storm, a possible seeding effect is discussed

  4. Growth patterns of fossil vertebrates as deduced from bone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-10-20

    Oct 20, 2009 ... The dicynodonts on the other hand, were characterized by an overall fast growth with periodic interruptions, variable growth rates dependent on ontogeny and indeterminate growth strategy. A comparative study encompassing several neotherapsid genera including the dicynodonts shows significant ...

  5. Geothermal gradients in Iraqi Kurdistan deduced from bottom hole temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzger A. Abdula

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bottom hole temperature (BHT data from 12 oil wells in Iraqi Kurdistan were used to obtain the thermal trend of Iraqi Kurdistan. Due to differences in thermal conductivity of rocks and groundwater movement, variations in geothermal gradients were observed. The highest geothermal gradient (29.2 °C/km was found for well Taq Taq-8 in the Low Folded Zone (central part of the area. The lowest geothermal gradients (14.9 °C/km were observed for well Bekhme-1 in the High Folded Zone (northern and northeastern parts of the area. The average regional geothermal gradient for Iraqi Kurdistan is 21 °C/km.

  6. Dust-gas interaction deduced from Halley multicolour camera observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Delamere, W.A.; Keller, H.U.; Reitsema, H.J.; Schmidt, H.U.; Whipple, F.L.; Wilhelm, K.

    1986-01-01

    The dust and gas productions of Comet Halley were measured by the dust counter and the mass spectrometers on the Giotto spacecraft. These instruments give only little information about the spatial asymmetry of the activity. The asymmetry in the dust production is clearly evident from the dust jets seen in the Halley Multicolour Camera images. Since the dust is entrained by the gas, production must be similarly asymmetric. The intensity profiles along and across several dust jets are related to their source regions on the nucleus. Properties of the dust jets are investigated. A few compact, but highly active source regions on the nucleus produce most of the visible dust and can account for most of the gas produced by the comet. 2 refs

  7. Piezometric surface deduced from vertical electrical sounding data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science World Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 4 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Piezometric surface deduced from vertical electrical sounding data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In hydrogeological studies the knowledge of the water table is very essential. In this work, one hundred and eight vertical electrical soundings were carried out, with the view of unravelling the hydrogeological characteristics of Kuri River Basin, Kaduna, Nigeria. The water table for eleven hand dug wells were directly ...

  9. Geothermal gradients in Iraqi Kurdistan deduced from bottom hole temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Abdula, Rzger A.

    2016-01-01

    Bottom hole temperature (BHT) data from 12 oil wells in Iraqi Kurdistan were used to obtain the thermal trend of Iraqi Kurdistan. Due to differences in thermal conductivity of rocks and groundwater movement, variations in geothermal gradients were observed. The highest geothermal gradient (29.2 °C/km) was found for well Taq Taq-8 in the Low Folded Zone (central part of the area). The lowest geothermal gradients (14.9 °C/km) were observed for well Bekhme-1 in the High Folded Zone (northern and...

  10. piezometric surface deduced from vertical electrical sounding data

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dogara M. D.

    The data obtained was processed ... social, economic and political problems, as part of this scientific methods are ... data collection in this work was carried out before the beginning of ... Where ρ = earth resistivity, I = Current, 2π = Constant, r =.

  11. Deducing the multi-trader population driving a financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nachi; Hauser, Raphael; Johnson, Neil

    2005-12-01

    We have previously laid out a basic framework for predicting financial movements and pockets of predictability by tracking the distribution of a multi-trader population playing on an artificial financial market model. This work explores extensions to this basic framework. We allow for more intelligent agents with a richer strategy set, and we no longer constrain the distribution over these agents to a probability space. We then introduce a fusion scheme which accounts for multiple runs of randomly chosen sets of possible agent types. We also discuss a mechanism for bias removal on the estimates.

  12. Site of iodination in hyperplastic thyroid glands deduced from autoradiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollman, S.H.; Ekholm, R.

    1981-01-01

    We have tried to ascertain the site of iodination in the chronically stimulated, hyperplastic thyroid gland of rats. Rats were fed propylthiouracil in a commercial rat diet for 10 days. Then the diet was changed to a low iodine diet for 5 days. To label the gland, 10 mCi of 125I-iodide was injected into the left heart ventricle. Ten seconds later the animal was perfused through the left ventricle with a fixative solution containing a goitrogen to block further iodination, and stable iodide to help extract uncombined radioiodide. Electron microscopic autoradiographs prepared from the fixed thyroids show strong labeling over the lumen of the follicle and no consistent labeling of any other site or organelle. We conclude that the site of iodination in the chronically stimulated, hyperplastic thyroid is the follicular lumen, i.e. the same as that in the normal gland

  13. Hydraulics of subaqueous ash flows as deduced from their deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronzo, Domenico M.; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2012-09-01

    Subaqueous ash flows are gravity currents consisting of a mixture of sea water and ash particles. Also called volcaniclastic turbidity currents (VTCs), they can be generated because of remobilization of pyroclastic fall deposits, which are emplaced into the sea around a volcanic island, as well as far away, during an explosive eruption. The VTC upper part is the turbulent transport system for the flow, whereas the viscous basal one is the depositional system. Typical sequences of VTC deposits are characterized by cross-laminations, planar and convolute laminations, and massive beds, which reflect the stratified nature of the flow. Here, the analysis of some VTC hydraulic parameters is presented in order to depict flow behavior and sedimentation during deposition. A reverse engineering approach is proposed, which consists of calculating hydraulic parameters by starting from deposit features. The calculated values show that a VTC is homogeneously-turbulent for most of the thickness, but is viscous at its base. First, cross-laminations are directly acquired over the rough pre-existing seafloor, then planar or convolute laminations aggrade over the newly formed substrate. Finally, fine-grained suspended particles gently settle and cap the flow deposit.

  14. Shell structure of potassium isotopes deduced from their magnetic moments

    CERN Document Server

    Papuga, J.; Kreim, K; Barbieri, C; Blaum, K; De Rydt, M; Duguet, T; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Kowalska, M; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nortershauser, W; Rajabali, M M; Sanchez, R; Smirnova, N; Soma, V; Yordanov, D T

    2014-09-29

    $\\textbf{Background:}$ Ground-state spins and magnetic moments are sensitive to the nuclear wave function, thus they are powerful probes to study the nuclear structure of isotopes far from stability. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Purpose:}$ Extend our knowledge about the evolution of the $1/2^+$ and $3/2^+$ states for K isotopes beyond the $N = 28$ shell gap. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Method:}$ High-resolution collinear laser spectroscopy on bunched atomic beams. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Results:}$ From measured hyperfine structure spectra of K isotopes, nuclear spins and magnetic moments of the ground states were obtained for isotopes from $N = 19$ up to $N = 32$. In order to draw conclusions about the composition of the wave functions and the occupation of the levels, the experimental data were compared to shell-model calculations using SDPF-NR and SDPF-U effective interactions. In addition, a detailed discussion about the evolution of the gap between proton $1d_{3/2}$ and $2s_{1/2}$ in the shell model and $\\textit{ab initio}$ framework is al...

