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Sample records for correlations 31ar deduced

  1. The {beta}2p decay mechanism of {sup 31}Ar[23.40.Hc; 27.30.+t; Radioactivity 31Ar({beta}+p) [from Ca(p,3pxn) reaction]; Measured {beta}-delayed protons Ep, E2p; pp energy and angular correlations; 31Ar deduced {beta}1p and {beta}2p decay channels; 30S, 31Cl deduced levels, T, {pi}, branching ratios; CaO target; On-line mass separation; Double sided Si strip detector; Si p-i-n detectors; Surface barrier Si detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fynbo, H.O.U.; Borge, M.J.G.; Axelsson, L.; Aeystoe, J.; Bergmann, U.C.; Fraile, L.M.; Honkanen, A.; Hornshoej, P.; Jading, Y.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Martel, I.; Mukha, I.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Oinonen, M.; Piqueras, I.; Riisager, K.; Siiskonen, T.; Smedberg, M.H.; Tengblad, O.; Thaysen, J.; Wenander, F

    2000-09-11

    We have measured the beta-decay of {sup 31}Ar with a high granularity setup sensitive to multiparticle decay branches. Two-proton emission is observed from the isobaric analog state in {sup 31}Cl to the four lowest states in {sup 29}P and furthermore from a large number of states fed in Gamow-Teller transitions. The mechanism of two-proton emission is studied via energy and angular correlations between the two protons. In all cases the mechanism is found to be sequential yielding information about states in {sup 30}S up to 8 MeV excitation energy. Improved data on the {beta}-delayed one-proton branches together with the two-proton data provide precise information about the beta-strength distribution up to 15 MeV excitation energy.

  2. Multi-particle emission in the decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Koldste, G T; Borge, M.J.G.; Briz, J.A.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Fraile, L.M.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grann, B.D.; Johansen, J.G.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Kurturkian-Nieto, T.; Kusk, J.H.; Nilsson, T.; Perea, A.; Pesudo, V.; Picado, E.; Riisager, K.; Saastamoinen, A.; Tengblad, O.; Thomas, J.C.; Van de Walle, J.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-hit capacity setup was used to study the decay of the dripline nucleus 31Ar, produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. A spectroscopic analysis of the beta-delayed three-proton decay of 31Ar is presented for the first time together with a quantitative analysis of the beta-delayed two-proton-gamma-decay. A new method for determination of the spin of low-lying levels in the beta-proton-daughter 30S using proton-proton angular correlations is presented and used for the level at 5.2 MeV, which is found to be either a 3+ or 4+ level, with the data pointing towards the 3+. The half-life of 31Ar is found to be 15.1(3) ms. An improved analysis of the Fermi beta-strength gives a total measured branching for the beta-3p-decay of 3.60(44) %, which is lower than the theoretical value found to be 4.24(43) %. Finally the strongest gamma-transitions in the decay of 33Ar are shown including a line at 4734(3) keV associated to the decay of the IAS, which has not previously been identified.

  3. Multi-particle Emission from ${^{31}}$Ar at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Marroquin, I; Ciemny, A A; de Witte, H; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Garzón-Camacho, A; Howard, A; Johansson, H; Jonson, B; Kirsebom, O S; Koldste, G T; Lica, R; Lund, M V; Madurga, M; Mazzocchi, C; Mihai, C; Munch, M; Nae, S A; Nacher, E; Negret, A; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Refsgaard, J; Riisager, K; Rapisarda, E; Sotty, C; Stanoiu, M; Tengblad, O; Turturica, A E; Vedia, M V

    2016-01-01

    A multi-particle decay experiment was successfully performed at the ISOLDE Decay Station. In this new permanent station, devoted to\\break $\\beta$-decay studies, the novel MAGISOL Si-Plugin Chamber was installed to study the exotic decay modes of the proton drip-line nucleus ${^{31}}$Ar. The motivation was to search for $\\beta3p$ and $\\beta3p\\gamma$ channels, as well as to provide information on resonances in ${^{30}}$S and ${^{29}}$P relevant for the astrophysical\\break rp-process. Description of the experimental set-up and preliminary results are presented.

  4. β-delayed Multi-particle Emission From 31Ar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. A. Ciemny; J. Du´enas-Daz; V. Dunin; J. M. Espino; A. Estrade; F. Farinon; A. Fomichev; H. Geisse; A. Gorshkov; G. Kami´nski; O. Kiselev; C. Mazzocchi; R. Kn¨obe; S. Krupko; M. Kuich; Yu. A. Litvinov; G. Marquinez-Dur´an; I. Martel; I. Mukha; C. Nociforo; A. K. Ord´uz; S. Pietri; W. Dominik; A. Prochazka; A. M. S´anchez-Ben´ıtez; H. Simon; B. Sitar; R. Slepnev; M. Stanoiu; P. Strmen; I. Szarka; M. Takechi; Y. Tanaka; Z. Janas; H. Weick; J. S. Winfield; M. Pf¨utzner; M. Pomorski; L. Acosta; S. Baraeva; E. Casarejos

    2016-01-01

    The β+ decay of 31Ar was investigated in an experiment at the GSI-FRS spectrometer. The ions of interest have been produced in the fragmentation of a 36Ar beam at 880 MeV/nucleon and implanted in a time projection chamber with optical readout. In addition to β-delayed one and two proton emission, for the first time the emission ofβ-delayed 3 protons has been observed. The branching ratio for this decay mode is found to be (0.07 ± 0.02)%.

  5. Direct oxidation of methyl radicals in OCM process deduced from correlation of product selectivities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Gao; Yuanyuan Ma

    2010-01-01

    Selectivity of hydrogen in reaction of oxidative coupling of methane(OCM)was evaluated over the MxOy-BaCO3(MxOy: La2O3,Sm2O3,MgO,CaO)catalysts.Correlation of product selectivities was thus discussed.From the correlation of product selectivities,it is revealed that the carbon oxides(CO and CO2)were most probably formed from the direct oxidation of methyl radicals under the conditions adopted in the present work.This is also in accordance with the OCM mechanism proposed in literature.

  6. Proton dripline studies at ISOLDE: {sup 31}Ar and {sup 9}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borge, M.J.G.; Fraile, L.M.; Tengblad, O.; Bergmann, U.O.C.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Mukha, I.; Riisager, K.; Axelsson, L.; Jonson, B.; Nyman, G.; Markenroth, K.; Aeystoe, J.; Honkanen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Oinonen, M.; Jading, Y.; Martel, I.; Nilsson, T.; Wenander, F

    2002-04-22

    In this contribution examples of the application of new technologies to disentangle the mechanism of beta-delayed multiparticle emission are given. In particular the mechanism of {beta}-delayed two-proton emission from {sup 31}Ar has been resolved and proved to be sequential, a preview of {sup 9}C-decay data is discussed.

  7. Sizeable beta-strength in {sup 31}Ar (β3p) decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koldste, G.T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Blank, B. [Centre d' Études Nucléaire de Bordeaux-Gradignan, CNRS/IN2P3 – Université Bordeaux I, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Borge, M.J.G.; Briz, J.A.; Carmona-Gallardo, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Fraile, L.M. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, CEI Moncloa, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Fynbo, H.O.U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Giovinazzo, J. [Centre d' Études Nucléaire de Bordeaux-Gradignan, CNRS/IN2P3 – Université Bordeaux I, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Johansen, J.G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Jokinen, A. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40351 Jyväskylä (Finland); Jonson, B. [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Kurturkian-Nieto, T. [Centre d' Études Nucléaire de Bordeaux-Gradignan, CNRS/IN2P3 – Université Bordeaux I, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Nilsson, T. [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Perea, A.; Pesudo, V. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2014-10-07

    We present for the first time precise spectroscopic information on the recently discovered decay mode β-delayed 3p-emission. The detection of the 3p events gives an increased sensitivity to the high energy part of the Gamow–Teller strength distribution from the decay of {sup 31}Ar revealing that as much as 30% of the strength resides in the β3p-decay mode. A simplified description of how the main decay modes evolve as the excitation energy increases in {sup 31}Cl is provided.

  8. $\\beta$3$p$-spectroscopy and proton-$\\gamma$ width determination in the decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to perform a detailed study of the $\\beta$-decay of the dripline nucleus $^{31}$Ar. This will allow a detailed study of the $\\beta$-delayed 3$p$-decay as well as provide important information on the resonances of $^{30}$S and $^{29}$P, in particular the ratio between the $p$- and $\\gamma$- partial widths relevant for astrophysics.

  9. Studies of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission : The cases of $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca

    CERN Multimedia

    Riisager, K; Jokinen, A; Canchel, G; Heinz, A M; Jonson, B N G; Dominguez reyes, R R; Koldste, G T; Fraile prieto, L M; Nilsson, T; Audirac, L L

    2008-01-01

    We propose to perform detailed studies of the decays of the two dripline nuclei $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca. This will allow an in-depth study in the process of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission ($\\beta$2p); as well as provide important information on resonances in $^{30}$S and $^{34}$Ar relevant for the astrophysical rp-process.

  10. Proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths of astrophysically important states of $^{30}$S studied by the $\\beta$-delayed decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Koldste, G T; Borge, M J G; Briz, J A; Carmona-Gallardo, M; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Giovinazzo, J; Johansen, J G; Jokinen, A; Jonson, B; Kurturkian-Nieto, T; Kusk, J H; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Picado, E; Riisager, K; Saastamoinen, A; Tengblad, O; Thomas, J -C; Van de Walle, J

    2013-01-01

    Resonances just above the proton threshold in $^{30}$S affect the $^{29}$P$(p,\\gamma)^{30}$S reaction under astrophysical conditions. The ($p,\\gamma$)-reaction rate is currently determined indirectly and depends on the properties of the relevant resonances. We present here a method for finding the ratio between the proton- and $\\gamma$- partial widths of resonances in $^{30}$S. The widths are determined from the $\\beta -2p$ and $\\beta -p-\\gamma$-decay of $^{31}$Ar, which is produced at ISOLDE, CERN. Experimental limits on the ratio between the proton- and $\\gamma$- partial widths for astrophysical relevant levels in $^{30}$S have been found for the first time. A level at 4689.2(24)keV is identified in the $\\gamma$-spectrum, and an upper limit on the $\\Gamma_{p}/\\Gamma_{\\gamma}$ ratio of 0.26 (95% C.L.) is found. In the two-proton spectrum two levels at 5227(3)keV and 5847(4)keV are identified. These levels were previously seen to $\\gamma$-decay and upper limits on the $\\Gamma_{\\gamma}/\\Gamma_{p}$ ratio of 0.5...

  11. Decay studies of nuclei near the proton drip line: /sup 35/Ca, /sup 31/Ar, /sup 69/Br, /sup 65/As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiff, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    Studies of new beta-delayed two-proton emitters and a search for ground state proton radioactivity in medium mass nuclei were performed using various experimental techniques in conjunction with several detection systems. A helium-jet transport system and three-element silicon telescopes were used to discover the existence and detect the decay of the first T/sub Z/ = /minus/5/2 nuclide, /sup 35/Ca. Two-proton emission from the T = 5/2 isobaric analog state in /sup 35/K at an excitation energy of 9.053 /plus minus/ 0.045 MeV, fed by the superallowed beta decay of /sup 35/Ca, resulted in transitions to both the ground state and first excited state of /sup 33/Cl. The corresponding two-proton sum energies were 4.089 /plus minus/ 0.030 MeV and 3.287 /plus minus/ 0.030 MeV. Measurements of the individual proton energies indicated the prevalence of a sequential decay mechanism. Using the isobaric multiplet mass equation, the mass excess of /sup 35/Ca was calculated to be 4.453 /plus minus/ 0.060 MeV. In order to study whose half-lives were too short for the helium-jet system, an in-beam recoil catcher wheel was constructed. The wheel speed can be varied to study nuclides whose half-lives range from 100 /mu/s to /approximately/250 ms. The first new decay observed with the wheel system and traditional /Delta/E-E telescopes was the beta-delayed two-proton emission from /sup 31/Ar. The two-proton sum energy of /approximately/7.5 MeV corresponds to a transition from the isobaric analog state in /sup 31/Cl to the ground state of /sup 29/P. The search for proton radioactivity required the development of low energy, particle identification detector telescopes. These telescopes, comprised of a gas /Delta/E and silicon E, were used in conjunction with the in-beam recoil catcher wheel to search for ground state proton emission from /sup 69/Br and /sup 65/As. 90 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Molecular cloning of a beta-glucan pattern-recognition lipoprotein from the white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei: correlations between the deduced amino acid sequence and the native protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Figueroa, María Gabriela; Vargas-Requena, Claudia; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Vargas-Albores, Francisco; Higuera-Ciapara, Inocencio; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2004-06-01

    The hemolymph pattern-recognition beta-glucan binding protein from the white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei is also a high density lipoprotein (betaGBP-HDL) involved in innate immunity. The betaGBP-HDL full length cDNA sequence determined was 6.3 kb long, and contains a long 3'UTR region with a polyadenylation signal and a poly-A+ tail. The open reading frame is 1454 amino acids long and the N-terminal residue of the mature protein is localized in position 198 of the ORF. Comparison of the betaGBP-HDL amino acid sequence against GenBank detected only significant similarity to betaGBP from the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. betaGBP-HDL is expressed in hepatopancreas, muscle, pleopods and gills, but not in hemocytes as determined by RT-PCR. We discuss the analysis of the deduced primary sequence in terms of the predicted secondary structure, glucanase-like and RGD motives relevant to its dual roles in defence and lipid transport.

  13. Applying generalized non deducibility on compositions (GNDC) approach in dependability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnesi, Stefania; Lenzini, Gabriele; Martinelli, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a framework where dependable systems can be uniformly modeled and dependable properties analyzed within the Generalized Non Deducibility on Compositions (GNDC), a scheme that has been profitably used in definition and analysis of security properties. Precisely, our framework requ

  14. Deducing Energy Consumer Behavior from Smart Meter Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebeid, Emad Samuel Malki; Heick, Rune; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg

    2017-01-01

    The ongoing upgrade of electricity meters to smart ones has opened a new market of intelligent services to analyze the recorded meter data. This paper introduces an open architecture and a unified framework for deducing user behavior from its smart main electricity meter data and presenting...

  15. A new evolutionary theory deduced mathematically from entropy amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new evolutionary theory which is able to unite the present evolutionary debates is deduced mathematically from the principle of entropy amplification.It suggests that the extensive evolution is driven by the amplification of entropy,or microscopic diversity,and the biological evolution is driven by the amplification of biodiversity.Forming high hierarchies is the most important way for the amplification and brings out spontaneously three kinds of selection.This theory has some positive cultural meanings.

  16. Photon strength function deduced from photon scattering and neutron capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matic A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The dipole strength function of 78Se and 196Pt are investigated by two different experimental methods, capture of cold neutrons in 77Se and 195Pt and photon scattering experiments on 78Se and 196Pt. Considering the different ways of excitation, the strength function deduced from the results are expected to agree. The report shows the status of the data analysis and presents first preliminary results.

  17. Deducing fast electron density changes in randomly orientated uncrystallized biomolecules in a pump–probe experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, K.; Schwander, P.; Schmidt, M.; Saldin, D. K.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method for deducing time-resolved structural changes in uncrystallized biomolecules in solution. The method relies on measuring the angular correlations of the intensities, when averaged over a large number of diffraction patterns from randomly oriented biomolecules in solution in a liquid solvent. The experiment is somewhat like a pump–probe version of an experiment on small angle X-ray scattering, except that the data expected by the algorithm are not just the radial variation of the averaged intensities. The differences of these correlation functions as measured from a photoexcited and dark structure enable the direct calculation of the difference electron density with a knowledge of only the dark structure. We exploit a linear relation we derive between the difference in these correlation functions and the difference electron density, applicable for small structural changes. PMID:24914159

  18. Deducing fast electron density changes in randomly orientated uncrystallized biomolecules in a pump-probe experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, K; Schwander, P; Schmidt, M; Saldin, D K

    2014-07-17

    We propose a method for deducing time-resolved structural changes in uncrystallized biomolecules in solution. The method relies on measuring the angular correlations of the intensities, when averaged over a large number of diffraction patterns from randomly oriented biomolecules in solution in a liquid solvent. The experiment is somewhat like a pump-probe version of an experiment on small angle X-ray scattering, except that the data expected by the algorithm are not just the radial variation of the averaged intensities. The differences of these correlation functions as measured from a photoexcited and dark structure enable the direct calculation of the difference electron density with a knowledge of only the dark structure. We exploit a linear relation we derive between the difference in these correlation functions and the difference electron density, applicable for small structural changes.

  19. Asteroid Sufaces/Regoliths Deduced by Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, S.

    Resolved imagery on a small number of asteroids provides information about the size, density and surface relief from which inferences may be made regarding their regoliths; Eros Eros is the best studied asteroid in this regard However, remote sensing is necessary to deduce properties for the large majority of objects. These techniques include: spectroscopy and multi-spectral band photometry, which provide clues as to the chemical composition of the surface, infrared (plus visible) radiometry, from which physical bulk and surface properties may be inferred through the derived albedo and thermal inertia, and radar, which permits one to deduce the near surface bulk density. This article reviews what these techniques have revealed about the surface characteristics of asteroids. Asteroids have been classified by the broad emissive properties of the surface as indicated by filter band photometry. Recently, observations from large scale surveys - 2MASS (Denis to a lesser extent) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - provided taxonomic classifications for thousands of asteroids. The mineralogy is more secure at higher spectral resolution. Silicates on the surface of asteroids have been inferred from IRAS, ISO and Kuiper Airborne infrared spectra. Infrared radiometry has been used to derive the albedos and diameters of ~2300 asteroids observed by IRAS and MSX. The simplified Standard Thermal Model (STM) works well for main belt asteroids. The model assumes that the asteroid does not rotate and is in instantaneous thermal equilibrium between absorbed sunlight and emitted radiation. Empirical factors for flux enhancement (beaming) and phase function are adopted. There is a dichotomy between large and small asteroids in this database. About 20% of the asteroids with diameters inertia, rotation rate, orientation of the rotation pole, surface roughness and degree of cratering. A complex model is required to account for all the variables. Such a model was developed using full

  20. Development of Deduced Protein Database Using Variable Bit Binary Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Parvathavarthini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of biological data is semi-structured and stored in any one the following file formats such as flat, XML and relational files. These databases must be integrated with the structured data available in relational or object-oriented databases. The sequence matching process is difficult in such file format, because string comparison takes more computation cost and time. To reduce the memory storage size of amino acid sequence in protein database, a novel probability-based variable bit length encoding technique has been introduced. The number of mapping of triplet CODON for every amino acid evaluates the probability value. Then, a binary tree has been constructed to assign unique bits of binary codes to each amino acid. This derived unique bit pattern of amino acid replaces the existing fixed byte representation. The proof of reduced protein database space has been discussed and it is found to be reduced between 42.86 to 87.17%. To validate our method, we have collected few amino acid sequences of major organisms like Sheep, Lambda phage and etc from NCBI and represented them using proposed method. The comparison shows that of minimum and maximum reduction in storage space are 43.30% and 72.86% respectively. In future the biological data can further be reduced by applying lossless compression on this deduced data.

  1. Properties of Active Galaxies Deduced from H I Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Luis C; Greene, Jenny E

    2008-01-01

    We completed a new survey for H I emission for a large, well-defined sample of 154 nearby (z < 0.1) galaxies with type 1 AGNs. We make use of the extensive database presented in a companion paper to perform a comprehensive appraisal of the cold gas content in active galaxies and to seek new strategies to investigate the global properties of the host galaxies and their relationship to their central black holes (BHs). We show that the BH mass obeys a strong, roughly linear relation with the host galaxy's dynamical mass. BH mass follows a looser, though still highly significant, correlation with the maximum rotation velocity of the galaxy, as expected from the known scaling between rotation velocity and central velocity dispersion. Neither of these H I-based correlations is as tight as the more familiar relations between BH mass and bulge luminosity or velocity dispersion, but they offer the advantage of being insensitive to the glare of the nucleus and therefore are promising new tools for probing the host g...

  2. Properties of the lithosphere and asthenosphere deduced from geoid observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the GEOS-3 and SEASAT Satellites provided a very accurate geoid map over the oceans. Broad bathymetric features in the oceans such as oceanic swells and plateaus are fully compensated. It is shown that the geoid anomalies due to the density structures of the lithosphere are proportional to the first moment of the density distribution. The deepening of the ocean basins is attributed to thermal isostasy. The thickness of the oceanic lithosphere increases with age due to the loss of heat to the sea floor. Bathymetry and the geoid provide constraints on the extent of this heat loss. Offsets in the geoid across major fracture zones can also be used to constrain this problem. Geoid bathymetry correlations show that the Hawaiian and Bermuda swells and the Cape Verde Rise are probably due to lithospheric thinning.

  3. Advance of the perihelion of Mercury deduced from QFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    I deduce the new gravitational formula from the variance in mass of QFT and GR (H05-0029-08, E15-0039 -08, E14-0032-08, D31-0054-10) in the partial differential: f (QFT) = f (GR) = delta∂ (m v)/delta∂ t = f _{P} + f _{C} , f _{P} = m delta∂ v / delta∂ t = - ( G m M /r (2) ) r / r, f _{C} = v delta∂ m / delta∂ t = - ( G m M / r (2) ) v / c (1), f (QFT) is the quasi-Casimir pressure of net virtual neutrinos nuν _{0} flux (after counteract contrary direction nuν _{0}). f (GR) is equivalent to Einstein’s equation, Eq. (1) is a new version of GR and can be solved exactly. Its core content is that the gravity produced by particles collide cannot linear addition, i.e., the nonlinearity of Einstein equation had been replaced by the nonlinearity caused by the variable mass in Eq.(1). Einstein equation can be inferred from Eq.(1) thereby from QFT, but QFT cannot be inferred from Eq.(1) or GR. f (QFT) is essential but f (GR) is phenomenological. Eq.(1) is obtained just by to absorb the essence of corpuscule collided gravitation origin ism proposed by Fatio in 1690 and 1920 Majorana’s experiment concept about gravitational shield effect again fuse with QFT. In my paper ‘QFT’S advance of the perihelion of Mercury, China Science &Technology Overview 125 88-90 (2011)’ QFT gravitational potential U = - G M /r is just the distribution density of net nuν _{0} flux, from SR we again get that: f (QFT) = f _{P} + f _{C}, f _{P} = - m ( delta∂ U / delta∂ r) r / r, f _{C} = - m ( delta∂U / delta∂ r) v / c (2), f _{ P} correspond the change rate of three-dimensional momentum p, f _{C} correspond the change rate of fourth dimensional momentum i m c which show directly as a dissipative force of mass change. According to Eq.(2) the circular motion is instability and elliptic motion is in the auto-stability state. In the fluctuation vacuum a particle with mass M neighbor another particle with mass m, the renormalization mass M and m will be less than that when

  4. Relations between aliphatics and silicate components in 12 stratospheric particles deduced from vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merouane, S.; Djouadi, Z.; Le Sergeant d' Hendecourt, L., E-mail: sihane.merouane@ias.u-psud.fr [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, UMR-8617, Université Paris Sud, Bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-01-10

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are among the most pristine extraterrestrial samples available in the laboratory for analyses with moderate to high spatial- and spectral-resolution spectroscopic techniques. Their composition can provide precious information on the early stages of the solar nebula as well as on the processes on the surfaces of different small bodies in the solar system from which IDPs originate. In this work, we have analyzed six anhydrous IDPs and six stratospheric particles possibly of cosmic origin through infrared (IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy to study and investigate their silicate and organic components. We find that the length/ramification of the aliphatic organics given by the CH{sub 2}/CH{sub 3} ratios in the IDPs is closely linked to the silicate family (pyroxene or olivine) present in the samples. Both IR and Raman data suggest that this relation is not correlated with either aqueous (as evidenced by the absence of aqueous related minerals) or thermal processes (as deduced from Raman measurements). Therefore, this observation might be related to the initial path of formation of the organics on the silicate surfaces, thus tracing a possible catalytic role that silicates would play in the formation and/or ramification of organic matter in the primitive nebula.

  5. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the Lewis{sup X} antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poveda, Ana [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion (Spain); Asensio, Juan Luis; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Instituto de Quimica Organica, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain)

    1997-07-15

    {sup 1}H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-{alpha}-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-(1{sup {yields}}4)[3-O-{alpha}-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, {sup 13}C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The {sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The{sup 13}C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the{sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS{sup 2}. Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Physics-based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-07

    please find the Final Technical Report with SF 298 for Dr. Erin E. Hackett’s ONR grant entitled Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine...From- To) 07/03/2017 Final Technica l Dec 2012- Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine...19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 843-349-4087 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Physics -Based Inverse Problem To

  7. New Route to Deducing Integration Formulas by Virtue of the IWOP Technique*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; LI Hong-Qi; XU Xing-Lei

    2011-01-01

    We point out a new route to deducing integration formulas, i.e., using the technique of integration within an ordered product (IWOP) of operators we derive some new integration formulas, which seems concise. As a by-product,some new operator identities also appear.

  8. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  9. CONSISTENT USE OF THE KALMAN FILTER IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS (CTMS) FOR DEDUCING EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past research has shown that emissions can be deduced using observed concentrations of a chemical, a Chemical Transport Model (CTM), and the Kalman filter in an inverse modeling application. An expression was derived for the relationship between the "observable" (i.e., the con...

  10. Wildland fire probabilities estimated from weather model-deduced monthly mean fire danger indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush K. Preisler; Shyh-Chin Chen; Francis Fujioka; John W. Benoit; Anthony L. Westerling

    2008-01-01

    The National Fire Danger Rating System indices deduced from a regional simulation weather model were used to estimate probabilities and numbers of large fire events on monthly and 1-degree grid scales. The weather model simulations and forecasts are ongoing experimental products from the Experimental Climate Prediction Center at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography...

  11. On the influence of neutral turbulence on ambipolar diffusivities deduced from meteor trail expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    Full Text Available By measuring fading times of radar echoes from underdense meteor trails, it is possible to deduce the ambipolar diffusivities of the ions responsible for these radar echoes. It could be anticipated that these diffusivities increase monotonically with height akin to neutral viscosity. In practice, this is not always the case. Here, we investigate the capability of neutral turbulence to affect the meteor trail diffusion rate.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence

  12. Two New Types of Conserved Quantities Deduced from Noether Symmetry for Nonholonomic Mechanical System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-Ni; FANG Jian-Hui; PANG Ting; LIN Peng

    2009-01-01

    For a nonholonomic mechanical system, the generalized Mei conserved quantity and the new generalized Hojman conserved quantity deduced from Noether symmetry of the system are studied.The criterion equation of the Noether symmetry for the system is got.The conditions under which the Noether symmetry can lead to the two new conserved quantities are presented and the forms of the conserved quantities are obtained.Finally, an example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  13. Hojman conserved quantity deduced by weak Noether symmetry for Lagrange systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Jia-Fang; Gang Tie-Qiang; Mei Feng-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the Hojman conserved quantity,a non-Noether conserved quantity,deduced by special weak Noether symmetry for Lagrange systems.Under special infinitesimal transformations in which the time is not variable,its criterion is given and a method of how to seek the Hojman conserved quantity is presented.A Hojman conserved quantity can be found by using the special weak Noether symmetry.

  14. Fungal diversity from various marine habitats deduced through culture-independent studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manohar, C.S.; Raghukumar, C.

    Author version: FEMS Microbiol. Lett., vol.341; 2013; 69-78 Fungal diversity from various marine habitats deduced through culture-independent studies Cathrine Sumathi Manohar* and Chandralata Raghukumar$ National Institute of Oceanography, (Council...: un-cultured fungal diversity from marine habitats Abstract Studies on the molecular diversity of the micro-eukaryotic community have shown that fungi occupy a central position in a large number of marine habitats. Environmental surveys using...

  15. Thick-target yields of radioactive targets deduced from inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikawa, M., E-mail: aikawa@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Ebata, S.; Imai, S. [Meme Media Laboratory, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The thick-target yield (TTY) is a macroscopic quantity reflected by nuclear reactions and matter properties of targets. In order to evaluate TTYs on radioactive targets, we suggest a conversion method from inverse kinematics corresponding to the reaction of radioactive beams on stable targets. The method to deduce the TTY is theoretically derived from inverse kinematics. We apply the method to the {sup nat}Cu({sup 12}C,X){sup 24}Na reaction to confirm availability. In addition, it is applied to the {sup 137}Cs + {sup 12}C reaction as an example of a radioactive system and discussed a conversion coefficient of a TTY measurement.

  16. Rabbit serum amyloid protein A: expression and primary structure deduced from cDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, M; Marhaug, G; Husby, G; Dowton, S B

    1991-12-01

    Serum amyloid A protein (SAA), the precursor of amyloid protein A (AA) in deposits of secondary amyloidosis, is an acute phase plasma apolipoprotein produced by hepatocytes. The primary structure of SAA demonstrates high interspecies homology. Several isoforms exist in individual species, probably with different amyloidogenic potential. The nucleotide sequences of two different rabbit serum amyloid A cDNA clones have been analysed, one (corresponding to SAA1) 569 base pairs (bp) long and the other (corresponding to SAA2) 513 bp long. Their deduced amino acid sequences differ at five amino acid positions, four of which are located in the NH2-terminal region of the protein. The deduced amino acid sequence of SAA2 corresponds to rabbit protein AA previously described except for one amino acid in position 22. Eighteen hours after turpentine stimulation, rabbit SAA mRNA is abundant in liver, while lower levels are present in spleen. None of the other extrahepatic organs studied showed any SAA mRNA expression. A third mRNA species (1.9 kb) hybridizing with a single-stranded RNA probe transcribed from the rabbit SAA cDNA, was identified. SAA1 and SAA2 mRNA were found in approximately equal amounts in turpentine-stimulated rabbit liver, but seem to be coordinately decreased after repeated inflammatory stimulation.

  17. Deducing the Kinetics of Protein Synthesis In Vivo from the Transition Rates Measured In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorf, Sophia; Thommen, Michael; Rodnina, Marina V.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The molecular machinery of life relies on complex multistep processes that involve numerous individual transitions, such as molecular association and dissociation steps, chemical reactions, and mechanical movements. The corresponding transition rates can be typically measured in vitro but not in vivo. Here, we develop a general method to deduce the in-vivo rates from their in-vitro values. The method has two basic components. First, we introduce the kinetic distance, a new concept by which we can quantitatively compare the kinetics of a multistep process in different environments. The kinetic distance depends logarithmically on the transition rates and can be interpreted in terms of the underlying free energy barriers. Second, we minimize the kinetic distance between the in-vitro and the in-vivo process, imposing the constraint that the deduced rates reproduce a known global property such as the overall in-vivo speed. In order to demonstrate the predictive power of our method, we apply it to protein synthesis by ribosomes, a key process of gene expression. We describe the latter process by a codon-specific Markov model with three reaction pathways, corresponding to the initial binding of cognate, near-cognate, and non-cognate tRNA, for which we determine all individual transition rates in vitro. We then predict the in-vivo rates by the constrained minimization procedure and validate these rates by three independent sets of in-vivo data, obtained for codon-dependent translation speeds, codon-specific translation dynamics, and missense error frequencies. In all cases, we find good agreement between theory and experiment without adjusting any fit parameter. The deduced in-vivo rates lead to smaller error frequencies than the known in-vitro rates, primarily by an improved initial selection of tRNA. The method introduced here is relatively simple from a computational point of view and can be applied to any biomolecular process, for which we have detailed information

  18. Deducing the kinetics of protein synthesis in vivo from the transition rates measured in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Rudorf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular machinery of life relies on complex multistep processes that involve numerous individual transitions, such as molecular association and dissociation steps, chemical reactions, and mechanical movements. The corresponding transition rates can be typically measured in vitro but not in vivo. Here, we develop a general method to deduce the in-vivo rates from their in-vitro values. The method has two basic components. First, we introduce the kinetic distance, a new concept by which we can quantitatively compare the kinetics of a multistep process in different environments. The kinetic distance depends logarithmically on the transition rates and can be interpreted in terms of the underlying free energy barriers. Second, we minimize the kinetic distance between the in-vitro and the in-vivo process, imposing the constraint that the deduced rates reproduce a known global property such as the overall in-vivo speed. In order to demonstrate the predictive power of our method, we apply it to protein synthesis by ribosomes, a key process of gene expression. We describe the latter process by a codon-specific Markov model with three reaction pathways, corresponding to the initial binding of cognate, near-cognate, and non-cognate tRNA, for which we determine all individual transition rates in vitro. We then predict the in-vivo rates by the constrained minimization procedure and validate these rates by three independent sets of in-vivo data, obtained for codon-dependent translation speeds, codon-specific translation dynamics, and missense error frequencies. In all cases, we find good agreement between theory and experiment without adjusting any fit parameter. The deduced in-vivo rates lead to smaller error frequencies than the known in-vitro rates, primarily by an improved initial selection of tRNA. The method introduced here is relatively simple from a computational point of view and can be applied to any biomolecular process, for which we have

  19. Vortex magnetic structure in circularly magnetized microwires as deduced from magneto-optical Kerr measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2014-02-14

    The magneto-optic Kerr effect has been employed to determine the magnetization process and estimate the domain structure of microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy. The diameter of microwires was 8 μm, and pieces 2 cm long were selected for measurements. The analysis of the local surface longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops has allowed us to deduce a vortex magnetic structure with axial core and circular external shell. Moreover, a bamboo-like surface domain structure is confirmed with wave length of around 10 to 15 μm and alternating chirality in adjacent circular domains. The width of the domain wall is estimated to be less than 3 μm. Finally, closure domain structures with significant helical magnetization component are observed extending up to around 1000 μm from the end of the microwire.

  20. Oxygen plasma flow properties deduced from laser-induced fluorescence and probe measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhle, Stefan; Eichhorn, Christoph; Steinbeck, Andreas; Lein, Sebastian; Herdrich, Georg; Röser, Hans-Peter; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    2008-04-01

    Estimation of the local dissociation degree and the local mass-specific enthalpy of a pure oxygen plasma flow determined mainly from laser-induced fluorescence measurements are reported. Measurements have been conducted for several generator parameters in an inductively heated plasma wind tunnel. Additional probe measurements of total pressure together with the deduced translational temperature are used to estimate the local mass-specific enthalpy. For a reference condition, full dissociation has been measured. The measured translational temperature of atomic oxygen for this condition is T = 3500 K. Subsequently, the local mass-specific enthalpy has been derived using these local density and temperature measurements. For the reference condition the estimated value of h = 27 MJ/kg is in good agreement with the probe measurements and results from diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

  1. Thick-target yields of radioactive targets deduced from inverse kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Imai, Shotaro

    2014-01-01

    The thick-target yield (TTY) of long-lived fission products (LLFP) is an essential quantity and represents basic data for transmutation. In order to evaluate TTY on radioactive targets including LLFP, we suggest a conversion method from inverse kinematics corresponding to the reaction of radioactive beams on stable targets. We demonstrate the method to deduce the TTY from inverse kinematics derived from the theoretical definition. This method is highly applicable in reactions at the energy per nucleon \\epsilon > 20 MeV/A as practically confirmed by the simulation of the SRIM2008 code. In this paper, we apply the method to the natCu(12C,X)24Na reaction to confirm availability. In addition, it is applied to the 137Cs + 12C reaction to reduce 137Cs and to suggest a TTY measurement of the 137Cs induced reaction on a thick 12C target.

  2. Atmospheric phenomena deduced from radiosonde and GPS occultation measurements for various application related studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C J Johny; S K Sarkar; D Punyasesudu

    2009-02-01

    The tropopause height and tropopause temperature are sensitive to temperature changes in troposphere and stratosphere. These are the measures of global climatic variability. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, refractivity and water vapour are always needed for communication, navigation and atmospheric modeling studies. The tropopause characteristics over the Indian region have been studied using radio occultation measurements (CHAMP) on the basis of cold point criterion. Tropopause height shows large variation in the latitude range ∼30° –40°N during winter. Tropopause temperature less than −82°C, assumed to facilitate troposphere to stratosphere air transport, is observed at a number of tropical Indian locations and no seasonal pattern is observed in its occurrence. The bias in temperature and refractivity deduced from radiosonde and radio occultation measurements is also presented.

  3. An asymmetric color image encryption method by using deduced gyrator transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lili; Yuan, Caojin; Qiang, Junjie; Feng, Shaotong; Nie, Shouping

    2017-02-01

    An encryption algorithm is proposed by using the properties of deduced gyrator transform (GT). After being transformed by the GT algorithm and multiplied by a phase distribution p*, the spectrum modulus of the input image is considered to be the encrypted image by further performing Fourier transformation. To resist the attack from iterative phase retrieval, the red, green and blue components of the input image is modulated by a random phase mask and then combined using convolution. The encryption result is real-valued, which is convenient for display, transmission and storage. In the decryption process, the three original color components can be recovered with decryption keys which are different from the encryption keys. An optoelectronic hybrid system for the encryption process is also presented. Computer simulations are presented to demonstrate its performance, and the security of the proposed system is analyzed as well.

  4. Martian low-altitude magnetic topology deduced from MAVEN/SWEA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaosui; Mitchell, David; Liemohn, Michael; Fang, Xiaohua; Ma, Yingjuan; Luhmann, Janet; Brain, David; Steckiewicz, Morgane; Mazelle, Christian; Connerney, Jack; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission for the first time make regular particle and field measurements down to ~150 km altitude. The Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) instrument provides 3-D measurements of the electron energy and angular distributions. This study presents the pitch angle-resolved shape parameters that can separate photoelectrons from solar wind electrons, therefore used to deduce the Martian magnetic topology. The three-dimensional view of the magnetic topology is manifested for the first time. The northern hemisphere is found to be dominated by the crustal closed field lines, instead of draped interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF), on the dayside and more day-night connections through cross-terminator closed field lines than in the south. This study can also single out open field lines attached to the dayside ionosphere, which provide possible passage for ion outflow. Magnetic topology governs energetic electrons' movement, thus necessary to understand nightside ionosphere, and aurora.

  5. Hydrodynamic properties of gamma-ray bursts outflows deduced from thermal component

    CERN Document Server

    Pe'er, Asaf; O'Mahony, Shane; Margutti, Raffaella; Ryde, Felix; Larsson, Josefin; Lazzatti, Davide; Livio, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We study the properties of a significant thermal emission component that was identified in 47 GRBs observed by different instruments. Within the framework of the "fireball" model, we deduce the values of the Lorentz factor Gamma, and the acceleration radius, r_0, for these bursts. We find that all the values of Gamma in our sample are in the range 10^2 = 310. We find a very weak dependence of Gamma on the acceleration radius r_0, Gamma ~ r_0^alpha with alpha = -0.10 +- 0.09 at sigma = 2.1 confidence level. The values of r_0 span a wide range, 10^7 ~10^{8.5} cm. This is higher than the gravitational radius of a 10 M_sun black hole by a factor ~100. We argue that this result provides indirect evidence for jet propagation inside a massive star, and suggests the existence of recollimation shocks that take place close to this radius.

  6. New values of gravitational moments J2 and J4 deduced from helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Redouane, Mecheri; Irbah, Abdanour; Provost, Janine; Berthomieu, Gabrielle; 10.1023/B:SOLA.0000043563.96766.21

    2009-01-01

    By applying the theory of slowly rotating stars to the Sun, the solar quadrupole and octopole moments J2 and J4 were computed using a solar model obtained from CESAM stellar evolution code (Morel, 1997) combined with a recent model of solar differential rotation deduced from helioseismology (Corbard et al., 2002). This model takes into account a near-surface radial gradient of rotation which was inferred and quantified from MDI f-mode observations by Corbard and Thompson (2002). The effect of this observational near-surface gradient on the theoretical values of the surface parameters J2, J4 is investigated. The results show that the octopole moment J4 is much more sensitive than the quadrupole moment J2 to the subsurface radial gradient of rotation.

  7. A major protein precursor of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) byssus: deduced sequence and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K E; Waite, J H

    1998-04-01

    The zebra mussel is a nonindigenous invader of North American lakes and rivers and one of the few freshwater bivalve molluscs having a byssus--a sclerotized organ used by the mussel for opportunistic attachment to hard surfaces. We have sequenced a foot-specific cDNA whose composite protein sequence was deduced from a series of overlapping but occasionally nonidentical cDNA fragments. The overall deduced sequence matches tryptic peptides from a major byssal precursor protein--Dreissena polymorpha foot protein 1 (Dpfp1). The calculated mass of Dpfp1 is 49 kDa; but this is known to be extensively hydroxylated and O-glycosylated during maturation. Purified native Dpfp1 analyzed using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry with time-of-flight indicates that the protein occurs as at least two size variants with masses of 48.6 and 54.5 kDa. In all probability, the sequence variants reported in this study are related to the larger mass variant. Dpfp1 has a block copolymer-like structure defined by two consensus motifs that are sharply segregated into domains. The N-terminal side of Dpfp1 has 22 tandem repeats of a heptapeptide consensus (P-[V/E]-Y-P-[T/S/delta]-[K/Q]-X); the C-terminal side has 16 repeats of a tridecapeptide motif (K-P-G-P-Y-D-Y-D-G-P-Y-D-K). Both consensus repeats are unique, with some limited homology to other proteins functioning in tension: marine mussel adhesives, plant extensins, titin, and trematode eggshell precursors.

  8. The Seismic risk perception in Italy deduced by a statistical sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Pessina, Vera; Peruzza, Laura; Cerbara, Loredana; Crescimbene, Cristiana

    2015-04-01

    In 2014 EGU Assembly we presented the results of a web a survey on the perception of seismic risk in Italy. The data were derived from over 8,500 questionnaires coming from all Italian regions. Our questionnaire was built by using the semantic differential method (Osgood et al. 1957) with a seven points Likert scale. The questionnaire is inspired the main theoretical approaches of risk perception (psychometric paradigm, cultural theory, etc.) .The results were promising and seem to clearly indicate an underestimation of seismic risk by the italian population. Based on these promising results, the DPC has funded our research for the second year. In 2015 EGU Assembly we present the results of a new survey deduced by an italian statistical sample. The importance of statistical significance at national scale was also suggested by ISTAT (Italian Statistic Institute), considering the study as of national interest, accepted the "project on the perception of seismic risk" as a pilot study inside the National Statistical System (SISTAN), encouraging our RU to proceed in this direction. The survey was conducted by a company specialised in population surveys using the CATI method (computer assisted telephone interview). Preliminary results will be discussed. The statistical support was provided by the research partner CNR-IRPPS. This research is funded by Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC).

  9. Martian low-altitude magnetic topology deduced from MAVEN/SWEA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaosui; Mitchell, David; Liemohn, Michael; Fang, Xiaohua; Ma, Yingjuan; Luhmann, Janet; Brain, David; Steckiewicz, Morgane; Mazelle, Christian; Connerney, Jack; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-02-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission has obtained comprehensive particle and magnetic field measurements. The Solar Wind Electron Analyzer provides electron energy-pitch angle distributions along the spacecraft trajectory that can be used to infer magnetic topology. This study presents pitch angle-resolved electron energy shape parameters that can distinguish photoelectrons from solar wind electrons, which we use to deduce the Martian magnetic topology and connectivity to the dayside ionosphere. Magnetic topology in the Mars environment is mapped in three dimensions for the first time. At low altitudes (connections through cross-terminator closed field lines than in the south. Although draped field lines with 100 km amplitude vertical fluctuations that intersect the electron exobase ( 160-220 km) in two locations could appear to be closed at the spacecraft, a more likely explanation is provided by crustal magnetic fields, which naturally have the required geometry. Around 30% of the time, we observe open field lines from 200 to 400 km, which implies three distinct topological layers over the northern hemisphere: closed field lines below 200 km, open field lines with foot points at lower latitudes that pass over the northern hemisphere from 200 to 400 km, and draped interplanetary magnetic field above 400 km. This study also identifies open field lines with one end attached to the dayside ionosphere and the other end connected with the solar wind, providing a path for ion outflow.

  10. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F S; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Fallon, P; Clark, R M; Deleplanque, M A; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S; Ai, H; Beausang, C; Cridder, B

    2005-12-29

    The authors have deduced the cross section for {sup 237}U(n,f) over an equivalent neutron energy range from 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions: {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}{prime}f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}{prime}f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). Scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} and 131{sup o}.

  11. Function of longitudinal vs circular muscle fibers in esophageal peristalsis, deduced with mathematical modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James G Brasseur; Mark A Nicosia; Anupam Pal; Larr S Miller

    2007-01-01

    We summarize from previous works the functions of circular vs. longitudinal muscle in esophageal peristaltic bolus transport using a mix of experimental data, the conservation laws of mechanics and mathematical modeling. Whereas circular muscle tone generates radial closure pressure to create a local peristaltic closure wave, longitudinal muscle tone has two functions, one physiological with mechanical implications, and one purely mechanical. Each of these functions independently reduces the tension of individual circular muscle fibers to maintain closure as a consequence of shortening of longitudinal muscle locally coordinated with increasing circular muscle tone. The physiological function is deduced by combining basic laws of mechanics with concurrent measurements of intraluminal pressure from manometry, and changes in cross sectional muscle area from endoluminal ultrasound from which local longitudinal shortening (LLS) can be accurately obtained. The purely mechanical function of LLS was discovered from mathematical modeling of peristaltic esophageal transport with the axial wall motion generated by LLS. Physiologically, LLS concentrates circular muscle fibers where closure pressure is highest.However, the mechanical function of LLS is to reduce the level of pressure required to maintain closure. The combined physiological and mechanical consequences of LLS are to reduce circular muscle fiber tension and power by as much as 1/10 what would be required for peristalsis without the longitudinal muscle layer, a tremendous benefit that may explain the existence of longitudinal muscle fiber in the gut. We also review what is understood of the role of longitudinal muscle in esophageal emptying, reflux and pathology.

  12. Radiation pressure on a submerged absorptive partial reflector deduced from the Doppler shift

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2012-01-01

    When a light pulse is reflected from a mirror, energy and momentum are exchanged between the electromagnetic field and the material medium. The resulting change in the energy of the reflected photons is directly related to their Doppler shift arising from the change in the state of motion of the mirror. Similarly, the Doppler shift of photons that enter an absorber is intimately tied to the kinetic energy and momentum acquired by the absorber in its interaction with the incident light. The argument from the Doppler shift yields expressions for the exchanged energy and momentum that are identical with those obtained from Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz law of force, despite the fact that the physical bases of the two methods are fundamentally different. Here we apply the Doppler shift argument to a submerged partial reflector (one that absorbs a fraction of the incident light), deducing in the process the magnitude of the photon momentum within the submerging medium. We also discuss the case of the submerg...

  13. Some results on the upper atmosphere deduced from satellite occultation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felske, D.; Knuth, R.; Martini, L.; Ohle, K.H.; Sonnemann, G.; Stark, B.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements of neutral gas densities in the upper atmosphere deduced from extinction profiles from the Intercosmos 1, 4, 7, 11 and 16 and SOLRAD 9 and 10 solar radiation satellites at sunrise and sunset are presented. Occultation measurements in the Lyman alpha range have revealed the presence of an anomalously high absorption above 110 km in winter, which may be explained by high densities of water in the thermosphere. Calculations of oxygen densities based on extinction profiles measured in Lyman alpha and the Schumann-Runge range also indicate the presence of high densities of NO, and an unknown Lyman alpha absorber of molecular weight corresponding to that of water. Observations obtained for the D-region winter anomaly indicate that the wavelike ionization variations have counterparts in similar neutral thermosphere density variations, which may influence the ion production and/or loss processes. Finally, short-term neutral density fluctuations between 90 and 300 km measured during a strong F-region disturbance are presented which demonstrate sharp rises in O density and decreases in O2 density accompanied by increases in electron concentration during the first phase of the disturbance, the opposite changes during the second phase, and complex mixing variations between O and O2 and their plasma counterparts in the recovery phase.

  14. Deducing radiation pressure on a submerged mirror from the Doppler shift

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2012-01-01

    Radiation pressure on a flat mirror submerged in a transparent liquid, depends not only on the refractive index n of the liquid, but also on the phase angle psi_0 of the Fresnel reflection coefficient of the mirror, which could be anywhere between 0^{\\circ} and 180^{\\circ}. Depending on the value of psi_0, the momentum per incident photon picked up by the mirror covers the range between the Abraham and Minkowski values, i.e., the interval (2\\hbarw_0/nc,2n\\hbarw_0/c). Here \\hbar is the reduced Planck constant, w_0 is the frequency of the incident photon, and c is the speed of light in vacuum. We argue that a simple experimental setup involving a dielectric slab of refractive index n, a vibrating mirror placed a short distance behind the slab, a collimated, monochromatic light beam illuminating the mirror through the slab, and an interferometer to measure the phase of the reflected beam, is all that is needed to deduce the precise magnitude of the radiation pressure on a submerged mirror. In the proposed experi...

