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Sample records for correcting neutron self-shielding

  1. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample

  2. A simple method for correcting the neutron self-shielding effect of matrix and improving the analytical response in prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    Sudarshan, K.; Tripathi, R.; Nair, A.G.C.; Acharya, R.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Goswami, A.

    2005-01-01

    A simple method using an internal standard is proposed to correct for the self-shielding effect of B, Cd and Gd in a matrix. This would increase the linear dynamic range of PGNAA in analyzing samples containing these elements. The method is validated by analyzing synthetic samples containing large amounts of B, Cd, Hg and Gd, the elements having high neutron absorption cross-section, in aqueous solutions and solid forms. A simple Monte-Carlo simulation to find the extent of self-shielding in the matrix is presented. The method is applied to the analysis of titanium boride alloy containing large amount of boron. The satisfactory results obtained showed the efficacy of the method of correcting for the self-shielding effects in the sample

  3. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    Nasrabadi, M.N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required

  4. Neutron self-shielding with k0-NAA irradiations

    Chilian, C.; Chambon, R.; Kennedy, G.

    2010-01-01

    A sample of SMELS Type II reference material was mixed with powdered Cd-nitrate neutron absorber and analysed by k 0 NAA for 10 elements. The thermal neutron self-shielding effect was found to be 34.8%. When flux monitors were irradiated sufficiently far from the absorbing sample, it was found that the self-shielding could be corrected accurately using an analytical formula and an iterative calculation. When the flux monitors were irradiated 2 mm from the absorbing sample, the calculations over-corrected the concentrations by as much as 30%. It is recommended to irradiate flux monitors at least 14 mm from a 10 mm diameter absorbing sample.

  5. Self-shielding for thick slabs in a converging neutron beam

    Mildner, D F R

    1999-01-01

    We have previously given a correction to the neutron self-shielding for a thin slab to account for the increased average path length through the slab when irradiated in a converging neutron beam. This expression overstates the case for the self-shielding for a thick (or highly absorbing) slab. We give a better approximation to the increase in effective shielding correction for a slab placed in a converging neutron beam. It is negligible at large absorption mean free paths. (author)

  6. Insufficient self-shielding correction in VITAMIN-B6

    Konno, Chikara; Ochiai, Kentaro; Ohnishi, Seiki

    2011-01-01

    We carried out a simple benchmark calculation test with a multigroup cross-section library VITAMIN-B6 generated from ENDF/B-VI. The model of this test consisted of an iron sphere of 1 m in radius with an isotropic 20 MeV neutron source in the center. Neutron spectra in the sphere were calculated with an Sn code ANISN and VITAMIN-B6 or FENDL/MG-1.1. A calculation with MCNP and ENDF/B-VI was carried out as a reference. The neutron spectra with ANISN and FENDL/MG-1.1 agreed with those with MCNP, while those with ANISN and VITAMIN-B6 were at most 50% different from those with MCNP. We uncovered that the discrepancy came from insufficient self-shielding correction due to the followings; 1) The smallest background cross section of 56 Fe in VITAMIN-B6 is 1. 2) The weighting flux used in generating VITAMIN-B6 is not adequate. VITAMIN-B6 should be revised for adequate self-shielding correction. (author)

  7. Development and testing of multigroup library with correction of self-shielding effects in fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    Zou Jun; He Zhaozhong; Zeng Qin; Qiu Yuefeng; Wang Minghuang

    2010-01-01

    A multigroup library HENDL2.1/SS (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library/Self-Shielding) based on ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluate data has been generated using Bondarenko and flux calculator method for the correction of self-shielding effect of neutronics analyses. To validate the reliability of the multigroup library HENDL2.1/SS, transport calculations for fusion-fission hybrid system FDS-I were performed in this paper. It was verified that the calculations with the HENDL2.1/SS gave almost the same results with MCNP calculations and were better than calculations with the HENDL2.0/MG which is another multigroup library without self-shielding correction. The test results also showed that neglecting resonance self-shielding caused underestimation of the K eff , neutron fluxes and waste transmutation ratios in the multigroup calculations of FDS-I.

  8. The problem of resonance self-shielding effect in neutron multigroup calculations

    Wang Qingming; Huang Jinghua

    1991-01-01

    It is not allowed to neglect the resonance self-shielding effect in hybrid blanket and fast reactor neutron designs. The authors discussed the importance as well as the method of considering the resonance self-shielding effect in hybrid blanket and fast reactor neutron multigroup calculations

  9. An ''exact'' treatment of self-shielding and covers in neutron spectra determinations

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Most neutron spectrum determination methodologies ignore self-shielding effects in dosimetry foils and treat covers with an exponential attenuation model. This work provides a quantitative analysis of the approximations in this approach. It also provides a methodology for improving the fidelity of the treatment of the dosimetry sensor response to a level consistent with the user's spectrum characterization approach. A library of correction functions for the energy-dependent sensor response has been compiled that addresses dosimetry foils/configurations in use at the Sandia National Laboratories Radiation Metrology Laboratory

  10. Gamma self-shielding correction factors calculation for aqueous bulk sample analysis by PGNAA technique

    Nasrabadi, M.N.; Mohammadi, A.; Jalali, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) was applied to aqueous sample analysis using a relative method. For elemental analysis of an unknown bulk sample, gamma self-shielding coefficient was required. Gamma self-shielding coefficient of unknown samples was estimated by an experimental method and also by MCNP code calculation. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the gamma self-shielding within the sample volume is required.

  11. Resonance self-shielding effect analysis of neutron data libraries applied for the dual-cooled waste transmutation blanket of the fusion-driven subcritical system

    Liu Haibo; Wu Yican; Zheng Shanliang; Zhang Chunzao

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Fusion-Driven Subcritical System (FDS-I), the 25 groups, 175 groups and 620 groups neutron nuclear data libraries with/without resonance self-shielding correction are made with the Njoy and Transx codes, and the K eff and reaction rates are calculated with the Anisn code. The conclusion indicates that the resonance self-shielding effect affects the reaction rates strongly. (authors)

  12. Enhancement of thermal neutron self-shielding in materials surrounded by reflectors

    Cornelia Chilian; Gregory Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Materials containing from 41 to 1124 mg chlorine and surrounded by polyethylene containers of various thicknesses, from 0.01 to 5.6 mm, were irradiated in a research reactor neutron spectrum and the 38 Cl activity produced was measured as a function of polyethylene reflector thickness. For the material containing the higher amount of chlorine, the 38 Cl specific activity decreased with increasing reflector thickness, indicating increased neutron self-shielding. It was found that the amount of neutron self-shielding increased by as much as 52% with increasing reflector thickness. This is explained by neutrons which have exited the material subsequently reflecting back into it and thus increasing the total mean path length in the material. All physical and empirical models currently used to predict neutron self-shielding have ignored this effect and need to be modified. A method is given for measuring the adjustable parameter of a self-shielding model for a particular sample size and combination of neutron reflectors. (author)

  13. Self-shielding coefficient and thermal flux depression factor of voluminous sample in neutron activation analysis

    Noorddin Ibrahim; Rosnie Akang

    2009-01-01

    Full text: One of the major problems encountered during the irradiation of large inhomogeneous samples in performing activation analysis using neutron is the perturbation of the neutron field due to absorption and scattering of neutron within the sample as well as along the neutron guide in the case of prompt gamma activation analysis. The magnitude of this perturbation shown by self-shielding coefficient and flux depression depend on several factors including the average neutron energy, the size and shape of the sample, as well as the macroscopic absorption cross section of the sample. In this study, we use Monte Carlo N-Particle codes to simulate the variation of neutron self-shielding coefficient and thermal flux depression factor as a function of the macroscopic thermal absorption cross section. The simulation works was carried out using the high performance computing facility available at UTM while the experimental work was performed at the tangential beam port of Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI, Malaysia Nuclear Agency. The neutron flux measured along the beam port is found to be in good agreement with the simulated data. Our simulation results also reveal that total flux perturbation factor decreases as the value of absorption increases. This factor is close to unity for low absorbing sample and tends towards zero for strong absorber. In addition, sample with long mean chord length produces smaller flux perturbation than the shorter mean chord length. When comparing both the graphs of self-shielding factor and total disturbance, we can conclude that the total disturbance of the thermal neutron flux on the large samples is dominated by the self-shielding effect. (Author)

  14. Calculation of self-shielding coefficients, flux depression and cadmium factor for thermal neutron flux measurement of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    Marques, Andre Luis Ferreira; Ting, Daniel Kao Sun; Mendonca, Arlindo Gilson

    1996-01-01

    A calculation methodology of Flux Depression, Self-Shielding and Cadmium Factors is presented, using the ANISN code, for experiments conducted at the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor. The correction factors were determined considering thermal neutron flux and 0.125 e 0.250 mm diameter of 197 Au wires. (author)

  15. Resonance self-shielding effect in uncertainty quantification of fission reactor neutronics parameters

    Chiba, Go; Tsuji, Masashi; Narabayashi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    In order to properly quantify fission reactor neutronics parameter uncertainties, we have to use covariance data and sensitivity profiles consistently. In the present paper, we establish two consistent methodologies for uncertainty quantification: a self-shielded cross section-based consistent methodology and an infinitely-diluted cross section-based consistent methodology. With these methodologies and the covariance data of uranium-238 nuclear data given in JENDL-3.3, we quantify uncertainties of infinite neutron multiplication factors of light water reactor and fast reactor fuel cells. While an inconsistent methodology gives results which depend on the energy group structure of neutron flux and neutron-nuclide reaction cross section representation, both the consistent methodologies give fair results with no such dependences.

  16. RESONANCE SELF-SHIELDING EFFECT IN UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION OF FISSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS PARAMETERS

    GO CHIBA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to properly quantify fission reactor neutronics parameter uncertainties, we have to use covariance data and sensitivity profiles consistently. In the present paper, we establish two consistent methodologies for uncertainty quantification: a self-shielded cross section-based consistent methodology and an infinitely-diluted cross section-based consistent methodology. With these methodologies and the covariance data of uranium-238 nuclear data given in JENDL-3.3, we quantify uncertainties of infinite neutron multiplication factors of light water reactor and fast reactor fuel cells. While an inconsistent methodology gives results which depend on the energy group structure of neutron flux and neutron-nuclide reaction cross section representation, both the consistent methodologies give fair results with no such dependences.

  17. Measurement of the thermal neutron self shielding coefficient in the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor inner irradiation site using the dy soils

    Khattab, K.; Khamis, I.

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of the thermal self shielding coefficient ( Gth ) in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) inner irradiation site using Dy foils is presented in this paper. The thermal self shielding coefficient is measured as a function of the foil thickness or numbers. The mathematical equation which calculates the average relative radioactivity (Bq/g) versus the foil number is found as well.

  18. Self-shielding and burn-out effects in the irradiation of strongly-neutron-absorbing material

    Sekine, T.; Baba, H.

    1978-01-01

    Self-shielding and burn-out effects are discussed in the evaluation of radioisotopes formed by neutron irradiation of a strongly-neutron-absorbing material. A method of the evaluation of such effects is developed both for thermal and epithermal neutrons. Gadolinium oxide uniformly mixed with graphite powder was irradiated by reactor-neutrons together with pieces of a Co-Al alloy wire (the content of Co being 0.475%) as the neutron flux monitor. The configuration of the samples and flux monitors in each of two irradiations is illustrated. The yields of activities produced in the irradiated samples were determined by the γ-spectrometry with a Ge(Li) detector of a relative detection efficiency of 8%. Activities at the end of irradiation were estimated by corrections due to pile-up, self-absorption, detection efficiency, branching ratio, and decay of the activity. Results of the calculation are discussed in comparison with the observed yields of 153 Gd, 160 Tb, and 161 Tb for the case of neutron irradiation of disc-shaped targets of gadolinium oxide. (T.G.)

  19. Resonance self-shielding methodology of new neutron transport code STREAM

    Choi, Sooyoung; Lee, Hyunsuk; Lee, Deokjung; Hong, Ser Gi

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and verification of three new resonance self-shielding methods. The verifications were performed using the new neutron transport code, STREAM. The new methodologies encompass the extension of energy range for resonance treatment, the development of optimum rational approximation, and the application of resonance treatment to isotopes in the cladding region. (1) The extended resonance energy range treatment has been developed to treat the resonances below 4 eV of three resonance isotopes and shows significant improvements in the accuracy of effective cross sections (XSs) in that energy range. (2) The optimum rational approximation can eliminate the geometric limitations of the conventional approach of equivalence theory and can also improve the accuracy of fuel escape probability. (3) The cladding resonance treatment method makes it possible to treat resonances in cladding material which have not been treated explicitly in the conventional methods. These three new methods have been implemented in the new lattice physics code STREAM and the improvement in the accuracy of effective XSs is demonstrated through detailed verification calculations. (author)

  20. A Wavelet-Based Finite Element Method for the Self-Shielding Issue in Neutron Transport

    Le Tellier, R.; Fournier, D.; Ruggieri, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach for treating the energy variable of the neutron transport equation in the resolved resonance energy range. The aim is to avoid recourse to a case-specific spatially dependent self-shielding calculation when considering a broad group structure. This method consists of a discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the energy using wavelet-based elements. A Σ t -orthogonalization of the element basis is presented in order to make the approach tractable for spatially dependent problems. First numerical tests of this method are carried out in a limited framework under the Livolant-Jeanpierre hypotheses in an infinite homogeneous medium. They are mainly focused on the way to construct the wavelet-based element basis. Indeed, the prior selection of these wavelet functions by a thresholding strategy applied to the discrete wavelet transform of a given quantity is a key issue for the convergence rate of the method. The Canuto thresholding approach applied to an approximate flux is found to yield a nearly optimal convergence in many cases. In these tests, the capability of such a finite element discretization to represent the flux depression in a resonant region is demonstrated; a relative accuracy of 10 -3 on the flux (in L 2 -norm) is reached with less than 100 wavelet coefficients per group. (authors)

  1. Self-shielding factors for TLD-600 and TLD-100 in an isotropic flux of thermal neutrons

    Horowitz, Y.S.; Dubi, A.; Ben Shahar, B.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters in mixed n-γ environments, and the dependence of LiF-TL on linear energy transfer are both topics of current interest. Monte Carlo calculations have therefore been carried out to determine the thermal neutron absorption probability (and consequently the self-shielding factor) for an isotropic flux of neutrons impinging on different sized cylindrical samples of LiF TLD-100 and TLD-600. The calculations were performed for cylinders of radius up to 10 cm and heights of 0.1 to 1.5 cm. The Monte Carlo results were found to be significantly different from the analytic calculations for infinitely long cylinders, but, as expected, converged to the same value for (r/h) << 1. (U.K.)

  2. Measurements and Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle self-shielding effect of B4C grains in neutron shielding concrete

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Kazi, S.; Bentley, P. M.

    2018-06-01

    A combined measurement and Monte-Carlo simulation study was carried out in order to characterize the particle self-shielding effect of B4C grains in neutron shielding concrete. Several batches of a specialized neutron shielding concrete, with varying B4C grain sizes, were exposed to a 2 Å neutron beam at the R2D2 test beamline at the Institute for Energy Technology located in Kjeller, Norway. The direct and scattered neutrons were detected with a neutron detector placed behind the concrete blocks and the results were compared to Geant4 simulations. The particle self-shielding effect was included in the Geant4 simulations by calculating effective neutron cross-sections during the Monte-Carlo simulation process. It is shown that this method well reproduces the measured results. Our results show that shielding calculations for low-energy neutrons using such materials would lead to an underestimate of the shielding required for a certain design scenario if the particle self-shielding effect is not included in the calculations.

  3. Self-shielding factors

    Kaul, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Throughout the last two decades many efforts have been made to estimate the effect of body self-shielding on organ doses from externally incident neutrons and gamma rays. These began with the use of simple geometry phantoms and have culminated in the use of detailed anthropomorphic phantoms. In a recent effort, adjoint Monte Carlo analysis techniques have been used to determine dose and dose equivalent to the active marrow as a function of energy and angle of neutron fluence externally incident on an anthropomorphic phantom. When combined with fluences from actual nuclear devices, these dose-to-fluence factors result in marrow dose values that demonstrate great sensitivity to variations in device type, range, and body orientation. Under a state-of-the-art radiation transport analysis demonstration program for the Japanese cities, sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency at the request of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the marrow dose study referred to above is being repeated to obtain spectral distributions within the marrow for externally incident neutrons and gamma rays of arbitrary energy and angle. This is intended to allow radiobiologists and epidemiologists to select and to modify numbers of merit for correlation with health effects and to permit a greater understanding of the relationship between human and laboratory subject dosimetry

  4. Self-shielding models of MICROX-2 code: Review and updates

    Hou, J.; Choi, H.; Ivanov, K.N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The MICROX-2 code has been improved to expand its application to advanced reactors. • New fine-group cross section libraries based on ENDF/B-VII have been generated. • Resonance self-shielding and spatial self-shielding models have been improved. • The improvements were assessed by a series of benchmark calculations against MCNPX. - Abstract: The MICROX-2 is a transport theory code that solves for the neutron slowing-down and thermalization equations of a two-region lattice cell. The MICROX-2 code has been updated to expand its application to advanced reactor concepts and fuel cycle simulations, including generation of new fine-group cross section libraries based on ENDF/B-VII. In continuation of previous work, the MICROX-2 methods are reviewed and updated in this study, focusing on its resonance self-shielding and spatial self-shielding models for neutron spectrum calculations. The improvement of self-shielding method was assessed by a series of benchmark calculations against the Monte Carlo code, using homogeneous and heterogeneous pin cell models. The results have shown that the implementation of the updated self-shielding models is correct and the accuracy of physics calculation is improved. Compared to the existing models, the updates reduced the prediction error of the infinite multiplication factor by ∼0.1% and ∼0.2% for the homogeneous and heterogeneous pin cell models, respectively, considered in this study

  5. Program GROUPIE (version 79-1): calculation of Bondarenko self-shielded neutron cross sections and multiband parameters from data in the ENDF/B format

    Cullen, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    Program GROUPIE reads evaluated data in the ENDF/B format and uses these data to calculate Bondarenko self-shielded cross sections and multiband parameters. To give as much generality as possible, the program allows the user to specify arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy-dependent neutron spectrum (weighing function). To guarantee the accuracy of the results, all integrals are performed analytically; in no case is iteration or any approximate form of integration used. The output from this program includes both listings and multiband parameters suitable for use either in a normal multigroup transport calculation or in a multiband transport calculation. A listing of the source deck is available on request

  6. URR [Unresolved Resonance Region] computer code: A code to calculate resonance neutron cross-section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and self-indication ratios for fissile and fertile nuclides

    Leal, L.C.; de Saussure, G.; Perez, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The URR computer code has been developed to calculate cross-section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and self-indication ratios for fertile and fissile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region. Monte Carlo methods are utilized to select appropriate resonance parameters and to compute the cross sections at the desired reference energy. The neutron cross sections are calculated by the single-level Breit-Wigner formalism with s-, p-, and d-wave contributions. The cross-section probability tables are constructed by sampling by Doppler broadened cross-sections. The various self-shielding factors are computer numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross-section probability tables

  7. Validation of a new 39 neutron group self-shielded library based on the nucleonics analysis of the Lotus fusion-fission hybrid test facility performed with the Monte Carlo code

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.

    1985-02-01

    The Swiss LOTUS fusion-fission hybrid test facility was used to investigate the influence of the self-shielding of resonance cross sections on the tritium breeding and on the thorium ratios. Nucleonic analyses were performed using the discrete-ordinates transport codes ANISN and ONEDANT, the surface-flux code SURCU, and the version 3 of the MCNP code for the Li 2 CO 3 and the Li 2 O blanket designs with lead, thorium and beryllium multipliers. Except for the MCNP calculation which bases on the ENDF/B-V files, all nuclear data are generated from the ENDF/B-IV basic library. For the deterministic methods three NJOY group libraries were considered. The first, a 39 neutron group self-shielded library, was generated at EIR. The second bases on the same group structure as the first does and consists of infinitely diluted cross sections. Finally the third library was processed at LANL and consists of coupled 30+12 neutron and gamma groups; these cross sections are not self-shielded. The Monte Carlo analysis bases on a continuous and on a discrete 262 group library from the ENDF/B-V evaluation. It is shown that the results agree well within 3% between the unshielded libraries and between the different transport codes and theories. The self-shielding of resonance cross sections results in a decrease of the thorium capture rate and in an increase of the tritium breeding of about 6%. The remaining computed ratios are not affected by the self-shielding of cross sections. (Auth.)

  8. Theoretical evaluation of self-shielding factors due to scattering resonances in foils

    Selander, W.N.

    1960-06-01

    A semi-analytical method is given for evaluating self-shielding factors for activation measurements which use thin foils having neutron scattering resonances. The energy loss by scattering in the foil is taken into account. The energy-dependent neutron angular distribution is expanded as a double series, the coefficients of which are (energy dependent) solutions of an infinite set of coupled integral equations. These are truncated in some suitable manner and solved numerically. The leading term of the series is proportional to the average, or effective flux in the activation sample. The product of this terra and the neutron capture cross-section is integrated numerically over the resonance to give the resonance self-shielding correction. Figure 4 shows resonance self-shielding factors derived in this mariner for the 132ev resonance in Co-59 and figure 5 shows similar results for the two Mn-55 resonances at 337ev and 1080ev. Self-shielding factors for 1/v capture are not significantly different from unity. (author)

  9. Validation of calculated self-shielding factors for Rh foils

    Jaćimović, R.; Trkov, A.; Žerovnik, G.; Snoj, L.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2010-10-01

    Rhodium foils of about 5 mm diameter were obtained from IRMM. One foil had thickness of 0.006 mm and three were 0.112 mm thick. They were irradiated in the pneumatic transfer system and in the carousel facility of the TRIGA reactor at the Jožef Stefan Institute. The foils were irradiated bare and enclosed in small cadmium boxes (about 2 g weight) of 1 mm thickness to minimise the perturbation of the local neutron flux. They were co-irradiated with 5 mm diameter and 0.2 mm thick Al-Au (0.1%) alloy monitor foils. The resonance self-shielding corrections for the 0.006 and 0.112 mm thick samples were calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation and amount to about 10% and 60%, respectively. The consistency of measurements confirmed the validity of self-shielding factors. Trial estimates of Q0 and k0 factors for the 555.8 keV gamma line of 104Rh were made and amount to 6.65±0.18 and (6.61±0.12)×10 -2, respectively.

  10. Resonance Self-Shielding Methodologies in SCALE 6

    Williams, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    SCALE 6 includes several problem-independent multigroup (MG) libraries that were processed from the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B using a generic flux spectrum. The library data must be self-shielded and corrected for problem-specific spectral effects for use in MG neutron transport calculations. SCALE 6 computes problem-dependent MG cross sections through a combination of the conventional Bondarenko shielding-factor method and a deterministic continuous-energy (CE) calculation of the fine-structure spectra in the resolved resonance and thermal energy ranges. The CE calculation can be performed using an infinite medium approximation, a simplified two-region method for lattices, or a one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculation with pointwise (PW) cross-section data. This paper describes the SCALE-resonance self-shielding methodologies, including the deterministic calculation of the CE flux spectra using PW nuclear data and the method for using CE spectra to produce problem-specific MG cross sections for various configurations (including doubly heterogeneous lattices). It also presents results of verification and validation studies.

  11. URR [Unresolved Resonance Region] computer code: A code to calculate resonance neutron cross-section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and self-indication ratios for fissile and fertile nuclides

    Leal, L.C.; de Saussure, G.; Perez, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The URR computer code has been developed to calculate cross-section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors, and self- indication ratios for fertile and fissile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region. Monte Carlo methods are utilized to select appropriate resonance parameters and to compute the cross sections at the desired reference energy. The neutron cross sections are calculated by the single-level Breit-Wigner formalism with s-, p-, and d-wave contributions. The cross-section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler broadened cross-section. The various shelf-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross-section probability tables. 6 refs

  12. Determination of self shielding factors and gamma attenuation effects for tree ring samples

    Dagistan Sahin; Kenan Uenlue

    2012-01-01

    Determination of tree ring chemistry using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is part of an ongoing research between Penn State University (PSU) and Cornell University, The Malcolm and Carolyn Wiener Laboratory for Aegean and Near Eastern Dendrochronology. Tree-ring chemistry yields valuable data for environmental event signatures. These signatures are a complex function of elemental concentration. To be certain about concentration of signature elements, it is necessary to perform the measurements and corrections with the lowest error and maximum accuracy possible. Accurate and precise values of energy dependent neutron flux at dry irradiation tubes and detector efficiency for tree ring sample are calculated for Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). For the calculation of energy dependent and self shielding corrected neutron flux, detailed model of the TRIGA Mark III reactor at PSU with updated fuel compositions was prepared using the MCNP utility for reactor evolution (MURE) libraries. Dry irradiation tube, sample holder and sample were also included in the model. The thermal flux self-shielding correction factors due to the sample holder and sample for were calculated and verified with previously published values. The Geant-4 model of the gamma spectroscopy system, developed at Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC), was improved and absolute detector efficiency for tree-ring samples was calculated. (author)

  13. Self shielding in cylindrical fissile sources in the APNea system

    Hensley, D.

    1997-01-01

    In order for a source of fissile material to be useful as a calibration instrument, it is necessary to know not only how much fissile material is in the source but also what the effective fissile content is. Because uranium and plutonium absorb thermal neutrons so Efficiently, material in the center of a sample is shielded from the external thermal flux by the surface layers of the material. Differential dieaway measurements in the APNea System of five different sets of cylindrical fissile sources show the various self shielding effects that are routinely encountered. A method for calculating the self shielding effect is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental results

  14. A new formulation for resonance self-shielding factors

    Palma, Daniel A.P.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: aquilino@lmp.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    The activation technique allows either absolute or relative very precise neutron intensity measurements. This technique requires the knowledge of the Doppler broadening function to determine resonance self-shielding factors. In the present work a new formulation is proposed for the self-shielding factors where the Doppler broadening function is calculated using the Frobenius's method and compared to the values obtained from the four-pole Pade method. This calculation method is shown to be effective from the point of view of accuracy. (author)

  15. A new formulation for resonance self-shielding factors

    Palma, Daniel A.P.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da

    2007-01-01

    The activation technique allows either absolute or relative very precise neutron intensity measurements. This technique requires the knowledge of the Doppler broadening function to determine resonance self-shielding factors. In the present work a new formulation is proposed for the self-shielding factors where the Doppler broadening function is calculated using the Frobenius's method and compared to the values obtained from the four-pole Pade method. This calculation method is shown to be effective from the point of view of accuracy. (author)

  16. Adaptive algorithms for a self-shielding wavelet-based Galerkin method

    Fournier, D.; Le Tellier, R.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of the energy variable in deterministic neutron transport methods is based on a multigroup discretization, considering the flux and cross-sections to be constant within a group. In this case, a self-shielding calculation is mandatory to correct sections of resonant isotopes. In this paper, a different approach based on a finite element discretization on a wavelet basis is used. We propose adaptive algorithms constructed from error estimates. Such an approach is applied to within-group scattering source iterations. A first implementation is presented in the special case of the fine structure equation for an infinite homogeneous medium. Extension to spatially-dependent cases is discussed. (authors)

  17. Neutron borehole logging correction technique

    Goldman, L.H.

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a method and apparatus is disclosed for logging earth formations traversed by a borehole in which an earth formation is irradiated with neutrons and gamma radiation produced thereby in the formation and in the borehole is detected. A sleeve or shield for capturing neutrons from the borehole and producing gamma radiation characteristic of that capture is provided to give an indication of the contribution of borehole capture events to the total detected gamma radiation. It is then possible to correct from those borehole effects the total detected gamma radiation and any earth formation parameters determined therefrom

  18. Uncertainty Analysis with Considering Resonance Self-shielding Effect

    Han, Tae Young

    2016-01-01

    If infinitely diluted multi-group cross sections were used for the sensitivity, the covariance data from the evaluated nuclear data library (ENDL) was directly applied. However, in case of using a self-shielded multi-group cross section, the covariance data should be corrected considering self-shielding effect. Usually, implicit uncertainty can be defined as the uncertainty change by the resonance self-shielding effect as described above. MUSAD ( Modules of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for DeCART ) has been developed for a multiplication factor and cross section uncertainty based on the generalized perturbation theory and it, however, can only quantify the explicit uncertainty by the self-shielded multi-group cross sections without considering the implicit effect. Thus, this paper addresses the implementation of the implicit uncertainty analysis module into the code and the numerical results for the verification are provided. The implicit uncertainty analysis module has been implemented into MUSAD based on infinitely-diluted cross section-based consistent method. The verification calculation was performed on MHTGR 350 Ex.I-1a and the differences with McCARD result decrease from 40% to 1% in CZP case and 3% in HFP case. From this study, it is expected that MUSAD code can reasonably produce the complete uncertainty on VHTR or LWR where the resonance self-shielding effect should be significantly considered

  19. Uncertainty Analysis with Considering Resonance Self-shielding Effect

    Han, Tae Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    If infinitely diluted multi-group cross sections were used for the sensitivity, the covariance data from the evaluated nuclear data library (ENDL) was directly applied. However, in case of using a self-shielded multi-group cross section, the covariance data should be corrected considering self-shielding effect. Usually, implicit uncertainty can be defined as the uncertainty change by the resonance self-shielding effect as described above. MUSAD ( Modules of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for DeCART ) has been developed for a multiplication factor and cross section uncertainty based on the generalized perturbation theory and it, however, can only quantify the explicit uncertainty by the self-shielded multi-group cross sections without considering the implicit effect. Thus, this paper addresses the implementation of the implicit uncertainty analysis module into the code and the numerical results for the verification are provided. The implicit uncertainty analysis module has been implemented into MUSAD based on infinitely-diluted cross section-based consistent method. The verification calculation was performed on MHTGR 350 Ex.I-1a and the differences with McCARD result decrease from 40% to 1% in CZP case and 3% in HFP case. From this study, it is expected that MUSAD code can reasonably produce the complete uncertainty on VHTR or LWR where the resonance self-shielding effect should be significantly considered.

  20. Correction Factor Analysis Of Foil Activation And The Effect Of Neglecting The Correction On Neutron Flux And Spectrum Measurement; ANALISIS FAKTOR KOREKSI KEPING AKTIVASI DAN PENGARUH PENGABAIANNYA PADA PENGUKURAN FLUKS DAN SPEKTRUM NEUTRON

    Radiyanti, Ita Budi; Hamzah, Amir; Pinem, Surian [Multipurpose Reactor Centre Indonesia, Serpong, (Indonesia)

    1996-04-15

    Foil activation method is commonly used in flux and neutron spectrum measurement in nuclear reactor and other research. The effect of the thickness, type of foil material and neutron spectrum shape on the self shielding correction and activities correction on the edges of the foil have been analyzed. Also the effect of neglecting those correction factors on neutron flux and spectrum measurement were analyzed. The calculation of the correction factor has been done by using the program which had been verified for several foils. The foils used are Au, In. Cu, Co and Dy of 0.00254 cm -0.127 cm thickness and 1.27 cm diameter. The result showed that the correction factor foils were not similar due to the variation of activation cross section and neutron spectrum shape. For the neutron spectrum in RS-2 multi purpose reactor GAS using foils of 0.00254 cm thick. The effect of neglecting correction factor on thermal flux measurement for Au, In, Co and Cu were less than -6%, for Dy was about -25%. On epithermal flux measurement for Au and In were about -60%, Co and Dy was -12% and -6%, for Cu less than -2%. The effect of neglecting correction factor on spectrum measurement was the change on the neutron flux density values along neutron energy region.

  1. Unresolved resonance self shielding calculation: causes and importance of discrepancies

    Ribon, P.; Tellier, H.

    1986-09-01

    To compute the self shielding coefficient, it is necessary to know the point-wise cross-sections. In the unresolved resonance region, we do not know the parameters of each level but only the average parameters. Therefore we simulate the point-wise cross-section by random sampling of the energy levels and resonance parameters with respect to the Wigner law and the X 2 distributions, and by computing the cross-section in the same way as in the resolved regions. The result of this statistical calculation obviously depends on the initial parameters but also on the method of sampling, on the formalism which is used to compute the cross-section or on the weighting neutron flux. In this paper, we will survey the main phenomena which can induce discrepancies in self shielding computations. Results are given for typical dilutions which occur in nuclear reactors. 8 refs

  2. Unresolved resonance self shielding calculation: causes and importance of discrepancies

    Ribon, P.; Tellier, H.