  15. Inter-relationships of haplosporidians deduced from ultrastructural studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hine, P.M.; Carnegie, R.B.; Burreson, E.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed papers reporting haplosporidian ultrastructure to compare inter-relationships based on ultrastructure with those based on molecular data, to identify features that may be important in haplosporidian taxonomy, and to consider parasite taxonomy in relation to host taxonomy. There were

  16. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T c 4 superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the suppression of momentum

  17. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-07-09

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T{sub c}4 superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the

  18. Concentric retinitis pigmentosa: clinicopathologic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, A H; De Castro, E B; Smith, J E; Tang, W X; John, S K; Gorin, M B; Stone, E M; Aguirre, G D; Jacobson, S G

    2001-10-01

    Progressive concentric (centripetal) loss of vision is one pattern of visual field loss in retinitis pigmentosa. This study provides the first clinicopathologic correlations for this form of retinitis pigmentosa. A family with autosomal dominant concentric retinitis pigmentosa was examined clinically and with visual function tests. A post-mortem eye of an affected 94 year old family member was processed for histopathology and immunocytochemistry with retinal cell specific antibodies. Unrelated simplex/multiplex patients with concentric retinitis pigmentosa were also examined. Affected family members of the eye donor and patients from the other families had prominent peripheral pigmentary retinopathy with more normal appearing central retina, good visual acuity, concentric field loss, normal or near normal rod and cone sensitivity within the preserved visual field, and reduced rod and cone electroretinograms. The eye donor, at age 90, had good acuity and function in a central island. Grossly, the central region of the donor retina appeared thinned but otherwise normal, while the far periphery contained heavy bone spicule pigment. Microscopically the central retina showed photoreceptor outer segment shortening and some photoreceptor cell loss. The mid periphery had a sharp line of demarcation where more central photoreceptors were near normal except for very short outer segments and peripheral photoreceptors were absent. Rods and cones showed abrupt loss of outer segments and cell death at this interface. It is concluded that concentric retinitis pigmentosa is a rare but recognizable phenotype with slowly progressive photoreceptor death from the far periphery toward the central retina. The disease is retina-wide but shows regional variation in severity of degeneration; photoreceptor death is severe in the peripheral retina with an abrupt edge between viable and degenerate photoreceptors. Peripheral to central gradients of unknown retinal molecule(s) may be defective

  19. Does asymmetric correlation affect portfolio optimization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryd, Lukas

    2017-07-01

    The classical portfolio optimization problem does not assume asymmetric behavior of relationship among asset returns. The existence of asymmetric response in correlation on the bad news could be important information in portfolio optimization. The paper applies Dynamic conditional correlation model (DCC) and his asymmetric version (ADCC) to propose asymmetric behavior of conditional correlation. We analyse asymmetric correlation among S&P index, bonds index and spot gold price before mortgage crisis in 2008. We evaluate forecast ability of the models during and after mortgage crisis and demonstrate the impact of asymmetric correlation on the reduction of portfolio variance.

  20. Correlations in Relaxed Clusters of Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babyk Iu.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The correlations among different quantities in galaxy clusters, observed by Newman et al. (2013a,b, are investigated. We find an anti-correlation among the slope α, the effective radius, Re, and a correlation among the core radius rcore and Re. Moreover, the mass inside 100 kpc (mainly dark matter is correlated with the mass inside 5 kpc (mainly baryons. The listed correlations can be understood in a two phase formation model: the first dissipative phase forming the brightest cluster galaxies, and the second dissipationless phase, in which the inner density profile is flattened by the interaction of baryonic clumps and the dark matter halo through dynamical friction.

  1. Noise correlations in cosmic microwave background experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, Scott; Kosowsky, Arthur; Myers, Steven T.

    1995-01-01

    Many analysis of microwave background experiments neglect the correlation of noise in different frequency of polarization channels. We show that these correlations, should they be present, can lead to serve misinterpretation of an experiment. In particular, correlated noise arising from either electronics or atmosphere may mimic a cosmic signal. We quantify how the likelihood function for a given experiment varies with noise correlation, using both simple analytic models and actual data. For a typical microwave background anisotropy experiment, noise correlations at the level of 1% of the overall noise can seriously reduce the significance of a given detection.

  2. Factorial correlators: angular scaling within QCD jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschanski, R.

    2001-01-01

    Factorial correlators measure the amount of dynamical correlation in the multiplicity between two separated phase-space windows. We present the analytical derivation of factorial correlators for a QCD jet described at the double logarithmic (DL) accuracy. We obtain a new angular scaling property for properly normalized correlators between two solid-angle cells or two rings around the jet axis. Normalized QCD factorial correlators scale with the angular distance and are independent of the window size. Scaling violations are expected beyond the DL approximation, in particular from the subject structure. Experimental tests are feasible, and thus would be welcome. (orig.)

  3. Fully exponentially correlated wavefunctions for small atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Frank E. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 and Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118435, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Fully exponentially correlated atomic wavefunctions are constructed from exponentials in all the interparticle coordinates, in contrast to correlated wavefunctions of the Hylleraas form, in which only the electron-nuclear distances occur exponentially, with electron-electron distances entering only as integer powers. The full exponential correlation causes many-configuration wavefunctions to converge with expansion length more rapidly than either orbital formulations or correlated wavefunctions of the Hylleraas type. The present contribution surveys the effectiveness of fully exponentially correlated functions for the three-body system (the He isoelectronic series) and reports their application to a four-body system (the Li atom)

  4. Bunches of random cross-correlated sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maystrenko, A A; Melnik, S S; Pritula, G M; Usatenko, O V

    2013-01-01

    The statistical properties of random cross-correlated sequences constructed by the convolution method (likewise referred to as the Rice or the inverse Fourier transformation) are examined. We clarify the meaning of the filtering function—the kernel of the convolution operator—and show that it is the value of the cross-correlation function which describes correlations between the initial white noise and constructed correlated sequences. The matrix generalization of this method for constructing a bunch of N cross-correlated sequences is presented. Algorithms for their generation are reduced to solving the problem of decomposition of the Fourier transform of the correlation matrix into a product of two mutually conjugate matrices. Different decompositions are considered. The limits of weak and strong correlations for the one-point probability and pair correlation functions of sequences generated by the method under consideration are studied. Special cases of heavy-tailed distributions of the generated sequences are analyzed. We show that, if the filtering function is rather smooth, the distribution function of generated variables has the Gaussian or Lévy form depending on the analytical properties of the distribution (or characteristic) functions of the initial white noise. Anisotropic properties of statistically homogeneous random sequences related to the asymmetry of a filtering function are revealed and studied. These asymmetry properties are expressed in terms of the third- or fourth-order correlation functions. Several examples of the construction of correlated chains with a predefined correlation matrix are given. (paper)

  5. Performance highlights of the ALMA correlators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Alain; Lacasse, Richard; Escoffier, Ray; Webber, John; Greenberg, Joseph; Platt, Laurence; Treacy, Robert; Saez, Alejandro F.; Cais, Philippe; Comoretto, Giovanni; Quertier, Benjamin; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Chikada, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Okuda, Takeshi; Kurono, Yasutake; Iguchi, Satoru

    2012-09-01

    Two large correlators have been constructed to combine the signals captured by the ALMA antennas deployed on the Atacama Desert in Chile at an elevation of 5050 meters. The Baseline correlator was fabricated by a NRAO/European team to process up to 64 antennas for 16 GHz bandwidth in two polarizations and another correlator, the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) correlator, was fabricated by a Japanese team to process up to 16 antennas. Both correlators meet the same specifications except for the number of processed antennas. The main architectural differences between these two large machines will be underlined. Selected features of the Baseline and ACA correlators as well as the main technical challenges met by the designers will be briefly discussed. The Baseline correlator is the largest correlator ever built for radio astronomy. Its digital hybrid architecture provides a wide variety of observing modes including the ability to divide each input baseband into 32 frequency-mobile sub-bands for high spectral resolution and to be operated as a conventional 'lag' correlator for high time resolution. The various observing modes offered by the ALMA correlators to the science community for 'Early Science' are presented, as well as future observing modes. Coherently phasing the array to provide VLBI maps of extremely compact sources is another feature of the ALMA correlators. Finally, the status and availability of these large machines will be presented.