  15. PAS domain of the deduced Org35 protein mediates the interaction with NifA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Ran; CUI Yanhua; CHEN Sanfeng; LI Jilun

    2006-01-01

    NifA in Azospirillum brasilense plays a key role in regulating the synthesis of nitrogenase in response to ammonia and oxygen available. Recently,our laboratory has identified four clones, whose gene prodcuts interact with NifA, from A. brasilense Sp7genomic libraries by using the yeast two-hybrid system with NifA as bait. We are interested in clone S35,one of the four clones, because it contains a PAS-domain coding region. The entire open reading frame (ORF) for the PAS domain-containing protein was isolated and designated as org35 here. org35gene is 2211-bp long and encodes a protein of 736aa with a predicted molecular weight of about 78.4 kD.The predicted amino acid sequence of org35 has similarity to some two-component sensor kinase/response regulator hybrids of bacteria. Structural analyses showed that Org35 comprises at least three discrete conserved domains: the N-terminal PAS, the central histidine protein kinase (HPK) and the C-terminal response regulator (RR). The PAS domain of the deduced Org35 protein was found to interact directly with NifA, but the central HPK and the C-terminal RR domains of Org35 were not. These results indicated that interaction between NifA and Org35 was mediated by PAS domain.

  16. F-region Pedersen conductivity deduced using the TIMED/GUVI limb retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As a proxy of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate for equatorial plasma bubbles, we investigate the flux-tube integrated F-region Pedersen conductivity (ΣPF using the electron density profiles (EDPs provided by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI on board the Thermosphere Ionosphere and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED satellite. The investigation is conducted using the EDPs obtained in the Atlantic sector at 19:00-22:00 LT during 4–17 August and 6-16 December 2002. The seasonal difference of the strength and location of the equatorial ionization anomalies (EIAs induces a significant difference in the deduced ΣPF. Much stronger EIAs are created at higher altitudes and latitudes in December rather than in August. At 19:00–20:00 LT, the peak value of the ΣPF has 23 mhos at 1100 km apex height during 14–16 December and 18mhos at 600 km during 15–17 August. The ΣPF decreases as local time progresses. Therefore, ΣPF provides a preferred condition for the growth of bubbles to higher altitudes at 19:00-20:00 LT than at later hours, in December rather than in August in the Atlantic sector.

  17. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  18. Optimizing Network Routing by Deducing a QoS Metric Using Rough Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali.A.Sakr,

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The routing within networks, must satisfy the QoS metrics. In traditional data networks, routing is concerned on connectivity or cost. Routing protocols usually characterize the network with one or more metric(s. However, in order to support a wide range of QoS requirements, routing protocols need to have a more complex model. Thenetwork is characterized with multiple metrics such as bandwidth, delay, jitters, loss rate, authentication, security,…etc. This complex model necessitates a long time to proceed. The Rough Set Theory (RST is applied to reduce these metrics successfully and decide the most effective ones. In this paper, RST is applied to reduce the online metrics that are reported by Routing Information Protocols (RIP. The paper represents information about network elements (links, or nodes to obtain the Quality of Service (QoS core [1]. ROSETTA software is applied to deduce a QoS metric as a substitution for all routing metrics. This metric is used to select the optimal routes. The results confirm that the proposed metric is adequately suit for selecting the proper routes.

  19. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L W; Fallon, P; Clark, R; Delaplanque, M; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S

    2005-08-16

    The authors have deduced the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross-section over an equivalent neutron energy range of 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}'f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}'f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). The energies of the scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} to 131{sup o}.

  20. Hysteresis Loop for a No-loaded, Delta-connected Transformer Model Deduced from Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrodi, Yves; Kamei, Kenji; Kohyama, Haruhiko; Ito, Hiroki

    At a transformer's steady-state condition, whereby a transformer and its load are constantly supplied by a sinusoidal source, the current-flux pair within the transformer core and its windings will cycle along a hysteresis loop. This nonlinear current-flux characteristic becomes important while at transformer gets reenergized. A remaining residual flux and the fact that a transformer is typically used up to its saturation level can lead to high-amplitude magnetizing inrush currents and associated voltage disturbances. These disturbances can be reduced by controlled transformer switching. In order to pre-evaluate the effect of a specific controlled transformer energization, pre-simulations can be applied. In that case the hysteresis loop and its saturation characteristic will become the most important model parameter. If the corresponding manufacturer specifications are not available a standard hysteresis loops can be used, but might come up with an inaccurate simulation result. Therefore, this paper analyses the measured 3-phase currents from two delta-connected power transformers by “Fourier Series” in order to deduce a single-phase hysteresis loop, which can be implemented into a typical 3-phase transformer model. Additionally, the saturation behavior of a power-transformer will be estimated and a comparison of ATP/EMTP simulations will conclude this paper.

  1. On the strength of the hydrogen-carbon interaction as deduced from physisorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T X; Bae, J-S; Wang, Y; Bhatia, S K

    2009-04-21

    We deduce a new value for the potential well depth for the C-H2 interaction on the basis of experimental validations of isotherms of H2 and D2 predicted using independently characterized microstructural parameters. We use two carbons, one an activated carbon fiber whose structure has been recently characterized by us (Nguyen, T. X.; cohaut, N.; Bae, J.-S.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2008, 24, 7912) using hybrid reverse Monte Carlo simulation (HRMC) and the other the commercial Takeda 3A carbon molecular sieve whose pore size distribution is determined here from the 273 K CO2 adsorption isotherm. The conventional grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation technique incorporating a semiclassical Feynman and Hibbs (FH) potential approximation (FHGCMC) as well as path integral Monte Carlo calculations is employed to determine theoretical adsorption isotherms. It is found that curvature enhances the well depth for the LJ C-H2 interaction by a factor of 1.134 over that for a flat graphite surface, consistent with our recent study (Nguyen, T. X.; cohaut, N.; Bae, J.-S.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2008, 24, 7912). A value of the C-C well depth of 37.26 K, used for estimating the C-H2 well depth in conjunction with the Berthelot rules, with the Steele C-C well depth used for interaction with heavier gases (Ar, CO2 and CH4), leads to excellent agreement with experimental isotherms in all cases.

  2. Characteristics of Turbulent Airflow Deduced from Rapid Surface Thermal Fluctuations: An Infrared Surface Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2017-07-01

    The intermittent nature of turbulent airflow interacting with the surface is readily observable in fluctuations of the surface temperature resulting from the thermal imprints of eddies sweeping the surface. Rapid infrared thermography has recently been used to quantify characteristics of the near-surface turbulent airflow interacting with the evaporating surfaces. We aim to extend this technique by using single-point rapid infrared measurements to quantify properties of a turbulent flow, including surface exchange processes, with a view towards the development of an infrared surface anemometer. The parameters for the surface-eddy renewal (α and β ) are inferred from infrared measurements of a single-point on the surface of a heat plate placed in a wind tunnel with prescribed wind speeds and constant mean temperatures of the surface. Thermally-deduced parameters are in agreement with values obtained from standard three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer measurements close to the plate surface (e.g., α = 3 and β = 1/26 (ms)^{-1} for the infrared, and α = 3 and β = 1/19 (ms)^{-1} for the sonic-anemometer measurements). The infrared-based turbulence parameters provide new insights into the role of surface temperature and buoyancy on the inherent characteristics of interacting eddies. The link between the eddy-spectrum shape parameter α and the infrared window size representing the infrared field of view is investigated. The results resemble the effect of the sampling height above the ground in sonic anemometer measurements, which enables the detection of larger eddies with higher values of α . The physical basis and tests of the proposed method support the potential for remote quantification of the near-surface momentum field, as well as scalar-flux measurements in the immediate vicinity of the surface.

  3. A novel computational framework for deducing muscle synergies from experimental joint moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantharaman eGopalakrishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior experimental studies have hypothesized the existence of a ‘muscle synergy’ based control scheme for producing limb movements and locomotion in vertebrates. Such synergies have been suggested to consist of fixed muscle grouping schemes with the co-activation of all muscles in a synergy resulting in limb movement. Quantitative representations of these groupings (termed muscle weightings and their control signals (termed synergy controls have traditionally been derived by the factorization of experimentally measured EMG. This study presents a novel approach for deducing these weightings and controls from inverse dynamic joint moments that are computed from an alternative set of experimental measurements – movement kinematics and kinetics. This technique was applied to joint moments for healthy human walking at 0.7 and 1.7 m/s, and two sets of ‘simulated’ synergies were computed based on two different criteria (1 synergies were required to minimize errors between experimental and simulated joint moments in a musculoskeletal model (pure-synergy solution (2 along with minimizing joint moment errors, synergies also minimized muscle activation levels (optimal-synergy solution. On comparing the two solutions, it was observed that the introduction of optimality requirements (optimal-synergy to a control strategy solely aimed at reproducing the joint moments (pure-synergy did not necessitate major changes in the muscle grouping within synergies or the temporal profiles of synergy control signals. Synergies from both the simulated solutions exhibited many similarities to EMG derived synergies from a previously published study, thus implying that the analysis of the two different types of experimental data reveals similar, underlying synergy structures.

  4. The radiation budget of a Cirrus layer deduced from simultaneous aircraft observations and model calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Kinne, Stefan A.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Several aircraft were employed during the FIRE Cirrus IFO in order to make nearly simultaneous observations of cloud properties and fluxes. A segment of the flight data collected on 28 October 1988 during which the NASA Ames ER-2 overflew the NCAR King Air was analyzed. The ER-2 flew at high altitude making observations of visible and infrared radiances and infrared flux and cloud height and thickness. During this segment, the King Air flew just above the cloud base making observations of ice crystal size and shape, local meteorological variables, and infrared fluxes. While the two aircraft did not collect data exactly coincident in space and time, they did make observations within a few minutes of each other. For this case study, the infrared radiation balance of the cirrus layer is of primary concern. Observations of the upwelling 10 micron radiance, made from the ER-2, can be used to deduce the 10 micron optical depth of the layer. The upwelling broadband infrared flux is also measured from the ER-2. At the same time, the upwelling and downwelling infrared flux at the cloud base is obtained from the King Air measurements. Information on cloud microphysics is also available from the King Air. Using this data in conjunction with atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles from local radiosondes, the necessary inputs for an infrared radiative transfer model can be developed. Infrared radiative transfer calculations are performed with a multispectral two-stream model. The model fluxes at the cloud base and at 19 km are then compared with the aircraft observations to determine whether the model is performing well. Cloud layer heating rates can then be computed from the radiation exchange.

  5. Structure of La Primavera caldera, Jalisco, Mexico, deduced from gravity anomalies and drilling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, I.; Mena, M.

    1991-07-01

    Previous studies of La Primavera caldera have mostly been based on surface geology and topography. Since 1980, many wells, exploring for geothermal energy, have reached depths of about 2 to 3 km at the center of the caldera. The results of the drillings, together with those of the gravity surveys, provide information about the subsurface structure of the caldera, and shed light on its formation. The drilling results and gravity anomalies at La Primavera caldera and San Marcos, located at about 40 km distance from the caldera, suggest that regional gravity anomalies can be interpreted in terms of depths of the granitic basements: the basement beneath La Primavera caldera is about 3 km deep and consists of roughly the same horizon as that beneath San Marcos. The drilling results within the caldera reveal that the depth of the caldera fills ranges from 0.3 to 1 km at the drilling sites. The andesite basement, about 1 km deep, remains approximately horizontal, and the granitic basement has a depth of about 3 km. The surface topographies, such as the postcaldera domes, scarcely disturb the subsurface strata. The local gravity anomalies show two lows within the caldera reflecting the configuration of caldera bottom, two funnel-shaped depressions, one of which corresponds to a vent of the Tala tuff deduced from geological observations. The mass deficiency within the caldera estimated from the gravity anomaly, satisfies the general relationship that the mass deficiency is proportional to the caldera diameter cubed. This means that caldera structure is three-dimensional: the larger the diameter, the deeper the funnel-shape. At present this argument may be limited to funnel-shaped calderas.

  6. Deducing growth mechanisms for minerals from the shapes of crystal size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of natural and synthetic samples are observed to have several distinct and different shapes. We have simulated these CSDs using three simple equations: the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), a mass balance equation, and equations for Ostwald ripening. The following crystal growth mechanisms are simulated using these equations and their modifications: (1) continuous nucleation and growth in an open system, during which crystals nucleate at either a constant, decaying, or accelerating nucleation rate, and then grow according to the LPE; (2) surface-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with an essentially unlimited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (3) supply-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with a specified, limited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (4) supply- or surface-controlled Ostwald ripening in a closed system, during which the relative rate of crystal dissolution and growth is controlled by differences in specific surface area and by diffusion rate; and (5) supply-controlled random ripening in a closed system, during which the rate of crystal dissolution and growth is random with respect to specific surface area. Each of these mechanisms affects the shapes of CSDs. For example, mechanism (1) above with a constant nucleation rate yields asymptotically-shaped CSDs for which the variance of the natural logarithms of the crystal sizes (??2) increases exponentially with the mean of the natural logarithms of the sizes (??). Mechanism (2) yields lognormally-shaped CSDs, for which ??2 increases linearly with ??, whereas mechanisms (3) and (5) do not change the shapes of CSDs, with ??2 remaining constant with increasing ??. During supply-controlled Ostwald ripening (4), initial lognormally-shaped CSDs become more symmetric, with ??2 decreasing with increasing ??. Thus, crystal growth mechanisms often can be deduced by noting trends in ?? versus ??2 of CSDs for

  7. ARCHITECTURE OF PEROXISOMAL ALCOHOL OXIDASE CRYSTALS FROM THE METHYLOTROPHIC YEAST HANSENULA-POLYMORPHA AS DEDUCED BY ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VONCK, J; VANBRUGGEN, EFJ

    1992-01-01

    The architecture of alcohol oxidase crystalloids occurring in vivo in the peroxisomes of methylotrophic yeasts was deduced from electron micrographs of similar crystals of the Hansenula polymorpha enzyme grown in vitro. Three characteristic views of the crystal are observed, as well as single layers

  8. SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflaumann, Uwe; Duprat, Josette; Pujol, Claude; Labeyrie, Laurent D.

    1996-02-01

    We present a data set of 738 planktonic foraminiferal species counts from sediment surface samples of the eastern North Atlantic and the South Atlantic between 87°N and 40°S, 35°E and 60°W including published Climate: Long-Range Investigation, Mapping, and Prediction (CLIMAP) data. These species counts are linked to Levitus's [1982] modern water temperature data for the four caloric seasons, four depth ranges (0, 30, 50, and 75 m), and the combined means of those depth ranges. The relation between planktonic foraminiferal assemblages and sea surface temperature (SST) data is estimated using the newly developed SIMMAX technique, which is an acronym for a modern analog technique (MAT) with a similarity index, based on (1) the scalar product of the normalized faunal percentages and (2) a weighting procedure of the modern analog's SSTs according to the inverse geographical distances of the most similar samples. Compared to the classical CLIMAP transfer technique and conventional MAT techniques, SIMMAX provides a more confident reconstruction of paleo-SSTs (correlation coefficient is 0.994 for the caloric winter and 0.993 for caloric summer). The standard deviation of the residuals is 0.90°C for caloric winter and 0.96°C for caloric summer at 0-m water depth. The SST estimates reach optimum stability (standard deviation of the residuals is 0.88°C) at the average 0- to 75-m water depth. Our extensive database provides SST estimates over a range of -1.4 to 27.2°C for caloric winter and 0.4 to 28.6°C for caloric summer, allowing SST estimates which are especially valuable for the high-latitude Atlantic during glacial times. An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on adiskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS.AGU.ORG. (LOGIN toAGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the username and GUESTas the password. Go to the right directory by typing CD APPEND. TypeLS to see what files are available. Type GET and the name of the file toget it. Finally type EXIT to

  9. Tropospheric CO vertical profiles deduced from total columns using data assimilation: methodology and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. El Amraoui

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation of a method to derive the vertical profile of carbon monoxide (CO from its total column using data assimilation. The main motivation of this study is twofold. First, to deduce both the vertical CO profiles and the assimilated CO fields with good confidence. Second, for chemical species that can be measured only as the total column, this method provides an attractive alternative for estimating their vertical profiles in the troposphere. We choose version 3 (V3 of MOPITT CO total columns to validate the proposed method. MOPITT has the advantage of providing both the vertical profiles and the total columns of CO. Furthermore, this version has been extensively validated by comparison with many independent datasets, and has been used in many scientific studies. The first step of the paper consists in the specification of the observation errors based on the Chi-square (χ2 test. The observations have been binned according to day, night, land and sea (LAND_DAY, LAND_NIGHT and SEA, respectively. The respective optimal observation error values for which the χ2 metric is the closest to 1 are: 7%, 8% and 11% for SEA, LAND_DAY and LAND_NIGHT, respectively. In a second step, the CO total column, with its specified errors, is used within the assimilation system to estimate the vertical profiles. These are validated by comparison with vertical profiles of MOPITT V3 retrievals at global and regional scales. Generally, both datasets show similar patterns and good agreement at both global and regional scales. Nevertheless, the total column analyses (TOTCOL_ANALYSES slightly overestimate CO concentrations compared to MOPITT observations. In a third step, vertical profiles calculated from TOTCOL_ANALYSES have been compared to those calculated from the assimilation of MOPITT V3 vertical profiles (PROFILE_ANALYSES. Both datasets shows very good agreement, but TOTCOL_ANALYSES tend to slightly overestimate CO concentrations. The mean

  10. Tropospheric CO vertical profiles deduced from total columns using data assimilation: methodology and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amraoui, L.; Attié, J.-L.; Ricaud, P.; Lahoz, W. A.; Piacentini, A.; Peuch, V.-H.; Warner, J. X.; Abida, R.; Barré, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a validation of a method to derive the vertical profile of carbon monoxide (CO) from its total column using data assimilation. The main motivation of this study is twofold. First, to deduce both the vertical CO profiles and the assimilated CO fields with good confidence. Second, for chemical species that can be measured only as the total column, this method provides an attractive alternative for estimating their vertical profiles in the troposphere. We choose version 3 (V3) of MOPITT CO total columns to validate the proposed method. MOPITT has the advantage of providing both the vertical profiles and the total columns of CO. Furthermore, this version has been extensively validated by comparison with many independent datasets, and has been used in many scientific studies. The first step of the paper consists in the specification of the observation errors based on the Chi-square (χ2) test. The observations have been binned according to day, night, land and sea (LAND_DAY, LAND_NIGHT and SEA, respectively). The respective optimal observation error values for which the χ2 metric is the closest to 1 are: 7%, 8% and 11% for SEA, LAND_DAY and LAND_NIGHT, respectively. In a second step, the CO total column, with its specified errors, is used within the assimilation system to estimate the vertical profiles. These are validated by comparison with vertical profiles of MOPITT V3 retrievals at global and regional scales. Generally, both datasets show similar patterns and good agreement at both global and regional scales. Nevertheless, the total column analyses (TOTCOL_ANALYSES) slightly overestimate CO concentrations compared to MOPITT observations. In a third step, vertical profiles calculated from TOTCOL_ANALYSES have been compared to those calculated from the assimilation of MOPITT V3 vertical profiles (PROFILE_ANALYSES). Both datasets shows very good agreement, but TOTCOL_ANALYSES tend to slightly overestimate CO concentrations. The mean bias between

  11. Approximate formulae (deduced from a mathematical model) for the characteristics of the interepidemic and epidemic periods of some virus diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, A L; Deutsch, I; Copelovici, Y

    1992-01-01

    By a qualitative analysis of the solutions of the mathematical model equations (describing the morbidity and susceptibility evolution in a viral epidemics), approximate formulae for the extreme values of the variables and for the duration of the main phases of a multiannual cycle are deduced. These formulae were validated by numerical simulation of the solutions, leading to the exact values of the mentioned essential characteristics of the diseases propagation.

  12. Second-order spatial correlation in the far-field: Comparing entangled and classical light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Erfeng; Liu, Weitao; Lin, Huizu; Chen, Pingxing

    2016-02-01

    We consider second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field. The quantum theory of second-order spatial correlation is analyzed, and the role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. Meanwhile, the difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced.

  13. An interpretation of ion composition diurnal variation deduced from EISCAT observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, A.V. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Troitsk (RU). Inst. Zemnogo Magnetizma, Ionosfery i Rasprostraneniya Radiovoln (IZMIRAN); Kofman, W. [Lab. de Planetologie de Grenoble, Grenoble (France)

    2001-03-01

    Physical interpretation is made of the O{sup +}/Ne diurnal variations in summer, revealed by Litvine et al. (1998) from the EISCAT observations. It is shown that the observed anti-correlation between the Z{sub 50} parameter, corresponding to the transition region between 50% of molecular and atomic ions, and the width D{sub z} of the transition, defined as the altitude width between 10% and 90% of the O{sup +}/Ne ratio, can be reproduced in model calculations and the result of different recombination laws (quadratic in the lower and linear in the upper ionosphere) as well as diurnal variations in the photoionization rates. (orig.)

  14. Structural Investigations of Afghanistan Deduced from Remote Sensing and Potential Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saibi Hakim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study integrates potential gravity and magnetic field data with remotely sensed images and geological data in an effort to understand the subsurface major geological structures in Afghanistan. Integrated analysis of Landsat SRTM data was applied for extraction of geological lineaments. The potential field data were analyzed using gradient interpretation techniques, such as analytic signal (AS, tilt derivative (TDR, horizontal gradient of the tilt derivative (HG-TDR, Euler Deconvolution (ED and power spectrum methods, and results were correlated with known geological structures.

  15. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris

    2016-01-01

    itself changes slowly, its time derivative can be locally (temporally and spatially) large, in particular when and where core surface secular acceleration peaks. Spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the flows are not well resolved, and many of them are strongly correlated. Averaging functions......Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them...

  16. Lower mantle thermal structure deduced from seismic tomography, mineral physics and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadek, O.; Yuen, D. A.; Steinbach, V.; Chopelas, A.; Matyska, C.

    1994-01-01

    The long-wavelength thermal anomalies in the lower mantle have been mapped out using several seismic tomographic models in conjunction with thermodynamic parameters derived from high-pressure mineral physics experiments. These parameters are the depth variations of thermal expansivity and of the proportionality factor between changes in density and seismic velocity. The giant plume-like structures in the lower mantle under the Pacific Ocean and Africa have outer fringes with thermal anomalies around 300-400 K, but very high temperatures are found in the center of the plumes near the base of the core-mantle boundary. These extreme values can exceed +1500 K and may reflect large hot thermal anomalies in the lower mantle, which are supported by recent measurements of high melting temperatures of perovskite and iron. Extremely cold anomalies, around -1500 K, are found for anomalies in the deep mantle around the Pacific rim and under South America. Numerical simulations show that large negative thermal anomalies in the mid-lower mantle have modest magnitudes of around -500 K. correlation pattern exists between the present-day locations of cold masses in the lower mantle and the sites of past subduction since the Cretaceous. Results from correlation analysis show that the slab mass-flux in the lower mantle did not conform to a steady-state nature but exhibited time-dependent behavior.

  17. Moisture transport pathways into the American Southwest from multiple oceanic sources as deduced from hydrogen isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, M.; Sharp, Z. D.; Gutzler, D. S.

    2006-12-01

    There has been a long-standing controversy regarding the oceanic sources of atmospheric moisture over the southwestern US, especially during the summer monsoon circulation. Past arguments have been made for moisture sources in the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of California, Eastern Pacific, or some combination thereof. To help resolve this problem, we are using hydrogen isotopes as a tracer to reconstruct the history of moisture being advected into central New Mexico. The hydrogen isotope composition (δD) of water vapor is dependent on many factors, including the temperature of the source ocean, rainout history, contributions from evapotranspiration over the continent, and mixing between air masses. Since April 1, 2005 we have been measuring δD of atmospheric water vapor (δDwv) at ground level 1 to 3 times per day. In addition, we periodically collect water vapor in ~300m vertical increments to ~3km above the surface using a light aircraft. We see significant temporal variations in δDwv on several different scales in the ground-level δDwv measurements. Lower δDwv values in the winter are consistent with moisture transport from the Pacific Ocean, while larger δDwv values in the summer imply moisture from a warmer body of water. During the fall, winter, and spring, large variations in δDwv (up to 80‰) can occur over the period of a few days to a few hours whereas during the summer monsoon season the δDwv values are much less variable. The relationship between δDwv and dew point also varies throughout the year; good correlations exist through portions of spring, fall, and winter, while at other times no correlation is apparent. During the summer monsoon season, a distinctive anticorrelation exists between dew point and δDwv. Using trajectory analyses, we have been able to demonstrate that many of the variations in δDwv can be explained by changes in moisture transport pathways. It appears that the source of the moisture being advected into central New Mexico can

  18. An interpretation of ion composition diurnal variation deduced from EISCAT observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    Full Text Available Physical interpretation is made of the O+/Ne diurnal variations in summer, revealed by Litvine et al. (1998 from the EISCAT observations. It is shown that the observed anti-correlation between the Z50 parameter, corresponding to the transition region between 50% of molecular and atomic ions, and the width Dz of the transition, defined as the altitude width between 10% and 90% of the O+/Ne ratio, can be reproduced in model calculations and the result of different recombination laws (quadratic in the lower and linear in the upper ionosphere as well as diurnal variations in the photo-ionization rates.

    Key words.Ionosphere (ion chemistry and composition; modeling and forecasting

  19. Dendroclimatic signals deduced from riparian versus upland forest interior pines in North Karelia, Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helama, Samuli; Arentoft, Birgitte W.; Collin-Haubensak, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Radial growth of boreal tree species is only rarely studied in riparian habitats. Here we investigated chronologies of earlywood, latewood, and annual ring widths and blue intensity (BI; a surrogate to latewood density) from riparian lake shore and upland forest interior pines (Pinus sylvestris L...... with the tree-ring chronologies were related to snow conditions at the start of the growing season. Deeper snowpack led to reduced upland pine growth, possibly due to delayed snowmelt and thus postponed onset of the growing season. Warm late winters were followed by increased riparian pine growth because...... a strong correlation with warm-season temperatures, indicating an encouraging possibility of summer temperature reconstruction using middle/south boreal pine tree-ring archives....

  20. Declining moisture availability in late Eocene Antarctica as deduced from Nothofagus sporopollenin δ13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griener, K. W.; Nelson, D. M.; Warny, S.

    2012-12-01

    Palynological data demonstrate that significant changes in vegetation and climate occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene (E-O) Boundary on the Antarctic Peninsula. These changes include decreases in terrestrial palynomorph abundance and diversity as well as dinoflagellate assemblages that reflect colder sea surface temperatures and increased glaciation (Warny and Askin, 2011). Understanding the factors controlling these changes in climate and vegetation is a topic of great interest. One area of remaining uncertainty is how the hydrologic regime varied during Antarctica's shift from greenhouse to icehouse conditions. For example, estimates of Antarctic precipitation from around the E-O boundary based on plant leaf margins (e.g. Francis et al., 2008), clay mineralogy (e.g. Christian and Kennett, 1997), and models (Thorn and DeConto 2006) are vastly different. We used a moving-wire device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (Sessions et al., 2005; Nelson et al., 2008) to analyze δ13C of small quantities of Nothofagus sporopollenin extracted from Antarctic Eocene SHALDRIL cores from ~35.9 Mya, just prior to the E-O Boundary (Bohaty et al., 2011). We also analyzed δ13C of modern Nothofagus sporopollenin from herbaria specimens and related these results to historical climate data. Our modern data show that carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) of Nothofagus sporopollenin is positively correlated with mean annual and growing-season precipitation, consistent with prior studies that demonstrate a strong relationship between Δ and water availability in C3 plants. Eocene Nothofagus Δ values progressively decreased through time, implying a decline in moisture availability. There is a close correlation between Nothofagus palynomorph abundance (Warny and Askin, 2011) and Δ, indicating that Nothofagus abundance declined in response to decreasing moisture availability. We consider changes in sea surface temperatures as well as increased glaciation as possible causes

  1. Oscillatory electron phonon coupling in Pb/Si(111) deduced by temperature-dependent quantum well states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yan-Feng; Jia Jin-Feng; Han Tie-Zhu; Tang Zhe; Shen Quan-Tong; Guo Yang; Xue Qi-Kun

    2005-01-01

    Photoemission study of atomically flat Pb films with a thickness from 15 to 24 monolayers (ML) have been performed within a temperature range 75-270K. Well-defined quantum well states (QWSs) are observed, which exhibit interesting temperature-dependent behaviours. The peak position of the QWSs shifts towards higher binding energy with increasing substrate temperature, whereas the peak width broadens linearly due to enhanced electron-phonon coupling strength (λ). An oscillatory λ with a period of 2ML is deduced. Preliminary analysis shows that the oscillation can be explained in terms of the interface induced phase variations, and is thus a manifestation of the quantum size effects.

  2. Properties of post-shock solar wind deduced from geomagnetic indices responses after sudden impulses

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shock plays a key role in causing the global dynamic changes of the geospace environment. For the perspective of Solar-Terrestrial relationship, it will be of great importance to estimate the properties of post-shock solar wind simply and accurately. Motivated by this, we performed a statistical analysis of IP shocks during 1998-2008, focusing on the significantly different responses of two well-used geomagnetic indices (SYMH and AL) to the passive of two types of IP shocks. For the IP shocks with northward IMF (91 cases), the SYMH index keeps on the high level after the sudden impulses (SI) for a long time. Meanwhile, the change of AL index is relative small, with an mean value of only -29 nT. However, for the IP shocks with southward IMF (92 cases), the SYMH index suddenly decreases at a certain rate after SI, and the change of AL index is much significant, of -316 nT. Furthermore, the change rate of SYMH index after SI is found to be linearly correlated with the post-shock reconnection ...

  3. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, C.; Lühr, H.; Ma, S. Y.; Stolle, C.; Fejer, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload) fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). We filtered the FGM data by using band-passes with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different maximum spatial scale sizes in the meridional plane ranging from 76-608 km. Associated with the EPB observations at about 400 km, the typical altitude of CHAMP during the year 2000-2005, we also investigate the post-sunset equatorial vertical plasma drift data from ROCSAT-1 (Republic of China Satellite 1). Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010). Small-scale EPB structures are observed by CHAMP when the irregularities reach apex heights of 800 km and more. Such events are encountered primarily in the Brazilian sector during the months around November, when the post-sunset vertical plasma drift is high.

  4. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xiong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload fluxgate magnetometer (FGM data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs. We filtered the FGM data by using band-passes with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different maximum spatial scale sizes in the meridional plane ranging from 76–608 km. Associated with the EPB observations at about 400 km, the typical altitude of CHAMP during the year 2000–2005, we also investigate the post-sunset equatorial vertical plasma drift data from ROCSAT-1 (Republic of China Satellite 1. Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010. Small-scale EPB structures are observed by CHAMP when the irregularities reach apex heights of 800 km and more. Such events are encountered primarily in the Brazilian sector during the months around November, when the post-sunset vertical plasma drift is high.

  5. Adult Opisthorchis felineus major protein fractions deduced from transcripts: comparison with liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomaznoy, Mikhail; Tatkov, Sergey; Katokhin, Alexey; Afonnikov, Dmitry; Babenko, Vladimir; Furman, Dagmara; Brusentsov, Ilya; Belavin, Pavel; Najakshin, Alexandr; Guselnikov, Sergey; Vasiliev, Gennady; Sivkov, Anton; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Skryabin, Konstantin; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav

    2013-10-01

    The epidemiologically important liver flukes Opisthorchis felineus, Opisthorchis viverrini, and Clonorchis sinensis are of interest to health professionals, epidemiologists, pharmacologists, and molecular biologists. Recently the transcriptomes of the latter two species were intensively investigated. However our knowledge on molecular biology of O. felineus is scarce. We report the first results of the O. felineus transcriptome analysis. We isolated and annotated a total of 2560 expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from adult O. felineus (deposited within the database of expressed sequence tags (dbEST), under accession numbers GenBank: JK624271-JK626790, JK006511-JK006547, JK649790-JK649792). Clustering and analysis resulted in the detection of 267 contigs. Of the protein sequences deduced from these, 82% had homologs in the NCBI (nr) protein database and 63% contained conserved domains, allowing the functions to be interpreted using the Gene Ontology terms. Comprehensive analysis of Opisthorchiidae- and Trematoda-specific substitutions within amino acid sequences deduced for the proteins myoglobin, vitelline precursor protein, cathepsin F, and 28kDa glutathione transferase was carried out. The gene set of the 32 ribosomal proteins for the three Opisthorchiidae species with the addition of available Schistosoma and Fasciola orthologs was created and is provided in the supplementary. The orthologous gene set created was used for inferring phylogeny within the Trematoda with special attention to interrelations within the Opisthorchiidae. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a closer relationship between C. sinensis and O. viverrini and some divergence of O. felineus from either O. viverrini or C. sinensis.

  6. Paleoclimate variability during the Blake geomagnetic excursion (MIS 5d) deduced from a speleothem record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Carlos; Mertz-Kraus, Regina; Osete, María-Luisa

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate possible connections between climate and the Earth's magnetic field, we examine paleoclimate proxies in a stalagmite (PA-8) recording the Blake excursion (˜112-˜116.4 ka) from Cobre cave (N Spain). Trace element, δ13C, δ18O, δ234U, fluorescent lamination, growth rate, and paleomagnetic records were synchronized using a floating lamina-counted chronology constrained by U-Th dates, providing a high-resolution multi-proxy paleoclimate record for MIS 5d. The alpine cave setting and the combination of proxies contributed to improve the confidence of the paleoclimatic interpretation. Periods of relatively warm and humid climate likely favored forest development and resulted in high speleothem growth rates, arguably annual fluorescent laminae, low δ13C and [Mg], and increased [Sr] and [Ba]. Colder periods limited soil activity and drip water availability, leading to reduced speleothem growth, poor development of fluorescent lamination, enhanced water-rock interaction leading to increased [Mg], δ13C, and δ234U, and episodic flooding. In the coldest and driest period recorded, evaporation caused simultaneous 18O and 13C enrichments and perturbed the trace element patterns. The Blake took place in a relatively warm interestadial at the inception of the Last Glacial period, but during a global cooling trend recorded in PA-8 by an overall decrease of δ18O and growth rate and increasing [Mg]. That trend culminated in the cessation of growth between ˜112 and ˜101 ka likely due to the onset of local glaciation correlated with Greenland stadial 25. That trend is consistent with a link between low geomagnetic intensity and climate cooling, but it does not prove it. Shorter term changes in relative paleointensity (RPI) relate to climate changes recorded in PA-8, particularly a prominent RPI low from ˜114.5 to ˜113 ka coincident with a significant cooling indicated by all proxy records, suggesting a link between geomagnetic intensity and climate at millennial

  7. Observed and modeled global-ocean turbulence regimes as deduced from surface trajectory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Jenny A. U.; Döös, Kristofer; Ruti, Paolo Michele; Artale, Vincenzo; Coward, Andrew; Brodeau, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to follow up and remember the work on Lagrangian diffusion undertaken by Volfango Rupolo, who died prematurely nearly three years ago. It was within this field that he achieved the highest of creativity, and his rather recent 2007 work Rupolo (2007) is undoubtedly the fullest and most important example. In that paper, he identified the utility of the relationship between the acceleration and velocity time scales of Lagrangian trajectories, and he separated these trajectories into four homogenous classes according to their correlation and dispersal properties. This classification is better known as 'trajectories taxonomy' and can be used to characterize and separate different turbulence regimes in the global ocean (Rupolo, 2007). He showed that the Lagrangian time scales could be obtained from the inverse use of Lagrangian Stochastic Models, and proposed a screening method for rationalizing the data analysis using the time scale relationships, and successfully applied it to both drifter and Argo-float observations. In the present study, his data analysis methods have been extended to study and evaluate trajectories from both surface drifters and an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with different grid resolutions. The drifter data can most accurately be described as quasi-Lagrangian trajectories due to the fact that although the buoy is freely drifting in the horizontal plane, it is anchored at 15 m depth by its drogue, and thus the observed trajectories represent a two-dimensional (2D) approximation of the surrounding flow field. The model trajectories were obtained by analytical computations of the particle advection equation, using the Lagrangian open-source software package TRACMASS, in the near-surface velocity fields from three different configurations of the global NEMO Ocean/Sea-Ice general circulation model. In global-scale ocean modeling, compromises are frequently made in terms of grid resolution and time-averaging of the output

  8. Optical correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boden, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    A survey is given of the most common types of coherent optical correlators, which are classified as spatial plane correlators, frequency plane correlators and special reference correlators. Only the spatial plane correlators are dealt with rather thoroughly. Basic principles, some special features,

  9. Intra-plasmaspheric wave power density deduced from long-term DEMETER measurements of terrestrial VLF transmitter wave amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauben, D.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U.

    2012-12-01

    We deduce the 3d intra-plasmaspheric distribution of VLF wave power between conjugate regions of strong VLF wave amplitudes as measured by DEMETER for high-power terrestrial VLF transmitters during its ~6-yr lifetime. We employ a mixed WKB/full-wave technique to solve for the primary and secondary electromagnetic and electrostatic waves which are transmitted and reflected from strong cold-plasma density gradients and posited irregularities, in order to match the respective end-point measured amplitude distributions. Energy arriving in the conjugate region and also escaping to other regions of the magnetosphere is note. The resulting 3d distribution allows improved estimates for the long-term average particle scattering induced by terrestrial VLF transmitters.

  10. Submarine paleoseismology of the northern Hikurangi subduction margin of New Zealand as deduced from Turbidite record since 16 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouderoux, Hugo; Proust, Jean-Noël; Lamarche, Geoffroy

    2014-01-01

    Paleoseismic studies seek to characterise the signature of pre-historical earthquakes by deriving quantitative information from the geological record such as the source, magnitude and recurrence of moderate to large earthquakes. In this study, we provide a ˜16,000 yr-long paleo-earthquake record of the 200 km-long northern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand, using cm-thick deep-sea turbidites identified in sediment cores. Cores were collected in strategic locations across the margin within three distinct morphological re-entrants - the Poverty, Ruatoria and Matakaoa re-entrants. The turbidite facies vary from muddy to sandy with evidence for rare hyperpycnites interbedded with hemipelagites and tephra. We use the Oxal probabilistic software to model the age of each turbidite, using the sedimentation rate of hemipelagite deduced from well-dated tephra layers and radiocarbon ages measurements on planktonic foraminifera.

  11. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  12. 16s rRNA的保守字和进化树重建%Conserved Words in 16s Ribosomal RNA Deduced from Evolutionary Tree Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗辽复; 贾孟文

    2002-01-01

    Evolutionary distance is defined by oligonucleotide (n-bases) frequency difference of two sequences.Phylogenetic tree is reconstructed using a set of 16S (18S) rRNA sequences and the definition of distance.The quality of trees generally improves with increasing n and reaches a plateau of best fit at n=7 or 8.So,the 7-mer or 8-mer frequencies provides a basis to describe rRNA evolution.Then,a group of 7-mers are deduced which are correlate well with evolution.Evolution-related conservative words longer than 7 bases for Bacteria and Archaea in 16S rRNA sequences have been found.They are highly conserved in nearly all species of a kingdom (or a sub-kingdom) and are located on nearly same sites of sequences. The structural meaning of these conservative words is discussed briefly.%据寡核苷(n核苷)频数差定义进化距离,由此构成16s rRNA进化树,当n=7,8时和实验资料符合很好,在寻找出全部进化相关的7-核苷的基础上,本文进一步求得了长度大于7的保守字,它们在一个界别中的诸物种中高度保守,并出现于核糖体序列的基本相同的位置上,这些保守字对于核糖体的早期进化至关重要.

  13. Building information deduced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Myrup Jensen, Morten; Beetz, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    that in practice models are no longer solely observed as culmination of knowledge in a 3d representation of future built structures, but as a source of information in itself. Experienced users of BIM want to Find Information within a model or across a set of these and Compare models in order to evaluate states......In recent years, Building Information Models have become commonplace in building profession. The extensive use and increasing experience with BIM models offers new perspectives and potentials for design and planning. A recent stakeholder study conducted by the authors of this paper show...... of a model, differences in separate models or models from different point of time. Current BIM tools support both modes only in a rudimentary form. This paper discusses current modes of information query within and across BIM models, shows beneficial scenarios for building and planning practice through...

  14. Building information deduced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Myrup Jensen, Morten; Beetz, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, Building Information Models have become commonplace in building profession. The extensive use and increasing experience with BIM models offers new perspectives and potentials for design and planning. A recent stakeholder study conducted by the authors of this paper show...... of a model, differences in separate models or models from different point of time. Current BIM tools support both modes only in a rudimentary form. This paper discusses current modes of information query within and across BIM models, shows beneficial scenarios for building and planning practice through...... that in practice models are no longer solely observed as culmination of knowledge in a 3d representation of future built structures, but as a source of information in itself. Experienced users of BIM want to Find Information within a model or across a set of these and Compare models in order to evaluate states...

  15. Geomechanical log deduced from porosity and mineralogical content; Diagraphie geomecanique deduite de la porosite et de la composition mineralogique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemer, E.; Vincke, O.; Longuemare, P. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    2004-07-01

    The 'geomechanical log' research project aims at estimating rock mechanical properties from a set of models, whose input data can be deduced from drilling logs and measurements on core samples (if these are available). The key point is to focus on defining relatively general and easy to handle models. In this paper, we propose various analytical models allowing one to estimate poroelastic and failure properties of limestones and sandstones directly from their porosity and, in the specific case of sandstone poroelastic characteristics, their mineralogical content. The properties obtained are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The second step of the project will be to actually infer the input data for the models (here porosity and mineral content) from drilling logs and to compare the results obtained to tests on core samples. A geomechanical log could then be automatically created from standard logs and help to optimize drilling. We also intend to test the same approaches on rock plastic properties and shale behavior. (authors)

  16. Deducing receptor signaling parameters from in vivo analysis: LuxN/AI-1 quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swem, Lee R.; Swem, Danielle L.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing, a process of bacterial cell-cell communication, relies on production, detection, and response to autoinducer signaling molecules. Here we focus on LuxN, a nine transmembrane domain protein from Vibrio harveyi, and the founding example of membrane-bound receptors for acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducers. Previously, nothing was known about signal recognition by membrane-bound AHL receptors. We used mutagenesis and suppressor analyses to identify the AHL-binding domain of LuxN, and discovered LuxN mutants that confer decreased and increased AHL sensitivity. Our analysis of dose-response curves of multiple LuxN mutants pins these inverse phenotypes on quantifiable opposing shifts in the free-energy bias of LuxN for its kinase and phosphatase states. To extract signaling parameters, we exploited a strong LuxN antagonist, one of fifteen small-molecule antagonists we identified. We find that quorum-sensing-mediated communication can be manipulated positively and negatively to control bacterial behavior, and that signaling parameters can be deduced from in vivo data. PMID:18692469

  17. New prospects for deducing the evolutionary history of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes: Aromatic biosynthesis as a case-in-point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Suhail; Jensen, Roy A.

    1988-03-01

    Metabolic pathways of prokaryotes are more biochemically diverse than is generally recognized. Distinctive biochemical features are shared by phylogenetic clusters. The hierarchical levels of characterstate clustering depends upon evolutionary events which fortuitously became fixed in the genome of a common ancestor. Prokaryotes can now be ordered on a phylogenetic tree. This allows the evolutionary steps that underlie the construction and regulation of appropriately complex biochemical pathways to be traced in an evolutionary progression of prokaryote types that house these pathways. Essentially the approach is to deduce ancestral character states at ever deeper phylogenetic levels, utilizing logical principles of maximum parsimony. The current perspective on the evolution of the biochemical pathway for biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids is developed as a case-in-point model for analyses that should be feasible with many major metabolic systems. Phenylalanine biosynthesis probably arose prior to the addition of branches leading to tyrosine and tryptophan. An evolutionary scenario is developed that begins with non-enzymatic reactions which may have operated in primitive systems, followed by the evolution of an enzymatic system that pre-dated the divergence of major lineages of modern eubacteria (Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative purple bacteria, and cyanobacteria).

  18. Neutron spectrum and yield of the Hiroshima A-bomb deduced from radionuclide measurements at one location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, W; Kato, K; Korschinek, G; Morinaga, H; Nolte, E

    1995-07-01

    In this paper measurements of the radionuclides of 36Cl, 41Ca, 60Co, 152Eu and 154Eu in samples from Hiroshima, which were exposed to neutrons of the A-bomb explosion, are interpreted. In order to calculate the neutron spectrum at the sample site, neutron transport calculations using Monte Carlo techniques were carried out. Activation profiles in a granite mock-up irradiated with reactor neutrons could be reproduced by this method using DS86 input parameters. The calculated neutron spectrum at the sample site for non-thermal neutrons is identical to that obtained in DS86, but contains some 50% more thermal neutrons. The influence of parameters like soil composition, source terms and air humidity on the activation of these radioisotopes is discussed. The granite-covered earth at the sample site, for example, hardens the spectrum in comparison with DS86 values. Even when using a fission spectrum pointing downward and neglecting air humidity one cannot explain our 36Cl measurements. If the effective thermal neutron fluences, that have a similar ratio of resonance integral to thermal neutron capture cross sections obtained from 36Cl, 41Ca and 152Eu, are averaged, a bomb yield of about 16 kt is deduced in agreement with a bomb yield of (15 +/- 3) kt estimated in DS86.

  19. Deducing the 236Pu(n,f) and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections via the surrogate ratio method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. O.; Beausang, C. W.; Ross, T. J.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; McCleskey, M.; Cooper, N.; Escher, J. E.; Gell, K. B.; Good, E.; Humby, P.; Saastimoinen, A.; Tarlow, T. D.

    2013-10-01

    The short half-lives associated with certain minor actinide nuclei that are relevant to stockpile stewardship pursuits and the development of next-generation nuclear reactors make direct neutron measurements very challenging. In certain cases, a stable beam and target ``surrogate reaction'' can be used in lieu of the neutron-induced reaction, and the (n,f) cross section can then be deduced indirectly. Agreement between surrogate and direct measurements for (n,f) cross sections in actinide nuclei is usually within 10%. The present work reports on the measurement of the 236Pu(n,f) and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections via 239Pu(p,tf) and 239Pu(p,df) surrogate reactions, respectively. The experiment was performed at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Facility using a 28.5 MeV proton beam to bombard 239Pu and 235U targets. Outgoing light ions were detected in coincidence with fission fragments using the STAR-LiTe detector array. Results of the analysis will be presented. This work was supported by DoE Grant Numbers: DE-FG52-09NA29454 and DE-FG02-05ER41379 (Richmond), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-FG52-09NA29467 (TAMU).

  20. Compressive stress field in the crust deduced from shear-wave anisotropy: an example in capital area of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yuan; WU Jing

    2008-01-01

    The rocks in the crust are pervaded by stress-aligned fluid-saturated microcracks, and the complex fault tectonics and stress control the configuration of the microcracks, however shear-wave splitting could indicate this kind of characteristics. In this paper, Capital Area Seismograph Network (CASN), the widest scope and highest density of regional seismograph network presently in China, is adopted to deduce the principal compressive stress field distribution pattern from polarizations of fast shear-waves, based on shear-wave splitting analysis. The principal compressive stress in capital area of China is at NE85.7°±41.0° in this study. Compared with the results of principal compressive stress field in North China obtained from other methods, the results in this study are reliable in the principal com-pressive stress field distribution in capital area. The results show that it is an effective way, although it is the first time to directly obtain crustal stress field from seismic anisotropy. It is effectively applied to the zones with dense seismograph stations.

  1. QSRR correlation of free-radical polymerization chain-transfer constants for styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatz-Hoover, F; Petrukhin, R; Karelson, M; Katritzky, A R

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative structure-reactivity relationships (QSRR) are deduced for kinetic chain-transfer constants for 90 agents on styrene polymerization at 60 degrees C. Three- and five-parameter correlations were obtained with R2 of 0.725 and 0.818, respectively. The descriptors involved in the correlations are consistent with the proposed mechanism of the chain-transfer reactions.

  2. Second-order spatial correlation in the far-field: Comparing entangled and classical light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Erfeng, E-mail: efzhang@163.com; Liu, Weitao; Lin, Huizu; Chen, Pingxing

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field is investigated. • The role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. • The difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced. - Abstract: We consider second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field. The quantum theory of second-order spatial correlation is analyzed, and the role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. Meanwhile, the difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced.

  3. Score Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Fabián, Z. (Zdeněk)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study a distribution-dependent correlation coefficient based on the concept of scalar score. This new measure of association of continuous random variables is compared by means of simulation experiments with the Pearson, Kendall and Spearman correlation coefficients.