    1986-01-01

    To compute the self shielding coefficient, it is necessary to know the point-wise cross-sections. In the unresolved resonance region, the parameters of each level are not known; only the average parameters. Therefore the authors simulate the point-wise cross-section by random sampling of the energy levels and resonance parameters with respect to the Wigner law and the x 2 distributions, and by computing the cross-section in the same way as in the resolved regions. The result of this statistical calculation obviously depends on the initial parameters but also on the method of sampling, on the formalism which is used to compute the cross-section or on the weighting neutron flux. In this paper, the authors survey the main phenomena which can induce discrepancies in self shielding computations. Results are given for typical dilutions which occur in nuclear reactors

  3. CREST : a computer program for the calculation of composition dependent self-shielded cross-sections

    Kapil, S.K.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program CREST for the calculation of the composition and temperature dependent self-shielded cross-sections using the shielding factor approach has been described. The code includes the editing and formation of the data library, calculation of the effective shielding factors and cross-sections, a fundamental mode calculation to generate the neutron spectrum for the system which is further used to calculate the effective elastic removal cross-sections. Studies to explore the sensitivity of reactor parameters to changes in group cross-sections can also be carried out by using the facility available in the code to temporarily change the desired constants. The final self-shielded and transport corrected group cross-sections can be dumped on cards or magnetic tape in a suitable form for their direct use in a transport or diffusion theory code for detailed reactor calculations. The program is written in FORTRAN and can be accommodated in a computer with 32 K work memory. The input preparation details, sample problem and the listing of the program are given. (author)

  4. Characteristic Determination Of Self Shielding Factor And Cadmium Ratio Of Cylindrical Probe

    Hamzah, Amir; Budi R, Ita; Pinem, Suriam

    1996-01-01

    Determination of thermal, epithermal and total self shielding factor and cadmium ratio of cylindrical probe has been done by measurement and calculation. Self shielding factor can be determined by dividing probe activity to Al-alloy probe activity. Due to the lack of cylindrical probe made of Al-alloy, self shielding factor can be determined by parabolic extrapolation of measured activities to 0 cm radius to divide those activities. Theoretically, self shielding factor can be determined by making numerical solution of two dimensional integral equations using Romberg method. To simplify, the calculation is based on single collision theory with the assumption of monoenergetic neutron and isotropic distribution. For gold cylindrical probe, the calculation results are quite close to the measurement one with the relative discrepancy for activities, cadmium ratio and self shielding factor of bare probe are less then 11.5%, 3,5% and 1.5% respectively. The program can be used for the calculation of other kinds of cylindrical probes. Due to dependency to radius, cylindrical probe made of copper has the best characteristic of self shielding factor and cadmium ratio

  5. GROUPIE2007, Bondarenko Self-Shielded Cross sections from ENDF/B

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function - GROUPIE reads evaluated data in ENDF/B Format and uses these to calculate unshielded group averaged Cross sections, Bondarenko self-shielded Cross sections, and multiband parameters. The program allows the user to specify arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy-dependent neutron spectrum (weighting function). IAEA0849/15: This version include the updates up to January 30, 2007. Changes in ENDF/B-VII Format and procedures, as well as the evaluations themselves, make it impossible for versions of the ENDF/B pre-processing codes earlier than PREPRO 2007 (2007 Version) to accurately process current ENDF/B-VII evaluations. The present code can handle all existing ENDF/B-VI evaluations through release 8, which will be the last release of ENDF/B-VI. 2 - Modifications from previous versions: Groupie VERS. 2007-1 (Jan. 2007): checked against all ENDF/B-VII; increased page size from 120,000 to 600,000 points. 3 - Method of solution: All integrals are performed analytically; in no case is iteration or any approximate form of integration used. GROUPIE reads either the 0 deg. Kelvin Cross sections or the Doppler broadened Cross sections to calculate the self-shielded Cross sections and multiband parameters for 25 values of the 'background' Cross sections (representing the combined effects of all other isotopes and of leakage). 4 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: GROUPIE requires that the energy-dependent neutron spectrum and all Cross sections be given in tabular form, with linear interpolation between tabulated values. There is no limit to the size of the table used to describe the spectrum, so the spectrum may be described in as much detail as required. - If only unshielded averages are calculated, the program can handle up to 3000 groups. If self-shielded averages and/or multiband parameters are calculated, the program can handle up to 175 groups. These limits can easily be extended. - The program only uses the

  6. Self Shielding in Nuclear Fissile Assay Using LSDS

    Lee, Yong Deok; Park, Chang Je; Park, Geun Il; Song, Kee Chan

    2012-01-01

    The new technology for isotopic fissile material contents assay is under development at KAERI using lead slowing down spectrometer(LSDS). LSDS is very sensitive to distinguish fission signals from each fissile isotope in spent and recycled fuel. The accumulation of spent fuel is current big issue. The amount of spent fuels will reach the maximum storage capacity of the pools soon. Therefore, an interim storage must be searched and it should be optimized in design by applying accurate fissile content. When the storage has taken effect, all the nuclear materials must be also specified and verified for safety, economics and management. Generally, the spent fuel from PWR has unburned ∼1 % U235, produced ∼0.5 % plutonium from decay chain, ∼3 % fission products, ∼ 0.1 % minor actinides (MA) and uranium remainder. About 1.5 % fissile materials still exist in the spent fuel. Therefore, for reutilization of fissile materials in spent fuel at SFR, resource material is produced through pyro process. Fissile material contents in resource material must be analyzed before fabricating SFR fuel for reactor safety and economics. In assay of fissile content of spent fuel and recycled fuel, intense radiation background gives limitation on the direct analysis of fissile materials. However, LSDS is not influenced by such a radiation background in fissile assay. Based on the decided geometry setup, self shielding parameter was calculated at the fuel assay zone by introducing spent fuel or pyro produced nuclear material. When nuclear material is inserted into the assay area, the spent fuel assembly or pyro recycled fuel material perturbs the spatial distribution of the slowing down neutrons in lead and the prompt fast fission neutrons produced by fissile materials are also perturbed. The self shielding factor is interpreted as that how much of absorption is created inside the fuel area when it is in the lead. Self shielding effect provides a non-linear property in the isotopic

  7. Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: Background corrections

    Floyd, Carey E.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bender, Janelle E.; Kapadia, Anuj J.; Xia, Jessie Q.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kiser, Matthew R.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Pedroni, Ronald S.; Macri, Robert A.; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Howell, Calvin R.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is an imaging technique that provides an in-vivo tomographic spectroscopic image of the distribution of elements in a body. To achieve this, a neutron beam illuminates the body. Nuclei in the body along the path of the beam are stimulated by inelastic scattering of the neutrons in the beam and emit characteristic gamma photons whose unique energy identifies the element. The emitted gammas are collected in a spectrometer and form a projection intensity for each spectral line at the projection orientation of the neutron beam. Rotating and translating either the body or the beam will allow a tomographic projection set to be acquired. Images are reconstructed to represent the spatial distribution of elements in the body. Critical to this process is the appropriate removal of background gamma events from the spectrum. Here we demonstrate the equivalence of two background correction techniques and discuss the appropriate application of each

  8. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  9. Evaluation of some resonance self-shielding procedures employed in high conversion light water reactor design

    Patino, N.E.; Abbate, M.J.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The procedures employed in the treatment of the resonance shielding effect have been identified as one of the causes of the large discrepancies found in the neutronic calculation of high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs), indicating the need for a revision of the self-shielding procedures employed. In this work some well known techniques applied in HCLWR self-shielding calculations are evaluated; the study involves the comparison of methods for the generation of group constants, the analysis of the impact of considering some isotopes as infinitely diluted and the evaluation of the usual approximations utilized for the treatment of heterogeneities

  10. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    Stimpson, Shane; Liu, Yuxuan; Collins, Benjamin S.; Clarno, Kevin T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as ''Lumped Parameter MOC''. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  11. Self-shielding effect in unresolved resonance data in JENDL-4.0

    Konno, Chikara; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Sato, Satoshi; Kato, Yoshinari

    2012-01-01

    At International Conference on Nuclear Data for Science and Technology in 2007 we pointed out that most of unresolved resonance data in JENDL-3.3 have a problem related to self-shielding correction. Here with a simple calculation model we have investigated whether the latest JENDL, JENDL-4.0, was improved for the problem or not. The results suggest that unresolved resonance data in JENDL-4.0 have no problem, but it seems that self-shielding effects for the unresolved resonance data in JENDL-4.0 are too large. New benchmark experiments for unresolved resonance data are strongly recommended in order to verify unresolved resonance data. (author)

  12. Resonance self-shielding calculation with regularized random ladders

    Ribon, P.

    1986-01-01

    The straightforward method for calculation of resonance self-shielding is to generate one or several resonance ladders, and to process them as resolved resonances. The main drawback of Monte Carlo methods used to generate the ladders, is the difficulty of reducing the dispersion of data and results. Several methods are examined, and it is shown how one (a regularized sampling method) improves the accuracy. Analytical methods to compute the effective cross-section have recently appeared: they are basically exempt from dispersion, but are inevitably approximate. The accuracy of the most sophisticated one is checked. There is a neutron energy range which is improperly considered as statistical. An examination is presented of what happens when it is treated as statistical, and how it is possible to improve the accuracy of calculations in this range. To illustrate the results calculations have been performed in a simple case: nucleus /sup 238/U, at 300 K, between 4250 and 4750 eV.

  13. The resonance self-shielding calculation with regularized random ladders

    Ribon, P.

    1986-01-01

    The straightforward method for calculation of resonance self-shielding is to generate one or several resonance ladders, and to process them as resolved resonances. The main drawback of Monte Carlo methods used to generate the ladders, is the difficulty of reducing the dispersion of data and results. Several methods are examined, and it is shown how one (a regularized sampling method) improves the accuracy. Analytical methods to compute the effective cross-section have recently appeared: they are basically exempt from dispersion, but are inevitably approximate. The accuracy of the most sophisticated one is checked. There is a neutron energy range which is improperly considered as statistical. An examination is presented of what happens when it is treated as statistical, and how it is possible to improve the accuracy of calculations in this range. To illustrate the results calculations have been performed in a simple case: nucleus 238 U, at 300 K, between 4250 and 4750 eV. (author)

  14. Missing level corrections using neutron spacings

    Mitchell, G.E.; Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    2009-11-01

    Nuclear level densities are very important for a wide variety of pure and applied neutron physics. Most of the relevant information is obtained from neutron resonance data. The key correction to the raw experimental data is for missing levels. All of the standard correction methods assume that the neutron resonances obey the predictions of the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble version of Random Matrix Theory (RMT) and utilize comparison with the Porter-Thomas distribution of reduced widths in order to determine the fraction of missing levels. Here we adopt an alternate approach, comparing the neutron data with the predictions of RMT for eigenvalue statistics. Since in RMT the widths and eigenvalues are independent, analysis of the eigenvalues provides an independent analysis of the same data set. We summarize recent work in this area using the nearest neighbour spacing distribution, and we also develop tests that utilize several other eigenvalue statistics to provide additional estimates of the missing fraction of levels. These additional statistics include the key test for long range order - the Dyson-Mehta Δ 3 statistic - as well as the thermodynamic energy (that arises from Dyson's Circular Orthogonal Ensemble), the linear correlation coefficient of adjacent spacings (a measure of short range anti-correlation), and a statistic related to the Q statistic defined by Dyson and Mehta in the early 1960s. Developed FORTRAN code is available at http://www-nds.iaea.org/missing-levels/. These tests are applied to the s-wave neutron resonances in n + 238 U and n + 232 Th. The results for 238 U are consistent with each other and raise some issues concerning data purity. For the 232 Th data, all of the tests are in excellent agreement. (author)

  15. A lumped parameter method of characteristics approach and multigroup kernels applied to the subgroup self-shielding calculation in MPACT

    Shane Stimpson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An essential component of the neutron transport solver is the resonance self-shielding calculation used to determine equivalence cross sections. The neutron transport code, MPACT, is currently using the subgroup self-shielding method, in which the method of characteristics (MOC is used to solve purely absorbing fixed-source problems. Recent efforts incorporating multigroup kernels to the MOC solvers in MPACT have reduced runtime by roughly 2×. Applying the same concepts for self-shielding and developing a novel lumped parameter approach to MOC, substantial improvements have also been made to the self-shielding computational efficiency without sacrificing any accuracy. These new multigroup and lumped parameter capabilities have been demonstrated on two test cases: (1 a single lattice with quarter symmetry known as VERA (Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Progression Problem 2a and (2 a two-dimensional quarter-core slice known as Problem 5a-2D. From these cases, self-shielding computational time was reduced by roughly 3–4×, with a corresponding 15–20% increase in overall memory burden. An azimuthal angle sensitivity study also shows that only half as many angles are needed, yielding an additional speedup of 2×. In total, the improvements yield roughly a 7–8× speedup. Given these performance benefits, these approaches have been adopted as the default in MPACT.

  16. A lumped parameter method of characteristics approach and multigroup kernels applied to the subgroup self-shielding calculation in MPACT

    Stimpson, Shane G.; Liu, Yuxuan; Collins, Benjamin S.; Clarno, Kevin T.

    2017-01-01

    An essential component of the neutron transport solver is the resonance self-shielding calculation used to determine equivalence cross sections. The neutron transport code, MPACT, is currently using the subgroup self-shielding method, in which the method of characteristics (MOC) is used to solve purely absorbing fixed-source problems. Recent efforts incorporating multigroup kernels to the MOC solvers in MPACT have reduced runtime by roughly 2×. Applying the same concepts for self-shielding and developing a novel lumped parameter approach to MOC, substantial improvements have also been made to the self-shielding computational efficiency without sacrificing any accuracy. These new multigroup and lumped parameter capabilities have been demonstrated on two test cases: (1) a single lattice with quarter symmetry known as VERA (Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications) Progression Problem 2a and (2) a two-dimensional quarter-core slice known as Problem 5a-2D. From these cases, self-shielding computational time was reduced by roughly 3–4×, with a corresponding 15–20% increase in overall memory burden. An azimuthal angle sensitivity study also shows that only half as many angles are needed, yielding an additional speedup of 2×. In total, the improvements yield roughly a 7–8× speedup. Furthermore given these performance benefits, these approaches have been adopted as the default in MPACT.

  17. Monte Carlo validation of self shielding and void effect calculations

    Tellier, H.; Coste, M.; Raepsaet, C.; Soldevila, M.; Van der Gucht, C.

    1995-01-01

    The self shielding validation and the void effect are studied with Monte Carlo method. The satisfactory comparison obtained between the APOLLO 2 results of the self shielding effect and the TRIPOLI and MCNP results allows us to be confident in the multigroup transport code. (K.A.)

  18. AUTOSECOL: an automatic calculation of the self-shielding of heavy isotope resonances

    Grandotto-Biettoli, Marc.

    The formalism is based on separating both types of resonance effects: local energy effects creating a fine structure in the flux, and bulk effects resulting in a slow variation in the flux. Effective reaction rates are defined that, used as tables in a multigroup calculation of cells with a large pitch in regard to resonance widths, allow an exact account of the dependence of the effective integral upon fast variations in the flux. These tables are used to introduce this phenomenon of resonance self-shielding in the multigroup Apollo program for solving the neutron transport equation, they are derived from nuclear data with using some parameters relating to the physical state of the resonant isotope inside the fuel medium. The AUTOSECOL system provides a library of effective reaction rates for taking account of the resonance self-shielding effect on the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cells. Its versatility in regard to the methods previously used for solving the same problem allows a rapid testing of the consequences of considering the self-shielding effect of new isotope resonances, a following up of the evolution in nuclear data evaluation, and rapidly studying the interest lying in new data. Results obtained with AUTOSECOL are compared with those obtained when using the SECOL code for computing the effective reaction rates of 235 U, 239 Pu, 107 Ag, 109 Ag, and 241 Pu [fr

  19. Elastic removal self-shielding factors for light and medium nuclides with strong-resonance scattering

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Yukio; Tokuno, Yukio.

    1978-01-01

    The self-shielding factors for elastic removal cross sections of light and medium weight nuclides were calculated for the parameter, σ 0 within the conventional concept of the group constant sets. The numerical study were performed for obtaining a simple and accurate method. The present results were compared with the exact values and the conventional ones, and shown to be remarkably improved. It became apparent that the anisotropy of the elastic scattering did not affect to the self-shielding factors though it did to the infinite dilution cross sections. With use of the present revised set, the neutron flux were calculated in an iron medium and in a prototype FBR and compared with those by the fine spectrum calculations and the conventional set. The present set showed the considerable improvement in the vicinity of the large resonance regions of sodium, iron and oxygen. (auth.)

  20. Self-Shielding Treatment to Perform Cell Calculation for Seed Furl In Th/U Pwr Using Dragon Code

    Ahmed Amin El Said Abd El Hameed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Time and precision of the results are the most important factors in any code used for nuclear calculations. Despite of the high accuracy of Monte Carlo codes, MCNP and Serpent, in many cases their relatively long computational time leads to difficulties in using any of them as the main calculation code. Usually, Monte Carlo codes are used only to benchmark the results. The deterministic codes, which are usually used in nuclear reactor’s calculations, have limited precision, due to the approximations in the methods used to solve the multi-group transport equation. Self- Shielding treatment, an algorithm that produces an average cross-section defined over the complete energy domain of the neutrons in a nuclear reactor, is responsible for the biggest error in any deterministic codes. There are mainly two resonance self-shielding models commonly applied: models based on equivalence and dilution and models based on subgroup approach. The fundamental problem with any self-shielding method is that it treats any isotope as there are no other isotopes with resonance present in the reactor. The most practical way to solve this problem is to use multi-energy groups (50-200 that are chosen in a way that allows us to use all major resonances without self-shielding. In this paper, we perform cell calculations, for a fresh seed fuel pin which is used in thorium/uranium reactors, by solving 172 energy group transport equation using the deterministic DRAGON code, for the two types of self-shielding models (equivalence and dilution models and subgroup models Using WIMS-D5 and DRAGON data libraries. The results are then tested by comparing it with the stochastic MCNP5 code.  We also tested the sensitivity of the results to a specific change in self-shielding method implemented, for example the effect of applying Livolant-Jeanpierre Normalization scheme and Rimman Integration improvement on the equivalence and dilution method, and the effect of using Ribbon

  1. Self-Shielding Of Transmission Lines

    Christodoulou, Christos [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The use of shielding to contend with noise or harmful EMI/EMR energy is not a new concept. An inevitable trade that must be made for shielding is physical space and weight. Space was often not as much of a painful design trade in older larger systems as they are in today’s smaller systems. Today we are packing in an exponentially growing number of functionality within the same or smaller volumes. As systems become smaller and space within systems become more restricted, the implementation of shielding becomes more problematic. Often, space that was used to design a more mechanically robust component must be used for shielding. As the system gets smaller and space is at more of a premium, the trades starts to result in defects, designs with inadequate margin in other performance areas, and designs that are sensitive to manufacturing variability. With these challenges in mind, it would be ideal to maximize attenuation of harmful fields as they inevitably couple onto transmission lines without the use of traditional shielding. Dr. Tom Van Doren proposed a design concept for transmission lines to a class of engineers while visiting New Mexico. This design concept works by maximizing Electric field (E) and Magnetic Field (H) field containment between operating transmission lines to achieve what he called “Self-Shielding”. By making the geometric centroid of the outgoing current coincident with the return current, maximum field containment is achieved. The reciprocal should be true as well, resulting in greater attenuation of incident fields. Figure’s 1(a)-1(b) are examples of designs where the current centroids are coincident. Coax cables are good examples of transmission lines with co-located centroids but they demonstrate excellent field attenuation for other reasons and can’t be used to test this design concept. Figure 1(b) is a flex circuit design that demonstrate the implementation of self-shielding vs a standard conductor layout.

  2. Energy corrections in pulsed neutron measurements for cylindrical geometry

    Drozdowicz, K.; Woznicka, U.

    1982-01-01

    A solution of the thermal neutron diffusion equation for a two-region concentric cylindrical system, with a constant neutron flux in the inner medium assumed, is given. The velocity-averaged dynamic parameters for thermal neutrons are used in the method. The corrections due to the diffusion cooling are introduced into the dynamic material buckling and into the velocity distribution of the thermal neutron flux. Detailed relations obtained for a hydrogenous moderator are given. Results of the measurements of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-sections for the samples in the two-region cylindrical systems are presented. (author)

  3. Advances in the development of a subgroup method for the self-shielding of resonant isotopes in arbitrary geometries

    Hebert, A.

    1997-01-01

    The subgroup method is used to compute self-shielded cross sections defined over coarse energy groups in the resolved energy domain. The validity of the subgroup approach was extended beyond the unresolved energy domain by partially taking into account correlation effects between the slowing-down source with the collision probability terms of the transport equation. This approach enables one to obtain a pure subgroup solution of the self-shielding problem without relying on any form of equivalence in dilution. Specific improvements are presented on existing subgroup methods: an N-term rational approximation for the fuel-to-fuel collision probability, a new Pade deflation technique for computing probability tables, and the introduction of a superhomogenization correction. The absorption rates obtained after self-shielding are compared with exact values obtained using an elastic slowing-down calculation where each resonance is modeled individually in the resolved energy domain

  4. Correction factor for the experimental prompt neutron decay constant

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Y.; Sadovich, S.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Definition of a spatial correction factor for the experimental prompt neutron decay constant. • Introduction of a MCNP6 calculation methodology to simulate Rossi-alpha distribution for pulsed neutron sources. • Comparison of MCNP6 results with experimental data for count rate, Rossi-alpha, and Feynman-alpha distributions. • Improvement of the comparison between numerical and experimental results by taking into account the dead-time effect. - Abstract: This study introduces a new correction factor to obtain the experimental effective multiplication factor of subcritical assemblies by the point kinetics formulation. The correction factor is defined as the ratio between the MCNP6 prompt neutron decay constant obtained in criticality mode and the one obtained in source mode. The correction factor mainly takes into account the longer neutron lifetime in the reflector region and the effects of the external neutron source. For the YALINA Thermal facility, the comparison between the experimental and computational effective multiplication factors noticeably improves after the application of the correction factor. The accuracy of the MCNP6 computational model of the YALINA Thermal subcritical assembly has been verified by reproducing the neutron count rate, Rossi-α, and Feynman-α distributions obtained from the experimental data

  5. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments

    Lee, K.W.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with 252 Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing 252 Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6-8 extended-range sphere versus the 6'' standard sphere). (authors)

  6. Methods and apparatus for environmental correction of thermal neutron logs

    Preeg, W.E.; Scott, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    An on-line environmentally-corrected measurement of the thermal neutron decay time (tau) of an earth formation traversed by a borehole is provided in a two-detector, pulsed neutron logging tool, by measuring tau at each detector and combining the two tau measurements in accordance with a previously established empirical relationship of the general form: tau = tausub(F) +A(tausub(F) + tausub(N)B) + C, where tausub(F) and tausub(N) are the tau measurements at the far-spaced and near-spaced detectors, respectively, A is a correction coefficient for borehole capture cross section effects, B is a correction coefficient for neutron diffusion effects, and C is a constant related to parameters of the logging tool. Preferred numerical values of A, B and C are disclosed, and a relationship for more accurately approximating the A term to specific borehole conditions. (author)

  7. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-01-01

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans. PMID:28367906

  8. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils.

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-04-10

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans.

  9. RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections

    Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, DEN/DM2S/SERMA/LENR, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

  10. RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections

    Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z.

    2006-01-01

    A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

  11. Nuclear reactions and self-shielding effects of gamma-ray database for nuclear materials

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Noda, Tetsuji [National Research Institute for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    A database for transmutation and radioactivity of nuclear materials is required for selection and design of materials used in various nuclear reactors. The database based on the FENDL/A-2.0 on the Internet and the additional data collected from several references has been developed in NRIM site of 'Data-Free-Way' on the Internet. Recently, the function predicted self-shielding effect of materials for {gamma}-ray was added to this database. The user interface for this database has been constructed for retrieval of necessary data and for graphical presentation of the relation between the energy spectrum of neutron and neutron capture cross section. It is demonstrated that the possibility of chemical compositional change and radioactivity in a material caused by nuclear reactions can be easily retrieved using a browser such as Netscape or Explorer. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactions and self-shielding effects of gamma-ray database for nuclear materials

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Noda, Tetsuji

    2001-01-01

    A database for transmutation and radioactivity of nuclear materials is required for selection and design of materials used in various nuclear reactors. The database based on the FENDL/A-2.0 on the Internet and the additional data collected from several references has been developed in NRIM site of 'Data-Free-Way' on the Internet. Recently, the function predicted self-shielding effect of materials for γ-ray was added to this database. The user interface for this database has been constructed for retrieval of necessary data and for graphical presentation of the relation between the energy spectrum of neutron and neutron capture cross section. It is demonstrated that the possibility of chemical compositional change and radioactivity in a material caused by nuclear reactions can be easily retrieved using a browser such as Netscape or Explorer. (author)

  13. Radiation monitoring in a self-shielded cyclotron installation

    Capaccioli, L.; Gori, C.; Mazzocchi, S.; Spano, G.

    2002-01-01

    As nuclear medicine is approaching a new era with the spectacular growth of PET diagnosis, the number of medical cyclotrons installed within the major hospitals is increasing accordingly. Therefore modern medical cyclotron are highly engineered and highly reliable apparatus, characterised with reduced accelerating energies (as the major goal is the production of fluorine 18) and often self-shielded. However specific dedicated monitors are still necessary in order to assure the proper radioprotection. At the Careggi University Hospital in Florence a Mini trace 10 MeV self-shielded cyclotron produced by General Electric has been installed in 2000. In a contiguous radiochemistry laboratory, the preparation and quality control of 1 8F DG and other radiopharmaceuticals takes place. Aim of this work is the characterisation and the proper calibration of the above mentioned monitors and control devices

  14. Revisiting the stamm'ler self-shielding method

    Hebert, A.

    2004-01-01

    The generalized Stamm'ler method is been used in lattice codes such as PHOENIX, WIMS-AECL and DRAGON-IST for computing self-shielded cross sections, prior to the main flux calculation. This method is handicapped by deficiencies, such as its low accuracy and its inability to represent distributed self-shielding effects in a fuel rod or across a fuel bundle. The paper describes improvements that could be made to the generalized Stamm'ler method in order to mitigate these two defects. A validation is presented for the case of 238 U nuclides located in different geometries. The isotopic absorption rates obtained with the proposed numerical scheme are compared with exact values obtained with a fine-group elastic slowing-down calculation in the resolved energy domain. (author)

  15. Uranium self-shielding in fast reactor blankets

    Kadiroglu, O.K.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of heterogeneity on resonance self-shielding are examined with particular emphasis on the blanket region of the fast breeder reactor and on its dominant reaction--capture in /sup 238/U. The results, however, apply equally well to scattering resonances, to other isotopes (fertile, fissile and structural species) and to other environments, so long as the underlying assumptions of narrow resonance theory apply. The heterogeneous resonance integral is first cast into a modified homogeneous form involving the ratio of coolant-to-fuel fluxes. A generalized correlation (useful in its own right in many other applications) is developed for this ratio, using both integral transport and collision probability theory to infer the form of correlation, and then relying upon Monte Carlo calculations to establish absolute values of the correlation coefficients. It is shown that a simple linear prescription can be developed for the flux ratio as a function of only fuel optical thickness and the fraction of the slowing-down source generated by the coolant. This in turn permitted derivation of a new equivalence theorem relating the heterogeneous self-shielding factor to the homogeneous self-shielding factor at a modified value of the background scattering cross section per absorber nucleus. A simple version of this relation is developed and used to show that heterogeneity has a negligible effect on the calculated blanket breeding ratio in fast reactors.

  16. The analysis and correction of neutron scattering effects in neutron imaging

    Raine, D.A.; Brenizer, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    A method of correcting for the scattering effects present in neutron radiographic and computed tomographic imaging has been developed. Prior work has shown that beam, object, and imaging system geometry factors, such as the L/D ratio and angular divergence, are the primary sources contributing to the degradation of neutron images. With objects smaller than 20--40 mm in width, a parallel beam approximation can be made where the effects from geometry are negligible. Factors which remain important in the image formation process are the pixel size of the imaging system, neutron scattering, the size of the object, the conversion material, and the beam energy spectrum. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code, version 4A (MCNP4A), was used to separate and evaluate the effect that each of these parameters has on neutron image data. The simulations were used to develop a correction algorithm which is easy to implement and requires no a priori knowledge of the object. The correction algorithm is based on the determination of the object scatter function (OSF) using available data outside the object to estimate the shape and magnitude of the OSF based on a Gaussian functional form. For objects smaller than 1 mm (0.04 in.) in width, the correction function can be well approximated by a constant function. Errors in the determination and correction of the MCNP simulated neutron scattering component were under 5% and larger errors were only noted in objects which were at the extreme high end of the range of object sizes simulated. The Monte Carlo data also indicated that scattering does not play a significant role in the blurring of neutron radiographic and tomographic images. The effect of neutron scattering on computed tomography is shown to be minimal at best, with the most serious effect resulting when the basic backprojection method is used

  17. Gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation methodology

    Gugiu, Daniela; Roth, Csaba; Ghinescu, Alecse

    2010-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a well established nuclear technique, suited to investigate the microstructural or elemental composition and can be applied to studies of a large variety of samples. The work with large samples involves, beside the development of large irradiation devices with well know neutron field characteristics, the knowledge of perturbing phenomena and adequate evaluation of correction factors like: neutron self shielding, extended source correction, gamma ray auto absorption. The objective of the works presented in this paper is to validate an appropriate methodology for gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation for large inhomogeneous samples. For this purpose a benchmark experiment has been defined - a simple gamma ray transmission experiment, easy to be reproduced. The gamma ray attenuation in pottery samples has been measured and computed using MCNP5 code. The results show a good agreement between the computed and measured values, proving that the proposed methodology is able to evaluate the correction factors. (authors)

  18. Situations of potential exposure in self-shielding electron accelerators

    Rios, D.A.S.; Rios, P.B.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G.

    2017-01-01

    The study discusses situations in the industrial environment that may lead to potential exposure of Occupationally Exposed Individuals and Public Individuals in self-shielding electron accelerators. Although these exposure situations are unlikely, simulation exercises can lead to improvements in the operating procedure as well as suggest changes in production line design in order to increase radiation protection at work. These studies can also be used in training and demonstrate a solid application of the ALARA principle in the daily activities of radiative installations

  19. Correction of rhodium detector signals for comparison to design calculations

    Judd, J.L.; Chang, R.Y.; Gabel, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Rhodium detectors are used in many commercial pressurized water reactors PWRs [pressurized water reactor] as in-core neutron detectors. The signals from the detectors are the result of neutron absorption in 103 Rh and the subsequent beta decay of 104 Rh to 104 Pd. The rhodium depletes ∼1% per full-power month, so corrections are necessary to the detector signal to account for the effects of the rhodium depletion. These corrections result from the change in detector self-shielding with rhodium burnup and the change in rhodium concentration itself. Correction for the change in rhodium concentration is done by multiplication of the factor N(t)/N 0 , where N(t) is the rhodium concentration at time t and N 0 is the initial rhodium concentration. The calculation of the self-shielding factor is more complicated and is presented. A self-shielding factor based on the fraction of rhodium remaining was calculated with the CASMO-3 code. The results obtained from our comparisons of predicted and measured in-core detector signals show that the CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 code package is an effective tool for estimating pin peaking and power distributions

  20. Neutron lifetime experiments using magnetically trapped neutrons: optimal background correction strategies

    Coakley, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    In the first stage of each run of a neutron lifetime experiment, a magnetic trap is filled with neutrons. In the second stage of each run, decay events plus background events are observed. In a separate experiment, background is measured. The mean lifetime is estimated by fitting a two parameter exponential model to the background-corrected data. For two models of the background signal, I determine the optimal ratio of the number of 'background-only' measurements to the number of primary 'neutron decay plus background' measurements. Further, for each run, I determine the optimal allocation of time for filling and for observing decay events. For the case where the background consists of an activated material (aluminum) plus a stationary Poisson process, the asymptotic standard error of the lifetime estimate computed from the background-corrected data is lower than the asymptotic standard error computed from the uncorrected data. For the case where the background is a stationary Poisson process, background correction is desirable provided that the background intensity is sufficiently small compared to the rate at which neutrons enter the trap

  1. New approximations for the Doppler broadening function applied to the calculation of resonance self-shielding factors

    Palma, Daniel A.; Goncalves, Alessandro C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C.

    2008-01-01

    The activation technique allows much more precise measurements of neutron intensity, relative or absolute. The technique requires the knowledge of the Doppler broadening function ψ(x,ξ) to determine the resonance self-shielding factors in the epithermal range G epi (τ,ξ). Two new analytical approximations for the Doppler broadening function ψ(x,ξ) are proposed. The approximations proposed are compared with other methods found in literature for the calculation of the ψ(x,ξ) function, that is, the 4-pole Pade method and the Frobenius method, when applied to the calculation of G epi (τ,ξ). The results obtained provided satisfactory accuracy. (authors)

  2. A review of neutron scattering correction for the calibration of neutron survey meters using the shadow cone method

    Kim, Sang In; Kim, Bong Hwan; Kim, Jang Lyul; Lee, Jung Il [Health Physics Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The calibration methods of neutron-measuring devices such as the neutron survey meter have advantages and disadvantages. To compare the calibration factors obtained by the shadow cone method and semi-empirical method, 10 neutron survey meters of five different types were used in this study. This experiment was performed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI; Daejeon, South Korea), and the calibration neutron fields were constructed using a {sup 252}Californium ({sup 252}Cf) neutron source, which was positioned in the center of the neutron irradiation room. The neutron spectra of the calibration neutron fields were measured by a europium-activated lithium iodide scintillator in combination with KAERI's Bonner sphere system. When the shadow cone method was used, 10 single moderator-based survey meters exhibited a smaller calibration factor by as much as 3.1 - 9.3% than that of the semi-empirical method. This finding indicates that neutron survey meters underestimated the scattered neutrons and attenuated neutrons (i.e., the total scatter corrections). This underestimation of the calibration factor was attributed to the fact that single moderator-based survey meters have an under-ambient dose equivalent response in the thermal or thermal-dominant neutron field. As a result, when the shadow cone method is used for a single moderator-based survey meter, an additional correction and the International Organization for Standardization standard 8529-2 for room-scattered neutrons should be considered.

  3. A review of neutron scattering correction for the calibration of neutron survey meters using the shadow cone method

    Kim, Sang In; Kim, Bong Hwan; Kim, Jang Lyul; Lee, Jung Il

    2015-01-01

    The calibration methods of neutron-measuring devices such as the neutron survey meter have advantages and disadvantages. To compare the calibration factors obtained by the shadow cone method and semi-empirical method, 10 neutron survey meters of five different types were used in this study. This experiment was performed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI; Daejeon, South Korea), and the calibration neutron fields were constructed using a 252 Californium ( 252 Cf) neutron source, which was positioned in the center of the neutron irradiation room. The neutron spectra of the calibration neutron fields were measured by a europium-activated lithium iodide scintillator in combination with KAERI's Bonner sphere system. When the shadow cone method was used, 10 single moderator-based survey meters exhibited a smaller calibration factor by as much as 3.1 - 9.3% than that of the semi-empirical method. This finding indicates that neutron survey meters underestimated the scattered neutrons and attenuated neutrons (i.e., the total scatter corrections). This underestimation of the calibration factor was attributed to the fact that single moderator-based survey meters have an under-ambient dose equivalent response in the thermal or thermal-dominant neutron field. As a result, when the shadow cone method is used for a single moderator-based survey meter, an additional correction and the International Organization for Standardization standard 8529-2 for room-scattered neutrons should be considered

  4. URR-PACK: Calculating Self-Shielding in the Unresolved Resonance Energy Range

    Cullen, Dermott E.; Trkov, Andrej

    2016-07-01

    This report describes HOW to calculate self-shielding in the unresolved resonance region (URR), in terms of the computer codes we provide to allow a user to do these calculations himself. Here we only describe HOW to calculate; a longer companion report describes in detail WHY it is necessary to include URR self-shielding.

  5. Corrections in the gold foil activation method for determination of neutron beam density

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1967-01-01

    A finite foil thickness and deviation in the cross section from the 1ν law imply corrections in the determination of neutron beam densities by means of foil activation. These corrections, which depend on the neutron velocity distribution, have been examined in general and are given in a specific...

  6. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    Aguilera, P., E-mail: paguilera87@gmail.com; Romero-Barrientos, J. [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Nueva Bilbao 12501, La Reina, Santiago (Chile); Universidad de Chile, Dpto. de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Las Palmeras 3425, Nuñoa, Santiago (Chile); Molina, F. [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Nueva Bilbao 12501, La Reina, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-07-07

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  7. Investigating spatial self-shielding and temperature effects for homogeneous and double heterogeneous pebble models with MCNP

    Li, J.; Nuenighoff; Pohl, C.; Allelein, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The gas-cooled, high temperature reactor (HTR) represents a valuable option for the future development of nuclear technology, because of its excellent safety features. One main safety feature is the negative temperature coefficient which is due to the Doppler broadening of the (n,y) resonance absorption cross section. A second important effect is the spatial self-shielding due to the double heterogeneous geometry of a pebble bed reactor. At FZ-Juelich two reactor analysis codes have been developed: VSOP for core design and MGT for transient analysis. Currently an update of the nuclear cross section libraries to ENDF/B-VII.0 of both codes takes place. In order to take the temperature dependency as well as the spatial self-shielding into account the absorption cross sections σ (n,y) for the resonance absorbers like 232 Th and 238 U have to be provided as function of incident neutron energy, temperature and nuclide concentration. There are two reasons for choosing the Monte-Carlo approach to calculate group wise cross sections. First, the former applied ZUT-DGL code to generate the resonance cross section tables for MGT is so far not able to handle the new resonance description based on Reich-Moore instead of Single-level Breit-Wigner. Second, the rising interest in PuO 2 fuel motivated an investigation on the generation of group wise cross sections describing thermal resonances of 240 Pu and 242 Pu. (orig.)