  6. Quantifying meta-correlations in financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Preis, Tobias; Gur-Gershgoren, Gitit; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-08-01

    Financial markets are modular multi-level systems, in which the relationships between the individual components are not constant in time. Sudden changes in these relationships significantly affect the stability of the entire system, and vice versa. Our analysis is based on historical daily closing prices of the 30 components of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) from March 15th, 1939 until December 31st, 2010. We quantify the correlation among these components by determining Pearson correlation coefficients, to investigate whether mean correlation of the entire portfolio can be used as a precursor for changes in the index return. To this end, we quantify the meta-correlation - the correlation of mean correlation and index return. We find that changes in index returns are significantly correlated with changes in mean correlation. Furthermore, we study the relationship between the index return and correlation volatility - the standard deviation of correlations for a given time interval. This parameter provides further evidence of the effect of the index on market correlations and their fluctuations. Our empirical findings provide new information and quantification of the index leverage effect, and have implications to risk management, portfolio optimization, and to the increased stability of financial markets.

  7. Clustering stocks using partial correlation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sean S.; Chang, Woojin

    2016-11-01

    A partial correlation analysis is performed on the Korean stock market (KOSPI). The difference between Pearson correlation and the partial correlation is analyzed and it is found that when conditioned on the market return, Pearson correlation coefficients are generally greater than those of the partial correlation, which implies that the market return tends to drive up the correlation between stock returns. A clustering analysis is then performed to study the market structure given by the partial correlation analysis and the members of the clusters are compared with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS). The initial hypothesis is that the firms in the same GICS sector are clustered together since they are in a similar business and environment. However, the result is inconsistent with the hypothesis and most clusters are a mix of multiple sectors suggesting that the traditional approach of using sectors to determine the proximity between stocks may not be sufficient enough to diversify a portfolio.

  8. Robustness of quantum correlations against linear noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Zhihua; Cao, Huaixin; Qu, Shixian

    2016-01-01

    Relative robustness of quantum correlations (RRoQC) of a bipartite state is firstly introduced relative to a classically correlated state. Robustness of quantum correlations (RoQC) of a bipartite state is then defined as the minimum of RRoQC of the state relative to all classically correlated ones. It is proved that as a function on quantum states, RoQC is nonnegative, lower semi-continuous and neither convex nor concave; especially, it is zero if and only if the state is classically correlated. Thus, RoQC not only quantifies the endurance of quantum correlations of a state against linear noise, but also can be used to distinguish between quantum and classically correlated states. Furthermore, the effects of local quantum channels on the robustness are explored and characterized. (paper)

  9. Investigation of parity admixtures in nuclear states by measuring the β-γ directional correlation of the 203Hg → 203Tl decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dydak, F.

    1972-01-01

    As a consequence of a weak nucleon-nucleon interaction parity admixtures in nuclear states give rise to a small forward-backward asymmetry of γ-quanta with respect to the direction of β-particle emission. A highly accurate arrangement using four β- and two γ-detectors has been developed to determine the odd Legendre term A cos(theta) in the β-γ directional correlation of the cascade decay 203 Hg→ 203 Tl as well as a control value which should be zero. The electronic equipment is a specially designed nanosecond system. The sources were prepared by means of a mass separator. Possible systematic distortions of the experimental data were carefully examined. A generalized least squares fit method symmetric in all variables was deduced for a correct data evaluation. The measurements yielded the coefficient A 1 = -(2,7+-0,7).10 -4 and the control value +(0,7+-0,8).10 -4 . (author)

  10. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    pathophysiology of and to develop adherence-promoting and alternative interventions for pediatric OSA. Citation: Hawkins SM, Jensen EL, Simon SL, Friedman NR. Correlates of pediatric CPAP adherence. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(6):879–884. PMID:27092702

  11. Material composition – Pinning strength correlation in Nb thin films with focused ion beam-milled washboard nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrovolskiy, Oleksandr V., E-mail: Dobrovolskiy@Physik.uni-frankfurt.de [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe-Universität, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Physical Department, Kharkiv National University, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Begun, Evgeniya; Huth, Michael [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe-Universität, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Shklovskij, Valerij A. [Physical Department, Kharkiv National University, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute for Theoretical Physics, NSC-KIPT, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We fabricated an array of grooves in Nb films by using focused ion beam milling. •We determined the material composition in different areas of the processed films. •We deduced the pinning activation energies from the magneto-resistivity data. •We obtained the material composition – pinning strength correlation in the processed films. -- Abstract: An analysis of the interrelated changes in the material composition and the pinning strength in nanostructured Nb (1 1 0) thin films is presented. The nanopatterns were prepared by focused ion beam milling of an array of uniaxial grooves. They induce a washboard-like pinning potential landscape for vortices in the mixed state. By applying different magnetic fields, the most likely pinning sites along which the flux lines move through the samples have been selected. By this, either the background isotropic pinning of the pristine film or the enhanced isotropic pinning originating from the nanoprocessing has been probed. The enhanced pinning strength in the processed films has been found to correlate with the content of Ga implanted into the films during the nanopatterning.

  12. Material composition – Pinning strength correlation in Nb thin films with focused ion beam-milled washboard nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrovolskiy, Oleksandr V.; Begun, Evgeniya; Huth, Michael; Shklovskij, Valerij A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We fabricated an array of grooves in Nb films by using focused ion beam milling. •We determined the material composition in different areas of the processed films. •We deduced the pinning activation energies from the magneto-resistivity data. •We obtained the material composition – pinning strength correlation in the processed films. -- Abstract: An analysis of the interrelated changes in the material composition and the pinning strength in nanostructured Nb (1 1 0) thin films is presented. The nanopatterns were prepared by focused ion beam milling of an array of uniaxial grooves. They induce a washboard-like pinning potential landscape for vortices in the mixed state. By applying different magnetic fields, the most likely pinning sites along which the flux lines move through the samples have been selected. By this, either the background isotropic pinning of the pristine film or the enhanced isotropic pinning originating from the nanoprocessing has been probed. The enhanced pinning strength in the processed films has been found to correlate with the content of Ga implanted into the films during the nanopatterning

  13. Dual channel detection of ultra low concentration of bacteria in real time by scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamore, Ilaria; Lanzano, Luca; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-06-01

    We describe a novel method to detect very low concentrations of bacteria in water. Our device consists of a portable horizontal geometry small confocal microscope with large pinhole and a holder for cylindrical cuvettes containing the sample. Two motors provide fast rotational and slow vertical motion of the cuvette so the device looks like a simplified flow cytometer without flow. To achieve high sensitivity, the design has two detection channels. Bacteria are stained by two different nucleic acid dyes and excited with two different lasers. Data are analyzed with a correlation filter based on particle passage pattern recognition. The passage of a particle through the illumination volume is compared with a Gaussian pattern in both channels. The width of the Gaussian correlates with the time of passage of the particle so one particle is counted when the algorithm finds a match with a Gaussian in both channels. The concentration of particles in the sample is deduced from the total number of coincident hits and the total volume scanned. This portable setup provides higher sensitivity, low-cost advantage, and it can have a wide use ranging from clinical applications to pollution monitors and water and air quality control.