  4. Current deformation in Central Afar and triple junction kinematics deduced from GPS and InSAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubre, Cécile; Déprez, Aline; Masson, Frédéric; Socquet, Anne; Lewi, Elias; Grandin, Raphaël; Nercessian, Alexandre; Ulrich, Patrice; De Chabalier, Jean-Bernard; Saad, Ibrahim; Abayazid, Ahmadine; Peltzer, Gilles; Delorme, Arthur; Calais, Eric; Wright, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Kinematics of divergent boundaries and Rift-Rift-Rift junctions are classically studied using long-term geodetic observations. Since significant magma-related displacements are expected, short-term deformation provides important constraints on the crustal mechanisms involved both in active rifting and in transfer of extensional deformation between spreading axes. Using InSAR and GPS data, we analyse the surface deformation in the whole Central Afar region in detail, focusing on both the extensional deformation across the Quaternary magmato-tectonic rift segments, and on the zones of deformation transfer between active segments and spreading axes. The largest deformation occurs across the two recently activated Asal-Ghoubbet (AG) and Manda Hararo-Dabbahu (MH-D) magmato-tectonic segments with very high strain rates, whereas the other Quaternary active segments do not concentrate any large strain, suggesting that these rifts are either sealed during interdyking periods or not mature enough to remain a plate boundary. Outside of these segments, the GPS horizontal velocity field shows a regular gradient following a clockwise rotation of the displacements from the Southeast to the East of Afar, with respect to Nubia. Very few shallow creeping structures can be identified as well in the InSAR data. However, using these data together with the strain rate tensor and the rotations rates deduced from GPS baselines, the present-day strain field over Central Afar is consistent with the main tectonic structures, and therefore with the long-term deformation. We investigate the current kinematics of the triple junction included in our GPS data set by building simple block models. The deformation in Central Afar can be described by adding a central microblock evolving separately from the three surrounding plates. In this model, the northern block boundary corresponds to a deep EW-trending trans-tensional dislocation, locked from the surface to 10-13 km and joining at depth the

  5. Comparison of GOME tropospheric NO2 columns with NO2 profiles deduced from ground-based in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schaub

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 vertical tropospheric column densities (VTCs retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME are compared to coincident ground-based tropospheric NO2 columns. The ground-based columns are deduced from in situ measurements at different altitudes in the Alps for 1997 to June 2003, yielding a unique long-term comparison of GOME NO2 VTC data retrieved by a collaboration of KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute and BIRA/IASB (Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy with independently derived tropospheric NO2 profiles. A first comparison relates the GOME retrieved tropospheric columns to the tropospheric columns obtained by integrating the ground-based NO2 measurements. For a second comparison, the tropospheric profiles constructed from the ground-based measurements are first multiplied with the averaging kernel (AK of the GOME retrieval. The second approach makes the comparison independent from the a priori NO2 profile used in the GOME retrieval. This allows splitting the total difference between the column data sets into two contributions: one that is due to differences between the a priori and the ground-based NO2 profile shapes, and another that can be attributed to uncertainties in both the remaining retrieval parameters (such as, e.g., surface albedo or aerosol concentration and the ground-based in situ NO2 profiles. For anticyclonic clear sky conditions the comparison indicates a good agreement between the columns (n=157, R=0.70/0.74 for the first/second comparison approach, respectively. The mean relative difference (with respect to the ground-based columns is −7% with a standard deviation of 40% and GOME on average slightly underestimating the ground-based columns. Both data sets show a similar seasonal behaviour with a distinct maximum of spring NO2 VTCs. Further analysis indicates small GOME columns being systematically smaller than the ground-based ones. The influence of different shapes in the a

  6. Global significance of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high-resolution seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, K.; Tittgemeyer, M.; Ryberg, T.; Wenzel, F.; Mooney, W.

    2002-01-01

    an on-going processes; nevertheless, the derived quantitative estimates of the SMBL properties provide important constraints for any hypothesis on scale-forming processes. Models to be tested by future numerical and field experiments are, for example, repeated subduction-convection stretching of oceanic lithosphere (marble-cake model) and schlieren formation at mid-ocean ridges. It is also proposed that the modeling of the observed blocking of Sn and Pn propagation at active plate margins offers a new tool to study the depth range of tectonics below the crust-mantle boundary. Finally, the deduced schlieren structure of the SMBL closes an important scale gap of three to four orders of magnitude between structural dimensions studied in petrological analysis of mantle samples (xenoliths or outcrop of oceanic lithosphere) and those imaged in classical seismological studies of the lithosphere.

  7. Deducing the magma chamber processes of middle Eocene volcanics, Sivas and Tokat regions; NE Turkey: Insights from clinopyroxene chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göçmengil, Gönenç; Karacık, Zekiye; Genç, Ş. Can; Prelevic, Dejan

    2016-04-01

    Middle Eocene Tokat and Sivas volcanic successions occur within the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone. Different models are suggested for the development of the middle Eocene volcanism such as post-collisional, delamination and slab-breakoff models as well as the arc magmatism. In both areas, volcanic units cover all the basement units with a regional disconformity and comprise lavas spanning a compositional range from mainly basalt-basaltic andesite to a lesser amount trachyte. Here, we report mineral chemistry of different basaltic lavas through transect from northern continent (Tokat region, Pontides) to southern continent (Sivas region, Kırşehir block) to deduce the characteristics of the magma chamber processes which are active during the middle Eocene. Basaltic lavas include olivine bearing basalts (Ol-basalt: ± olivine + clinopyroxene + plagioclase); amphibole bearing basaltic andesite (Amp-basaltic andesite: amphibole + clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± biotite) and pyroxene bearing basaltic andesite (Px-basaltic andesite: clinopyroxene + plagioclase). Microlitic, glomeroporphyric and pilotaxitic texture are common. Clinopyroxene phenocrystals (macro ≥ 750 μm and micro ≤300 μm) are common in all three lava series which are investigated by transecting core to rim compositional profiles. They are generally augite and diopside; euhedral to subhedral in shape with oscillatory, normal and reverse zoning patterns. Also, all clinopyroxene phenocrystals are marked by moderately high Mg# (for Ol-basalt: 67-91; avg. 80; Amp-basaltic andesite: 76-83, avg: 80; Px -basaltic andesite 68-95, avg: 81). In Ol-basalt, clinopyroxene phenocrystals show normal zonation (high Mg# cores and low Mg# rims). In Amp-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxenes are generally homogenous in composition with minor variation of Mg# towards the rims. On the contrary, in Px-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxene macro phenocrystals show reverse zonation with the core with low Mg# and the rims with

  8. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M

    2014-12-01

    Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of "smart dimensions", and dynamically-generated user interfaces. DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort "join" functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source system changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  9. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: The Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M.; Rusincovitch, Shelley A.; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C.; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Methods Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of “smart dimensions”, and dynamically-generated user interfaces. Results DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort “join” functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Conclusions Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source

  10. Nuclear disassembly time scales using space time correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, D.; Colin, J.; Lecolley, J.F.; Meslin, C.; Aboufirassi, M.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Bilwes, B.; Cosmo, F. [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France); Galin, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); and others

    1996-09-01

    The lifetime, {tau}, with respect to multifragmentation of highly excited nuclei is deduced from the analysis of strongly damped Pb+Au collisions at 29 MeV/u. The method is based on the study of space-time correlations induced by `proximity` effects between fragments emitted by the two primary products of the reaction and gives the time between the re-separation of the two primary products and the subsequent multifragment decay of one partner. (author). 2 refs.

  11. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  12. Correlator technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schooneveld, C. van

    1968-01-01

    The paper reviews a number of designs of cross-correlation receivers for the detection of active underwater transmissions. Particular attention is given to the various structures of phase insensitive receivers, and to the problems concerned with clipping of the input signal and the reference functio

  13. Ionospheric Response to the Total Solar Eclipse of 22 July 2009 as Deduced from VLBI and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Shu, F. C.; Zheng, W. M.; Kondo, T.; Ichikawa, R.; Hasegawa, S.; Sekido, M.

    2010-01-01

    A total solar eclipse occurred over China at latitudes of about 30 N on the morning of 22 July 2009, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the influence of the sun on the earth's upper ionosphere. GPS observations from Shanghai GPS Local Network and VLBI observations from stations Shanghai, Urumqi, and Kashima were used to observe the response of TEC to the total solar eclipse. From the GPS data reduction, the sudden decrease of TEC at the time of the eclipse, amounting to 2.8 TECU, and gradual increase of TEC after the eclipse were found by analyzing the diurnal variations. More distinctly, the variations of TEC were studied along individual satellite passes. The delay in reaching the minimum level of TEC with the maximum phase of eclipse was 5-10 min. Besides, we also compared the ionospheric activity derived from different VLBI stations with the GPS results and found a strong correlation between them.

  14. Nanocrystalline tin oxide: Possible origin of its weak ferromagnetism deduced from nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Lian, Yadong; Gu, Min; Yu, Ji; Tang, Tong B.; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Weiyi

    2016-09-01

    Nanocrystalline tin oxide was fabricated, with molar ratio O/Sn determined as 1.40, 1.55, 1.79, 1.92 and 1.96 from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They displayed weak ferromagnetism, the sample with O/Sn = 1.55 showing the maximum saturation magnetization reaching almost 8 ×10-3 emu /g at room temperature. 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance allowed the deduction, based on four resolved resonance peaks, that their Sn ions had four possible coordination numbers, namely 3, 4, 5 and 6. The relative fraction of 4-coordinated cations was the one found to bear positive linear correlation with saturation magnetization of the sample. It is surmised that magnetism in tin oxide results mainly from 4-coordination Sn ions, of valance about +3, as estimated from the binding energies of their 3d photoelectron emission levels.

  15. Least-squares analysis of clock frequency comparison data to deduce optimized frequency and frequency ratio values

    CERN Document Server

    Margolis, H S

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for analysing over-determined sets of clock frequency comparison data involving standards based on a number of different reference transitions. This least-squares adjustment procedure, which is based on the method used by CODATA to derive a self-consistent set of values for the fundamental physical constants, can be used to derive optimized values for the frequency ratios of all possible pairs of reference transitions. It is demonstrated to reproduce the frequency values recommended by the International Committee for Weights and Measures, when using the same input data used to derive those values. The effects of including more recently published data in the evaluation is discussed and the importance of accounting for correlations between the input data is emphasised.

  16. Implications of two-body fragment decay for the interpretation of emission chronology from velocity-gated correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Helgesson, J; Ekman, J; Helgesson, Johan; Ghetti, Roberta; Jorgen Ekman

    2006-01-01

    From velocity-gated small-angle correlation functions the emission chronology can be deduced for non-identical particles, if the emission is independent. This is not the case for non-identical particles that originate from two-body decay of fragments. Experimental results may contain contributions from both independent emission and two-body decay, so care is needed in interpreting the velocity-gated correlation functions. It is shown that in some special cases, it is still possible to deduce the emission chronology, even if there is a contribution from two-body decay.

  17. Correlation spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  18. Concentrations of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in the free upper troposphere and lower stratosphere deduced from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 infrared solar occultation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results on the volume mixing ratio profiles of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, deduced from the spectroscopic analysis of IR solar absorption spectra obtained in the occultation mode with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during its mission aboard Spacelab 3. A comparison of the ATMOS measurements for both northern and southern latitudes with previous field investigations at low midlatitudes shows a relatively good agreement. Southern Hemisphere volume mixing ratio profiles for both molecules were obtained for the first time, as were the profiles for the Northern Hemisphere covering the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere simultaneously.

  19. Hole size distributions in cardo-based polymer membranes deduced from the lifetimes of ortho-positronium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Kinomura, A.; Kazama, S.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Haraya, K.; Mohamed, H. F. M.; O'Rourke, B. E.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the free volume size distributions of the cardo-based polymer membranes, where ortho-positronium (o-Ps) undergoes pick-off annihilation, the o-Ps lifetime distributions were analyzed by the LT9 programme. It was found that the cardo-based polysulfone membrane has much narrower o-Ps lifetime/hole size distributions than the cardo-based polyimide membranes with the 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) moiety. Further, the lifetime/hole size distributions of the cardo-based polymer membranes are appreciably broadened with increasing temperature. This suggests that in these membranes there are holes not only of different sizes but also of different thermal expansion coefficients. It is also shown that in a membrane with a wider hole size distribution the average o-Ps lifetime tends to be longer than would be expected from the correlation between the o-Ps lifetime and the total free volume for common polymers.

  20. Multi-scale Holocene Asian monsoon variability deduced from a twin-stalagmite record in southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Yongjin; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, Richard Lawrence; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Liu, Dianbing; Shao, Qingfeng; Deng, Chao; Zhang, Zhenqiu; Wang, Quan

    2016-07-01

    We present two isotopic (δ18O and δ13C) sequences of a twin-stalagmite from Zhuliuping Cave, southwestern China, with 230Th dates from 14.6 to 4.6 ka. The stalagmite δ18O record characterizes orbital- to decadal-scale variability of Asian summer monsoon (ASM) intensity, with the Holocene optimum period (HOP) between 9.8 and 6.8 ka BP which is reinforced by its co-varying δ13C data. The large multi-decadal scale amplitude of the cave δ18O indicates its high sensitivity to climate change. Four centennial-scale weak ASM events during the early Holocene are centered at 11.2, 10.8, 9.1 and 8.2 ka. They can be correlated to cold periods in the northern high latitudes, possibly resulting from rapid dynamics of atmospheric circulation associated with North Atlantic cooling. The 8.2 ka event has an amplitude more than two-thirds that of the Younger Dryas (YD), and is significantly stronger than other cave records in the Asia monsoon region, likely indicating a more severe dry climate condition at the cave site. At the end of the YD event, the δ13C record lags the δ18O record by 300-500 yr, suggesting a multi-centennial slow response of vegetation and soil processes to monsoon enhancement.

  1. MODERN CLIMATIC SIGNALS DEDUCED FROM STABLE ISOTOPE IN SHELLS IN XINGCUO LAKE SEDIMENTS,EAST TIBETAN PLATEAU, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Xingcuo lake, a closed one, is situated in eastern Tibetan Plateau. There are abundant snail shells Gyraulus sibirica in its sediments. Here we display the determining results of δ13C, δ18O in shell Gyraulus sibirica continuously preserved in Xincuo Lake sediments in the recent 50 years. And by coupling the indexes of δ13C, δ18O and instrumental meteorological data in its basin to build relative function relations among them, we probe quantitatively climatic signals recorded in those indexes. The results show that there are remarkable relations between δ13C proxy and precipitation,δ18O proxy and air temperature, of which correlative coefficient was 0. 89 and 0. 71, respectively. Besides, we also demonstrated that average variation between δ13C proxy and precipitation (dδ13C/dP) was 0. 027‰/mm and 1.64‰/℃ for δ18O and air temperature (dδ18O/dT).

  2. Deducing transmissivity from specific capacity in the heterogeneous upper aquifer system of Jifarah Plain, NW-Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Farrah, Nawal; Van Camp, Marc; Walraevens, Kristine

    2013-09-01

    The hydraulic characterisation of aquifer systems is important for the development of exploitation scenarios and management strategies. Especially in lithologically heterogeneous aquifers, local scale variations in transmissivity (T) may not be neglected. Field scale transmissivity values are usually derived from pumping tests, but in most cases their number and availability is rather limited. Therefore T values are often estimated from specific well capacities (SC) which can easily be measured in exploitation wells based on static and dynamic water levels. Empirical relations allow T to be calculated from SC values using a power law relation of the form T = A * SCN. In this paper this relation is investigated for three aquifers in north-west Lybia, using the results from step-drawdown tests which allow determination of well efficiencies, which can be incorporated into the regression analysis. The obtained fitting coefficients of the power law relations were compared with published values from other studies. Both parameters of the power law relation (scale factor and power coefficient) seem to be highly correlated following an exponential relationship (R2 = 0.89), reducing the T-SC relation to a single parameter equation, which is mainly related to lithology.

  3. Ergodic channel capacity of the spatial correlated rayleigh MIMO channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui-ping; WU Ping; LIU Ai-jun

    2007-01-01

    The theoretical capacity of the spatial correlated Rayleigh multiple input multiple output (MIMO) channel is an important issue in MIMO technology. In this article, an ergodic channel capacity formula of the spatial correlated rayleigh MIMO channel is provided, which is deduced when two antennas exist at either the transmitter or the receiver. The multi-dimensional least-squares fit algorithm is employed to narrow the difference between the theoretical formula capacity and the practical capacity. Simulation results show that the theoretical capacity approaches the practical one closely.

  4. Volume-energy correlations in the slow degrees of freedom of computer-simulated phospholipid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Pedersen, Ulf R; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2007-01-01

    Constant-pressure molecular-dynamics simulations of phospholipid membranes in the fluid phase reveal strong correlations between equilibrium fluctuations of volume and energy on the nanosecond time-scale. The existence of strong volume-energy correlations was previously deduced indirectly by Heimburg from experiments focusing on the phase transition between the fluid and the ordered gel phases. The correlations, which are reported here for three different membranes (DMPC, DMPS-Na, and DMPSH), have volume-energy correlation coefficients ranging from 0.81 to 0.89. The DMPC membrane was studied at two temperatures showing that the correlation coefficient increases as the phase transition is approached.

  5. An attempt to observe economy globalization: the cross correlation distance evolution of the top 19 GDP's

    CERN Document Server

    Miskiewicz, J; Miskiewicz, Janusz; Marcel Ausloos

    2005-01-01

    Economy correlations between the 19 richest countries are investigated through their Gross Domestic Product increments. A distance is defined between increment correlation matrix elements and their evolution studied as a function of time and time window size. Unidirectional and Bidirectional Minimal Length Paths are generated and analyzed for different time windows. A sort of critical correlation time window is found indicating a transition for best observations. The mean length path decreases with time, indicating stronger correlations. A new method for estimating a realistic minimal time window to observe correlations and deduce macroeconomy conclusions from such features is thus suggested.

  6. Crust and mantle lithospheric structure of the South China Sea and adjacent regions deduced from geophysical potential data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J.

    2016-12-01

    In order to investigate the lithospheric structure of the South China Sea and adjacent regions and it's lateral crustal density variations, we using a two-step approach. First the crustal and lithospheric mantle structure is calculated from the geoid height and elevation data combined with thermal analysis further constrained by seismic data. We then compute the 3D gravity effect of the resulting lithospheric structure to separate the measured Bouguer anomaly into its regional and local components. Our results show that for the majority of the study area the crustal thickness does correlate with the regional topography pattern. Moho depth varies from ˜10 km at the Central basin to ˜35 km at the continental shelf and slope zones. The lithosphere is thinner beneath the Central basin (˜70 km) and thicker underneath the continental shelf and slope zones (˜100 km). The residual gravity anomaly, obtained by subtraction of the regional components to the measured field, is analyzed in terms of the dominating upper crustal structures. Central basins and areas with high velocity layer are characterized by positive values (20 100 mGal), whereas the negative values are related to the Trough and Trench, such as Nansha Trough and Manila Trench and shallow basement depths(-100 -20 mGal). The transform boundary of continental-oceanic is consistent with the residual gravity anomaly gradient zone and is proposed accordingly. The variation of Moho and the residual gravity anomaly exists between the conjugate margins which demonstrated the asymmetric crustal extension of the South China Sea margin.

  7. Membrane fluidity profiles as deduced by saturation-recovery EPR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times of spin labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Feix, Jimmy B; Hyde, James S; Subczynski, Witold K

    2011-10-01

    There are no easily obtainable EPR spectral parameters for lipid spin labels that describe profiles of membrane fluidity. The order parameter, which is most often used as a measure of membrane fluidity, describes the amplitude of wobbling motion of alkyl chains relative to the membrane normal and does not contain explicitly time or velocity. Thus, this parameter can be considered as nondynamic. The spin-lattice relaxation rate (T(1)(-1)) obtained from saturation-recovery EPR measurements of lipid spin labels in deoxygenated samples depends primarily on the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety within the lipid bilayer. Thus, T(1)(-1) can be used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity that reflects local membrane dynamics. T(1)(-1) profiles obtained for 1-palmitoyl-2-(n-doxylstearoyl)phosphatidylcholine (n-PC) spin labels in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol are presented in parallel with profiles of the rotational diffusion coefficient, R(⊥), obtained from simulation of EPR spectra using Freed's model. These profiles are compared with profiles of the order parameter obtained directly from EPR spectra and with profiles of the order parameter obtained from simulation of EPR spectra. It is shown that T(1)(-1) and R(⊥) profiles reveal changes in membrane fluidity that depend on the motional properties of the lipid alkyl chain. We find that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect only to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. These effects cannot be differentiated by profiles of the order parameter. All profiles in this study were obtained at X-band (9.5 GHz).

  8. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2016-01-26

    It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event-the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids-as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches.

  9. A Hypothesis: Life Initiated from Two Genes, as Deduced from the RNA World Hypothesis and the Characteristics of Life-Like Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Kawamura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available RNA played a central role in the emergence of the first life-like system on primitive Earth since RNA molecules contain both genetic information and catalytic activity. However, there are several drawbacks regarding the RNA world hypothesis. Here, I briefly discuss the feasibility of the RNA world hypothesis to deduce the RNA functions that are essential for forming a life-like system. At the same time, I have conducted a conceptual analysis of the characteristics of biosystems as a useful approach to deduce a realistic life-like system in relation to the definition of life. For instance, an RNA-based life-like system should possess enough stability to resist environmental perturbations, by developing a cell-like compartment, for instance. Here, a conceptual viewpoint is summarized to provide a realistic life-like system that is compatible with the primitive Earth environment and the capabilities of RNA molecules. According to the empirical and conceptual analysis, I propose the hypothesis that the first life-like system could have initiated from only two genes.

  10. A Hypothesis: Life Initiated from Two Genes, as Deduced from the RNA World Hypothesis and the Characteristics of Life-Like Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2016-08-02

    RNA played a central role in the emergence of the first life-like system on primitive Earth since RNA molecules contain both genetic information and catalytic activity. However, there are several drawbacks regarding the RNA world hypothesis. Here, I briefly discuss the feasibility of the RNA world hypothesis to deduce the RNA functions that are essential for forming a life-like system. At the same time, I have conducted a conceptual analysis of the characteristics of biosystems as a useful approach to deduce a realistic life-like system in relation to the definition of life. For instance, an RNA-based life-like system should possess enough stability to resist environmental perturbations, by developing a cell-like compartment, for instance. Here, a conceptual viewpoint is summarized to provide a realistic life-like system that is compatible with the primitive Earth environment and the capabilities of RNA molecules. According to the empirical and conceptual analysis, I propose the hypothesis that the first life-like system could have initiated from only two genes.

  11. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Ikehara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event—the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids—as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches.

  12. Field-Correlation Effects on Rayleigh-Enhanced Nondegenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王延帮; 姜谦; 米辛; 俞祖和; 傅盘铭

    2002-01-01

    We study Rayleigh-enhanced nondegenerate four-wave mixing (NFWM) with time-delayed, correlated fluctuating fields. The importance of the field correlation is revealed in the Rayleigh-enhanced NFWM spectrum when the time delay is varied. The Rayleigh-enhanced NFWM is employed to study the ultrafast processes in the frequency domain. A relaxation time as short as 220 fs was deduced in the Rayleigh-enhanced NFWM experiments in carbon disulphide.

  13. Statistical γ -decay properties of 64Ni and deduced (n ,γ ) cross section of the s -process branch-point nucleus 63Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo Campo, L.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Eriksen, T. K.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hadynska-Klek, K.; Klintefjord, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Renstrøm, T.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Springer, A.; Tornyi, T. G.; Tveten, G. M.

    2016-10-01

    Particle-γ coincidence data have been analyzed to obtain the nuclear level density and the γ -strength function of 64Ni by means of the Oslo method. The level density found in this work is in very good agreement with known energy levels at low excitation energies as well as with data deduced from particle-evaporation measurements at excitation energies above Ex≈5.5 MeV. The experimental γ -strength function presents an enhancement at γ energies below Eγ≈3 MeV and possibly a resonancelike structure centered at Eγ≈9.2 MeV. The obtained nuclear level density and γ -strength function have been used to estimate the (n ,γ ) cross section for the s -process branch-point nucleus 63Ni, of particular interest for astrophysical calculations of elemental abundances.

  14. New constraints on the rupture process of the 1999 August 17 Izmit earthquake deduced from estimates of stress glut rate moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clévédé, E.; Bouin, M.-P.; Bukchin, B.; Mostinskiy, A.; Patau, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper illustrates the use of integral estimates given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 for constraining the rupture scenario of a large earthquake in the particular case of the 1999 Izmit mainshock. We determine the integral estimates of the geometry, source duration and rupture propagation given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 by inverting long-period surface wave (LPSW) amplitude spectra. Kinematic and static models of the Izmit earthquake published in the literature are quite different from one another. In order to extract the characteristic features of this event, we calculate the same integral estimates directly from those models and compare them with those deduced from our inversion. While the equivalent rupture zone and the eastward directivity are consistent among all models, the LPSW solution displays a strong unilateral character of the rupture associated with a short rupture duration that is not compatible with the solutions deduced from the published models. With the aim of understand this discrepancy, we use simple equivalent kinematic models to reproduce the integral estimates of the considered rupture processes (including ours) by adjusting a few free parameters controlling the western and eastern parts of the rupture. We show that the joint analysis of the LPSW solution and source tomographies allows us to elucidate the scattering of source processes published for this earthquake and to discriminate between the models. Our results strongly suggest that (1) there was significant moment released on the eastern segment of the activated fault system during the Izmit earthquake; (2) the apparent rupture velocity decreases on this segment.

  15. Variation and correlation of hydrologic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Hydrological properties vary within a given geological formation and even more so among different soil and rock media. The variance of the saturated permeability is shown to be related to the variance of the pore-size distribution index of a given medium by a simple equation. This relationship is deduced by comparison of the data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Peters et al., 1984), Las Cruces, New Mexico (Wierenga et al., 1989), and Apache Leap, Arizona (Rasmussen et al., 1990). These and other studies in different soils and rocks also support the Poiseuille-Carmen relationship between the mean value of saturated permeability and the mean value of capillary radius. Correlations of the mean values and variances between permeability and pore-geometry parameters can lead us to better quantification of heterogeneous flow fields and better understanding of the scaling laws of hydrological properties.

  16. The four hexamerin genes in the honey bee: structure, molecular evolution and function deduced from expression patterns in queens, workers and drones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Juliana R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hexamerins are hemocyanin-derived proteins that have lost the ability to bind copper ions and transport oxygen; instead, they became storage proteins. The current study aimed to broaden our knowledge on the hexamerin genes found in the honey bee genome by exploring their structural characteristics, expression profiles, evolution, and functions in the life cycle of workers, drones and queens. Results The hexamerin genes of the honey bee (hex 70a, hex 70b, hex 70c and hex 110 diverge considerably in structure, so that the overall amino acid identity shared among their deduced protein subunits varies from 30 to 42%. Bioinformatics search for motifs in the respective upstream control regions (UCRs revealed six overrepresented motifs including a potential binding site for Ultraspiracle (Usp, a target of juvenile hormone (JH. The expression of these genes was induced by topical application of JH on worker larvae. The four genes are highly transcribed by the larval fat body, although with significant differences in transcript levels, but only hex 110 and hex 70a are re-induced in the adult fat body in a caste- and sex-specific fashion, workers showing the highest expression. Transcripts for hex 110, hex 70a and hex70b were detected in developing ovaries and testes, and hex 110 was highly transcribed in the ovaries of egg-laying queens. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that HEX 110 is located at the most basal position among the holometabola hexamerins, and like HEX 70a and HEX 70c, it shares potential orthology relationship with hexamerins from other hymenopteran species. Conclusions Striking differences were found in the structure and developmental expression of the four hexamerin genes in the honey bee. The presence of a potential binding site for Usp in the respective 5' UCRs, and the results of experiments on JH level manipulation in vivo support the hypothesis of regulation by JH. Transcript levels and patterns in the fat body

  17. Assessment of volatile compound profiles and the deduced sensory significance of virgin olive oils from the progeny of Picual×Arbequina cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Ana G; de la Rosa, Raúl; Pascual, Mar; Sánchez-Ortiz, Araceli; Romero-Segura, Carmen; León, Lorenzo; Sanz, Carlos

    2016-01-08

    Volatile compounds are responsible for most of the sensory qualities of virgin olive oil and they are synthesized when enzymes and substrates come together as olive fruit is crushed during the industrial process to obtain the oil. Here we have studied the variability among the major volatile compounds in virgin olive oil prepared from the progeny of a cross of Picual and Arbequina olive cultivars (Olea europaea L.). The volatile compounds were isolated by SPME, and analyzed by HRGC-MS and HRGC-FID. Most of the volatile compounds found in the progeny's oil are produced by the enzymes in the so-called lipoxygenase pathway, and they may be clustered into different groups according to their chain length and polyunsaturated fatty acid origin (linoleic and linolenic acids). In addition, a group of compounds derived from amino acid metabolism and two terpenes also contributed significantly to the volatile fraction, some of which had significant odor values in most of the genotypes evaluated. The volatile compound content of the progeny was very varied, widely transgressing the progenitor levels, suggesting that in breeding programs it might be more effective to consider a larger number of individuals within the same cross than using different crosses with fewer individuals. Multivariate analysis allowed genotypes with particularly interesting volatile compositions to be identified and their flavor quality deduced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Deduced sequences of the membrane fusion and attachment proteins of canine distemper viruses isolated from dogs and wild animals in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chae-Wun; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Nak-Hyung; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Choi, In-Soo

    2013-08-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes highly contagious respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological diseases in wild and domestic animal species. Despite a broad vaccination campaign, the disease is still a serious problem worldwide. In this study, six field CDV strains were isolated from three dogs, two raccoon dogs, and one badger in Korea. The full sequence of the genes encoding fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) proteins were compared with those of other CDVs including field and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis for the F and H genes indicated that the two CDV strains isolated from dogs were most closely related to Chinese strains in the Asia-1 genotype. Another four strains were closely related to Japanese strains in the Asia-2 genotype. The six currently isolated strains shared 90.2-92.1% and 88.2-91.8% identities with eight commercial vaccine strains in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the F protein, respectively. They also showed 90.1-91.4% and 87.8-90.7% identities with the same vaccine strains in their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the H protein, respectively. Different N-linked glycosylation sites were identified in the F and H genes of the six isolates from the prototype vaccine strain Onderstepoort. Collectively, these results demonstrate that at least two different CDV genotypes currently exist in Korea. The considerable genetic differences between the vaccine strains and wild-type isolates would be a major factor of the incomplete protection of dogs from CDV infections.

  19. Non-conventional interaction contributions in permalloy/NiO composite thin films deduced from their static and dynamic magnetization behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zighem, F; Roussigne, Y; Cherif, S-M; Moch, P [Laboratoire des Proprietes Mecaniques et Thermodynamiques des Materiaux, CNRS, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris-Nord, Avenue J-B Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)], E-mail: zighem@galilee.univ-paris13.fr

    2008-03-26

    A comparative study of thin permalloy films (10.4 nm) interfaced with NiO layers of various thicknesses (6 to 47 nm) is presented. The magnetic parameters deduced from different experimental techniques (Brillouin spectroscopy, ferromagnetic resonance and magnetometric (vibrating sample magnetometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect) investigations) show original characteristics which have not been previously evidenced: (i) for most of the samples studied, the exchange bias field is not parallel or perpendicular to the cooling field, in contrast with the in-plane anisotropy field; (ii) the magnetic properties under an out-of-plane applied magnetic field H do not match the calculated ones derived from the usual expression for the density of magnetic energy. We introduce a phenomenological additional term proportional to cos[{alpha}] where {alpha} is the angle between H and the direction normal to the sample: this non-conventional interaction between NiO and permalloy layers allows us to fit all the experimental data.

  20. Predictable 'meta-mechanisms' emerge from feedbacks between transpiration and plant growth and cannot be simply deduced from short-term mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, François; Parent, Boris

    2016-08-29

    Growth under water deficit is controlled by short-term mechanisms but, because of numerous feedbacks, the combination of these mechanisms over time often results in outputs that cannot be deduced from the simple inspection of individual mechanisms. It can be analysed with dynamic models in which causal relationships between variables are considered at each time-step, allowing calculation of outputs that are routed back to inputs for the next time-step and that can change the system itself. We first review physiological mechanisms involved in seven feedbacks of transpiration on plant growth, involving changes in tissue hydraulic conductance, stomatal conductance, plant architecture and underlying factors such as hormones or aquaporins. The combination of these mechanisms over time can result in non-straightforward conclusions as shown by examples of simulation outputs: 'over production of abscisic acid (ABA) can cause a lower concentration of ABA in the xylem sap ', 'decreasing root hydraulic conductance when evaporative demand is maximum can improve plant performance' and 'rapid root growth can decrease yield'. Systems of equations simulating feedbacks over numerous time-steps result in logical and reproducible emergent properties that can be viewed as 'meta-mechanisms' at plant level, which have similar roles as mechanisms at cell level.

  1. cDNA and deduced primary structure of basic phospholipase A2 with neurotoxic activity from the venom secretion of the Crotalus durissus collilineatus rattlesnake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H.R. Fagundes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To illustrate the construction of precursor complementary DNAs, we isolated mRNAs from whole venom samples. After reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, we amplified the cDNA coding for a neurotoxic protein, phospholipase A2 D49 (PLA2 D49, from the venom of Crotalus durissus collilineatus (Cdc PLA2. The cDNA encoding Cdc PLA2 from whole venom was sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of this cDNA has high overall sequence identity with the group II PLA2 protein family. Cdc PLA2 has 14 cysteine residues capable of forming seven disulfide bonds that characterize this group of PLA2 enzymes. Cdc PLA2 was isolated using conventional Sephadex G75 column chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The molecular mass was estimated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We tested the neuromuscular blocking activities on chick biventer cervicis neuromuscular tissue. Phylogenetic analysis of Cdc PLA2 showed the existence of two lines of N6-PLA2, denominated F24 and S24. Apparently, the sequences of the New World’s N6-F24-PLA2 are similar to those of the agkistrodotoxin from the Asian genus Gloydius. The sequences of N6-S24-PLA2 are similar to the sequence of trimucrotoxin from the genus Protobothrops, found in the Old World.

  2. Temporal intensity correlation of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Dussaux, A; Guerin, W; Alibart, O; Tanzilli, S; Vakili, F; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    We present temporal intensity correlation measurements of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor. Clear evidence of photon bunching is shown at very short time-scales (ns) imposed by the Doppler broadening of the hot vapor. Moreover, we demonstrate that some relevant information about the scattering process, such as the ratio of single to multiple scattering, can be deduced from the measured intensity correlation function. These measurements confirm the interest of temporal intensity correlation measurements to access non-trivial spectral features, with potential applications in astrophysics.

  3. Spatial correlation of temperature in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramina, T; Tilgner, A

    2006-12-01

    A cubic Rayleigh-Bénard cell is operated at a Rayleigh number of 1.5x10(9) and a Prandtl number of 6.1. The cell is equipped with thermistors placed along the vertical line through the center of the cell. The spatial correlation of temperature is deduced from simultaneous temperature recordings from these thermistors. The correlation function is well fitted by the sum of two exponentials. There is no cascade in the temperature field as only two characteristic length scales appear. The direct measurement of spatial correlations allows us to test the validity of Taylor's hypothesis in this flow.

  4. The application of striation analysis and focal mechanism stress inversion in deducing the kinematic history of faults: Examples from the Bristol Channel UK and the Ionian Zone Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Nikolaos S.; Miliorizos, Marios N.; Oshoano Aipoh, Hilary

    2013-04-01

    The present work compliments the application of a methodology, in reviewing and investigating further the kinematic history of faults, based on striation analysis and stress inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms and combines them to refine tectonic modelling and hence improve further hazard assessment. Two areas are chosen for this application: the Bristol Channel, UK and the Ionian Zone, Greece. Striation analysis is carried out in two complementary fault terranes. The first along the northern margin of the Inner Bristol Channel, UK, offers a natural laboratory to study in detail the reactivation history of the inverted Bristol Channel basin; and, the second along the north western coastline of the Ionian Zone, Greece, presents an opportunity to illustrate the relationship between movement of a framework of faults within the external orogenic zone of the Hellenides and the stress deduced from focal mechanisms of earthquakes in the region. The UK example reveals phases of Mesozoic negative inversion of Late Palaeozoic basement frontal and oblique ramp thrust faults, followed by Caenozoic positive inversions of Mesozoic normal and strike slip faults. The Greek example shows an equally composite history of faulting; Tethyan basement strata contain normal faults that pass up sequence and across unconformities into Mesozoic and Caenozoic strata, with thrusts and positively inverted faults recording typical dextral transpression. The fault framework in older strata and the veneers of Recent strata above them display Neotectonic fault histories of sinistral transtension, in addition to the transpression. Since the Ionian Zone lies suitably in the external zone, deformation favours the reactivation of fault lineaments, rather than the genesis of pristine faults. Both examples are used to demonstrate this structural principle. Focal mechanisms of Greek earthquake data are used in stress inversion and the results are applied upon the inherited fault framework and are

  5. Deducing the molecular properties of zwitterionic, protonated, deprotonated, and double-deprotonated forms of L-cysteine from vibrational spectroscopy (IR, Raman, VCD) and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Moreno, María Mar; Avilés-Moreno, Juan Ramón; Márquez-García, A A; López-González, Juan Jesús

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of L-cysteine (C3H7NO2S, (2R)-2-amino-3-sulfanylpropanoic acid) in water at different pH values was analyzed both experimentally and theoretically. The behavior was studied at pH values of 5.21 (at this pH, L-cysteine is a zwitterionic species), 1.00 (protonated species), 8.84 (monodeprotonated species), and 13.00 (dideprotonated species). We carried out a vibrational study using nonchiroptical (IR-Raman) and chiroptical (VCD) techniques complemented by quantum chemical calculations. We adopted a dual strategy, as follows. (i) The hybrid density functionals B3LYP and M062X and the ab initio MP2 method were employed, with the same 6-311++G (d,p) basis set, in order to characterize the relative energies and structures of an extensive set of conformers of L-cysteine. The presence of water was included by utilizing the IEF-PCM implicit solvation model. (ii) The vibrational analysis was made using a chirality-sensitive using a chirality-sensitive technique (VCD) and chirality-insensitive techniques (IR, including MIR and FIR, and Raman), especially in aqueous solution. The results obtained theoretically and experimentally were compared in order to deduce the most stable structures at each pH. Moreover, for the first time, the monodeprotonated anion of L-cysteine was detected in aqueous solution by means of IR, Raman and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). Finally, analysis of the low-frequency region using the IR and Raman techniques was shown to be a very important way to understanding the conformational preference of the zwitterionic species.

  6. 一种地炮作战效能评估动态推演方法%A Dynamic Deducing Method of Field Artillery Operational Effectiveness Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱江; 俞杰; 赵定烽

    2011-01-01

    Traditional assessment method cannot fit current needs of information war. As for it,a new dynamic deducing method which based on MAS (Multi-Agent System)and CAS (Complex Adaptative System) technology is used to assess operational effectiveness of field artillery. In this method,from micro viewpoint,agent is bulit in mulit-resolution way, and from macro viewpont, the dynamic confront process of campaign is modeled. The method can solute the problem of the traditional static assessment methods such as not reflecting dynamicly confrontting with enemy .leaving aside a systematic viewpoind of operation and so on, This is a new idea and method for assesment of artillery operational effectiveness.%为了解决传统地炮作战效能评估方法不能适应信息化条件下我军需求的问题,基于复杂适应系统理论和多智能体建模技术提出动态推演方法进行地炮作战效能评估.微观层面对智能体进行多分辨率建模,宏观层面模拟作战动态对抗过程,能有效地解决传统评估方法难以适应复杂环境,难以反映动态对抗,割裂体系逐个评估,割裂人与武器联系的不足.该方法为研究地炮效能评估提供了新思路.

  7. Metabolic and evolutionary insights into the closely-related species Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans deduced from high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Marcus

    2010-12-01

    deduce that S. lividans 66 and TK24, both deficient in the glyoxylate bypass, possess an alternative metabolic mechanism for the assimilation of C2 compounds. Given that streptomycetes generally display high genetic instability it is envisaged that these high-density arrays will find application for rapid assessment of genome content (particularly amplifications/deletions in mutational studies of S. coelicolor and related species.

  8. Evidence of different ocean responses to atmospheric pressurevariations in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Basins as deduced fromERS-2 altimetric data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gómez-Enri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The exponential increase in the use of altimeter data in oceanographic studies in the past two decades has improved the knowledge of the processes that govern the interaction between the ocean and the atmosphere. One of these processes is the response of the ocean to atmospheric pressure variations, which has been deeply analysed in the past. That response is based on the isostatic assumption used to establish a standard correction for altimetric purposes, the Inverse Barometer Correction (IBC. As a general rule, the ocean goes up/down 1cm when the atmospheric pressure goes down/up 1mbar. However, in light of recent works in some oceanic regions, discrepancies arise when the real response is compared to the hypothetical one. It is important to quantify this discrepancy, in order to improve the accuracy of the correction, which is one of the most significant geophysical corrections applied to altimeter records. Some aspects of this response remain unclear, such as the real space-temporal scales where IBC can be applied, the influence of wind, non-isostatic atmospheric pressure-driven signals, and the effect of aliasing from high frequency signals. This paper is an attempt to gain insight into this phenomenon. The data used are the residuals obtained between sea surface heights from the ERS-2 altimeter and the outputs of a global barotropic ocean model. Significant departures from the hypothetical isostatic response in all data series (spatial and temporal domain have been found, especially in the case of altimeter records. By applying the collinear track method, we observe that the estimated Atlantic Ocean response is quite similar to the one deduced from the isostatic assumption at all latitudinal bands. Nonetheless, the Indian and Pacific Oceans show important departures from the hypothetical value at low latitudes. Results obtained with the crossover track method show important deviations at low latitudes in the three basins. In

  9. Deducing corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 signaling networks from gene expression data by usage of genetic algorithms and graphical Gaussian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trümbach, Dietrich; Graf, Cornelia; Pütz, Benno; Kühne, Claudia; Panhuysen, Marcus; Weber, Peter; Holsboer, Florian; Wurst, Wolfgang; Welzl, Gerhard; Deussing, Jan M

    2010-11-19

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a hallmark of complex and multifactorial psychiatric diseases such as anxiety and mood disorders. About 50-60% of patients with major depression show HPA axis dysfunction, i.e. hyperactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation. The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptor type 1 (CRHR1) are key regulators of this neuroendocrine stress axis. Therefore, we analyzed CRH/CRHR1-dependent gene expression data obtained from the pituitary corticotrope cell line AtT-20, a well-established in vitro model for CRHR1-mediated signal transduction. To extract significantly regulated genes from a genome-wide microarray data set and to deduce underlying CRHR1-dependent signaling networks, we combined supervised and unsupervised algorithms. We present an efficient variable selection strategy by consecutively applying univariate as well as multivariate methods followed by graphical models. First, feature preselection was used to exclude genes not differentially regulated over time from the dataset. For multivariate variable selection a maximum likelihood (MLHD) discriminant function within GALGO, an R package based on a genetic algorithm (GA), was chosen. The topmost genes representing major nodes in the expression network were ranked to find highly separating candidate genes. By using groups of five genes (chromosome size) in the discriminant function and repeating the genetic algorithm separately four times we found eleven genes occurring at least in three of the top ranked result lists of the four repetitions. In addition, we compared the results of GA/MLHD with the alternative optimization algorithms greedy selection and simulated annealing as well as with the state-of-the-art method random forest. In every case we obtained a clear overlap of the selected genes independently confirming the results of MLHD in combination with a genetic algorithm. With two unsupervised algorithms

  10. Deducing corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 signaling networks from gene expression data by usage of genetic algorithms and graphical Gaussian models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holsboer Florian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is a hallmark of complex and multifactorial psychiatric diseases such as anxiety and mood disorders. About 50-60% of patients with major depression show HPA axis dysfunction, i.e. hyperactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation. The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH and its receptor type 1 (CRHR1 are key regulators of this neuroendocrine stress axis. Therefore, we analyzed CRH/CRHR1-dependent gene expression data obtained from the pituitary corticotrope cell line AtT-20, a well-established in vitro model for CRHR1-mediated signal transduction. To extract significantly regulated genes from a genome-wide microarray data set and to deduce underlying CRHR1-dependent signaling networks, we combined supervised and unsupervised algorithms. Results We present an efficient variable selection strategy by consecutively applying univariate as well as multivariate methods followed by graphical models. First, feature preselection was used to exclude genes not differentially regulated over time from the dataset. For multivariate variable selection a maximum likelihood (MLHD discriminant function within GALGO, an R package based on a genetic algorithm (GA, was chosen. The topmost genes representing major nodes in the expression network were ranked to find highly separating candidate genes. By using groups of five genes (chromosome size in the discriminant function and repeating the genetic algorithm separately four times we found eleven genes occurring at least in three of the top ranked result lists of the four repetitions. In addition, we compared the results of GA/MLHD with the alternative optimization algorithms greedy selection and simulated annealing as well as with the state-of-the-art method random forest. In every case we obtained a clear overlap of the selected genes independently confirming the results of MLHD in combination with a genetic

  11. Coulomb correlation effects in YBaCuO system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Munoz, J.S.; Sanchez, A. (Dept. de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)); Balle, S. (Dept. de Fisica, Univ. de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca (Spain))

    1989-12-01

    In this work, we apply a mean field potential deduced from the multiband Hubbard hamiltonian in order to obtain the lower and upper strongly correlated bands. We have obtained the total and partial density of states for U{sub d} = 0 and U{sub d} = 4 eV. The results show that the density of states calculated with U{sub d} = 4 eV at E{sub F} is lesser than that obtained with U{sub d} = 0. A small peak above E{sub F} arising from the strong correlated bands appears in the dDOS calculated with U{sub d} = 4 eV and this is in agreement with the experimental data. (orig.).

  12. Correlation and Entanglement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-long Luo; You-feng Luo

    2003-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, it is long recognized that there exist correlations between observables which are much stronger than the classical ones. These correlations are usually called entanglement, and cannot be accounted for by classical theory. In this paper, we will study correlations between observables in terms of covariance and the Wigner-Yanase correlation, and compare their merits in characterizing entanglement. We will show that the Wigner-Yanase correlation has some advantages over the conventional covariance.

  13. General correlation and partial correlation analysis in finding interactions: with Spearman rank correlation and proportion correlation as correlation measures

    OpenAIRE

    WenJun Zhang; Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Between-taxon interactions can be detected by calculating the sampling data of taxon sample type. In present study, Spearman rank correlation and proportion correlation are chosen as the general correlation measures, and their partial correlations are calculated and compared. The results show that for Spearman rank correlation measure, in all predicted candidate direct interactions by partial correlation, about 16.77% (x, 0-45.4%) of them are not successfully detected by Spearman rank correla...

  14. Impact delivery of organic matter on the acapulcoite-lodranite parent-body deduced from C, N isotopes and nanostructures of carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, E.; Aléon, J.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Lodran. Carbon phases in Lodran would have been formed by the secondary carbonization of hydrocarbon fluids released during the primary carbonization of IOM. In the framework of this model, the C isotopic compositions can be reproduced using Rayleigh distillation at each carbonization step and the N isotopic compositions can be understood as resulting from the variable loss and preservation of 15N-rich nitriles (δ15N ∼ +800‰) and 15N-poor pyrroles (δ15N = -140‰) during carbonization. The combined interpretation of the temperatures deduced from this model, petrographic cooling rates, and thermochronological indicators suggest that the CI-CM IOM could have been introduced in the parent-body by an impact, about 10 Myr after solar system formation.

  15. Explicit correlation factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cole M.; Hirata, So; Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the performance of 17 different correlation factors in explicitly correlated second-order many-body perturbation calculations for correlation energies. Highly performing correlation factors are found to have near-universal shape and size in the short range of electron-electron distance (0 1.5 a.u.) is insignificant insofar as the factor becomes near constant, leaving an orbital expansion to describe decoupled electrons. An analysis based on a low-rank Taylor expansion of the correlation factor seems limited, except that a negative second derivative with the value of around -1.3 a.u. correlates with high performance.

  16. Pu236(n,f), Pu237(n,f), and Pu238(n,f) cross sections deduced from (p,t), (p,d), and (p,p') surrogate reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. O.; Beausang, C. W.; Ross, T. J.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Cooper, N.; Escher, J. E.; Gell, K.; Good, E.; Humby, P.; McCleskey, M.; Saastimoinen, A.; Tarlow, T. D.; Thompson, I. J.

    2014-07-01

    The Pu236(n,f), Pu237(n,f) and Pu238(n,f) cross sections have been inferred by utilizing the surrogate ratio method. Targets of Pu239 and U235 were bombarded with 28.5-MeV protons, and the light ion recoils, as well as fission fragments, were detected using the STARS detector array at the K150 Cyclotron at the Texas A&M cyclotron facility. The (p, tf) reaction on Pu239 and U235 targets was used to deduce the σ (Pu236(n ,f))/σ(U232(n,f)) ratio, and the Pu236(n,f) cross section was subsequently determined for En=0.5-7.5 MeV. Similarly, the (p,df) reaction on the same two targets was used to deduce the σ(Pu237(n ,f))/σ(U233(n,f)) ratio, and the Pu237(n,f) cross section was extracted in the energy range En=0.5-7 MeV. The Pu238(n,f) cross section was also deduced by utilizing the (p,p') reaction channel on the same targets. There is good agreement with the recent ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluated cross section data for Pu238(n,f) in the range En=0.5-10.5 MeV and for Pu237(n,f) in the range En=0.5-7 MeV; however, the Pu236(n,f) cross section deduced in the present work is higher than the evaluation between 2 and 7 MeV.

  17. Comparing dependent robust correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Rand R

    2016-11-01

    Let r1 and r2 be two dependent estimates of Pearson's correlation. There is a substantial literature on testing H0  : ρ1  = ρ2 , the hypothesis that the population correlation coefficients are equal. However, it is well known that Pearson's correlation is not robust. Even a single outlier can have a substantial impact on Pearson's correlation, resulting in a misleading understanding about the strength of the association among the bulk of the points. A way of mitigating this concern is to use a correlation coefficient that guards against outliers, many of which have been proposed. But apparently there are no results on how to compare dependent robust correlation coefficients when there is heteroscedasicity. Extant results suggest that a basic percentile bootstrap will perform reasonably well. This paper reports simulation results indicating the extent to which this is true when using Spearman's rho, a Winsorized correlation or a skipped correlation.