  8. Self-shielding of hydrogen in the IGM during the epoch of reionization

    Chardin, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Girish; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate self-shielding of intergalactic hydrogen against ionizing radiation in radiative transfer simulations of cosmic reionization carefully calibrated with Lyα forest data. While self-shielded regions manifest as Lyman-limit systems in the post-reionization Universe, here we focus on their evolution during reionization (redshifts z = 6-10). At these redshifts, the spatial distribution of hydrogen-ionizing radiation is highly inhomogeneous, and some regions of the Universe are still neutral. After masking the neutral regions and ionizing sources in the simulation, we find that the hydrogen photoionization rate depends on the local hydrogen density in a manner very similar to that in the post-reionization Universe. The characteristic physical hydrogen density above which self-shielding becomes important at these redshifts is about nH ˜ 3 × 10-3 cm-3, or ˜20 times the mean hydrogen density, reflecting the fact that during reionization photoionization rates are typically low enough that the filaments in the cosmic web are often self-shielded. The value of the typical self-shielding density decreases by a factor of 3 between redshifts z = 3 and 10, and follows the evolution of the average photoionization rate in ionized regions in a simple fashion. We provide a simple parameterization of the photoionization rate as a function of density in self-shielded regions during the epoch of reionization.

  9. New Improvements in Mixture Self-Shielding Treatment with APOLLO2 Code

    Coste-Delclaux, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of the presentation follows: APOLLO2 is a modular multigroup transport code developed at the CEA in Saclay (France). Previously, the self-shielding module could only treat one resonant isotope mixed with moderator isotopes. Consequently, the resonant mixture self-shielding treatment was an iterative one. Each resonant isotope of the mixture was treated separately, the other resonant isotopes of the mixture being then considered as moderator isotopes, that is to say non-resonant isotopes. This treatment could be iterated. Recently, we have developed a new method that consists in treating the resonant mixture as a unique entity. A main feature of APOLLO2 self-shielding module is that some implemented models are very general and therefore very powerful and versatile. We can give, as examples, the use of probability tables in order to describe the microscopic cross-section fluctuations or the TR slowing-down model that can deal with any resonance shape. The self-shielding treatment of a resonant mixture was developed essentially thanks to these two models. The goal of this paper is to describe the improvements on the self-shielding treatment of a resonant mixture and to present, as an application, the calculation of the ATRIUM-10 BWR benchmark. We will conclude by some prospects on remaining work in the self-shielding domain. (author)

  10. New approximations for the Doppler broadening function applied to the calculation of resonance self-shielding factors

    Palma, Daniel A. [CEFET QUIMICA de Nilopolis/RJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Goncalves, Alessandro C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. [COPPE/UFRJ - Programa de Engenharia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The activation technique allows much more precise measurements of neutron intensity, relative or absolute. The technique requires the knowledge of the Doppler broadening function psi(x,xi) to determine the resonance self-shielding factors in the epithermal range G{sub epi} (tau,xi). Two new analytical approximations for the Doppler broadening function psi(x,xi) are proposed. The approximations proposed are compared with other methods found in literature for the calculation of the psi(x,xi) function, that is, the 4-pole Pade method and the Frobenius method, when applied to the calculation of G{sub epi} (tau,xi). The results obtained provided satisfactory accuracy. (authors)

  11. Neutron sensitivity of prompt-response self-powered neutron detectors and the interval rule

    Molina Avila, J.; Carmolopes, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the calculation of thermal s th and epithermal s epi sensitivities of cobalt prompt-response Self-Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs). The thermal sensitivity was obtained for a Maxwellian neutron field, and the effect of scattering on the self-shielding correction was taken into consideration in the second-collision approximation. The dependence of s th on the emitter radius R was studied in a wide region of R (0.025 to 0.2 cm). The differential and global epithermal sensitivities were calculated using a simple expression for the first-collision neutron absorption probability. Finally, a criterion to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters of the model was established in the form of some Interval Rule which is very sensitive to the radial dependence of the flux perturbation correction and other parameters of the model in both the thermal and epithermal regions

  12. Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis: A Challenge in Cultural Heritage Studies

    Stamatelatos, I.E.; Tzika, F.

    2007-01-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis compliments and significantly extends the analytical tools available for cultural heritage and authentication studies providing unique applications of non-destructive, multi-element analysis of materials that are too precious to damage for sampling purposes, representative sampling of heterogeneous materials or even analysis of whole objects. In this work, correction factors for neutron self-shielding, gamma-ray attenuation and volume distribution of the activity in large volume samples composed of iron and ceramic material were derived. Moreover, the effect of inhomogeneity on the accuracy of the technique was examined

  13. Calculation of self-shielding factors for cross-sections in the unresolved resonance region using the GRUCON applied program package

    Sinitsa, V.V.

    1984-11-01

    The author gives a scheme for the calculation of the self-shielding factors in the unresolved resonance region using the GRUCON applied program package. This package is especially created to be used in the conversion of evaluated neutron cross-section data, as available in existing data libraries, into multigroup microscopic constants. A detailed description of the formulae and algorithms used in the programs is given. Some typical examples of calculation are considered and the results are compared with those of other authors. The calculation accuracy is better than 2%

  14. Absorbed dose kernel and self-shielding calculations for a novel radiopaque glass microsphere for transarterial radioembolization.

    Church, Cody; Mawko, George; Archambault, John Paul; Lewandowski, Robert; Liu, David; Kehoe, Sharon; Boyd, Daniel; Abraham, Robert; Syme, Alasdair

    2018-02-01

    Radiopaque microspheres may provide intraprocedural and postprocedural feedback during transarterial radioembolization (TARE). Furthermore, the potential to use higher resolution x-ray imaging techniques as opposed to nuclear medicine imaging suggests that significant improvements in the accuracy and precision of radiation dosimetry calculations could be realized for this type of therapy. This study investigates the absorbed dose kernel for novel radiopaque microspheres including contributions of both short and long-lived contaminant radionuclides while concurrently quantifying the self-shielding of the glass network. Monte Carlo simulations using EGSnrc were performed to determine the dose kernels for all monoenergetic electron emissions and all beta spectra for radionuclides reported in a neutron activation study of the microspheres. Simulations were benchmarked against an accepted 90 Y dose point kernel. Self-shielding was quantified for the microspheres by simulating an isotropically emitting, uniformly distributed source, in glass and in water. The ratio of the absorbed doses was scored as a function of distance from a microsphere. The absorbed dose kernel for the microspheres was calculated for (a) two bead formulations following (b) two different durations of neutron activation, at (c) various time points following activation. Self-shielding varies with time postremoval from the reactor. At early time points, it is less pronounced due to the higher energies of the emissions. It is on the order of 0.4-2.8% at a radial distance of 5.43 mm with increased size from 10 to 50 μm in diameter during the time that the microspheres would be administered to a patient. At long time points, self-shielding is more pronounced and can reach values in excess of 20% near the end of the range of the emissions. Absorbed dose kernels for 90 Y, 90m Y, 85m Sr, 85 Sr, 87m Sr, 89 Sr, 70 Ga, 72 Ga, and 31 Si are presented and used to determine an overall kernel for the

  15. Computing Moment-Based Probability Tables for Self-Shielding Calculations in Lattice Codes

    Hebert, Alain; Coste, Mireille

    2002-01-01

    As part of the self-shielding model used in the APOLLO2 lattice code, probability tables are required to compute self-shielded cross sections for coarse energy groups (typically with 99 or 172 groups). This paper describes the replacement of the multiband tables (typically with 51 subgroups) with moment-based tables in release 2.5 of APOLLO2. An improved Ribon method is proposed to compute moment-based probability tables, allowing important savings in CPU resources while maintaining the accuracy of the self-shielding algorithm. Finally, a validation is presented where the absorption rates obtained with each of these techniques are compared with exact values obtained using a fine-group elastic slowing-down calculation in the resolved energy domain. Other results, relative to the Rowland's benchmark and to three assembly production cases, are also presented

  16. New improvements in the self-shielding formalism of the Apollo-2 code

    Coste, M.; Tellier, H.; Ribon, P.; Raepsaet, V.; Van der Gucht, C.

    1993-01-01

    One important modelization of a transport code working on a coarse energy mesh is the self-shielding. The French transport code APPOLO 2, developed at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, uses a self-shielding formalism based on a double equivalence. First a homogenization gives the reaction rates in a heterogeneous geometry, and then a multigroup equivalence gives, once the reaction rates are known, the self-shielded cross-sections. The homogenization is a very sensitive part because it is the one which requires physical modelizations. We have added a new model which allows us to treat numerous narrow resonances statistically distributed in the same group of the multigroup mesh. It is important to notice that for a narrow resonance isolated in a group, that new model is equivalent to the previous narrow resonance model (NR)

  17. Calculation of the electron trajectory for 200 kV self-shielded electron accelerator

    Wang Shuiqing

    2000-01-01

    In order to calculate the electron trajectory of 200 kV self-shielded electron accelerator, the electric field is calculated with a TRAJ program. In this program, following electron track mash points one by one, the electron beam trajectories are calculated. Knowing the effect of grid voltage on electron optics and gaining grid voltage focusing effect in the various energy grades, the authors have gained scientific basis for adjusting grid voltage, and also accumulated a wealth of experience for designing self-shielded electron accelerator or electron curtain in future

  18. Calibration procedure and wavelength correction for neutron depolarization experiments

    Roest, W.; Rekveldt, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    The neutron polarimeter, for which an extended calibration procedure is described here, enables one to investigate magnetic properties of materials. Such an investigation is carried out by offering a polarized neutron beam in the x-, y- and z-direction successively and, after transmission through the sample, by analysing the polarization in all three directions. The result is a 3x3 depolarization matrix. After the polarizer, the neutron beam has a polarization along the z-direction. Two coil systems creating a magnetic field in the yz-plane perpendicular to the beam direction provide the possibility to direct the polarization in the x-, y- and z-direction by means of Larmor precession of the polarization in these fields. New research areas, where small depolarization effects together with considerable polarization rotation are measured, have caused a need for more accuracy in, and better knowledge of the calibration of the polarimeter. The calibration procedure use up to now and the improvements made on it are described. (orig.)

  19. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2009-08-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those self-shielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional, discrete

  20. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Nigg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those self-shielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional, discrete

  1. Measurement of neutron flux distribution by semiconductor detector

    Obradovic, D.; Bosevski, T.

    1964-01-01

    Application of semiconductor detectors for measuring neutron flux distribution is about 10 times faster than measurements by activation foils and demands significantly lower reactor power. Following corrections are avoided: mass of activation foils which influences the self shielding, nuclear decay during activity measurements; counter dead-time. It is possible to control the measured data during experiment and repeat measurements if needed. Precision of the measurement is higher since it is possible to choose the wanted statistics. The method described in this paper is applied for measurements at the RB reactor. It is concluded that the method is suitable for fast measurements but the activation analysis is still indispensable

  2. Corrections on energy spectrum and scattering for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility

    Liu Shuquan; Thomas, Boucherl; Li Hang; Zou Yubin; Lu Yuanrong; Guo Zhiyu

    2013-01-01

    Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM-Ⅱ in Technische Universitaet Mounchen (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections. (authors)

  3. Corrections on energy spectrum and scatterings for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility

    Liu, Shu-Quan; Bücherl, Thomas; Li, Hang; Zou, Yu-Bin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Guo, Zhi-Yu

    2013-11-01

    Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM- II in Technische Universität München (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections.

  4. Determination of shell correction energies at saddle point using pre-scission neutron multiplicities

    Golda, K.S.; Saxena, A.; Mittal, V.K.; Mahata, K.; Sugathan, P.; Jhingan, A.; Singh, V.; Sandal, R.; Goyal, S.; Gehlot, J.; Dhal, A.; Behera, B.R.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Kailas, S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-scission neutron multiplicities have been measured for 12 C + 194, 198 Pt systems at matching excitation energies at near Coulomb barrier region. Statistical model analysis with a modified fission barrier and level density prescription have been carried out to fit the measured pre-scission neutron multiplicities and the available evaporation residue and fission cross sections simultaneously to constrain statistical model parameters. Simultaneous fitting of the pre-scission neutron multiplicities and cross section data requires shell correction at the saddle point

  5. Bonderenko self-shielded cross sections and multiband parameters derived from the LLL Evaluated-Nuclear-Data Library (ENDL)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    Bonderenko self-shielded cross sections and multiband parameters from the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Evaluated-Nuclear-Data Library (ENDL) as of July 4, 1978 are presented. These data include total, elastic, capture, and fission cross sections in the TART 175 group structure. Multiband parameters are listed. Bonderenko self-shielded cross section and the multiband parameters are presented on microfiche

  6. License Application Design Selection Feature Report: Waste Package Self Shielding Design Feature 13

    Tang, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    In the Viability Assessment (VA) reference design, handling of waste packages (WPs) in the emplacement drifts is performed remotely, and human access to the drifts is precluded when WPs are present. This report will investigate the feasibility of using a self-shielded WP design to reduce the radiation levels in the emplacement drifts to a point that, when coupled with ventilation, will create an acceptable environment for human access. This provides the benefit of allowing human entry to emplacement drifts to perform maintenance on ground support and instrumentation, and carry out performance confirmation activities. More direct human control of WP handling and emplacement operations would also be possible. However, these potential benefits must be weighed against the cost of implementation, and potential impacts on pre- and post-closure performance of the repository and WPs. The first section of this report will provide background information on previous investigations of the self-shielded WP design feature, summarize the objective and scope of this document, and provide quality assurance and software information. A shielding performance and cost study that includes several candidate shield materials will then be performed in the subsequent section to allow selection of two self-shielded WP design options for further evaluation. Finally, the remaining sections will evaluate the impacts of the two WP self-shielding options on the repository design, operations, safety, cost, and long-term performance of the WPs with respect to the VA reference design

  7. Success and prospects for low energy, self-shielded electron beam accelerators

    Laeuppi, U.V.

    1988-01-01

    The advantages of self-shielded, low energy, electron beam accelerators for electron beam processing are described. Applications of these accelerators for cross-linking plastic films, drying of coated materials and printing inks and for curing processes are discussed. (U.K.)

  8. Advanced resonance self-shielding method for gray resonance treatment in lattice physics code GALAXY

    Koike, Hiroki; Yamaji, Kazuya; Kirimura, Kazuki; Sato, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Hideki; Yamamoto, Akio

    2012-01-01

    A new resonance self-shielding method based on the equivalence theory is developed for general application to the lattice physics calculations. The present scope includes commercial light water reactor (LWR) design applications which require both calculation accuracy and calculation speed. In order to develop the new method, all the calculation processes from cross-section library preparation to effective cross-section generation are reviewed and reframed by adopting the current enhanced methodologies for lattice calculations. The new method is composed of the following four key methods: (1) cross-section library generation method with a polynomial hyperbolic tangent formulation, (2) resonance self-shielding method based on the multi-term rational approximation for general lattice geometry and gray resonance absorbers, (3) spatially dependent gray resonance self-shielding method for generation of intra-pellet power profile and (4) integrated reaction rate preservation method between the multi-group and the ultra-fine-group calculations. From the various verifications and validations, applicability of the present resonance treatment is totally confirmed. As a result, the new resonance self-shielding method is established, not only by extension of a past concentrated effort in the reactor physics research field, but also by unification of newly developed unique and challenging techniques for practical application to the lattice physics calculations. (author)

  9. Experimental evaluation of the extended Dytlewski-style dead time correction formalism for neutron multiplicity counting

    Lockhart, M.; Henzlova, D.; Croft, S.; Cutler, T.; Favalli, A.; McGahee, Ch.; Parker, R.

    2018-01-01

    Over the past few decades, neutron multiplicity counting has played an integral role in Special Nuclear Material (SNM) characterization pertaining to nuclear safeguards. Current neutron multiplicity analysis techniques use singles, doubles, and triples count rates because a methodology to extract and dead time correct higher order count rates (i.e. quads and pents) was not fully developed. This limitation is overcome by the recent extension of a popular dead time correction method developed by Dytlewski. This extended dead time correction algorithm, named Dytlewski-Croft-Favalli(DCF), is detailed in reference Croft and Favalli (2017), which gives an extensive explanation of the theory and implications of this new development. Dead time corrected results can then be used to assay SNM by inverting a set of extended point model equations which as well have only recently been formulated. The current paper discusses and presents the experimental evaluation of practical feasibility of the DCF dead time correction algorithm to demonstrate its performance and applicability in nuclear safeguards applications. In order to test the validity and effectiveness of the dead time correction for quads and pents, 252Cf and SNM sources were measured in high efficiency neutron multiplicity counters at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the count rates were extracted up to the fifth order and corrected for dead time. In order to assess the DCF dead time correction, the corrected data is compared to traditional dead time correction treatment within INCC. The DCF dead time correction is found to provide adequate dead time treatment for broad range of count rates available in practical applications.

  10. Extinction correction in white X-ray and neutron diffraction

    Tomiyoshi, S.; Yamada, M.; Watanabe, H.

    1980-01-01

    Extinction effects in white-beam X-ray and neutron diffraction are considered. In white-beam diffraction, a small deviation of the wavelength from the Bragg condition Δlambda is a variable which represents the line profile of the diffraction peaks, so that by using the new parameter Δlambda the theory is converted to one in white-beam diffraction. It is shown that for a convex crystal, primary extinction agrees with the results calculated already for monochromatic diffraction. The same relation is shown to hold in secondary extinction. It is concluded that extinction theory derived for monochromatic diffraction is applicable without any modification in white-beam diffraction. (Auth.)

  11. Calibration and correction procedures for cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture probes located across Australia

    Hawdon, Aaron; McJannet, David; Wallace, Jim

    2014-06-01

    The cosmic-ray probe (CRP) provides continuous estimates of soil moisture over an area of ˜30 ha by counting fast neutrons produced from cosmic rays which are predominantly moderated by water molecules in the soil. This paper describes the setup, measurement correction procedures, and field calibration of CRPs at nine locations across Australia with contrasting soil type, climate, and land cover. These probes form the inaugural Australian CRP network, which is known as CosmOz. CRP measurements require neutron count rates to be corrected for effects of atmospheric pressure, water vapor pressure changes, and variations in incoming neutron intensity. We assess the magnitude and importance of these corrections and present standardized approaches for network-wide analysis. In particular, we present a new approach to correct for incoming neutron intensity variations and test its performance against existing procedures used in other studies. Our field calibration results indicate that a generalized calibration function for relating neutron counts to soil moisture is suitable for all soil types, with the possible exception of very sandy soils with low water content. Using multiple calibration data sets, we demonstrate that the generalized calibration function only applies after accounting for persistent sources of hydrogen in the soil profile. Finally, we demonstrate that by following standardized correction procedures and scaling neutron counting rates of all CRPs to a single reference location, differences in calibrations between sites are related to site biomass. This observation provides a means for estimating biomass at a given location or for deriving coefficients for the calibration function in the absence of field calibration data.

  12. Thermal neutron radiative capture cross-section of 186W(n, γ)187W reaction

    Tan, V H; Son, P N

    2016-01-01

    The thermal neutron radiative capture cross section for 186 W(n, γ) 187 W reaction was measured by the activation method using the filtered neutron beam at the Dalat research reactor. An optimal composition of Si and Bi, in single crystal form, has been used as neutron filters to create the high-purity filtered neutron beam with Cadmium ratio of R cd = 420 and peak energy E n = 0.025 eV. The induced activities in the irradiated samples were measured by a high resolution HPGe digital gamma-ray spectrometer. The present result of cross section has been determined relatively to the reference value of the standard reaction 197 Au(n, γ) 198 Au. The necessary correction factors for gamma-ray true coincidence summing, and thermal neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in this experiment by Monte Carlo simulations. (paper)

  13. MINX, Multigroup Cross-Sections and Self-Shielding Factors from ENDF/B for Program SPHINX

    Soran, P.D.; MacFarlane, R.E.; Harris, D.R.; LaBauve, R.J.; Hendricks, J.S.; Kidman, R.B.; Weisbin, C.R.; White, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: MINX calculates fine-group averaged infinitely diluted cross sections and self-shielding factors from ENDF/B-IV data. Its primary purpose is to generate a pseudo-composition-independent multigroup library which is input to the SPHINX space-energy collapse program (2) (PSR-0129) through standard CCCC-III (8) interfaces. MINX incorporates and improves upon the resonance capabilities of existing codes such as ETOX (5) (NESC0388) and ENDRUN (9) and the high-order group-to-group transfer matrices of SUPERTOG (10) (PSR-0013) and ETOG (11). Fine group energy boundaries, Legendre expansion order, gross spectral shape component (in the Bondarenko flux model), temperatures and dilutions can all be used specifically. 2 - Method of solution: Infinitely dilute, un-broadened point cross sections are obtained from resolved resonance parameters using a modified version of the RESEND program (3) (NESC0465). The SIGMA1 (4) (IAEA0854) kernel-broadening method is used to Doppler broaden and thin the tabulated linearized pointwise cross sections at 0 K (outside of the unresolved energy region). Effective temperature- dependent self-shielded pointwise cross sections are derived from the formulation in the ETOX code. The primary modification to the ETOX algorithm is associated with the numerical quadrature scheme used to establish the mean values of the fluctuation intervals. The selection of energy mesh points, at which the effective cross sections are calculated, has been modified to include the energy points given in the ENDF/B file or, if the energy-independent formalism was employed, points at half-lethargy intervals. Infinitely dilute group cross sections and self-shielding factors are generated using the Bondarenko flux weighting model with the gross spectral shape under user control. The integral over energy for each group is divided into a set of panels defined by the union of the grid points describing the total cross section, the

  14. Cross-section fluctuations and self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance region - International Evaluation Co-operation volume 15

    Froehner, F.H.; Larson, Duane C.; Tagesen, Siegfried; Petrizzi, Luigi; Hasegawa, Akira; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Hogenbirk, Alfred; Weigmann, H.

    1995-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). NEA/NSC Subgroup 15 has had the task to assess self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance range of structural materials, in particular their importance at various energies, and possible ways to deal with them in shielding and activation work. The principal results achieved are summarised briefly, in particular: - New data base consisting of high-resolution transmission data measured at Oak Ridge and Geel; - Improved theoretical understanding of cross-section fluctuations, including their prediction, that has been derived from the Hauser-Feshbach theory; - Benchmark results on the importance of self-shielding in iron at various energies; - Consequences for information storage in evaluated nuclear data files; - Practical utilisation of self-shielding information from evaluated files. Benchmark results as well as the Hauser-Feshbach theory show that self-shielding effects are important up to a 4-or 5-MeV neutron energy. Fluctuation factors extracted from high-resolution total cross-section data can be

  15. A novel approach to correct the coded aperture misalignment for fast neutron imaging

    Zhang, F. N.; Hu, H. S., E-mail: huasi-hu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, D. M.; Jia, J. [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, T. K. [Laser Fusion Research Center, CAEP, Mianyang, 621900 Sichuan (China); Jia, Q. G. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Aperture alignment is crucial for the diagnosis of neutron imaging because it has significant impact on the coding imaging and the understanding of the neutron source. In our previous studies on the neutron imaging system with coded aperture for large field of view, “residual watermark,” certain extra information that overlies reconstructed image and has nothing to do with the source is discovered if the peak normalization is employed in genetic algorithms (GA) to reconstruct the source image. Some studies on basic properties of residual watermark indicate that the residual watermark can characterize coded aperture and can thus be used to determine the location of coded aperture relative to the system axis. In this paper, we have further analyzed the essential conditions for the existence of residual watermark and the requirements of the reconstruction algorithm for the emergence of residual watermark. A gamma coded imaging experiment has been performed to verify the existence of residual watermark. Based on the residual watermark, a correction method for the aperture misalignment has been studied. A multiple linear regression model of the position of coded aperture axis, the position of residual watermark center, and the gray barycenter of neutron source with twenty training samples has been set up. Using the regression model and verification samples, we have found the position of the coded aperture axis relative to the system axis with an accuracy of approximately 20 μm. Conclusively, a novel approach has been established to correct the coded aperture misalignment for fast neutron coded imaging.

  16. Radially and azimuthally dependent resonance self-shielding treatment for general multi-region geometry based on a unified theory

    Koike, Hiroki; Kirimura, Kazuki; Yamaji, Kazuya; Kosaka, Shinya; Yamamoto, Akio

    2018-01-01

    A unified resonance self-shielding method, which can treat general sub-divided fuel regions, is developed for lattice physics calculations in reactor physics field. In a past study, a hybrid resonance treatment has been developed by theoretically integrating equivalence theory and ultra-fine-group slowing-down calculation. It can be applied to a wide range of neutron spectrum conditions including low moderator density ranges in severe accident states, as long as each fuel region is not sub-divided. In order to extend the method for radially and azimuthally sub-divided multi-region geometry, a new resonance treatment is established by incorporating the essence of sub-group method. The present method is composed of two-step flux calculation, i.e. 'coarse geometry + fine energy' (first step) and 'fine geometry + coarse energy' (second step) calculations. The first step corresponds to a hybrid model of the equivalence theory and the ultra-fine-group calculation, and the second step corresponds to the sub-group method. From the verification results, effective cross-sections by the new method show good agreement with the continuous energy Monte-Carlo results for various multi-region geometries including non-uniform fuel compositions and temperature distributions. The present method can accurately generate effective cross-sections with short computation time in general lattice physics calculations. (author)

  17. Standard model treatment of the radiative corrections to the neutron β-decay

    Bunatyan, G.G.

    2003-01-01

    Starting with the basic Lagrangian of the Standard Model, the radiative corrections to the neutron β-decay are acquired. The electroweak interactions are consistently taken into consideration amenably to the Weinberg-Salam theory. The effect of the strong quark-quark interactions on the neutron β-decay is parametrized by introducing the nucleon electromagnetic form factors and the weak nucleon transition current specified by the form factors g V , g A , ... The radiative corrections to the total decay probability W and to the asymmetry coefficient of the momentum distribution A are obtained to constitute δW ∼ 8.7 %, δA ∼ -2 %. The contribution to the radiative corrections due to allowance for the nucleon form factors and the nucleon excited states amounts up to a few per cent of the whole value of the radiative corrections. The ambiguity in description of the nucleon compositeness is surely what causes the uncertainties ∼ 0.1 % in evaluation of the neutron β-decay characteristics. For now, this puts bounds to the precision attainable in obtaining the element V ud of the CKM matrix and the g V , g A , ... values from experimental data processing

  18. REPOSITORY LAYOUT SUPPORTING DESIGN FEATURE NO.13 - WASTE PACKAGE SELF SHIELDING

    Owen, J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to develop a repository layout, for Feature No. 13, that will accommodate self-shielding waste packages (WP) with an areal mass loading of 25 metric tons of uranium per acre (MTU/acre). The scope of this analysis includes determination of the number of emplacement drifts, amount of emplacement drift excavation required, and a preliminary layout for illustrative purposes

  19. Self-shielding characteristics of aqueous self-cooled blankets for next generation fusion devices

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    The present study examines self-shielding characteristics for two aqueous self-cooled tritium producing driver blankets for next generation fusion devices. The aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept (ASCB) is a very simple blanket concept that relies on just structural material and coolant. Lithium compounds are dissolved in water to provide for tritium production. An ASCB driver blanket would provide a low technology and low temperature environment for blanket test modules in a next generation fusion reactor. The primary functions of such a blanket would be shielding, energy removal and tritium production. One driver blanket considered in this study concept relates to the one proposed for the Next European Torus (NET), while the second concept is indicative for the inboard shield design for the Engineering Test Reactor proposed by the USA (TIBER II/ETR). The driver blanket for NET is based on stainless steel for the structural material and aqueous solution, while the inboard shielding blanket for TIBER II/ETR is based on a tungsten/aqueous solution combination. The purpose of this study is to investigate self-shielding and heterogeneity effects in aqueous self-cooled blankets. It is found that no significant gains in tritium breeding can be achieved in the stainless steel blanket if spatial and energy self-shielding effects are considered, and the heterogeneity effects are also insignificant. The tungsten blanket shows a 5 percent increase in tritium production in the shielding blanket when energy and spatial self-shielding effects are accounted for. However, the tungsten blanket shows a drastic increase in the tritium breeding ratio due to heterogeneity effects. (author) 17 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Connection factor calculation for isotopic neutron flux measurements with foil detectors

    Avila L, J.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal and resonance neutron self-shielding factors, neutron flux distortion and edge effects as well as a connection factor for neutron flux profile around a foil detector have been calculated. A general expression for resonance self shielding factor is presented in order to take into account the most important resonances for a given isotope. A computer program SPRESYTER.BAS was written and results for In-115 and Au-197 foils are given

  1. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    Downar, T.

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system. The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multidimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system. Specifically, the methods here utilize the existing continuous energy SCALE5 module, CENTRM, and the multi-dimensional discrete ordinates solver, NEWT to develop a new code, CENTRM( ) NEWT. The work here addresses specific theoretical limitations in existing CENTRM resonance treatment, as well as investigates advanced numerical and parallel computing algorithms for CENTRM and NEWT in order to reduce the computational burden. The result of the work here will be a new computer code capable of performing problem dependent self-shielding analysis for both existing and proposed GENIV fuel designs. The objective of the work was to have an immediate impact on the safety analysis of existing reactors through improvements in the calculation of fuel temperature effects, as well as on the analysis of more sophisticated GENIV/NGNP systems through improvements in the depletion/transmutation of actinides for Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives.

  2. Importance of self-shielding for improving sensitivity coefficients in light water nuclear reactors

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new method has been developed for calculating sensitivity coefficients. • This method is based on the use of infinite dilution cross-sections instead of effective cross-sections. • The change of self-shielding factor due to cross-section perturbation has been considered. • SRAC and SAINT codes are used for calculating improved sensitivities, while MCNP code has been used for verification. - Abstract: In order to perform sensitivity analyzes in light water reactors where self-shielding effect becomes important, a new method has been developed for calculating sensitivity coefficient of core characteristics relative to the infinite dilution cross-sections instead of the effective cross-sections. This method considers the change of the self-shielding factor due to cross-section perturbation for different nuclides and reactions. SRAC and SAINT codes are used to calculate the improved sensitivity; while the accuracy of the present method has been verified by MCNP code and good agreement has been found

  3. Measurement of neutron flux distribution by semiconductor detector; merenje raspodele neutronskog fluksa poluprovodnickim detektorom

    Obradovic, D; Bosevski, T [Institut za nuklearne nauke Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1964-07-01

    Application of semiconductor detectors for measuring neutron flux distribution is about 10 times faster than measurements by activation foils and demands significantly lower reactor power. Following corrections are avoided: mass of activation foils which influences the self shielding, nuclear decay during activity measurements; counter dead-time. It is possible to control the measured data during experiment and repeat measurements if needed. Precision of the measurement is higher since it is possible to choose the wanted statistics. The method described in this paper is applied for measurements at the RB reactor. It is concluded that the method is suitable for fast measurements but the activation analysis is still indispensable.

  4. Analysis of mixed oxides critical experiments using the Hammer-Technion code with self-shielding treatment by Bondarenko method

    Abe, Alfredo Y.; Santos, Adimir dos

    1995-01-01

    The present work summarizes the verification of the treatment of self-shielding based on Bondarenko method in HAMMER-TECHNION cell code for the Pu O 2 -U O 2 critical system using JENDL-3 nuclear data library. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with the original treatment of self-shielding employed by HAMMER-TECHNION cell code. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig, 9 tabs

  5. Multiple scattering and attenuation corrections in Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments

    Dawidowski, J; Blostein, J J; Granada, J R

    2006-01-01

    Multiple scattering and attenuation corrections in Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments are analyzed. The theoretical basis of the method is stated, and a Monte Carlo procedure to perform the calculation is presented. The results are compared with experimental data. The importance of the accuracy in the description of the experimental parameters is tested, and the implications of the present results on the data analysis procedures is examined

  6. Use of digital computers for correction of gamma method and neutron-gamma method indications

    Lakhnyuk, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The program for the NAIRI-S computer is described which is intended for accounting and elimination of the effect of by-processes when interpreting gamma and neutron-gamma logging indications. By means of slight corrections it is possible to use the program as a mathematical basis for logging diagram standardization by the method of multidimensional regressive analysis and estimation of rock reservoir properties

  7. Correction for variable moderation and multiplication effects associated with thermal neutron coincidence counting

    Baron, N.

    1978-01-01

    A correction is described for multiplication and moderation when doing passive thermal neutron coincidence counting nondestructive assay measurements on powder samples of PuO 2 mixed arbitrarily with MgO, SiO 2 , and moderating material. The multiplication correction expression is shown to be approximately separable into the product of two independent terms; F/sub Pu/ which depends on the mass of 240 Pu, and F/sub αn/ which depends on properties of the matrix material. Necessary assumptions for separability are (1) isotopic abundances are constant, and (2) fission cross sections are independent of incident neutron energy: both of which are reasonable for the 8% 240 Pu powder samples considered here. Furthermore since all prompt fission neutrons are expected to have nearly the same energy distributions, variations among different samples can be due only to the moderating properties of the samples. Relative energy distributions are provided by a thermal neutron well counter having two concentric rings of 3 He proportional counters placed symmetrically about the well. Measured outer-to-inner ring ratios raised to an empirically determined power for coincidences, (N/sup I//N/sup O/)/sup Z/, and singles, (T/sup O//T/sup I/)/sup delta/, provide corrections for moderation and F/sub αn/ respectively, and F/sub Pu/ is approximated by M 240 /sup X//M 240 . The exponents are calibration constants determined by a least squares fitting procedure using standards' data. System calibration is greatly simplified using the separability principle. Once appropriate models are established for F/sub Pu/ and F/sub αn/, only a few standards are necessary to determine the calibration constants associated with these terms. Since F/sub Pu/ is expressed as a function of M 240 , correction for multiplication in a subsequent assay demands only a measurement of F/sub αn/

  8. Impact of the neutron detector choice on Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor for subcriticality measurement

    Talamo, Alberto, E-mail: alby@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Y.; Cao, Y.; Zhong, Z. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 99 acad. Krasin str., Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

    2012-03-11

    In subcritical assemblies, the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used to correct the measured reactivity from different detector positions. In addition to the measuring position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the detector material, the detector size, and the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons. The effective multiplication factor calculated by computer codes in criticality mode slightly differs from the average value obtained from the measurements in the different experimental channels of the subcritical assembly, which are corrected by the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor. Generally, this difference is due to (1) neutron counting errors; (2) geometrical imperfections, which are not simulated in the calculational model, and (3) quantities and distributions of material impurities, which are missing from the material definitions. This work examines these issues and it focuses on the detector choice and the calculation methodologies. The work investigated the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly of Belarus, which has been operated with three different fuel enrichments in the fast zone either: high (90%) and medium (36%), medium (36%), or low (21%) enriched uranium fuel.

  9. Impact of the neutron detector choice on Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor for subcriticality measurement

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Y.; Cao, Y.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.

    2012-01-01

    In subcritical assemblies, the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used to correct the measured reactivity from different detector positions. In addition to the measuring position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the detector material, the detector size, and the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons. The effective multiplication factor calculated by computer codes in criticality mode slightly differs from the average value obtained from the measurements in the different experimental channels of the subcritical assembly, which are corrected by the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor. Generally, this difference is due to (1) neutron counting errors; (2) geometrical imperfections, which are not simulated in the calculational model, and (3) quantities and distributions of material impurities, which are missing from the material definitions. This work examines these issues and it focuses on the detector choice and the calculation methodologies. The work investigated the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly of Belarus, which has been operated with three different fuel enrichments in the fast zone either: high (90%) and medium (36%), medium (36%), or low (21%) enriched uranium fuel.