  14. Dual channel detection of ultra low concentration of bacteria in real time by scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altamore, Ilaria; Lanzano, Luca; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel method to detect very low concentrations of bacteria in water. Our device consists of a portable horizontal geometry small confocal microscope with large pinhole and a holder for cylindrical cuvettes containing the sample. Two motors provide fast rotational and slow vertical motion of the cuvette so the device looks like a simplified flow cytometer without flow. To achieve high sensitivity, the design has two detection channels. Bacteria are stained by two different nucleic acid dyes and excited with two different lasers. Data are analyzed with a correlation filter based on particle passage pattern recognition. The passage of a particle through the illumination volume is compared with a Gaussian pattern in both channels. The width of the Gaussian correlates with the time of passage of the particle so one particle is counted when the algorithm finds a match with a Gaussian in both channels. The concentration of particles in the sample is deduced from the total number of coincident hits and the total volume scanned. This portable setup provides higher sensitivity, low-cost advantage, and it can have a wide use ranging from clinical applications to pollution monitors and water and air quality control. (paper)

  15. The overall heat transfer characteristics of a double pipe heat exchanger: comparison of experimental data with predictions of standard correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrabian, M. A.; Mansouri, S. H.; Sheikhzadeh, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The single-phase flow and thermal performance of a double pipe heat exchanger are examined by experimental methods. The working fluid is water at atmospheric pressure. Temperature measurements at the inlet and outlet of the two streams and also at an intermediate point half way between the inlet and outlet is made, using copper-constantan thermocouple wires. Mass flow rates for each stream are also measured using calibrated ratemeters. Heat is supplied to the inner tube stream by an immersion heater. The overall heat transfer coefficients are inferred from the measured data. The heat transfer coefficient of the inner tube flow (circular cross section) is calculated using the standard correlations. The heat transfer coefficient of the outer tube flow (annular cross section) is then deduced.Higher heat transfer coefficients are reported in the laminar flow regime in comparison to the predictions of standard correlations for straight and smooth tubes. The reasons for this discrepancy are identified and discussed. Experimental errors in measuring temperatures and mass flow rates are studied and their effects on the heat transfer coefficients are estimated. Experimental results for the range of operating conditions used in this work show that the outer tube side heat transfer coefficients are smaller than the inner side heat transfer coefficients by a factor of almost 1.5 and 3.4 in counter flow and parallel flow arrangements, respectively. The agreement with predictions is very good for the counter flow arrangement, but not very good for the parallel flow arrangement

  16. Correlated Topic Vector for Scene Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Pengxu; Qin, Fei; Wan, Fang; Zhu, Yi; Jiao, Jianbin; Ye, Qixiang

    2017-07-01

    Scene images usually involve semantic correlations, particularly when considering large-scale image data sets. This paper proposes a novel generative image representation, correlated topic vector, to model such semantic correlations. Oriented from the correlated topic model, correlated topic vector intends to naturally utilize the correlations among topics, which are seldom considered in the conventional feature encoding, e.g., Fisher vector, but do exist in scene images. It is expected that the involvement of correlations can increase the discriminative capability of the learned generative model and consequently improve the recognition accuracy. Incorporated with the Fisher kernel method, correlated topic vector inherits the advantages of Fisher vector. The contributions to the topics of visual words have been further employed by incorporating the Fisher kernel framework to indicate the differences among scenes. Combined with the deep convolutional neural network (CNN) features and Gibbs sampling solution, correlated topic vector shows great potential when processing large-scale and complex scene image data sets. Experiments on two scene image data sets demonstrate that correlated topic vector improves significantly the deep CNN features, and outperforms existing Fisher kernel-based features.

  17. Image correlation method for DNA sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were "digitally" obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment.

  18. Proton-proton, anti-proton-anti-proton, proton-anti-proton correlations in Au+Au collisions measured by STAR at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gos, H.P.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of two-particle correlations provides a powerful tool to study the properties of hot and dense matter created in heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. Applied to identical and non-identical hadron pairs, it makes the study of space-time evolution of the source in femtoscopic scale possible. Baryon femtoscopy allows extraction of the radii of produced sources which can be compared to those deduced from identical pion studies, providing complete information about the source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for identical and non-identical baryon pairs of protons and anti-protons. The data were collected recently in Au+Au collisions at √(s NN )=62 GeV and √(s NN )=200 GeV by the STAR detector at the RHIC accelerator. We introduce corrections to the baryon-baryon correlations taking into account: residual correlations from weak decays, particle identification probability and the fraction of primary baryons. Finally we compare our results to theoretical predictions. (orig.)

  19. Correlations between the anatomical traits of Gymnocladus canadensis Lam. in heartwood and sapwood of early- and latewood zones of growth rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokanović Dušan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows correlations between vessel characteristics and differences in growth-ring width in heartwood and sapwood. Analyzed samples were from an iron-wood tree (Gymnocladus canadensis Lam. that grew in the Mužljanski Rit area, of the Srpska Crnja municipality in Serbia. According to previous research, it was deduced that Gymnocladus canadensis Lam. belongs to ring-porous species with big vessel lumen in the earlywood zone and thicker cell walls in the latewood. Vessels were more numerous in the latewood zone, and the same was true for heartwood and sapwood. For both layers, sapwood possessed a few more vessels than heartwood, and a statistically significant difference was confirmed by t-test during the early phase. The greatest negative value of correlation coefficient was between the number of vessels and growth-ring width during the early phase for sapwood. The number of vessels decreased in the wider growth rings. The correlation between growth-ring width and the area of vessels had a statistically significant positive value of correlative coefficient, which means that wider growth rings had larger vessel areas in the early phase for sapwood. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 31041

  20. Hypothesis testing for differentially correlated features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Elisa; Witten, Daniela; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2016-10-01

    In a multivariate setting, we consider the task of identifying features whose correlations with the other features differ across conditions. Such correlation shifts may occur independently of mean shifts, or differences in the means of the individual features across conditions. Previous approaches for detecting correlation shifts consider features simultaneously, by computing a correlation-based test statistic for each feature. However, since correlations involve two features, such approaches do not lend themselves to identifying which feature is the culprit. In this article, we instead consider a serial testing approach, by comparing columns of the sample correlation matrix across two conditions, and removing one feature at a time. Our method provides a novel perspective and favorable empirical results compared with competing approaches. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Rod bundle burnout data and correlation comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, G.L.; Morris, D.G.; Mullins, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Rod bundle burnout data from 30 steady-state and 3 transient tests were obtained from experiments performed in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The tests covered a parameter range relevant to intact core reactor accidents ranging from large break to small break loss-ofcoolant conditions. Instrumentation within the 64-rod test section indicated that burnout occurred over an axial range within the bundle. The distance from the point where the first dry rod was detected to the point where all rods were dry was up to 60 cm in some of the tests. The burnout data should prove useful in developing new correlations for use in reactor thermalhydraulic codes. Evaluation of several existing critical heat flux correlations using the data show that three correlations, the Barnett, Bowring, and Katto correlations, perform similarly and correlate the data better than the Biasi correlation

  2. Nuclear Matter Bulk Parameter Scales and Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, B. M.; Delfino, A.; Dutra, M.; Lourenço, O.