  18. Optomechanical Quantum Correlation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, T. P.; Grutter, K. E.; Davanco, M. I.; Srinivasan, K.; Taylor, J. M.

    We present an optomechanical approach for producing accurate thermometry over a wide temperature range using quantum Brownian motion. Optical measurements induce quantum correlations in an optomechanical system when quantum-limited intensity fluctuations of a probe laser drive mechanical motion. The size of the correlations in the weak probe limit are dictated by the scale of individual phonons. We have recently measured optomechanical quantum correlations in the cross correlation spectrum between the amplitude and phase fluctuations of a single probe laser interacting with a silicon nitride optomechanical crystal. These correlations are independent of thermally-induced Brownian motion. However, Brownian motion does simultaneously produce much larger correlation signals between other optical quadratures. A comparison of the size of thermally-induced correlations to quantum correlations allows us to absolutely calibrate Brownian motion thermometry to the mechanical energy quantization scale.

  19. The Correlation Confocal Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, D S

    2010-01-01

    A new type of confocal microscope is described which makes use of intensity correlations between spatially correlated beams of light. It is shown that this apparatus leads to significantly improved transverse resolution.

  20. International Correlation Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Mueller; Andreas Stathopoulos; Andrea Vedolin

    2012-01-01

    Foreign exchange correlation is a key driver of risk premia in the cross-section of carry trade returns. First, we show that the correlation risk premium, defined as the difference between the risk-neutral and objective measure correlation is large (15% per year) and highly time-varying. Second, sorting currencies according to their exposure with correlation innovations yields portfolios with attractive risk and return characteristics. We also find that high (low) interest rate currencies hav...

  1. Correlation in business networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souma, Wataru; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Kaizoji, Taisei

    2006-10-01

    This paper considers business networks. Through empirical study, we show that business networks display characteristics of small-world networks and scale-free networks. In this paper, we characterize firms as sales and bankruptcy probabilities. A correlation between sales and a correlation between bankruptcy probabilities in business networks are also considered. The results reveal that the correlation between sales depends strongly on the type of network, whereas the correlation between bankruptcy probabilities does so only weakly.

  2. Teager Correlation Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Tommy Kristensen; Hamila, R.; Gabbouj, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new correlation function called the Teager correlation function is introduced in this paper. The connection between this function, the Teager energy operator and the conventional correlation function is established. Two applications are presented. The first is the minimization of the Teager error...... norm and the second one is the use of the instantaneous Teager correlation function for simultaneous estimation of TDOA and FDOA (Time and Frequency Difference of Arrivals)....

  3. Universal correlators from geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Korteweg-de Vries Institute for Mathematics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Temuerhan, Mine; Sinkovics, Annamaria [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: sinkovic@science.uva.nl

    2004-11-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion. (author)

  4. Universal Correlators from Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Temurhan, Mine

    2004-11-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion.

  5. Universal Correlators from Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkgraaf, R; Temurhan, M; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Temurhan, Mine

    2004-01-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion.

  6. Modified Biserial Correlation Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1981-01-01

    Asymptotic distribution theory of Brogden's form of biserial correlation coefficient is derived and large sample estimates of its standard error obtained. Its relative efficiency to the biserial correlation coefficient is examined. Recommendations for choice of estimator of biserial correlation are presented. (Author/JKS)

  7. Analyses on schedule-cost coefficient correlation of spaceflight project based on historical statistics and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yanqiong; Chen Yingwu

    2006-01-01

    When analyze the uncertainty of the cost and the schedule of the spaceflight project, it is needed to know the value of the schedule-cost correlation coefficient. This paper deduces the schedule distribution, considering the effect of the cost, and proposes the estimation formula of the correlation coefficient between the ln(schedule) and the cost. On the basis of the fact and Taylor expansion, the relation expression between the schedule-cost correlation coefficient and the ln-schedule-cost correlation coefficient is put forward. By analyzing the value features of the estimation formula of the ln-schedule-cost correlation coefficient, the general rules are proposed to ascertain the value of the schedule-cost correlation coefficient. An example is given to demonstrate how to approximately amend the schedule-cost correlation coefficient based on the historical statistics, which reveals the traditional assigned value is inaccurate. The universality of this estimation method is analyzed.

  8. Correlations in Werner States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li; LUO Shun-Long; XIU Xiao-Ming; LI Nan; GAO Ya-Jun; CHI Feng

    2008-01-01

    Werner states are paradigmatic examples of quantum states and play an innovative role in quantum information theory. In investigating the correlating capability of Werner states, we find the curious phenomenon that quantum correlations, as quantified by the entanglement of formation, may exceed the total correlations, as measured by the quantum mutual information. Consequently, though the entanglement of formation is so widely used in quantifying entanglement, it cannot be interpreted as a consistent measure of quantum correlations per se if we accept the folklore that total correlations are measured (or rather upper bounded) by the quantum mutual information.

  9. Experimental fully contextual correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Amselem, Elias; Lopez-Tarrida, Antonio J; Portillo, Jose R; Bourennane, Mohamed; Cabello, Adan

    2011-01-01

    Quantum correlations are contextual yet, in general, nothing prevents the existence of even more contextual correlations. We identify and test a simple noncontextual inequality in which the quantum violation cannot be improved by any hypothetical post-quantum resource, and use it to experimentally obtain correlations in which the maximum noncontextual content, defined as the maximum fraction of noncontextual correlations, is less than 0.06. Our correlations are experimentally generated from the outcomes of sequential compatible measurements on a four-state quantum system encoded in the polarization and path of a single photon.

  10. Particle Correlations at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kress, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Particle correlations are extensively studied to obtain information about the dynamics of hadron production. From 1989 to 2000 the four LEP collaborations recorded more than 16 million hadronic Z0 decays and several thousand W+W- events. In Z0 decays, two-particle correlations were analysed in detail to study Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac correlations for various particle species. In fully-hadronic W+W- decays, particle correlations were used to study whether the two W bosons decay independently. A review of selected results is presented.

  11. Learning efficient correlated equilibria

    KAUST Repository

    Borowski, Holly P.

    2014-12-15

    The majority of distributed learning literature focuses on convergence to Nash equilibria. Correlated equilibria, on the other hand, can often characterize more efficient collective behavior than even the best Nash equilibrium. However, there are no existing distributed learning algorithms that converge to specific correlated equilibria. In this paper, we provide one such algorithm which guarantees that the agents\\' collective joint strategy will constitute an efficient correlated equilibrium with high probability. The key to attaining efficient correlated behavior through distributed learning involves incorporating a common random signal into the learning environment.

  12. Correlation Functions and Spin

    CERN Document Server

    Tyc, T

    2000-01-01

    The k-electron correlation function of a free chaotic electron beam is derived with the spin degree of freedom taken into account. It is shown that it can be expressed with the help of correlation functions for a polarized electron beam of all orders up to k and the degree of spin polarization. The form of the correlation function suggests that if the electron beam is not highly polarized, observing multi-particle correlations should be difficult. The result can be applied also to chaotic photon beams, the degree of spin polarization being replaced by the degree of polarization.

  13. Polyakov loop and spin correlators on finite lattices a study beyond the mass gap

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, J; Neuhaus, T; Engels, J; Mitrjushkin, V K; Neuhaus, T

    1995-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for point-to-point correlation functions of the Polyakov loop based on the transfer matrix formalism. For the 2d Ising model we show that the results deduced from point-point spin correlators are coinciding with those from zero momentum correlators. We investigate the contributions from eigenvalues of the transfer matrix beyond the mass gap and discuss the limitations and possibilities of such an analysis. The finite size behaviour of the obtained 2d Ising model matrix elements is examined. The point-to-point correlator formula is then applied to Polyakov loop data in finite temperature SU(2) gauge theory. The leading matrix element shows all expected scaling properties. Just above the critical point we find a Debye screening mass ~\\mu_D/T\\approx4~, independent of the volume.

  14. Mean vertical wind in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region (80–120 km deduced from the WINDII observations on board UARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fauliot

    Full Text Available The WINDII interferometer placed on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite measures temperature and wind from the O(1S green-line emission in the Earth's mesosphere and lower thermosphere. It is a remote-sensing instrument providing the horizontal wind components. In this study, the vertical winds are derived using the continuity equation. Mean wind annually averaged at equinoxes and solstices is shown. Ascendance and subsidence to the order of 1–2 cm s–1 present a seasonal occurrence at the equator and tropics. Zonal Coriolis acceleration and adiabatic heating and cooling rate associated to the mean meridional and vertical circulations are evaluated. The line emission rate measured together with the horizontal wind shows structures in altitude and latitude correlated with the meridional and vertical wind patterns. The effect of wind advection is discussed.

  15. Simplified method for deducing high-energy neutron spectra between 1 and 100 MeV using Foil-Activation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasugai, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Yashima, H. [Research Reactor Inst., Kyoto Univ., Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Matsumura, H.; Iwase, H.; Hirayama, H. [High Energy Accelerator Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Mokhov, N.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Vaziri, K.; Lauten, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 87545 (United States); Oishi, K. [Shimizu Corporation, 4-17, Echujima 3-chome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8530 (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Tohoku Univ., Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    The Japanese and American Study of Muon Interaction and Neutron detection (JASMIN) collaboration, has been conducting shielding experiments using the Fermilab anti-proton target station (Pbar) shielding assembly. A multi-foil technique was used to measure the high energy neutron spectra, in the range of 1 to 100 MeV, for the target station shielding configuration. The neutron spectra were de-convoluted using a new fitting method. This method is based on the assumption that a neutron spectrum can be expressed as a simple sum of two exponentials. The validity of the fitting method was confirmed by comparison with the results obtained using SAND-II computer code and theoretical calculations. Finally, it was found that there are simple correlations between reaction rates and the adjustable parameters in the fitting function. (authors)

  16. Improving fundamental factors among correlation matching algorithms in underwater TANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Yan, Lei; Tong, Qingxi

    2007-06-01

    TERCOM, ICP and TIEM algorithms, which mathematically all apply correlation matching mode, have been developed for positioning in underwater Terrain-aided Navigation System (TANS), but how to virtually improve their performance is still research puzzle now. Analyzing the characters of terrain reference data's distribution and vehicles prowling underwater, we find that grid spacing and accumulation sequence are two decisional elements of underwater TANS. Then the modified Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimation algorithm (M-MAP) from super-resolution images reconstruction is creatively explored for implementing interpolation to enhance the accuracy of non-surveyed points' deep-determination, and basic error mechanism model (EMM) based on Mean Absolute Difference (MAD) algorithm is deduced which can reflect the relationship of underwater TANS's inner factors. Simulation experiments indicate that adopting appropriate fundamental factors can effectively boost up underwater TANS's navigation competence based on the algorithms listed above.

  17. Correlation between the Mayan calendar and ours: Astronomy helps to answer why the most popular correlation (GMT) is wrong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.; Böhm, V.; Böhm, B.; Vondrák, J.; Vítek, F.

    2008-05-01

    The Maya used their own very precise calendar. When transforming data from the Mayan calendar to ours, or vice versa, a surprisingly large uncertainty is found. The relationship between the two calendars has been investigated by many researchers during the last century and about 50 different values of the transformation coefficient, known as the correlation, have been deduced. They can differ by centuries, potentially yielding an incredibly large error in the relation of Mayan history to the history of other civilizations. The most frequently used correlation is the GMT one (of Goodman-Martínez-Thompson), based largely on historical evidence from colonial times. Astronomy (celestial mechanics) may resolve the problem of the correlation, provided that historians have correctly decoded the records of various astronomical phenomena discovered, namely, in one extremely important and rare Mayan book, the Dresden Codex (DC). This describes (among other matters) observations of various astronomical phenomena (eclipses, conjunctions, maximum elongations, heliacal aspects, etc), made by the Maya. Modern celestial mechanics enables us to compute exactly when the phenomena occurred in the sky for the given place on the Earth, even though far back in time. Here we check (by a completely independent method), confirming the value of the correlation obtained by Böhm & Böhm (1996, 1999). In view of these tests, we advocate rejecting the GMT correlation and replacing it by the Böhm's correlation. We also comment on the criticism of GMT by some investigators. The replacement of GMT by another correlation seems, however, unacceptable to many Mayanists, as they would need to rewrite the whole history of Mesoamerica. The history of the Maya would be - for example with Böhm's correlation - closer to our time by 104 years.

  18. Radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Han, Xiang; Wen, Fei; Zhang, Shoubiao; Kong, Defeng; Wang, Yumin; Gao, Yu; Huang, Canbin; Cai, Jianqing; Gao, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    An X-mode polarized V band (50 GHz-75 GHz) radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry is designed and installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Two frequency synthesizers (12 GHz-19 GHz) are used as sources. Signals from the sources are up-converted to V band using active quadruplers and then coupled together for launching through one single pyramidal antenna. Two poloidally separated antennae are installed to receive the reflected waves from plasma. This reflectometry system can be used for radial and poloidal correlation measurement of the electron density fluctuation. In ohmically heated plasma, the radial correlation length is about 1.5 cm measured by the system. The poloidal correlation analysis provides a means to estimate the fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field. In the present paper, the distance between two poloidal probing points is calculated with ray-tracing code and the propagation time is deduced from cross-phase spectrum. Fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field in the core of ohmically heated plasma is about from -1 km/s to -3 km/s.

  19. Spectral methods and cluster structure in correlation-based networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimo, Tapio; Tibély, Gergely; Saramäki, Jari; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how in complex systems the eigenpairs of the matrices derived from the correlations of multichannel observations reflect the cluster structure of the underlying networks. For this we use daily return data from the NYSE and focus specifically on the spectral properties of weight W=|-δ and diffusion matrices D=W/sj-δ, where C is the correlation matrix and si=∑jW the strength of node j. The eigenvalues (and corresponding eigenvectors) of the weight matrix are ranked in descending order. As in the earlier observations, the first eigenvector stands for a measure of the market correlations. Its components are, to first approximation, equal to the strengths of the nodes and there is a second order, roughly linear, correction. The high ranking eigenvectors, excluding the highest ranking one, are usually assigned to market sectors and industrial branches. Our study shows that both for weight and diffusion matrices the eigenpair analysis is not capable of easily deducing the cluster structure of the network without a priori knowledge. In addition we have studied the clustering of stocks using the asset graph approach with and without spectrum based noise filtering. It turns out that asset graphs are quite insensitive to noise and there is no sharp percolation transition as a function of the ratio of bonds included, thus no natural threshold value for that ratio seems to exist. We suggest that these observations can be of use for other correlation based networks as well.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding a major allergenic protein in rice seeds. Homology of the deduced amino acid sequence with members of alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, H; Adachi, T; Fujii, N; Matsuda, T; Nakamura, R; Tanaka, K; Urisu, A; Kurosawa, Y

    1992-05-18

    A cDNA clone of rice major allergenic protein (RAP) was isolated from a cDNA library of maturing rice seeds. The cDNA had an open reading frame (486 nucleotides) which coded a 162 amino acid residue polypeptide comprising a 27-residue signal peptide and a 135-residue mature protein of M(r) 14,764. The deduced amino acid sequence of RAP showed a considerable similarity to barley trypsin inhibitor [1983, J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7998-8003] and wheat alpha-amylase inhibitor [1981, Phytochemistry 20, 1781-1784].

  1. Correlations in multiparticle production

    CERN Document Server

    Troshin, S M

    2011-01-01

    We discuss correlations in the hadron production in the $pp$-collision with emphasize on the ridge-like structure origin in the two-particle correlation function. We suggest that this structure can appear due to a rotating nature of the transient state of matter generated in the intermidiate stage of proton collison.

  2. ALMA correlator computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Jim; Amestica, Rodrigo; Perez, Jesus

    2004-09-01

    We present a design for the computer systems which control, configure, and monitor the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) correlator and process its output. Two distinct computer systems implement this functionality: a rack- mounted PC controls and monitors the correlator, and a cluster of 17 PCs process the correlator output into raw spectral results. The correlator computer systems interface to other ALMA computers via gigabit Ethernet networks utilizing CORBA and raw socket connections. ALMA Common Software provides the software infrastructure for this distributed computer environment. The control computer interfaces to the correlator via multiple CAN busses and the data processing computer cluster interfaces to the correlator via sixteen dedicated high speed data ports. An independent array-wide hardware timing bus connects to the computer systems and the correlator hardware ensuring synchronous behavior and imposing hard deadlines on the control and data processor computers. An aggregate correlator output of 1 gigabyte per second with 16 millisecond periods and computational data rates of approximately 1 billion floating point operations per second define other hard deadlines for the data processing computer cluster.

  3. Higher-spin correlators

    CERN Document Server

    Alday, Luis F

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the properly normalized three-point correlator of two protected scalar operators and one higher spin twist-two operator in N=4 super Yang-Mills, in the limit of large spin j. The relevant structure constant can be extracted from the OPE of the four-point correlator of protected scalar operators. We show that crossing symmetry of the four point correlator plus a judicious guess for the perturbative structure of the three-point correlator, allow to make a prediction for the structure constant at all loops in perturbation theory, up to terms that remain finite as the spin becomes large. Furthermore, the expression for the structure constant allows to propose an expression for the all loops four-point correlator G(u,v), in the limit u,v -> 0. Our predictions are in perfect agreement with the large j expansion of results available in the literature.

  4. Growth and physiological responses of larch trees to climate changes deduced from tree-ring widths and δ13C at two forest sites in eastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Shunsuke; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Ohta, Takeshi; Maximov, Trofim C.

    2014-06-01

    Tree-ring chronologies of ring width and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) over the past 160 years were developed using living larch trees at two forest sites, each with different annual precipitation, in eastern Siberia: Spasskaya Pad (SP) (62°14‧N, 129°37‧E); and Elgeeii (EG) (60°0‧N, 133°49‧E). Intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) was derived from tree-ring δ13C. The physiological responses of the larch trees to climate varied between these sites and over time. Ring widths correlated negatively with summer temperatures at SP, where summer precipitation is lower than at EG, probably due to temperature-induced water stress. Since the 1990s, however, the negative effect of warming has been more severe at EG, where the productivity of larch trees is higher than at SP. A greater reduction of larch tree growth and higher increase rate of iWUE at EG reflects greater temperature-induced water stress, which is incident to the larger forest biomass. Our results suggest that effect of increase in atmospheric CO2 on larch tree growth is not sufficient to compensate for temperature-induced water stress on larch growth in eastern Siberia and differences in precipitation and forest productivity largely affect the larch tree response to changing climate in eastern Siberia.

  5. Effects of Bedrock Lithology and Subglacial Till on the Motion of Ruth Glacier, Alaska, Deduced from Five Pulses from 1973-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, J.; Forster, R.; Sauber, Jeanne; Hall, Dorothy K.; Bruhn, R.

    2013-01-01

    A pulse is a type of unstable glacier flow intermediate between normal flow and surging. Using Landsat MSS, TM, and ETM+ imagery and feature tracking software, a time-series of mostly annual velocity maps from 1973 to 2012 was produced that reveals five pulses of Ruth Glacier, Alaska. Peaks in ice velocity were found in the 1981, 1989, 1997, 2003, and 2010; approximately every 7 years. During these peak years the ice velocity increased 300%, from approximately 40 m/yr to 160 m/yr, and occurred in an area of the glacier underlain by sedimentary bedrock. Based on the spatio-temporal behavior of Ruth Glacier during the pulse cycles, we suggest the pulses are due to enhanced basal motion via deformation of a subglacial till. The cyclical nature of the pulses is theorized to be due to a thin till, with low permeability, that causes incomplete drainage of the till between the pulses, followed by eventual recharge and dilation of the till. These findings suggest care is needed when attempting to correlate changes in regional climate with decadal-scale changes in velocity, because in some instances basal conditions may have a greater influence on ice dynamics than climate.

  6. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  7. Correlation plenoptic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    D'Angelo, Milena; Pepe, Francesco V; Vaccarelli, Ornella; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising optical modality that simultaneously captures the location and the propagation direction of light in order to enable tridimensional imaging in a single shot. However, in classical imaging systems, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are fundamentally linked; thereby, the maximum achievable depth of field is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. We propose to take advantage of the second-order correlation properties of light to overcome this fundamental limitation. In this paper, we demonstrate that the momentum/position correlation of chaotic light leads to the enhanced refocusing power of correlation plenoptic imaging with respect to standard plenoptic imaging.

  8. Correlated Multiphoton Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Afek, Itai; Silberberg, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    We generate bipartite states of light which exhibit an absence of multiphoton coincidence events between two modes amid a constant background flux. These `correlated photon holes' are produced by mixing a coherent state and relatively weak spontaneous parametric down-conversion using a balanced beamsplitter. Correlated holes with arbitrarily high photon numbers may be obtained by adjusting the relative phase and amplitude of the inputs. We measure states of up to five photons and verify their nonclassicality. The scheme provides a route for observation of high-photon-number nonclassical correlations without requiring intense quantum resources.

  9. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  10. Correlation Plenoptic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Milena; Pepe, Francesco V.; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising optical modality that simultaneously captures the location and the propagation direction of light in order to enable three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. However, in standard plenoptic imaging systems, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are fundamentally linked; thereby, the maximum achievable depth of field is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. We propose to take advantage of the second-order correlation properties of light to overcome this fundamental limitation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the correlation in both momentum and position of chaotic light leads to the enhanced refocusing power of correlation plenoptic imaging with respect to standard plenoptic imaging.

  11. Reconstruction of palaeoenvironmental change in a late Miocene peatland, as deduced from distribution patterns of lipid biomarkers and the carbon isotopic composition of individual n-alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnny Briggs; David Large [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2007-07-01

    In order to comprehend the processes of peatland evolution, and to make projections concerning the long-term response of the peatland carbon reservoir to environmental change, we consider thick lignite deposits formed over periods of 1 my. To explore the long-term response of peatland to changing climate, we have investigated the reaction of peatland plant communities to changes in the exogenic carbon cycle on timescales exceeding 100 ky. This was achieved by examining variations in bulk {delta}{sup 13}C, biomarker distributions, and compound specific {delta}{sup 13}C compositions of plant derived n-alkanes, from orbitally tuned early Miocene lignite. 21 samples were analysed from the Morwell 1B lignite, Gippsland Basin, Australia. These samples encompassed 27.8 m of lignite, thought to correspond to the time interval of 22.29 - 22.68 Ma. Prior to analysis by GC-IR-MS, the n-alkanes were purified using urea adduction. Analysis of the relative distributions of n-alkanes and aliphatic Terpenoid biomarkers was undertaken by GC-MS. The distributions of Terpenoid biomarkers indicated that no correlation exists between bulk {delta}{sup 13}C and the relative contribution of angiosperm to gymnosperm type vegetation. The n-alkane distributions demonstrated a link between bulk {delta}{sup 13}C and aquatic macrophytes, (greatest contributor to the C{sub 29} homologue in peat forming vegetation is terrestrial plants, whereas the C{sub 25} homologue is a proxy for aquatic macrophytes). This suggests that after accounting for atmospheric {delta}{sup 13}C, bulk carbon isotopes carry a signature for the hydrological conditions of plant growth. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  12. New light on a dark subject: On the use of fluorescence data to deduce redox states of natural organic matter (NOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the use of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEMS), parallel factor statistical analysis (PARAFAC), and oxidation-reduction experiments to examine the effect of redox conditions on PARAFAC model results for aqueous samples rich in natural organic matter. Fifty-four aqueous samples from 11 different geographic locations and two plant extracts were analyzed untreated and after chemical treatments or irradiation were used in attempts to change the redox status of the natural organic matter. The EEMS spectra were generated and modeled using a PARAFAC package developed by Cory and McKnight (2005). The PARAFAC model output was examined for consistency with previously reported relations and with changes expected to occur upon experimental oxidation and reduction of aqueous samples. Results indicate the implied fraction of total sample fluorescence attributed to quinone-like moieties was consistent (0.64 to 0.78) and greater than that observed by Cory and McKnight (2005). The fraction of the quinone-like moieties that was reduced (the reducing index, RI) showed relatively little variation (0.46 to 0.71) despite attempts to alter the redox status of the natural organic matter. The RI changed little after reducing samples using zinc metal, oxidizing at high pH with air, or irradiating with a Xenon lamp. Our results, however, are consistent with the correlations between the fluorescence indices (FI) of samples and the ratio of PARAFAC fitting parameters suggested by Cory and McKnight (2005), though we used samples with a much narrower range of FI values.

  13. Deduced amino acid sequence of the small hydrophobic protein of US avian pneumovirus has greater identity with that of human metapneumovirus than those of non-US avian pneumoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Abdul S; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Huang, Zhuhui; Samal, Siba K

    2003-05-01

    We report here the nucleotide and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus strain Colorado (APV/CO). The SH gene of APV/CO is 628 nucleotides in length from gene-start to gene-end. The longest ORF of the SH gene encoded a protein of 177 aas in length. Comparison of the deduced aa sequence of the SH protein of APV/CO with the corresponding published sequences of other members of genera metapneumovirus showed 28% identity with the newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV), but no discernable identity with the APV subgroup A or B. Collectively, this data supports the hypothesis that: (i) APV/CO is distinct from European APV subgroups and belongs to the novel subgroup APV/C (APV/US); (ii) APV/CO is more closely related to hMPV, a mammalian metapneumovirus, than to either APV subgroup A or B. The SH gene of APV/CO was cloned using a genomic walk strategy which initiated cDNA synthesis from genomic RNA that traversed the genes in the order 3'-M-F-M2-SH-G-5', thus confirming that gene-order of APV/CO conforms in the genus Metapneumovirus. We also provide the sequences of transcription-signals and the M-F, F-M2, M2-SH and SH-G intergenic regions of APV/CO.

  14. DTG combustion behaviour of coal: correlations with proximate and ultimate analysis data. [Derivative thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghetti, P.

    1986-05-01

    Solid fuel samples were characterized by their proximate and ultimate analyses and then subjected to heat in a thermobalance, both under air and nitrogen. Trends in weight loss were recorded by thermogravimetry (TG) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG). By examining the data obtained, it was possible to show the existence of good correlations between the VM/FC, C/H and (C+H)/O ratios and both rate of weight loss data and the temperatures deduced from the burning and volatile release profiles. Methods for evaluating the reactivity of coal are reported showing that these substantially agree with the results obtained. 16 references.

  15. Examining Correlates of Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Bryk, Anthony S.

    1987-01-01

    Statistical methods are presented for studying "correlates of diversity," defined as characteristics of educational organizations that predict dispersion on the dependent variable. Strategies based on exact distribution theory and asymptotic normal approximation are considered. (TJH)

  16. Strongly Correlated Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Si, Qimiao

    2013-01-01

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective ...

  17. Optically fixed photorefractive correlator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘友文; 刘立人; 周常河; 徐良瑛

    2002-01-01

    An optically fixed photorefractive correlator is presented, where two-centre non-volatile holographic recording isemployed to write and fix the matched filter in doubly doped LiNbO3 crystals. This correlator shows good correlationcharacteristics and insensitivity to the writing beam during readout. It can be used in cases requiring stability and notrequiring modification for a long period, and it is refreshed optically when new information needs to be registered.

  18. Emerging Correlation Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Gbur, Gregory J.; Polyanskii, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting the state-of-the-art of correlation optics and showing synergetics between the theoretical background and experimental techniques.......This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting the state-of-the-art of correlation optics and showing synergetics between the theoretical background and experimental techniques....

  19. Change of the Asian dust source region deduced from the relationship between anthropogenic radionuclides in surface soil and precipitation in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Igarashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Asian dust source region may be expanding primarily as a result of recent climate change, especially during the 2000s. This change was investigated by examining anthropogenic radionuclides contained in surface soil samples from Mongolia. Surface soil was globally labeled by radioactive fallout from nuclear testing during the late 1950s and early 1960s. There are no current direct sources for anthropogenic radionuclides in the air, so the radionuclides in the atmosphere are mainly carried by dust from wind-blown surface soil, that is, aeolian dust. Asian dust carries 90Sr, 137Cs, and other anthropogenic radionuclides; the heaviest deposition occurs in spring and has been recorded in Japan since the early 1990s. The composition of anthropogenic radionuclides in atmospheric depositions would be affected by a change in the dust source. Previous studies of atmospheric depositions at long-term monitoring sites (e.g. in Tsukuba, Japan have detected changes in the 137Cs/90Sr ratio and in the specific activity of the radionuclides. These changes in the composition of observed atmospheric depositions should be a reflection for a change in the climatic conditions of the dust source region. To investigate this dust source change, a field survey for radionuclides (90Sr and 137Cs in surface soil samples was conducted in September 2007 in the eastern and southern regions of Mongolia, where dust storms have occurred more frequently since 2000. It was found that specific activities of both radionuclides as well as the 137Cs/90Sr ratio in the surface soil correlated well with annual average precipitation in the Mongolian desert-steppe zone. The higher specific activities and the higher 137Cs/90Sr ratio were found in the grassland region with the greater precipitation. This finding suggests that the increased specific activities and the activity ratio

  20. The relationship between seismic velocity structure and the seismic coupling in the Hyuga-nada region, southwest Japan, deduced from onshore and offshore seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehira, K.; Yakiwara, H.; Yamada, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Nakao, S.; Kobayashi, R.; Goto, K.; Miyamachi, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Nakahigashi, K.; Shinohara, M.; Kanazawa, T.; Hino, R.; Goda, M.; Shimizu, H.

    2011-12-01

    serpentinized wedge mantle. This region correlates with that of the after-slips and slow-slip events. This results is consistent with weak plate coupling. In southern part of Hyuga-nada, Poisson's ratio at mantle wedge is about 0.25. Uehira et al. (2007) was estimated that plate coupling is strong in southern part of Hyuga-nada, so, this result is consistent with this estimation.

  1. CARMA Correlator Graphical Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D.; Shaya, B.; Pound, M. W.

    2011-07-01

    CARMA Correlator Graphical Setup (CGS) is a Java tool to help users of the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) plan observations. It allows users to visualize the correlator bands overlaid on frequency space and view spectral lines within each band. Bands can be click-dragged to anywhere in frequency and can have their properties (e.g., bandwidth, quantization level, rest frequency) changed interactively. Spectral lines can be filtered from the view by expected line strength to reduce visual clutter. Once the user is happy with the setup, a button click generates the Python commands needed to configure the correlator within the observing script. CGS can also read Python configurations from an observing script and reproduce the correlator setup that was used. Because the correlator hardware description is defined in an XML file, the tool can be rapidly reconfigured for changing hardware. This has been quite useful as CARMA has recently commissioned a new correlator. The tool was written in Java by high school summer interns working in UMD's Laboratory for Millimeter Astronomy and has become an essential planning tool for CARMA PIs.

  2. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  3. Spatial heterogeneity of the structure and stress field in Hyuga-nada region, southwest Japan, deduced from onshore and offshore seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehira, K.; Yakiwara, H.; Yamada, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Nakao, S.; Kobayashi, R.; Goto, K.; Miyamachi, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Nakahigashi, K.; Shinohara, M.; Kanazawa, T.; Hino, R.; Goda, M.; Shimizu, H.

    2010-12-01

    Kyushu-Palau Ridge at low seismicity area. We estimated the stress filed using a stress tensor inversion method by polarity of first arrivals from earthquakes [Horiuchi et al. (1995)], and we found that there is a good correlation between the slip distribution at large earthquakes and the angle between maximum principal axis and the plate boundary in northern part of Hyuga-nada region [Uehira et al. (2007)]. Because the shear stress of plate boundary is large on the subducted Kyushu-Palau Ridge, we suspected that it might be caused the strong interplate coupling. We also found a subducted seamount in the southwest margin of source region of the 1968 Hyuga-nada earthquake (Mw 7.5). This may acts as a barrier.

  4. Characteristic analysis on UAV-MIMO channel based on normalized correlation matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xi jun; Chen, Zi li; Hu, Yong Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional GBSBCM (geometrically based double bounce cylinder model) channel model of MIMO for unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), the simple form of UAV space-time-frequency channel correlation function which includes the LOS, SPE, and DIF components is presented. By the methods of channel matrix decomposition and coefficient normalization, the analytic formula of UAV-MIMO normalized correlation matrix is deduced. This formula can be used directly to analyze the condition number of UAV-MIMO channel matrix, the channel capacity, and other characteristic parameters. The simulation results show that this channel correlation matrix can be applied to describe the changes of UAV-MIMO channel characteristics under different parameter settings comprehensively. This analysis method provides a theoretical basis for improving the transmission performance of UAV-MIMO channel. The development of MIMO technology shows practical application value in the field of UAV communication.

  5. Some insights in the structure of correlation functions in Liouville and Toda field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Parikshit

    2014-01-01

    We discuss some aspects of Liouville field theory, starting from operator equation of motion in presence of two screening charges and re-derive the dual zero mode Schwinger Dyson equations for the two screening charges from the path integral. Using functional methods we show the familiar pole structure of Liouville correlation function using the partition function. Next we discuss a generalized structure of the correlation functions obtained from the zero mode functional equations. From this structure we infer the use of the Barnes double Gamma functions to construct a part of the denominator of the correlators and also use Weyl symmetry of the theory to deduce more information about the rest. We similarly extend these arguments in the case of Toda field theories where we make a general statement about the denominator of the three point function and Sine-Liouvile field theory where we only obtain an infinite product structure.

  6. Second-Order Correlation Function of the Photon Emission from a Single Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yao-Yi; CHENG Mu-Tian; ZHOU Hui-Jun; LIU Shao-Ding; WANG Qu-Quan

    2005-01-01

    @@ The photon correlation of photon emission from a single quantum dot with cw excitation and pulsed excitation is investigated in details. To calculate the second-order correlation function for optical pumping, we deduce rate equations with a simplified two-level model under cw excitation and present the master equation approach in the interaction picture to the study of evolution of a three-level system under pulsed excitation. In addition, we report photon correlation measurements on a single self-assembled In0.5 Ga0.5As quantum dot, which show strong antibunching behaviour under both the conditions of cw and pulsed excitations. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental measurements.

  7. Observation of Ortho-III correlations by neutron and hard x-ray scattering in an untwinned YBa2Cu3O6.77 single crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleger, P.; Casalta, H.; Hadfield, R.;

    1995-01-01

    We present measurements of Ortho-III phase correlations in an untwinned single crystal of YBa2Cu3O6.77 by neutron scattering and the novel method of hard (95 keV) X-ray scattering. The Ortho-III ordering is essentially two-dimensional, exhibiting Lorentzian peak shapes in the a-b plane. At room...... temperature, the correlation lengths deduced from the Lorentzian peak widths are about 5 unit cells (congruent-to 20 angstrom) along h and 19 unit cells (congruent-to 74 angstrom) along k, and are comparable to some correlation lengths measured for the Ortho-II phase. Upon heating, the superstructure...

  8. Strongly correlated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Si, Qimiao

    2012-09-18

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective and offer possibilities for technological applications. This article looks at these materials through the lens of research performed at Rice University. Topics examined include: Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality in "heavy fermion" materials and the iron pnictide high temperature superconductors; computational ab initio methods to examine strongly correlated materials and their interface with analytical theory techniques; layered dichalcogenides as example correlated materials with rich phases (charge density waves, superconductivity, hard ferromagnetism) that may be tuned by composition, pressure, and magnetic field; and nanostructure methods applied to the correlated oxides VO₂ and Fe₃O₄, where metal-insulator transitions can be manipulated by doping at the nanoscale or driving the system out of equilibrium. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting prospects for this class of materials.

  9. Cross-correlation beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigrok, Elmer; Gibbons, Steven; Wapenaar, Kees

    2016-10-01

    An areal distribution of sensors can be used for estimating the direction of incoming waves through beamforming. Beamforming may be implemented as a phase-shifting and stacking of data recorded on the different sensors (i.e., conventional beamforming). Alternatively, beamforming can be applied to cross-correlations between the waveforms on the different sensors. We derive a kernel for beamforming cross-correlated data and call it cross-correlation beamforming (CCBF). We point out that CCBF has slightly better resolution and aliasing characteristics than conventional beamforming. When auto-correlations are added to CCBF, the array response functions are the same as for conventional beamforming. We show numerically that CCBF is more resilient to non-coherent noise. Furthermore, we illustrate that with CCBF individual receiver-pairs can be removed to improve mapping to the slowness domain. An additional flexibility of CCBF is that cross-correlations can be time-windowed prior to beamforming, e.g., to remove the directionality of a scattered wavefield. The observations on synthetic data are confirmed with field data from the SPITS array (Svalbard). Both when beamforming an earthquake arrival and when beamforming ambient noise, CCBF focuses more of the energy to a central beam. Overall, the main advantage of CCBF is noise suppression and its flexibility to remove station pairs that deteriorate the signal-related beampower.

  10. Terrain correlation suitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wang; McClintock, Robert L.

    1994-07-01

    Terrain-aided navigation (TAN), also referred to as terrain correlation, is a technique that has proven to be highly successful as a navigational aid for autonomous, unmanned guided missiles. Qualitatively speaking, the effectiveness of terrain correlation is a function of signal- to-noise (S/N) ratio. The signal is equivalent to terrain roughness, while the noise is the combination of reference map errors, radar altimeter errors, and INS altitude errors. However, it is not practical to use only a single parameter, such as S/N, to define the suitability of terrain correlation. This paper discusses the shortcomings of the conventional single-parameter approach to the terrain contour matching algorithm (TERCOM) used in cruise missile guidance systems scene selection. A more comprehensive technique is then presented that analyzes the terrain correlation suitability based on a Monte Carlo simulation technique. A figure-of-merit (FOM) for terrain correlation suitability, computed from sample statistics, is introduced and simulation results are provided to illustrate the feasibility of using a multi-parameter FOM technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed approach could provide a cost effective enhancement to the TAN-based mission planning process.

  11. Electron correlation in beryllium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omiste, Juan J.; Li, Wenliang; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2017-01-01

    We apply a three-dimensional implementation of the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) method to investigate effects of electron correlation in the ground state of Be as well as in its photoionization dynamics by short XUV pulses, including time delay in photo......We apply a three-dimensional implementation of the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) method to investigate effects of electron correlation in the ground state of Be as well as in its photoionization dynamics by short XUV pulses, including time delay...... schemes, and in this way we identify the orbital spaces that are relevant for an accurate description of the photoelectron spectra. Finally, we investigate the effects of electron correlation on the magnitude of the relative Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith (EWS) time delay in the photoionization process into two...... different ionic channels. One channel, the ground-state channel in the ion, is accessible without electron correlation. The other channel is only accessible when including electron correlation. For theory beyond the mean-field time-dependent Hartree-Fock, the EWS time delay for the photon energy analyzed...

  12. Correlation Degree and Correlation Coefficient of Multi- Output Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Gui-zhi; ZHAO Ya-qun

    2005-01-01

    We present definitions of the correlation degree and correlation coefficient of multi-output functions. Two relationships about the correlation degree of multi-output functions are proved. One is between the correlation degree and independency,the other is between the correlation degree and balance. Especially the paper discusses the correlation degree of affine multioutput functions. We demonstrate properties of the correlation coefficient of multi-output functions. One is the value range of the correlation coefficient, one is the relationship between the correlation coefficient and independency, and another is the sufficient and necessary condition that two multi-output functions are equivalent to each other.

  13. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  14. Nonlocality of quantum correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Streltsov, A; Roga, W; Bruß, D; Illuminati, F

    2012-01-01

    We show that only those composite quantum systems possessing nonvanishing quantum correlations have the property that any nontrivial local unitary evolution changes their global state. This type of nonlocality occurs also for states that do not violate a Bell inequality, such as, for instance, Werner states with a low degree of entanglement. We derive the exact relation between the global state change induced by local unitary evolutions and the amount of quantum correlations. We prove that the minimal change coincides with the geometric measure of discord, thus providing the latter with an operational interpretation in terms of the capability of a local unitary dynamics to modify a global state. We establish rigorously that Werner states are the maximally quantum correlated two-qubit states, and thus are the ones that maximize this novel type of nonlocality.

  15. Fully nonlocal quantum correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Aolita, Leandro; Acín, Antonio; Chiuri, Andrea; Vallone, Giuseppe; Mataloni, Paolo; Cabello, Adán

    2011-01-01

    Quantum mechanics is a nonlocal theory, but not as nonlocal as the no-signalling principle allows. However, there exist quantum correlations that exhibit maximal nonlocality: they are as nonlocal as any non-signalling correlations and thus have a local content, quantified by the fraction $p_L$ of events admitting a local description, equal to zero. Previous examples of maximal quantum nonlocality between two parties require an infinite number of measurements, and the corresponding Bell violation is not robust against noise. We show how every proof of the Kochen-Specker theorem gives rise to maximally nonlocal quantum correlations that involve a finite number of measurements and are robust against noise. We perform the experimental demonstration of a Bell test originating from the Peres-Mermin Kochen-Specker proof, providing an upper bound on the local content $p_L\\lesssim 0.22$.

  16. Pair Correlation Function Integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; O'Connell, John P.; Peters, Günther H.J.;

    2011-01-01

    numerical tests complementing previous results. Pure molecular fluids are here studied in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble with isothermal compressibilities evaluated from the total correlation function integrals and compared with values derived from volume fluctuations. For systems where the radial......We describe a method for extending radial distribution functions obtained from molecular simulations of pure and mixed molecular fluids to arbitrary distances. The method allows total correlation function integrals to be reliably calculated from simulations of relatively small systems. The long......, and J. Abildskov, Mol. Simul. 36, 1243 (2010); Fluid Phase Equilib. 302, 32 (2011)], but describe here its theoretical basis more thoroughly and derive long-distance approximations for the direct correlation functions. We describe the numerical implementation of the method in detail, and report...

  17. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rohde, Steven B.

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  18. TOPS optical correlation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, Scott D.

    1993-09-01

    Martin Marietta is conducting a TOPS optical correlation program in which several algorithms and four optical correlators involving two spatial light modulator technologies will be developed and tested. The program will culminate in 1994 with an automatic target recognition flight demonstration using a UH-1 helicopter flying a Fiber Optic Guide Missile (FOG-M) mission profile. The flight demonstration will be conducted by US Army Missile Command (MICOM) and Martin Marietta and will involve detecting, locating and tracking a M60A2 tank positioned among an array of five vehicle types. Current status of the TOPS program will be given.

  19. Clustering of correlated networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    We obtain the clustering coefficient, the degree-dependent local clustering, and the mean clustering of networks with arbitrary correlations between the degrees of the nearest-neighbor vertices. The resulting formulas allow one to determine the nature of the clustering of a network.

  20. Nonverbal Correlates of Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Bruce K.

    Twenty college age males' hand shrugs, face-play manipulations, and frequency and duration of mutual eye contact were recorded in response to a female counterpart who varied her assertiveness and attractiveness in a two by two factorial design. Mutual eye contact, which increased under attractive conditions, was a useful negative correlate of…

  1. Robust correlation tracker

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sankar Kishore; K Veerabhadra Rao

    2001-06-01

    Correlation tracking plays an important role in the automation of weapon systems. Area correlation is an effective technique for tracking targets that have neither prominent features nor high contrast with the background and the ‘target’ can even be an area or a scene of interest. Even though this technique is robust under varying conditions of target background and light conditions, it has some problems like target drift and false registration. When the tracker or target is moving, the registration point drifts due to the discrete pixel size and aspect angle change. In this research work, an attempt has been made to improve the performance of a correlation tracker for tracking ground targets with very poor contrast. In the present work only the CCD visible images with very poor target to background contrast are considered. Applying novel linear and nonlinear filters, the problems present in the correlation tracker are overcome. Confidence and redundancy measures have been proposed to improve the performance by detecting misregistration. The proposed algorithm is tested on different sequences of images and its performance is satisfactory.

  2. From micro-correlations to macro-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2016-11-01

    Random vectors with a symmetric correlation structure share a common value of pair-wise correlation between their different components. The symmetric correlation structure appears in a multitude of settings, e.g. mixture models. In a mixture model the components of the random vector are drawn independently from a general probability distribution that is determined by an underlying parameter, and the parameter itself is randomized. In this paper we study the overall correlation of high-dimensional random vectors with a symmetric correlation structure. Considering such a random vector, and terming its pair-wise correlation "micro-correlation", we use an asymptotic analysis to derive the random vector's "macro-correlation" : a score that takes values in the unit interval, and that quantifies the random vector's overall correlation. The method of obtaining macro-correlations from micro-correlations is then applied to a diverse collection of frameworks that demonstrate the method's wide applicability.

  3. Multiplicities and correlations at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E

    2002-01-01

    A brief review on recent charge multiplicity and correlation measurements at LEP is given. The measurements of unbiased gluon jet multiplicity are discussed. Recent results on charged particle Bose- Einstein and Fermi-Dirac correlations at LEP1. are reported. New results on two-particle correlations of neutral pions are given. Correlations of more than two particles (high-order correlations) obtained using different methods are performed. Recent Bose-Einstein correlation measurements at LEP2 are discussed. (13 refs).

  4. Correlation radio range finder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorochan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In work widely known methods of range measuring are short characterized. The basic attention is given features of signal processing in a correlation method of range measuring. The signal with angular modulation with one-voice-frequency fluctuation is used as a probing signal. The absence of Doppler effect on the formation of the correlation integral, the frequency instability of the transmitter, the phase change on reflection from the target is presented. It is noticed that the result of signal processing in the range measuring instrument is reduced to formation on an exit one-voice-frequency harmonious fluctuation equal to modulating frequency that provides high characteristics of a radio range finder.

  5. Clinicohistopathological correlation of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Shrestha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is a chronic infectious granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It is a spectral disease which is classified into five groups according to Ridley and Jopling based on clinical, histological, microbiological and immunological criteria. Adequate clinical information combined with bacilloscopy and histopathology is helpful not only in classification of different types of leprosy but also useful for management of the cases.METHOD: 50 cases of leprosy were examined and clinical data was recorded. Slit skin smears were stained with Ziehl Neelsen stain. Skin biopsy was stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin stain and Fite Farraco stain was performed to demonstrate acid fast bacilli. All patients were classified according to Ridley & Jopling classification. Clinico-histopathological correlation was done. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 16.0.RESULTS: Most common histological type of leprosy was tuberculoid leprosy seen in 19(38% cases followed by indeterminate leprosy. Overall clinico-histopathological correlation was seen in 39.58%. The correlation was highest in indeterminate and histoid leprosy (100% followed by lepromatous leprosy (66.66 %% and tuberculoid leprosy (50%. Slit skin smear showed bacilli in 12 out of 48 cases (25% while biopsy showed bacilli in 16 out of 48 cases (33.3%.CONCLUSION: In the present study, clinical diagnosis did not correlate with histopathological diagnosis significantly (p value=0.04159. The study emphasizes the role of histopathological and bacilloscopic examination to aid the clinical diagnosis for accurate typing of leprosy cases then better management of the patient.

  6. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Research Triangle Park , NC 27709-2211 Condensed Matter, Topological Phases of Matter REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S...Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials

  7. Neural Correlates of Gratitude

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Ryan Fox; Jonas eKaplan; Hanna eDamasio; Antonio eDamasio

    2015-01-01

    Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To this end, we conducted an experiment during which we induced gratitude in participants while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. ...

  8. Wind and Yaw correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    The report describes measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. A comparison between wind speed on the metmast and Nacelle Windspeed are made and the results are presented on graphs and in a table. The data used for the comparison are identical with the data used for the Risø-I-3246(EN......) power curve report. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1] and the wind and yaw correlation is analyzed in accordance to Ref. [2]....

  9. Quantum correlations and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, Jan

    2015-07-16

    The present thesis is a state of the art report on the characterization techniques and measurement strategies to verify quantum correlations. I mainly focus on research which has been performed in the theoretical quantum optics group at the University of Rostock during the last few years. The results include theoretical findings and analysis of experimental studies of radiation fields. We investigate the verification of quantum properties, the quantification of these quantum effects, and the characterization of quantum optical detector systems.

  10. Wind and Yaw correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    The report describes measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. A comparison between wind speed on the metmast and Nacelle Windspeed are made and the results are presented on graphs and in a table. The data used for the comparison are identical with the data used for the Risø-I-3246(EN) po......) power curve report. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1] and the wind and yaw correlation is analyzed in accordance to Ref. [2]....

  11. RELAP-7 Closure Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrs, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansel, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sharpe, J. P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johns, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5’s and TRACE’s capabilities and extends their analysis capabilities for all reactor system simulation scenarios. The RELAP-7 code utilizes the well-posed 7-equation two-phase flow model for compressible two-phase flow. Closure models used in the TRACE code has been reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past decades and provide a basis for the colure correlations implemented in the RELAP-7 code. This document provides a summary on the closure correlations that are currently implemented in the RELAP-7 code. The closure correlations include sub-grid models that describe interactions between the fluids and the flow channel, and interactions between the two phases.