  10. Calibration, checking and physical corrections for a new dual-spaced neutron porosity tool

    Smith, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    A new dual-spaced neutron tool has been developed that features high count rates and improved statistical precision and log repeatability. Environmental corrections including borehole diameter, standoff, and lithology are at acceptable levels for DSN-II. The effects of varying source-to-detector spacings and shielding are summarized. Porosity measurement resolution and statistical precision are discussed and it is indicated how tradeoffs between higher count rates and increased environmental corrections must be considered. The absolute calibration of a standard tool is based on its response to limestone test pits, field data, and theoretical calculations. Test data for actual manufactured tools are presented. Shop calibration and wellsite check procedures are discussed. The advantages of multiposition check operations are explained, including reduced sensitivity to check block positioning and external environment. An analysis is presented of errors from tool manufacturing, calibration, and check procedures. A generalized theory of neutron scattering and absorption has been developed to correct dual-spaced neutron logs for unusual minerals and fluids

  11. Heavy nucleus resonant absorption in heterogeneous lattices. I- Apollo 2 self-shielding formalism; Absorption resonnante des noyaux lourds dans les reseaux heterogenes. I -Formalisme du module d`autoprotection d`Apollo 2

    Coste, M.

    1994-01-01

    This note gives in detailed way the self-shielding formalism which is used in the multigroup transport code APOLLO2. The self-shielded cross-sections are performed with the same scheme as in APOLLO1. We use two equivalencies, first an heterogeneous/homogeneous equivalence which gives the reaction rates and then a multigroup equivalence in order to obtain the cross-sections which preserve these reaction rates. However, numerous improvements were implemented, specially in the homogenization step. Homogenization can be performed group per group with different modelizations of the heavy slowing-down operator (statistical, intermediary and ``wide resonance`` models), which allows us to fit correctly the resonance shapes. Moreover, we can take exactly into account the spatial interferences between resonant isotopes with the background matrix model. Consequently, we are now able to perform, for instance, the radial distribution of the resonant absorption inside a fuel pin. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Design of incoming neutron-beam for detecting oil dirt

    Zhao Jingwu; Chen Xiaocheng; Alimujiang Naimaiti; Aierken Abuliemu

    2012-01-01

    For the technique of neutron back-scattering, the neutron counts are non-linear and have a tendency toward saturation because of the neutron self-shielding. As a result, the measurement accuracy is reduced and the measurement range is limited. Using a simply model and comparing with experimental data, it is shown that, in the measurement of the thickness of oil dirt, by adjusting the ratio of thermal to epithermal neutrons, the neutron self: shielding is weakened. As a result, the non-linearity can be reduced and the measurement accuracy and range can be improved. (authors)

  13. Neutron flux measurements in C-9 capsule pressure tube

    Barbos, D.; Roth, C. S.; Gugiu, D.; Preda, M.

    2001-01-01

    C-9 capsule is a fuel testing facility in which the testing consists of a daily cycle ranging between the limits 100% power to 50% power. C-9 in-pile section with sample holder an instrumentation are introduced in G-9 and G-10 experimental channels. The experimental fuel channel has a maximum value when the in-pile section (pressure tube) is in G-9 channel and minimum value in G-10 channel. In this paper the main goals are determination or measurements of: - axial thermal neutron flux distribution in C-9 pressure tube both in G-9 and G-10 channel; - ratio of maximum neutron flux value in G-9 and the same value in G-9 channel and the same value in G-10 channel; - neutron flux-spectrum. On the basis of axial neutron flux distribution measurements, the experimental fuel element in sample holder position in set. Both axial neutron flux distribution of thermal neutrons and neutron flux-spectrum were performed using multi- foil activation technique. Activation rates were obtained by absolute measurements of the induced activity using gamma spectroscopy methods. To determine the axial thermal neutron flux distribution in G-9 and G-10, Cu 100% wire was irradiated at the reactor power of 2 MW. Ratio between the two maximum values, in G-9 and G-10 channels, is 2.55. Multi-foil activation method was used for neutron flux spectrum measurements. The neutron spectra and flux were obtained from reaction rate measurements by means of SAND 2 code. To obtain gamma-ray spectra, a HPGe detector connected to a multichannel analyzer was used. The spectrometer is absolute efficiency calibrated. The foils were irradiated at 2 MW reactor power in previously determined maximum flux position resulted from wire measurements. This reaction rates were normalized for 10 MW reactor power. Neutron self shielding corrections for the activation foils were applied. The self-shielding corrections are computed using Monte Carlo simulation methods. The measured integral flux is 1.1·10 14 n/cm 2 s

  14. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dose meters used in high-energy neutron environments improved and extended results based on a complete survey of all neutron spectra in IAEA-TRS-403

    Oparaji, U.; Tsai, Y. H.; Liu, Y. C.; Lee, K. W.; Patelli, E.; Sheu, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents improved and extended results of our previous study on corrections for conventional neutron dose meters used in environments with high-energy neutrons (E n > 10 MeV). Conventional moderated-type neutron dose meters tend to underestimate the dose contribution of high-energy neutrons because of the opposite trends of dose conversion coefficients and detection efficiencies as the neutron energy increases. A practical correction scheme was proposed based on analysis of hundreds of neutron spectra in the IAEA-TRS-403 report. By comparing 252 Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values derived from fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this study provides recommendations for neutron field characterization and the corresponding dose correction factors. Further sensitivity studies confirm the appropriateness of the proposed scheme and indicate that (1) the spectral correction factors are nearly independent of the selection of three commonly used calibration sources: 252 Cf, 241 Am-Be and 239 Pu-Be; (2) the derived correction factors for Bonner spheres of various sizes (6''-9'') are similar in trend and (3) practical high-energy neutron indexes based on measurements can be established to facilitate the application of these correction factors in workplaces. (authors)

  15. Moisture corrections in neutron coincidence counting of PuO2

    Stewart, J.E.; Menlove, H.O.

    1987-01-01

    Passive neutron coincidence counting is capable of 1% assay accuracy for pure, well-characterized PuO 2 samples that contain plutonium masses from a few tens of grams to several kilograms. Moisture in the sample can significantly bias the assay high by changing the (α,n) neutron production, the sample multiplication, and the detection efficiency. Monte Carlo calculations and an analytical model of coincidence counting have been used to quantify the individual and cumulative effects of moisture biases for two PuO 2 sample sizes and a range of moisture levels from 0 to 9 wt %. Results of the calculations suggest a simple correction procedure for moisture bias that is effective from 0 to 3 wt % H 2 O. The procedure requires that the moisture level in the sample be known before the coincidence measurement

  16. Benchmark experiments on neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall penetrations

    Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Lilley, S.; Naish, J.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Stamatelatos, I.; Syme, B.; Vasilopoulou, T.; contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    Neutronics experiments are performed at JET for validating in a real fusion environment the neutronics codes and nuclear data applied in ITER nuclear analyses. In particular, the neutron fluence through the penetrations of the JET torus hall is measured and compared with calculations to assess the capability of state-of-art numerical tools to correctly predict the radiation streaming in the ITER biological shield penetrations up to large distances from the neutron source, in large and complex geometries. Neutron streaming experiments started in 2012 when several hundreds of very sensitive thermo-luminescence detectors (TLDs), enriched to different levels in 6LiF/7LiF, were used to measure the neutron and gamma dose separately. Lessons learnt from this first experiment led to significant improvements in the experimental arrangements to reduce the effects due to directional neutron source and self-shielding of TLDs. Here we report the results of measurements performed during the 2013-2014 JET campaign. Data from new positions, at further locations in the South West labyrinth and down to the Torus Hall basement through the air duct chimney, were obtained up to about a 40 m distance from the plasma neutron source. In order to avoid interference between TLDs due to self-shielding effects, only TLDs containing natural Lithium and 99.97% 7Li were used. All TLDs were located in the centre of large polyethylene (PE) moderators, with natLi and 7Li crystals evenly arranged within two PE containers, one in horizontal and the other in vertical orientation, to investigate the shadowing effect in the directional neutron field. All TLDs were calibrated in the quantities of air kerma and neutron fluence. This improved experimental arrangement led to reduced statistical spread in the experimental data. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to calculate the air kerma due to neutrons and the neutron fluence at detector positions, using a JET model validated up to the

  17. Application of the characteristics method combined with advanced self-shielding models to an ACR-type cell

    Le Tellier, R.; Hebert, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the usage of the method of characteristics (MOC) with advanced self-shielding models for a fundamental lattice calculation on an ACR-type cell i.e. a cluster geometry with light water coolant and heavy water moderator. Comparison with the collision probability method (CP) show the consistency of the method of characteristics as implemented both in flux and self-shielding calculations. Acceleration techniques are tested in the different calculations and prove to be efficient. Comparisons with the Monte-Carlo code Tripoli4 show the advantage of a subgroup approach for self-shielding calculations : the difference in k eff is less than one standard deviation of the Tripoli4 calculation and in terms of total absorption rates, in the resolved resonances group, the maximum relative error is of the order of 3% localised in the most outer region of the central pin. (author)

  18. A Monte Carlo evaluation of analytical multiple scattering corrections for unpolarised neutron scattering and polarisation analysis data

    Mayers, J.; Cywinski, R.

    1985-03-01

    Some of the approximations commonly used for the analytical estimation of multiple scattering corrections to thermal neutron elastic scattering data from cylindrical and plane slab samples have been tested using a Monte Carlo program. It is shown that the approximations are accurate for a wide range of sample geometries and scattering cross-sections. Neutron polarisation analysis provides the most stringent test of multiple scattering calculations as multiply scattered neutrons may be redistributed not only geometrically but also between the spin flip and non spin flip scattering channels. A very simple analytical technique for correcting for multiple scattering in neutron polarisation analysis has been tested using the Monte Carlo program and has been shown to work remarkably well in most circumstances. (author)

  19. Monte Carlo calculation of correction factors for radionuclide neutron source emission rate measurement by manganese bath method

    Li Chunjuan; Liu Yi'na; Zhang Weihua; Wang Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The manganese bath method for measuring the neutron emission rate of radionuclide sources requires corrections to be made for emitted neutrons which are not captured by manganese nuclei. The Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP was used to simulate the manganese bath system of the standards for the measurement of neutron source intensity. The correction factors were calculated and the reliability of the model was demonstrated through the key comparison for the radionuclide neutron source emission rate measurements organized by BIPM. The uncertainties in the calculated values were evaluated by considering the sensitivities to the solution density, the density of the radioactive material, the positioning of the source, the radius of the bath, and the interaction cross-sections. A new method for the evaluation of the uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculation was given. (authors)

  20. Design of a control system for self-shielded irradiators with remote access capability

    Iyengar, R.D.; Verma, P.B.; Prasad, V.V.S.S.; George, Jain R.; Das, Tripti; Deshmukh, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    With self-shielded irradiators like Gamma chambers, and Blood irradiators are being sold by BRIT to customers both within and outside the country, it has become necessary to improve the quality of service without increasing the overheads. The recent advances in the field of communications and information technology can be exploited for improving the quality of service to the customers. A state of the art control system with remote accessibility has been designed for these irradiators enhancing their performance. This will provide an easy access to these units wherever they might be located, through the Internet. With this technology it will now be possible to attend to the needs of the customers, as regards fault rectification, error debugging, system software update, performance testing, data acquisition etc. This will not only reduce the downtime of these irradiators but also reduce the overheads. (author)

  1. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  2. Study for correction of neutron scattering in the calibration of the albedo individual monitor from the Neutron Laboratory (LN), IRD/CNEN-RJ, Brazil

    Freitas, B.M.; Silva, A.X. da

    2014-01-01

    The Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD) runs a neutron individual monitoring service with albedo type monitor and thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Moreover the largest number of workers exposed to neutrons in Brazil is exposed to 241 Am-Be fields. Therefore a study of the response of albedo dosemeter due to neutron scattering from 241 Am-Be source is important for a proper calibration. In this work, it has been evaluated the influence of the scattering correction in two distances at the Low Scattering Laboratory of the Neutron Laboratory of the Brazilian National Laboratory (Lab. Nacional de Metrologia Brasileira de Radiacoes Ionizantes) in the calibration of that albedo dosemeter for a 241 Am-Be source. (author)

  3. Geometry-based multiplication correction for passive neutron coincidence assay of materials with variable and unknown (α,n) neutron rates

    Langner, D.G.; Russo, P.A.

    1993-02-01

    We have studied the problem of assaying impure plutonium-bearing materials using passive neutron coincidence counting. We have developed a technique to analyze neutron coincidence data from impure plutonium samples that uses the bulk geometry of the sample to correct for multiplication in samples for which the (α,n) neutron production rate is unknown. This technique can be applied to any impure plutonium-bearing material whose matrix constituents are approximately constant, whose self-multiplication is low to moderate, whose plutonium isotopic composition is known and not substantially varying, and whose bulk geometry is measurable or can be derived. This technique requires a set of reference materials that have well-characterized plutonium contents. These reference materials are measured once to derive a calibration that is specific to the neutron detector and the material. The technique has been applied to molten salt extraction residues, PuF 4 samples that have a variable salt matrix, and impure plutonium oxide samples. It is also applied to pure plutonium oxide samples for comparison. Assays accurate to 4% (1 σ) were obtained for impure samples measured in a High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter II. The effects on the technique of variations in neutron detector efficiency with energy and the effects of neutron capture in the sample are discussed

  4. New developments in resonant mixture self-shielding treatment with Apollo code and application to Jules Horowitz reactor core calculation

    Coste-Delclaux, M.; Aggery, A.; Huot, N.

    2005-01-01

    APOLLO2 is a modular multigroup transport code developed by Cea in Saclay. Until last year, the self-shielding module could only treat one resonant isotope mixed with moderator isotopes. Consequently, the resonant mixture self-shielding treatment was an iterative one. Each resonant isotope of the mixture was treated separately, the other resonant isotopes of the mixture being then considered as moderator isotopes, that is to say non-resonant isotopes. This treatment could be iterated. Last year, we have developed a new method that consists in treating the resonant mixture as a unique entity. A main feature of APOLLO2 self-shielding module is that some implemented models are very general and therefore very powerful and versatile. We can give, as examples, the use of probability tables in order to describe the microscopic cross-section fluctuations or the TR slowing-down model that can deal with any resonance shape. The self-shielding treatment of a resonant mixture was developed essentially thanks to these two models. The calculations of a simplified Jules Horowitz reactor using a Monte-Carlo code (TRIPOLI4) as a reference and APOLLO2 in its standard and improved versions, show that, as far as the effective multiplication factor is concerned, the mixture treatment does not bring an improvement, because the new treatment suppresses compensation between the reaction rate discrepancies. The discrepancy of 300 pcm that appears with the reference calculation is in accordance with the technical specifications of the Jules Horowitz reactor

  5. Correcting the error in neutron moisture probe measurements caused by a water density gradient

    Wilson, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    If a neutron probe lies in or near a water density gradient, the probe may register a water density different to that at the measuring point. The effect of a thin stratum of soil containing an excess or depletion of water at various distances from a probe in an otherwise homogeneous system has been calculated, producing an 'importance' curve. The effect of these strata can be integrated over the soil region in close proximity to the probe resulting in the net effect of the presence of a water density gradient. In practice, the probe is scanned through the point of interest and the count rate at that point is corrected for the influence of the water density on each side of it. An example shows that the technique can reduce an error of 10 per cent to about 2 per cent

  6. Correction

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.].......[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.]....

  7. Neutron activation analysis of archaeological artifacts using the conventional relative method: a realistic approach for analysis of large samples

    Bedregal, P.S.; Mendoza, A.; Montoya, E.H.; Cohen, I.M.; Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires; Oscar Baltuano

    2012-01-01

    A new approach for analysis of entire potsherds of archaeological interest by INAA, using the conventional relative method, is described. The analytical method proposed involves, primarily, the preparation of replicates of the original archaeological pottery, with well known chemical composition (standard), destined to be irradiated simultaneously, in a well thermalized external neutron beam of the RP-10 reactor, with the original object (sample). The basic advantage of this proposal is to avoid the need of performing complicated effect corrections when dealing with large samples, due to neutron self shielding, neutron self-thermalization and gamma ray attenuation. In addition, and in contrast with the other methods, the main advantages are the possibility of evaluating the uncertainty of the results and, fundamentally, validating the overall methodology. (author)

  8. COMBINE7.0 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2008-09-01

    COMBINE7.0 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.0 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 finegroup cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko selfshielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those selfshielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.0 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a onedimensional, discrete

  9. COMBINE7.0 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Nigg, David W.

    2008-01-01

    COMBINE7.0 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.0 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 finegroup cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko selfshielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those selfshielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.0 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a onedimensional, discrete

  10. Measurement of thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction using electron linac-based neutron source

    Nguyen, Van Do; Pham, Duc Khue; Kim, Tien Thanh; Kim, Guinyun; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won

    2011-01-01

    The thermal neutron cross-section and the resonance integral of the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction have been measured by the activation method using a 197Au(n,γ) 198Au monitor reaction as a single comparator. The high-purity natural Ho and Au foils with and without a cadmium shield case of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated in a neutron field of the Pohang neutron facility. The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a calibrated p-type high-purity Ge detector. The correction factors for the γ-ray attenuation ( Fg), the thermal neutron self-shielding ( Gth), the resonance neutron self-shielding ( Gepi) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ( α) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross-section for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction has been determined to be 59.7 ± 2.5 barn, relative to the reference value of 98.65 ± 0.09 barn for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. By assuming the cadmium cut-off energy of 0.55 eV, the resonance integral for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction is 671 ± 47 barn, which is determined relative to the reference value of 1550 ± 28 barn for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. The present results are, in general, good agreement with most of the previously reported data within uncertainty limits.

  11. Neutron coincidence counting based on time interval analysis with dead time corrected one and two dimensional Rossi-alpha distributions: an application for passive neutron waste assay

    Bruggeman, M.; Baeten, P.; De Boeck, W.; Carchon, R.

    1996-03-01

    The report describes a new neutron multiplicity counting method based on Rossi-alpha distributions. The report also gives the necessary dead time correction formulas for the multiplicity counting method. The method was tested numerically using a Monte Carlo simulation of pulse trains. The use of this multiplicity method in the field of waste assay is explained: it can be used to determine the amount of fissile material in a waste drum without prior knowledge of the actual detection efficiency

  12. Weld metal microstructures of hardfacing deposits produced by self-shielded flux-cored arc welding

    Dumovic, M.; Monaghan, B.J.; Li, H.; Norrish, J.; Dunne, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    The molten pool weld produced during self-shielded flux-cored arc welding (SSFCAW) is protected from gas porosity arising from oxygen and nitrogen by reaction ('killing') of these gases by aluminium. However, residual Al can result in mixed micro-structures of δ-ferrite, martensite and bainite in hardfacing weld metals produced by SSFCAW and therefore, microstructural control can be an issue for hardfacing weld repair. The effect of the residual Al content on weld metal micro-structure has been examined using thermodynamic modeling and dilatometric analysis. It is concluded that the typical Al content of about 1 wt% promotes δ-ferrite formation at the expense of austenite and its martensitic/bainitic product phase(s), thereby compromising the wear resistance of the hardfacing deposit. This paper also demonstrates how the development of a Schaeffler-type diagram for predicting the weld metal micro-structure can provide guidance on weld filler metal design to produce the optimum microstructure for industrial hardfacing applications.

  13. Numerical estimates of multiple reaction corrections in neutron cross-section measurements

    Magnusson, G.

    1979-04-01

    A method to evaluate the effect of secondary neutrons in 14-15 MeV neutron cross-section measurements is presented. The emission spectra of secondary neutrons are calculated by means of the preequilibrium and statistical models. An expression for the collision probability in a homogenous body has been utilized in the calculations. (author)

  14. Comparative study on the use of self-shielded packages or returnable shielding for the land disposal of radioactive wastes

    Fitzpatrick, J.; Verrall, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    A comparative study has been carried out on the two philosophies for providing the radiological protection necessary for the transport and handling of packaged intermediate level wastes from their sites of origin to disposal. The two philosophies are self shielding and returnable shielding. The approach taken was to assess the cost and radiological impact differentials of two respective representative waste management procedures. The comparison indicated the merits of each procedure. As a consequence, a hybrid procedure was identified which combines the advantages of each philosophy. This hybrid procedure was used for further comparison. The results of the study indicate that the use of self shielded packages throughout will incur considerable extra expense and give only a small saving in radiological impact. (author)

  15. Effect of interpolation error in pre-processing codes on calculations of self-shielding factors and their temperature derivatives

    Ganesan, S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Ramanadhan, M.M.; Cullan, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate the effect of interpolation error in the pre-processing codes LINEAR, RECENT and SIGMA1 on calculations of self-shielding factors and their temperature derivatives. We consider the 2.0347 to 3.3546 keV energy region for 238 U capture, which is the NEACRP benchmark exercise on unresolved parameters. The calculated values of temperature derivatives of self-shielding factors are significantly affected by interpolation error. The sources of problems in both evaluated data and codes are identified and eliminated in the 1985 version of these codes. This paper helps to (1) inform code users to use only 1985 versions of LINEAR, RECENT, and SIGMA1 and (2) inform designers of other code systems where they may have problems and what to do to eliminate their problems. (author)

  16. Effect of interpolation error in pre-processing codes on calculations of self-shielding factors and their temperature derivatives

    Ganesan, S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Ramanadhan, M.M.; Cullen, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The authors investigate the effect of interpolation error in the pre-processing codes LINEAR, RECENT and SIGMA1 on calculations of self-shielding factors and their temperature derivatives. They consider the 2.0347 to 3.3546 keV energy region for /sup 238/U capture, which is the NEACRP benchmark exercise on unresolved parameters. The calculated values of temperature derivatives of self-shielding factors are significantly affected by interpolation error. The sources of problems in both evaluated data and codes are identified and eliminated in the 1985 version of these codes. This paper helps to (1) inform code users to use only 1985 versions of LINEAR, RECENT, and SIGMA1 and (2) inform designers of other code systems where they may have problems and what to do to eliminate their problems

  17. Rigidity spectrum of Forbush decrease calculated by neutron monitors data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances

    Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A; Sdobnov, V E; Kravtsova, M V

    2013-01-01

    Forbush decreases (Fd) of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity and geomagnetic storms are observed almost at the same time. Geomagnetic storm is a reason of significant disturbances of the magnetic cut off rigidity causing the distortion of the time profile of the Fd of the GCR intensity. We show some differences in the temporal changes of the rigidity spectra of Fd calculated by neutron monitors experimental data corrected and uncorrected for the changes of the geomagnetic cut off rigidity. Nevertheless, the general features of the temporal changes of the rigidity spectrum of Fd maintain as it was found in our previous investigations. Namely, at the beginning phase of Fd rigidity spectrum is relatively soft and gradually becomes hard up to reaching the minimum level of the GCR intensity; then the rigidity spectrum gradually becomes soft during the recovery phase of Fd. We also confirm that for the established temporal profiles of the rigidity spectrum of Fd a structural changes of the interplanetary magnetic field turbulence in the range of frequencies, 10 −-6 ÷10 −-5 Hz are responsible.

  18. The new solid target system at UNAM in a self-shielded 11 MeV cyclotron

    Zarate-Morales, A.; Gaspar-Carcamo, R. E.; Lopez-Rodriguez, V.; Flores-Moreno, A.; Trejo-Ballado, F.; Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    A dual beam line (BL) self-shielded RDS 111 cyclotron for radionuclide production was installed at the School of Medicine of the National Autonomous University of Mexico in 2001. One of the BL’s was upgraded to Eclipse HP (Siemens) in 2008 and the second BL was recently upgraded (June 2011) to the same version with the option for the irradiation of solid targets for the production of metallic radioisotopes.

  19. CO Self-Shielding as a Mechanism to Make 16O-Enriched Solids in the Solar Nebula

    Joseph A. Nuth, III

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical self-shielding of CO has been proposed as a mechanism to produce solids observed in the modern, 16O-depleted solar system. This is distinct from the relatively 16O-enriched composition of the solar nebula, as demonstrated by the oxygen isotopic composition of the contemporary sun. While supporting the idea that self-shielding can produce local enhancements in 16O-depleted solids, we argue that complementary enhancements of 16O-enriched solids can also be produced via C16O-based, Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT catalytic processes that could produce much of the carbonaceous feedstock incorporated into accreting planetesimals. Local enhancements could explain observed 16O enrichment in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs, such as those from the meteorite, Isheyevo (CH/CHb, as well as in chondrules from the meteorite, Acfer 214 (CH3. CO self-shielding results in an overall increase in the 17O and 18O content of nebular solids only to the extent that there is a net loss of C16O from the solar nebula. In contrast, if C16O reacts in the nebula to produce organics and water then the net effect of the self-shielding process will be negligible for the average oxygen isotopic content of nebular solids and other mechanisms must be sought to produce the observed dichotomy between oxygen in the Sun and that in meteorites and the terrestrial planets. This illustrates that the formation and metamorphism of rocks and organics need to be considered in tandem rather than as isolated reaction networks.

  20. The self shielding module of Apollo.II; Module d`autoprotection du code Apollo.II

    Sanchez, R.

    1994-06-01

    This note discusses the methods used in the APOLLO.II code for the calculation of self shielded multigroup cross sections. Basically, the calculation consists in characterizing a heterogenous medium with a single parameter: the background cross section, which is in then used to interpolate reaction rates from pre tabulated values. Very fine multigroup slowing down calculations in homogenous media are used to generate these tables, which contain absorption, diffusion and production reaction rates per group, resonant isotope, temperature and background cross section. Multigroup self shielded cross sections are determined from an equivalence that preserves absorption rates at a slowing down problem with given sources. This article gives a detailed description of the PIC and ``dilution matrix`` formalisms that are used in the homogenization step, as well as the utilization of Bell macro-groups and the different quadrature formulas that may be used in the calculations. Self shielding techniques for isotopic resonant mixtures are also discussed. (author). 2 refs., 193 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A Modeling of BWR-MOX assemblies based on the characteristics method combined with advanced self-shielding models

    Le Tellier, R.; Hebert, A.; Le Tellier, R.; Santamarina, A.; Litaize, O.

    2008-01-01

    Calculations based on the characteristics method and different self-shielding models are presented for 9 x 9 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies fully loaded with mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. The geometry of these assemblies was recovered from the BASALA experimental program. We have focused our study on three configurations simulating the different voiding conditions that an assembly can undergo in a BWR pressure vessel. A parametric study was carried out with respect to the spatial discretization, the tracking parameters, and the anisotropy order. Comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations in terms of k eff , radiative capture, and fission rates were performed to validate the computational tools. The results are in good agreement between the stochastic and deterministic approaches. The mutual self-shielding model recently introduced within the framework of the Ribon extending self-shielding method appears to be useful for this type of assemblies. Indeed, in the calculation of these MOX benchmarks, the overlapping of resonances, especially between 238 U and 240 Pu, plays an important role due to the spectral strengthening of the flux as the voiding percentage is increased. The method of characteristics is shown to be adequate to perform accurate calculations handling a fine spatial discretization. (authors)

  2. Experience in developing and using the VITAMIN-C 171-neutron, 36-gamma-ray group cross-section library

    Roussin, R.W.; Weisbin, C.R.; White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.; Greene, N.M.; Ford, W.E. III; Wright, J.B.; Diggs, B.R.

    1978-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy (DMFE) and Reactor Research and Technology (DRRT) jointly sponsored the development of a coupled, fine-group cross-section library. The 171-neutron, 36-gamma-ray group library is intended to be applicable to fusion reactor neutronics and LMFBR core and shield analysis. Versions of the library are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in both AMPX and CCCC formats. Computer codes for energy group collapsing, interpolation on Bondarenko factors for resonance self-shielding and temperature corrections, and various other useful data manipulations are available. The experience gained in the utilization of this library is discussed. Indications are that this venture, which is designed to allow users to derive problem-dependent cross sections from a fine-group master library, has been a success

  3. Performance of advanced self-shielding models in DRAGON Version4 on analysis of a high conversion light water reactor lattice

    Karthikeyan, Ramamoorthy; Hebert, Alain

    2008-01-01

    A high conversion light water reactor lattice has been analysed using the code DRAGON Version4. This analysis was performed to test the performance of the advanced self-shielding models incorporated in DRAGON Version4. The self-shielding models are broadly classified into two groups - 'equivalence in dilution' and 'subgroup approach'. Under the 'equivalence in dilution' approach we have analysed the generalized Stamm'ler model with and without Nordheim model and Riemann integration. These models have been analysed also using the Livolant-Jeanpierre normalization. Under the 'subgroup approach', we have analysed Statistical self-shielding model based on physical probability tables and Ribon extended self-shielding model based on mathematical probability tables. This analysis will help in understanding the performance of advanced self-shielding models for a lattice that is tight and has a large fraction of fissions happening in the resonance region. The nuclear data for the analysis was generated in-house. NJOY99.90 was used for generating libraries in DRAGLIB format for analysis using DRAGON and A Compact ENDF libraries for analysis using MCNP5. The evaluated datafiles were chosen based on the recommendations of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on the WIMS Library Update Project. The reference solution for the problem was obtained using Monte Carlo code MCNP5. It was found that the Ribon extended self-shielding model based on mathematical probability tables using correlation model performed better than all other models

  4. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  5. Correcting the effects of the matrix using capture gamma-ray spectrometry: Application to measurement by Active Neutron Interrogation

    Baudry, G.

    2003-11-01

    In the field of the measurement of low masses of fissile material ( 235 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu) in radioactive waste drums, the Active Neutron Interrogation is a non-destructive method achieving good results. It does however remain reliant upon uncertainties related to the matrix effects on interrogation and fission neutrons. The aim of this thesis is to develop a correction method able to take into account these matrix effects by quantifying the amount of absorbent materials (chlorine and hydrogen) in a 118- liter homogeneous matrix. The main idea is to use the gamma-ray spectrometry of gamma emitted by neutron captures to identify and quantify the composition of the matrix. An indicator from its chlorine content is then deduced in order to choose the calibration coefficient which best represents the real composition of the matrix. This document firstly presents the needs of control and characterization of radioactive objects, and the means used in the field of nuclear measurement. Emphases is put in particular on the Active Neutron Interrogation method. The matrices of interest are those made of light technological waste (density ≤ 0,4 g/cm 3 ) containing hydrogenated and chlorinated materials. The advantages of gamma-rays emitted by neutron captures for the determination of a chlorine content indicator of the matrices and the principles of the correction method are then explained. Measurements have been firstly realized with an existing Neutron Interrogation device (PROMETHEE 6). Such measurements have proven its inadequacy: no signal from the matrix hydrogen was detected, due to an intense signal from the polyethylene contained in some cell elements. Moreover, the matrix chlorine content appeared difficult to be measured. A new and specific device, named REGAIN and dedicated to active gamma-rays spectrometry, was defined with the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The experiments conducted with this new device made it possible to detect the hydrogen from the

  6. CO Self-Shielding as a Mechanism to Make O-16 Enriched Solids in the Solar Nebula

    Nuth, Joseph A. III; Johnson, Natasha M.; Hill, Hugh G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical self-shielding of CO has been proposed as a mechanism to produce solids observed in the modern, O-16 depleted solar system. This is distinct from the relatively O-16 enriched composition of the solar nebula, as demonstrated by the oxygen isotopic composition of the contemporary sun. While supporting the idea that self-shielding can produce local enhancements in O-16 depleted solids, we argue that complementary enhancements of O-16 enriched solids can also be produced via CO-16 based, Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) catalytic processes that could produce much of the carbonaceous feedstock incorporated into accreting planetesimals. Local enhancements could explain observed O-16 enrichment in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), such as those from the meteorite, Isheyevo (CH/CHb), as well as in chondrules from the meteorite, Acfer 214 (CH3). CO selfshielding results in an overall increase in the O-17 and O-18 content of nebular solids only to the extent that there is a net loss of CO-16 from the solar nebula. In contrast, if CO-16 reacts in the nebula to produce organics and water then the net effect of the self-shielding process will be negligible for the average oxygen isotopic content of nebular solids and other mechanisms must be sought to produce the observed dichotomy between oxygen in the Sun and that in meteorites and the terrestrial planets. This illustrates that the formation and metamorphism of rocks and organics need to be considered in tandem rather than as isolated reaction networks.

  7. Correction

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  8. Automatic welding technologies for long-distance pipelines by use of all-position self-shielded flux cored wires

    Zeng Huilin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the automatic welding of pipes in a complex operation environment, an automatic welding system has been developed by use of all-position self-shielded flux cored wires due to their advantages, such as all-position weldability, good detachability, arc's stability, low incomplete fusion, no need for welding protective gas or protection against wind when the wind speed is < 8 m/s. This system consists of a welding carrier, a guide rail, an auto-control system, a welding source, a wire feeder, and so on. Welding experiments with this system were performed on the X-80 pipeline steel to determine proper welding parameters. The welding technique comprises root welding, filling welding and cover welding and their welding parameters were obtained from experimental analysis. On this basis, the mechanical properties tests were carried out on welded joints in this case. Results show that this system can help improve the continuity and stability of the whole welding process and the welded joints' inherent quality, appearance shape, and mechanical performance can all meet the welding criteria for X-80 pipeline steel; with no need for windbreak fences, the overall welding cost will be sharply reduced. Meanwhile, more positive proposals were presented herein for the further research and development of this self-shielded flux core wires.

  9. Influence of preheating on API 5L-X80 pipeline joint welding with self shielded flux-cored wire

    Cooper, R.; Silva, J. H. F.; Trevisan, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    The present work refers to the characterization of API 5L-X80 pipeline joints welded with self-shielded flux cored wire. This process was evaluated under preheating conditions, with an uniform and steady heat input. All joints were welded in flat position (1G), with the pipe turning and the torch still. Tube dimensions were 762 mm in external diameter and 16 mm in thickness. Welds were applied on single V-groove, with six weld beads, along with three levels of preheating temperatures (room temperature, 100 degree centigree, 160 degree centigree). These temperatures were maintained as inter pass temperature. The filler metal E71T8-K6 with mechanical properties different from parent metal was used in under matched conditions. The weld characterization is presented according to the mechanical test results of tensile strength, hardness and impact test. The mechanical tests were conducted according to API 1104, AWS and ASTM standards. API 1104 and API 51 were used as screening criteria. According to the results obtained, it was possible to remark that it is appropriate to weld API 5L-X80 steel ducts with Self-shielded Flux Cored wires, in conformance to the API standards and no preheat temperature is necessary. (Author) 22 refs

  10. Correction

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Gorelik, G., & Shackelford, T.K. (2011. Human sexual conflict from molecules to culture. Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 564–587: The authors wish to correct an omission in citation to the existing literature. In the final paragraph on p. 570, we neglected to cite Burch and Gallup (2006 [Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2006. The psychobiology of human semen. In S. M. Platek & T. K. Shackelford (Eds., Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty (pp. 141–172. New York: Cambridge University Press.]. Burch and Gallup (2006 reviewed the relevant literature on FSH and LH discussed in this paragraph, and should have been cited accordingly. In addition, Burch and Gallup (2006 should have been cited as the originators of the hypothesis regarding the role of FSH and LH in the semen of rapists. The authors apologize for this oversight.