    2015-01-01

    We study the arising of correlations among some isovector bulk parameters in nonrelativistic and relativistic hadronic mean-field models. For the former, we investigate correlations in the nonrelativistic (NR) limit of relativistic point-coupling models. We provide analytical correlations, for the NR limit model, between the symmetry energy and its derivatives, namely, the symmetry energy slope, curvature, skewness and fourth order derivative, discussing the conditions in which they are linear ones. We also show that some correlations presented in the NR limit model are reproduced for relativistic models presenting cubic and quartic self-interactions in its scalar field. As a direct application of such linear correlations, we remark its association with possible crossing points in the density dependence of the linearly correlated bulk parameter. (author)

  3. Artificial intelligence approach to interwell log correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jong-Se [Korea Maritime University, Pusan(Korea); Kang, Joo Myung [Seoul National University, Seoul(Korea); Kim, Jung Whan [Korea National Oil Corp., Anyang(Korea)

    2000-04-30

    This paper describes a new approach to automated interwell log correlation using artificial intelligence and principal component analysis. The approach to correlate wire line logging data is on the basis of a large set of subjective rules that are intended to represent human logical processes. The data processed are mainly the qualitative information such as the characteristics of the shapes extracted along log traces. The apparent geologic zones are identified by pattern recognition for the specific characteristics of log trace collected as a set of objects by object oriented programming. The correlation of zones between wells is made by rule-based inference program. The reliable correlation can be established from the first principal component logs derived from both the important information around well bore and the largest common part of variances of all available well log data. Correlation with field log data shows that this approach can make interwell log correlation more reliable and accurate. (author). 6 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N c approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  5. Decoherence-induced transition from photon correlation to anti-correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q

    2014-01-01

    Decoherence tends to induce the quantum-to-classical transition, which leads to a crucial obstacle in the realization of reliable quantum information processing. Counterintuitively, we propose that the decoherence due to phase decay brings about the switch from photon correlation to anti-correlation. Stronger decoherence also gives rise to an enhancement of the transition from photon correlation to anti-correlation. This breaks the conventional correlation of strong decoherence with fast decorrelation. (letters)

  6. Quantum correlator outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Buss

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the quantum correlator in Schwarzschild black hole space–time. We perform the calculation for a scalar field in three different quantum states: Boulware, Unruh and Hartle–Hawking, and for points along a timelike circular geodesic. The results show that the correlator presents a global fourfold singularity structure, which is state-independent. Our results also show the different correlations in the three different quantum states arising in-between the singularities.

  7. Reliability of Structural Systems with Correlated Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1982-01-01

    Calculation of the probability of failure of a system with correlation members is usually a difficult and time-consuming numerical problem. However, for some types of systems with equally correlated elements this calculation can be performed in a simple way. This has suggested two new methods bas...... on so-called average and equivalent correlation coefficients. By using these methods approximate values for the probability of failure can easily be calculated. The accuracy of these methods is illustrated with examples....

  8. Hidden neuronal correlations in cultured networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, Ronen; Baruchi, Itay; Hulata, Eyal; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2004-01-01

    Utilization of a clustering algorithm on neuronal spatiotemporal correlation matrices recorded during a spontaneous activity of in vitro networks revealed the existence of hidden correlations: the sequence of synchronized bursting events (SBEs) is composed of statistically distinguishable subgroups each with its own distinct pattern of interneuron spatiotemporal correlations. These findings hint that each of the SBE subgroups can serve as a template for coding, storage, and retrieval of a specific information

  9. Hadron correlations from recombination and fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Rainer J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    We review the formalism of quark recombination applied to the hadronization of a quark-gluon plasma. Evidence in favour of the quark recombination model is outlined. Recent work on parton correlations, leading to detectable correlations between hadrons, is discussed. Hot spots from completely quenched jets are a likely source of such correlations which appear to be jet like. It will be discussed how such a picture compares with measurement of associated hadron yields at RHIC.

  10. Using nonlocal coherence to quantify quantum correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Pei; Wang, Wei; Li, Chong; Song, He-Shan

    2010-01-01

    We reexamine quantum correlation from the fundamental perspective of its consanguineous quantum property, the coherence. We emphasize the importance of specifying the tensor product structure of the total state space before discussing quantum correlation. A measure of quantum correlation for arbitrary dimension bipartite states using nonlocal coherence is proposed, and it can be easily generalized to the multipartite case. The quantification of non-entangled component within quantum correlati...

  11. Particle correlations in high-multiplicity reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayot, Fernand.

    1976-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the results obtained in the study of short range correlations in high-multiplicity events is presented: introduction of the fundamental short-range order hypothesis, introduction of clusters in nondiffractive events (only the production of identical, independent, and neutral clusters was considered); search for short range dynamical effects between particles coming from the decay of a same cluster by studying two-particle rapidity correlations in inclusive and semi-inclusive experiments; study of transverse momentum correlations [fr

  12. Strongly correlating liquids and their isomorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Gnan, Nicoletta; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schröder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the properties of strongly correlating liquids, i.e., liquids with strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations at constant volume. We proceed to focus on the experimental predictions for strongly correlating glass-forming liquids. These predictions include i) density scaling, ii) isochronal superposition, iii) that there is a single function from which all frequency-dependent viscoelastic response functions may be calculated, iv) that...

  13. Speckle pattern processing by digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubarev Fedor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing the method of speckle pattern processing based on the digital image correlation is carried out in the current work. Three the most widely used formulas of the correlation coefficient are tested. To determine the accuracy of the speckle pattern processing, test speckle patterns with known displacement are used. The optimal size of a speckle pattern template used for determination of correlation and corresponding the speckle pattern displacement is also considered in the work.