  12. Neural Correlates of Gratitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Ryan Fox

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To this end, we conducted an experiment during which we induced gratitude in participants while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. We hypothesized that gratitude ratings would correlate with activity in brain regions associated with moral cognition, value judgment and theory of mind. The stimuli used to elicit gratitude were drawn from stories of survivors of the Holocaust, as many survivors report being sheltered by strangers or receiving lifesaving food and clothing, and having strong feelings of gratitude for such gifts. The participants were asked to place themselves in the context of the Holocaust and imagine what their own experience would feel like if they received such gifts. For each gift, they rated how grateful they felt. The results revealed that ratings of gratitude correlated with brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, in support of our hypotheses. The results provide a window into the brain circuitry for moral cognition and positive emotion that accompanies the experience of benefitting from the goodwill of others.

  13. Recurrent correlation associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiueh, T D; Goodman, R M

    1991-01-01

    A model for a class of high-capacity associative memories is presented. Since they are based on two-layer recurrent neural networks and their operations depend on the correlation measure, these associative memories are called recurrent correlation associative memories (RCAMs). The RCAMs are shown to be asymptotically stable in both synchronous and asynchronous (sequential) update modes as long as their weighting functions are continuous and monotone nondecreasing. In particular, a high-capacity RCAM named the exponential correlation associative memory (ECAM) is proposed. The asymptotic storage capacity of the ECAM scales exponentially with the length of memory patterns, and it meets the ultimate upper bound for the capacity of associative memories. The asymptotic storage capacity of the ECAM with limited dynamic range in its exponentiation nodes is found to be proportional to that dynamic range. Design and fabrication of a 3-mm CMOS ECAM chip is reported. The prototype chip can store 32 24-bit memory patterns, and its speed is higher than one associative recall operation every 3 mus. An application of the ECAM chip to vector quantization is also described.

  14. Neural correlates of gratitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Glenn R; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To this end, we conducted an experiment during which we induced gratitude in participants while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. We hypothesized that gratitude ratings would correlate with activity in brain regions associated with moral cognition, value judgment and theory of mind. The stimuli used to elicit gratitude were drawn from stories of survivors of the Holocaust, as many survivors report being sheltered by strangers or receiving lifesaving food and clothing, and having strong feelings of gratitude for such gifts. The participants were asked to place themselves in the context of the Holocaust and imagine what their own experience would feel like if they received such gifts. For each gift, they rated how grateful they felt. The results revealed that ratings of gratitude correlated with brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, in support of our hypotheses. The results provide a window into the brain circuitry for moral cognition and positive emotion that accompanies the experience of benefitting from the goodwill of others.

  15. Correlation of the leptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finucane, F; Luan, J; Wareham, N

    2009-01-01

    (M/I) from hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp studies in 1,226 EGIR RISC participants. RESULTS: The LAR was highly correlated with HOMA-S in men (r = -0.58, p = 4.5 x 10(-33) and r = -0.65, p = 1.1 x 10(-66) within the Ely and EGIR RISC study cohorts, respectively) and in women (r = -0.51, p = 2.8 x...... from the Ely and European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR) Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Risk (RISC) study cohorts. LAR was compared with fasting insulin and HOMA-derived insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S) in all individuals and with the insulin sensitivity index...... 10(-36) and r = -0.61, p = 2.5 x 10(-73)). The LAR was also strongly correlated with the clamp M/I value (r = -0.52, p = 4.5 x 10(-38) and r = -0.47, p = 6.6 x 10(-40) in men and women, respectively), similar to correlations between HOMA-S and the M/I value. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The leptin...

  16. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y K [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  17. Cots Correlator Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Kjeld; Overeem, Ruud

    2004-06-01

    Moore’s law is best exploited by using consumer market hardware. In particular, the gaming industry pushes the limit of processor performance thus reducing the cost per raw flop even faster than Moore’s law predicts. Next to the cost benefits of Common-Of-The-Shelf (COTS) processing resources, there is a rapidly growing experience pool in cluster based processing. The typical Beowulf cluster of PC’s supercomputers are well known. Multiple examples exists of specialised cluster computers based on more advanced server nodes or even gaming stations. All these cluster machines build upon the same knowledge about cluster software management, scheduling, middleware libraries and mathematical libraries. In this study, we have integrated COTS processing resources and cluster nodes into a very high performance processing platform suitable for streaming data applications, in particular to implement a correlator. The required processing power for the correlator in modern radio telescopes is in the range of the larger supercomputers, which motivates the usage of supercomputer technology. Raw processing power is provided by graphical processors and is combined with an Infiniband host bus adapter with integrated data stream handling logic. With this processing platform a scalable correlator can be built with continuously growing processing power at consumer market prices.

  18. Neural correlates of gratitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Glenn R.; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To this end, we conducted an experiment during which we induced gratitude in participants while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. We hypothesized that gratitude ratings would correlate with activity in brain regions associated with moral cognition, value judgment and theory of mind. The stimuli used to elicit gratitude were drawn from stories of survivors of the Holocaust, as many survivors report being sheltered by strangers or receiving lifesaving food and clothing, and having strong feelings of gratitude for such gifts. The participants were asked to place themselves in the context of the Holocaust and imagine what their own experience would feel like if they received such gifts. For each gift, they rated how grateful they felt. The results revealed that ratings of gratitude correlated with brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, in support of our hypotheses. The results provide a window into the brain circuitry for moral cognition and positive emotion that accompanies the experience of benefitting from the goodwill of others. PMID:26483740

  19. Wavelet Correlation Coefficient of 'strongly correlated' financial time series

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Razdan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use wavelet concepts to show that correlation coefficient between two financial data's is not constant but varies with scale from high correlation value to strongly anti-correlation value This studies is important because correlation coefficient is used to quantify degree of independence between two variables. In econophysics correlation coefficient forms important input to evolve hierarchial tree and minimum spanning tree of financial data.

  20. Correlating Anomalous Diffusion with Membrane Obstacle Structure Using Single Molecule Tracking and AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaug, Michael; Longo, Marjorie; Faller, Roland

    2011-03-01

    Anomalous diffusion has been observed abundantly in the plasma membrane, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In general, it has not been possible to directly image the obstacles to diffusion in membranes, so the dynamics of diffusing particles are used to deduce the obstacle characteristics. We present a supported lipid bilayer system in which we characterized the anomalous diffusion of lipid molecules using single molecule tracking, while at the same time imaging the obstacles to diffusion with atomic force microscopy. To explain our experimental results, we performed lattice Monte Carlo simulations of tracer diffusion in the presence of the experimentally determined obstacle configurations. We correlate the observed anomalous diffusion with obstacle area fraction, fractal dimension and correlation length. We further discuss our results in the context of confinement models and the generating stochastic process. Supported by NSF grant CBET 0506602.

  1. Sequence Pattern Correlation of Amino Acid in Collision-induced Dissociation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG,Hao-Wei(宋浩威); YUE,Gui-Hua(岳贵花); LU,Yu(陆宇); YANG,Peng-Yuan(杨芃原); WANG,Hong-Hai(王洪海)

    2002-01-01

    A novel approach of sequence pattern correlation has been applied to predict an expected amino acid sequence from CID ESI-MS spectra. The proposed approach deduces sequence patterns with no help from known protein database such that it is useful to identify an unknown peptide or new protein. The algorithm applies a cross-correlation to match an experimental CID spectrum with predicted sequence pattern generated from fragmentation information. The fragmentation knowledge of both y-series and other non y-series are utilized to generate the predicted sequence patterns. In contrast to the normal de novo approach, the proposed approach is insensitive to mass tolerance and non-susceptive to spectral integrality with no need for selection of a starting point.

  2. Biological Correlates of Empathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Timucin Oral

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Empathy can be defined as the capacity to know emotionally what another is experiencing from within the frame of reference of that other person and the capacity to sample the feelings of another or it can be metaphorized as to put oneself in another’s shoes. Although the concept of empathy was firstly described in psychological theories, researches studying the biological correlates of psychological theories have been increasing recently. Not suprisingly, dinamically oriented psychotherapists Freud, Kohut, Basch and Fenichel had suggested theories about the biological correlates of empathy concept and established the basis of this modality decades ago. Some other theorists emphasized the importance of empathy in the early years of lifetime regarding mother-child attachment in terms of developmental psychology and investigated its role in explanation of psychopathology. The data coming from some of the recent brain imaging and animal model studies also seem to support these theories. Although increased activity in different brain regions was shown in many of the brain imaging studies, the role of cingulate cortex for understanding mother-child relationship was constantly emphasized in nearly all of the studies. In addition to these studies, a group of Italian scientists has defined a group of neurons as “mirror neurons” in their studies observing rhesus macaque monkeys. Later, they also defined mirror neurons in human studies, and suggested them as “empathy neurons”. After the discovery of mirror neurons, the hopes of finding the missing part of the puzzle for understanding the biological correlates of empathy raised again. Although the roles of different biological parameters such as skin conductance and pupil diameter for defining empathy have not been certain yet, they are going to give us the opportunity to revise the inconsistent basis of structural validity in psychiatry and to stabilize descriptive validity. In this review, the

  3. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Borghini; P M Dinh; J-Y Ollitrault

    2003-04-01

    First observations of elliptic flow in Au–Au collisions at RHIC have been interpreted as evidence that the colliding system reaches thermal equilibrium. We discuss some of the arguments leading to this conclusion and show that a more accurate analysis is needed, which the standard flow analysis may not provide. We then present a new method of flow analysis, based on a systematic study of multiparticle azimuthal correlations. This method allows one to test quantitatively the collective behaviour of the interacting system. It has recently been applied by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC.

  4. Superconductivity from correlated hopping

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, C D; Aligia, A A

    1995-01-01

    We consider a chain described by a next-nearest-neighbor hopping combined with a nearest-neighbor spin flip. In two dimensions this three-body term arises from a mapping of the three-band Hubbard model for CuO$_2$ planes to a generalized $t-J$ model and for large O-O hopping favors resonance-valence-bond superconductivity of predominantly $d$-wave symmetry. Solving the ground state and low-energy excitations by analytical and numerical methods we find that the chain is a Luther-Emery liquid with correlation exponent $K_{\\rho} = (2-n)^2/2$, where $n$ is the particle density.

  5. Strongly correlated Bose gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2016-10-01

    The strongly interacting Bose gas is one of the most fundamental paradigms of quantum many-body physics and the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations. We review recent progress on strongly correlated Bose gases, starting with a description of beyond mean-field corrections. We show that the Efimov effect leads to non universal phenomena and to a metastability of the low temperature Bose gas through three-body recombination to deeply bound molecular states. We outline differences and similarities with ultracold Fermi gases, discuss recent experiments on the unitary Bose gas, and finally present a few perspectives for future research.

  6. Investigation of correlations in the breakup of He{sup 8}; Etude des correlations dans la dissociation de l'He{sup 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, B

    2007-11-15

    Correlations in light neutron-rich nuclei are of considerable importance in understanding their structure. In this context the breakup of He{sup 8} into He{sup 6} + 2n has been investigated at 15 MeV/nucleon. The measurements were undertaken using a setup composed of two detector arrays: CHARISSA to detect the charged fragments and DEMON to detect the neutrons. The interpretation of the results was facilitated using a Monte Carlo simulation which was developed to take into account the correlations, the reaction and the experimental setup. Two techniques were used to study the correlations in the breakup of He{sup 8}. The first, intensity interferometry, provides, via the construction of the neutron-neutron correlation function, for a first estimate of the source size and thus the average separation between the neutrons. The second, using Dalitz plots, allows both the neutron-neutron and core-neutron correlations to be probed. Here, sequential decay via the ground state resonance of He{sup 7} and has been found to dominate the dissociation of He{sup 8}. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the breakup of He{sup 8} have thus been deduced and a root-mean-square separation between the two valence neutrons in the continuum states was estimated to be (7.3 {+-} 0.6) fm with a time delay between their emission of (1000 {+-} 300) fm/c. (author)

  7. Long-term changes in UT/LS ozone between the late 1970s and the 1990s deduced from the GASP and MOZAIC aircraft programs and from ozonesondes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Stübi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We present ozone measurements of the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP performed from four commercial and one research aircraft in the late 1970s to compare them with respective measurements of the ongoing MOZAIC project. Multi-annual averages of UT/LS ozone were built using the aircraft data sets (1975–1979 and 1994–2001, and long-term changes between the 1970s and 1990s were derived by comparison. The data were binned relative to the dynamical tropopause to separate between UT and LS air masses. LS data were analysed using equivalent latitudes. In the UT, pronounced increases of 20–40% are found over the Middle East and South Asia in the spring and summer seasons. Increases are also found over Japan, Europe, and the eastern parts of the United States depending on season. LS ozone over northern mid- and high latitudes was found to be lower in the 1990s compared to the 1970s in all seasons of the year. In addition, a comparison with long-term changes deduced from ozonesondes is presented. The early 1970s European Brewer-Mast (BM sonde data agree with GASP within the range of uncertainty (UT or measured slightly less ozone (LS. In contrast, the 1990s BM sensors show consistently and significantly higher UT/LS ozone values than MOZAIC. This unequal behaviour of aircraft/sonde comparisons in the 1970s and 1990s leads to differences in the estimated long-term changes over Europe: while the comparison between GASP and MOZAIC indicates ozone changes of −5% to 10% over Europe, the sondes suggest a much larger increase of 10%–35% depending on station and season, although statistical significance is not conclusive due to data sample limitations. In contrast to the BM sondes, the Electrochemical Cell (ECC sonde at Wallops Island, USA, measured higher UT ozone than both GASP and MOZAIC. Hence, long-term changes from GASP/MOZAIC agree within the range of uncertainty with the changes deduced from Wallops Island.

  8. Long-term changes in UT/LS ozone between the late 1970s and the 1990s deduced from the GASP and MOZAIC aircraft programs and from ozonesondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnadt Poberaj, C.; Staehelin, J.; Brunner, D.; Thouret, V.; de Backer, H.; Stübi, R.

    2009-07-01

    We present ozone measurements of the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) performed from four commercial and one research aircraft in the late 1970s to compare them with respective measurements of the ongoing MOZAIC project. Multi-annual averages of UT/LS ozone were built using the aircraft data sets (1975-1979 and 1994-2001), and long-term changes between the 1970s and 1990s were derived by comparison. The data were binned relative to the dynamical tropopause to separate between UT and LS air masses. LS data were analysed using equivalent latitudes. In the UT, pronounced increases of 20-40% are found over the Middle East and South Asia in the spring and summer seasons. Increases are also found over Japan, Europe, and the eastern parts of the United States depending on season. LS ozone over northern mid- and high latitudes was found to be lower in the 1990s compared to the 1970s in all seasons of the year. In addition, a comparison with long-term changes deduced from ozonesondes is presented. The early 1970s European Brewer-Mast (BM) sonde data agree with GASP within the range of uncertainty (UT) or measured slightly less ozone (LS). In contrast, the 1990s BM sensors show consistently and significantly higher UT/LS ozone values than MOZAIC. This unequal behaviour of aircraft/sonde comparisons in the 1970s and 1990s leads to differences in the estimated long-term changes over Europe: while the comparison between GASP and MOZAIC indicates ozone changes of -5% to 10% over Europe, the sondes suggest a much larger increase of 10%-35% depending on station and season, although statistical significance is not conclusive due to data sample limitations. In contrast to the BM sondes, the Electrochemical Cell (ECC) sonde at Wallops Island, USA, measured higher UT ozone than both GASP and MOZAIC. Hence, long-term changes from GASP/MOZAIC agree within the range of uncertainty with the changes deduced from Wallops Island.

  9. Jet-quenching and correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the experimental aspects of jet-quenching and correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Emphasis is put on correlation measurements, namely jet-like correlations with anisotropic flow subtraction in heavy-ion collisions and long-range pseudorapidity correlations in small systems. Future path on correlation studies is envisioned which may elucidate jet–medium interactions and the properties of the hot dense medium in QCD.

  10. Hexagonalization of Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Fleury, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    We propose a nonperturbative framework to study general correlation functions of single-trace operators in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at large $N$. The basic strategy is to decompose them into fundamental building blocks called the hexagon form factors, which were introduced earlier to study structure constants using integrability. The decomposition is akin to a triangulation of a Riemann surface, and we thus call it hexagonalization. We propose a set of rules to glue the hexagons together based on symmetry, which naturally incorporate the dependence on the conformal and the R-symmetry cross ratios. Our method is conceptually different from the conventional operator product expansion and automatically takes into account multi-trace operators exchanged in OPE channels. To illustrate the idea in simple set-ups, we compute four-point functions of BPS operators of arbitrary lengths and correlation functions of one Konishi operator and three short BPS operators, all at one loop. In all cases,...

  11. Energy calibration via correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The main task of an energy calibration is to find a relation between pulse-height values and the corresponding energies. Doing this for each pulse-height channel individually requires an elaborated input spectrum with an excellent counting statistics and a sophisticated data analysis. This work presents an easy to handle energy calibration process which can operate reliably on calibration measurements with low counting statistics. The method uses a parameter based model for the energy calibration and concludes on the optimal parameters of the model by finding the best correlation between the measured pulse-height spectrum and multiple synthetic pulse-height spectra which are constructed with different sets of calibration parameters. A CdTe-based semiconductor detector and the line emissions of an 241 Am source were used to test the performance of the correlation method in terms of systematic calibration errors for different counting statistics. Up to energies of 60 keV systematic errors were measured to be le...

  12. Correlation networks visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Provart

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available New, in silico ways of generating hypotheses based on large data sets have emerged in the past decade. These data sets have been used to investigate different aspects of plant biology, especially at the level of transcriptome, from tissue-specific expression patterns to patterns in as little as a few cells. Such publicly-available data are a boon to researchers for hypothesis generation by providing a guide for experimental work such as phenotyping or genetic analysis. More advanced computational methods can leverage these data via gene coexpression analysis, the results of which can be visualized and refined using network analysis. Other kinds of networks of e.g. protein-protein interactions, can also be used to inform biology. These networks can be visualized and analyzed with additional information on gene expression levels, subcellular localization, etc., or with other emerging kinds information. Finally, cross-level correlation is an area that will become increasingly important. Visualizing these cross-level correlations will require new data visualization tools.

  13. Cross-Correlation of Excitation Functions for Different Fragments and Different Scattering Angles in 27Al(19F, x) y Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jian-Long; WU He-Yu; LI Zhi-Chang; LU Xiu-Qin; ZHAO Kui; ZHOU Ping; LIU Jian-Cheng; XU Guo-Ji; Sergey Yu Kun; WANG Qi; BAI Zhen; DONG Yu-Chuan; LI Song-Lin; DUAN Li-Min; XU Hu-Shan; XU Hua-Gen; CHEN Ruo-Fu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Excitation functions have been measured for different projectile-like fragments produced in 27 Al(19 F,x)y reactions at incident energies from 110.25 to 118. 75 Me V in 250 ke V steps. Strong cross section fluctuations of the excitation functions are observed. The cross-correlation coefficients of the excitation functions for different atomic number Z and for different scattering angle θcm have been deduced. These coefficients are much larger than the statistical theoretical calculated ones. This indicates that there are strong correlations between different exit channels in the dissipative heavy ion collision of 27 Al(19 F,x )y.

  14. PREFACE: Correlated Electrons (Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kazumasa

    2007-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to results in the field of strongly correlated electron systems under multiple-environment. The physics of strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) has attracted much attention since the discovery of superconductivity in CeCu_2 Si_2 by Steglich and his co-workers a quater-century ago. Its interest has been intensified by the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in a series of cuprates with layered perovskite structure which are still under active debate. The present issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter present some aspects of SCES physics on the basis of activities of a late project "Centre-Of-Excellence" supported by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Sports, Science, Culture and Technology of the Japanese Government). This project has been performed by a condensed matter physics group in the faculties of science and engineering science of Osaka University. Although this project also covers correlated phenomena in optics and nano-scale systems, we focus here on the issues of SCES related to superconductivity, mainly unconventional. The present issue covers the discussions on a new mechanism of superconductivity with electronic origin (critical valence fluctuation mechanism), interplay and unification of magnetism and superconductivity in SCES based on a systematic study of NQR under pressure, varieties of Fermi surface of Ce- and U-based SCES probed by the de Haas-van Alphen effect, electronic states probed by a bulk sensitive photoemission spectroscopy with soft X-ray, pressure induced superconductivity of heavy electron materials, pressure dependence of superconducting transition temperature based on a first-principle calculation, and new superconductors under very high-pressure. Some papers offer readers' reviews of the relevant fields and/or include new developments of this intriguing research field of SCES. Altogether, the papers within this issue outline some aspects of electronic states

  15. Some correlates of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, T; Stimpson, D V; Maughan, M R

    1978-05-01

    Trust has been variously defined by behavioral scientists and not very thoroughly investigated. In this study trust was defined as an expectancy held by an individual that the behavior of another person or a group would be altruistic and personally beneficial. An attempt was made, using this conceptual definition, to identify some personality and behavioral correlates of trust. Seven interpersonal relations groups with approximately 10 male and female undergraduates per group were studied with use of the Janis and Field self-esteem inventory, Schutz's FIRO-B scale, and the Rotter internal-external scale. It was discovered that a trusted person is one who is highly influential, has an internal locus of control, a low need to control others, high self-esteem, and is open to being influenced by others.

  16. Neural correlates of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrao, B L; Viljoen, M

    2009-11-01

    A basic understanding of consciousness and its neural correlates is of major importance for all clinicians, especially those involved with patients with altered states of consciousness. In this paper it is shown that consciousness is dependent on the brainstem and thalamus for arousal; that basic cognition is supported by recurrent electrical activity between the cortex and the thalamus at gamma band frequencies; aand that some kind of working memory must, at least fleetingly, be present for awareness to occur. The problem of cognitive binding and the role of attention are briefly addressed and it shown that consciousness depends on a multitude of subconscious processes. Although these processes do not represent consciousness, consciousness cannot exist without them.

  17. Broadcasting Correlated Gaussians

    CERN Document Server

    Bross, Shraga; Tinguely, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    We consider the transmission of a bi-variate Gaussian source over a one-to-two power-limited Gaussian broadcast channel. Receiver 1 observes the transmitted signal corrupted by Gaussian noise and wishes to estimate the first component of the source. Receiver 2 observes the transmitted signal in larger Gaussian noise and wishes to estimate the second component. We seek to characterize the pairs of mean squared-error distortions that are simultaneously achievable at the two receivers. Our result is that below a certain SNR-threshold an "uncoded scheme" that sends a linear combination of the source components is optimal. The SNR-theshold can be expressed as a function of the source correlation and the distortion at Receiver 1.

  18. Periodic Ising Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Hystad, Grethe

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we first rework B. Kaufman's 1949 paper, "Crystal Statistics. II. Partition Function Evaluated by Spinor Analysis", by using representation theory. Our approach leads to a simpler and more direct way of deriving the spectrum of the transfer matrix for the finite periodic Ising model. We then determine formulas for the spin correlation functions that depend on the matrix elements of the induced rotation associated with the spin operator in a basis of eigenvectors for the transfer matrix. The representation of the spin matrix elements is obtained by considering the spin operator as an intertwining map. We exhibit the "new" elements V+ and V- in the Bugrij-Lisovyy formula as part of a holomorphic factorization of the periodic and anti-periodic summability kernels on the spectral curve associated with the induced rotation for the transfer matrix.

  19. Correlated emission of hadrons from recombination of correlated partons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, R J; Bass, S A; Müller, B

    2005-04-01

    We discuss different sources of hadron correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We show that correlations among partons in a quasithermal medium can lead to the correlated emission of hadrons by quark recombination and argue that this mechanism offers a plausible explanation for the dihadron correlations in the few GeV/c momentum range observed in Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  20. Lagged correlation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curme, Chester

    Technological advances have provided scientists with large high-dimensional datasets that describe the behaviors of complex systems: from the statistics of energy levels in complex quantum systems, to the time-dependent transcription of genes, to price fluctuations among assets in a financial market. In this environment, where it may be difficult to infer the joint distribution of the data, network science has flourished as a way to gain insight into the structure and organization of such systems by focusing on pairwise interactions. This work focuses on a particular setting, in which a system is described by multivariate time series data. We consider time-lagged correlations among elements in this system, in such a way that the measured interactions among elements are asymmetric. Finally, we allow these interactions to be characteristically weak, so that statistical uncertainties may be important to consider when inferring the structure of the system. We introduce a methodology for constructing statistically validated networks to describe such a system, extend the methodology to accommodate interactions with a periodic component, and show how consideration of bipartite community structures in these networks can aid in the construction of robust statistical models. An example of such a system is a financial market, in which high frequency returns data may be used to describe contagion, or the spreading of shocks in price among assets. These data provide the experimental testing ground for our methodology. We study NYSE data from both the present day and one decade ago, examine the time scales over which the validated lagged correlation networks exist, and relate differences in the topological properties of the networks to an increasing economic efficiency. We uncover daily periodicities in the validated interactions, and relate our findings to explanations of the Epps Effect, an empirical phenomenon of financial time series. We also study bipartite community

  1. Correlates of Sensitive Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Paul [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-04-22

    By “Quantitative Empirical Analysis” (QEA) is intended the use of statistical methods to infer, from data that often tend to be of a historical nature, the characteristics of states that correlate with some designated dependent variable (e.g. proliferation of nuclear weapons). QEA is a well-established approach in the social sciences, but is not notably well-known among physical scientists, who tend to think of the social sciences as inherently qualitative. This article attempts to provide a snapshot of research, most of which has evolved over the past decade, involving the application of QEA to issues in which the dependent variable of interest is intended as some measure of nuclear proliferation. Standard practices in QEA are described, especially as they relate to data collection. The QEA approach is compared and contrasted to other quantitative approaches to studying proliferation-related issues, including a “figure of merit” approach that has largely been developed within the DOE complex, and two distinct methodologies termed in a recent US National Academy of Sciences study as “case by case” and “predefined framework.” Sample results from QEA applied to proliferation are indicated, as are doubts about such quantitative approaches. A simplistic decision-theoretic model of the optimal time for the international community to intervene in a possible proliferation scenario is used to illustrate the possibility of synergies between different approaches

  2. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Spin Correlation in Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Farbiash, N; Farbiash, Netzach; Steinitz, Raphael

    2004-01-01

    We examine the correlation of projected rotational velocities in binary systems. It is an extension of previous work (Steinitz and Pyper, 1970; Levato, 1974). An enlarged data basis and new tests enable us to conclude that there is indeed correlation between the projected rotational velocities of components of binaries. In fact we suggest that spins are already correlated.

  4. Model validation: Correlation for updating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D J Ewins

    2000-06-01

    In this paper, a review is presented of the various methods which are available for the purpose of performing a systematic comparison and correlation between two sets of vibration data. In the present case, the application of interest is in conducting this correlation process as a prelude to model correlation or updating activity.

  5. Correlated electronic states of SrVO{sub 3} revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T. [Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kobayashi, M. [KEK, Photon Factory, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Yoshimatsu, K. [KEK, Photon Factory, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kumigashira, H. [KEK, Photon Factory, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujimori, A. [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    In this article, we review recent progress in angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies of the Mott-Hubbard-type correlated electron systems SrVO{sub 3}. It has the d{sup 1} electron configuration and is an ideal model compound to study electron correlation effects in normal metal. ARPES studies of bulk single-crystal SrVO{sub 3} and CaVO{sub 3} have revealed the difference in the mass renormalization of electrons between them. In-situ ARPES studies of thin films fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition method have clarified not only quasi-particle dispersions, which show a kink like high-T{sub c} cuprates, but also finite dispersions in the incoherent part. Self-energy in a wide energy range has been deduced from the ARPES spectral weight using Kramers–Kronig transformation. The obtained self-energy has several structures which yield the incoherent feature and a pseudogap-like dip similar to the high-T{sub c} cuprates. Quantum-well states in ultrathin films of SrVO{sub 3} have revealed sub-bands with correlated electrons. These findings of electron correlation effects outlined in the present article would provide a starting point not only for fundamental condensed-matter physics but also for the development of new devices with correlated electrons.

  6. On the practical convergence of coda-based correlations: a window optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, J.; Clerc, V.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Knox, H.

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel optimization approach to improve the convergence of interstation coda correlation functions towards the medium's empirical Green's function. For two stations recording a series of impulsive events in a multiply scattering medium, we explore the impact of coda window selection through a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme, with the aim of generating a gather of correlation functions that is the most coherent and symmetric over events, thus recovering intuitive elements of the interstation Green's function without any nonlinear post-processing techniques. This approach is tested here for a 2-D acoustic finite difference model, where a much improved correlation function is obtained, as well as for a database of small impulsive icequakes recorded on Erebus Volcano, Antarctica, where similar robust results are shown. The average coda solutions, as deduced from the posterior probability distributions of the optimization, are further representative of the scattering strength of the medium, with stronger scattering resulting in a slightly delayed overall coda sampling. The recovery of singly scattered arrivals in the coda of correlation functions are also shown to be possible through this approach, and surface wave reflections from outer craters on Erebus volcano were mapped in this fashion. We also note that, due to the improvement of correlation functions over subsequent events, this approach can further be used to improve the resolution of passive temporal monitoring.

  7. Cross correlation calculations and neutron scattering analysis for a portable solid state neutron detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltos, Andrea

    In efforts to perform accurate dosimetry, Oakes et al. [Nucl. Intrum. Mehods. (2013)] introduced a new portable solid state neutron rem meter based on an adaptation of the Bonner sphere and the position sensitive long counter. The system utilizes high thermal efficiency neutron detectors to generate a linear combination of measurement signals that are used to estimate the incident neutron spectra. The inversion problem associated to deduce dose from the counts in individual detector elements is addressed by applying a cross-correlation method which allows estimation of dose with average errors less than 15%. In this work, an evaluation of the performance of this system was extended to take into account new correlation techniques and neutron scattering contribution. To test the effectiveness of correlations, the Distance correlation, Pearson Product-Moment correlation, and their weighted versions were performed between measured spatial detector responses obtained from nine different test spectra, and the spatial response of Library functions generated by MCNPX. Results indicate that there is no advantage of using the Distance Correlation over the Pearson Correlation, and that weighted versions of these correlations do not increase their performance in evaluating dose. Both correlations were proven to work well even at low integrated doses measured for short periods of time. To evaluate the contribution produced by room-return neutrons on the dosimeter response, MCNPX was used to simulate dosimeter responses for five isotropic neutron sources placed inside different sizes of rectangular concrete rooms. Results show that the contribution of scattered neutrons to the response of the dosimeter can be significant, so that for most cases the dose is over predicted with errors as large as 500%. A possible method to correct for the contribution of room-return neutrons is also assessed and can be used as a good initial estimate on how to approach the problem.

  8. Professional correlates of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Damien; Massuel, Marie-Anne; Metlaine, Arnaud

    2006-02-01

    Insomnia is a highly prevalent disorder that affects daytime functioning, behavior, and quality of life. Several reports have shown that insomnia impacts on the workforce and is associated with an increased risk of absenteeism. However, few workplace studies have been performed. Our study attempted to evaluate the professional correlates of insomnia by comparing a group of workers with insomnia to a matched group of good sleepers. The main objective measure was absenteeism. Accidents, self-esteem at work, job satisfaction, and efficiency at work were also investigated. Pairs of workers with insomnia (according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition definition) and good sleepers, matched by age, sex, and occupational status, were interviewed by their occupational physician and also answered a self-administered questionnaire on work-related criteria. Objective data on absenteeism (number of days absent from work) were provided by the employers' health resource databases. Paris and the Ile de France region (France). Seven hundred eighty-five subjects completed the questionnaire. We retained 369 pair (ie, 738 subjects) for analysis. Insomniacs missed work twice as often as good sleepers. The difference between insomniacs and good sleepers in terms of absenteeism was particularly high for blue-collar workers (odds ratio = 3.0) and men (odds ratio = 2.31). Insomniacs had also a higher accident rate while driving and, strikingly, a 3-fold greater risk of having 2 or 3 serious road accidents. They also reported poor self-esteem at work, less job satisfaction, and less efficiency at work, compared with good sleepers. Our study found an objective increase in absenteeism in insomniacs compared with good sleepers.

  9. Modeling Complex System Correlation Using Detrended Cross-Correlation Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keqiang Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of complex systems has become an area of active research for physicists because such systems exhibit interesting dynamical properties such as scale invariance, volatility correlation, heavy tails, and fractality. We here focus on traffic dynamic as an example of a complex system. By applying the detrended cross-correlation coefficient method to traffic time series, we find that the traffic fluctuation time series may exhibit cross-correlation characteristic. Further, we show that two traffic speed time series derived from adjacent sections exhibit much stronger cross-correlations than the two speed series derived from adjacent lanes. Similarly, we also demonstrate that the cross-correlation property between the traffic volume variables from two adjacent sections is stronger than the cross-correlation property between the volume variables of adjacent lanes.

  10. Correlations of correlations: Secondary autocorrelations in finite harmonic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyukhin, Dan; Plyukhin, Alex V

    2015-10-01

    The momentum or velocity autocorrelation function C(t) for a tagged oscillator in a finite harmonic system decays like that of an infinite system for short times, but exhibits erratic behavior at longer time scales. We introduce the autocorrelation function of the long-time noisy tail of C(t) ("a correlation of the correlation"), which characterizes the distribution of recurrence times. Remarkably, for harmonic systems with same-mass particles this secondary correlation may coincide with the primary correlation C(t) (when both functions are normalized) either exactly, or over a significant initial time interval. When the tagged particle is heavier than the rest, the equality does not hold, correlations show nonrandom long-time scale pattern, and higher-order correlations converge to the lowest normal mode.

  11. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    CERN Document Server

    Ord, S M; Emrich, D; Pallot, D; Wayth, R B; Clark, M A; Tremblay, S E; Arcus, W; Barnes, D; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bhat, N D R; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Bunton, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; deSouza, L; Ewell-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Herne, D; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, H; Jacobs, D; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kincaid, B B; Koenig, R; Kratzenberg, E; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A; Pathikulangara, J; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Remillard, R A; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Salah, J E; Sault, R J; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Stevens, J; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2015-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio--astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia (WA). The MWA consists of 4096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and others by Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 TFLOPS (Tera FLoating point Operations Per Second). The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB/day of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper we outline the correlator design, signal path, and proce...

  12. Electronic Correlation Strength of Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, A.; C. Albers, R.; E. Christensen, N.

    2013-01-01

    A new electronic quantity, the correlation strength, is defined as a necessary step for understanding the properties and trends in strongly correlated electronic materials. As a test case, this is applied to the different phases of elemental Pu. Within the GW approximation we have surprisingly...... found a "universal" scaling relationship, where the f-electron bandwidth reduction due to correlation effects is shown to depend only upon the local density approximation (LDA) bandwidth and is otherwise independent of crystal structure and lattice constant....

  13. Multiview Bayesian Correlated Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamronn, Simon Due; Poulsen, Andreas Trier; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2015-01-01

    we denote Bayesian correlated component analysis, evaluates favorably against three relevant algorithms in simulated data. A well-established benchmark EEG data set is used to further validate the new model and infer the variability of spatial representations across multiple subjects....... are identical. Here we propose a hierarchical probabilistic model that can infer the level of universality in such multiview data, from completely unrelated representations, corresponding to canonical correlation analysis, to identical representations as in correlated component analysis. This new model, which...

  14. Electronic Correlation Strength of Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, A.; C. Albers, R.; E. Christensen, N.

    2013-01-01

    A new electronic quantity, the correlation strength, is defined as a necessary step for understanding the properties and trends in strongly correlated electronic materials. As a test case, this is applied to the different phases of elemental Pu. Within the GW approximation we have surprisingly...... found a "universal" scaling relationship, where the f-electron bandwidth reduction due to correlation effects is shown to depend only upon the local density approximation (LDA) bandwidth and is otherwise independent of crystal structure and lattice constant....

  15. Interpretation of correlation analysis results

    OpenAIRE

    Kılıç, Selim

    2012-01-01

    Correlation analysis is used to quantify the degree of linear association between two variables. Correlation coefficient is showed as “r” and it may have values between (-) 1 and (+)1. The symbols (-) or (+) in front of “r coefficient” show the direction of correlation. The direction of association does not affect the strength of association. A “ r coefficient” which is equal or greater than 0.70 is accepted as a good association. Correlation coeefficient only remarks the strength of associat...

  16. Three-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Ulery, J G

    2007-01-01

    Two-particle azimuthal correlations reveal broadened and softened away-side correlations. Several different physics mechanisms are possible: large angle gluon radiation, deflected jets, and conical flow or Cerenkov radiation. Three-particle correlations are investigated to try to discriminate these mechanisms. We present results on 3-particle azimuthal correlations between a trigger particle of 3

  17. Detecting protein atom correlations using correlation of probability of recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fataftah, Hiba; Karain, Wael

    2014-09-01

    The dynamic cross-correlation Map(DCCM) technique has been used extensively to study protein dynamics. In this work, we introduce the use of the method of correlation of probability of recurrence (CPR) as a complementary method to detect correlations between protein residue atoms. Time series of the distances of the Cα atoms of the β-lactamase inhibitory protein (BLIP) from a reference position are analyzed using CPR and mutual information (MI). The results are compared to those provided by DCCM. In comparison to MI, CPR is found to detect more of the correlations present in DCCM. It is also able to detect a small number of significant correlations between distant residues that are not detected by DCCM. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fault deducing model research of switched reluctance power system of airplane based on PHM%飞机开关磁阻发电系统故障推理模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁; 雷洪利; 韩建定; 朱喜华

    2011-01-01

    开关磁阻发电系统是飞机供电系统的核心部分,为了研究飞机供电系统健康管理技术,减少故障推理模型的检测参数,满足飞机可靠性方面的要求,利用MATLAB软件对开关磁阻发电机典型电气故障进行了仿真分析,并引入记忆模块解决以往仿真过程中产生的代数环问题.然后将发电机输出电压信号利用EMD算法进行分解,将其分解后的各层频率信号的标准差作为特征量训练神经网络,得出开关磁阻发电系统的故障推理模型,本模型只需测量输出电压一个参数,减少了检测参数的数量,为开关磁阻发电系统故障预测模型及飞机整个供电系统键康管理系统的开发奠定了基础.%The switched reluctance power system is the com of airplane power system. In order to research the application of PHM in the power system of airplane, reduce the measure parameters of the fault deducing model,and satisfy the requirements of airplane dependability, the typical electric faults of SRG was carefully analyzed in this paper with MATLAB, and the memory module was used to solve the algebraic loop problem. The SRG voltage signal with EMD was analyzed, and the decomposed signal as character data was used to train the neural network and gain the fault concluding model of SRG main electrical power system. Only one parameter of the output voltage was needed to be measured with this model, which reduced the number of the measured parameters and was meaningful to the research of the prognostic model and PHM system of power system.

  19. Correlation energy, correlated electron density, and exchange-correlation potential in some spherically confined atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2016-12-05

    We report correlation energies, electron densities, and exchange-correlation potentials obtained from configuration interaction and density functional calculations on spherically confined He, Be, Be(2+) , and Ne atoms. The variation of the correlation energy with the confinement radius Rc is relatively small for the He, Be(2+) , and Ne systems. Curiously, the Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) functional works well for weak confinements but fails completely for small Rc . However, in the neutral beryllium atom the CI correlation energy increases markedly with decreasing Rc . This effect is less pronounced at the density-functional theory level. The LYP functional performs very well for the unconfined Be atom, but fails badly for small Rc . The standard exchange-correlation potentials exhibit significant deviation from the "exact" potential obtained by inversion of Kohn-Sham equation. The LYP correlation potential behaves erratically at strong confinements. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Non-linear canonical correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Eeke; de Leeuw, Jan

    1983-01-01

    Non-linear canonical correlation analysis is a method for canonical correlation analysis with optimal scaling features. The method fits many kinds of discrete data. The different parameters are solved for in an alternating least squares way and the corresponding program is called CANALS. An

  1. RECESSION AND INTERNATIONAL MARKET CORRELATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Jones

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationships between various world stock indices from June 2007 to May 2009. The primary concern is whether the recession and the higher variance in daily market returns impact correlations between market indices. The results suggest that the correlations between daily returns on market indices are higher during the recession period of September 2008 to May 2009.

  2. Programming services with correlation sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesi, Fabrizio; Carbone, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Correlation sets define a powerful mechanism for routing incoming communications to the correct running session within a server, by inspecting the content of the received messages. We present a language for programming services based on correlation sets taking into account key aspects of service...

  3. Correlation measurement of squeezed light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krivitsky, Leonid; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Dong, R.;

    2009-01-01

    We study the implementation of a correlation measurement technique for the characterization of squeezed light which is nearly free of electronic noise. With two different sources of squeezed light, we show that the sign of the covariance coefficient, revealed from the time-resolved correlation data...

  4. Improved Digital Image Correlation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudassar, Asloob Ahmad; Butt, Saira

    2016-12-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a powerful technique which is used to correlate two image segments to determine the similarity between them. A correlation image is formed which gives a peak known as correlation peak. If the two image segments are identical the peak is known as auto-correlation peak otherwise it is known as cross correlation peak. The location of the peak in a correlation image gives the relative displacement between the two image segments. Use of DIC for in-plane displacement and deformation measurements in Electronic Speckle Photography (ESP) is well known. In ESP two speckle images are correlated using DIC and relative displacement is measured. We are presenting background review of ESP and disclosing a technique based on DIC for improved relative measurements which we regard as the improved DIC method. Simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed improved-DIC method is superior to the conventional DIC method in two aspects, in resolution and in the availability of reference position in displacement measurements.

  5. Heteronuclear Long-Range Correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole W.

    The lecture will cover heteronuclear long-range correlation techniques like HMBC, H2BC, and HAT HMBC with the emphasis on determining the number of covalent bonds between two spins being correlated. H2BC and HMBC spectra are quite complementary as a peak can be strong in one of the two spectra...

  6. Correlation Weights in Multiple Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Niels G.; Jones, Jeff A.

    2010-01-01

    A general theory on the use of correlation weights in linear prediction has yet to be proposed. In this paper we take initial steps in developing such a theory by describing the conditions under which correlation weights perform well in population regression models. Using OLS weights as a comparison, we define cases in which the two weighting…

  7. Personality Correlates of Polydrug Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Dean G.; And Others

    Although the personality correlates of heroin addiction, LSD use, and marijuana smoking have been frequently investigated, relatively few data are available to describe the personality or lifestyle variables correlated with the pattern of polydrug abuse. In an attempt to gather such information, 17 polydrug users, selected from a group of 224…

  8. Differential correlation for sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siska, Charlotte; Kechris, Katerina

    2017-01-19

    Several methods have been developed to identify differential correlation (DC) between pairs of molecular features from -omics studies. Most DC methods have only been tested with microarrays and other platforms producing continuous and Gaussian-like data. Sequencing data is in the form of counts, often modeled with a negative binomial distribution making it difficult to apply standard correlation metrics. We have developed an R package for identifying DC called Discordant which uses mixture models for correlations between features and the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for fitting parameters of the mixture model. Several correlation metrics for sequencing data are provided and tested using simulations. Other extensions in the Discordant package include additional modeling for different types of differential correlation, and faster implementation, using a subsampling routine to reduce run-time and address the assumption of independence between molecular feature pairs. With simulations and breast cancer miRNA-Seq and RNA-Seq data, we find that Spearman's correlation has the best performance among the tested correlation methods for identifying differential correlation. Application of Spearman's correlation in the Discordant method demonstrated the most power in ROC curves and sensitivity/specificity plots, and improved ability to identify experimentally validated breast cancer miRNA. We also considered including additional types of differential correlation, which showed a slight reduction in power due to the additional parameters that need to be estimated, but more versatility in applications. Finally, subsampling within the EM algorithm considerably decreased run-time with negligible effect on performance. A new method and R package called Discordant is presented for identifying differential correlation with sequencing data. Based on comparisons with different correlation metrics, this study suggests Spearman's correlation is appropriate for sequencing data

  9. Correlation Functions and Power Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The present lecture note is a supplement to the textbook Digital Signal Processing by J. Proakis and D.G. Manolakis used in the IMM/DTU course 02451 Digital Signal Processing and provides an extended discussion of correlation functions and power spectra. The definitions of correlation functions...... and spectra for discrete-time and continuous-time (analog) signals are pretty similar. Consequently, we confine the discussion mainly to real discrete-time signals. The Appendix contains detailed definitions and properties of correlation functions and spectra for analog as well as discrete-time signals....... It is possible to define correlation functions and associated spectra for aperiodic, periodic and random signals although the interpretation is different. Moreover, we will discuss correlation functions when mixing these basic signal types. In addition, the note include several examples for the purpose...

  10. Different Luminosity Correlation of GRBs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Z. B. Zhang; H. C. Liu; L. Y. Jiang; D. Y. Chen

    2014-09-01

    We report our recent understanding about a tight correlation between relative spectral lag and luminosity (or redshift) for -ray bursts. The latest investigations indicate that the empirical correlations got from BATSE bursts also exist for Swift/BAT ones. The special luminosity-lag correlation is much similar to that of the luminosity with pulse number proposed by Schaefer (2003), but largely different from most others ever discovered. Note that our newly built luminosity-lag correlation predicts that luminosity should evolve with cosmological redshift as p ∝ (1 + )2.4 ± 0.7 that is excellently confirmed by Salvaterra et al. (2012) and Geng & Huang (2013). In addition, it is also surprisingly found that the luminosity-lag correlation can account for both long and short Swift/BAT bursts, which might be an evidence of the same radiation mechanism for diverse burst groups.

  11. Analysis of Negative Correlation Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yong; Zou Xiu-fen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes negative correlation learning for designing neural network ensembles. Negative correlation learning has been firstly analysed in terms of minimising mutual information on a regression task. By ninimising the mutual information between variables extracted by two neural networks, they are forced to convey different information about some features of their input. Based on the decision boundaries and correct response sets, negative correlation learning has been further studied on two pattern classification problems. The purpose of examining the decision boundaries and the correct response sets is not only to illustrate the learning behavior of negative correlation learning, but also to cast light on how to design more effective neural network ensembles. The experimental results showed the decision boundary of the trained neural network ensemble by negative correlation learning is almost as good as the optimum decision boundary.

  12. Neural correlates of consciousness reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neisser, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted among philosophers that neuroscientists are conducting a search for the neural correlates of consciousness, or NCC. Chalmers (2000) conceptualized this research program as the attempt to correlate the contents of conscious experience with the contents of representations in specific neural populations. A notable claim on behalf of this interpretation is that the neutral language of "correlates" frees us from philosophical disputes over the mind/body relation, allowing the science to move independently. But the experimental paradigms and explanatory canons of neuroscience are not neutral about the mechanical relation between consciousness and the brain. I argue that NCC research is best characterized as an attempt to locate a causally relevant neural mechanism and not as an effort to identify a discrete neural representation, the content of which correlates with some actual experience. It might be said that the first C in "NCC" should stand for "causes" rather than "correlates."

  13. Superconductivity, Antiferromagnetism, and Kinetic Correlation in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ground state of two-dimensional Hubbard model on the basis of the variational Monte Carlo method. We use wave functions that include kinetic correlation and doublon-holon correlation beyond the Gutzwiller ansatz. It is still not clear whether the Hubbard model accounts for high-temperature superconductivity. The antiferromagnetic correlation plays a key role in the study of pairing mechanism because the superconductive phase exists usually close to the antiferromagnetic phase. We investigate the stability of the antiferromagnetic state when holes are doped as a function of the Coulomb repulsion U. We show that the antiferromagnetic correlation is suppressed as U is increased exceeding the bandwidth. High-temperature superconductivity is possible in this region with enhanced antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation and pairing interaction.

  14. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H, E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  15. Cluster identification based on correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, L S

    2012-04-01

    The problem addressed is the identification of cooperating agents based on correlations created as a result of the joint action of these and other agents. A systematic method for using correlations beyond second moments is developed. The technique is applied to a didactic example, the identification of alphabet letters based on correlations among the pixels used in an image of the letter. As in this example, agents can belong to more than one cluster. Moreover, the identification scheme does not require that the patterns be known ahead of time.

  16. Correlation, Cost Risk, and Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1992-01-01

    The geometric viewpoint identifies the choice of a correlation matrix for the simulation of cost risk with the pairwise choice of data vectors corresponding to the parameters used to obtain cost risk. The correlation coefficient is the cosine of the angle between the data vectors after translation to an origin at the mean and normalization for magnitude. Thus correlation is equivalent to expressing the data in terms of a non orthogonal basis. To understand the many resulting phenomena requires the use of the tensor concept of raising the index to transform the measured and observed covariant components into contravariant components before vector addition can be applied. The geometric viewpoint also demonstrates that correlation and covariance are geometric properties, as opposed to purely statistical properties, of the variates. Thus, variates from different distributions may be correlated, as desired, after selection from independent distributions. By determining the principal components of the correlation matrix, variates with the desired mean, magnitude, and correlation can be generated through linear transforms which include the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix. The conversion of the data to a non orthogonal basis uses a compound linear transformation which distorts or stretches the data space. Hence, the correlated data does not have the same properties as the uncorrelated data used to generate it. This phenomena is responsible for seemingly strange observations such as the fact that the marginal distributions of the correlated data can be quite different from the distributions used to generate the data. The joint effect of statistical distributions and correlation remains a fertile area for further research. In terms of application to cost estimating, the geometric approach demonstrates that the estimator must have data and must understand that data in order to properly choose the correlation matrix appropriate for a given estimate

  17. Nonclassicality of local bipartite correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebaratnam, C.; Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.