  11. Correction

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  12. Correction

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  13. Attenuation data of point isotropic neutron sources up to 400MeV in water, ordinary concrete and iron

    Kotegawa, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sakamoto, Yukio; Nakane, Yoshihiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1994-08-01

    A comprehensive attenuation data of dose equivalent for point isotropic monoenergetic neutron sources up to 400MeV in infinite shields of water, ordinary concrete and iron has been calculated using the ANISN-JR code and a neutron-photon multigroup macroscopic cross section HIL086R. The attenuation factors were fitted to a 4th order polynomial exponent formula, making possible to use easily for point kernel codes. Additional data in finite shielding geometry was also calculated to correct the effect due to infinite medium, giving the maximum correction of 0.23 in the region for more 400 cm distance from neutron source of 400 MeV in iron shield. Effective attenuation length for monoenergetic neutrons have been studied in detail. Subsequently, it was shown that the attenuation length was strongly dependent upon the penetration length and the Moyer`s formula using a single attenuation length brought large error into the dose estimation behind thick shields for the intermediate energy neutrons up to 400 MeV. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that there was difference more than 50 % in the attenuation length of iron between the calculations with HIL086R and HIL086 because of the self-shielding effect. (author).

  14. Relativistic corrections to one-particle neutron levels in the harmonic oscillator well

    Yanavichyus, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Relativistic corrections to mass and potential energy for one-particle levels in the harmonic oscillator well are calculated in the first approximation of the perturbation theory. These corrections are, mainly negliqible, but they sharply increase with growth of the head and orbital quantum numbers. For the state 1s the relativistic correction is of the order of 0.01 MeV, and for 3p it is equal to 0.4 MeV. Thus, the relativistic correction for certain states approaches the energy of spin-orbital interactions and it should be taken into account in calculating the energy of one-particle levels

  15. Feasibility studies on large sample neutron activation analysis using a low power research reactor

    Gyampo, O.

    2008-06-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) can be directly applied to samples with masses in grams. Samples weights were in the range of 0.5g to 5g. Therefore, the representativity of the sample is improved as well as sensitivity. Irradiation of samples was done using a low power research reactor. The correction for the neutron self-shielding within the sample is determined from measurement of the neutron flux depression just outside the sample. Correction for gamma ray self-attenuation in the sample was performed via linear attenuation coefficients derived from transmission measurements. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of data were done using gamma ray spectrometry (HPGe detector). The results of this study on the possibilities of large sample NAA using a miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) show clearly that the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) at the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) can be used for sample analyses up to 5 grams (5g) using the pneumatic transfer systems.

  16. Simulation study of the photon quality correction factors of ionization chambers for FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam

    Koivunoro, H.; Uusi-Simola, J.; Savolainen, S.; Kotiluoto, P.; Auterinen, I.; Kosunen, A.

    2006-01-01

    At FiR 1 BNCT facility in Finland, neutron-insensitive Mg(Ar) ionization chambers are used for photon dose measurements in an epithermal neutron beam. Previously, photon sensitivity factors for the chamber for the measurements in a water phantom in FiR 1 beam have been determined experimentally from measurements in 60 Co gamma and in a 6 MV clinical accelerator photon beams. However, the response of the ionization chamber in a water phantom depends on energy spectrum and angle of the photons and the secondary electrons created inside the phantom and may differ depending on type of the irradiation source (accelerator vs. an epithermal neutron beam). Also, the experimental sensitivity factor does not take into account the possible perturbations in the photon production in phantom caused by the ionization chamber materials. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the photon quality correction factors (k Qγ ) for the Mg(Ar) chamber at the FiR 1 beam through computer simulations. In this study, the k Qγ factors have been determined for Mg(Ar) chamber from Monte Carlo calculations of absorbed photon dose at two depths in a water phantom using MCNP code. The k qγ factors obtained with this method are compared to the sensitivity factors determined with measurements in an accelerator photon beam and to the k Qγ factors published previously. (author)

  17. Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman, vibrational analysis with anharmonic corrections, and scaled quantum mechanical force field for polycrystalline L-alanine

    Williams, Robert W. [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Uniformed Services University, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20815 (United States)], E-mail: bob@bob.usuhs.mil; Schluecker, Sebastian [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Hudson, Bruce S. [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2008-01-22

    A scaled quantum mechanical harmonic force field (SQMFF) corrected for anharmonicity is obtained for the 23 K L-alanine crystal structure using van der Waals corrected periodic boundary condition density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the PBE functional. Scale factors are obtained with comparisons to inelastic neutron scattering (INS), Raman, and FT-IR spectra of polycrystalline L-alanine at 15-23 K. Calculated frequencies for all 153 normal modes differ from observed frequencies with a standard deviation of 6 wavenumbers. Non-bonded external k = 0 lattice modes are included, but assignments to these modes are presently ambiguous. The extension of SQMFF methodology to lattice modes is new, as are the procedures used here for providing corrections for anharmonicity and van der Waals interactions in DFT calculations on crystals. First principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations are performed on the L-alanine crystal structure at a series of classical temperatures ranging from 23 K to 600 K. Corrections for zero-point energy (ZPE) are estimated by finding the classical temperature that reproduces the mean square displacements (MSDs) measured from the diffraction data at 23 K. External k = 0 lattice motions are weakly coupled to bonded internal modes.

  18. Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman, vibrational analysis with anharmonic corrections, and scaled quantum mechanical force field for polycrystalline L-alanine

    Williams, Robert W.; Schluecker, Sebastian; Hudson, Bruce S.

    2008-01-01

    A scaled quantum mechanical harmonic force field (SQMFF) corrected for anharmonicity is obtained for the 23 K L-alanine crystal structure using van der Waals corrected periodic boundary condition density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the PBE functional. Scale factors are obtained with comparisons to inelastic neutron scattering (INS), Raman, and FT-IR spectra of polycrystalline L-alanine at 15-23 K. Calculated frequencies for all 153 normal modes differ from observed frequencies with a standard deviation of 6 wavenumbers. Non-bonded external k = 0 lattice modes are included, but assignments to these modes are presently ambiguous. The extension of SQMFF methodology to lattice modes is new, as are the procedures used here for providing corrections for anharmonicity and van der Waals interactions in DFT calculations on crystals. First principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations are performed on the L-alanine crystal structure at a series of classical temperatures ranging from 23 K to 600 K. Corrections for zero-point energy (ZPE) are estimated by finding the classical temperature that reproduces the mean square displacements (MSDs) measured from the diffraction data at 23 K. External k = 0 lattice motions are weakly coupled to bonded internal modes

  19. QCD corrections to neutron electric dipole moment from dimension-six four-quark operators

    Hisano, Junji, E-mail: hisano@eken.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8568 (Japan); Tsumura, Koji, E-mail: ko2@eken.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yang, Masaki J.S., E-mail: yang@eken.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-07-18

    In this Letter, the renormalization-group equations for the (flavor-conserving) CP-violating interaction are derived up to the dimension six, including all the four-quark operators, at one-loop level. We apply them to the models with the neutral scalar boson or the color-octet scalar boson which have CP-violating Yukawa interactions with quarks, and discuss the neutron electric dipole moment in these models.

  20. New laser technique revives old ideas for thermoluminescence neutron dosimetry

    Braeunlich, P.; Brown, M.; Gasiot, J.; Fillard, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Laser heating is discussed as a means to evaluate thermoluminescence dosimeters in neutron dosimetry. Direct energy coupling from the photon beam to the phonons of the TL material permits heating of thin layers with rates of temperature increase exceeding 10 4 Ks - 1 . Rapid TLD evaluation will allow the design of dosimetry badges containing a number of different small thin film TLD elements in various orientations and behind appropriate filters, hydrogenous radiators, etc. Desired redundance is readily possible by using back-up TLDs for every specific task. Reading occurs with a scanning laser beam rather than by mechanically manipulating the TLD toward a fixed heat source. Improvements in the signal-to-noise ratio of up to a factor of 1000 are readily obtained. Thus, sensitive thin-film TLDs can be designed with negligible self-shielding for thermal neutrons in albedo applications and with known, nearly energy dependent cavity correction factors for dosimetry in mixed n-#betta# fields. Due to the greatly increased sensitivity possible with fast laser heating, significant advances are expected in the fast neutron dosimetry techniques which are based on hydrogeneous proton radiators or LET-dependent slow peak formation

  1. Large sample neutron activation analysis of a reference inhomogeneous sample

    Vasilopoulou, T.; Athens National Technical University, Athens; Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.; Koster-Ammerlaan, M.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    A benchmark experiment was performed for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) of a large inhomogeneous sample. The reference sample was developed in-house and consisted of SiO 2 matrix and an Al-Zn alloy 'inhomogeneity' body. Monte Carlo simulations were employed to derive appropriate correction factors for neutron self-shielding during irradiation as well as self-attenuation of gamma rays and sample geometry during counting. The large sample neutron activation analysis (LSNAA) results were compared against reference values and the trueness of the technique was evaluated. An agreement within ±10% was observed between LSNAA and reference elemental mass values, for all matrix and inhomogeneity elements except Samarium, provided that the inhomogeneity body was fully simulated. However, in cases that the inhomogeneity was treated as not known, the results showed a reasonable agreement for most matrix elements, while large discrepancies were observed for the inhomogeneity elements. This study provided a quantification of the uncertainties associated with inhomogeneity in large sample analysis and contributed to the identification of the needs for future development of LSNAA facilities for analysis of inhomogeneous samples. (author)

  2. Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis of Heterogeneous Samples

    Stamatelatos, I.E.; Vasilopoulou, T.; Tzika, F.

    2018-01-01

    A Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis (LSNAA) technique was developed for non-destructive analysis of heterogeneous bulk samples. The technique incorporated collimated scanning and combining experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations for the identification of inhomogeneities in large volume samples and the correction of their effect on the interpretation of gamma-spectrometry data. Corrections were applied for the effect of neutron self-shielding, gamma-ray attenuation, geometrical factor and heterogeneous activity distribution within the sample. A benchmark experiment was performed to investigate the effect of heterogeneity on the accuracy of LSNAA. Moreover, a ceramic vase was analyzed as a whole demonstrating the feasibility of the technique. The LSNAA results were compared against results obtained by INAA and a satisfactory agreement between the two methods was observed. This study showed that LSNAA is a technique capable to perform accurate non-destructive, multi-elemental compositional analysis of heterogeneous objects. It also revealed the great potential of the technique for the analysis of precious objects and artefacts that need to be preserved intact and cannot be damaged for sampling purposes. (author)

  3. High energy resolution measurement of the sup 238 U neutron capture yield from 1 to 100 keV

    Macklin, R.L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Perez, R.B. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); De Saussure, G.; Ingle, R.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the precise determination of the {sup 238}U neutron capture yield (i.e. the probability of neutron capture) as a function of neutron energy with the highest available neutron energy resolution. The motivation for this undertaking arises from the central role played by the {sup 238}U neutron capture process in the neutron balance of both thermal reactors and fast breeder reactors. The present measurement was performed using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) facility. The pulsed beam of neutrons from the ORELA facility is collimated on a sample of {sup 238}U. The neutron capture rate in the sample is measured, as a function of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) by detecting the {gamma}-rays from the {sup 238}U(n, {gamma}){sup 239}U reaction with a large {gamma}-ray detector surrounding the {sup 238}U sample. At each energy, the capture yield is proportional to the observed capture rate divided by the measured intensity of the neutron beam. The constant of proportionality (the normalization constant) is obtained from the ratio of theoretical to experimentally measured areas under small {sup 238}U resonances where the resonance parameters have been determined from high-resolution {sup 238}U transmission measurements. The cross section for the reaction {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}){sup 239}U can be derived from the measured capture yield if one applies appropriate corrections for multiple scattering and resonance self-shielding. Some 200 {sup 238}U neutron resonances in the energy range from 250 eV to 10 keV have been observed which had not been detected in previous measurements. (author).

  4. The fortran programme for the calculation of the absorption and double scattering corrections in cross-section measurements with fast neutrons using the monte Carlo method (1963); Programme fortran pour le calcul des corrections d'absorption et de double diffusion dans les mesures de sections efficaces pour les neutrons rapides par la methode de monte-carlo (1963)

    Fernandez, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    A calculation for double scattering and absorption corrections in fast neutron scattering experiments using Monte-Carlo method is given. Application to cylindrical target is presented in FORTRAN symbolic language. (author) [French] Un calcul des corrections de double diffusion et d'absorption dans les experiences de diffusion de neutrons rapides par la methode de Monte-Carlo est presente. L'application au cas d'une cible cylindrique est traitee en langage symbolique FORTRAN. (auteur)

  5. Simulations of the instability of the m=1 self-shielding diocotron mode in finite-length nonneutral plasmas

    Mason, Grant W.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2002-01-01

    The 'self-shielding' m=1 diocotron mode in Malmberg-Penning traps has been known for over a decade to be unstable for finite length nonneutral plasmas with hollow density profiles. Early theoretical efforts were unsuccessful in accounting for the exponential growth and/or the magnitude of the growth rate. Recent theoretical work has sought to resolve the discrepancy either as a consequence of the shape of the plasma ends or as a kinetic effect resulting from a modified distribution function as a consequence of the protocol used to form the hollow profiles in experiments. We have investigated both of these finite length mechanisms in selected test cases using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell code that allows realistic treatment of shape and kinetic effects. We find that a persistent discrepancy of a factor of 2-3 remains between simulation and experimental values of the growth rate

  6. Measurement of thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals for sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As by using sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be isotopic neutron source

    Karadag, M; Tan, M; Oezmen, A

    2003-01-01

    Thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals for the sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As reactions were measured by the activation method. The experimental samples with and without a cylindrical Cd shield case in 1 mm wall thickness were irradiated in an isotropic neutron field of the sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be neutron source. The induced activities in the samples were measured by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry with a calibrated reverse-electrode germanium detector. Thermal neutron cross-sections for 2200 m/s neutrons and resonance integrals for the sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As reactions have been obtained relative to the reference values, sigma sub 0 =13.3+-0.1 b and I sub 0 =14.0+-0.3 b for the sup 5 sup 5 Mn(n,gamma) sup 5 sup 6 Mn reaction as a single comparator. The necessary correction factors for gamma attenuation, thermal neutron and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into...

  7. Verification of the accuracy of Doppler broadened, self-shielded multigroup cross sections for fast power reactor applications

    Ganesan, S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Ramanadhan, M.M.; Cullen, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Verification results for Doppler broadening and self-shielding are presented. One of the important results presented is that the original SIGMA1 method of numerical Doppler broadening has now been demonstrated to be inaccurate and not capable of producing results to within required accuracies. Fortunately, due to this study, the SIGMA1 method has been significantly improved and the new SIGMA1 is now capable of producing results to within required accuracies. Although this paper presents results based upon using only one code system, it is important to realize that the original SIGMA1 method is presently used in many cross-section processing code systems; the results of this paper indicate that unless these other code systems are updated to include the new SIGMA1 method, the results produced by these code systems could be very inaccurate. The objectives of the IAEA nuclear data processing code verification project are reviewed as well as the requirements for the accuracy of calculation of Doppler coefficients and the present status of these calculations. The initial results of Doppler broadening and self-shielding calculations are presented and the inconsistency of the results which led to the discovery of errors in the original SIGMA1 method of Doppler broadening are pointed out. Analysis of the errors found and improvements in the SIGMA1 method are presented. Improved results are presented in order to demonstrate that the new SIGMA1 method can produce results within required accuracies. Guidelines are presented to limit the uncertainty introduced due to cross-section processing in order to balance available computer resources to accuracy requirements. Finally cross-section processing code users are invited to participate in the IAEA processing code verification project in order to verify the accuracy of their calculated results. (author)

  8. Neutron flux calculations for criticality safety analysis using the narrow resonance approximations. Vol. 2

    Hathout, A M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, NC-NSRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The narrow resonance approximation is applicable for all low-energy resonances and the heaviest nuclides. It is of great importance in neutron calculations, hence, fertile isotopes do not undergo fission at resonance energies. The effect of overestimating the self shielded group averaged cross-section data for a given resonance nuclide can be fairly serious. In the present work, a detailed study, and derivation of the problem of self-shielding are carried-out through the information of Hansen-roach library which is used for criticality safety analysis. The intermediate neutron flux spectrum is analyzed, using the narrow resonance approximation. The resonance self-shielded values of various cross-sections are determined. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Neutron activation analysis of copper traces: a study for sodium correction factor

    Tripathi, A.B.R.; Bhadkambekar, C.A.; Basu, A.K.; Chattopadhyay, N.

    2007-01-01

    Peak ratio correction factors for accurate quantitative determination of copper by NAA via 64 Cu radioisotope in presence of high 24 Na radioactivities has been established. Copper is the principal element as a marker of bullet residues on targets in connection to forensic ballistics cases. Reliable and precise estimation of copper by NAA either via non-destructive way or by resorting to radiochemical separation is of importance in forensic analysis for arriving at definitive inferences. However, majority of samples originating from wearing apparels, paper, leather, skin, glass or any other metal exhibit matrices contain high levels of sodium. The NAA scheme for determination of copper rests on measurements of net counts at 511 KeV which is the positron annihilation peak of 64 Cu. 24 Na also contributes significantly exactly at 511 KeV of gamma energy albeit by different mechanism i.e., by pair production. Therefore, total signal at 511 KeV is contributed by both. The easiest approach for correct estimation of copper traces has been established by the peak ratio correction factor. This has significance as both 64 Cu and 24 Na have comparable half lives, hence, as such time gap measurements cannot improve the situation. The consistency of peak ratio correction factor could be established for a particular geometry. (author)

  10. Validation of MCNP NPP Activation Simulations for Decommissioning Studies by Analysis of NPP Neutron Activation Foil Measurement Campaigns

    Volmert Ben

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an overview of the Swiss Nuclear Power Plant (NPP activation methodology is presented and the work towards its validation by in-situ NPP foil irradiation campaigns is outlined. Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG in The Netherlands has been given the task of performing the corresponding neutron metrology. For this purpose, small Aluminium boxes containing a set of circular-shaped neutron activation foils have been prepared. After being irradiated for one complete reactor cycle, the sets have been successfully retrieved, followed by gamma-spectrometric measurements of the individual foils at NRG. Along with the individual activities of the foils, the reaction rates and thermal, intermediate and fast neutron fluence rates at the foil locations have been determined. These determinations include appropriate corrections for gamma self-absorption and neutron self-shielding as well as corresponding measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the NPP Monte Carlo calculations with the results of the foil measurements is done by using an individual generic MCNP model functioning as an interface and allowing the simulation of individual foil activation by predetermined neutron spectra. To summarize, the comparison between calculation and measurement serve as a sound validation of the Swiss NPP activation methodology by demonstrating a satisfying agreement between measurement and calculation. Finally, the validation offers a chance for further improvements of the existing NPP models by ensuing calibration and/or modelling optimizations for key components and structures.

  11. Contribution to the study of the unresolved resonance range of the neutrons cross sections

    Noguere, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    This document presents the statistical description of neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance range. The modeling of the total cross section and of the 'shape - elastic' cross section is based on the 'average R-Matrix' formalism. The partial cross sections describing the radiative capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and fission process are calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach formalism with width fluctuation corrections. In the unresolved resonance range, these models depend on the average resonance parameters (neutron strength function Sc, mean level spacing D c , average partial reaction widths Γ c , channel radius a c , effective radius R' and distant level parameter R-bar c ∞ ). The codes (NJOY, CALENDF...) dedicated to the processing of nuclear data libraries (JEFF, ENDF/B, JENDL, CENDL, BROND... ) use the average parameters to take into account the self-shielding phenomenon for the simulation of the neutron transport in Monte-Carlo (MCNP, TRIPOLI... ) and deterministic (APOLLO, ERANOS...) codes. The evaluation work consists in establishing a consistent set of average parameters as a function of the total angular momentum J of the system and of the orbital moment of the incident neutron l. The work presented in this paper aims to describe the links between the S-Matrix and the 'average R-Matrix' formalism for the calculation of Sc, R-bar c ∞ , ac and R'. (author) [fr

  12. Extension of the Dytlewski-style dead time correction formalism for neutron multiplicity counting to any order

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Here, neutron multiplicity counting using shift-register calculus is an established technique in the science of international nuclear safeguards for the identification, verification, and assay of special nuclear materials. Typically passive counting is used for Pu and mixed Pu-U items and active methods are used for U materials. Three measured counting rates, singles, doubles and triples are measured and, in combination with a simple analytical point-model, are used to calculate characteristics of the measurement item in terms of known detector and nuclear parameters. However, the measurement problem usually involves more than three quantities of interest, but even in cases where the next higher order count rate, quads, is statistically viable, it is not quantitatively applied because corrections for dead time losses are currently not available in the predominant analysis paradigm. In this work we overcome this limitation by extending the commonly used dead time correction method, developed by Dytlewski, to quads. We also give results for pents, which may be of interest for certain special investigations. Extension to still higher orders, may be accomplished by inspection based on the sequence presented. We discuss the foundations of the Dytlewski method, give limiting cases, and highlight the opportunities and implications that these new results expose. In particular there exist a number of ways in which the new results may be combined with other approaches to extract the correlated rates, and this leads to various practical implementations.

  13. Neutron Environment Characterization of the Central Cavity in the Annular Core Research Reactor *

    Parma Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the neutron environment in the central cavity of the Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR is important in order to provide experimenters with the most accurate spectral information and maintain a high degree of fidelity in performing reactor experiments. Characterization includes both modeling and experimental efforts. Building accurate neutronic models of the ACRR and the central cavity “bucket” environments that can be used by experimenters is important in planning and designing experiments, as well as assessing the experimental results and quantifying uncertainties. Neutron fluence characterizations of two bucket environments, LB44 and PLG, are presented. These two environments are used frequently and represent two extremes in the neutron spectrum. The LB44 bucket is designed to remove the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and significantly attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The PLG bucket is designed to enhance the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The neutron characterization for each bucket was performed by irradiating 20 different activation foil types, some of which were cadmium covered, resulting in 37 different reactions at the peak axial flux location in each bucket. The dosimetry results were used in the LSL-M2 spectrum adjustment code with a 640-energy group MCNP-generated trial spectrum, self-shielding correction factors, the SNLRML or IRDFF dosimetry cross-section library, trial spectrum uncertainty, and trial covariance matrix, to generate a least-squares adjusted neutron spectrum, spectrum uncertainty, and covariance matrix. Both environment character-izations are well documented and the environments are available for use by experimenters.

  14. Control of radioactive wastes and coupling of neutron/gamma measurements: use of radiative capture for the correction of matrix effects that penalize the fissile mass measurement by active neutron interrogation

    Loche, F.

    2006-10-01

    In the framework of radioactive waste drums control, difficulties arise in the nondestructive measurement of fissile mass ( 235 U, 239 Pu..) by Active Neutron Interrogation (ANI), when dealing with matrices containing materials (Cl, H...) influencing the neutron flux. The idea is to use the neutron capture reaction (n,γ) to determine the matrix composition to adjust the ANI calibration coefficient value. This study, dealing with 118 litres, homogeneous drums of density less than 0,4 and composed of chlorinated and/or hydrogenated materials, leads to build abacus linking the γ ray peak areas to the ANI calibration coefficient. Validation assays of these abacus show a very good agreement between the corrected and true fissile masses for hydrogenated matrices (max. relative standard deviation: 23 %) and quite good for chlorinated and hydrogenated matrices (58 %). The developed correction method improves the measured values. It may be extended to 0,45 density, heterogeneous drums. (author)

  15. Next generation self-shielded flux cored electrode with improved toughness for off shore oil well platform structures

    Singh, Daya; Soltis, Patrick; Narayanan, Badri; Quintana, Marie; Fox, Jeff [The Lincoln Electric Company (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Self-shielded flux cored arc welding electrodes (FCAW-S) are ideal for outdoor applications, particularly open fabrication yards where high winds are a possibility. Development work was carried out on a FCAW-S electrode for welding 70 and 80 ksi yield strength base materials with a required minimum average Charpy V-Notch (CVN) absorbed energy value of 35 ft-lb at -40 deg F in the weld metal. The effect of Al, Mg, Ti, and Zr on CVN toughness was evaluated by running a Design of Experiments approach to systematically vary the levels of these components in the electrode fill and, in turn, the weld metal. These electrodes were used to weld simulated pipe joints. Over the range of compositions tested, 0.05% Ti in the weld metal was found to be optimum for CVN toughness. Ti also had a beneficial effect on the usable voltage range. Simulated offshore joints were welded to evaluate the effect of base metal dilution, heat input, and welding procedure on the toughness of weld metal. CVN toughness was again measured at -40 deg F on samples taken from the root and the cap pass regions. The root pass impact toughness showed strong dependence on the base metal dilution and the heat input used to weld the root and fill passes. (author)

  16. Effect of inclusions on microstructure and toughness of deposited metals of self-shielded flux cored wires

    Zhang, Tianli; Li, Zhuoxin; Kou, Sindo; Jing, Hongyang; Li, Guodong; Li, Hong; Jin Kim, Hee

    2015-01-01

    The effect of inclusions on the microstructure and toughness of the deposited metals of self-shielded flux cored wires was investigated by optical microscopy, electron microscopy and mechanical testing. The deposited metals of three different wires showed different levels of low temperature impact toughness at −40 °C mainly because of differences in the properties of inclusions. The inclusions formed in the deposited metals as a result of deoxidation caused by the addition of extra Al–Mg alloy and ferromanganese to the flux. The inclusions, spherical in shape, were mixtures of Al 2 O 3 and MgO. Inclusions predominantly Al 2 O 3 and 0.3–0.8 μm in diameter were effective for nucleation of acicular ferrite. However, inclusions predominantly MgO were promoted by increasing Mg in the flux and were more effective than Al 2 O 3 inclusions of the same size. These findings suggest that the control of inclusions can be an effective way to improve the impact toughness of the deposited metal

  17. Graphs of neutron cross sections in JSD1000 for radiation shielding safety analysis

    Yamano, Naoki

    1984-03-01

    Graphs of neutron cross sections and self-shielding factors in the JSD1000 library are presented for radiation shielding safety analysis. The compilation contains various reaction cross sections for 42 nuclides from 1 H to 241 Am in the energy range from 3.51 x 10 -4 eV to 16.5 MeV. The Bondarenko-type self-shielding factors of each reaction are given by the background cross sections from σ 0 = 0 to σ 0 = 10000. (author)

  18. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies up to 400 MeV: HILO86R

    Kotegawa, Hiroshi; Nakane, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Akira; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1993-02-01

    A macroscopic multigroup cross section library of 66 neutron and 22 photon groups for neutron energies up to 400 MeV: HILO86R is prepared for 10 typical shielding materials; water, concrete, iron, air, graphite, polyethylene, heavy concrete, lead, aluminum and soil. The library is a revision of the DLC-119/HILO86, in which only the cross sections below 19.6 MeV have been exchanged with a group cross section processed from the JENDL-3 microscopic cross section library. In the HILO86R library, self shielding factors are used to produce effective cross sections for neutrons less than 19.6 MeV considering rather coarse energy meshes. Energy spectra and dose attenuation in water, concrete and iron have been compared among the HILO, HILO86 and HILO86R libraries for different energy neutron sources. Significant discrepancy has been observed in the energy spectra less than a couple of MeV energy in iron among the libraries, resulting large difference in the dose attenuation. The difference was attributed to the effect of self-shielding factor, namely to the difference between infinite dilution and effective cross sections. Even for 400 MeV neutron source the influence of the self-shielding factor is significant, nevertheless only the cross sections below 19.6 MeV are exchanged. (author)

  19. Self-shielding phenomenon modelling in multigroup transport code Apollo-2; Modelisation du phenomene d'autoprotection dans le code de transport multigroupe Apollo 2

    Coste-Delclaux, M

    2006-03-15

    This document describes the improvements carried out for modelling the self-shielding phenomenon in the multigroup transport code APOLLO2. They concern the space and energy treatment of the slowing-down equation, the setting up of quadrature formulas to calculate reaction rates, the setting-up of a method that treats directly a resonant mixture and the development of a sub-group method. We validate these improvements either in an elementary or in a global way. Now, we obtain, more accurate multigroup reaction rates and we are able to carry out a reference self-shielding calculation on a very fine multigroup mesh. To end, we draw a conclusion and give some prospects on the remaining work. (author)

  20. Self-shielding phenomenon modelling in multigroup transport code Apollo-2; Modelisation du phenomene d'autoprotection dans le code de transport multigroupe Apollo 2

    Coste-Delclaux, M

    2006-03-15

    This document describes the improvements carried out for modelling the self-shielding phenomenon in the multigroup transport code APOLLO2. They concern the space and energy treatment of the slowing-down equation, the setting up of quadrature formulas to calculate reaction rates, the setting-up of a method that treats directly a resonant mixture and the development of a sub-group method. We validate these improvements either in an elementary or in a global way. Now, we obtain, more accurate multigroup reaction rates and we are able to carry out a reference self-shielding calculation on a very fine multigroup mesh. To end, we draw a conclusion and give some prospects on the remaining work. (author)

  1. Measurement of double differential cross sections of charged particle emission reactions by incident DT neutrons. Correction for energy loss of charged particle in sample materials

    Takagi, Hiroyuki; Terada, Yasuaki; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito

    2000-01-01

    In the measurement of charged particle emission spectrum induced by neutrons, correcting the energy loss of charged particle in sample materials becomes a very important inverse problem. To deal with this inverse problem, we have applied the Bayesian unfolding method to correct the energy loss, and tested the performance of the method. Although this method is very simple, it was confirmed from the test that the performance was not inferior to other methods at all, and therefore the method could be a powerful tool for charged particle spectrum measurement. (author)

  2. The effect of the 238U neutron strength function uncertainty on resonance structure calculations in unresolved regions

    Koshcheev, V.N.; Manturov, G.N.; Sinitsa, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the neutron strength function uncertainties on the calculated values of the self-shielding factors and energy dependence of the total and capture 238 U cross-sections in the unresolved resonance region are investigated. (author). 26 refs, 5 figs

  3. A time series approach to the correction for atmosphere effects and the significance of a semi-diurnal variation in corrected intensities of secondary cosmic ray neutrons and mesons (NM64 and MT64)

    Huijsmans, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this research was to distinguish as accurately as possible between two mechanisms behind a half-daily variation in detected numbers of neutrons and mesons in the secondary cosmic ray particles at sea level. These two mechanisms are due to air pressure variations at sea level and affect the number of primary particles with a certain arrival direction. The distribution among arrival directions in the ecliptic plane varies if a gradient exists in the guiding centre density of primaries in directions perpendicular to the neutral sheet. Chapter 2 is devoted to the calculation of a physically and statistically justifiable determination of the barometric coefficient for neutron measurements and air pressures. Chapter 3 deals with the estimation of atmospheric correction coefficients for the elimination of the influence of changing atmospheric conditions on the number of detected mesons. For mesons the variation of total mass, and also the variations in mass-distribution along the trajectory of the mesons are important. After correction for atmospheric variations using the resulting atmospheric correction coefficients from chapter 2 and 3, the influence of the structure of the interplanetary magnetic field near the earth is examined in chapter 4. 0inally, in chapter 5, a power spectral analysis of variations in corrected intensities of neutrons and mesons is carried out. Such an analysis distinguishes the variance of a time series into contributions within small frequency intervals. From the power spectra of variations on a yearly basis, a statistically fundamented judgement can be given as to the significance of the semi-diurnal variation during the different phases of the solar magnetic activity cycle. (Auth.)

  4. Theory of neutron resonance cross sections for safety applications

    Froehner, F.H.

    1992-09-01

    Neutron resonances exert a strong influence on the behaviour of nuclear reactors, especially on their response to the temperature changes accompanying power excursions, and also on the efficiency of shielding materials. The relevant theory of neutron resonance cross sections including the practically important approximations is reviewed, both for the resolved and the unresolved resonance region. Numerical techniques for Doppler broadening of resonances are presented, and the construction of group constants and especially of self-shielding factors for neutronics calculations is outlined. (orig.) [de

  5. Neutron Activation Analysis of Archaeological Pottery Samples of Large Size, Including Pieces of Low Symmetry Shape: How to Get Accurate Analytical Results in a Practical Way

    Bedregal, P.S.; Montoya, E.H.; Mendoza, P.; Ubillús, M.; Baltuano, O.; Hernández, Y.; Gago, J.; Cohen, I.M.

    2018-01-01

    The feasibility of the instrumental neutron activation analysis of entire pieces of archaeological pottery, using low thermal neutron fluxes, is examined and a new approach for the non-destructive analysis of entire pottery objects by INAA, using the conventional relative method, is described. The proposed method relies in the preparation of a comparison standard, which is a nominally identical replicate of the original object to be studied. INAA of small samples taken from that replicate allows determining its composition for the elements to be analyzed. Then the intact sample and intact standard are irradiated together with the neutrons from a nuclear reactor neutron beam, using a suitable turntable facility and monitored by neutron flux monitors. Finally, after proper decay times, the induced activities in sample, standard and flux monitors, are successively measured, by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, using a high-efficiency germanium detector. In this way, several complicating effects such geometrical efficiency, neutron self-shielding and gamma ray attenuation are avoided and the need of complicated mathematical corrections is not needed. A potential advantage of the method is that it can be fully validated. Quantitative experiments using 7 - 13 hours of irradiation of pairs of 750 grams replicates, at low neutron fluxes of 3.9 x10 6 n cm -2 s -1 , followed by 100000 to 200000 seconds of counting in front of a 70% relative efficiency HPGe detector, led to recoveries between 90% and 110% for Sc and La. Another experiment, using pairs of replicates of small solid mud anthropomorphic objects, (weighing about 100 grams each), irradiated by 8 hours at a neutron flux of 10 9 n cm -2 s -1 , led to recoveries better than 90% and 110% for As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Lu, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Yb and U, showing that the proposed method is suitable for LSNAA of entire pottery or mud archaeological objects. (author)

  6. The determination of self-powered neutron detector sensitivity on thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities

    Erben, O.

    1980-01-01

    The coefficients of thermal and epithermal neutron flux density depression and self-shielding for the SPN detectors with vanadium, rhodium, silver and cobalt emitters are presented, (for cobalt SPN detectors the functions describing the absorbtion of neutrons along the emitter cross-section are also shown). Using these coefficients and previously published beta particle escape efficiencies, sensitivities are determined for the principal types of detectors produced by Les Cables de Lyon and SODERN companies. The experiments and their results verifying the validity of the theoretical work are described. (author)

  7. Matrix effects correction on 252Cf shufflers by application of the alternating conditional expectation to neutron flux monitor data

    Pickrell, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The 252 Cf shuffler assays fissile uranium and plutonium using active neutron interrogation and then counting the induced delayed neutrons. Using the shuffler, we conducted over 1700 assays of 55-gal. drums with 28 different matrices and several different fissionable materials. We measured the drums to diagnose the matrix and position effects on 252 Cf shuffler assays. The matrices incorporated metals, neutron poisons, and hydrogen in densities ranging from 0≤ pH ≤ 0.086 g/cm 3 , a range of cases more extreme than typically found in routine plant use. We used several neutron flux monitors during irradiation and kept statistics on the count rates of individual detector banks. The intent of these measurements was to gauge the effect of the matrix independently from the uranium assay

  8. Will Organic Synthesis Within Icy Grains or on Dust Surfaces in the Primitive Solar Nebula Completely Erase the Effects of Photochemical Self Shielding?

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    There are at least 3 separate photochemical self-shielding models with different degrees of commonality. All of these models rely on the selective absorption of (12))C(16)O dissociative photons as the radiation source penetrates through the gas allowing the production of reactive O-17 and O-18 atoms within a specific volume. Each model also assumes that the undissociated C(16)O is stable and does not participate in the chemistry of nebular dust grains. In what follows we will argue that this last, very important assumption is simply not true despite the very high energy of the CO molecular bond.