  14. The illusionist game and hidden correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brida, G; Degiovanni, I P; Genovese, M; Meda, A; Olivares, S; Paris, M

    2013-01-01

    We suggest and demonstrate a new protocol based on correlated beams of light: the ‘optical illusionist game’. An ‘illusionist’ at first shows that if two uncorrelated light beams excited in the same Gaussian state are mixed in a beam splitter, then no correlations arise between them, as it was not present. On the other hand, when correlations with an ancillary state are exploited, the presence of the beam splitter can be unveiled. (paper)

  15. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  16. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  17. Color correlations in parton jet decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, E.M.; Ryskin, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The pre-confinement effect is discussed. Colour correlations are calculated for the decays of parton jets with account for the coherence of the gluon interaction. It is shown that, in contrast to the results of previous works, the colour correlations between two gluons with a high pair mass can be appreciable. In any kinematical interval, however, the energy carried away be the particles correlated in the colour is always much less than the total energy carried away by the partons

  18. Spatial correlations in compressible granular flows

    OpenAIRE

    Van Noije, T. P. C.; Ernst, M. H.; Brito López, Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    The clustering instability in freely evolving granular fluids manifests itself in the density-density correlation function and structure factor. These functions are calculated from fluctuating hydrodynamics. As time increases, the structure factor of density fluctuations develops a maximum, which shifts to smaller wave numbers (growing correlation length). Furthermore, the inclusion of longitudinal velocity fluctuations changes long-range correlations in the flow field qualitatively and exten...

  19. Signal and noise in financial correlation matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Zdzisław; Jurkiewicz, Jerzy

    2004-12-01

    Using Random Matrix Theory one can derive exact relations between the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix and the eigenvalue spectrum of its estimator (experimentally measured correlation matrix). These relations will be used to analyze a particular case of the correlations in financial series and to show that contrary to earlier claims, correlations can be measured also in the “random” part of the spectrum. Implications for the portfolio optimization are briefly discussed.

  20. Random Correlation Matrix and De-Noising

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichi Mitsui; Yoshio Tabata

    2006-01-01

    In Finance, the modeling of a correlation matrix is one of the important problems. In particular, the correlation matrix obtained from market data has the noise. Here we apply the de-noising processing based on the wavelet analysis to the noisy correlation matrix, which is generated by a parametric function with random parameters. First of all, we show that two properties, i.e. symmetry and ones of all diagonal elements, of the correlation matrix preserve via the de-noising processing and the...

  1. The genetic correlation between procrastination and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehlin, John C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    The reported genetic correlation of 1.0 between the traits of procrastination and impulsivity (Gustavson, D. E., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. K., & Friedman, N. P. (2014). Psychological Science), which was held to support an evolutionary origin of the relationship between the two traits, was tested in data from two large samples of twins from Australia. A genetic correlation of 0.299 was obtained. It was concluded that, although the presence of a genetic correlation between the two traits was supported, the modest magnitude of the correlation was such as to be consistent with many possible hypotheses, evolutionary and otherwise, about causal relationships between the traits in question.

  2. Energy flux correlations and moving mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    We study the quantum stress tensor correlation function for a massless scalar field in a flat two-dimensional spacetime containing a moving mirror. We construct the correlation functions for right-moving and left-moving fluxes for an arbitrary trajectory, and then specialize them to the case of a mirror trajectory for which the expectation value of the stress tensor describes a pair of delta-function pulses, one of negative energy and one of positive energy. The flux correlation function describes the fluctuations around this mean stress tensor, and reveals subtle changes in the correlations between regions where the mean flux vanishes

  3. Burst firing enhances neural output correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Ka eChan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons communicate and transmit information predominantly through spikes. Given that experimentally observed neural spike trains in a variety of brain areas can be highly correlated, it is important to investigate how neurons process correlated inputs. Most previous work in this area studied the problem of correlation transfer analytically by making significant simplifications on neural dynamics. Temporal correlation between inputs that arises from synaptic filtering, for instance, is often ignored when assuming that an input spike can at most generate one output spike. Through numerical simulations of a pair of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF neurons receiving correlated inputs, we demonstrate that neurons in the presence of synaptic filtering by slow synapses exhibit strong output correlations. We then show that burst firing plays a central role in enhancing output correlations, which can explain the above-mentioned observation because synaptic filtering induces bursting. The observed changes of correlations are mostly on a long time scale. Our results suggest that other features affecting the prevalence of neural burst firing in biological neurons, e.g., adaptive spiking mechanisms, may play an important role in modulating the overall level of correlations in neural networks.

  4. H3+-WZNW correlators from Liouville theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribault, Sylvain; Teschner, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    We prove that arbitrary correlation functions of the H 3 + -WZNW model on a sphere have a simple expression in terms of Liouville theory correlation functions. This is based on the correspondence between the KZ and BPZ equations, and on relations between the structure constants of Liouville theory and the H 3 + -WZNW model. In the critical level limit, these results imply a direct link between eigenvectors of the Gaudin hamiltonians and the problem of uniformization of Riemann surfaces. We also present an expression for correlation functions of the SL(2)/U(1) gauged WZNW model in terms of correlation functions in Liouville theory

  5. High precision studies of directional correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-khosht, M.

    1980-01-01

    Two applications of the method of directional correlations are described. The first part deals with gamma-gamma directional correlations measurements. A total of 27 cascades have been studied in 97 Tc, 206 Pb and 206 Bi. Information is obtained on the angular momenta of levels, multipolarities of electromagnetic transitions and further, reduced transition probabilities. The later part of this thesis describes a determination of anisotropic directional correlation between gamma-rays and LX-rays in 160 Dy. To the authors' knowledge this is the first observation of an anisotropic correlation between gamma rays and X-rays following internal conversion. (Auth.)

  6. Learning to Play Efficient Coarse Correlated Equilibria

    KAUST Repository

    Borowski, Holly P.

    2018-03-10

    The majority of the distributed learning literature focuses on convergence to Nash equilibria. Coarse correlated equilibria, on the other hand, can often characterize more efficient collective behavior than even the best Nash equilibrium. However, there are no existing distributed learning algorithms that converge to specific coarse correlated equilibria. In this paper, we provide one such algorithm, which guarantees that the agents’ collective joint strategy will constitute an efficient coarse correlated equilibrium with high probability. The key to attaining efficient correlated behavior through distributed learning involves incorporating a common random signal into the learning environment.

  7. Parallel auto-correlative statistics with VTK.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Bennett, Janine Camille

    2013-08-01

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK and presents both the serial and parallel auto-correlative statistics engines. It is a sequel to [PT08, BPRT09b, PT09, BPT09, PT10] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, principal component analysis, contingency, k-means, and order statistics engines. The ease of use of the new parallel auto-correlative statistics engine is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets and algorithm verification is provided. This report justifies the design of the statistics engines with parallel scalability in mind, and provides scalability and speed-up analysis results for the autocorrelative statistics engine.

  8. Response of spiking neurons to correlated inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Ruben; Rocha, Jaime de la; Renart, Alfonso; Parga, Nestor

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a temporally correlated afferent current on the firing rate of a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron is studied. This current is characterized in terms of rates, autocorrelations, and cross correlations, and correlation time scale τ c of excitatory and inhibitory inputs. The output rate ν out is calculated in the Fokker-Planck formalism in the limit of both small and large τ c compared to the membrane time constant τ of the neuron. By simulations we check the analytical results, provide an interpolation valid for all τ c , and study the neuron's response to rapid changes in the correlation magnitude

  9. Ascertaining the uncertainty relations via quantum correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun-Li; Du, Kun; Qiao, Cong-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new scheme to express the uncertainty principle in the form of inequality of the bipartite correlation functions for a given multipartite state, which provides an experimentally feasible and model-independent way to verify various uncertainty and measurement disturbance relations. By virtue of this scheme, the implementation of experimental measurement on the measurement disturbance relation to a variety of physical systems becomes practical. The inequality in turn, also imposes a constraint on the strength of correlation, i.e. it determines the maximum value of the correlation function for two-body system and a monogamy relation of the bipartite correlation functions for multipartite system. (paper)

  10. Rank reduction of correlation matrices by majorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pietersz (Raoul); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper a novel method is developed for the problem of finding a low-rank correlation matrix nearest to a given correlation matrix. The method is based on majorization and therefore it is globally convergent. The method is computationally efficient, is straightforward to implement,

  11. WHEN THE DISTURBANCES ARE SPATIALLY CORRELATED

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    correlation, spatial error process. INTRODUCTION. Consider the linear regression model for spatial correlation y=XB +u, u=Ce, (1) where y is a Txl observable random vector, X is a Txk matrix of known constants with full column rank k, B is a k xl vector of unknown parameters,. :2 is a Txl random vector with expectation zero ...