    2017-03-01

    Simulating quantum nonlocality and steering requires augmenting preshared randomness with nonvanishing communication cost. This prompts the question of how one may provide such an operational characterization for the quantumness of correlations due to even unentangled states. Here we show that for a certain class of states, such quantumness can be pointed out by superlocality, the requirement for a larger dimension of the preshared randomness to simulate the correlations than that of the quantum state that generates them. This provides an approach to define the nonclassicality of local multipartite correlations in convex operational theories.

  18. Evaluation of Little Ice Age cooling in Western Central Andes, suggested by paleoELAs, in contrast with global warming since late 19th century deduced from instrumental records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David; Campos, Néstor; Giraldez, Claudia; García, Eduardo; Quiros, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate climate cooling (°C) during the glacial expansion phases using the product GTV•ΔELA, where GTV is the vertical air temperature gradient (°C/m) and ΔELA (m) the difference in level observed between the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) reconstructions for current and past glaciers. With this aim the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio-(AABR) method was used to produce reconstructions of present ELAs (2002-2010) and paleoELAs corresponding to the last glacier advance phase. The reconstructions were produced in three study areas located along a N-S transect of the western cordillera in the Central Andes: the south-western sector of the Nevado Hualcán (9°S, 77°W; Giráldez 2011); the southern slope of the Cordillera Pariaqaqa (12°S, 76°W; Quirós, 2013) and the NW, NE, SE and SW quadrants of the Nevado Coropuna (16°S, 72°W; García 2013; Úbeda 2011; Campos, 2012). The three mountains exceed 6000 m altitude, their summit areas are covered by glaciers, and on their slopes there are existing well-conserved moraines deposited by the last advances near the present front of the ice masses. Although there are no absolute dates to confirm this hypothesis, it has been assumed that the last glacial advances occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which the oxygen isotopes of the Nevado Huascarán (9°S, 77°W) date to the period 1500-1890. For the Hualcán and Pariaqaqa the mean global value of the Earth's GTV (6.5°C/km) was used, considered valid for the Tropics. On the Coropuna a GTV=8.4°C/km was used, based on high resolution sensors installed in situ since 2007 (Úbeda 2011). This gradient is approaching the upper limit of the dry adiabatic gradient (9.8°C/km), as the Coropuna region is more arid than the other case study areas. The climate cooling estimates deduced from the product GTV•ΔELA were compared with the global warming shown by the 1880-2012 series, ΔT=0.85°C, and 1850/1900-2003/2012, ΔT=0.78°C. The differences are

  19. Measurement of electric field gradient at {sup 117}In on the Cu-site in mavicyanin by perturbed angular correlation of {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, A., E-mail: yokoyama@cacheibm.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Hashimoto, T.; Ihara, K.; Kikunaga, H.; Kinoshita, N.; Yamazaki, I.; Kataoka, K.; Yanase, M.; Takata, M. [Kanazawa University, Faculty of Science and Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology (Japan); Murakami, Y.; Takamiya, K.; Tanigaki, M.; Ohkubo, Y. [Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    The structure around the metal site of mavicyanin, a protein molecule with a copper site, was investigated in solution by using time-differential perturbed angular correlation of {sup 117}In. The electric field gradient (EFG) of the metal site was deduced from the measurement. It demonstrated that the site in a mutant-type mavicyanin, Thr15Ala-Mav, gives an EFG different from that in the wild-type mavicyanin does. The pH dependence of the EFG was also observed for both proteins.

  20. Particle correlations and their implication to collectivity in pPb and PbPb from CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Byungsik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-range two-particle correlation functions reveal the near-side ridge structures in highmultiplicity pp, pPb and PbPb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. The model that takes into account the collective flow originated from the initial-state geometry fluctuation can successfully describe the measured long-range correlation functions of charged particles. In this review paper, the recent experimental data on the long-range correlations and the extracted elliptic and triangular flow parameters in pPb and PbPb collisions from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS experiment are summarized. The flow parameters from the longrange correlation analyses are compared with those from the multiparticle cumulants and the Lee-Yang Zeros (LYZ method. In addition, the pseudorapidity dependence of long-range two-particle correlation functions in pPb and the deduced flow parameters for identified strange hadrons (KS0 and Λ/Λ̄ in pPb and PbPb are also presented to provide more insights on the long-range correlations and flow dynamics.

  1. Correlation functions on conical defects

    CERN Document Server

    Smolkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We explore the new technique developed recently in \\cite{Rosenhaus:2014woa} and suggest a correspondence between the $N$-point correlation functions on spacetime with conical defects and the $(N+1)$-point correlation functions in regular Minkowski spacetime. This correspondence suggests a new systematic way to evaluate the correlation functions on spacetimes with conical defects. We check the correspondence for the expectation value of a scalar operator and of the energy momentum tensor in a conformal field theory and obtain the exact agreement with the earlier derivations for cosmic string spacetime. We then use this correspondence and do the computations for a generic scalar operator and a conserved vector current. For generic unitary field theory we compute the expectation value of the energy momentum tensor using the known spectral representation of the $2$-point correlators of stress-energy tensor in Minkowski spacetime.

  2. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat,...

  3. Modernizing the JPL VLBI Correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogstad, S.; Goodhart, C. E.; Clark, J. E.; Finley, S.; Lanyi, G. E.; White, L. A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.>

    This poster will present the current capabilities of the JPL VLBI Correlator (JVC) and the general architecture of the equipment. In addition, the scientific and navigation uses of the JVC will be enumerated for background purposes. The JVC is a software correlator based on a Beowulf cluster of computers. It replaces a thirty year old correlator based on custom designed digital hardware. General comparisons between the old and new equipment will be made. The JVC makes use of a separate program, SoftC, to do the actual correlations. The JVC manages the sending of data to multiple machines in a Beowulf cluster each running SoftC in parallel on small chunks of the data. The basic architecture of SoftC will also be described.

  4. Photon correlations in multimode waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poem, Eilon; Silberberg, Yaron [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2011-10-15

    We consider the propagation of classical and nonclassical light in multimode optical waveguides. We focus on the evolution of the few-photon correlation functions, which, much as the light-intensity distribution in such systems, evolve in a periodic manner, culminating in the ''revival'' of the initial correlation pattern at the end of each period. It is found that when the input state possesses nontrivial symmetries, the correlation revival period can be longer than that of the intensity, and thus the same intensity pattern can display different correlation patterns. We experimentally demonstrate this effect for classical, pseudothermal light, and compare the results with the predictions for nonclassical, quantum light.

  5. Rapidity correlations test stochastic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zin, Christopher; Moschelli, George

    2016-01-01

    We show that measurements of the rapidity dependence of transverse momentum correlations can be used to determine the characteristic time $\\tau_{\\pi}$ that dictates the rate of isotropization of the stress energy tensor, as well as the shear viscosity $\

  6. Correlations and Neuronal Population Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Adam; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pouget, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Brain function involves the activity of neuronal populations. Much recent effort has been devoted to measuring the activity of neuronal populations in different parts of the brain under various experimental conditions. Population activity patterns contain rich structure, yet many studies have focused on measuring pairwise relationships between members of a larger population-termed noise correlations. Here we review recent progress in understanding how these correlations affect population information, how information should be quantified, and what mechanisms may give rise to correlations. As population coding theory has improved, it has made clear that some forms of correlation are more important for information than others. We argue that this is a critical lesson for those interested in neuronal population responses more generally: Descriptions of population responses should be motivated by and linked to well-specified function. Within this context, we offer suggestions of where current theoretical frameworks fall short.

  7. Programming services with correlation sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesi, Fabrizio; Carbone, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Correlation sets define a powerful mechanism for routing incoming communications to the correct running session within a server, by inspecting the content of the received messages. We present a language for programming services based on correlation sets taking into account key aspects of service......-oriented systems, such as distribution, loose coupling, open-endedness and integration. Distinguishing features of our approach are the notion of correlation aliases and an asynchronous communication model. Our language is equipped with formal syntax, semantics, and a typing system for ensuring desirable...... properties of programs with respect to correlation sets. We provide an implementation as an extension of the JOLIE language and apply it to a nontrivial real-world example of a fully-functional distributed user authentication system....

  8. Totality of Subquantum Nonlocal Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    In a series of previous papers we developed a purely field model of microphenomena, so called prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT). This model not only reproduces important probabilistic predictions of QM including correlations for entangled systems, but it also gives a possibility to go beyond quantum mechanics (QM), i.e., to make predictions of phenomena which could be observed at the subquantum level. In this paper we discuss one of such predictions - existence of nonlocal correlations between prequantum random fields corresponding to {\\it all} quantum systems. (And by PCSFT quantum systems are represented by classical Gaussian random fields and quantum observables by quadratic forms of these fields.) The source of these correlations is the common background field. Thus all prequantum random fields are "entangled", but in the sense of classical signal theory. On one hand, PCSFT demystifies quantum nonlocality by reducing it to nonlocal classical correlations based on the common random back...

  9. Default probabilities and default correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Erlenmaier, Ulrich; Gersbach, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Starting from the Merton framework for firm defaults, we provide the analytics and robustness of the relationship between default correlations. We show that loans with higher default probabilities will not only have higher variances but also higher correlations between loans. As a consequence, portfolio standard deviation can increase substantially when loan default probabilities rise. This result has two important implications. First, relative prices of loans with different default probabili...

  10. Dynamics of Stock Market Correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Dror Y Kenett; Shapira, Yoash; Madi, Asaf; Bransburg-Zabary, Sharron; gur-Gershgoren, Gitit; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel approach to the study the dynamics of stock market correlations. This is achieved through an innovative visualization tool that allows an investigation of the structure and dynamics of the market, through the study of correlations. This is based on the Stock Market Holography (SMH) method recently introduced. This qualitative measure is complemented by the use of the eigenvalue entropy measure, to quantify how the information in the market changes in time. Using this innova...

  11. Why Waveform Correlation Sometimes Fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, J.

    2015-12-01

    Waveform correlation detectors used in explosion monitoring scan noisy geophysical data to test two competing hypotheses: either (1) an amplitude-scaled version of a template waveform is present, or, (2) no signal is present at all. In reality, geophysical wavefields that are monitored for explosion signatures include waveforms produced by non-target sources that are partially correlated with the waveform template. Such signals can falsely trigger correlation detectors, particularly at low thresholds required to monitor for smaller target explosions. This challenge is particularly formidable when monitoring known test sites for seismic disturbances, since uncatalogued natural seismicity is (generally) more prevalent at lower magnitudes, and could be mistaken for small explosions. To address these challenges, we identify real examples in which correlation detectors targeting explosions falsely trigger on both site-proximal earthquakes (Figure 1, below) and microseismic "noise". Motivated by these examples, we quantify performance loss when applying these detectors, and re-evaluate the correlation-detector's hypothesis test. We thereby derive new detectors from more general hypotheses that admit unknown background seismicity, and apply these to real data. From our treatment, we derive "rules of thumb'' for proper template and threshold selection in heavily cluttered signal environments. Last, we answer the question "what is the probability of falsely detecting an earthquake collocated at a test site?", using correlation detectors that include explosion-triggered templates. Figure Top: An eight-channel data stream (black) recorded from an earthquake near a mine. Red markers indicate a detection. Middle: The correlation statistic computed by scanning the template against the data stream at top. The red line indicates the threshold for event declaration, determined by a false-alarm on noise probability constraint, as computed from the signal-absent distribution using

  12. Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Aleem

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: As platelets secrete and express a number of crucial mediators of coagulation and inflammation, coagulation and inflammatory cascades may play a positive role in chronic urticaria, paving the way for better understanding of pathogenesis and introduction of newer drugs.

  13. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, S. M.; Crosse, B.; Emrich, D.; Pallot, D.; Wayth, R. B.; Clark, M. A.; Tremblay, S. E.; Arcus, W.; Barnes, D.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Bunton, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; deSouza, L.; Ewell-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Herne, D.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kincaid, B. B.; Koenig, R.; Kratzenberg, E.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Salah, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, J.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-03-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array is a Square Kilometre Array Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. The MWA consists of 4 096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays, and others by Graphics Processing Units housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 tera floating point operations per second. The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB day-1 of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper, we outline the correlator design, signal path, and processing elements and present the data format for the internal and external interfaces.

  14. Spectral analysis by correlation; Analyse spectrale par correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauque, J.M.; Berthier, D.; Max, J.; Bonnet, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The spectral density of a signal, which represents its power distribution along the frequency axis, is a function which is of great importance, finding many uses in all fields concerned with the processing of the signal (process identification, vibrational analysis, etc...). Amongst all the possible methods for calculating this function, the correlation method (correlation function calculation + Fourier transformation) is the most promising, mainly because of its simplicity and of the results it yields. The study carried out here will lead to the construction of an apparatus which, coupled with a correlator, will constitute a set of equipment for spectral analysis in real time covering the frequency range 0 to 5 MHz. (author) [French] La densite spectrale d'un signal qui represente la repartition de sa puissance sur l'axe des frequences est une fonction de premiere importance, constamment utilisee dans tout ce qui touche le traitement du signal (identification de processus, analyse de vibrations, etc...). Parmi toutes les methodes possibles de calcul de cette fonction, la methode par correlation (calcul de la fonction de correlation + transformation de Fourier) est tres seduisante par sa simplicite et ses performances. L'etude qui est faite ici va deboucher sur la realisation d'un appareil qui, couple a un correlateur, constituera un ensemble d'analyse spectrale en temps reel couvrant la gamme de frequence 0 a 5 MHz. (auteur)

  15. Correlation of oilfield service companies' R&D investment on the basis of competitive speculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Lei; Zhang Baosheng

    2008-01-01

    When an oligopoly company decides how much should be invested in its R&D,in order to reap the largest profits,it considers not only what its competitors have done but also how its competitors would respond to its action.Therefore,different relationships between oligopoly companies will lead to different responses in their decisions on R&D investment.A correlation deduced from different responses of oligopoly companies in R&D investment with the complete information tactic game theory is presented,and the R&D investment of oilfield service companies was analyzed with this correlation.The correlations of Schlumberger's R&D investment,Halliburton's R&D investment and Baker Hughes' R&D investment were established and analyzed.Meanwhile,two regression models were presented.One was composed of Schlumberger's R&D investment in the previous year and Halliburton's R&D investment.The other was composed of Schlumberger's R&D investment and Baker Hughes' R&D investment in the same year.The accuracy of these two models was proved to be good.

  16. A scalable correlator for multichannel diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapels, Christopher J.; Kolodziejski, Noah J.; McAdams, Daniel; Podolsky, Matthew J.; Fernandez, Daniel E.; Farkas, Dana; Christian, James F.

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a technique which enables powerful and robust non-invasive optical studies of tissue micro-circulation and vascular blood flow. The technique amounts to autocorrelation analysis of coherent photons after their migration through moving scatterers and subsequent collection by single-mode optical fibers. A primary cost driver of DCS instruments are the commercial hardware-based correlators, limiting the proliferation of multi-channel instruments for validation of perfusion analysis as a clinical diagnostic metric. We present the development of a low-cost scalable correlator enabled by microchip-based time-tagging, and a software-based multi-tau data analysis method. We will discuss the capabilities of the instrument as well as the implementation and validation of 2- and 8-channel systems built for live animal and pre-clinical settings.

  17. LCP correlations with improved resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilborn, Lauren; McIntosh, Alan; Jedele, Andrea; Youngs, Mike; Zarrella, Andrew; Yennello, Sherry

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear Equation of State (EoS) is important to a fundamental understanding of nuclear matter. The density dependence of the asymmetry energy, the least constrained term in the EoS, is critical to describing exotic systems such as neutron-rich heavy-ion collisions and neutron stars. Correlation functions of particles emitted in heavy ion reactions (such a p-p correlations) have been predicted to be sensitive to the asymmetry energy. In order to measure correlation functions with high resolution, the Forward Array Using Silicon Technology (FAUST) at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has been recently re-commissioned with position-sensitive silicons as the delta-E detectors. A new method of position calibration for FAUST has been developed to take advantage of the 200um position resolution within each detector. Data has been collected from reactions of 40Ar +70Zn, 40Ar +58Fe and 40Ca +58Ni at 40 MeV/nucleon. The three systems allow correlation functions to be compared for systems with varying (N-Z)/A while holding constant either the total charge or the total mass. Light charged particles have been measured, and preliminary investigation of correlations from this campaign will be shown. Transport simulations will also be compared and presented.

  18. Spatiotemporal correlations of aftershock sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Peixoto, Tiago P; Davidsen, Jörn

    2010-01-01

    Aftershock sequences are of particular interest in seismic research since they may condition seismic activity in a given region over long time spans. While they are typically identified with periods of enhanced seismic activity after a large earthquake as characterized by the Omori law, our knowledge of the spatiotemporal correlations between events in an aftershock sequence is limited. Here, we study the spatiotemporal correlations of two aftershock sequences form California (Parkfield and Hector Mine) using the recently introduced concept of "recurrent" events. We find that both sequences have very similar properties and that most of them are captured by the space-time epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model if one takes into account catalog incompleteness. However, the stochastic model does not capture the spatiotemporal correlations leading to the observed structure of seismicity on small spatial scales.

  19. Quark spin-orbit correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    The proton spin puzzle issue focused the attention on the parton spin and orbital angular momentum contributions to the proton spin. However, a complete characterization of the proton spin structure requires also the knowledge of the parton spin-orbit correlation. We showed that this quantity can be expressed in terms of moments of measurable parton distributions. Using the available phenomenological information about the valence quarks, we concluded that this correlation is negative, meaning that the valence quark spin and kinetic orbital angular momentum are, in average, opposite. The quark spin-orbit correlation can also be expressed more intuitively in terms of relativistic phase-space distributions, which can be seen as the mother distributions of the standard generalized and transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. We present here for the first time some examples of the general multipole decomposition of these phase-space distributions.

  20. Quantumness of correlations and entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Devi, A R Usha; Sudha,

    2011-01-01

    Generalized measurement schemes on one part of bipartite states, which would leave the set of all separable states insensitive are explored here to understand quantumness of correlations in a more general perspecitve. This is done by employing linear maps associated with generalized projective measurements. A generalized measurement corresponds to a quantum operation mapping a density matrix to another density matrix, preserving its positivity, hermiticity and traceclass. The Positive Operator Valued Measure (POVM) -- employed earlier in the literature to optimize the measures of classical/quatnum correlations -- correspond to completely positive (CP) maps. The other class, the not completely positive (NCP) maps, are investigated here, in the context of measurements, for the first time. It is shown that that such NCP projective maps provide a new clue to the understanding the quantumness of correlations in a general setting. Especially, the separability-classicality dichotomy gets resolved only when both the ...

  1. Fragment correlations from NAUTILUS multidetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizard, G. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    1995-12-31

    It is shown on a few examples how heavy fragment correlations, induced either by conservation laws or by Coulomb interaction can bring physical information on nuclear reactions. All the experimental data discussed have been obtained at GANIL using the NAUTILUS gaseous multi detectors DELF and XYZT, which - due to their good spatial and time resolution and their large solid angle coverage - have proved to be efficient tools for multifragment correlation studies. Different reactions of Ar, Kr, Xe, and Pb beams on Au targets are discussed. It is shown that velocity and angular correlations between fragments provide a powerful clock to scrutinize the details of the hot nuclei decay history. (K.A.). 18 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Electron correlations in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Tipton, D L J

    2001-01-01

    Quantum dot structures confine electrons in a small region of space. Some properties of semiconductor quantum dots, such as the discrete energy levels and shell filling effects visible in addition spectra, have analogies to those of atoms and indeed dots are sometimes referred to as 'artificial atoms'. However, atoms and dots show some fundamental differences due to electron correlations. For real atoms, the kinetic energy of electrons dominates over their mutual Coulomb repulsion energy and for this reason the independent electron approximation works well. For quantum dots the confining potential may be shallower than that of real atoms leading to lower electron densities and a dominance of mutual Coulomb repulsion over kinetic energy. In this strongly correlated regime the independent electron picture leads to qualitatively incorrect results. This thesis concentrates on few-electron quantum dots in the strongly correlated regime both for quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional dots in a square confining p...

  3. Biometric verification with correlation filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Kumar, B. V. K.; Savvides, Marios; Xie, Chunyan; Venkataramani, Krithika; Thornton, Jason; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2004-01-01

    Using biometrics for subject verification can significantly improve security over that of approaches based on passwords and personal identification numbers, both of which people tend to lose or forget. In biometric verification the system tries to match an input biometric (such as a fingerprint, face image, or iris image) to a stored biometric template. Thus correlation filter techniques are attractive candidates for the matching precision needed in biometric verification. In particular, advanced correlation filters, such as synthetic discriminant function filters, can offer very good matching performance in the presence of variability in these biometric images (e.g., facial expressions, illumination changes, etc.). We investigate the performance of advanced correlation filters for face, fingerprint, and iris biometric verification.

  4. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Randall T; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-10-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associated with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology has led to rapid improvement in the protocols and has ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation--integration.

  5. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    OpenAIRE

    Shengjun Wu; Zhihao Ma; Zhihua Chen; Sixia Yu

    2013-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches ...

  6. Cultural correlates of youth suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckersley, Richard; Dear, Keith

    2002-12-01

    Youth suicide has risen in most developed nations over the past 50 years, especially among males, but the increase remains to be explained. Statistical analyses were used to examine associations between youth suicide rates in 11-21 mainly Western, developed nations and 32 socio-economic and cultural variables. The central hypothesis was that suicide rates would be correlated with various cultural measures of social attachment and integration, especially individualism. Socio-economic variables were included in the analysis to demonstrate the relative strength of the cultural associations. The study found a strong positive correlation between male youth suicide rates and subjective measures of health, optimism, and several indices of individualism, including personal freedom and control. Correlations between female youth suicide and individualism were smaller, attaining significance in only one instance. Male youth suicide and individualism were negatively correlated with older people's sense of parental duty. Correlations between suicide and other possibly relevant cultural variables--tolerance of suicide, belief in God and national pride--were not significant. The analysis of socio-economic variables yielded only one significant, but doubtful, correlation. The findings can be interpreted as supporting two very different hypotheses: that youth suicide represents "an island of misery in an ocean of happiness" or "the tip of an iceberg of suffering". In favouring the latter interpretation, and consistent with Durkheim's theories on suicide, it is argued that increased youth suicide reflects a failure of Western societies to provide appropriate sites or sources of social identity and attachment, and, conversely, a tendency to promote unrealistic or inappropriate expectations of individual freedom and autonomy.

  7. Converting Coherence to Quantum Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiajun; Yadin, Benjamin; Girolami, Davide; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2016-04-22

    Recent results in quantum information theory characterize quantum coherence in the context of resource theories. Here, we study the relation between quantum coherence and quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation which appears even in nonentangled states. We prove that the creation of quantum discord with multipartite incoherent operations is bounded by the amount of quantum coherence consumed in its subsystems during the process. We show how the interplay between quantum coherence consumption and creation of quantum discord works in the preparation of multipartite quantum correlated states and in the model of deterministic quantum computation with one qubit.

  8. Tetrachoric Correlation: A Permutation Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Michael A.; Berry, Kenneth J.; Mielke, Paul W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    An exact permutation test is provided for the tetrachoric correlation coefficient. Comparisons with the conventional test employing Student's t distribution demonstrate the necessity of using the permutation approach for small sample sizes and/or disproportionate marginal frequency totals. (Contains 4 tables.)

  9. Illusory correlation and social anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter; Merckelbach, H; Bogels, S; Kindt, M

    1998-01-01

    An illusory correlation (IC) experiment examined the presence of a phobia-relevant covariation bias in the context of social anxiety. Low (n = 28) and high (n = 32) social anxious women were shown a series of slides comprising pictures of angry, happy and neutral faces which were randomly paired wit

  10. Pairing correlations in exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    The BCS and HFB theories which can accommodate the pairing correlations in the ground states of atomic nuclei are presented. As an application of the pairing theories, we investigate the spatial extension of weakly bound Ne and C isotopes by taking into account the pairing correlation with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method and a 3-body model, respectively. We show that the odd-even staggering in the reaction cross sections of $^{30,31,32}$Ne and $^{14,15,16}$C are successfully reproduced, and thus the staggering can be attributed to the unique role of pairing correlations in nuclei far from the stability line. A correlation between a one-neutron separation energy and the anti-halo effect is demonstrated for $s$- and p-waves using the HFB wave functions. We also propose effective density-dependent pairing interactions which reproduce both the neutron-neutron ($nn$) scattering length at zero density and the neutron pairing gap in uniform matter. Then, we apply these interactions to study pairing gaps in ...

  11. Correlation for Sessile Drop Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Zion, Peter; Pursell, Christopher; Wassom, Gregory; Mandelkorn, Brenton; Nkinthorn, Chris

    2016-11-01

    To better understand how the evaporation of sessile drops and small puddles is controlled by the vapor phase transport mechanisms of mass diffusion and buoyancy-induced convection, the evaporation rates of eight liquids evaporating under a broad range of ambient conditions were correlated with physical and geometrical properties. Examination of the correlation provides valuable insight into how the roles of diffusive and convective transport change with physical and geometrical parameters. The correlation predicts measured evaporation rates to within a root-mean-square error of 7.3%. The correlation is composed of two terms, a term which provides the rate of evaporation under diffusion-only conditions, and a term which provides the influence of convection. This second term suggests the manner in which the processes of diffusion and convection are coupled. Both processes are dependent on the distribution of the vapor, through the molar concentration gradient for diffusion and through the mass density gradient for convection. The term representing the influence of convection is approximately inversely proportional to the square root of diffusivity, indicating the tendency of diffusive transport to reduce convection by making the vapor distribution more uniform. Financial support was provided by the ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  12. Primary progressive aphasia: clinicopathological correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Grossman, Murray

    2010-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a disorder of declining language that is a frequent presentation of neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Three variants of PPA are recognized: progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic progressive aphasia. In an era of etiology-specific treatments for neurodegenerative conditions, determining the histopathological basis of PPA is crucial. Clinicopathological correlations in PPA emphasize the contributo...

  13. The Seduction of Correlational Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Nancy

    1979-01-01

    A dependency on correlational data allows one to avoid theory building and even to avoid defining terms. The social science community is being seduced by data and would do well to resist what is available simply because of its ease of tabulation and redundancy. (RL)

  14. Resistant multiple sparse canonical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jacob; Replogle, Joseph; Chandler, Gabriel; Hardin, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a multivariate technique that takes two datasets and forms the most highly correlated possible pairs of linear combinations between them. Each subsequent pair of linear combinations is orthogonal to the preceding pair, meaning that new information is gleaned from each pair. By looking at the magnitude of coefficient values, we can find out which variables can be grouped together, thus better understanding multiple interactions that are otherwise difficult to compute or grasp intuitively. CCA appears to have quite powerful applications to high-throughput data, as we can use it to discover, for example, relationships between gene expression and gene copy number variation. One of the biggest problems of CCA is that the number of variables (often upwards of 10,000) makes biological interpretation of linear combinations nearly impossible. To limit variable output, we have employed a method known as sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA), while adding estimation which is resistant to extreme observations or other types of deviant data. In this paper, we have demonstrated the success of resistant estimation in variable selection using SCCA. Additionally, we have used SCCA to find multiple canonical pairs for extended knowledge about the datasets at hand. Again, using resistant estimators provided more accurate estimates than standard estimators in the multiple canonical correlation setting. R code is available and documented at https://github.com/hardin47/rmscca.

  15. Global Method for Electron Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piris, Mario

    2017-08-01

    The current work presents a new single-reference method for capturing at the same time the static and dynamic electron correlation. The starting point is a determinant wave function formed with natural orbitals obtained from a new interacting-pair model. The latter leads to a natural orbital functional (NOF) capable of recovering the complete intrapair, but only the static interpair correlation. Using the solution of the NOF, two new energy functionals are defined for both dynamic (Edyn) and static (Esta) correlation. Edyn is derived from a modified second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), while Esta is obtained from the static component of the new NOF. Double counting is avoided by introducing the amount of static and dynamic correlation in each orbital as a function of its occupation. As a result, the total energy is represented by the sum E˜ HF+Edyn+Esta , where E˜ HF is the Hartree-Fock energy obtained with natural orbitals. The new procedure called NOF-MP2 scales formally as O (M5) (where M is the number of basis functions), and is applied successfully to the homolytic dissociation of a selected set of diatomic molecules, paradigmatic cases of near-degeneracy effects. The size consistency has been numerically demonstrated for singlets. The values obtained are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Dynamics of electricity market correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Escarela-Perez, R.; Espinosa-Perez, G.; Urrea, R.

    2009-06-01

    Electricity market participants rely on demand and price forecasts to decide their bidding strategies, allocate assets, negotiate bilateral contracts, hedge risks, and plan facility investments. However, forecasting is hampered by the non-linear and stochastic nature of price time series. Diverse modeling strategies, from neural networks to traditional transfer functions, have been explored. These approaches are based on the assumption that price series contain correlations that can be exploited for model-based prediction purposes. While many works have been devoted to the demand and price modeling, a limited number of reports on the nature and dynamics of electricity market correlations are available. This paper uses detrended fluctuation analysis to study correlations in the demand and price time series and takes the Australian market as a case study. The results show the existence of correlations in both demand and prices over three orders of magnitude in time ranging from hours to months. However, the Hurst exponent is not constant over time, and its time evolution was computed over a subsample moving window of 250 observations. The computations, also made for two Canadian markets, show that the correlations present important fluctuations over a seasonal one-year cycle. Interestingly, non-linearities (measured in terms of a multifractality index) and reduced price predictability are found for the June-July periods, while the converse behavior is displayed during the December-January period. In terms of forecasting models, our results suggest that non-linear recursive models should be considered for accurate day-ahead price estimation. On the other hand, linear models seem to suffice for demand forecasting purposes.

  17. 罗非鱼源无乳链球菌S-核糖基高半胱氨酸酶基因(luxS)的克隆及其推导蛋白的三维结构预测%Cloning of Streptococcus agalactiae luxS gene from tilapia and 3D structure prediction of deduced protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马艳平; 李嘉彬; 郝乐; 刘振兴; 冯国清; 周结珊; 柯浩

    2013-01-01

    We have amplified, cloned and determined the sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae luxS gene from Tilapia sp. by PCR. The characteristics of the deduced luxS protein were predicted by ExPAsy software; the 3D structures of luxS and the deduced protein were established and analyzed by SWISS-Model and SwisS-PDBviewer software, respectively. The results indicate that the deduced luxS protein contains conserved active center and Zn2+ binding site, which may affect biofilm formation and regulate virulence factor. The Ramachandram plot shows that the structure of modeled luxS protein is reasonable.%利用PCR技术对罗非鱼源无乳链球菌(Streptococcus agalactiae)S-核糖基高半胱氨酸酶(luxS)基因全长DNA进行了扩增、克隆和序列测定,采用ExPAsy软件包预测了推导蛋白的特性,利用SwisS-Model服务器建立了luxS 三维结构,利用SwisS-PDBviewer软件进行了蛋白质三维结构的分析.预测结果显示,罗非鱼源无乳链球菌luxS推导蛋白包括保守的酶活性中心和锌结合位点,具有影响生物被膜形成、毒力因子调控等特性功能;经拉氏构象图(Ramachandran plot)分析,所构建的luxS的空间结构合理.

  18. Negative Correlations in Visual Cortical Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chelaru, Mircea I; Dragoi, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    .... Whereas positive noise correlations have been extensively studied using experimental and theoretical tools, the functional role of negative correlations in cortical circuits has remained elusive...

  19. Multiparticle Bose-Einstein Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    1998-01-01

    Multiparticle symmetrization effects are contributions to the spectra of Bose-symmetrized states which are not the product of pairwise correlations. Usually they are neglected in particle interferometric calculations which aim at determining the geometry of the boson emitting source from the measured momentum distributions. Based on a method introduced by Zajc and Pratt, we give a calculation of all multiparticle symmetrization effects to the one- and two-particle momentum spectra for a Gaussian phase space distribution of emission points. Our starting point is an ensemble of N-particle Bose-symmetrized wavefunctions with specified phase space localization. In scenarios typical for relativistic heavy ion collisions, multiparticle effects steepen the slope of the one-particle spectrum for realistic particle phase space densities by up to 20 MeV, and they broaden the relative momentum dependence of the two-particle correlations. We discuss these modifications and their consequences in quantitative detail. Also,...

  20. [Correlation between EEG and neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2012-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of physiological mechanisms underlying nonepileptiform EEG abnormalities is reviewed to clarify the correlation between EEG and neuroimaging. Focal and widespread slow waves, background abnormalities, and bursts of rhythmic slow activity are discussed. EEG phenomena were correlated with lesion size, location, type (white matter vs. gray matter, high density vs. low density), and mass effect. Clinical and experimental accumulated over the past five decades suggest that polymorphic slow activity is generated in cerebral cortex by layers of pyramidal cells and is probably due to partial deafferentation from subcortical areas. Unilateral background activity changes are probably thalamic dysfunction, and bilateral paroxysmal slow activity is due to abnormal thalamocortical circuits combined with cortical pathology. Paroxysmal discharges indicate the presence of epilepsy with possible brain lesion(s). The EEG is a functional test and provides us complementary information to neuroimaging studies.

  1. Correlated electrons in quantum matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fulde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the effects of electronic correlations in quantum systems is one of the most challenging problems in physics, partly due to the relevance in modern high technology. Yet there exist hardly any books on the subject which try to give a comprehensive overview on the field covering insulators, semiconductors, as well as metals. The present book tries to fill that gap. It intends to provide graduate students and researchers a comprehensive survey of electron correlations, weak and strong, in insulators, semiconductors and metals. This topic is a central one in condensed matter and beyond that in theoretical physics. The reader will have a better understanding of the great progress which has been made in the field over the past few decades.

  2. Correlations in avalanche critical points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Vives, Eduard

    2009-07-01

    Avalanche dynamics and related power-law statistics are ubiquitous in nature, arising in phenomena such as earthquakes, forest fires, and solar flares. Very interestingly, an analogous behavior is associated with many condensed-matter systems, such as ferromagnets and martensites. Bearing it in mind, we study the prototypical random-field Ising model at T=0 . We find a finite correlation between waiting intervals and the previous avalanche size. This correlation is not found in other models for avalanches but it is experimentally found in earthquakes and in forest fires. Our study suggests that this effect occurs in critical points that are at the end of a first-order discontinuity separating two regimes: one with high activity from another with low activity.

  3. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  4. The dynamics of correlated novelties

    CERN Document Server

    Tria, F; Servedio, V D P; Strogatz, S H

    2013-01-01

    One new thing often leads to another. Such correlated novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also thought to be fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called "expanding the adjacent possible". The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (analogous to Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (analogous to Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the hypothesized process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit ev...

  5. Strongly correlated systems numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern numerical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and material science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciate consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as possi...

  6. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  7. Heterogeneity, correlations and financial contagion

    OpenAIRE

    FABIO CACCIOLI; Thomas A. Catanach; J Doyne Farmer

    2011-01-01

    We consider a model of contagion in financial networks recently introduced in Gai, P. and Kapadia, S. [Contagion in financial networks, Proc. R. Soc. A 466(2120) (2010) 2401–2423], and we characterize the effect of a few features empirically observed in real networks on the stability of the system. Notably, we consider the effect of heterogeneous degree distributions, heterogeneous balance sheet size and degree correlations between banks. We study the probability of contagion conditional on t...

  8. Correlation Effects in Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Bagdasaryan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of the complex network theory is presented and classification of such networks in accordance with the main statistical characteristics is considered. For the adjacency matrix of a real neural network the shortest distances for each pair of nodes as well as the node degree distribution and cluster coefficients are calculated. Comparison of the main statistical parameters with the random network is performed, and based on this, the conclusions about the correlation phenomena in biological system are made.

  9. Electron correlation energies in atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Shane Patrick

    This dissertation is a study of electron correlation energies Ec in atoms. (1) Accurate values of E c are computed for isoelectronic sequences of "Coulomb-Hooke" atoms with varying mixtures of Coulombic and Hooke character. (2) Coupled-cluster calculations in carefully designed basis sets are combined with fully converged second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) computations to obtain fairly accurate, non-relativistic Ec values for the 12 closed-shell atoms from Ar to Rn. The complete basis-set (CBS) limits of MP2 energies are obtained for open-shell atoms by computations in very large basis sets combined with a knowledge of the MP2/CBS limit for the next larger closed-shell atom with the same valence shell structure. Then higher-order correlation corrections are found by coupled-cluster calculations using basis sets that are not quite as large. The method is validated for the open-shell atoms from Al to Cl and then applied to get E c values, probably accurate to 3%, for the 4th-period open-shell atoms: K, Sc-Cu, and Ga-Br. (3) The results show that, contrary to quantum chemical folklore, MP2 overestimates |Ec| for atoms beyond Fe. Spin-component scaling arguments are used to provide a simple explanation for this overestimation. (4) Eleven non-relativistic density functionals, including some of the most widely-used ones, are tested on their ability to predict non-relativistic, electron correlation energies for atoms and their cations. They all lead to relatively poor predictions for the heavier atoms. Several novel, few-parameter, density functionals for the correlation energy are developed heuristically. Four new functionals lead to improved predictions for the 4th-period atoms without unreasonably compromising accuracy for the lighter atoms. (5) Simple models describing the variation of E c with atomic number are developed.

  10. Oscillatory Correlates of Visual Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gallotto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conscious experiences are linked to activity in our brain: the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC. Empirical research on these NCCs covers a wide range of brain activity signals, measures, and methodologies. In this paper, we focus on spontaneous brain oscillations; rhythmic fluctuations of neuronal (population activity which can be characterized by a range of parameters, such as frequency, amplitude (power, and phase. We provide an overview of oscillatory measures that appear to correlate with conscious perception. We also discuss how increasingly sophisticated techniques allow us to study the causal role of oscillatory activity in conscious perception (i.e., ‘entrainment’. This review of oscillatory correlates of consciousness suggests that, for example, activity in the alpha-band (7–13 Hz may index, or even causally support, conscious perception. But such results also showcase an increasingly acknowledged difficulty in NCC research; the challenge of separating neural activity necessary for conscious experience to arise (prerequisites from neural activity underlying the conscious experience itself (substrates or its results (consequences.

  11. Oscillatory Correlates of Visual Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotto, Stefano; Sack, Alexander T; Schuhmann, Teresa; de Graaf, Tom A

    2017-01-01

    Conscious experiences are linked to activity in our brain: the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC). Empirical research on these NCCs covers a wide range of brain activity signals, measures, and methodologies. In this paper, we focus on spontaneous brain oscillations; rhythmic fluctuations of neuronal (population) activity which can be characterized by a range of parameters, such as frequency, amplitude (power), and phase. We provide an overview of oscillatory measures that appear to correlate with conscious perception. We also discuss how increasingly sophisticated techniques allow us to study the causal role of oscillatory activity in conscious perception (i.e., 'entrainment'). This review of oscillatory correlates of consciousness suggests that, for example, activity in the alpha-band (7-13 Hz) may index, or even causally support, conscious perception. But such results also showcase an increasingly acknowledged difficulty in NCC research; the challenge of separating neural activity necessary for conscious experience to arise (prerequisites) from neural activity underlying the conscious experience itself (substrates) or its results (consequences).

  12. Fibroadenomas: Sonographic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sung; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Eun Ah; Lee, Sun Wha; Sung, Soon Hee [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-15

    To correlate sonographic appearance and histopathologic findings of fibroadenomas. Forty-one biopsy-proven fibroadenomas were retrospectively evaluate for sonographic-pathologic correlation. The fibroadenomas were histologically classified into sclerotic, myxoid, glandular and mixed type. The stromal cellularity and fibrosis were also classified into mild and severe. The internal echotexture and posterior acoustic enhancement of mass in ultrasonogram were correlated with histopathologic findings. The pathologic types of fibroadenomas were sclerotic in sixteen, myxoid in thirteen, and glandular or mixed in each of six cases. Most of the sclerotic type showed hypoechoic internal echotexture (68.8%) and myxoid and glandular types showed isoechoic internal echotexture (84.6%, 83.3% respectively). The hypoechoic masses showed 12 cases of mild (75.0%) and 4 cases of severe (25.0%) in cellularity and 3 cases of mild (18.7%) and 13 cases (81.3%) of sever degree in fibrosis. Most of the myxoid type (77%) showed posterior enhancement, and most of the sclerotic type (87.5%) did not show posterior enhancement on ultrasonogram. Posterior enhancement was absent in 22 cases, in which 4 cases (18.2%) showed mild and 18 cases (81.2%) showed severe degree of fibrosis. Sclerotic type with mild cellularity and severe fibrosis on histopathology showed hypoechogenicity on ultrasonogram; whereas myxoid and glandular types were predominantly isoechoic. Most of the myxoid type showed posterior enhancement. Sclerotic type with mild cellularity and severe fibrosis did not show posterior enhancement.

  13. Spatial correlations in attribute communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Cerina

    Full Text Available Community detection is an important tool for exploring and classifying the properties of large complex networks and should be of great help for spatial networks. Indeed, in addition to their location, nodes in spatial networks can have attributes such as the language for individuals, or any other socio-economical feature that we would like to identify in communities. We discuss in this paper a crucial aspect which was not considered in previous studies which is the possible existence of correlations between space and attributes. Introducing a simple toy model in which both space and node attributes are considered, we discuss the effect of space-attribute correlations on the results of various community detection methods proposed for spatial networks in this paper and in previous studies. When space is irrelevant, our model is equivalent to the stochastic block model which has been shown to display a detectability-non detectability transition. In the regime where space dominates the link formation process, most methods can fail to recover the communities, an effect which is particularly marked when space-attributes correlations are strong. In this latter case, community detection methods which remove the spatial component of the network can miss a large part of the community structure and can lead to incorrect results.

  14. Correlation dimension of financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chun-Xiao

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, correlation dimension is applied to financial data analysis. We calculate the correlation dimensions of some real market data and find that the dimensions are significantly smaller than those of the simulation data based on geometric Brownian motion. Based on the analysis of the Chinese and US stock market data, the main results are as follows. First, by calculating three data sets for the Chinese and US market, we find that large market volatility leads to a significant decrease in the dimensions. Second, based on 5-min stock price data, we find that the Chinese market dimension is significantly larger than the US market; this shows a significant difference between the two markets for high frequency data. Third, we randomly extract stocks from a stock set and calculate the correlation dimensions, and find that the average value of these dimensions is close to the dimension of the original set. In addition, we analyse the intuitional meaning of the relevant dimensions used in this paper, which are directly related to the average degree of the financial threshold network. The dimension measures the speed of the average degree that varies with the threshold value. A smaller dimension means that the rate of change is slower.

  15. Proton - Lambda Correlations in Central Pb+Pb Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 17.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Beck, H; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Bogusz, M; Boimska, B; Book, J; Botje, M; Buncic, P; Cetner, T; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J; Eckardt, V; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gazdzicki, M; Grebieszkow, K; Hohne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kolesnikov, V; Kowalski, M; Kresan, D; Laszlo, A; Lacey, R; van Leeuwen, M; Mackowiak, M K; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A; Mateev, M; Melkumov, G; Mitrovski, M; Mrowczynski, St; Nicolic, V; Palla, G; Panagiotou, A; Peryt, W; Pluta, J; Prindle, D; Puhlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Seyboth, P; Sikler, F; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Strobele, H; Susa, T; Szuba, M; Utvic, M; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A

    2011-01-01

    The momentum correlation between protons and lambda particles emitted from central Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt(s_{NN}) = 17.3 GeV was studied by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. A clear enhancement is observed for small relative momenta (q_{inv} < 0.2 GeV). By fitting a theoretical model, which uses the strong interaction between the proton and the lambda in a given pair, to the measured data a value for the effective source size is deduced. Assuming a static Gaussian source distribution we derive an effective radius parameter of R_G = 3.02 \\pm 0.20$(stat.)^{+0.44}_{-0.16}(syst.) fm.

  16. Spin dynamics and magnetic correlation length in two-dimensional quantum heisenberg antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta; Ciabattoni; Cuccoli; Mognaschi; Rigamonti; Tognetti; Verrucchi

    2000-01-10

    The correlated spin dynamics and temperature dependence of the correlation length xi(T) in two-dimensional quantum (S = 1/2) Heisenberg antiferromagnets (2DQHAF) on a square lattice are discussed in light of experimental results of proton spin lattice relaxation in copper formiate tetradeuterate. In this compound the exchange constant is much smaller than the one in recently studied 2DQHAF, such as La2CuO4 and Sr2CuO2Cl2. Thus the spin dynamics can be probed in detail over a wider temperature range. The NMR relaxation rates turn out to be in excellent agreement with a theoretical mode-coupling calculation. The deduced temperature behavior of xi(T) is in agreement with high-temperature expansions, quantum Monte Carlo simulations, and the pure quantum self-consistent harmonic approximation. Contrary to the predictions of the theories based on the nonlinear sigma model, no evidence of crossover between different quantum regimes is observed.

  17. Multi-particle correlations and KNO scaling in the medium-induced jet evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Escobedo, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    We study the gluon distribution produced via successive medium-induced branchings by an energetic jet propagating through a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma. We show that under suitable approximations the evolution of the jet can be described as a classical stochastic process, which is exactly solvable. For this process, we construct exact analytic solutions for all the n-point correlation functions (the n-body densities in the space of energy). The corresponding results for the one-point and the two-point functions were already known, but those for the higher-point functions are new. These results demonstrate strong correlations associated with the existence of common ancestors in the branching process. By integrating these n-point functions over the gluon energies, we deduce the mean gluon multiplicity $\\langle N\\rangle$ as well as the higher moments $\\langle N^p\\rangle$ with $p\\ge 2$. We find that the multiplicities of the soft gluons are parametrically large and show a remarkable regularity, known as Kob...

  18. Correlating anomalous diffusion with lipid bilayer membrane structure using single molecule tracking and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaug, Michael J.; Faller, Roland; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2011-06-01

    Anomalous diffusion has been observed abundantly in the plasma membrane of biological cells, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In general, it has not been possible to directly image the obstacles to diffusion in membranes, which are thought to be skeleton bound proteins, protein aggregates, and lipid domains, so the dynamics of diffusing particles is used to deduce the obstacle characteristics. We present a supported lipid bilayer system in which we characterized the anomalous diffusion of lipid molecules using single molecule tracking, while at the same time imaging the obstacles to diffusion with atomic force microscopy. To explain our experimental results, we performed lattice Monte Carlo simulations of tracer diffusion in the presence of the experimentally determined obstacle configurations. We correlate the observed anomalous diffusion with obstacle area fraction, fractal dimension, and correlation length. To accurately measure an anomalous diffusion exponent, we derived an expression to account for the time-averaging inherent to all single molecule tracking experiments. We show that the length of the single molecule trajectories is critical to the determination of the anomalous diffusion exponent. We further discuss our results in the context of confinement models and the generating stochastic process.

  19. Hints of Correlations Between Broad-Line and Radio Variations for AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, H T; Feng, H C; Li, S K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the issue of correlation between broad-line and radio variations under a spherical broad-line region (BLR), and attempt to locate the position of radio (and gamma-ray) emitting region in jet of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Considering the radial profiles of the radius and number density of clouds in the spherical BLR, we have deduced new formulae connecting the radio emitting position $R_{\\rm{jet}}$ to the time lags $\\tau_{\\rm{ob}}$ between broad-line and radio variations, and the BLR inner and outer radii. The new formulae are applied to broad-line radio-loud Fermi-LAT AGNs, 3C 273 and 3C 120. For 3C 273, a common feature of negative time lags is found in the cross-correlation functions between light curves of radio emission and the Balmer lines, and as well Ly$\\alpha$ $\\lambda 1216$ and C IV $\\lambda 1549$ lines. $R_{\\rm{jet}}=$ 1.0--2.6 parsec (pc) are obtained from the time lags of the Balmer lines. For 3C 120, positive lags of about 0.3 yr are found between the 15 GHz...

  20. Correlation between active layer thickness and ambient gas stability in IGZO thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu; Lin, Meng-Fang; Mao, Bao-Hua; Shimizu, Maki; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Ou-Yang, Wei; Nabatame, Toshihide; Liu, Zhi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the active layer thickness has been recently reported as an alternative way to achieve fully depleted oxide thin-film transistors for the realization of low-voltage operations. However, the correlation between the active layer thickness and device resistivity to environmental changes is still unclear, which is important for the optimized design of oxide thin-film transistors. In this work, the ambient gas stability of IGZO thin-film transistors is found to be strongly correlated to the IGZO thickness. The TFT with the thinnest IGZO layer shows the highest intrinsic electron mobility in a vacuum, which is greatly reduced after exposure to O2/air. The device with a thick IGZO layer shows similar electron mobility in O2/air, whereas the mobility variation measured in the vacuum is absent. The thickness dependent ambient gas stability is attributed to a high-mobility region in the IGZO surface vicinity with less sputtering-induced damage, which will become electron depleted in O2/air due to the electron transfer to adsorbed gas molecules. The O2 adsorption and deduced IGZO surface band bending is demonstrated by the ambient-pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy results.