  9. A study of the effect of intermediate structure in the fission cross section of 239Pu on self-shielding factors

    Ganesan, S.

    1978-01-01

    A set of energy dependent fission widths of 1 + spin state corresponding to the recommended fission cross sections of Sowerby et al is evaluated by adjustment in the energy region 600 ev to 25 Kev. Corresponding to these mean fission widths of 1 + spin state, the intermediate resonance parameters based on Weigmann's formulation of Struitinsky's double humped fission barrier model are then obtained. Pseudorandom resonances are generated with and without the intermediate structure in the mean fission but leading to the same value of infinite dilution fission cross section. The effect of the intermediate structure on the self shielding factors was then investigated. (author)

  10. Instrumentation and procedures for moisture corrections to passive neutron coincidence counting assays of bulk PuO2 and MOX powders

    Stewart, J.E.; Menlove, H.O.; Ferran, R.R.; Aparo, M.; Zeppa, P.; Troiani, F.

    1993-05-01

    For passive neutron-coincidence-counting verification measurements of PuO 2 and MOX powder, assay biases have been observed that result from moisture entrained in the sample. This report describes a unique set of experiments in which MOX samples, with a range of moisture concentrations, were produced and used to calibrate and evaluate two prototype moisture monitors. A new procedure for moisture corrections to PuO 2 and MOX verification measurements yields MOX assays accurate to 1.5% (1σ) for 0.6- and 1.1-kg samples. Monte Carlo simulations were used to extend the measured moisture calibration data to higher sample masses. A conceptual design for a high-efficiency neutron coincidence counter with improved sensitivity to moisture is also presented

  11. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from advanced blanket materials and structural materials induced by D-T neutrons. Correction for energy loss of charged particle in sample materials

    Nishio, Takashi; Kondo, Tetsuo; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito; Kokooo; Maekawa, Fujio; Ikeda, Yujiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    D-T neutron benchmark experiments for LiAlO 2 , Li 2 TiO 3 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , Cu and W have been conducted at FNS of JAERI to validate five nuclear data files. The former three are promising advanced breeder materials and the latter two are important structural materials in a fusion reactor. From the results, all the nuclear data files were confirmed to be fairly reliable with respect to the prediction of neutron spectrum in the use of Li 2 TiO 3 and Cu. For LiAlO 2 and W, some large discrepancies between the experimental and calculated data were observed. For Li 2 ZrO 3 , the C/E values became very large for all the nuclear data files. (author)

  12. Improvement of non-destructive fissile mass assays in α low-level waste drums: A matrix correction method based on neutron capture gamma-rays and a neutron generator

    Jallu, F.; Loche, F.

    2008-08-01

    Within the framework of radioactive waste control, non-destructive assay (NDA) methods may be employed. The active neutron interrogation (ANI) method is now well-known and effective in quantifying low α-activity fissile masses (mainly 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu) with low densities, i.e. less than about 0.4, in radioactive waste drums of volumes up to 200 l. The PROMpt Epithermal and THErmal interrogation Experiment (PROMETHEE [F. Jallu, A. Mariani, C. Passard, A.-C. Raoux, H. Toubon, Alpha low level waste control: improvement of the PROMETHEE 6 assay system performances. Nucl. Technol. 153 (January) (2006); C. Passard, A. Mariani, F. Jallu, J. Romeyer-Dherber, H. Recroix, M. Rodriguez, J. Loridon, C. Denis, PROMETHEE: an alpha low level waste assay system using passive and active neutron measurement methods. Nucl. Technol. 140 (December) (2002) 303-314]) based on ANI has been under development since 1996 to reach the incinerating α low level waste (LLW) criterion of about 50 Bq[α] per gram of crude waste (≈50 μg Pu) in 118 l drums on the date the drums are conditioned. Difficulties arise when dealing with matrices containing neutron energy moderators such as H and neutron absorbents such as Cl. These components may have a great influence on the fissile mass deduced from the neutron signal measured by ANI. For example, the calibration coefficient measured in a 118 l drum containing a cellulose matrix (density d = 0.144 g cm -3) may be 50 times higher than that obtained in a poly-vinyl-chloride matrix ( d = 0.253 g cm -3). Without any information on the matrix, the fissile mass is often overestimated due to safety procedures and by considering the most disadvantageous calibration coefficient corresponding to the most absorbing and moderating calibration matrix. The work discussed in this paper was performed at the CEA Nuclear Measurement Laboratory in France. It concerns the development of a matrix effect correction method, which consists in identifying and quantifying

  13. Improvement of non-destructive fissile mass assays in α low-level waste drums: A matrix correction method based on neutron capture gamma-rays and a neutron generator

    Jallu, F.; Loche, F.

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of radioactive waste control, non-destructive assay (NDA) methods may be employed. The active neutron interrogation (ANI) method is now well-known and effective in quantifying low α-activity fissile masses (mainly 235 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu) with low densities, i.e. less than about 0.4, in radioactive waste drums of volumes up to 200 l. The PROMpt Epithermal and THErmal interrogation Experiment (PROMETHEE [F. Jallu, A. Mariani, C. Passard, A.-C. Raoux, H. Toubon, Alpha low level waste control: improvement of the PROMETHEE 6 assay system performances. Nucl. Technol. 153 (January) (2006); C. Passard, A. Mariani, F. Jallu, J. Romeyer-Dherber, H. Recroix, M. Rodriguez, J. Loridon, C. Denis, PROMETHEE: an alpha low level waste assay system using passive and active neutron measurement methods. Nucl. Technol. 140 (December) (2002) 303-314]) based on ANI has been under development since 1996 to reach the incinerating α low level waste (LLW) criterion of about 50 Bq[α] per gram of crude waste (∼50 μg Pu) in 118 l drums on the date the drums are conditioned. Difficulties arise when dealing with matrices containing neutron energy moderators such as H and neutron absorbents such as Cl. These components may have a great influence on the fissile mass deduced from the neutron signal measured by ANI. For example, the calibration coefficient measured in a 118 l drum containing a cellulose matrix (density d = 0.144 g cm -3 ) may be 50 times higher than that obtained in a poly-vinyl-chloride matrix (d = 0.253 g cm -3 ). Without any information on the matrix, the fissile mass is often overestimated due to safety procedures and by considering the most disadvantageous calibration coefficient corresponding to the most absorbing and moderating calibration matrix. The work discussed in this paper was performed at the CEA Nuclear Measurement Laboratory in France. It concerns the development of a matrix effect correction method, which consists in identifying and

  14. Improvement of non-destructive fissile mass assays in {alpha} low-level waste drums: A matrix correction method based on neutron capture gamma-rays and a neutron generator

    Jallu, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA, DEN, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, Bat. 224, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)], E-mail: fanny.jallu@cea.fr; Loche, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA, DEN, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, Bat. 224, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2008-08-15

    Within the framework of radioactive waste control, non-destructive assay (NDA) methods may be employed. The active neutron interrogation (ANI) method is now well-known and effective in quantifying low {alpha}-activity fissile masses (mainly {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) with low densities, i.e. less than about 0.4, in radioactive waste drums of volumes up to 200 l. The PROMpt Epithermal and THErmal interrogation Experiment (PROMETHEE [F. Jallu, A. Mariani, C. Passard, A.-C. Raoux, H. Toubon, Alpha low level waste control: improvement of the PROMETHEE 6 assay system performances. Nucl. Technol. 153 (January) (2006); C. Passard, A. Mariani, F. Jallu, J. Romeyer-Dherber, H. Recroix, M. Rodriguez, J. Loridon, C. Denis, PROMETHEE: an alpha low level waste assay system using passive and active neutron measurement methods. Nucl. Technol. 140 (December) (2002) 303-314]) based on ANI has been under development since 1996 to reach the incinerating {alpha} low level waste (LLW) criterion of about 50 Bq[{alpha}] per gram of crude waste ({approx}50 {mu}g Pu) in 118 l drums on the date the drums are conditioned. Difficulties arise when dealing with matrices containing neutron energy moderators such as H and neutron absorbents such as Cl. These components may have a great influence on the fissile mass deduced from the neutron signal measured by ANI. For example, the calibration coefficient measured in a 118 l drum containing a cellulose matrix (density d = 0.144 g cm{sup -3}) may be 50 times higher than that obtained in a poly-vinyl-chloride matrix (d = 0.253 g cm{sup -3}). Without any information on the matrix, the fissile mass is often overestimated due to safety procedures and by considering the most disadvantageous calibration coefficient corresponding to the most absorbing and moderating calibration matrix. The work discussed in this paper was performed at the CEA Nuclear Measurement Laboratory in France. It concerns the development of a matrix effect correction

  15. Control of radioactive wastes and coupling of neutron/gamma measurements: use of radiative capture for the correction of matrix effects that penalize the fissile mass measurement by active neutron interrogation; Controle des dechets radioactifs et couplage de mesures neutron/gamma: exploitation de la capture radiative pour corriger les effets de matrice penalisant la mesure de la masse fissile par interrogation neutronique active

    Loche, F

    2006-10-15

    In the framework of radioactive waste drums control, difficulties arise in the nondestructive measurement of fissile mass ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu..) by Active Neutron Interrogation (ANI), when dealing with matrices containing materials (Cl, H...) influencing the neutron flux. The idea is to use the neutron capture reaction (n,{gamma}) to determine the matrix composition to adjust the ANI calibration coefficient value. This study, dealing with 118 litres, homogeneous drums of density less than 0,4 and composed of chlorinated and/or hydrogenated materials, leads to build abacus linking the {gamma} ray peak areas to the ANI calibration coefficient. Validation assays of these abacus show a very good agreement between the corrected and true fissile masses for hydrogenated matrices (max. relative standard deviation: 23 %) and quite good for chlorinated and hydrogenated matrices (58 %). The developed correction method improves the measured values. It may be extended to 0,45 density, heterogeneous drums. (author)

  16. The influence of rhodium burn-up on the sensitivity of rhodium self-powered neutron detectors

    Erben, O.

    1980-01-01

    Depression and self-shielding coefficients are presented for thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities. Functions are shown describing the distribution of beta particle sources on the emitter cross section for 0 to 50% rhodium burnup. The values are calculated of detector sensitivity to thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities for the said burnup for main types of rhodium SPN detectors made by SODERN. (J.B.)

  17. Verification of effectiveness of borated water shield for a cyclotron type self-shielded; Verificacao da eficacia da blindagem de agua borada construida para um acelerador ciclotron do tipo autoblindado

    Videira, Heber S.; Burkhardt, Guilherme M.; Santos, Ronielly S., E-mail: heber@cyclopet.com.br [Cyclopet Radiofarmacos Ltda., Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Passaro, Bruno M.; Gonzalez, Julia A.; Santos, Josefina; Guimaraes, Maria I.C.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Lenzi, Marcelo K. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitina (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica

    2013-04-15

    The technological advances in positron emission tomography (PET) in conventional clinic imaging have led to a steady increase in the number of cyclotrons worldwide. Most of these cyclotrons are being used to produce {sup 18}F-FDG, either for themselves as for the distribution to other centers that have PET. For there to be safety in radiological facilities, the cyclotron intended for medical purposes can be classified in category I and category II, ie, self-shielded or non-shielded (bunker). Therefore, the aim of this work is to verify the effectiveness of borated water shield built for a cyclotron accelerator-type Self-shielded PETtrace 860. Mixtures of water borated occurred in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, as well as the results of the radiometric survey in the vicinity of the self-shielding of the cyclotron in the conditions established by the manufacturer showed that radiation levels were below the limits. (author)

  18. An investigation of tungsten by neutron activation techniques

    Svetsreni, R.

    1978-01-01

    This investigation used neutron from Plutonium-Beryllium source (5 curie) to analyse the amount of tungsten in tungsten oxide which was extracted from tungsten ores, slag and tungsten alloy of tungsten iron and carbon. The technique of neutron activation analysis with NaI(Tl) gamma detector 3'' x 3'' and 1024 multichannel analyzer. The dilution technique was used by mixing Fe 2 O 3 or pure sand into the sample before irradiation. In this study self shielding effect in the analysis of tungsten was solved and the detection limit of the tungsten in the sample was about 0.5%

  19. Atmospheric neutrons

    Preszler, A.M.; Moon, S.; White, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron and additional analysis corrections lead to the slightly changed neutron fluxes reported here. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with our experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current J 2 /sub pi/ (Merker, 1972; Armstrong et al., 1973) is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. Our experimental fluxes agree with those of the Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV

  20. Development of neutron fluence measurement and evaluation technology for the test materials in the capsule

    Hong, U.; Choi, S. H.; Kang, H. D. [Kyungsan University, Kyungsan (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The four kinds of the fluence monitor considered by self-shielding are design and fabricated for evaluation of neutron irradiation fluence. They are equipped with dosimeters consisting of Ni, Fe and Ti wires and so forth. The nuclear reaction rate is obtained by measurement on dosimeter using the spectroscopic analysis of induced {gamma}-ray. We established the nuetron fluence evaluating technology that is based on the measurement of the reaction rate considering reactor's irradiation history, burn-out, self-shielding in fluence monitor, and the influence of impurity in dosimeter. The distribution of high energy neutron flux on the vertical axis of the capsule shows fifth order polynomial equation and is good agree with theoretical value in the error range of 30% by MCNP/4A code. 22 refs., 50 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  1. Errors and corrections in the separation of spin-flip and non-spin-flip thermal neutron scattering using the polarization analysis technique

    Williams, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    The use of the polarization analysis technique to separate spin-flip from non-spin-flip thermal neutron scattering is especially important in determining magnetic scattering cross-sections. In order to identify a spin-flip ratio in the scattering with a particular scattering process, it is necessary to correct the experimentally observed 'flipping-ratio' to allow for the efficiencies of the vital instrument components (polarizers and spin-flippers), as well as multiple scattering effects in the sample. Analytical expressions for these corections are presented and their magnitudes in typical cases estimated. The errors in measurement depend strongly on the uncertainties in the calibration of the efficiencies of the polarizers and the spin-flipper. The final section is devoted to a discussion of polarization analysis instruments

  2. Finite-Geometry and Polarized Multiple-Scattering Corrections of Experimental Fast- Neutron Polarization Data by Means of Monte Carlo Methods

    Aspelund, O; Gustafsson, B

    1967-05-15

    After an introductory discussion of various methods for correction of experimental left-right ratios for polarized multiple-scattering and finite-geometry effects necessary and sufficient formulas for consistent tracking of polarization effects in successive scattering orders are derived. The simplifying assumptions are then made that the scattering is purely elastic and nuclear, and that in the description of the kinematics of the arbitrary Scattering {mu}, only one triple-parameter - the so-called spin rotation parameter {beta}{sup ({mu})} - is required. Based upon these formulas a general discussion of the importance of the correct inclusion of polarization effects in any scattering order is presented. Special attention is then paid to the question of depolarization of an already polarized beam. Subsequently, the afore-mentioned formulas are incorporated in the comprehensive Monte Carlo program MULTPOL, which has been designed so as to correctly account for finite-geometry effects in the sense that both the scattering sample and the detectors (both having cylindrical shapes) are objects of finite dimensions located at finite distances from each other and from the source of polarized fast-neutrons. A special feature of MULTPOL is the application of the method of correlated sampling for reduction of the standard deviations .of the results of the simulated experiment. Typical data of performance of MULTPOL have been obtained by the application of this program to the correction of experimental polarization data observed in n + '{sup 12}C elastic scattering between 1 and 2 MeV. Finally, in the concluding remarks the possible modification of MULTPOL to other experimental geometries is briefly discussed.

  3. Off-line correction for excessive constant-fraction-discriminator walk in neutron time-of-flight experiments

    Heilbronn, Lawrence; Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, H.

    2003-01-01

    A method for reducing excessive constant-fraction-discriminator walk that utilizes experimental data in the off-line analysis stage is introduced. Excessive walk is defined here as any walk that leads to an overall timing resolution that is much greater than the intrinsic timing resolution of the detection system. The method is able to reduce the contribution to the overall timing resolution from the walk that is equal to or less than the intrinsic timing resolution of the detectors. Although the method is explained in the context of a neutron time-of-flight experiment, it is applicable to any data set that satisfies two conditions. (1) A measure of the signal amplitude for each event must be recorded on an event-by-event basis; and (2) There must be a distinguishable class of events present where the timing information is known a priori

  4. Off-line correction for excessive constant-fraction-discriminator walk in neutron time-of-flight experiments

    Heilbronn, L.; Iwata, Y.; Iwase, H.

    2004-01-01

    A method for reducing excessive constant-fraction-discriminator walk that utilizes experimental data in the off-line analysis stage is introduced. Excessive walk is defined here as any walk that leads to an overall timing resolution that is much greater than the intrinsic timing resolution of the detection system. The method is able to reduce the contribution to the overall timing resolution from the walk to a value that is equal to or less than the intrinsic timing resolution of the detectors. Although the method is explained in the context of a neutron time-of-flight experiment, it is applicable to any data set that satisfies two conditions: (1) a measure of the signal amplitude for each event must be recorded on an event-by-event basis; and (2) there must be a distinguishable class of events present where the timing information is known a priori

  5. Comparison of two ultra-sensitive methods for the determination of 232Th by recovery corrected pre-concentration radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    Glover, S.E.; Qu, H.; LaMont, S.P.; Grimm, C.A.; Filby, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    The determination of isotopic thorium by alpha spectrometric methods is a routine practice for bioassay and environmental measurement programs. Alpha-spectrometry has excellent detection limits (by mass) for all isotopes of thorium except 232 Th due to its extremely long half-life. Improvements in the detection limit an sensitivity over previously reported methods of pre-concentration neutron activation analysis (PCNAA) for the recovery corrected, isotopic determination of thorium in various matrices is discussed. Following irradiation, the samples were dissolved, 231 Pa added as a tracer, and Pa isolated by two different methods and compared (extraction chromatography and anion exchange chromatography) followed by alpha spectrometry for recovery correction. Ion exchange chromatography was found to be superior for this application at this time, principally for reliability. The detection limit for 232 Th of 3.5 x 10 -7 Bq is almost three orders of magnitude lower than for alpha spectrometry using the PCRNAA method and one order of magnitude below previously reported PCNAA methods. (author)

  6. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of 58Ni

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.B.; Whalen, J.F.

    1981-09-01

    Neutron total cross sections of 58 Ni were measured at 25 keV intervals from 0.9 to 4.5 MeV with 50 to 100 keV resolutions. Attention was given to self-shielding corrections to the observed total cross sections. Differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured at 50 keV intervals from 1.35 to 4.0 MeV with 50 to 100 keV resolutions. Inelastic excitation of levels at 1.458 +- 0.009, 2.462 +- 0.010, 2.791 +- 0.015, 2.927 +- 0.012 and 3.059 +- 0.025 MeV was observed. The experimental results were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels models. A spherical optical-statistical model was found generally descriptive of an energy-average of the experimental results. However, detailed considerations suggested significant contributions from direct-vibrational interactions, particularly associated with the excitation of the first 2+ level

  7. Shell correction approach to nuclear state densities and the competition between fission and neutron emission of 210Po

    Gottschalk, P.A.; Ledergerber, T.

    Starting from the Hartree-Fock approximation to the grand-canonical partition function we formulate a consistent renormalization of the ground state energy and the intrinsic state density as a function of deformation. The relationship to recent selfconsistent temperature dependent calculations is discussed. The competition between fission and neutron emission, GAMMA sub(f)/GAMMA sub(n)(E), of 210 Po is studied within the framework of the statistical theory as an example. Calculations using renormalized state densities are compared with usual shell model calculations and experimental data. It is found that the usual calculations reflect the incorrect uniform deformation dependence of the shell model spectral function. Important changes due to renormalization are found: a rapid change of the shape of the transition state at approximately 45 MeV excitation energy, GAMMA sub(f)/GAMMA sub(n)(E) remains smaller than unity for all excitation energies and the deformation of the transition state increases after the 'shape transition' at 45 MeV monotonically towards the liquid drop saddle point deformation with a tendency towards slightly larger deformations. (author)

  8. Preparation of the in-house neutron detectors and the software needed to process experimental data

    Haddad, Kh.; Haj-Hassan, H.; Helal, W.

    2007-04-01

    In - house neutron activation detectors were prepared in this work using pure commercial gold. The neutron self-shielding factors in the foils for both thermal and epithermal neutrons have been determined experimentally. The work shows good results repeatability and good agreement with certified activation monitors. the software KHW for neutron flux measurements using local and standards gold foils was designed and performed locally. it deals as well with irradiated uranium spectrums to calculate some important fission product ratios for neutron flux measurement. Some experiments were performed to investigate the possibility of using uranium, produced in the pilot plant, as fission neutron detector. The results shows the possibility of using fission product ratios to determine the cooling time of the samples. It shows also the possibility of using fission and activation product ratios as an indicators of neutron fluences ratios.(author)

  9. Simulations of the instability of the m=1 self-shielding diocotron mode in finite-length non-neutral plasmas

    Mason, Grant W.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2002-01-01

    The 'self-shielding' m=1 diocotron mode in Malmberg-Penning traps has been known for over a decade to be unstable for finite length non-neutral plasmas with hollow density profiles. Early theoretical efforts were unsuccessful in accounting for the exponential growth and/or the magnitude of the growth rate. Recent theoretical work has sought to resolve the discrepancy either as a consequence of the shape of the plasma ends or as a kinetic effect resulting from a modified distribution function as a consequence of the protocol used to form the hollow profiles in experiments. Both of these finite length mechanisms have been investigated in selected test cases using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell code that allows realistic treatment of shape and kinetic effects. A persistent discrepancy of a factor of 2-3 remains between simulation and experimental values of the growth rate. Simulations reported here are more in agreement with theoretical predictions and fail to explain the discrepancy

  10. Decontamination of the activation product based on a legal revision of the cyclotron vault room on the non-self-shield compact medical cyclotron

    Komiya, Isao; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Fujibuchi, Toshiou; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Baba, Shingo; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The non-self-shield compact medical cyclotron and the cyclotron vault room were in operation for 27 years. They have now been decommissioned. We efficiently implemented a technique to identify an activation product in the cyclotron vault room. Firstly, the distribution of radioactive concentrations in the concrete of the cyclotron vault room was estimated by calculation from the record of the cyclotron operation. Secondly, the comparison of calculated results with an actual measurement was performed using a NaI scintillation survey meter and a high-purity germanium detector. The calculated values were overestimated as compared to the values measured using the Nal scintillation survey meter and the high-purity germanium detector. However, it could limit the decontamination area. By simulating the activation range, we were able to minimize the concrete core sampling. Finally, the appropriate range of radioactivated area in the cyclotron vault room was decontaminated based on the results of the calculation. After decontamination, the radioactive concentration was below the detection limit value in all areas inside the cyclotron vault room. By these procedures, the decommissioning process of the cyclotron vault room was more efficiently performed. (author)

  11. 1 1/2 years of experience with a 10 MeV self-shielded on-line e-beam sterilization system

    Lambert, Byron; Tang, Fuh-Wei; Riggs, Brian; Allen, Thomas; Williams, C.B.

    2000-01-01

    The Vascular Intervening Group of the Guidant Corporation (Guidant IV) has been operating a self-shielded, 10 MeV 4 kW, electron beam sterilization system since July of 1988. The system was designed, built and installed in a 70 square meter area in an existing Guidant manufacturing facility by Titan Scan Corporation and performance of the system was validated in conformance with 1S0-11137 standards. The goal of this on-site e-beam system was 'just in time' JIT, sterilization, i.e. the ability to manufacture, sterilize and ship, high intrinsic value medical devices in less than 24 hours. The benefits of moving from a long gas sterilization cycle of greater than one week to a JIT process were envisioned to be a) speed to market with innovated new products b) rapid response to customer requirements c) reduced inventory carrying costs and finally manufacturing and quality system efficiency. The ability of Guidant to realize these benefits depended upon the ability of the Guidant VI business units to adapt to the new sterilization modality and functionality and on the overall system reliability. This paper reviews the operating experience to date and the overall system reliability. (author)

  12. Adjustment and start-up of an irradiator self shielding model Isogamma LL.CO. in the Centre of Technological Applications and Nuclear Development

    Gonzalez, Dania Soguero; Ardanza, Armando Chavez

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the process of installation of a self-shielded irradiator category I, model ISOGAMMA LL.Co of 60 Co, with a nominal 25 kCi activity, rate of absorbed dose 8 kG/h and 5 L workload. The stages are describe step by step: import, the customs procedure which included the interview with the master of the vessel transporter, the monitoring of the entire process by the head of radiological protection of the importing Center, control of the levels of surface contamination of the shipping container of the sources before the removal of the ship, the supervision of the national regulatory authority and the transportation to the final destination. Details of assembling of the installation and the opening of the container for transportation of supplies is outlined. The action plan previously developed for the case of occurrence of radiological successful events is presented, detailing the phase of the load of radioactive sources by the specialists of the company selling the facility (IZOTOP). Finally describes the setting and implementation of the installation and the procedure of licensing for exploitation

  13. The background influence of cadmium detection in saline water using PGNAA technique

    Daqian Hei; Zhou Jiang; Hongtao Wang; Jiatong Li

    2016-01-01

    In order to solve the background influence of cadmium detection in saline water using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique, a series experiments have been designed and carried out. Furthermore, a method based on internal standard was used to correct the neutron self-shielding effect, and the background influence has been decreased sequentially. The results showed a good linear relationship between the characteristic peak counts and the concentrations of cadmium after the neutron self-shielding correction. And in the detection of saline water by PGNAA technique, the proposed methodology can be used to reduce the influence of background with the self-shielding effect correction. (author)

  14. Capability and limitation study of the DDT passive-active neutron waste assay instrument

    Nicholas, N.J.; Coop, K.L.; Estep, R.J.

    1992-05-01

    The differential-dieaway-technique passive-active neutron assay system is widely used by transuranic waste generators to certify their drummed waste for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Stricter criteria being established for waste emplacement at the WIPP site has led to a renewed interest in improvements to and a better understanding of current nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Our study includes the effects of source position, extreme matrices, high neutron backgrounds, and source self-shielding to explore the system's capabilities and limitations and to establish a basis for comparison with other NDA systems. 11 refs

  15. Determination of boron in borosilicate glasses by neutron capture prompt gamma-ray activation analysis

    Riley, Jr, J E; Lindstrom, R M

    1987-01-01

    Major levels of boron in borosilicate glasses were determined nondestructively by neutron activation analysis. The effects of neutron self-shielding by boron (1 to 8% by weight) are examined. Results of the analysis of a series of glasses with increasing boron composition are 1.150 +- .005% and 7.766 +- .035% for the low and high members of the series. Once analyzed, the glasses are useful as secondary standards for alpha track counting, and also ion and electron microprobe analyses of glasses. 12 refs.; 3 tables.

  16. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on 239Pu, 235U, 238U

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for 99 Mo, 95 Zr, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 141,143 Ce, and 147 Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the 147 Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by ∼5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except

  17. Neutron radiography

    Alaa eldin, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The digital processing of the neutron radiography images gives the possibility for data quantification. In this case an exact relation between the measured neutron attenuation and the real macroscopic attenuation coefficient for every point of the sample is required. The assumption that the attenuation of the neutron beam through the sample is exponential is valid only in an ideal case where a monochromatic beam, non scattering sample and non background contribution are assumed. In the real case these conditions are not fulfilled and in dependence on the sample material we have more or less deviation from the exponential attenuation law. Because of the high scattering cross-sections of hydrogen (σs=80.26 barn) for thermal neutrons, the problem with the scattered neutrons at quantitative radiography investigations of hydrogenous materials (as PE, Oil, H 2 O, etc) is not trivial. For these strong scattering materials the neutron beam attenuation is no longer exponential and a dependence of the macroscopic attenuation coefficient on the material thickness and on the distance between the sample and the detector appears. When quantitative radiography (2 D) or tomography investigations (3 D) are performed, some image correction procedures for a description of the scattering effect are required. This thesis presents a method that can be used to enhance the neutron radiography image for objects with high scattering materials like hydrogen, carbon and other light materials. This method uses the Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, to simulate the neutron radiography process and get the flux distribution for each pixel of the image and determine the scattered neutrons distribution that causes the image blur and then subtract it from the initial image to improve its quality.

  18. Neutron shielding material based on colemanite and epoxy resin

    Okuno, K.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a need for compact shielding design such as self-shielding of a PET cyclotron or up-gradation of radiation machinery in existing facilities. In these cases, high performance shielding materials are needed. Concrete or polyethylene have been used for a neutron shield. However, for compact shielding, they fall short in terms of performance or durability. Therefore, a new type of neutron shielding material based on epoxy resin and colemanite has been developed. Slab attenuation experiments up to 40 cm for the new shielding material were carried out using a 252 Cf neutron source. Measurement was carried out using a REM-counter, and compared with calculation. The results show that the shielding performance is better than concrete and polyethylene mixed with 10 wt% boron oxide. From the result, we confirmed that the performance of the new material is suitable for practical use. (authors)

  19. Determination of neutron flux with an arbitrary energy distribution by measurement of irradiated foils activity

    Ljubenov, V.; Milosevic, M.

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for the neutron flux determination in a neutron field with an arbitrary energy spectrum, based on the using of standard methods for the measurement of irradiated foils activity and on the application of the SCALE-4.4a code system for averaged cross section calculation is described in this paper. Proposed procedure allows to include the energy spectrum of neutron flux reestablished in the location of irradiated foils and the resonance self-shielding effects in the foils also. Example application of this procedure is given for the neutron flux determination inside the neutron filter with boron placed in the centre of heavy water critical assembly RB at the Vinca Institute (author)

  20. Corrections to primordial nucleosynthesis

    Dicus, D.A.; Kolb, E.W.; Gleeson, A.M.; Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Teplitz, V.L.; Turner, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The changes in primordial nucleosynthesis resulting from small corrections to rates for weak processes that connect neutrons and protons are discussed. The weak rates are corrected by improved treatment of Coulomb and radiative corrections, and by inclusion of plasma effects. The calculations lead to a systematic decrease in the predicted 4 He abundance of about ΔY = 0.0025. The relative changes in other primoridal abundances are also 1 to 2%

  1. Situations of potential exposure in self-shielding electron accelerators; Situações de exposição potencial em aceleradores de elétrons autoblindados

    Rios, D.A.S.; Rios, P.B., E-mail: denise@inovafi.com.br [Inovafi Física aplicada à Inovação Ltda, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Sordi, G.M.A.A.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The study discusses situations in the industrial environment that may lead to potential exposure of Occupationally Exposed Individuals and Public Individuals in self-shielding electron accelerators. Although these exposure situations are unlikely, simulation exercises can lead to improvements in the operating procedure as well as suggest changes in production line design in order to increase radiation protection at work. These studies can also be used in training and demonstrate a solid application of the ALARA principle in the daily activities of radiative installations.

  2. Occupational radiation exposure at the self-shielded IBA CYCLONE 10/5, cyclotron of the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne, Australia

    Tochon-Danguy, H.; Sachinidis, J.I.; U, P.; Egan, G.; Mukherjee, B.

    1999-01-01

    A series of health physics measurements was carried out at the IBA CYCLONE 10/5 Medical Cyclotron of the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne. The neutron attenuation factor of the cyclotron shielding was estimated using the Superheated Bubble dosimeters. The neutron and gamma dose rates at various public access and radiation worker's area in the vicinity of the cyclotron facility were evaluated during the 11 C, 18 F, 13 N and 15 O production conditions. (authors)

  3. Neutron stars

    Irvine, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: introduction (resume of stellar evolution, gross characteristics of neutron stars); pulsars (pulsar characteristics, pulsars as neutron stars); neutron star temperatures (neutron star cooling, superfluidity and superconductivity in neutron stars); the exterior of neutron stars (the magnetosphere, the neutron star 'atmosphere', pulses); neutron star structure; neutron star equations of state. (U.K.)

  4. Correcting the effects of the matrix using capture gamma-ray spectrometry: Application to measurement by Active Neutron Interrogation; Correction des effets de matrice par spectrometrie des rayonnements gamma de capture: Application a la mesure par Interrogation Neutronique Active (I.N.A.)

    Baudry, G.

    2003-11-15

    In the field of the measurement of low masses of fissile material ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in radioactive waste drums, the Active Neutron Interrogation is a non-destructive method achieving good results. It does however remain reliant upon uncertainties related to the matrix effects on interrogation and fission neutrons. The aim of this thesis is to develop a correction method able to take into account these matrix effects by quantifying the amount of absorbent materials (chlorine and hydrogen) in a 118- liter homogeneous matrix. The main idea is to use the gamma-ray spectrometry of gamma emitted by neutron captures to identify and quantify the composition of the matrix. An indicator from its chlorine content is then deduced in order to choose the calibration coefficient which best represents the real composition of the matrix. This document firstly presents the needs of control and characterization of radioactive objects, and the means used in the field of nuclear measurement. Emphases is put in particular on the Active Neutron Interrogation method. The matrices of interest are those made of light technological waste (density {<=} 0,4 g/cm{sup 3}) containing hydrogenated and chlorinated materials. The advantages of gamma-rays emitted by neutron captures for the determination of a chlorine content indicator of the matrices and the principles of the correction method are then explained. Measurements have been firstly realized with an existing Neutron Interrogation device (PROMETHEE 6). Such measurements have proven its inadequacy: no signal from the matrix hydrogen was detected, due to an intense signal from the polyethylene contained in some cell elements. Moreover, the matrix chlorine content appeared difficult to be measured. A new and specific device, named REGAIN and dedicated to active gamma-rays spectrometry, was defined with the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The experiments conducted with this new device made it possible to detect the

  5. MC2-2: a code to calculate fast neutron spectra and multigroup cross sections

    Henryson, H. II; Toppel, B.J.; Stenberg, C.G.

    1976-06-01

    MC 2 -2 is a program to solve the neutron slowing down problem using basic neutron data derived from the ENDF/B data files. The spectrum calculated by MC 2 -2 is used to collapse the basic data to multigroup cross sections for use in standard reactor neutronics codes. Four different slowing down formulations are used by MC 2 -2: multigroup, continuous slowing down using the Goertzel-Greuling or Improved Goertzel-Greuling moderating parameters, and a hyper-fine-group integral transport calculation. Resolved and unresolved resonance cross sections are calculated accounting for self-shielding, broadening and overlap effects. This document provides a description of the MC 2 -2 program. The physics and mathematics of the neutron slowing down problem are derived and detailed information is provided to aid the MC 2 -2 user in preparing input for the program and implementation of the program on IBM 370 or CDC 7600 computers

  6. PROMETHEE: An Alpha Low Level Waste Assay System Using Passive and Active Neutron Measurement Methods

    Passard, Christian; Mariani, Alain; Jallu, Fanny; Romeyer-Dherbey, Jacques; Recroix, Herve; Rodriguez, Michel; Loridon, Joel; Denis, Caroline; Toubon, Herve

    2002-01-01

    The development of a passive-active neutron assay system for alpha low level waste characterization at the French Atomic Energy Commission is discussed. Less than 50 Bq[α] (about 50 μg Pu) per gram of crude waste must be measured in 118-l 'European' drums in order to reach the requirements for incinerating wastes. Detection limits of about 0.12 mg of effective 239 Pu in total active neutron counting, and 0.08 mg of effective 239 Pu coincident active neutron counting, may currently be detected (empty cavity, measurement time of 15 min, neutron generator emission of 1.6 x 10 8 s -1 [4π]). The most limiting parameters in terms of performances are the matrix of the drum - its composition (H, Cl...), its density, and its heterogeneity degree - and the localization and self-shielding properties of the contaminant

  7. The neutron porosity tool

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    The report contains a review of available information on neutron porosity tools with the emphasis on dual thermal-neutron-detector porosity tools and epithermal-neutron-detector porosity tools. The general principle of such tools is discussed and theoretical models are very briefly reviewed. Available data on tool designs are summarized with special regard to the source-detector distance. Tool operational data, porosity determination and correction of measurements are briefly discussed. (author) 15 refs

  8. Thermoluminescence fast neutron dosimetry by laser heating

    Mathur, V.K.; Brown, M.D.; Braeunlich, P.