  12. Correlations of plasticity in sheared glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varnik, F.; Mandal, S.; Chikkadi, V.; Denisov, D.; Olsson, P.; Vågberg, D.; Raabe, D.; Schall, P.

    2014-01-01

    n a recent paper [Mandal et al., Phys. Rev. E 88, 022129 (2013)], the nature of spatial correlations of plasticity in hard-sphere glasses was addressed both via computer simulations and in experiments. It was found that the experimentally obtained correlations obey a power law, whereas the

  13. Physical correlation effects in the lattice gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murch, G.E.; Thorn, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The circumstances of the existence of the physical correlation factor in the Nernst--Einstein relation are discussed. Use is then made of the linear phenomenological equations of irreversible thermodynamics to show that the physical correlation factor must also be present in the Darken equation. Computer simulation results in the nearest neighbor interacting lattice gas are then presented to verify this finding

  14. Stochastic GARCH dynamics describing correlations between stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat-Ortega, G.; Savel'ev, S. E.

    2014-09-01

    The ARCH and GARCH processes have been successfully used for modelling price dynamics such as stock returns or foreign exchange rates. Analysing the long range correlations between stocks, we propose a model, based on the GARCH process, which is able to describe the main characteristics of the stock price correlations, including the mean, variance, probability density distribution and the noise spectrum.

  15. Microwave Correlation Measurement Crossed-pair Antennas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We propose here new processes, an add and square correlation radiometer and the non-resonant perturbation, which thoroughly investigated for different muscle phantom materials to define the optimum penetration depth of the electromagnetic field at fixed distance between the antennas. Keywords: Microwave correlation ...

  16. Correlations and fluctuations '98. Collected abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csoergoe, T.; Hegyi, S.; Hwa, R.C.; Jancso, G.

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings of the 8. International workshop on multiparticle production contains the abstracts of papers on various topics of correlations and fluctuations. Hydrodynamic models, Bose-Einstein correlations, hadron-hadron interactions, heavy ion reactions are discussed in detail. 54 items are indexed separately for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  17. Quantum entanglement and teleportation using statistical correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. A study of quantum teleportation using two and three-particle correlated density matrix is presented. A criterion based on standard quantum statistical correlations employed in the many-body virial expansion is used to determine the extent of entanglement for a 2N-particle system. A relation between the probability ...

  18. Relativistic quantum correlations in bipartite fermionic states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The influences of relative motion, the size of the wave packet and the average momentum of the particles on different types of correlations present in bipartite quantum states are investigated. In particular, the dynamics of the quantum mutual information, the classical correlation and the quantum discord on the ...

  19. Intershell correlations in photoionization of outer shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya. [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Chernysheva, L.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Drukarev, E.G. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate that the cross sections for photoionization of the outer shells are noticeably modified at the photon energies close to the thresholds of ionization of the inner shells due to correlations with the latter. The correlations may lead to increase or to decrease of the cross sections just above the ionization thresholds.

  20. Correlation anlaysis of plasma fluctuation signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Baonian; Wang Zhaoshen

    1987-01-01

    The application of correlation analysis to identify waves and instabilities in plasma is presented. First, the principle of correlation analysis and its application to diagnose plasma fluctuation signals are given. Then, the data acqusition system, application program and calibration method are described. Finally, experimental results from a mirror device are given

  1. Monopole correlations in holographically flavored liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, N.

    2015-01-01

    Many-body systems with a conserved U(1) current in (2+1) dimensions may be probed by weakly gauging this current and studying correlation functions of magnetic monopole operators in the resulting dynamical gauge theory. We study such monopole correlations in holographic liquids with fundamental

  2. correlation between maximum dry density and cohesion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    represents maximum dry density, signifies plastic limit and is liquid limit. Researchers [6, 7] estimate compaction parameters. Aside from the correlation existing between compaction parameters and other physical quantities there are some other correlations that have been investigated by other researchers. The well-known.

  3. Building Correlators with Many-Core Hardware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwpoort, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    Radio telescopes typically consist of multiple receivers whose signals are cross-correlated to filter out noise. A recent trend is to correlate in software instead of custom-built hardware, taking advantage of the flexibility that software solutions offer. Examples include e-VLBI and LOFAR. However,

  4. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, D [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Strongly correlated fermions are investigated. An understanding of strongly correlated fermions underpins a diverse range of phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions, high-temperature superconductivity, magnetic impurity problems and the properties of heavy-fermion systems, in all of which local moments play an important role. (author).

  5. On the insignificance of Herschel's sunspot correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2013-08-01

    We examine William Herschel's hypothesis that solar-cycle variation of the Sun's irradiance has a modulating effect on the Earth's climate and that this is, specifically, manifested as an anticorrelation between sunspot number and the market price of wheat. Since Herschel first proposed his hypothesis in 1801, it has been regarded with both interest and skepticism. Recently, reports have been published that either support Herschel's hypothesis or rely on its validity. As a test of Herschel's hypothesis, we seek to reject a null hypothesis of a statistically random correlation between historical sunspot numbers, wheat prices in London and the United States, and wheat farm yields in the United States. We employ binary-correlation, Pearson-correlation, and frequency-domain methods. We test our methods using a historical geomagnetic activity index, well known to be causally correlated with sunspot number. As expected, the measured correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity would be an unlikely realization of random data; the correlation is "statistically significant." On the other hand, measured correlations between sunspot number and wheat price and wheat yield data would be very likely realizations of random data; these correlations are "insignificant." Therefore, Herschel's hypothesis must be regarded with skepticism. We compare and contrast our results with those of other researchers. We discuss procedures for evaluating hypotheses that are formulated from historical data.

  6. Intershell correlations in photoionization of outer shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Chernysheva, L.V.; Drukarev, E.G.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the cross sections for photoionization of the outer shells are noticeably modified at the photon energies close to the thresholds of ionization of the inner shells due to correlations with the latter. The correlations may lead to increase or to decrease of the cross sections just above the ionization thresholds.

  7. The Bonn Astro/Geo Correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhart, Simone; Alef, Walter; Bertarini, Alessandra; La Porta, Laura; Muskens, Arno; Rottmann, Helge; Roy, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Bonn Distributed FX (DiFX) correlator is a software correlator operated jointly by the Max- Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie (MPIfR), the Institut fur Geodasie und Geoinformation der Universitat Bonn (IGG), and the Bundesamt fur Kartographie und Geodasie (BKG) in Frankfurt.