  1. Multi-particle correlations and KNO scaling in the medium-induced jet evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Miguel A.; Iancu, Edmond

    2016-12-01

    We study the gluon distribution produced via successive medium-induced branchings by an energetic jet propagating through a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma. We show that under suitable approximations the evolution of the jet can be described as a classical stochastic process, which is exactly solvable. For this process, we construct exact analytic solutions for all the n-point correlation functions (the n-body densities in the space of energy). The corresponding results for the one-point and the two-point functions were already known, but those for the higher-point functions are new. These results demonstrate strong correlations associated with the existence of common ancestors in the branching process. By integrating these n-point functions over the gluon energies, we deduce the mean gluon multiplicity as well as the higher moments with p ≥ 2. We find that the multiplicities of the soft gluons are parametrically large and show a remarkable regularity, known as Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling: the reduced moments / p are pure numbers, independent of any of the physical parameters of the problem. We recognize a special negative binomial distribution which is characterized by large statistical fluctuations. These predictions can be tested in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC, via event-by-event measurements of the di-jet asymmetry.

  2. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  3. The correlation of hippocampal T2-mapping with neuropsychology test in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuren Luo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: 1 To deduce T2, the inverse of the transverse relaxation rate (R2, in the hippocampus of healthy adults; 2 to investigate the brain iron deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients and age-matched healthy controls using T2-values. METHODS: T2-weighted data from the bilateral-hippocampi of ten AD patients and sixty healthy controls were collected at six echo time points using multi-slice multi-echo turbo spin echo (MSME-TSE imaging on a 3.0 T MR-scanner, followed by the neuropsychological testing. The correlations between T2-values and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores were investigated on group-wise basis (covariates in the group-wise analyses: gender, age, side and healthy/AD. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in hippocampal T2-values on intra-gender and inter-gender basis (P > 0.05. Hippocampal T2-values of both sides were similar (right: 85.2±2.4 milliseconds; left: 85.3±2.5 milliseconds. The bilateral hippocampal T2 values correlated moderately with age (right: r = -0.59; left: -0.58; P < 0.001. The AD-group had significantly lower T2-values in the hippocampus when compared to normal controls (P < 0.001 and such low T2-values had a strong positive correlation with the MMSE score (R (2 = 0.97; P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Patients with AD showed significantly lower T2 values, which can be attributed to the increased iron depositions in the hippocampus. A positive correlation between T2-values and cognition scores suggests that quantitative T2 can be used in the early diagnosis of AD and in the monitoring of the treatment response.

  4. Electron-gamma directional correlations; Correlations directionnelles electron-gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerholm, T.R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-10-01

    The theory of the angular correlation between conversion electrons and gamma rays is briefly outlined. The experimental methods used for the study of the electron-gamma correlation are described. The effects of the formation of a hole and the hyperfine structure magnetic coupling dependent on time are then considered. The experimental results showed that the attenuations found for different metallic media plainly conform to a simple quadrupolar interaction mechanism. For a source surrounded by an insulator, however, the results show that a rapidly disappearing coupling occurs as a supplement to the quadrupolar interaction mechanism. This coupling attenuates the angular correlation by about 75% of the non-perturbed value. It was concluded that for an intermediate half life of the level of the order of the nanosecond, the attenuations produced by the secondary effects of the hole formation can not be completely neglected. The metallic media considered were Ag, Au, Al, and Ga. In the study of E2 conversion processes, the radical matrix elements governing the E2 conversion process in the 412-KeV transition of {sup 198}Hg were determined. The results exclude the presence of dynamic contributions within the limits of experimental error. The values b{sub 2} (E2) and {alpha}-k (E2) obtained indirectly from the experimentally determined b{sub 4} particle parameter are in complete agreement with the theoretical values obtained by applying the corrections due to the shielding effect and to the finite dimension of the nucleus and excluding the dynamic contributions. The value for the internal conversion coefficient was also in good agreement. Experimental results from the intensity ratios between the peak and the continuum, however, seem to show significant deviations with respect to other experimental and theoretical values. There is good agreement between experimental and theoretical results on the internal conversion of {sup 203}Tl, {sup 201}Tl, and {sup 181}Ta. The theory

  5. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  6. [Correlations of orthodontics and periodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, P

    1989-08-01

    Periodontics and orthodontics are correlated with one other in many ways. For instance, periodontal conditions have to be considered in the orthodontic treatment of adults, special orthodontic measures are taken to enhance a periodontal treatment, and when periodontal surgery is performed for the prevention of relapse or the disimpaction of teeth. Dental practitioners working in the field of orthodontics should have a sound understanding of the biology and pathology of the periodontium in order to avoid causing periodontal lesions, or when lesions are present, how best to determine prognosis and differential treatment.

  7. Boundary Anomalies and Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    It was shown recently that boundary terms of conformal anomalies recover the universal contribution to the entanglement entropy and also play an important role in the boundary monotonicity theorem of odd-dimensional quantum field theories. Motivated by these results, we investigate relationships between boundary anomalies and the stress tensor correlation functions in conformal field theories. In particular, we focus on how the conformal Ward identity and the renormalization group equation are modified by boundary central charges. Renormalized stress tensors induced by boundary Weyl invariants are also discussed, with examples in spherical and cylindrical geometries.

  8. Development of Active Correlation Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Y S

    2015-01-01

    With reaching to extremely high intensities of heavy-ion beams new requirements for the detection system of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) will definitely be set. One of the challenges is how to apply the active correlations method to suppress beam associated background products without significant losses in the whole long-term experiment efficiency value. Different scenarios and equations to develop the method according this requirement are under consideration in the present paper. The execution time to estimate the dead time parameter associated with the optimal choice of the life-time parameter is presented.

  9. Correlations for the Novak process

    CERN Document Server

    Nordenstam, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We study random lozenge tilings of a certain shape in the plane called the Novak half-hexagon, and compute the correlation functions for this process. This model was introduced by Nordenstam and Young (2011) and has many intriguing similarities with a more well-studied model, domino tilings of the Aztec diamond. The most difficult step in the present paper is to compute the inverse of the matrix whose (i,j) entry is the binomial coefficient C(A, B_j - i) for indeterminate variables A and B_1, ..., B_n.

  10. Correlation dimension of complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lacasa, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new measure to characterize the dimension of complex networks based on the ergodic theory of dynamical systems. This measure is derived from the correlation sum of a trajectory generated by a random walker navigating the network, and extends the classical Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to the context of complex networks. The method is validated with reliable results for both synthetic networks and real-world networks such as the world air-transportation network or urban networks, and provides a computationally fast way for estimating the dimensionality of networks which only relies on the local information provided by the walkers.

  11. Detecting Botnets Through Log Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Hammadi, Yousof

    2010-01-01

    Botnets, which consist of thousands of compromised machines, can cause significant threats to other systems by launching Distributed Denial of Service (SSoS) attacks, keylogging, and backdoors. In response to these threats, new effective techniques are needed to detect the presence of botnets. In this paper, we have used an interception technique to monitor Windows Application Programming Interface (API) functions calls made by communication applications and store these calls with their arguments in log files. Our algorithm detects botnets based on monitoring abnormal activity by correlating the changes in log file sizes from different hosts.

  12. Precision protection through indirect correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yao, E-mail: 616969274@qq.com

    2016-04-15

    The dynamics of the quantum Fisher information of the parameters of the initial atomic state is studied, in the framework of open quantum systems, for a pair of static two-level atoms coupled to a bath of fluctuating vacuum scalar fields. Our results show that the correlations between the two atoms as well as the precision limit in quantum metrology are determined by the separation between the two atoms. Remarkably, when the separation between the two atoms approaches zero, the quantum Fisher information, thus the precision limit of the estimation of the parameters of the initial atomic state will be survived from the vacuum fluctuations after long time evolution.

  13. The crystallography of correlated disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, David A; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2015-05-21

    Classical crystallography can determine structures as complicated as multi-component ribosomal assemblies with atomic resolution, but is inadequate for disordered systems--even those as simple as water ice--that occupy the complex middle ground between liquid-like randomness and crystalline periodic order. Correlated disorder nevertheless has clear crystallographic signatures that map to the type of disorder, irrespective of the underlying physical or chemical interactions and material involved. This mapping hints at a common language for disordered states that will help us to understand, control and exploit the disorder responsible for many interesting physical properties.

  14. [EEG correlates of social creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumnikova, O M; Finikov, S B

    2010-01-01

    EEG correlates of social creativity defined as ability to originally and flexibly interpret social significant situations were studied. It was found that the alpha2 and gamma2 rhythms are specific bands which make it possible to tell the difference between social creativity and control task. Solving socially significant problems in experimental conditions is accompanied by an increase in the power of the delta and gamma2 bands and desynchronization in the alpha2 band less pronounced in divergent tasks than during the interpretation of convergent visual stimuli.

  15. Spin squeezing and quantum correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Mallesh; Swarnamala Sirsi; Mahmoud A A Sbaih; P N Deepak; G Ramachandran

    2002-08-01

    We discuss the notion of spin squeezing considering two mutually exclusive classes of spin- states, namely, oriented and non-oriented states. Our analysis shows that the oriented states are not squeezed while non-oriented states exhibit squeezing. We also present a new scheme for construction of spin- states using 2 spinors oriented along different axes. Taking the case of = 1, we show that the `non-oriented’ nature and hence squeezing arise from the intrinsic quantum correlations that exist among the spinors in the coupled state.

  16. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  17. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1997-10-22

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular `mock-up` reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent`s efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author) 128 refs.

  18. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  19. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1997-10-22

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular `mock-up` reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent`s efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author) 128 refs.

  20. Correlations in multi-parton interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasemets, Tomas

    2012-07-27

    In double parton interactions, the two hard proceses are correlated via double parton densities. We examine the double Drell-Yan process and the impact of such correlations on the differential cross section. In particular correlations between the spins of the interacting quarks can induce correlations between the decay planes of the vector bosons. We investigate upper limits on spin correlations following from positivity of the double parton densities.

  1. Estimation of Correlation Functions by Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    This paper illustrates how correlation functions can be estimated by the random decrement technique. Several different formulations of the random decrement technique, estimating the correlation functions are considered. The speed and accuracy of the different formulations of the random decrement...... and the length of the correlation functions. The accuracy of the estimates with respect to the theoretical correlation functions and the modal parameters are both investigated. The modal parameters are extracted from the correlation functions using the polyreference time domain technique....

  2. The Neurogenetic Correlates of Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, John K.

    2013-09-01

    The neurogenetic correlates of consciousness (NgCC) is a new field of consciousness studies that focuses on genes that have an effect on or are involved in the continuum of neuron-based consciousness. A framework of consciousness based on the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) has already been established by Francis Crick and Christof Kock. In this work I propose that there are NgCC underlying the NCC which are both active during the conscious experience. So how are genes involved? There are two significant connections between DNA and neurons that are involved in the conscious experience. First, any brain system can be adversely affected by underlying genetic abnormalities which can be expressed in an individual at birth, in adulthood, or later in life. Second, the DNA molecule does not lay dormant while the neuron runs on autopilot. DNA is active in translating and transcribing RNA and protein products that are utilized during neuron functioning. Without these products being continuously produced by the DNA during a conscious experience the neurons would cease to function correctly and be rendered unable to provide a continuum of human consciousness. Consequently, in addition to NCC, NgCC must be factored in when appreciating a conscious event. In this work I will discuss and explain some NgCC citing several examples.

  3. Correlation Models for Temperature Fields

    KAUST Repository

    North, Gerald R.

    2011-05-16

    This paper presents derivations of some analytical forms for spatial correlations of evolving random fields governed by a white-noise-driven damped diffusion equation that is the analog of autoregressive order 1 in time and autoregressive order 2 in space. The study considers the two-dimensional plane and the surface of a sphere, both of which have been studied before, but here time is introduced to the problem. Such models have a finite characteristic length (roughly the separation at which the autocorrelation falls to 1/e) and a relaxation time scale. In particular, the characteristic length of a particular temporal Fourier component of the field increases to a finite value as the frequency of the particular component decreases. Some near-analytical formulas are provided for the results. A potential application is to the correlation structure of surface temperature fields and to the estimation of large area averages, depending on how the original datastream is filtered into a distribution of Fourier frequencies (e.g., moving average, low pass, or narrow band). The form of the governing equation is just that of the simple energy balance climate models, which have a long history in climate studies. The physical motivation provided by the derivation from a climate model provides some heuristic appeal to the approach and suggests extensions of the work to nonuniform cases.

  4. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines1, 2, 3, 4. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number5. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes6. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  5. Correlates of self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R G; Scheier, M F; Carver, C S; Ickes, W

    1978-06-01

    Examined the relationship between the three subscales of the Self-Consciousness Scale and a variety of other personality dimensions, including measures of reflectivity, self-regulation, and social desirability. Data from six geographically diverse samples (total N = 1395) were presented. In general, both the construct validity and discriminant validity of the subscales were supported. First, private self-consciousness significantly correlated with the Guilford-Zimmerman Thoughtfulness Scale and the Paivio Imagery Scale. Second, all of the self-consciousness subscales were shown to be relatively independent of the social desirability response set. Third, less than 6% of the variance in each self-consciousness subscale was shared with scores on the Self-Monitoring Scale. Finally, the minimal relationships between the self-consciousness subscales and measures of emotionality and test anxiety reported by Carver and Glass (1976) were in general replicated. The low magnitude of the correlations obtained was interpreted as supporting the distinctive contribution of the Self-Consciousness Scale to personality assessment.

  6. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  7. The dynamics of correlated novelties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tria, F.; Loreto, V.; Servedio, V. D. P.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2014-07-01

    Novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called ``expanding the adjacent possible''. The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological, or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit events of Wikipedia pages, the emergence of tags in annotation systems, the sequence of words in texts, and listening to new songs in online music catalogues. By quantifying the dynamics of correlated novelties, our results provide a starting point for a deeper understanding of the adjacent possible and its role in biological, cultural, and technological evolution.

  8. Cortical Correlates of Fitts’ Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eIfft

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fitts' law describes the fundamental trade-off between movement accuracy and speed: It states that the duration of reaching movements is a function of target size and distance. While Fitts' law has been extensively studied in ergonomics and has guided the design of human-computer interfaces, there have been few studies on its neuronal correlates. To elucidate sensorimotor cortical activity underlying Fitts’ law, we implanted two monkeys with multielectrode arrays in the primary motor (M1 and primary somatosensory (S1 cortices. The monkeys performed reaches with a joystick-controlled cursor towards targets of different size. The reaction time, movement time and movement velocity changed with target size, and M1 and S1 activity reflected these changes. Moreover, modifications of cortical activity could not be explained by changes of movement parameters alone, but required target size as an additional parameter. Neuronal representation of target size was especially prominent during the early reaction time period where it influenced the slope of the firing rate rise preceding movement initiation. During the movement period, cortical activity was mostly correlated with movement velocity. Neural decoders were applied to simultaneously decode target size and motor parameters from cortical modulations. We suggest using such classifiers to improve neuroprosthetic control.

  9. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-09

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  10. EARLINET Correlative Measurements For CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, G.

    2006-12-01

    EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network, is the first aerosol lidar network, established in 2000, with the main goal to provide a comprehensive, quantitative, and statistically significant data base for the aerosol distribution on a continental scale. At present, 24 stations distributed over Europe are part of the network: 10 single backscatter lidar stations, 7 Raman lidar stations with the Raman channel in the UV for independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter, and 7 multi-wavelength Raman lidar stations (elastic channel at 1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, Raman channels at 532 nm and 355 nm, plus depolarization channel at 532 nm) for the retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties. The network activity is based on scheduled measurements, a rigorous quality assurance program addressing both instruments and evaluation algorithms, and a standardized data exchange format. In order to collect unbiased data, all the network stations perform measurements simultaneously at three fixed dates a week. Lidar observations are performed on a regular schedule of one daytime measurement on Monday around noon, when the boundary layer is usually well developed, and two night time measurements per week (Monday and Thursday), with low background light, in order to perform Raman extinction measurements. Additional network measurements are performed to address specifically important processes that are localized either in space or time, like Saharan dust outbreaks, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, photochemical smog. EARLINET represents an optimal tool to validate CALIPSO lidar data and to provide the necessary information to fully exploit the information from that mission. In particular, aerosol extinction measurements, provided by the network, will be important for the aerosol retrievals from the CALIPSO backscatter lidar. EARLINET started correlative measurements for CALIPSO since 14 June 2006. These EARLINET correlative measurements are performed at

  11. Solar wind correlations: Statistical and case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Zastenker, G. N.; Dalin, P. A.

    1999-06-01

    Recent work on solar wind plasma correlations using data from several widely-separated spacecraft (IMP 8, INTERBALL-1, WIND, and ISEE-3) has shown that, for 6-hour periods, the average plasma correlation is ~0.7. The focus of these studies has been directed toward a statistical understanding of gross solar wind correlation behavior. In all correlations examined, lower average correlations are caused by the presence of many points from the low correlation subpopulation; nevertheless, data points from the high correlation population are still present. No single organizational factor has yet been found which adequately separates low-correlation periods from high-correlation periods. Some of the spread in correlations is due to the spatial orientations and dimensions of solar wind structures, and thus to the locational alignments of the spacecraft being correlated, but this does not adequately explain all the good or poor correlations since sometimes three nearby spacecraft show poor correlations, while sometimes three widely-separated space-craft show good correlations. Thus, in order to understand the underlying physics, detailed investigation of individual cases has been undertaken. These results will be important in assigning quality measures to space weather predictions using satellite measurements taken at L1, for example.

  12. Signatures of synchrony in pairwise count correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Tchumatchenko

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Concerted neural activity can reflect specific features of sensory stimuli or behavioral tasks. Correlation coefficients and count correlations are frequently used to measure correlations between neurons, design synthetic spike trains and build population models. But are correlation coefficients always a reliable measure of input correlations? Here, we consider a stochastic model for the generation of correlated spike sequences which replicate neuronal pairwise correlations in many important aspects. We investigate under which conditions the correlation coefficients reflect the degree of input synchrony and when they can be used to build population models. We find that correlation coefficients can be a poor indicator of input synchrony for some cases of input correlations. In particular, count correlations computed for large time bins can vanish despite the presence of input correlations. These findings suggest that network models or potential coding schemes of neural population activity need to incorporate temporal properties of correlated inputs and take into consideration the regimes of firing rates and correlation strengths to ensure that their building blocks are an unambiguous measures of synchrony.

  13. Nonclassical correlations in superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliore, Rosanna [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); CNR-INFM, UdR CNISM di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Scala, Matteo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Guccione, Marina; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Messina, Antonino [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    A key step on the road map to solid-state quantum information processing (and to a deeper understanding of many counterintuitive aspects of quantum mechanics) is the generation and manipulation of nonclassical correlations between different quantum systems. Within this framework, we analyze the possibility of generating maximally entangled states in a system of two superconducting flux qubits, as well as the effectof their own environments on the entanglement dynamics. The analysis reported here confirms that the phenomena of sudden birth and sudden death of the entanglement do not depend on the particular measure of the entanglement adopted (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  15. Correlating thalamocortical connectivity and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Sporns, Olaf

    2006-07-01

    The segregated regions of the mammalian cerebral cortex and thalamus form an extensive and complex network, whose structure and function are still only incompletely understood. The present letter describes an application of the concepts of complex networks and random walks that allows the identification of nonrandom, highly structured features of thalamocortical connections and their potential effects on dynamic interactions between cortical areas in the cat brain. Utilizing large-scale anatomical data sets of this thalamocortical system, we investigate uniform random walks in such a network by considering the steady state eigenvector of the respective stochastic matrix. It is shown that thalamocortical connections are organized in such a way as to guarantee strong correlation between the outdegree and occupancy rate (a stochastic measure potentially related to activation) of each cortical area. Possible organizational principles underlying this effect are identified and discussed.

  16. The ESIS Correlation Environment Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giommi, P.; Ansari, S. G.; Ciarlo, A.; Donzelli, P.; Stokke, H.; Torrente, P.; Walker, S.; Zampognaro, V.

    This paper gives a brief description of the Correlation Environment Prototype currently under development at ESRIN (Frascati, Italy) as part of the European Space Information System (ESIS) project. The prototype consists of a C program that acts as graphical user-interface, as tasks scheduler and as data-handler within the general ESIS system. This program will provide a uniform view to a number of applications that allow the user to retrieve, inspect and compare Astronomy and Space-Physics data. The prototype architecture is object oriented and open so that new packages can easily be included as they become available. The prototype will run on VAX-VMS and on UNIX systems.

  17. Correlation functions in stochastic inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vennin, Vincent [University of Portsmouth, Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Starobinsky, Alexei A. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Utrecht University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    Combining the stochastic and δ N formalisms, we derive non-perturbative analytical expressions for all correlation functions of scalar perturbations in single-field, slow-roll inflation. The standard, classical formulas are recovered as saddle-point limits of the full results. This yields a classicality criterion that shows that stochastic effects are small only if the potential is sub-Planckian and not too flat. The saddle-point approximation also provides an expansion scheme for calculating stochastic corrections to observable quantities perturbatively in this regime. In the opposite regime, we show that a strong suppression in the power spectrum is generically obtained, and we comment on the physical implications of this effect. (orig.)

  18. Large Scale Correlation Clustering Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Bagon, Shai

    2011-01-01

    Clustering is a fundamental task in unsupervised learning. The focus of this paper is the Correlation Clustering functional which combines positive and negative affinities between the data points. The contribution of this paper is two fold: (i) Provide a theoretic analysis of the functional. (ii) New optimization algorithms which can cope with large scale problems (>100K variables) that are infeasible using existing methods. Our theoretic analysis provides a probabilistic generative interpretation for the functional, and justifies its intrinsic "model-selection" capability. Furthermore, we draw an analogy between optimizing this functional and the well known Potts energy minimization. This analogy allows us to suggest several new optimization algorithms, which exploit the intrinsic "model-selection" capability of the functional to automatically recover the underlying number of clusters. We compare our algorithms to existing methods on both synthetic and real data. In addition we suggest two new applications t...

  19. Correlative microscopy of detergent granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, G; Nootenboom, P; Heussen, P C M

    2011-03-01

    The microstructure of detergent products for textile cleaning determines to a large extent the physical properties of these products. Correlative microscopy was used to reveal the microstructure by reconciling images obtained by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray microtomography and Fourier transform infrared microscopy. These techniques were applied on the same location of a subsample of a spray-dried detergent base powder embedded in polyacrylate. In this way, the three-dimensional internal and external structure of detergent granules could be investigated from milli to nano scale with detailed spatial information about the components present. This will generate knowledge how to design optimal microstructures for laundry products to obtain product properties demanded by the market. This method is also very useful for other powder systems used in a large variety of industries (e.g. for pharmaceutical, food, ceramic and metal industries).

  20. Health correlates of workplace bullying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Gullander, Maria; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the course of workplace bullying and health correlates among Danish employees across a four-year period. METHODS: In total, 7502 public service and private sector employees participated in a 3-wave study from 2006 through 2011. Workplace bullying over the past......-labelled bullying at baseline using logistic regression. RESULTS: Reports of bullying were persistent across four years in 22.2% (57/257) of employees who initially reported bullying. Baseline associations between self-labelled bullying and sick-listing, poor self-rated health, poor sleep, and depressive symptoms...... were significant with adjusted odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.8 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-2.4] for poor sleep quality among those bullied "now and then" to 6.9 (95% CI 3.9-12.3) for depression among those reporting being bullied on a daily to monthly basis. In longitudinal analyses...

  1. On soft limits of large-scale structure correlation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2016-08-15

    Large-scale structure surveys have the potential to become the leading probe for precision cosmology in the next decade. To extract valuable information on the cosmological evolution of the Universe from the observational data, it is of major importance to derive accurate theoretical predictions for the statistical large-scale structure observables, such as the power spectrum and the bispectrum of (dark) matter density perturbations. Hence, one of the greatest challenges of modern cosmology is to theoretically understand the non-linear dynamics of large-scale structure formation in the Universe from first principles. While analytic approaches to describe the large-scale structure formation are usually based on the framework of non-relativistic cosmological perturbation theory, we pursue another road in this thesis and develop methods to derive generic, non-perturbative statements about large-scale structure correlation functions. We study unequal- and equal-time correlation functions of density and velocity perturbations in the limit where one of their wavenumbers becomes small, that is, in the soft limit. In the soft limit, it is possible to link (N+1)-point and N-point correlation functions to non-perturbative 'consistency conditions'. These provide in turn a powerful tool to test fundamental aspects of the underlying theory at hand. In this work, we first rederive the (resummed) consistency conditions at unequal times by using the so-called eikonal approximation. The main appeal of the unequal-time consistency conditions is that they are solely based on symmetry arguments and thus are universal. Proceeding from this, we direct our attention to consistency conditions at equal times, which, on the other hand, depend on the interplay between soft and hard modes. We explore the existence and validity of equal-time consistency conditions within and beyond perturbation theory. For this purpose, we investigate the predictions for the soft limit of the

  2. Clinicoradiological correlation in birth asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj Patil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE is the most dreaded neurological disease of the new-born. Assessment of severity of HIE would help proper parent counseling and early institution of stimulation therapy for better development of the infant. Methods: This study was conducted between December 2012 and May 2014. 37 term neonates with perinatal asphyxia were the subjects. The cranial ultrasound, EEG and MRI findings of these babies are analysed and correlated with each other and with clinical staging and the neurological condition of the babies at discharge. Results: Among the 37 neonates, 21 were of HIE stage 2 and 16 were of stage 3. Sensitivity of EEG in detecting abnormality in the neurological condition according to our study is 76.9%, specificity 87.5%, positive predictive value 76.9%, negative predictive value 87.5%. Sensitivity of severe pattern of injury in MRI brain in detecting abnormality in neurological condition according to our study is 76.9%, specificity 91.6%, positive predictive value 83.3%, negative predictive value 88%. Involvement of both basal ganglia and cortex in MRI brain had statistically significant correlation with abnormal neurological condition at discharge in our study (P = 0.04. Conclusion: An abnormal EEG and MRI brain in a term new-born with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE is associated with poor neurological outcome. Involvement of basal ganglia/thalamus and cortex together in the MRI are predictors of abnormal outcome. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 560-567

  3. Optimal measurements for nonlocal correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Sacha; Stefanov, André; Wolf, Stefan; Montina, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    A problem in quantum information theory is to find the experimental setup that maximizes the nonlocality of correlations with respect to some suitable measure such as the violation of Bell inequalities. There are however some complications with Bell inequalities. First and foremost it is unfeasible to determine the whole set of Bell inequalities already for a few measurements and thus unfeasible to find the experimental setup maximizing their violation. Second, the Bell violation suffers from an ambiguity stemming from the choice of the normalization of the Bell coefficients. An alternative measure of nonlocality with a direct information-theoretic interpretation is the minimal amount of classical communication required for simulating nonlocal correlations. In the case of many instances simulated in parallel, the minimal communication cost per instance is called nonlocal capacity, and its computation can be reduced to a convex-optimization problem. This quantity can be computed for a higher number of measurements and turns out to be useful for finding the optimal experimental setup. Focusing on the bipartite case, we present a simple method for maximizing the nonlocal capacity over a given configuration space and, in particular, over a set of possible measurements, yielding the corresponding optimal setup. Furthermore, we show that there is a functional relationship between Bell violation and nonlocal capacity. The method is illustrated with numerical tests and compared with the maximization of the violation of CGLMP-type Bell inequalities on the basis of entangled two-qubit as well as two-qutrit states. Remarkably, the anomaly of nonlocality displayed by qutrits turns out to be even stronger if the nonlocal capacity is employed as a measure of nonlocality.

  4. A method for generating realistic correlation matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Stephan Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Simulating sample correlation matrices is important in many areas of statistics. Approaches such as generating normal data and finding their sample correlation matrix or generating random uniform $[-1,1]$ deviates as pairwise correlations both have drawbacks. We develop an algorithm for adding noise, in a highly controlled manner, to general correlation matrices. In many instances, our method yields results which are superior to those obtained by simply simulating normal data. Moreover, we demonstrate how our general algorithm can be tailored to a number of different correlation models. Finally, using our results with an existing clustering algorithm, we show that simulating correlation matrices can help assess statistical methodology.

  5. Investigation of correlations in light neutron-rich nuclei; Etude des correlations dans les noyaux legers riches en neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, G

    2004-10-01

    Correlations play a crucial role in understanding the structure of light nuclei at and beyond the neutron drip-line. In this context, the two-neutron halo nucleus He{sup 6} and the unbound systems H{sup 5}, He{sup 7,9} and Li{sup 10} have been studied via measurements of the breakup of beams of He{sup 6} and Be{sup 11,12}. The CHARISSA and DEMON detector arrays were employed. The interpretation was facilitated by a simulation code (SILLAGE) which provided for the setup. In the case of He{sup 7}, the existence of an excited state with E{sub r} {approx} 1 MeV and gamma {approx} 0.75 MeV was confirmed. The virtual character of the s-wave ground state of Li{sup 10} was also confirmed and a scattering length of as {approx} -16 fm deduced. The results obtained for He{sup 9} suggest that a virtual s-wave state may exist just above threshold. The study of the three-body breakup of He{sup 6} found that the decay of the first 2+ state is essentially direct, while the decay of the remaining continuum strength is sequential - passage via He{sup 5}. Using the technique of intensity interferometry an rms separation between the halo neutrons of 7.7 +- 0.8 fm was derived. This result was confirmed by a complementary method utilizing Dalitz plots. In the case of H{sup 5}, the invariant mass spectrum was found to exhibit a broad (gamma {approx} 2 MeV) structure some 1.8 MeV above threshold. Comparison with recent three-body model calculations suggest that this corresponds to the predicted 1/2+ ground state. An rms valence neutron separation of some 5.5 fm was estimated. A search was also carried out for the 4n system using the Be{sup 12*} (2 alpha + Xn decay channel). No signal was observed beyond that expected on the basis of the known background processes. (author)

  6. The Effect of Error Correlation on Interfactor Correlation in Psychometric Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Peter H.; Henning, Kevin S. S.; Howell, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how interfactor correlation is affected by error correlations. Theoretical and practical justifications for error correlations are given, and a new equivalence class of models is presented to explain the relationship between interfactor correlation and error correlations. The class allows simple, parsimonious modeling of error…

  7. Spin-resolved correlations in the warm-dense homogeneous electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Priya; Kumar, Krishan; Moudgil, R. K.

    2017-04-01

    We have studied spin-resolved correlations in the warm-dense homogeneous electron gas by determining the linear density and spin-density response functions, within the dynamical self-consistent mean-field theory of Singwi et al. The calculated spin-resolved pair-correlation function gσσ'(r) is compared with the recent restricted path-integral Monte Carlo (RPIMC) simulations due to Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)], while interaction energy Eint and exchange-correlation free energy Fxc with the RPIMC and very recent ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations by Dornheim et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 156403 (2016)]. g↑↓(r) is found to be in good agreement with the RPIMC data, while a mismatch is seen in g↑↑(r) at small r where it becomes somewhat negative. As an interesting result, it is deduced that a non-monotonic T-dependence of g(0) is driven primarily by g↑↓(0). Our results of Eint and Fxc exhibit an excellent agreement with the QMC study due to Dornheim et al., which deals with the finite-size correction quite accurately. We observe, however, a visible deviation of Eint from the RPIMC data for high densities ( 8% at rs = 1). Further, we have extended our study to the fully spin-polarized phase. Again, with the exception of high density region, we find a good agreement of Eint with the RPIMC data. This points to the need of settling the problem of finite-size correction in the spin-polarized phase also. Interestingly, we also find that the thermal effects tend to oppose spatial localization as well as spin polarization of electrons. Supplementary material in the form of one zip file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2017-70532-y

  8. Oxidative damage in muscular dystrophy correlates with the severity of the pathology: role of glutathione metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renjini, R; Gayathri, N; Nalini, A; Srinivas Bharath, M M

    2012-04-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), sarcoglycanopathy (Sgpy) and dysferlinopathy (Dysfy) are recessive genetic neuromuscular diseases that display muscle degeneration. Although these MDs have comparable endpoints of muscle pathology, the onset, severity and the course of these diseases are diverse. Different mechanisms downstream of genetic mutations might underlie the disparity in these pathologies. We surmised that oxidative damage and altered antioxidant function might contribute to these differences. The oxidant and antioxidant markers in the muscle biopsies from patients with DMD (n = 15), Sgpy (n = 15) and Dysfy (n = 15) were compared to controls (n = 10). Protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation was evident in all MDs and correlated with the severity of pathology, with DMD, the most severe dystrophic condition showing maximum damage, followed by Sgpy and Dysfy. Oxidative damage in DMD and Sgpy was attributed to the depletion of glutathione (GSH) and lowered antioxidant activities while loss of GSH peroxidase and GSH-S-transferase activities was observed in Dysfy. Lower GSH level in DMD was due to lowered activity of gamma-glutamyl cysteine ligase, the rate limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis. Similar analysis in cardiotoxin (CTX) mouse model of MD showed that the dystrophic muscle pathology correlated with GSH depletion and lipid peroxidation. Depletion of GSH prior to CTX exposure in C2C12 myoblasts exacerbated oxidative damage and myotoxicity. We deduce that the pro and anti-oxidant mechanisms could be correlated to the severity of MD and might influence the dystrophic pathology to a different extent in various MDs. On a therapeutic note, this could help in evolving novel therapies that offer myoprotection in MD.

  9. IR-images of PV-modules with potential induced degradation (PID) correlated to monitored string power output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerhop, Claudia; Pickel, Tobias; Blumberg, Tiberius; Adams, Jens; Wrana, Simon; Dalsass, Manuel; Zetzmann, Cornelia; Camus, Christian; Hauch, Jens; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2016-09-01

    Many PV-plants suffer from potential induced degradation (PID) which causes severe power reduction of installed PVmodules. Fast and reliable methods to detect PID and evaluate the impact on the module performance are gaining importance. Drone-assisted IR-inspection is a suitable method. PID affected modules are detected by their characteristic IR-fingerprint, modules with differing number of slightly heated cells occur more frequently at the negative string end. These modules show a degraded IV-curve, lowered Voc and Isc, and electroluminescence (EL)-images with suspicious, dark cells. Also, the measured string power is reduced. For a first quantitative data evaluation the suspicious cell are counted in the IR-images and correlated with the module power. A linear decrease of the module power with increasing number of suspicious cells results. A correlation function for estimating the module power was deduced, which has a mean deviation of less than 7%. This correlation function allows an acceptable approximation of the string power.

  10. On a correlational clustering of integers

    OpenAIRE

    Aszalós László; Hajdu Lajos (1968-) (matematikus); Pethő Attila (1950-) (matematikus, informatikus)

    2016-01-01

    Correlation clustering is a concept of machine learning. The ultimate goal of such a clustering is to find a partition with minimal conflicts. In this paper we investigate a correlation clustering of integers, based upon the greatest common divisor.

  11. Software correlators as testbeds for RFI algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Deller, Adam T

    2010-01-01

    In-correlator techniques offer the possibility of identifying and/or excising radio frequency interference (RFI) from interferometric observations at much higher time and/or frequency resolution than is generally possible with the final visibility dataset. Due to the considerable computational requirements of the correlation procedure, cross-correlators have most commonly been implemented using high-speed digital signal processing boards, which typically require long development times and are difficult to alter once complete. "Software" correlators, on the other hand, make use of commodity server machines and a correlation algorithm coded in a high-level language. They are inherently much more flexible and can be developed - and modified - much more rapidly than purpose-built "hardware" correlators. Software correlators are thus a natural choice for testing new RFI detection and mitigation techniques for interferometers. The ease with which software correlators can be adapted to test RFI detection algorithms ...

  12. Psychological factors as correlates of underachievement among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological factors as correlates of underachievement among high achievers ... Data were collected using emotional intelligence scale (r=0.79), Academic self ... Data were analysed using pearson product moment correlation and multiple ...

  13. Local Descriptors of Dynamic and Nondynamic Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Matito, Eduard

    2017-06-13

    Quantitatively accurate electronic structure calculations rely on the proper description of electron correlation. A judicious choice of the approximate quantum chemistry method depends upon the importance of dynamic and nondynamic correlation, which is usually assesed by scalar measures. Existing measures of electron correlation do not consider separately the regions of the Cartesian space where dynamic or nondynamic correlation are most important. We introduce real-space descriptors of dynamic and nondynamic electron correlation that admit orbital decomposition. Integration of the local descriptors yields global numbers that can be used to quantify dynamic and nondynamic correlation. Illustrative examples over different chemical systems with varying electron correlation regimes are used to demonstrate the capabilities of the local descriptors. Since the expressions only require orbitals and occupation numbers, they can be readily applied in the context of local correlation methods, hybrid methods, density matrix functional theory, and fractional-occupancy density functional theory.

  14. Spatial photon correlations in multiple scattering media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Muskens, O.; Lagendijk, A.;

    2010-01-01

    We present the first angle-resolved measurements of spatial photon correlations that are induced by multiple scattering of light. The correlation relates multiple scattered photons at different spatial positions and depends on incident photon fluctuations.......We present the first angle-resolved measurements of spatial photon correlations that are induced by multiple scattering of light. The correlation relates multiple scattered photons at different spatial positions and depends on incident photon fluctuations....

  15. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  16. Prototype Optical Correlator For Robotic Vision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    1993-01-01

    Known and unknown images fed in electronically at high speed. Optical correlator and associated electronic circuitry developed for vision system of robotic vehicle. System recognizes features of landscape by optical correlation between input image of scene viewed by video camera on robot and stored reference image. Optical configuration is Vander Lugt correlator, in which Fourier transform of scene formed in coherent light and spatially modulated by hologram of reference image to obtain correlation.

  17. Pitfalls in tests for changes in correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Brian H. Boyer; Michael S. Gibson; Mico Loretan

    1997-01-01

    Correlations are crucial for pricing and hedging derivatives whose payoff depends on more than one asset. Typically, correlations computed separately for ordinary and stressful market conditions differ considerably, a pattern widely termed "correlation breakdown." As a result, risk managers worry that their hedges will be useless when they are most needed, namely during "stressful" market situations. ; We show that such worries may not be justified since "correlation breakdowns" can easily be...

  18. Analytic matrix elements with shifted correlated Gaussians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.......Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics....

  19. Correlates of social support receipt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel-Schetter, C; Folkman, S; Lazarus, R S

    1987-07-01

    Psychological correlates of social support receipt were examined in an investigation of stress and coping among 150 middle-aged community residents. Subjects were interviewed monthly for 6 months, each time concerning a specific stressful situation in the previous month. Social support received and methods of coping were assessed each time, as well as other variables. Factors hypothesized to be associated with support receipt were person predispositions, appraisal patterns with regard to specific stressful encounters, and coping strategies used. Each was most strongly associated with a particular type of social support. Person predispositions related most strongly to emotional support received, appraisal factors related most strongly to aid, and coping strategies related most to informational support received. Furthermore, of the three sets of variables, the individual's ways of coping appeared to be most strongly associated with all types of social support received. Two implications are explored. First, we suggest that the three types of social support studied represent different constructs with different antecedents and consequences. Second, we argue that coping behavior provides interpersonal cues regarding what is wanted or needed in a stressful situation and that the members of the social environment respond accordingly.

  20. PSYCHOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anida Fazlagić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV, postpartum depression may include any nonpsychotic depressive disorder during the first four weeks of postpartum, according to research criteria during the first year after birth. The exact cause of postpartum depression is not yet known, and most researchers believe that postpartum depression is a bio-psycho-social problem. So far, the biological aspect of the disease is explained by changing the levels of estrogen and progesterone during pregnancy, and by decrease of hormone levels after birth. Psychological correlates are often associated with low selfesteem, pessimism as a personality trait, bad strategies of coping with stress, mood swings and emotional reactions. The social aspect of the disease is associated with the existential conditions of pregnant woman, support of partners and education level. This paper will include issues like hereditary causes and possible psychological factors of postpartum depression prevention. Nowadays, it is estimated that on average 15% of women, regardless of the pregnancy outcome, are suffering from postpartum depression. However, this information includes only those women who were diagnosed with postpartum depression and who themselves reported about it. Almost every woman receives basic care during pregnancy to prevent complications in the physiological level. This paper has shown possible psychological factors of postpartum depression prevention, the impact of optimism, self-esteem and coping skills.

  1. de Finetti reductions for correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon-Friedman, Rotem; Renner, Renato

    2015-05-01

    When analysing quantum information processing protocols, one has to deal with large entangled systems, each consisting of many subsystems. To make this analysis feasible, it is often necessary to identify some additional structures. de Finetti theorems provide such a structure for the case where certain symmetries hold. More precisely, they relate states that are invariant under permutations of subsystems to states in which the subsystems are independent of each other. This relation plays an important role in various areas, e.g., in quantum cryptography or state tomography, where permutation invariant systems are ubiquitous. The known de Finetti theorems usually refer to the internal quantum state of a system and depend on its dimension. Here, we prove a different de Finetti theorem where systems are modelled in terms of their statistics under measurements. This is necessary for a large class of applications widely considered today, such as device independent protocols, where the underlying systems and the dimensions are unknown and the entire analysis is based on the observed correlations.

  2. Chrysotherapy: pharmacological and clinical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, A; Simon, T M; Leeb, J; Carroll, P E

    1975-12-01

    Relationships between gold administration and serum gold content were observed in 56 RA subjects receiving up to five years of weekly chrysotherapy. Wide fluctuations in serum gold responses to standard 50 mg IM injections were noted. Individual adjustments to dosage schedules were made as dictated by patient serum gold responses. Enhanced clinical and laboratory response was prolonged with higher sustained serum gold concentration greater than 300 mug per cent. Maintaining serum levels greater than 300 mug per cent is postulated to facilitate access of gold to "effector sites" within the deeper compartments by providing higher sustained gradients between superficial (blood) and deeper body compartments. The complexity of the system of effector sites responsive to gold and their divergent location within the body likely affects the accessibility of the agent for these sites; hence, affecting the correlation between gold levels and therapeutic response. The application of pharmacokinetic principles in chrysotherapy, nevertheless, provides the basis for optimizing accessibility of the agent and the therapeutic response. (J Rheumatol 2: 401-410, 1975).

  3. Correlators with sℓ2 Yangian symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuksa, J.; Kirschner, R.

    2017-01-01

    Correlators based on sℓ2 Yangian symmetry and its quantum deformation are studied. Symmetric integral operators can be defined with such correlators as kernels. Yang-Baxter operators can be represented in this way. Particular Yangian symmetric correlators are related to the kernels of QCD parton evolution. The solution of the eigenvalue problem of Yangian symmetric operators is described.

  4. Coefficient of Partial Correlation and Its Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段全才; 张保法

    1992-01-01

    This thesis offers the general concept of coefficient of partial correlation.Starting with regres-sion analysis,the paper,by using samples,infers the general formula of expressing coefficient of partial correlation by way of simple correlation coefficient.

  5. Correlated noise in a logistic growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Guo-Tao; Liu, Liang-Gang

    2003-02-01

    The logistic differential equation is used to analyze cancer cell population, in the presence of a correlated Gaussian white noise. We study the steady state properties of tumor cell growth and discuss the effects of the correlated noise. It is found that the degree of correlation of the noise can cause tumor cell extinction.

  6. Correlation Measurements on Small Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Here, analysis of the antenna correlation at the design stage is done, with focus on measurement techniques. Various theoretical definitions of correlations are used with the corresponding measured data required. The problems related to the coaxial measurement cables, when calculating correlation...

  7. Quantum entanglement and teleportation using statistical correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atul Kumar; Mangala Sunder Krishnan

    2009-09-01

    A study of quantum teleportation using two and three-particle correlated density matrix is presented. A criterion based on standard quantum statistical correlations employed in the many-body virial expansion is used to determine the extent of entanglement for a 2-particle system. A relation between the probability and statistical parameters is established using the correlated density matrices for the particles.

  8. Correlated measurement error hampers association network inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduk, Mateusz; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Vis, Daniel J; Reijmers, Theo; van der Greef, Jan; Smilde, Age K; Hendriks, Margriet M W B

    2014-09-01

    Modern chromatography-based metabolomics measurements generate large amounts of data in the form of abundances of metabolites. An increasingly popular way of representing and analyzing such data is by means of association networks. Ideally, such a network can be interpreted in terms of the underlying biology. A property of chromatography-based metabolomics data is that the measurement error structure is complex: apart from the usual (random) instrumental error there is also correlated measurement error. This is intrinsic to the way the samples are prepared and the analyses are performed and cannot be avoided. The impact of correlated measurement errors on (partial) correlation networks can be large and is not always predictable. The interplay between relative amounts of uncorrelated measurement error, correlated measurement error and biological variation defines this impact. Using chromatography-based time-resolved lipidomics data obtained from a human intervention study we show how partial correlation based association networks are influenced by correlated measurement error. We show how the effect of correlated measurement error on partial correlations is different for direct and indirect associations. For direct associations the correlated measurement error usually has no negative effect on the results, while for indirect associations, depending on the relative size of the correlated measurement error, results can become unreliable. The aim of this paper is to generate awareness of the existence of correlated measurement errors and their influence on association networks. Time series lipidomics data is used for this purpose, as it makes it possible to visually distinguish the correlated measurement error from a biological response. Underestimating the phenomenon of correlated measurement error will result in the suggestion of biologically meaningful results that in reality rest solely on complicated error structures. Using proper experimental designs that allow

  9. On the correlation between the electroanalytical behavior and crystallographic features of Li-intercalation electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, M. D.; Levi, E.; Aurbach, D.; Schmidt, M.; Oesten, R.; Heider, U.

    The electroanalytical behavior of Li xNiO 2 and Li xCo 0.2Ni 0.8O 2 was studied by simultaneous application of slow-scan rate cyclic voltammetry (SSCV), potentiostatic and galvanostatic intermittent titration (PITT and GITT), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Application of a finite-space diffusion model for treating the results obtained by these techniques allowed us to calculate the diffusion coefficient of Li ions ( D) and the differential (incremental) capacity ( Cint) as functions of the electrode's potential. Our final purpose was to compare D versus E and Cint versus E plots for both the electrodes, in order to correlate the observed difference in their electroanalytical behavior with the clear distinction in the related Li-insertion mechanisms deduced from XRD studies. While Li insertion into Li xCo 0.2Ni 0.8O 2 exhibits a single-phase reaction upon charge in the 3.0-4.08 V (versus Li/Li +) range, Li intercalation into Li xNiO 2 undergoes two-phase transitions in the same potential range. The shape of both plots, D versus E and Cint versus E for these electrodes, is discussed in the framework of a finite-space diffusion model and Li-insertion processes that can be described by Frumkin-type intercalation isotherms with short-range attraction interactions among intercalation sites.

  10. Radio Identifications of Markarian Galaxies and the Correlation between Radio and Far-Infrared Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Guang Luo; Xue-Bing Wu

    2005-01-01

    By checking DSS optical images and NVSS radio images, 782 Markarian galaxies were identified to be NVSS radio sources. A comparison of the radio luminosity at 1.4 GHz and the far-infrared (FIR) luminosity for 468 "normal"galaxies shows a tight correlation. Most of the Seyfert galaxies and quasars follow the radio-FIR relation deduced from the "normal" galaxy sample, but with a somewhat larger scatter. A total 167 Markarian galaxies, comprising 100 "normal"galaxies, 66 Seyfert galaxies and one quasar, have either excess radio emission or much lower FIR spectral index α(25μm, 60μm). These galaxies may be classified as "AGN-powered". For "normal" galaxies, the average q value (defined as the log ratio between FIR and radio luminosities) is 2.3. There seems a trend for q to slightly decrease with increasing radio luminosity. This may imply that the ongoing active star formation in galaxies with higher radio luminosities is more efficient in heating the cosmic-ray electrons.

  11. A model for a correlated random walk based on the ordered extension of pseudopodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J M Van Haastert

    Full Text Available Cell migration in the absence of external cues is well described by a correlated random walk. Most single cells move by extending protrusions called pseudopodia. To deduce how cells walk, we have analyzed the formation of pseudopodia by Dictyostelium cells. We have observed that the formation of pseudopodia is highly ordered with two types of pseudopodia: First, de novo formation of pseudopodia at random positions on the cell body, and therefore in random directions. Second, pseudopod splitting near the tip of the current pseudopod in alternating right/left directions, leading to a persistent zig-zag trajectory. Here we analyzed the probability frequency distributions of the angles between pseudopodia and used this information to design a stochastic model for cell movement. Monte Carlo simulations show that the critical elements are the ratio of persistent splitting pseudopodia relative to random de novo pseudopodia, the Left/Right alternation, the angle between pseudopodia and the variance of this angle. Experiments confirm predictions of the model, showing reduced persistence in mutants that are defective in pseudopod splitting and in mutants with an irregular cell surface.

  12. Persistence of octupole correlations in sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Ra

    CERN Document Server

    Fraile-Prieto, L M; Mach, H; Boutami, R; Aas, A J; Fogelberg, B; García-Raffi, L M; Grant, I S; Gulda, K; Hageboe, E; Kurcewicz, W; Kvasil, J; López, M J; Løvhøiden, G; Martínez, T; Rubio, B; Taín, J L; Tengblad, O

    2001-01-01

    The structure of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Ra, the heaviest odd Ra nucleus currently accessible for detailed spectroscopic investigation, has been studied in the beta sup - decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Fr. The main purpose has been to verify whether fast B(E1) rates and significant octupole correlations recently established in sup 2 sup 2 sup 9 Ra persist in sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Ra. The excited states in sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Ra have been determined for the first time. Spins and parities have been deduced from conversion electron measurements, while level half-lives in the ps and ns ranges have been measured with the Advanced Time Delayed beta gamma gamma(t) method. The moderately fast B(E1) rates found for transitions connecting the lowest-lying K suppi=5/2 sup+- and K suppi=1/2 sup+- bands, reveal the persistence of octupole collective effects in sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Ra, although the B(E1) rates are lower than in sup 2 sup 2 sup 9 Ra. These findings reinforce the differences in the B(E1) systematics between isotonic Ra and Th ...