    1984-01-01

    Heating rates in excess of 10 4 K.sec -1 have been achieved for thin layers of TL dosemeters by laser heating. The high heating rate improves the signal to noise ratio up to a factor of 10 3 . Thus sensitive thin film fast neutron dosemeters with negligible self-shielding have become a practical reality. Thin samples of CaSO 4 :Dy have been investigated for their response to fast neutrons from a Pu-Be source and a 14.6 MeV neutron generator by using a hydrogenous radiator. A 15 watt CO 2 laser was focussed on the thin TLD layer to a spot size of less than 1 mm to heat it. An exposure of a few tens of milliseconds was sufficient to obtain a TLD curve, which was displayed and processed by a wave form digitiser. The laser spot could be scanned over the TLD sample by a x-y positioner and a large number of observations were obtained on each sample. Preliminary results show that it is possible to obtain a figure of merit of approx. 5% in a mixed n, γ field. A practical design for a fast neutron dosemeter is proposed. (author)

  9. Prospects for accelerator neutron sources for large volume minerals analysis

    Clayton, C.G.; Spackman, R.

    1988-01-01

    The electron Linac can be regarded as a practical source of thermal neutrons for activation analysis of large volume mineral samples. With a suitable target and moderator, a neutron flux of about 10 10 n/cm/s over 2-3 kg of rock can be generated. The proton Linac gives the possibility of a high neutron yield (> 10 12 n/s) of fast neutrons at selected energies. For the electron Linac, targets of W-U and W-Be are discussed. The advantages and limitations of the system are demonstrated for the analysis of gold in rocks and ores and for platinum in chromitite. These elements were selected as they are most likely to justify an accelerator installation at the present time. Errors due to self shielding in gold particles for thermal neutrons are discussed. The proton Linac is considered for neutrons generated from a lithium target through the 7 Li(p, n) 7 Be reaction. The analysis of gold by fast neutron activation is considered. This approach avoids particle self-absorption and, by appropriate proton energy selection, avoids potentially dominating interfering reactions. The analysis of 235 U in the presence of 238 U and 232 Th is also considered. (author)

  10. Neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance region

    Janeva, N.; Lukyanov, A.; Koyumdjieva, N.; Volev, K.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a development of the characteristic function model, created to reveal the resonance cross section structure in the unresolved resonance region is presented. The main advantage of this model is the calculation of resonance averaged self-shielding factors analytically. To determine average values of the cross sections and their functionals the function of joint statistical distribution of the R-matrix real and imaginary parts should be used. The characteristic function of such distribution is determined and the resonance ladder for the unresolved region is optimized to calculate the group averaged functionals in the same way as it is in the resolved resonance region. The main advantage of this model is the calculation of resonance averaged self-shielding factors analytically. The neutron width energy dependence leads to some deformation in the shape of resonances. This deformation is most apparent near the inelastic scattering threshold. For the case when the inelastic channel momentum is zero we present the formula for level shape bellow and over the inelastic threshold and the calculated resonance deformation in dependence of the position of the resonance in respect to the threshold. (authors)

  11. Aluminium-gold reference material for the k0-standardisation of neutron activation analysis

    Ingelbrecht, C.; Peetermans, F.; Corte, F. de; Wispelaere, A. de; Vandecasteele, C.; Courtijn, E.; Hondt, P. d'

    1991-01-01

    Gold is an excellent comparator material for the k 0 -standardisation of neutron activation analysis because of its convenient and well defined nuclear properties. The most suitable form for a reference material is a dilute aluminium-gold alloy, for which the self-shielding effect for neutrons is small. Castings of composition Al-0.1 wt.% Au were prepared by crucible-less levitation melting, which gives close control of ingot composition with minimal contamination of the melt. The alloy composition was checked using induction-coupled plasma source emission spectrometry. The homogeneity of the alloy was measured by neutron activation analysis and a relative standard deviation of the gold content of 0.30% was found (10 mg samples). Metallography revealed a homogeneous distribution of AuAl 2 particles. The alloy was certified as Reference Materials CBNM-530, with certified gold mass fraction 0.100±0.002 wt.%. (orig.)

  12. Neutron logging reliability techniques and apparatus

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for verifying the validity of data derived at least in part by neutron logging of earth formations, and, where indicated, for affording neutron diffusion-corrected values of such data, are disclosed. (WHK)

  13. Polarized neutrons

    Williams, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    The book on 'polarized neutrons' is intended to inform researchers in condensed matter physics and chemistry of the diversity of scientific problems that can be investigated using polarized neutron beams. The contents include chapters on:- neutron polarizers and instrumentation, polarized neutron scattering, neutron polarization analysis experiments and precessing neutron polarization. (U.K.)

  14. Neutron--neutron logging

    Allen, L.S.

    1977-01-01

    A borehole logging tool includes a steady-state source of fast neutrons, two epithermal neutron detectors, and two thermal neutron detectors. A count rate meter is connected to each neutron detector. A first ratio detector provides an indication of the porosity of the formation surrounding the borehole by determining the ratio of the outputs of the two count rate meters connected to the two epithermal neutron detectors. A second ratio detector provides an indication of both porosity and macroscopic absorption cross section of the formation surrounding the borehole by determining the ratio of the outputs of the two count rate meters connected to the two thermal neutron detectors. By comparing the signals of the two ratio detectors, oil bearing zones and salt water bearing zones within the formation being logged can be distinguished and the amount of oil saturation can be determined. 6 claims, 2 figures

  15. Neutronics characteristics of micro-heterogeneous ThO2-UO2 PWR cores

    Zhao, X.; Driscoll, M.J.; Kazimi, S.

    2001-01-01

    A new fuel concept, axially-micro-heterogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel, where ThO 2 fuel pellets and UO 2 fuel pellets are stacked in separate layers in the fuel rods, is being studied at MIT as an option to reduce plutonium production in LWR fuel. Very interesting neutronic behavior is observed: (1) A reactivity increase of 3% to 4% at EOL for a given 235 U inventory which results in a 20-30% increase in average core discharge burnup; (2) For certain configurations, a ''burnable poison'' effect is observed. Analysis shows that these effects are achieved due to a combination of changes in self-shielding, local fissile worth, and conversion ratio, among which self-shielding is the dominant effect at the end of a reactivity-limited burnup. Other variations of micro-heterogeneous UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel including duplex pellets, checkerboard pin distribution, and checkerboard-axial combinations have also been investigated, and their neutronic performance compared. It is concluded that the axial fuel micro-heterogeneity provides the largest gain in reactivity-limited burnup. (author)

  16. An optimized ultra-fine energy group structure for neutron transport calculations

    Huria, Harish; Ouisloumen, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an optimized energy group structure that was developed for neutron transport calculations in lattices using the Westinghouse lattice physics code PARAGON. The currently used 70-energy group structure results in significant discrepancies when the predictions are compared with those from the continuous energy Monte Carlo methods. The main source of the differences is the approximations employed in the resonance self-shielding methodology. This, in turn, leads to ambiguous adjustments in the resonance range cross-sections. The main goal of developing this group structure was to bypass the self-shielding methodology altogether thereby reducing the neutronic calculation errors. The proposed optimized energy mesh has 6064 points with 5877 points spanning the resonance range. The group boundaries in the resonance range were selected so that the micro group cross-sections matched reasonably well with those derived from reaction tallies of MCNP for a number of resonance absorbers of interest in reactor lattices. At the same time, however, the fast and thermal energy range boundaries were also adjusted to match the MCNP reaction rates in the relevant ranges. The resulting multi-group library was used to obtain eigenvalues for a wide variety of reactor lattice numerical benchmarks and also the Doppler reactivity defect benchmarks to establish its adequacy. (authors)

  17. Effect of neutron anisotropic scattering in fast reactor analysis

    Chiba, Gou

    2004-01-01

    Numerical tests were performed about an effect of a neutron anisotropic scattering on criticality in the Sn transport calculation. The simplest approximation, the consistent P approximation and the extended transport approximation were compared with each other in one-dimensional slab fast reactor models. JAERI fast set which has been used for fast reactor analyses is inadequate to evaluate the effect because it doesn't include the scattering matrices and the self-shielding factors to calculate the group-averaged cross sections weighted by the higher-order moment of angular flux. In the present study, the sub-group method was used to evaluate the group-averaged cross sections. Results showed that the simplest approximation is inadequate and the transport approximation is effective for evaluating the anisotropic scattering. (author)

  18. Neutronic analysis of JET external neutron monitor response

    Snoj, Luka, E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor; Čufar, Aljaž [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Syme, Brian; Popovichev, Sergey [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Conroy, Sean [VR Association, Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We model JET tokamak containing JET remote handling system. • We investigate effect of remote handling system on external neutron monitor response. • Remote handling system correction factors are calculated. • Integral correction factors are relatively small, i.e up to 8%. - Abstract: The power output of fusion devices is measured in terms of the neutron yield which relates directly to the fusion yield. JET made a transition from Carbon wall to ITER-Like Wall (Beryllium/Tungsten/Carbon) during 2010–11. Absolutely calibrated measurement of the neutron yield by JET neutron monitors was ensured by direct measurements using a calibrated {sup 252}Cf neutron source (NS) deployed by the in-vessel remote handling system (RHS) inside the JET vacuum vessel. Neutronic calculations were required in order to understand the neutron transport from the source in the vacuum vessel to the fission chamber detectors mounted outside the vessel on the transformer limbs of the tokamak. We developed a simplified computational model of JET and the JET RHS in Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP and analyzed the paths and structures through which neutrons reach the detectors and the effect of the JET RHS on the neutron monitor response. In addition we performed several sensitivity studies of the effect of substantial massive structures blocking the ports on the external neutron monitor response. As the simplified model provided a qualitative picture of the process only, some calculations were repeated using a more detailed full 3D model of the JET tokamak.

  19. A Neutron Rem Counter

    Andersson, I Oe; Braun, J

    1964-01-15

    A neutron detector is described which measures the neutron dose rate in rem/h independently of the energy of the neutrons from thermal to 15 MeV. The detector consists of a BF{sub 3} proportional counter surrounded by a shield made of polyethylene and boron plastic that gives the appropriate amount of moderation and absorption to the impinging neutrons to obtain rem response. Two different versions have been developed. One model can utilize standard BF{sub 3} counters and is suitable for use in installed monitors around reactors and accelerators and the other model is specially designed for use in a portable survey instrument. The neutron rem counter for portable instruments has a sensitivity of 2.4 cps/mrem/h and is essentially nondirectional in response. With correct bias setting the counter is insensitive to gamma exposure up to 200 r/h from Co-60.

  20. Fission products silver, palladium, and cadmium identification in neutron-irradiated SiC TRISO particles using a Cs-Corrected HRTEM

    Rooyen, I.J. van, E-mail: isabella.vanrooyen@inl.gov [Fuel Design and Development Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Olivier, E.J.; Neethling, J.H. [Centre for High Resolution Electron Microscopy, Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2016-08-01

    Electron microscopy investigations of selected coated particles from the first advanced gas reactor experiment at Idaho National Laboratory provided important information on fission product distribution and chemical composition in the silicon-carbide (SiC) layer. Silver precipitates were nano-sized, and therefore high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to provide more information at the atomic level. Based on gamma-ray analysis, this particle which was irradiated to an average burnup of 19.38% fissions per initial metal atom, may have released as much as 10% of its available Ag-110 m inventory during irradiation. The HRTEM investigation focused on silver, palladium, and cadmium due to interest in silver transport mechanisms and possible correlation with palladium and silver previously found. Palladium, silver, and cadmium were found to co-exist in some of the SiC grain boundaries and triple junctions. This study confirmed palladium both at inter and intragranular sites. Phosphor was identified in SiC grain boundaries and triple points. - Highlights: • First high resolution electron microscopy fission product nano-structural locations of irradiated TRISO coated particles. • Pd observed inside SiC grains in proximity to planar defects e.g. stacking faults. • Ag co-exists with Pd and Cd only may suggest a Pd-assisted transport mechanism. • First finding of neutron transmutation product P, in SiC layer of TRISO coated particles. No direct link to Ag transport. • No significant Pd corrosion of SiC observed even at this high resolution images.

  1. Ultracold neutrons

    Steenstrup, S.

    Briefly surveys recent developments in research work with ultracold neutrons (neutrons of very low velocity, up to 10 m/s at up to 10 -7 eV and 10 -3 K). Slow neutrons can be detected in an ionisation chamber filled with B 10 F 3 . Very slow neutrons can be used for investigations into the dipole moment of neutrons. Neutrons of large wave length have properties similar to those of light. The limit angle for total reflection is governed by the wave length and by the material. Total reflection can be used to filter ultracold neutrons out of the moderator material of a reactor. Total reflection can also be used to store ultracold neutrons but certain problems with storage have not yet been clarified. Slow neutrons can be made to lose speed in a neutron turbine, and come out as ultracold neutrons. A beam of ultracold neutrons could be used in a neutron microscope. (J.S.)

  2. Measurements and applications of neutron multiple scattering in resonance region

    Ohkubo, Makio

    1977-02-01

    Capture yield of neutrons impinging on a thick material is complicated due to self-shielding and multiple scattering, especially in the resonance region. When the incident neutron energy is equal to a resonance energy of the material, capture probability of the neutron increases with sample thickness and reaches a saturation value P sub(CO). There is a simple relation between P sub(CO) and GAMMA sub(n)/GAMMA and the recoil energy by the Monte-Carlo calculation. To examine validity of the relation, P sub(CO) was measured for 19 resonances in 12 nuclides with thick samples, using a JAERI linac time-of-flight spectrometer with Moxon-Rae type gamma ray detector and transmission type neutron flux monitor. Results of the measurements confirmed the validity. With this relation, the GAMMA sub(n)/GAMMA or GAMMA sub(γ)/GAMMA value can be obtained from the measured P sub(CO), and also the level spins be determined by combining the transmission data. Because of the definition of P sub(CO), determination of the resonance parameters is not sensitive to the sample thickness as far as it is sufficiently thick. (auth.)

  3. Sensitivity Calculation of Vanadium Self-Powered Neutron Detector

    Cha, Kyoon Ho

    2011-01-01

    Self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is being widely used to monitor the reactor core of the nuclear power plants. The SPND contains a neutron-sensitive metallic emitter surrounded by a ceramic insulator. Currently, the rhodium SPND has been used in many nuclear power plants. The lifetime of rhodium is too short (about 3∼5 years) to operate the nuclear power plant economically. The vanadium (V) SPND is also primarily sensitive to neutrons like rhodium, but is a somewhat slower reaction time as that of a rhodium SPND. The benefit of vanadium over rhodium is its low depletion rate, which is a factor of 7 times less than that of rhodium. For this reason, a vanadium SPND has been being developed to replace the rhodium SPND which is used in OPR1000. Some Monte Carlo simulations were accomplished to calculate the initial sensitivity of vanadium emitter material and alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) insulator with a cylindrical geometry. An MCNP-X code was used to simulate some factors (neutron self shielding factor and electron escape probability from the emitter) necessary to calculate the sensitivity of vanadium detector. The simulation results were compared with some theoretical and experimental values. The method presented here can be used to analyze the optimum design of the vanadium SPND

  4. A program for calculating group constants on the basis of libraries of evaluated neutron data

    Sinitsa, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The GRUKON program is designed for processing libraries of evaluated neutron data into group and fine-group (having some 300 groups) microscopic constants. In structure it is a package of applications programs with three basic components: a monitor, a command language and a library of functional modules. The first operative version of the package was restricted to obtaining mid-group non-block cross-sections from evaluated neutron data libraries in the ENDF/B format. This was then used to process other libraries. In the next two versions, cross-section table conversion modules and self-shielding factor calculation modules, respectively, were added to the functions already in the package. Currently, a fourth version of the GRUKON applications program package, for calculation of sub-group parameters, is under preparation. (author)

  5. Pulsed neutron uranium borehole logging with prompt fission neutrons

    Bivens, H.M.; Smith, G.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1976-01-01

    The gross count natural gamma log normally used for uranium borehole logging is seriously affected by disequilibrium. Methods for the direct measurement of uranium, such as neutron logging, which are not affected by disequilibrium have been the object of considerable effort in recent years. This paper describes a logging system for uranium which uses a small accelerator to generate pulses of 14 MeV neutrons to detect and assay uranium by the measurement of prompt fission neutrons in the epithermal energy range. After an initial feasibility study, a prototype logging probe was built for field evaluation which began in January 1976. Physical and operational characteristics of the prototype probe, the neutron tube-transformer assembly, and the neutron tube are described. In logging operations, only the epithermal prompt fission neutrons detected between 250 microseconds to 2500 microseconds following the excitation neutron pulse are counted. Comparison of corrected neutron logs with the conventional gross count natural gamma logs and the chemical assays of cores from boreholes are shown. The results obtained with this neutron probe clearly demonstrate its advantages over the gross count natural gamma log, although at this time the accuracy of the neutron log assay is not satisfactory under some conditions. The necessary correction factors for various borehole and formation parameters are being determined and, when applied, should improve the assay accuracy

  6. Program RECENT (version 79-1): reconstruction of energy-dependent neutron cross sections from resonance parameters in the ENDF/B format

    Cullen, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Program RECENT reconstructs energy-dependent neutron total, elastic, capture, and fission cross sections from a combination of resonance parameters and tabulated background cross sections in the ENDF/B format. Entire evaluations, not just cross sections, are written to the result file, which is in ENDF/B format. The output includes the original resonance parameters in a form that can be used in Doppler broadening and self-shielding calculations. A listing of the source deck is available on request. 5 figures, 5 tables

  7. Generation of ENDF/B-IV based 35 group neutron cross-section library and its application in criticality studies

    Garg, S.B.; Sinha, A.

    1985-01-01

    A 35 group cross-section library with P/sub 3/-anisotropic scattering matrices and resonance self-shielding factors has been generated from the basic ENDF/B-IV cross-section files for 57 elements. This library covers the neutron energy range from 0.005 ev to 15 MeV and is well suited for the neutronics and safety analysis of fission, fusion and hybrid systems. The library is contained in two well known files, namely, ISOTXS and BRKOXS. In order to test the efficacy of this library and to bring out the importance of resonance self-shielding, a few selected fast critical assemblies representing large dilute oxide and carbide fueled uranium and plutonium based systems have been analysed. These assemblies include ZPPR/sub 2/, ZPR-3-48, ZPR-3-53, ZPR-6-6A, ZPR-6-7, ZPR-9-31 and ZEBRA-2 and are amongst those recommended by the US Nuclear Data Evaluation Working Group for testing the accuracy of cross-sections. The evaluated multiplication constants of these assemblies compare favourably with those calculated by others

  8. Neutron reflectometry

    Van Well, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron research where reflection, refraction, and interference play an essential role is generally referred to as 'neutron optics'. The neutron wavelength, the scattering length density and the magnetic properties of the material determine the critical angle for total reflection. The theoretical background of neutron reflection, experimental methods and the interpretation of reflection data are presented. (K.A.)

  9. THE SECONDARY EXTINCTION CORRECTION

    Zachariasen, W. H.

    1963-03-15

    It is shown that Darwin's formula for the secondary extinction correction, which has been universally accepted and extensively used, contains an appreciable error in the x-ray diffraction case. The correct formula is derived. As a first order correction for secondary extinction, Darwin showed that one should use an effective absorption coefficient mu + gQ where an unpolarized incident beam is presumed. The new derivation shows that the effective absorption coefficient is mu + 2gQ(1 + cos/sup 4/2 theta )/(1 plus or minus cos/sup 2/2 theta )/s up 2/, which gives mu + gQ at theta =0 deg and theta = 90 deg , but mu + 2gQ at theta = 45 deg . Darwin's theory remains valid when applied to neutron diffraction. (auth)

  10. Neutron filters for producing monoenergetic neutron beams

    Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Harvey, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron transmission measurements have been made on high-purity, highly-enriched samples of 58 Ni (99.9%), 60 Ni (99.7%), 64 Zn (97.9%) and 184 W (94.5%) to measure their neutron windows and to assess their potential usefulness for producing monoenergetic beams of intermediate energies from a reactor. Transmission measurements on the Los Alamos Sc filter (44.26 cm Sc and 1.0 cm Ti) have been made to determine the characteristics of the transmitted neutron beam and to measure the total cross section of Sc at the 2.0 keV minimum. When corrected for the Ti and impurities, a value of 0.35 +- 0.03 b was obtained for this minimum

  11. Magnetohydrodynamics of neutron star interiors

    Easson, I.; Pethick, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic equations for the charged particles in the fluid interior of a neutron star are derived from the Landau-Boltzmann kinetic equations. It is assumed that the protons are normal and the neutrons are superfluid. The dissipative processes associated with the weak interactions are shown to be negligible except in very hot neutron stars; we neglect them here. Among the topics discussed are: the influence of the neutron-proton nuclear force (Fermi liquid corrections) on the magnetohydrodynamics; the effects of the magnetic field on the pressure, viscosity, and heat conductivity tensors; the plasma equation of state; and the form of the generalized Ohm's law

  12. Resonance analysis and evaluation of the 235U neutron induced cross sections

    Leal, L.C.

    1990-06-01

    Neutron cross sections of fissile nuclei are of considerable interest for the understanding of parameters such as resonance absorption, resonance escape probability, resonance self-shielding,and the dependence of the reactivity on temperature. In the present study, new techniques for the evaluation of the 235 U neutron cross sections are described. The Reich-Moore formalism of the Bayesian computer code SAMMY was used to perform consistent R-matrix multilevel analyses of the selected neutron cross-section data. The Δ 3 -statistics of Dyson and Mehta, along with high-resolution data and the spin-separated fission cross-section data, have provided the possibility of developing a new methodology for the analysis and evaluation of neutron-nucleus cross sections. The results of the analysis consists of a set of resonance parameters which describe the 235 U neutron cross sections up to 500 eV. The set of resonance parameters obtained through a R-matrix analysis are expected to satisfy statistical properties which lead to information on the nuclear structure. The resonance parameters were tested and showed good agreement with the theory. It is expected that the parametrization of the 235 U neutron cross sections obtained in this dissertation represents the current state of art in data as well as in theory and, therefore, can be of direct use in reactor calculations. 44 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  13. Neutron radiography with ultracold neutrons

    Bates, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The neutron transmission factor of very thin films may be low if the neutron energy is comparable to the pseudo-potential of the film material. Surprisingly, perhaps, it is relatively easy to obtain neutrons with such low energies in sufficient numbers to produce neutron radiographs. (orig.)

  14. Neutron Skins and Neutron Stars

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ("PREX") at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in 208Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron be...

  15. Neutron Dosimetry

    Vanhavere, F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on neutron dosimetry is to improve the determination of neutron doses by studying neutron spectra, neutron dosemeters and shielding adaptations. In 2000, R and D focused on the contiued investigation of the bubble detectors type BD-PND and BDT, in particular their sensitivity and temperature dependence; the updating of SCK-CEN's criticality dosemeter, the investigation of the characteristics of new thermoluminescent materials and their use in neutron dosemetry; and the investigation of neutron shielding

  16. Neutron Dosimetry

    Vanhavere, F

    2001-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on neutron dosimetry is to improve the determination of neutron doses by studying neutron spectra, neutron dosemeters and shielding adaptations. In 2000, R and D focused on the contiued investigation of the bubble detectors type BD-PND and BDT, in particular their sensitivity and temperature dependence; the updating of SCK-CEN's criticality dosemeter, the investigation of the characteristics of new thermoluminescent materials and their use in neutron dosemetry; and the investigation of neutron shielding.

  17. Derivation of a volume-averaged neutron diffusion equation; Atomos para el desarrollo de Mexico

    Vazquez R, R.; Espinosa P, G. [UAM-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Morales S, Jaime B. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos 62550 (Mexico)]. e-mail: rvr@xanum.uam.mx

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a general theoretical analysis of the problem of neutron motion in a nuclear reactor, where large variations on neutron cross sections normally preclude the use of the classical neutron diffusion equation. A volume-averaged neutron diffusion equation is derived which includes correction terms to diffusion and nuclear reaction effects. A method is presented to determine closure-relationships for the volume-averaged neutron diffusion equation (e.g., effective neutron diffusivity). In order to describe the distribution of neutrons in a highly heterogeneous configuration, it was necessary to extend the classical neutron diffusion equation. Thus, the volume averaged diffusion equation include two corrections factor: the first correction is related with the absorption process of the neutron and the second correction is a contribution to the neutron diffusion, both parameters are related to neutron effects on the interface of a heterogeneous configuration. (Author)

  18. Neutron radiography

    Hrdlicka, Z.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a radiographic method using a neutron beam of a defined geometry. The neutron source usually consists of a research reactor, a specialized neutron radiography reactor or the 252 Cf radioisotope source. There are two types of the neutron radiography display system, viz., a system producing neutron radiography images by a photographic process or a system allowing a visual display, eg., using a television monitor. The method can be used wherever X-ray radiography is used except applications in the radiography of humans. The neutron radiography unit at UJV uses the WWR-S reactor as the neutron source and both types of the above mentioned display system. (J.P.)

  19. Publisher Correction

    Turcot, Valérie; Lu, Yingchang; Highland, Heather M

    2018-01-01

    In the published version of this paper, the name of author Emanuele Di Angelantonio was misspelled. This error has now been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.......In the published version of this paper, the name of author Emanuele Di Angelantonio was misspelled. This error has now been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article....

  20. Author Correction

    Grundle, D S; Löscher, C R; Krahmann, G

    2018-01-01

    A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has not been fixed in the paper.......A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has not been fixed in the paper....

  1. The neutron

    Kredov, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    The history of the neutron is displayed on the basis of contributions by scientists who produced outstanding results in neutron research (part 1), of summarizing discoveries and theories which led to the discovery of the neutron and the resulting development of nuclear physics (part 2), and of fundamental papers written by Rutherford, Chadwick, Iwanenko, and others (appendix). Of interest to physicists, historians, and students

  2. Neutron techniques

    Charlton, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    The way in which neutrons interact with matter such as slowing-down, diffusion, neutron absorption and moderation are described. The use of neutron techniques in industry, in moisture gages, level and interface measurements, the detection of blockages, boron analysis in ore feedstock and industrial radiography are discussed. (author)

  3. Bi-Modal Model for Neutron Emissions from PuO2 and MOX Holdup

    Menlove, Howard; Lafleur, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of uranium and plutonium holdup in plants during process activity and for decommissioning is important for nuclear safeguards and material control. The amount of plutonium and uranium holdup in glove-boxes, pipes, ducts, and other containers has been measured for several decades using both neutron and gamma-ray techniques. For the larger containers such as hot cells and glove-boxes that contain processing equipment, the gamma-ray techniques are limited by self-shielding in the sample as well as gamma absorption in the equipment and associated shielding. The neutron emission is more penetrating and has been used extensively to measure the holdup for the large facilities such as the MOX processing and fabrication facilities in Japan and Europe. In some case the totals neutron emission rates are used to determine the holdup mass and in other cases the coincidence rates are used such as at the PFPF MOX fabrication plant in Japan. The neutron emission from plutonium and MOX has 3 primary source terms: 1) Spontaneous fission (SF) from the plutonium isotopes, 2) The (α,n) reactions from the plutonium alpha particle emission reacting with the oxygen and other impurities, and 3) Neutron multiplication (M) in the plutonium and uranium as a result of neutrons created by the first two sources. The spontaneous fission yield per gram is independent of thickness, whereas, the above sources 2) and 3) are very dependent on the thickness of the deposit. As the effective thickness of the deposit becomes thin relative to the alpha particle range, the (α,n) reactions and neutrons from multiplication (M) approach zero. In any glove-box, there will always be two primary modes of holdup accumulation, namely direct powder contact and non-contact by air dispersal. These regimes correspond to surfaces in the glove-box that have come into direct contact with the process MOX powder versus surface areas that have not had direct contact with the powder. The air dispersal of Pu

  4. Bi-Modal Model for Neutron Emissions from PuO{sub 2} and MOX Holdup

    Menlove, Howard; Lafleur, Adrienne [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Safeguard Science and Technology Group, NEN-1, MS E540, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The measurement of uranium and plutonium holdup in plants during process activity and for decommissioning is important for nuclear safeguards and material control. The amount of plutonium and uranium holdup in glove-boxes, pipes, ducts, and other containers has been measured for several decades using both neutron and gamma-ray techniques. For the larger containers such as hot cells and glove-boxes that contain processing equipment, the gamma-ray techniques are limited by self-shielding in the sample as well as gamma absorption in the equipment and associated shielding. The neutron emission is more penetrating and has been used extensively to measure the holdup for the large facilities such as the MOX processing and fabrication facilities in Japan and Europe. In some case the totals neutron emission rates are used to determine the holdup mass and in other cases the coincidence rates are used such as at the PFPF MOX fabrication plant in Japan. The neutron emission from plutonium and MOX has 3 primary source terms: 1) Spontaneous fission (SF) from the plutonium isotopes, 2) The (α,n) reactions from the plutonium alpha particle emission reacting with the oxygen and other impurities, and 3) Neutron multiplication (M) in the plutonium and uranium as a result of neutrons created by the first two sources. The spontaneous fission yield per gram is independent of thickness, whereas, the above sources 2) and 3) are very dependent on the thickness of the deposit. As the effective thickness of the deposit becomes thin relative to the alpha particle range, the (α,n) reactions and neutrons from multiplication (M) approach zero. In any glove-box, there will always be two primary modes of holdup accumulation, namely direct powder contact and non-contact by air dispersal. These regimes correspond to surfaces in the glove-box that have come into direct contact with the process MOX powder versus surface areas that have not had direct contact with the powder. The air dispersal of Pu

  5. Decommissioning of an Irradiator MPX-γ - 25M and a neutron Irradiator

    Soguero, Dania; Guerra, Mercedes; Prieto, Enrique; Desdin, Luis

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a technology is developed with its procedures in radiation protection to ensure the safety of the process of decommissioning of two irradiators. Both processes are described, the process of decommissioning of a neutron Irradiator 4. 44·10 11 Bq, employed in the vegetal radio mutagenesis, and disassembling of an installation of gamma irradiation of 3.33 * 10 12 Bq, self-shielded of category I, model MPX - γ - 25 M. The specific objectives are: a) identify aspects of the contractual assurance, of human and technical resources, b) to evaluate the radiological situation of the process and c) analyze the potential radiological extraordinary events in each of the steps of the process, ensuring the right answers. Evaluation of radiological successful events described can be considered as reference to address the process of disassembling of other similar irradiators

  6. Condensation and homogenization of cross sections for the deterministic transport codes with Monte Carlo method: Application to the GEN IV fast neutron reactors

    Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV reactors neutronic research, new core calculation tools are implemented in the code system APOLLO3 for the deterministic part. These calculation methods are based on the discretization concept of nuclear energy data (named multi-group and are generally produced by deterministic codes) and should be validated and qualified with respect to some Monte-Carlo reference calculations. This thesis aims to develop an alternative technique of producing multi-group nuclear properties by a Monte-Carlo code (TRIPOLI-4). At first, after having tested the existing homogenization and condensation functionalities with better precision obtained nowadays, some inconsistencies are revealed. Several new multi-group parameters estimators are developed and validated for TRIPOLI-4 code with the aid of itself, since it has the possibility to use the multi-group constants in a core calculation. Secondly, the scattering anisotropy effect which is necessary for handling neutron leakage case is studied. A correction technique concerning the diagonal line of the first order moment of the scattering matrix is proposed. This is named the IGSC technique and is based on the usage of an approximate current which is introduced by Todorova. An improvement of this IGSC technique is then presented for the geometries which hold an important heterogeneity property. This improvement uses a more accurate current quantity which is the projection on the abscissa X. The later current can represent the real situation better but is limited to 1D geometries. Finally, a B1 leakage model is implemented in the TRIPOLI-4 code for generating multi-group cross sections with a fundamental mode based critical spectrum. This leakage model is analyzed and validated rigorously by the comparison with other codes: Serpent and ECCO, as well as an analytical case.The whole development work introduced in TRIPOLI-4 code allows producing multi-group constants which can then be used in the core

  7. Notes on neutron flux measurement

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to get an useful guide to carry out topical neutron flux measurements. Although the foil activation technique is used in the majority of the cases, other techniques, such as those based on fission chambers and self-powered neutron detectors, are also shown. Special interest is given to the description and application of corrections on the measurement of relative and absolute induced activities by several types of detectors (scintillators, G-M and gas proportional counters). The thermal arid epithermal neutron fluxes, as determined in this work, are conventional or effective (West cots fluxes), which are extensively used by the reactor experimentalists; however, we also give some expressions where they are related to the integrated neutron fluxes, which are used in neutron calculations. (Author) 16 refs

  8. Evaluating secondary neutron doses of a refined shielded design for a medical cyclotron using the TLD approach

    Lin, Jye-Bin; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Wen-Shan; Lin, Ding-Bang; Hsieh, Teng-San; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of cyclotrons at medical centers in Taiwan have been installed to generate radiopharmaceutical products. An operating cyclotron generates immense amounts of secondary neutrons from reactions such the 18 O(p, n) 18 F, used in the production of FDG. This intense radiation can be hazardous to public health, particularly to medical personnel. To increase the yield of 18 F-FDG from 4200 GBq in 2005 to 48,600 GBq in 2011, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital (CSMUH) has prolonged irradiation time without changing the target or target current to meet requirements regarding the production 18 F. The CSMUH has redesigned the CTI Radioisotope Delivery System shield. The lack of data for a possible secondary neutron doses has increased due to newly designed cyclotron rooms. This work aims to evaluate secondary neutron doses at a CTI cyclotron center using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-600). Two-dimensional neutron doses were mapped and indicated that neutron doses were high as neutrons leaked through self-shielded blocks and through the L-shaped concrete shield in vault rooms. These neutron doses varied markedly among locations close to the H 2 18 O target. The Monte Carlo simulation and minimum detectable dose are also discussed and demonstrated the reliability of using the TLD-600 approach. Findings can be adopted by medical centers to identify radioactive hot spots and develop radiation protection. - Highlights: • Neutron doses were verified using TLD approach. • Neutron doses were increased at cyclotron centers. • Revised L-shaped shield suppresses effectively the neutrons. • Neutron dose can be attenuated to 1.13×10 6 %

  9. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    Verbeke, J.M., E-mail: verbeke2@llnl.gov; Prasad, M.K., E-mail: prasad1@llnl.gov; Snyderman, N.J., E-mail: snyderman1@llnl.gov

    2015-09-11

    A method is proposed to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.