  8. Alternatives to Pearson's and Spearman's Correlation Coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2008-01-01

    This article presents several alternatives to Pearson's correlation coefficient and many examples. In the samples where the rank in a discrete variable counts more than the variable values, the mixtures that we propose of Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients give better results.

  9. Mimicking anti-correlations with classical interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, S; Seifert, B; Wallentowitz, S

    2013-01-01

    It is shown how classical laser light impinging on a beam splitter with internal reflections may mimic anti-correlations of the detected outputs, similar to those observed for anti-bunched light. The experimentally observed anti-correlation may be interpreted as a classical Hong–Ou–Mandel dip. (paper)

  10. Intelligence and Semen Quality Are Positively Correlated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, Rosalind; Gottfredson, Linda S.; Miller, Geoffrey; Pierce, Arand

    2009-01-01

    Human cognitive abilities inter-correlate to form a positive matrix, from which a large first factor, called "Spearman's g" or general intelligence, can be extracted. General intelligence itself is correlated with many important health outcomes including cardio-vascular function and longevity. However, the important evolutionary question of…

  11. General Correlation Theorem for Trinion Fourier Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Bahri, Mawardi

    2017-01-01

    - The trinion Fourier transform is an extension of the Fourier transform in the trinion numbers setting. In this work we derive the correlation theorem for the trinion Fourier transform by using the relation between trinion convolution and correlation definitions in the trinion Fourier transform domains.

  12. Structural Analysis of Covariance and Correlation Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joreskog, Karl G.

    1978-01-01

    A general approach to analysis of covariance structures is considered, in which the variances and covariances or correlations of the observed variables are directly expressed in terms of the parameters of interest. The statistical problems of identification, estimation and testing of such covariance or correlation structures are discussed.…

  13. Correlation Evaluation on Small LTE Handsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of the first MIMO handset on the market. It investigates the correlation coefficient computed from coaxial cable measurements and from optical fiber measurements. The results are compared and discussed. The question of the actual feasibility of low correlation...... for the LTE-700 band in small terminals is raised....

  14. Form factor expansion for thermal correlators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozsgay, B.; Takács, G.

    2010-01-01

    We consider finite temperature correlation functions in massive integrable quantum field theory. Using a regularization by putting the system in finite volume, we develop a novel approach (based on multi-dimensional residues) to the form factor expansion for thermal correlators. The first few terms

  15. Reassessment of the nonlocality of correlation boxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A.P.; Parisio, Fernando, E-mail: parisio@df.ufpe.br

    2017-01-15

    Correlation boxes are hypothetical systems usually designed to produce the maximal algebraic violation of a Bell inequality, beyond the quantum bound and without superluminal signalling. The fact that these systems show stronger correlations than those presented by maximally entangled quantum states, as the spin singlet, has been regarded as a demonstration that the former are more nonlocal than the latter. By applying an alternative, consistent measure of nonlocality to a family of correlation boxes, we show that this conclusion is not necessarily true. Complementarily, we define a class of systems displaying subquantum correlations which, nevertheless, are more nonlocal than the singlet state, showing that the extent of the numeric violation of an inequality may have little to do with the degree of nonlocality, especially in the case of correlation boxes.

  16. Phase coherence induced by correlated disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyunsuk; O'Keeffe, Kevin P; Strogatz, Steven H

    2016-02-01

    We consider a mean-field model of coupled phase oscillators with quenched disorder in the coupling strengths and natural frequencies. When these two kinds of disorder are uncorrelated (and when the positive and negative couplings are equal in number and strength), it is known that phase coherence cannot occur and synchronization is absent. Here we explore the effects of correlating the disorder. Specifically, we assume that any given oscillator either attracts or repels all the others, and that the sign of the interaction is deterministically correlated with the given oscillator's natural frequency. For symmetrically correlated disorder with zero mean, we find that the system spontaneously synchronizes, once the width of the frequency distribution falls below a critical value. For asymmetrically correlated disorder, the model displays coherent traveling waves: the complex order parameter becomes nonzero and rotates with constant frequency different from the system's mean natural frequency. Thus, in both cases, correlated disorder can trigger phase coherence.

  17. Graph-theoretic approach to quantum correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Adán; Severini, Simone; Winter, Andreas

    2014-01-31

    Correlations in Bell and noncontextuality inequalities can be expressed as a positive linear combination of probabilities of events. Exclusive events can be represented as adjacent vertices of a graph, so correlations can be associated to a subgraph. We show that the maximum value of the correlations for classical, quantum, and more general theories is the independence number, the Lovász number, and the fractional packing number of this subgraph, respectively. We also show that, for any graph, there is always a correlation experiment such that the set of quantum probabilities is exactly the Grötschel-Lovász-Schrijver theta body. This identifies these combinatorial notions as fundamental physical objects and provides a method for singling out experiments with quantum correlations on demand.

  18. Quantum correlations in connected multipartite Bell experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Bell experiments measure correlations between outcomes of a number of observers measuring on a shared physical state emitted from a single source. Quantum correlations arising in such Bell experiments have been intensively studied over the last decades. Much less is known about the nature of quantum correlations arising in network structures beyond Bell experiments. Such networks can involve many independent sources emitting states to observers in accordance with the network configuration. Here, we will study classical and quantum correlations in a family of networks which can be regarded as compositions of several independent multipartite Bell experiments connected together through a central node. For such networks we present tight Bell-type inequalities which are satisfied by all classical correlations. We study properties of the violations of our inequalities by probability distributions arising in quantum theory. (paper)

  19. Correlation of iris biometrics and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Stine; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2013-01-01

    The presented work concerns prediction of complex human phenotypes from genotypes. We were interested in correlating iris color and texture with DNA. Our data consist of 212 eye images along with DNA: 32 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We used two types of biometrics to describe the eye...... images: One for iris color and one for iris texture. Both biometrics were high dimensional and a sparse principle component analysis (SPCA) reduced the dimensions and resulted in a representation of data with good interpretability. The correlations between the sparse principal components (SPCs......) and the 32 SNPs were found using a canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The result was a single significant canonical correlation (CC) for both biometrics. Each CC comprised two correlated canonical variables, consisting of a linear combination of SPCs and a linear combination of SNPs, respectively...

  20. Quantum Correlations in Nonlocal Boson Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahandeh, Farid; Lund, Austin P; Ralph, Timothy C

    2017-09-22

    Determination of the quantum nature of correlations between two spatially separated systems plays a crucial role in quantum information science. Of particular interest is the questions of if and how these correlations enable quantum information protocols to be more powerful. Here, we report on a distributed quantum computation protocol in which the input and output quantum states are considered to be classically correlated in quantum informatics. Nevertheless, we show that the correlations between the outcomes of the measurements on the output state cannot be efficiently simulated using classical algorithms. Crucially, at the same time, local measurement outcomes can be efficiently simulated on classical computers. We show that the only known classicality criterion violated by the input and output states in our protocol is the one used in quantum optics, namely, phase-space nonclassicality. As a result, we argue that the global phase-space nonclassicality inherent within the output state of our protocol represents true quantum correlations.