  13. A Correlation between Proton Events and Hα Flares and its Possible Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Comparing space proton event data obtained during 1970-1980 with their identified Hα flare signatures we discover a peculiar correlation between them,according to which weak and small Hα flares can also produce proton events, and we reveal a characteristic "triangle" distribution of Hα flares accompanying protonevents. In order to explain such feature of proton events, we accept the accelerationmechanism by DC electric field. To deduce the parallel electric field we use the elec-tric current helicity (or force-free parameter α) determined by the Huairou vectormagnetograph. A comparison of E‖ with E shows that the former is negligiblein flaring sites. We show that in the flaring current sheet ion-anisotropy is gener-ated, and it, in turn, gives rise to ion-anisotropic instability which competes withelectric acceleration to give one possibility: the acceleration by DC electric field orannihilation of the built-up energy. The competition of DC acceleration and ion-anisotropic instability annihilation in the current sheet gives a possible explanationfor the above-mentioned "triangle" character of the distribution.

  14. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-07-09

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T{sub c}4 superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the

  15. Energetics of correlations in interacting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Nicolai; Huber, Marcus; Perarnau-Llobet, Martí

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental connection between thermodynamics and information theory arises from the fact that correlations exhibit an inherent work value. For noninteracting systems this translates to a work cost for establishing correlations. Here we investigate the relationship between work and correlations in the presence of interactions that cannot be controlled or removed. For such naturally coupled systems, which are correlated even in thermal equilibrium, we determine general strategies that can reduce the work cost of correlations, and illustrate these for a selection of exemplary physical systems.

  16. Spatial correlation coefficient images for ultrasonic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepel, Raina; Ho, K C; Rinker, Brett A; Palmer, Donald D; Lerch, Terrence P; Neal, Steven P

    2007-09-01

    In ultrasonics, image formation and detection are generally based on signal amplitude. In this paper, we introduce correlation coefficient images as a signal-amplitude independent approach for image formation. The correlation coefficients are calculated between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. In these images, defects are revealed as regions of high or low correlation relative to the background correlations associated with noise. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular ring and crack detection in an aluminum aircraft structure.

  17. Pair correlations in scale-free networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Zhuang-Xiong; Wang Xin-Ran; Zhu Han

    2004-01-01

    Correlation between nodes is found to be a common and important property in many complex networks. Here we investigate degree correlations of the Barabasi-Albert (BA) scale-free model with both analytical results and simulations,and find two neighbouring regions, a disassortative one for low degrees and a neutral one for high degrees. The average degree of the neighbours of a randomly picked node is expected to diverge in the limit of infinite network size. As a generalization of the concept of correlation, we also study the correlations of other scalar properties, including age and clustering coefficient. Finally we propose a correlation measurement in bipartite networks.

  18. Does asymmetric correlation affect portfolio optimization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryd, Lukas

    2017-07-01

    The classical portfolio optimization problem does not assume asymmetric behavior of relationship among asset returns. The existence of asymmetric response in correlation on the bad news could be important information in portfolio optimization. The paper applies Dynamic conditional correlation model (DCC) and his asymmetric version (ADCC) to propose asymmetric behavior of conditional correlation. We analyse asymmetric correlation among S&P index, bonds index and spot gold price before mortgage crisis in 2008. We evaluate forecast ability of the models during and after mortgage crisis and demonstrate the impact of asymmetric correlation on the reduction of portfolio variance.

  19. Antiferromagnetic noise correlations in optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Georg Morten; Syljuåsen, F. T.; Pedersen, K. G. L.;

    2009-01-01

    We analyze how noise correlations probed by time-of-flight experiments reveal antiferromagnetic (AF) correlations of fermionic atoms in two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical lattices. Combining analytical and quantum Monte Carlo calculations using experimentally realistic parameters, we...... show that AF correlations can be detected for temperatures above and below the critical temperature for AF ordering. It is demonstrated that spin-resolved noise correlations yield important information about the spin ordering. Finally, we show how to extract the spin correlation length and the related...

  20. Algorithms For Detection Of Correlation Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Marija S.; Udomkesmalee, Suraphol

    1993-01-01

    Three algorithms provide for improved postprocessing of outputs of optical correlators based on binary phase-only filters. Detect correlation spots. Function in presence of noise and executed rapidly. First algorithm starts processing correlation-image data while data fed out of video camera and digitized for subsequent analysis. Second involves convolution of correlation image with small-window two-dimensional impulse-response function followed by threshold operation in which negative values of convolution integral set to zero. Third affects generation as well as postprocessing of correlation image.

  1. Quantifying meta-correlations in financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Preis, Tobias; Gur-Gershgoren, Gitit; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-08-01

    Financial markets are modular multi-level systems, in which the relationships between the individual components are not constant in time. Sudden changes in these relationships significantly affect the stability of the entire system, and vice versa. Our analysis is based on historical daily closing prices of the 30 components of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) from March 15th, 1939 until December 31st, 2010. We quantify the correlation among these components by determining Pearson correlation coefficients, to investigate whether mean correlation of the entire portfolio can be used as a precursor for changes in the index return. To this end, we quantify the meta-correlation - the correlation of mean correlation and index return. We find that changes in index returns are significantly correlated with changes in mean correlation. Furthermore, we study the relationship between the index return and correlation volatility - the standard deviation of correlations for a given time interval. This parameter provides further evidence of the effect of the index on market correlations and their fluctuations. Our empirical findings provide new information and quantification of the index leverage effect, and have implications to risk management, portfolio optimization, and to the increased stability of financial markets.

  2. Clustering stocks using partial correlation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sean S.; Chang, Woojin

    2016-11-01

    A partial correlation analysis is performed on the Korean stock market (KOSPI). The difference between Pearson correlation and the partial correlation is analyzed and it is found that when conditioned on the market return, Pearson correlation coefficients are generally greater than those of the partial correlation, which implies that the market return tends to drive up the correlation between stock returns. A clustering analysis is then performed to study the market structure given by the partial correlation analysis and the members of the clusters are compared with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS). The initial hypothesis is that the firms in the same GICS sector are clustered together since they are in a similar business and environment. However, the result is inconsistent with the hypothesis and most clusters are a mix of multiple sectors suggesting that the traditional approach of using sectors to determine the proximity between stocks may not be sufficient enough to diversify a portfolio.

  3. Separation of Dynamic and Nondynamic Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Matito, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The account of electron correlation and its efficient separation into dynamic and nondynamic parts plays a key role in the development of computational methods. In this paper we suggest a physically-sound matrix formulation to split electron correlation into dynamic and nondynamic parts using the two-particle cumulant matrix and a measure of the deviation from idempotency of the first-order density matrix. These matrices are applied to a two-electron model, giving rise to a simplified electron correlation index that ($i$) depends only on natural orbitals and their occupancies, ($ii$) can be straightforwardly decomposed into orbital contributions and ($iii$) splits into dynamic and nondynamic correlation parts that ($iv$) admit a local version. These expressions are shown to account for dynamic and nondynamic correlation in a variety of systems containing different electron correlation regimes, thus providing the first separation of dynamic and nondynamic correlation using solely natural orbital occupancies.

  4. Correlation Statistics of Quantized Noiselike Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Gwinn, C

    2004-01-01

    I calculate the statistics of correlation of two digitized noiselike signals, which are drawn from complex Gaussian distributions, sampled, quantized, correlated, and averaged. Averaged over many such samples, the correlation r approaches a Gaussian distribution. The mean and variance of r fully characterize the distribution of r. The mean corresponds to the reproducible part of the measurement, and the variance corresponds to the random part, or noise. I investigate the case of nonnegligible covariance rho between the signals. Noise in the correlation can increase or decrease, depending on quantizer parameters, when rho increases. This contrasts with the correlation of continuously valued or unquantized signals, for which the noise in phase with rho increases with increasing rho, and noise out of phase decreases. Indeed, for some quantizer parameters, I find that the correlation of quantized signals provides a more accurate estimate of rho than would correlation without quantization. I present analytic resul...

  5. Sensitivity of adjustment to parameter correlations and to response-parameter correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagschal, J.J. [Racah Inst. of Physics, Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

    2011-07-01

    The adjusted parameters and response, and their respective posterior uncertainties and correlations, are presented explicitly as functions of all relevant prior correlations for the two parameters, one response case. The dependence of these adjusted entities on the various prior correlations is analyzed and portrayed graphically for various valid correlation combinations on a simple criticality problem. (authors)

  6. Maximizing negative correlations in resting-state functional connectivity MRI by time-lag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelman, Gadi; Gordon, Noam; Bonne, Omer

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to better understand the physiological meaning of negative correlations in resting state functional connectivity MRI (r-fcMRI). The correlations between anatomy-based brain regions of 18 healthy humans were calculated and analyzed with and without a correction for global signal and with and without spatial smoothing. In addition, correlations between anatomy-based brain regions of 18 naïve anesthetized rats were calculated and compared to the human data. T-statistics were used to differentiate between positive and negative connections. The application of spatial smoothing and global signal correction increased the number of significant positive connections but their effect on negative connections was complex. Positive connections were mainly observed between cortical structures while most negative connections were observed between cortical and non-cortical structures with almost no negative connections between non-cortical structures. In both human and rats, negative connections were never observed between bilateral homologous regions. The main difference between positive and negative connections in both the human and rat data was that positive connections became less significant with time-lags, while negative connections became more significant with time-lag. This effect was evident in all four types of analyses (with and without global signal correction and spatial smoothing) but was most significant in the analysis with no correction for the global signal. We hypothesize that the valence of r-fcMRI connectivity reflects the relative contributions of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and flow (CBF) to the BOLD signal and that these relative contributions are location-specific. If cerebral circulation is primarily regulated by CBF in one region and by CBV in another, a functional connection between these regions can manifest as an r-fcMRI negative and time-delayed correlation. Similarly, negative correlations could result from spatially inhomogeneous

  7. Disordered strongly correlated electronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan Mard, Hossein

    Disorder can have a vast variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this dissertation we study the effects of quenched disorder on electronic systmens at zero temperature. First, we perform variational studies of the interaction-localization problem to describe the interaction-induced renormalizations of the effective (screened) random potential seen by quasiparticles. Here we present results of careful finite-size scaling studies for the conductance of disordered Hubbard chains at half-filling and zero temperature. While our results indicate that quasiparticle wave functions remain exponentially localized even in the presence of moderate to strong repulsive interactions, we show that interactions produce a strong decrease of the characteristic conductance scale g* signaling the crossover to strong localization. This effect, which cannot be captured by a simple renormalization of the disorder strength, instead reflects a peculiar non-Gaussian form of the spatial correlations of the screened disordered potential, a hitherto neglected mechanism to dramatically reduce the impact of Anderson localization (interference) effects. Second, we formulate a strong-disorder renormalization-group (SDRG) approach to study the beta function of the tight-binding model in one dimension with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder for states at the band center. We show that the SDRG method, when used to compute transport properties, yields exact results since it is identical to the transfer matrix method. The beta function is shown to be universal when only off-diagonal disorder is present even though single-parameter scaling is known to be violated. A different single-parameter scaling theory is formulated for this particular (particle-hole symmetric) case. Upon breaking particle-hole symmetry (by adding diagonal disorder), the beta function is shown to

  8. Inter-relationships of haplosporidians deduced from ultrastructural studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hine, P.M.; Carnegie, R.B.; Burreson, E.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed papers reporting haplosporidian ultrastructure to compare inter-relationships based on ultrastructure with those based on molecular data, to identify features that may be important in haplosporidian taxonomy, and to consider parasite taxonomy in relation to host taxonomy. There were link

  9. Shell structure of potassium isotopes deduced from their magnetic moments

    CERN Document Server

    Papuga, J; Kreim, K; Barbieri, C; Blaum, K; De Rydt, M; Duguet, T; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Kowalska, M; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nortershauser, W; Rajabali, M M; Sanchez, R; Smirnova, N; Soma, V; Yordanov, D T

    2014-01-01

    $\\textbf{Background:}$ Ground-state spins and magnetic moments are sensitive to the nuclear wave function, thus they are powerful probes to study the nuclear structure of isotopes far from stability. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Purpose:}$ Extend our knowledge about the evolution of the $1/2^+$ and $3/2^+$ states for K isotopes beyond the $N = 28$ shell gap. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Method:}$ High-resolution collinear laser spectroscopy on bunched atomic beams. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Results:}$ From measured hyperfine structure spectra of K isotopes, nuclear spins and magnetic moments of the ground states were obtained for isotopes from $N = 19$ up to $N = 32$. In order to draw conclusions about the composition of the wave functions and the occupation of the levels, the experimental data were compared to shell-model calculations using SDPF-NR and SDPF-U effective interactions. In addition, a detailed discussion about the evolution of the gap between proton $1d_{3/2}$ and $2s_{1/2}$ in the shell model and $\\textit{ab initio}$ framework is al...

  10. Using register data to deduce patterns of social exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Fredrik

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a novel method for deducting propensities for social exchange between individuals based on the choices they make, and based on factors such as country of origin, sex, school grades and socioeconomic background. The objective here is to disentangle the effect of social ties from the other factors, in order to find patterns of social exchange. This is done through a control-treatment design on analysing available data, where the 'treatment' is similarity of choices between socially connected individuals, and the control is similarity of choices between non-connected individuals. Structural dependencies are controlled for and effects from different classes are pooled through a mix of methods from network and meta-analysis. The method is demonstrated and tested on Swedish register data on students at upper secondary school. The results show that having similar grades is a predictor of social exchange. Also, previous results from Norwegian data are replicated, showing that students cluster based on country of origin.

  11. Deducing effective light transport parameters in optically thin systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzamuto, Giacomo; Toninelli, Costanza; Wiersma, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    We present an extensive Monte Carlo study on light transport in optically thin slabs, addressing both axial and transverse propagation. We completely characterize the so-called ballistic-to-diffusive transition, notably in terms of the spatial variance of the transmitted/reflected profile. We test the validity of the prediction cast by diffusion theory, that the spatial variance should grow independently of absorption and, to a first approximation, of the sample thickness and refractive index contrast. Based on a large set of simulated data, we build a freely available look-up table routine allowing reliable and precise determination of the microscopic transport parameters starting from robust observables which are independent of absolute intensity measurements. We also present the Monte Carlo software package that was developed for the purpose of this study.

  12. Deducing protein function by forensic integrative cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Earnshaw

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to sequence genomes has provided us with near-complete lists of the proteins that compose cells, tissues, and organisms, but this is only the beginning of the process to discover the functions of cellular components. In the future, it's going to be crucial to develop computational analyses that can predict the biological functions of uncharacterised proteins. At the same time, we must not forget those fundamental experimental skills needed to confirm the predictions or send the analysts back to the drawing board to devise new ones.

  13. Deducing Electron Properties from Hard X-ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E. P.; Brown, J. C.; Emslie, A. G.; Hajdas, W.; Holman, G. D.; Hurford, G. J.; Kašparová, J.; Mallik, P. C. V.; Massone, A. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Piana, M.; Prato, M.; Schmahl, E. J.; Suarez-Garcia, E.

    2011-09-01

    X-radiation from energetic electrons is the prime diagnostic of flare-accelerated electrons. The observed X-ray flux (and polarization state) is fundamentally a convolution of the cross-section for the hard X-ray emission process(es) in question with the electron distribution function, which is in turn a function of energy, direction, spatial location and time. To address the problems of particle propagation and acceleration one needs to infer as much information as possible on this electron distribution function, through a deconvolution of this fundamental relationship. This review presents recent progress toward this goal using spectroscopic, imaging and polarization measurements, primarily from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager ( RHESSI). Previous conclusions regarding the energy, angular (pitch angle) and spatial distributions of energetic electrons in solar flares are critically reviewed. We discuss the role and the observational evidence of several radiation processes: free-free electron-ion, free-free electron-electron, free-bound electron-ion, photoelectric absorption and Compton backscatter (albedo), using both spectroscopic and imaging techniques. This unprecedented quality of data allows for the first time inference of the angular distributions of the X-ray-emitting electrons and improved model-independent inference of electron energy spectra and emission measures of thermal plasma. Moreover, imaging spectroscopy has revealed hitherto unknown details of solar flare morphology and detailed spectroscopy of coronal, footpoint and extended sources in flaring regions. Additional attempts to measure hard X-ray polarization were not sufficient to put constraints on the degree of anisotropy of electrons, but point to the importance of obtaining good quality polarization data in the future.

  14. Comet plasma densities deduced from refraction of occulted radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.S. (Commonwealth Department of Science, Ionospheric Prediction Service, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia); Nelson, G.J. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Div. of Radiophysics, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia)

    1979-04-01

    Observations of the occultation of radio sources by comet plasma tails are used to derive the electron density and density gradients in the tails. Occultations of source Culgoora-1 0300+16 by Comet Kohoutek and of Culgoora-1 2313-14 by Comet West were measured by radioheliograph at 80 MHz. After corrections for ionospheric refraction, a 2 arcmin anomaly was observed in the declination of 0300+16, attributed to refraction by the tail of Comet Kohoutek, while none was observed for Comet West. The maximum electron density in the tail of Comet Kohoutek is calculated to be 2 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm, while that of Comet West is 5 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm, with density gradients of about 0.05 per cu cm per km. The direction of refraction observed suggests that the tail of Kohoutek is either highly asymmetric about its axis or has the form of a hollow, cylindrical plasma sheath. The high electron densities observed in Kohoutek may indicate the presence of undetected ion species or a low ionization loss rate.

  15. Deducing Electron Properties From Hard X-Ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kontar, E P; Emslie, A G; Hajdas, W; Holman, G D; Hurford, G J; Kasparova, J; Mallik, P C V; Massone, A M; McConnell, M L; Piana, M; Prato, M; Schmahl, E J; Suarez-Garcia, E

    2011-01-01

    X-radiation from energetic electrons is the prime diagnostic of flare-accelerated electrons. The observed X-ray flux (and polarization state) is fundamentally a convolution of the cross-section for the hard X-ray emission process(es) in question with the electron distribution function, which is in turn a function of energy, direction, spatial location and time. To address the problems of particle propagation and acceleration one needs to infer as much information as possible on this electron distribution function, through a deconvolution of this fundamental relationship. This review presents recent progress toward this goal using spectroscopic, imaging and polarization measurements, primarily from the \\textit{Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager} ({\\em RHESSI}). Previous conclusions regarding the energy, angular (pitch angle) and spatial distributions of energetic electrons in solar flares are critically reviewed. We discuss the role and the observational evidence of several radiation processe...

  16. piezometric surface deduced from vertical electrical sounding data

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dogara M. D.

    agricultural purposes has led to widespread search in all geological formations in ... this reason, depth to water table maps are drawn for some chosen typical .... interfaces corresponding to the zones of non-saturation (first break), intermittent ...

  17. Deducing protein function by forensic integrative cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnshaw, William C

    2013-12-01

    Our ability to sequence genomes has provided us with near-complete lists of the proteins that compose cells, tissues, and organisms, but this is only the beginning of the process to discover the functions of cellular components. In the future, it's going to be crucial to develop computational analyses that can predict the biological functions of uncharacterised proteins. At the same time, we must not forget those fundamental experimental skills needed to confirm the predictions or send the analysts back to the drawing board to devise new ones.

  18. Criteria for measures of quantum correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Brodutch, Aharon

    2011-01-01

    Entanglement does not describe all quantum correlations and several authors have shown the need to go beyond entanglement when dealing with mixed states. Several different measures have sprung up in the literature, for a variety of reasons, To describe quantum correlations; some are known under the collective name quantum discord. Yet, in the same sprit as the criteria for entanglement measures, there is no general mechanism that determines whether a measure of quantum and classical correlations is a proper measure of correlations. This is partially due to the fact that the answer is a bit muddy. In this article we attempt tackle this muddy topic by writing down several criteria for a "good" measure of correlations. We breakup our list into necessary, reasonable, and debatable conditions. We then proceed to prove several of these conditions for generalized measures of quantum correlations. However, not all conditions are met by all measures; we show this via several examples. The reasonable conditions are rel...

  19. Relativistic quantum correlations in bipartite fermionic states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S KHAN; N A KHAN

    2016-10-01

    The influences of relative motion, the size of the wave packet and the average momentum of the particles on different types of correlations present in bipartite quantum states are investigated. In particular, the dynamics of the quantum mutual information, the classical correlation and the quantum discord on the spincorrelations of entangled fermions are studied. In the limit of small average momentum, regardless of the size of the wave packet and the rapidity, the classical and the quantum correlations are equally weighted. On the otherhand, in the limit of large average momentum, the only correlations that exist in the system are the quantum correlations. For every value of the average momentum, the quantum correlations maximize at an optimal size of the wave packet. It is shown that after reaching a minimum value, the revival of quantum discord occurs with increasing rapidity.

  20. Spontaneous dimerization, critical lines, and short-range correlations in a frustrated spin-1 chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepiga, Natalia; Affleck, Ian; Mila, Frédéric

    2016-11-01

    We report on a detailed investigation of the spin-1 J1-J2-J3 Heisenberg model, a frustrated model with nearest-neighbor coupling J1, next-nearest neighbor coupling J2, and a three-site interaction J3[(Si -1.Si) (Si.Si +1) +H .c . ] previously studied in [Phys. Rev. B 93, 241108(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.241108]. Using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and exact diagonalizations, we show that the phase boundaries between the Haldane phase, the next-nearest neighbor Haldane phase, and the dimerized phase can be very accurately determined by combining the information deduced from the dimerization, the ground-state energy, the entanglement spectrum and the Berry phase. By a careful investigation of the finite-size spectrum, we also show that the transition between the next-nearest neighbor Haldane phase and the dimerized phase is in the Ising universality class all along the critical line. Furthermore, we justify the conformal embedding of the SU (2) 2 Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theory in terms of a boson and an Ising field, and we explicitly derive a number of consequences of this embedding for the spectrum along the SU (2) 2 transition line between the Haldane phase and the dimerized phase. We also show that the solitons along the first-order transition line between the Haldane phase and the dimerized phase carry a spin-1/2, while the domain walls between different dimerization domains inside the dimerized phase carry a spin 1. Finally, we show that short-range correlations change character in the Haldane and dimerized phases through disorder and Lifshitz lines, as well as through the development of short-range dimer correlations in the Haldane phase, leading to a remarkably rich phase diagram.

  1. Following the TRMC Trail: Optimization of Photovoltaic Efficiency and Structure-Property Correlation of Thiophene Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Tanwistha; Gopal, Anesh; Nagasawa, Shinji; Mohan, Nila; Saeki, Akinori; Nair, Vijayakumar C

    2016-09-28

    Semiconducting conjugated oligomers having same end group (N-ethylrhodanine) but different central core (thiophene: OT-T, bithiophene: OT-BT, thienothiophene: OT-TT) connected through thiophene pi-linker (alkylated terthiophene) were synthesized for solution processable bulk-heterojunction solar cells. The effect of the incorporation of an extra thiophene to the central thiophene unit either through C-C bond linkage to form bithiophene or by fusing two thiophenes together to form thienothiophene on the optoelectronic properties and photovoltaic performances of the oligomers were studied in detail. Flash photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (FP-TRMC) technique shows OT-TT has significantly higher photoconductivity than OT-T and OT-BT implying that the former can outperform the latter two derivatives by a wide margin under identical conditions in a bulk-heterojunction solar cell device. However, the initial photovoltaic devices fabricated from all three oligomers (with PC71BM as the acceptor) gave power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of about 0.7%, which was counterintuitive to the TRMC observation. By using TRMC results as a guiding tool, solution engineering was carried out; no remarkable changes were seen in the PCE of OT-T and OT-BT. On the other hand, 5-fold enhancement in the device efficiency was achieved in OT-TT (PCE: 3.52%, VOC: 0.80 V, JSC: 8.74 mA cm(-2), FF: 0.50), which was in correlation with the TRMC results. The structure-property correlation and the fundamental reasons for the improvement in device performance upon solvent engineering were deduced through UV-vis absorption, atomic force microscopy, bright-field transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence quenching analysis and two-dimensional grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies.

  2. Correlated Edge Overlaps in Multiplex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, Gareth J; da Costa, Rui A; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N; Mendes, José F F

    2016-01-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local tree-likeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and non-overlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions.

  3. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  4. Hadron Correlations from Recombination and Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fries, R J

    2005-01-01

    We review the formalism of quark recombination applied to the hadronization of a quark gluon plasma. Evidence in favor of the quark recombination model is outlined. Recent work on parton correlations, leading to detectable correlations between hadrons, is discussed. Hot spots from completely quenched jets are a likely source of such correlations which appear to be jet-like. It will be discussed how such a picture compares with measurement of associated hadron yields at RHIC.

  5. Power Spectra for Galaxy Shape Correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    It has recently been argued that the observed ellipticities of galaxies may be determined at least in part by the primordial tidal gravitational field in which the galaxy formed. Long-range correlations in the tidal field could thus lead to an ellipticity-ellipticity correlation for widely separated galaxies. I present results of a calculation of the angular power spectrum of intrinsic galaxy shape correlations using a new model relating ellipticity to angular momentum. I show that for low re...

  6. Detrended cross-correlation analysis of electroencephalogram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Zhao Da-Qing

    2012-01-01

    In the paper we use detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) to study the electroencephalograms of healthy young subjects and healthy old subjects.It is found that the cross-correlation between different leads of a healthy young subject is larger than that of a healthy old subject.It was shown that the cross-correlation relationship decreases with the aging process and the phenomenon can help to diagnose whether the subject's brain function is healthy or not.

  7. Fluctuations and correlations introduction and overview

    CERN Document Server

    Kittel, E W

    2005-01-01

    Higher-order correlations have been observed as particle-density fluctuations. Approximate scaling with improving resolution provides evidence for a self-similar correlation effect. Quantum- Chromodynamics branching is a good candidate for a dynamical explanation of these correlations in e **+e**- collisions at CERN/LEP and, as expected, also of those in pp collisions at future CERN/LHC energies. However, also other sources such as identical-particle Bose-Einstein interference effects contribute.

  8. Modulated Entanglement Evolution Via Correlated Noises

    CERN Document Server

    Corn, Brittany

    2009-01-01

    We study entanglement dynamics in the presence of correlated environmental noises. Specifically, we investigate the quantum entanglement dynamics of two spins in the presence of correlated classical white noises, deriving Markov master equation and obtaining explicit solutions for several interesting classes of initial states including Bell states and X form density matrices. We show how entanglement can be enhanced or reduced by the correlation between the two participating noises.

  9. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  10. Indistinguishability and correlation in model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguna, H G; Sagar, R P, E-mail: sagar@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-05-06

    We study the influence of wavefunction symmetry on localization measures of quantum mechanical distributions for two non-interacting particles in a box, in position and in momentum spaces. A comparison between the marginal distributions and the previously studied one-particle model is performed. The correlation coefficient and mutual information are examined as measures of correlation and the differences discussed. The influence of symmetry on the correlation measures is examined in both spaces.

  11. Speckle pattern processing by digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubarev Fedor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing the method of speckle pattern processing based on the digital image correlation is carried out in the current work. Three the most widely used formulas of the correlation coefficient are tested. To determine the accuracy of the speckle pattern processing, test speckle patterns with known displacement are used. The optimal size of a speckle pattern template used for determination of correlation and corresponding the speckle pattern displacement is also considered in the work.

  12. Integral correlation measures for multiparticle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, H C; Carruthers, Peter A; Buschbeck, Brigitte

    1993-01-01

    We report on a considerable improvement in the technique of measuring multiparticle correlations via integrals over correlation functions. A modification of measures used in the characterization of chaotic dynamical sytems permits fast and flexible calculation of factorial moments and cumulants as well as their differential versions. Higher order correlation integral measurements even of large multiplicity events such as encountered in heavy ion collisons are now feasible. The change from ``ordinary'' to ``factorial'' powers may have important consequences in other fields such as the study of galaxy correlations and Bose-Einstein interferometry.

  13. Equilibrium Correlations in a Clustering Universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张航; 黄霞; 李晓卿

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the observed result of the two-point galaxy correlation function and the three-point correlation function in the Universe agrees with a quasi-equilibrium assumption of mass distribution.Utilizing the form of the three-point correlation,we find that the two-point correlation function can be obtained by solving an equation derived from maximizing entropy under some constraints in a self-gravitating particle model.A generalized non-extensive entropy is also introduced to improve our result.

  14. RECONSTRUCTING THE SHAPE OF THE CORRELATION FUNCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Galeazzi, M.; Ursino, E. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We develop an estimator for the correlation function which, in the ensemble average, returns the shape of the correlation function, even for signals that have significant correlations on the scale of the survey region. Our estimator is general and works in any number of dimensions. We develop versions of the estimator for both diffuse and discrete signals. As an application, we apply them to Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray background measurements. These include a realistic, spatially inhomogeneous population of spurious detector events. We discuss applying the estimator to the averaging of correlation functions evaluated on several small fields, and to other cosmological applications.

  15. Correlated electrons in a dissipative environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, R.

    2009-12-01

    When a system of correlated electrons is embedded in a dissipative environment, new emergent phenomena might occur due to the interplay of correlation and dissipation. Here we focus on quantum impurity systems with coupling to a bosonic bath. For the theoretical investigation we introduce the bosonic numerical renormalization group method which has been initially set up for the spin-boson model. The role of both correlations and dissipation is described in the context of two-electron transfer systems. We also discuss prospects for the investigation of lattice models of correlated electrons with coupling to a dissipative bath.

  16. Quantum Correlations in Heisenberg XY Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yin-Yan; ZHANG Yong

    2013-01-01

    Quantum correlations measured by quantum discord (QD),measurement-induced distance (MID),and geometric measure of quantum discord (GMQD) in two-qubit Heisenberg XY spin chain are investigated.The effects of DM interaction and anisotropic on the three correlations are considered.Characteristics of various correlation measures for the two-qubit states are compared.The increasing Dz increases QD,MID and GMQD monotonously while the increasing anisotropy both increases and decreases QD and GMQD.The three quantum correlations are always existent at very high temperature.MID is always larger than QD,but there is no definite ordering between QD and GMQD.

  17. Reconstructing the shape of the correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Huffenberger, K M; Ursino, E

    2012-01-01

    We develop an estimator for the angular correlation function which, in the ensemble average, returns the shape of the correlation function, even for signals that have significant correlations on the scale of the survey region. We develop versions of the estimator for both diffuse and discrete signals, and apply them to Monte Carlo simulations of the diffuse X-ray background that include spatially inhomogeneous detector background events. The estimator is applied to data from the Chandra X-ray observatory in a companion paper, Galeazzi et al. 2012. We discuss applying the estimator to the averaging of correlation functions evaluated on several small fields, and to other cosmological applications.

  18. Parallel auto-correlative statistics with VTK.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Bennett, Janine Camille

    2013-08-01

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK and presents both the serial and parallel auto-correlative statistics engines. It is a sequel to [PT08, BPRT09b, PT09, BPT09, PT10] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, principal component analysis, contingency, k-means, and order statistics engines. The ease of use of the new parallel auto-correlative statistics engine is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets and algorithm verification is provided. This report justifies the design of the statistics engines with parallel scalability in mind, and provides scalability and speed-up analysis results for the autocorrelative statistics engine.

  19. Probability of Default and Default Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a system where the asset values of firms are correlated with the default thresholds. We first evaluate the probability of default of a single firm under the correlated assets assumptions. This extends Merton’s probability of default of a single firm under the independent asset values assumption. At any time, the distance-to-default for a single firm is derived in the system, and this distance-to-default should provide a different measure for credit rating with the correlated asset values into consideration. Then we derive a closed formula for the joint default probability and a general closed formula for the default correlation via the correlated multivariate process of the first-passage-time default correlation model. Our structural model encodes the sensitivities of default correlations with respect to the underlying correlation among firms’ asset values. We propose the disparate credit risk management from our result in contrast to the commonly used risk measurement methods considering default correlations into consideration.

  20. Proton-Lambda correlations in central Pb plus Pb collisions at root s(NN)=17.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Botje, M; Karev, A; Chvala, O; Roland, G; Skrzypczak, E; Kowalski, M; Panagiotou, A D; Malakhov, A I; Prindle, D; Sikler, F; Bartke, J; Strobele, H; Vranic, D; Cetner, T; Vesztergombi, G; Makariev, M; Laszlo, A; Schmitz, N; Grebieszkow, K; Rybczynski, M; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A; Szuba, M; Beck, H; Palla, G; Bogusz, M; Peryt, W; Kresan, D; Eckardt, V; Lacey, R; Betev, L; Kolesnikov, V I; Susa, T; Gazdzicki, M; Sandoval, A; Friese, V; Mateev, M; Foka, P; Mitrovski, M; Utvic, M; Mrowczynski, S; Boimska, B; Christakoglou, P; Stock, R; Seyboth, P; Blume, C; Bialkowska, H; Rybicki, A; Barna, D; Buncic, P; Schuster, T; Vassiliou, M; Wlodarczyk, Z; Stefanek, G; Book, J; Renfordt, R; Veres, G I; Nicolic, V; Varga, D; Pluta, J; Anticic, T; Melkumov, G L; Mackowiak, M; Hohne, C; Fodor, Z; Cramer, J G; Baatar, B; Puhlhofer, F; Chung, P; Kadija, K; van Leeuwen, M

    2011-01-01

    The momentum correlation between protons and Lambda particles emitted from central Pb+Pb collisions at root s(NN) = 17.3 GeV was studied by the NA49 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. A clear enhancement is observed for small relative momenta (q(inv) < 0.2 GeV). By fitting a theoretical model, which uses the strong interaction between the proton and the Lambda in a given pair, to the measured data, a value for the effective source size is deduced. Assuming a static Gaussian source distribution, we derive an effective radius parameter of R(G) = 3.02 +/- 0.20(stat.)(-0.16)(+0.44)(syst.) fm.

  1. Single-scan scatter correction in CBCT by using projection correlation based view interpolation (PC-VI) and a stationary ring-shaped beam stop array (BSA)

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Hao; Zhang, Yanbo; Zankl, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the scatter correction for x-ray Cone Beam (CB) CT, the single-scan scheme with moving Beam Stop Array (BSA) offers reliable scatter measurement with low dose, and by using Projection Correlation based View Interpolation (PC-VI), the primary fluence shaded by the moving BSA (during scatter measurement) could be recovered with high accuracy. However, the moving BSA may increase the mechanical burden in real applications. For better practicability, in this paper we proposed a PC-VI based single-scan scheme with a ring-shaped stationary BSA, which serves as a virtual moving BSA during CB scan, so the shaded primary fluence by this stationary BSA can be also well recovered by PC-VI. The principle in designing the whole system is deduced and evaluated. The proposed scheme greatly enhances the practicability of the single-scan scatter correction scheme.

  2. Correlation between self-ignition of a dust layer on a hot surface and in baskets in an oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, A; Carson, D; Accorsi, A; Chaineaux, J; Tribouilloy, B; Morainvillers, D

    2008-11-30

    Evaluation of self-ignition hazard of bulk materials requires experimental determination of self-ignition temperatures as a function of volume. There are two standardised methods: (1) determination of the self-ignition temperature of dust samples in oven and (2) measurement of the self-ignition temperature of a dust layer deposited on a hot surface. Sometimes, the sample behaviour during these tests makes the second method difficult to apply. The self-ignition phenomena in these two tests rely on the same principles. Their results are interpreted with the help of theoretical relations. The correlation described in this paper can be considered acceptable to deduce self-ignition temperature of a dust layer, based on results of self-ignition of the same dust in heating ovens, if the Biot number (alpha) can be estimated. Uncertainty on the correlation is near 30K. This uncertainty is on the same order of magnitude as the difference in the self-ignition temperature on a hot surface for thickness between 5 and 15 mm.

  3. Interaction-powered supernovae: Rise-time vs. peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Tal, D; Sullivan, M; Gal-Yam, A; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Ben-Ami, S; Bersier, D; Cao, Y; Cenko, S B; De Cia, A; Filippenko, A V; Fransson, C; Kasliwal, M M; Laher, R; Surace, J; Quimby, R; Yaron, O

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limit...

  4. Resolving microsatellite genotype ambiguity in populations of allopolyploid and diploidized autopolyploid organisms using negative correlations between allelic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lindsay V; Schreier, Andrea Drauch

    2016-11-21

    A major limitation in the analysis of genetic marker data from polyploid organisms is non-Mendelian segregation, particularly when a single marker yields allelic signals from multiple, independently segregating loci (isoloci). However, with markers such as microsatellites that detect more than two alleles, it is sometimes possible to deduce which alleles belong to which isoloci. Here, we describe a novel mathematical property of codominant marker data when it is recoded as binary (presence/absence) allelic variables: under random mating in an infinite population, two allelic variables will be negatively correlated if they belong to the same locus, but uncorrelated if they belong to different loci. We present an algorithm to take advantage of this mathematical property, sorting alleles into isoloci based on correlations, then refining the allele assignments after checking for consistency with individual genotypes. We demonstrate the utility of our method on simulated data, as well as a real microsatellite data set from a natural population of octoploid white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Our methodology is implemented in the R package polysat version 1.6.

  5. Correlations between the anatomical traits of Gymnocladus canadensis Lam. in heartwood and sapwood of early- and latewood zones of growth rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokanović Dušan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows correlations between vessel characteristics and differences in growth-ring width in heartwood and sapwood. Analyzed samples were from an iron-wood tree (Gymnocladus canadensis Lam. that grew in the Mužljanski Rit area, of the Srpska Crnja municipality in Serbia. According to previous research, it was deduced that Gymnocladus canadensis Lam. belongs to ring-porous species with big vessel lumen in the earlywood zone and thicker cell walls in the latewood. Vessels were more numerous in the latewood zone, and the same was true for heartwood and sapwood. For both layers, sapwood possessed a few more vessels than heartwood, and a statistically significant difference was confirmed by t-test during the early phase. The greatest negative value of correlation coefficient was between the number of vessels and growth-ring width during the early phase for sapwood. The number of vessels decreased in the wider growth rings. The correlation between growth-ring width and the area of vessels had a statistically significant positive value of correlative coefficient, which means that wider growth rings had larger vessel areas in the early phase for sapwood. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 31041

  6. Dynamics of Nonclassical Correlation in Interacting Qubits under Correlated Dissipative Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Liang

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of nonclassical correlation in interacting qubits is investigated under the correlated dissipative environments for two classes of initial states.If the correlated decay rate equals the independent decay rate,there will be stationary nonclassical correlation between the qubits prepared initially in some separable states.When the correlated decay rate is different from the independent decay rate,the nonclassical correlation between the qubits eventually decays to zero for a certain class of initial states.Quantum entanglement is one of the most remarkable features of quantum mechanics and it plays a central role in quantum information and communication theory.There exists,however,nonclassical correlation,which is more general and more fundamental than entanglement in the sense that separable mixed states can have nonclassical correlation.Moreover,nonclassical correlation other than entanglement can be responsible for the quantum computational efficiency of deterministic quantum computation with one pure qubit.[1,2] Nonclassical correlation has also been used in other physical contexts,such as improving the efficiency of quantum Carnot engines,[3] quantum phase transition and Grover search processes.[4-6]In these contexts,nonclassical correlation could be a new resource for quantum computation.Quantum discord,the most popular measure of such correlations,was introduced by Olliver and Zurek.[7]%The dynamical evolution of nonclassical correlation in interacting qubits is investigated under the correlated dissipative environments for two classes of initial states. If the correlated decay rate equals the independent decay rate, there will be stationary nonclassical correlation between the qubits prepared initially in some separable states. When the correlated decay rate is different from the independent decay rate, the nonclassical correlation between the qubits eventually decays to zero for a certain class of initial states.

  7. Correlation of endothelin-1 concentration in aqueous humor with intraocular pressure in primary open angle and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choritz, Lars; Machert, Maren; Thieme, Hagen

    2012-10-23

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been found in elevated concentrations in the aqueous humor of glaucoma patients. Indirect evidence from animal studies suggests that ET-1 might directly influence intraocular pressure (IOP). The aim of this study was to determine whether ET-1 concentrations in aqueous humor of cataract and glaucoma patients correlate with IOP. Aqueous humor and blood samples from patients with either cataract (control, n = 38), primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, n = 35), or pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (PEXG, n = 21), without other ocular or systemic disease, were collected during routine cataract surgery or trabeculectomy. ET-1 concentration was determined by an ET-1 ELISA kit. IOP was measured preoperatively by standard Goldmann applanation tonometry. All statistical analysis was performed using commercial predictive analytics software. Both IOP and ET-1 concentration in aqueous humor were significantly increased in POAG (23.4 ± 6.8 mm Hg, 5.9 ± 2.9 pg/mL) and PEXG (24.3 ± 8.8 mm Hg, 7.7 ± 2.1 pg/mL) compared with control (15.0 ± 2.9 mm Hg, 4.3 ± 2.4 pg/mL). No difference was detected for plasma ET-1 concentrations. IOP and ET-1 in the aqueous humor were significantly correlated (R = 0.394, R² = 0.155, P < 0.001), although no correlation was found between IOP and ET-1 in blood plasma or between ET-1 in aqueous humor and ET-1 in plasma. In this study, a small but highly significant correlation between IOP and the ET-1 concentration in the aqueous humor was found. Although no causative relationship can be deduced from this, ocular ET-1 effects on IOP control may merit further investigation.

  8. On the Blasius correlation for friction factors

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Khanh Tuoc

    2010-01-01

    The Blasius empirical correlation for turbulent pipe friction factors is derived from first principles and extended to non-Newtonian power law fluids. Two alternative formulations are obtained that both correlate well with the experimental measurements of Dodge, Bogue and Yoo. Key words: Blasius, turbulent friction factor, power law fluids

  9. Polyakov Loop Correlations at Large N

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    I describe a study of the two-point single-eigenvalue distribution correlation function of Polyakov loops in the confined phase of four dimensional SU(N) YM theory at large N. The reasons for the interest in this correlation function are explained. Analytical and numerical results are presented. Brief conclusions are drawn.

  10. Spin-orbit correlations in the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the correlations between the quark spin and orbital angular momentum inside the nucleon. Similarly to the Ji relation, we show that these correlations can be expressed in terms of specific moments of measurable parton distributions. This provides a whole new piece of information about the partonic structure of the nucleon.

  11. Scaled density functional theory correlation functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouri, Mohammed M; Singh, Saurabh; Ramachandran, B

    2007-10-18

    We show that a simple one-parameter scaling of the dynamical correlation energy estimated by the density functional theory (DFT) correlation functionals helps increase the overall accuracy for several local and nonlocal functionals. The approach taken here has been described as the "scaled dynamical correlation" (SDC) method [Ramachandran, J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 396], and its justification is the same as that of the scaled external correlation (SEC) method of Brown and Truhlar. We examine five local and five nonlocal (hybrid) DFT functionals, the latter group including three functionals developed specifically for kinetics by the Truhlar group. The optimum scale factors are obtained by use of a set of 98 data values consisting of molecules, ions, and transition states. The optimum scale factors, found with a linear regression relationship, are found to differ from unity with a high degree of correlation in nearly every case, indicating that the deviation of calculated results from the experimental values are systematic and proportional to the dynamic correlation energy. As a consequence, the SDC scaling of dynamical correlation decreases the mean errors (signed and unsigned) by significant amounts in an overwhelming majority of cases. These results indicate that there are gains to be realized from further parametrization of several popular exchange-correlation functionals.

  12. Accurate structural correlations from maximum likelihood superpositions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L Theobald

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The cores of globular proteins are densely packed, resulting in complicated networks of structural interactions. These interactions in turn give rise to dynamic structural correlations over a wide range of time scales. Accurate analysis of these complex correlations is crucial for understanding biomolecular mechanisms and for relating structure to function. Here we report a highly accurate technique for inferring the major modes of structural correlation in macromolecules using likelihood-based statistical analysis of sets of structures. This method is generally applicable to any ensemble of related molecules, including families of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR models, different crystal forms of a protein, and structural alignments of homologous proteins, as well as molecular dynamics trajectories. Dominant modes of structural correlation are determined using principal components analysis (PCA of the maximum likelihood estimate of the correlation matrix. The correlations we identify are inherently independent of the statistical uncertainty and dynamic heterogeneity associated with the structural coordinates. We additionally present an easily interpretable method ("PCA plots" for displaying these positional correlations by color-coding them onto a macromolecular structure. Maximum likelihood PCA of structural superpositions, and the structural PCA plots that illustrate the results, will facilitate the accurate determination of dynamic structural correlations analyzed in diverse fields of structural biology.

  13. Alternatives to Pearson's and Spearman's Correlation Coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2008-01-01

    This article presents several alternatives to Pearson's correlation coefficient and many examples. In the samples where the rank in a discrete variable counts more than the variable values, the mixtures that we propose of Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients give better results.

  14. On the insignificance of Herschel's sunspot correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine William Herschel's hypothesis that solar-cycle variation of the Sun's irradiance has a modulating effect on the Earth's climate and that this is, specifically, manifested as an anticorrelation between sunspot number and the market price of wheat. Since Herschel first proposed his hypothesis in 1801, it has been regarded with both interest and skepticism. Recently, reports have been published that either support Herschel's hypothesis or rely on its validity. As a test of Herschel's hypothesis, we seek to reject a null hypothesis of a statistically random correlation between historical sunspot numbers, wheat prices in London and the United States, and wheat farm yields in the United States. We employ binary-correlation, Pearson-correlation, and frequency-domain methods. We test our methods using a historical geomagnetic activity index, well known to be causally correlated with sunspot number. As expected, the measured correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity would be an unlikely realization of random data; the correlation is “statistically significant.” On the other hand, measured correlations between sunspot number and wheat price and wheat yield data would be very likely realizations of random data; these correlations are “insignificant.” Therefore, Herschel's hypothesis must be regarded with skepticism. We compare and contrast our results with those of other researchers. We discuss procedures for evaluating hypotheses that are formulated from historical data.

  15. Correlation Evaluation on Small LTE Handsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of the first MIMO handset on the market. It investigates the correlation coefficient computed from coaxial cable measurements and from optical fiber measurements. The results are compared and discussed. The question of the actual feasibility of low correlation...

  16. Cosmological 3-point correlators from holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McFadden, P.; Skenderis, K.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the non-Gaussianity of primordial cosmological perturbations using holographic methods. In particular, we derive holographic formulae that relate all cosmological 3-point correlation functions, including both scalar and tensor perturbations, to stress-energy correlation functions of a

  17. Current correlators for general gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooguri, Hirosi [California Institute of Technology, 452-48 Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Ookouchi, Yutaka [California Institute of Technology, 452-48 Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)], E-mail: yutaka@caltech.edu; Park, Chang-Soon; Song, Jaewon [California Institute of Technology, 452-48 Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-02-11

    In the gauge mediation mechanism, the effects of the hidden sector are characterized by a set of correlation functions of the global symmetry current of the hidden sector. We present methods to compute these correlators in cases with strongly coupled hidden sectors. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the technique explicitly.

  18. Optical correlation recognition based on LCOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingchuan; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-08-01

    Vander-Lugt correlator[1] plays an important role in optical pattern recognition due to the characteristics of accurate positioning and high signal-to-noise ratio. The ideal Vander-Lugt correlator should have the ability of outputting strong and sharp correlation peak in allusion to the true target, in the existing Spatial Light Modulators[2], Liquid Crystal On Silicon(LCOS) has been the most competitive candidate for the matched filter owing to the continuous phase modulation peculiarity. Allowing for the distortions of the target to be identified including rotations, scaling changes, perspective changes, which can severely impact the correlation recognition results, herein, we present a modified Vander-Lugt correlator based on the LCOS by means of applying an iterative algorithm to the design of the filter so that the correlator can invariant to the distortions while maintaining good performance. The results of numerical simulation demonstrate that the filter could get the similar recognition results for all the training images. And the experiment shows that the modified correlator achieves the 180° rotating tolerance significantly improving the recognition efficiency of the correlator.

  19. Sedimentary porphyrins: Correlations with biological precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callot, H.J.; Ocampo, R.; Albrecht, P. (Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France))

    Over the past 6 years several sedimentary porphyrins (petroporphyrins, geoporphyrins) were correlated for the first time with biological precursors specific for classes of organisms (algae, photosynthetic bacteria (Chlorobiaceae)). This article discusses the various examples of correlations and the methods that led to these conclusions (isolation of pure porphyrins, structure determination using spectroscopic techniques, total synthesis, isotope measurements).

  20. The Correlations between Language, Culture and Thought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹忠凯

    2015-01-01

    With the purpose of having a better understanding,this article discusses the correlations between language, culture and thought as well their interactions. They not only correlate but also are different social phenomena. They are dependent and mutu⁃ally influenced with Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis as its main points.