  10. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    Verbeke, J.M.; Prasad, M.K.; Snyderman, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction

  11. Search Strategy of Detector Position For Neutron Source Multiplication Method by Using Detected-Neutron Multiplication Factor

    Endo, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative definition of a neutron multiplication factor, detected-neutron multiplication factor kdet, is produced for the neutron source multiplication method..(NSM). By using kdet, a search strategy of appropriate detector position for NSM is also proposed. The NSM is one of the practical subcritical measurement techniques, i.e., the NSM does not require any special equipment other than a stationary external neutron source and an ordinary neutron detector. Additionally, the NSM method is based on steady-state analysis, so that this technique is very suitable for quasi real-time measurement. It is noted that the correction factors play important roles in order to accurately estimate subcriticality from the measured neutron count rates. The present paper aims to clarify how to correct the subcriticality measured by the NSM method, the physical meaning of the correction factors, and how to reduce the impact of correction factors by setting a neutron detector at an appropriate detector position

  12. Neutron radiography

    Hiraoka, Eiichi

    1988-01-01

    The thermal neutron absorption coefficient is essentially different from the X-ray absorption coefficient. Each substance has a characteristic absorption coefficient regardless of its density. Neutron deams have the following features: (1) neutrons are not transmitted efficiently by low molecular weight substances, (2) they are transmitted efficiently by heavy metals, and (3) the transmittance differs among isotopes. Thus, neutron beams are suitable for cheking for foreign matters in heavy metals and testing of composites consisting of both heavy and light materials. A neutron source generates fast neutrons, which should be converted into thermal neutrons by reducing their energy. Major neutron souces include nuclear reactors, radioisotopes and particle accelerators. Photographic films and television systems are mainly used to observe neutron transmission images. Computers are employed for image processing, computerized tomography and three-dimensional analysis. The major applications of neutron radiography include inspection of neclear fuel; evaluation of material for airplane; observation of fuel in the engine and oil in the hydraulic systems in airplanes; testing of composite materials; etc. (Nogami, K.)

  13. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99 Mo is the parent isotope of 99m Tc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  14. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Talamo, Alberto [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99Mo is the parent isotope of 99mTc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  15. SUSANS With Polarized Neutrons.

    Wagh, Apoorva G; Rakhecha, Veer Chand; Strobl, Makus; Treimer, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Super Ultra-Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SUSANS) studies over wave vector transfers of 10(-4) nm(-1) to 10(-3) nm(-1) afford information on micrometer-size agglomerates in samples. Using a right-angled magnetic air prism, we have achieved a separation of ≈10 arcsec between ≈2 arcsec wide up- and down-spin peaks of 0.54 nm neutrons. The SUSANS instrument has thus been equipped with the polarized neutron option. The samples are placed in a uniform vertical field of 8.8 × 10(4) A/m (1.1 kOe). Several magnetic alloy ribbon samples broaden the up-spin neutron peak significantly over the ±1.3 × 10(-3) nm(-1) range, while leaving the down-spin peak essentially unaltered. Fourier transforms of these SUSANS spectra corrected for the instrument resolution, yield micrometer-range pair distribution functions for up- and down-spin neutrons as well as the nuclear and magnetic scattering length density distributions in the samples.

  16. Neutron albedo effects of underground nuclear explosion

    Yang Bo; Ying Yangjun; Li Jinhong; Bai Yun

    2013-01-01

    The neutron field distribution is affected by the surrounding medium in the underground nuclear explosion. It will influence the radiation chemical diagnosis. By Monte Carlo simulation, the fuel burnup induced by device and neutron albedo was calculated. The analysis method of albedo effect on radiation chemical diagnosis result under special environment was proposed. Neutron albedo should be considered when capture reaction burnup fraction is used, and then correct analysis can be carried out on the nuclear device.The neutron field distribution is affected by the surrounding medium in the underground nuclear explosion. It will influence the radiation chemical diagnosis. By Monte Carlo simulation, the fuel burnup induced by device and neutron albedo was calculated. The analysis method of albedo effect on radiation chemical diagnosis result under special environment was proposed. Neutron albedo should be considered when capture reaction burnup fraction is used, and then correct analysis can be carried out on the nuclear device. (authors)

  17. Neutron detector

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  18. Fusion neutronics

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  19. Neutron spectometers

    Poortmans, F.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental work in the field of low-energy neutron physics can be subdivided into two classes: 1)Study of the decay process of the compound-nucleus state as for example the study of the capture gamma rays and of the neutron induced fission process; 2)Study of the reaction mechanism, mainly by measuring the reaction cross-sections and resonance parameters. These neutron cross-sections and resonance parameters are also important data required for many technological applications especially for reactor development programmes. In general, the second class of experiments impose other requirements on the neutron spectrometer than the first class. In most cases, a better neutron energy resolution and a broader neutron energy range are required for the study of the reaction mechanism than for the study of various aspects of the decay process. (author)

  20. Properties of the TRIUMF neutron beam

    Gan, L.; Berdoz, A.R.; Green, P.W.; Greeniaus, L.G.; Helmer, R.; Korkmaz, E.; Lee, L.; Miller, C.A.; Opper, A.K.; Page, S.A.; Van Oers, W.T.H.; Zhao, J.

    1995-01-01

    Properties of the TRIUMF neutron beam (4A/2) are presented and compared with a Monte Carlo prediction. The beam intensity profile, energy spectrum and polarization are predicted taking into account the beamline geometry, energy losses in the LD 2 production target, the properties of the vector pd→ vector npp reaction, and the scattering of neutrons from the collimator walls. The results allow for improved corrections to systematic errors in a number of TRIUMF neutron experiments. (orig.)

  1. Neutron exposure

    Prillinger, G.; Konynenburg, R.A. van

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 6, LWR-PV neutron transport calculations and dosimetry methods and how they are combined to evaluate the neutron exposure of the steel of pressure vessels are discussed. An effort to correlate neutron exposure parameters with damage is made

  2. Neutron Albedo

    Ignatovich, V K

    2005-01-01

    A new, algebraic, method is applied to calculation of neutron albedo from substance to check the claim that use of ultradispersive fuel and moderator of an active core can help to gain in size and mass of the reactor. In a model of isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons it is shown that coherent scattering on separate grains in the case of thermal neutrons increases transport cross section negligibly, however it decreases albedo from a wall of finite thickness because of decrease of substance density. A visible increase of albedo takes place only for neutrons with wave length of the order of the size of a single grain.

  3. HIGH-PRECISION C17O, C18O, AND C16O MEASUREMENTS IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS: ANALOGUES FOR CO SELF-SHIELDING IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    Smith, Rachel L.; Young, Edward D.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Morris, Mark R.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2009-01-01

    Using very high resolution (λ/Δλ ∼ 95 000) 4.7 μm fundamental and 2.3 μm overtone rovibrational CO absorption spectra obtained with the Cryogenic Infrared Echelle Spectrograph infrared spectrometer on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we report detections of four CO isotopologues-C 16 O, 13 CO, C 18 O, and the rare species, C 17 O-in the circumstellar environment of two young protostars: VV CrA, a binary T Tauri star in the Corona Australis molecular cloud, and Reipurth 50, an intermediate-mass FU Ori star in the Orion Molecular Cloud. We argue that the observed CO absorption lines probe a protoplanetary disk in VV CrA, and a protostellar envelope in Reipurth 50. All CO line profiles are spectrally resolved, with intrinsic line widths of ∼3-4 km s -1 (FWHM), permitting direct calculation of CO oxygen isotopologue ratios with 5%-10% accuracy. The rovibrational level populations for all species can be reproduced by assuming that CO absorption arises in two temperature regimes. In the higher temperature regime, in which the column densities are best determined, the derived oxygen isotope ratios in VV CrA are: [C 16 O]/[C 18 O] =690 ± 30; [C 16 O]/[C 17 O] =2800 ± 300, and [C 18 O]/[C 17 O]=4.1 ± 0.4. For Reipurth 50, we find [C 16 O]/[C 18 O] =490 ± 30; [C 16 O]/[C 17 O] =2200 ± 150, [C 18 O]/[C 17 O] = 4.4 ± 0.2. For both objects, 12 C/ 13 C are on the order of 100, nearly twice the expected interstellar medium (ISM) ratio. The derived oxygen abundance ratios for the VV CrA disk show a significant mass-independent deficit of C 17 O and C 18 O relative to C 16 O compared to ISM baseline abundances. The Reipurth 50 envelope shows no clear differences in oxygen CO isotopologue ratios compared with the local ISM. A mass-independent fractionation can be interpreted as being due to selective photodissociation of CO in the disk surface due to self-shielding. The deficits in C 17 O and C 18 O in the VV CrA protoplanetary disk are consistent with an analogous

  4. Measurement of mercury isotopic ratio in stone meteorites by neutron activation analysis

    Thakur, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    196 Hg and 202 Hg isotopes have been measured by neutron activation analysis in samples of twelve stone meteorites. Hg is extracted from an irradiated sample by stepwise heating. The mercury concentrations vary from 0.07 to 33 ppm. While most of the samples give 196 Hg/ 202 Hg ratios similar to terrestrial value within error limits, in some cases large anomalies are observed. A number of control experiments have been devised, that show the absence of experimental artifacts, during sample preparation, neutron irradiation, chemical separation and counting stages. Several anomalous and normal Hg distillate have been re-irradiated as Hg-diethyl-dithio-carbamate complex to eliminate the influence of neutron self shielding and interfering reactions from matrix elements. The isotopic ratio patterns persist in the distillates too proving that any artifacts during meteorite irradiation and measurement are essentially absent. Both positive and negative anomalies are observed: however, the negative anomalies are much more frequent and abundant. In an extreme case of fine grained magnetic particles of Ambapur Nagla the 196 Hg is apparently absent in the Hg released at 100 deg C. A 2σ 196 Hg/ 202 Hg value is only 6% relative to the monitor. This experiment shows the robustness of neutron activation analysis and suggest some constrains on the formation history of stone meteorites. (author)

  5. Publisher Correction

    Stokholm, Jakob; Blaser, Martin J.; Thorsen, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The originally published version of this Article contained an incorrect version of Figure 3 that was introduced following peer review and inadvertently not corrected during the production process. Both versions contain the same set of abundance data, but the incorrect version has the children...

  6. Publisher Correction

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Dose, Janina; Gentschew, Liljana

    2018-01-01

    The original version of this Article contained an error in the spelling of the author Robert Häsler, which was incorrectly given as Robert Häesler. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article....

  7. Correction to

    Roehle, Robert; Wieske, Viktoria; Schuetz, Georg M

    2018-01-01

    The original version of this article, published on 19 March 2018, unfortunately contained a mistake. The following correction has therefore been made in the original: The names of the authors Philipp A. Kaufmann, Ronny Ralf Buechel and Bernhard A. Herzog were presented incorrectly....

  8. Influence of preheating on API 5L-X80 pipeline joint welding with self shielded flux-cored wire; Influencia del precalentamiento en las propiedades de uniones soldadas de acero API 5L-X80 soldadas con alambre tubular autoprotegido

    Cooper, R.; Silva, J. H. F.; Trevisan, R. E.

    2004-07-01

    The present work refers to the characterization of API 5L-X80 pipeline joints welded with self-shielded flux cored wire. This process was evaluated under preheating conditions, with an uniform and steady heat input. All joints were welded in flat position (1G), with the pipe turning and the torch still. Tube dimensions were 762 mm in external diameter and 16 mm in thickness. Welds were applied on single V-groove, with six weld beads, along with three levels of preheating temperatures (room temperature, 100 degree centigree, 160 degree centigree). These temperatures were maintained as inter pass temperature. The filler metal E71T8-K6 with mechanical properties different from parent metal was used in under matched conditions. The weld characterization is presented according to the mechanical test results of tensile strength, hardness and impact test. The mechanical tests were conducted according to API 1104, AWS and ASTM standards. API 1104 and API 51 were used as screening criteria. According to the results obtained, it was possible to remark that it is appropriate to weld API 5L-X80 steel ducts with Self-shielded Flux Cored wires, in conformance to the API standards and no preheat temperature is necessary. (Author) 22 refs.

  9. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  10. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Fratin, Luciano

    1994-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  11. Neutronic reactor

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  12. Neutron polarization

    Firk, F.W.K.

    1976-01-01

    Some recent experiments involving polarized neutrons are discussed; they demonstrate how polarization studies provide information on fundamental aspects of nuclear structure that cannot be obtained from more traditional neutron studies. Until recently, neutron polarization studies tended to be limited either to very low energies or to restricted regions at higher energies, determined by the kinematics of favorable (p, vector n) and (d, vector n) reactions. With the advent of high intensity pulsed electron and proton accelerators and of beams of vector polarized deuterons, this is no longer the case. One has entered an era in which neutron polarization experiments are now being carried out, in a routine way, throughout the entire range from thermal energies to tens-of-MeV. The significance of neutron polarization studies is illustrated in discussions of a wide variety of experiments that include the measurement of T-invariance in the β-decay of polarized neutrons, a search for the effects of meson exchange currents in the photo-disintegration of the deuteron, the determination of quantum numbers of states in the fission of aligned 235 U and 237 Np induced by polarized neutrons, and the double- and triple-scattering of fast neutrons by light nuclei

  13. Neutron holography

    Beynon, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    the paper concerns neutron holography, which allows an image to be constructed of the surfaces, as well as the interiors, of objects. The technique of neutron holography and its applications are described. Present and future use of the method is briefly outlined. (U.K.)

  14. Neutron source

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap

  15. Neutron transport

    Berthoud, Georges; Ducros, Gerard; Feron, Damien; Guerin, Yannick; Latge, Christian; Limoge, Yves; Santarini, Gerard; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Vernaz, Etienne; Coste-Delclaux, Mireille; M'Backe Diop, Cheikh; Nicolas, Anne; Andrieux, Catherine; Archier, Pascal; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Bernard, David; Biaise, Patrick; Blanc-Tranchant, Patrick; Bonin, Bernard; Bouland, Olivier; Bourganel, Stephane; Calvin, Christophe; Chiron, Maurice; Damian, Frederic; Dumonteil, Eric; Fausser, Clement; Fougeras, Philippe; Gabriel, Franck; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Gallo, Daniele; Hudelot, Jean-Pascal; Hugot, Francois-Xavier; Dat Huynh, Tan; Jouanne, Cedric; Lautard, Jean-Jacques; Laye, Frederic; Lee, Yi-Kang; Lenain, Richard; Leray, Sylvie; Litaize, Olivier; Magnaud, Christine; Malvagi, Fausto; Mijuin, Dominique; Mounier, Claude; Naury, Sylvie; Nicolas, Anne; Noguere, Gilles; Palau, Jean-Marc; Le Pallec, Jean-Charles; Peneliau, Yannick; Petit, Odile; Poinot-Salanon, Christine; Raepsaet, Xavier; Reuss, Paul; Richebois, Edwige; Roque, Benedicte; Royer, Eric; Saint-Jean, Cyrille de; Santamarina, Alain; Serot, Olivier; Soldevila, Michel; Tommasi, Jean; Trama, Jean-Christophe; Tsilanizara, Aime; Behar, Christophe; Provitina, Olivier; Lecomte, Michael; Forestier, Alain; Bender, Alexandra; Parisot, Jean-Francois; Finot, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    This bibliographical note presents a reference book which addresses the study of neutron transport in matter, the study of conditions for a chain reaction and the study of modifications of matter composition due to nuclear reactions. This book presents the main nuclear data, their measurement, assessment and processing, and the spallation. It proposes an overview of methods applied for the study of neutron transport: basic equations and their derived forms, deterministic methods and Monte Carlo method of resolution of the Boltzmann equation, methods of resolution of generalized Bateman equations, methods of time resolution of space kinetics coupled equations. It presents the main calculation codes, discusses the qualification and experimental aspects, and gives an overview of neutron transport applications: neutron transport calculation of reactors, neutron transport coupled with other disciplines, physics of fuel cycle, criticality

  16. Neutron transport in Eulerian coordinates with bulk material motion

    Baker, Randal S., E-mail: rsb@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Computational Physics Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dahl, Jon A., E-mail: dahl@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Computational Physics Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fichtl, Erin J., E-mail: efichtl@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Computational Physics Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morel, Jim E., E-mail: morel@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A consistent, numerically stable algorithm for the solution of the neutron transport equation in the presence of a moving material background is presented for one-dimensional spherical geometry. Manufactured solutions are used to demonstrate the correctness and stability of our numerical algorithm. The importance of including moving material corrections is shown for the r-process in proto-neutron stars.

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Full Text Available ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ...

  18. Microdosimetry of intermediate energy neutrons in fast neutron fields

    Saion, E.B.; Watt, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A coaxial double cylindrical proportional counter has been constructed for microdosimetry of intermediate energy neutrons in mixed fields. Details are given of the measured gas gain and resolution characteristics of the counter for a wide range of anode voltages. Event spectra due to intermediate neutrons in any desired energy band is achieved by an appropriate choice of thickness of the common dividing wall in the counter and by appropriate use of the coincidence, anticoincidence pulse counting arrangements. Calculated estimates indicate that the dose contribution by fast neutrons to the energy deposition events in the intermediate neutron range may be as large as 25%. Empirical procedures being investigated aim to determine the necessary corrections to be applied to the microdose distributions, with a precision of 10%. (author)

  19. Neutron transport equation - indications on homogenization and neutron diffusion

    Argaud, J.P.

    1992-06-01

    In PWR nuclear reactor, the practical study of the neutrons in the core uses diffusion equation to describe the problem. On the other hand, the most correct method to describe these neutrons is to use the Boltzmann equation, or neutron transport equation. In this paper, we give some theoretical indications to obtain a diffusion equation from the general transport equation, with some simplifying hypothesis. The work is organised as follows: (a) the most general formulations of the transport equation are presented: integro-differential equation and integral equation; (b) the theoretical approximation of this Boltzmann equation by a diffusion equation is introduced, by the way of asymptotic developments; (c) practical homogenization methods of transport equation is then presented. In particular, the relationships with some general and useful methods in neutronic are shown, and some homogenization methods in energy and space are indicated. A lot of other points of view or complements are detailed in the text or the remarks

  20. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of {sup 45}Sc

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Thi Hien, Nguyen [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwangsoo [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun [Department of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Manwoo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ{sub 0}) and resonance integral (I{sub 0}) of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (G{sub th}) and resonance (G{sub epi}) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (F{sub g}) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction, with σ{sub o,Au} = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and I{sub o,Au} = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σ{sub o,Sc} = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be I{sub o,Sc} = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  1. Study of scattering in bi-dimensional neutron radiographic images

    Oliveira, K.A.M. de; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, F.C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of neutron scattering frequently causes distortions in neutron radiographic images and, thus, reduces the quality. In this project, a type of filter, comprised of cadmium (a neutron absorber), was used in the form of a grid to correct this effect. This device generated image data in the discrete shadow bands of the absorber, components relative to neutron scattering on the test object and surroundings. Scattering image data processing, together with the original neutron radiographic image, resulted in a corrected image with improved edge delineation and, thus, greater definition in the neutron radiographic image of the test object. The objective of this study is to propose a theoretical/experimental methodology that is capable of eliminating the components relative to neutron scattering in neutron radiographic images, coming from the material that composes the test object and the materials that compose the surrounding area. (author)

  2. Soft error rate simulation and initial design considerations of neutron intercepting silicon chip (NISC)

    Celik, Cihangir

    results show that soft errors in the memories increase proportionally with the neutron flux, whereas they decrease with increasing the supply voltages. NISC design considerations include the effects of device scaling, 10B content in the BPSG layer, incoming neutron energy, and critical charge of the node for this dissertation. NISCSAT simulations were performed with various memory node models to account these effects. Device scaling simulations showed that any further increase in the thickness of the BPSG layer beyond 2 mum causes self-shielding of the incoming neutrons due to the BPSG layer and results in lower detection efficiencies. Moreover, if the BPSG layer is located more than 4 mum apart from the depletion region in the node, there are no soft errors in the node due to the fact that both of the reaction products have lower ranges in the silicon or any possible node layers. Calculation results regarding the critical charge indicated that the mean charge deposition of the reaction products in the sensitive volume of the node is about 15 fC. It is evident that the NISC design should have a memory architecture with a critical charge of 15 fC or less to obtain higher detection efficiencies. Moreover, the sensitive volume should be placed in close proximity to the BPSG layers so that its location would be within the range of alpha and 7Li particles. Results showed that the distance between the BPSG layer and the sensitive volume should be less than 2 mum to increase the detection efficiency of the NISC. Incoming neutron energy was also investigated by simulations and the results obtained from these simulations showed that NISC neutron detection efficiency is related with the neutron cross-sections of 10B (n,alpha) 7Li reaction, e.g., ratio of the thermal (0.0253 eV) to fast (2 MeV) neutron detection efficiencies is approximately equal to 8000:1. Environmental conditions and their effects on the NISC performance were also studied in this research. Cosmic rays were

  3. Neutron therapy

    Riesler, Rudi

    1995-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy uses Xrays or electrons which have low LET (linear energy transfer); in contrast, particles such as neutrons with high LET have different radiobiological responses. In the late 1960s, clinical trials by Mary Catterall at the Hammersmith Hospital in London indicated that fast neutron radiation had clinical advantages for certain malignant tumours. Following these early clinical trials, several cyclotron facilities were built in the 1980s for fast neutron therapy, for example at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at UCLA. Most of these newer machines use extracted cyclotron proton beams in the range 42 to 66 MeV with beam intensities of 15 to 60 microamps. The proton beams are transported to dedicated therapy rooms, where neutrons are produced from beryllium targets. Second-generation clinical trials showed that accurate neutron beam delivery to the tumour site is more critical than for photon therapy. In order to achieve precise beam geometries, the extracted proton beams have to be transported through a gantry which can rotate around the patient and deliver beams from any angle; also the neutron beam outline (''field shape'') must be adjusted to extremely irregular shapes using a flexible collimation system. A therapy procedure has to be appropriately organized, with physicians, radiotherapists, nurses, medical physicists and other staff in attendance; other specialized equipment, such as CT or MRI scanners and radiation simulators must be made available. Neutron therapy is usually performed only in radiation oncology departments of major medical centres

  4. Decommissioning of an Irradiator MPX-{gamma} - 25M and a neutron Irradiator; Desmantelamiento de un irradiador tipo MPX-{gamma}-25M y de un irradiador de neutrones

    Soguero, Dania; Guerra, Mercedes; Prieto, Enrique; Desdin, Luis, E-mail: sdania@ceaden.edu.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologica y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper a technology is developed with its procedures in radiation protection to ensure the safety of the process of decommissioning of two irradiators. Both processes are described, the process of decommissioning of a neutron Irradiator 4. 44{center_dot}10{sup 11}Bq, employed in the vegetal radio mutagenesis, and disassembling of an installation of gamma irradiation of 3.33 * 10{sup 12} Bq, self-shielded of category I, model MPX - {gamma} - 25 M. The specific objectives are: a) identify aspects of the contractual assurance, of human and technical resources, b) to evaluate the radiological situation of the process and c) analyze the potential radiological extraordinary events in each of the steps of the process, ensuring the right answers. Evaluation of radiological successful events described can be considered as reference to address the process of disassembling of other similar irradiators.

  5. Neutronics codes

    Buckel, G.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives are the development, testing and cultivation of reliable, efficient and user-optimized neutron-physical calculation methods and conformity with users' requirements concerning design of power reactors, planning and analysis of experiments necessary for their protection as well as research on physical key problems. A short outline of available computing programmes for the following objectives is given: - Provision of macroscopic group constants, - Calculation of neutron flux distribution in transport theory and diffusion approximation, - Evaluation of neutron flux-distribution, - Execution of disturbance calculations for the determination reactivity coefficients, and - graphical representation of results. (orig./RW) [de

  6. On the mechanism of fission neutron emission

    Maerten, H.; Richter, D.; Seeliger, D.

    1986-01-01

    This review represents the present knowledge of the mechanism of prompt fission neutron emission. Starting with a brief fission process characterization related with neutron emission, possible emission mechanisms are discussed. It is emphasized that the experimental study of special mechanisms, i.e. scission neutron emission processes, requires a sufficiently correct description of emission probabilities on the base of the main mechanism, i.e. the evaporation from fully accelerated fragments. Adequate statistical-model approaches have to account for the complexity of nuclear fission reflected by an intricate fragment distribution. The present picture of scission neutron emission is not clarified neither experimentally nor theoretically. Deduced data are contradictory and depend on the used analysis procedures often involving rough discriptions of evaporated-neutron distributions. The contribution of two secondary mechanisms of fission neutron emission, i.e. the neutron evaporation during fragment acceleration and neutron emission due to the decay of 5 He after ternary fission, is estimated. We summarize the recent progress of the theoretical description of fission neutron spectra in the framework of statistical models considering the standard spectrum of 252 Cf(sf) neutrons especially. The main experimental basis for the study of fission neutron emission is the accurate measurement of emission probabilities as a function of emission energy and angle (at least) as well as fragment parameters (mass number ratio and kinetic energy). The present status is evaluated. (author)

  7. Analysis of neutronics benchmarks for the utilization of mixed oxide fuel in light water reactor using DRAGON code

    Nithyadevi, Rajan; Thilagam, L.; Karthikeyan, R.; Pal, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of advanced computational code – DRAGON-5 using advanced self shielding model USS. • Testing the capability of DRAGON-5 code for the analysis of light water reactor system. • Wide variety of fuels LEU, MOX and spent fuel have been analyzed. • Parameters such as k ∞ , one, few and multi-group macroscopic cross-sections and fluxes were calculated. • Suitability of deterministic methodology employed in DRAGON-5 code is demonstrated for LWR. - Abstract: Advances in reactor physics have led to the development of new computational technologies and upgraded cross-section libraries so as to produce an accurate approximation to the true solution for the problem. Thus it is necessary to revisit the benchmark problems with the advanced computational code system and upgraded cross-section libraries to see how far they are in agreement with the earlier reported values. Present study is one such analysis with the DRAGON code employing advanced self shielding models like USS and 172 energy group ‘JEFF3.1’ cross-section library in DRAGLIB format. Although DRAGON code has already demonstrated its capability for heavy water moderator systems, it is now tested for light water reactor (LWR) and fast reactor systems. As a part of validation of DRAGON for LWR, a VVER computational benchmark titled “Neutronics Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel-Volume 3” submitted by the Russian Federation has been taken up. Presently, pincell and assembly calculations are carried out considering variation in fuel temperature (both fresh and spent), moderator temperatures and boron content in the moderator. Various parameters such as infinite neutron multiplication (k ∞ ) factor, one group integrated flux, few group homogenized cross-sections (absorption, nu-fission) and reaction rates (absorption, nu-fission) of individual isotopic nuclides are calculated for different reactor states. Comparisons of results are made with the reported Monte Carlo

  8. Electroweak corrections

    Beenakker, W.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The prospect of high accuracy measurements investigating the weak interactions, which are expected to take place at the electron-positron storage ring LEP at CERN and the linear collider SCL at SLAC, offers the possibility to study also the weak quantum effects. In order to distinguish if the measured weak quantum effects lie within the margins set by the standard model and those bearing traces of new physics one had to go beyond the lowest order and also include electroweak radiative corrections (EWRC) in theoretical calculations. These higher-order corrections also can offer the possibility of getting information about two particles present in the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model (GSW), but not discovered up till now, the top quark and the Higgs boson. In ch. 2 the GSW standard model of electroweak interactions is described. In ch. 3 some special techniques are described for determination of integrals which are responsible for numerical instabilities caused by large canceling terms encountered in the calculation of EWRC effects, and methods necessary to get hold of the extensive algebra typical for EWRC. In ch. 4 various aspects related to EWRC effects are discussed, in particular the dependence of the unknown model parameters which are the masses of the top quark and the Higgs boson. The processes which are discussed are production of heavy fermions from electron-positron annihilation and those of the fermionic decay of the Z gauge boson. (H.W.). 106 refs.; 30 figs.; 6 tabs.; schemes

  9. Neutron reflectometry

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    of desired information. In the course, an introduction into the method and an overview on selected instruments at large scale facilities will be presented. Examples will be given that illustrate the potential of the method, mostly based on organic films. Results from the investigation of layered films......Neutron (and X-ray) reflectometry constitute complementary interfacially sensitive techniques that open access to studying the structure within thin films of both soft and hard condensed matter. Film thickness starts oxide surfaces on bulk substrates, proceeding to (pauci-)molecular layers and up...... films or films with magnetic properties. The reason is the peculiar property of neutron light since the mass of a neutron is close to the one of a proton, and since it bears a magnetic moment. The optical properties of matter, when interacting with neutrons, are described by a refractive index...

  10. Neutron scattering

    Furrer, A.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the text of 16 lectures given at the Summer School and the report on a panel discussion entitled ''the relative merits and complementarities of x-rays, synchrotron radiation, steady- and pulsed neutron sources''. figs., tabs., refs

  11. Neutron storage

    Strelkov, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The report is devoted to neutron storage (NS) and describes the history of experiments on the NS development. Great attention is paid to ultracold neutron (UCN) storage. The experiments on the UCN generation, transport, spectroscopy, storage and detection are described. Experiments on searching the UCN electric-dipole moment and electric charge are continued. Possible using of UCN for studying the nanoparticles is discussed [ru

  12. Neutron radiography

    Bayon, G.

    1989-01-01

    Neutronography or neutron radiography, a non-destructive test method which is similar in its principle to conventional X-ray photography, presently occupies a marginal position among non-destructive test methods (NDT) (no source of suitable performance or cost). Neutron radiography associated with the ORPHEE reactor permits industrial testing; it can very quickly meet a cost requirement comparable to that of conventional test methods. In 1988, 2500 parts were tested on this unit [fr

  13. Randomly dispersed particle fuel model in the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    Leppaenen, J.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels are composed of thousands of microscopic fuel particles, randomly dispersed in a graphite matrix. The modelling of such geometry is complicated, especially using continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, which are unable to apply any deterministic corrections in the calculation. This paper presents the geometry routine developed for modelling randomly dispersed particle fuels using the PSG Monte Carlo reactor physics code. The model is based on the delta-tracking method, and it takes into account the spatial self-shielding effects and the random dispersion of the fuel particles. The calculation routine is validated by comparing the results to reference MCNP4C calculations using uranium and plutonium based fuels. (authors)

  14. Neutron detector

    Endo, Hiroshi.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention detects neutrons in a reactor container under a high temperature and reduces the noise level in an FBR type reactor. That is, the detection section comprises a high heat resistant vessel containing a scintillator therein for detecting neutrons. Neutron signals sent from the detection section are inputted to a neutron measuring section by way of a signal transmission section. The detection section is disposed at the inside of the reactor container. Further, the signal transmission section is connected optically to the detection section. With such a constitution, since the detection section comprising the high temperature resistant vessel is disposed at the inside of the reactor container, neutron fluxes can be detected and measured at high sensitivity even under a high temperature circumstance. Since the signal transmission section is optically connected to the detection section, influence of radiation rays upon transmission of the neutron detection signals can be reduced. Accordingly, the noise level can be kept low. (I.S.)

  15. Neutron Scattering

    Fayer, Michael J.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2005-01-01

    The neutron probe is a standard tool for measuring soil water content. This article provides an overview of the underlying theory, describes the methodology for its calibration and use, discusses example applications, and identifies the safety issues. Soil water makes land-based life possible by satisfying plant water requirements, serving as a medium for nutrient movement to plant roots and nutrient cycling, and controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the soil environment. Therefore, a successful understanding of the dynamics of plant growth, nutrient cycling, and contaminant behavior in the soil requires knowledge of the soil water content as well as its spatial and temporal variability. After more than 50 years, neutron probes remain the most reliable tool available for field monitoring of soil water content. Neutron probes provide integrated measurements over relatively large volumes of soil and, with proper access, allow for repeated sampling of the subsurface at the same locations. The limitations of neutron probes include costly and time-consuming manual operation, lack of data automation, and costly regulatory requirements. As more non-radioactive systems for soil water monitoring are developed to provide automated profiling capabilities, neutron-probe usage will likely decrease. Until then, neutron probes will continue to be a standard for reliable measurements of field water contents in soils around the globe

  16. Accounting for the thermal neutron flux depression in voluminous samples for instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Overwater, R.M.W.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    At the Delft University of Technology Interfaculty Reactor Institute, a facility has been installed to irradiate cylindrical samples with diameters up to 15 cm and weights up to 50 kg for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) purposes. To be able to do quantitative INAA on voluminous samples, it is necessary to correct for gamma-ray absorption, gamma-ray scattering, neutron absorption, and neutron scattering in the sample. The neutron absorption and the neutron scattering are discussed. An analytical solution is obtained for the diffusion equation in the geometry of the irradiation facility. For samples with known composition, the neutron flux--as a function of position in the sample--can be calculated directly. Those of unknown composition require additional flux measurements on which least-squares fitting must be done to obtain both the thermal neutron diffusion coefficient D s and the diffusion length L s of the sample. Experiments are performed to test the theory

  17. Neutron-neutron probe for uranium exploration

    Smith, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron activation probe for assaying the amount of fissionable isotopes in an ore body is described which comprises a casing which is movable through a borehole in the ore body, a neutron source and a number of delayed neutron detectors arranged colinearly in the casing below the neutron source for detecting delayed neutrons

  18. Thermalization of monoenergetic neutrons in a concrete room

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Mercado, G.A. [UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Iniguez, M.P.; Martin M, A. [Universidad de Valladolid, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The thermalization of neutrons from monoenergetic neutron sources in a concrete room has been studied. During calibration of neutron detectors it is mandatory to make corrections due to neutron scattering produced by the room walls, therefore this factor must be known in advance. The scattered neutrons are thermalized and produce a neutron field that is directly proportional to source strength and inversely proportional to room total wall-surfaces, the proportional coefficient has been calculated for neutrons whose energy goes from 1 eV to 20 MeV. This coefficient was calculated using Monte Carlo methods for 150, 200 and 300 cm-radius spherical cavity, where monoenergetic neutrons were located at the center, along the spherical cavity radius neutron spectra were calculated at several source-to-detector distances inside the cavity. The obtained coefficient is almost three times larger than the factor normally utilized. (Author)

  19. Modulation Spectrometry Of Neutrons With Diffractometry Applications

    Hiismaki, P.

    1997-01-01

    Modulation spectrometry of neutrons refers to a measuring principle, characterized by classification of neutron histories in a probabilistic way, not the usual deterministic way. In order to accomplish this, neutron beams entering the sample are modulated by high-transmission, white-beam selectors of the multislit type, such as Fourier or statistical choppers or high-frequency-modulated spin-flippers. In this scheme it is impossible to decide in a unique way through which particular slit any single neutron passed, but the distribution of histories for a large population of neutrons can nevertheless be correctly obtained, by classifying each conceivable history either as a high-probability or as a low-probability event,based on the actual observed state of the neutron selector. So far the principle has been successfully applied to powder diffraction, but it seems to offer extra degrees of freedom if applied to measuring dispersion curves of coherent excitations, such as phonons in single crystals

  20. Neutrons scattering studies in the actinide region

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1992-09-01

    During the report period were investigated the following areas: prompt fission neutron energy spectra measurements; neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from 239 Pu; neutron scattering in 181 Ta and 197 Au; response of a 235 U fission chamber near reaction thresholds; two-parameter data acquisition system; ''black'' neutron detector; investigation of neutron-induced defects in silicon dioxide; and multiple scattering corrections. Four Ph.D. dissertations and one M.S. thesis were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of three journal articles, four conference papers in proceedings, and eleven abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. There are currently four Ph.D. and one M.S. candidates working on dissertations directly associated with the project. In addition, three other Ph.D. candidates are working on dissertations involving other aspects of neutron physics in this laboratory

  1. Radiation transport and shielding information, computer codes, and nuclear data for use in CTR neutronics research and development

    Santoro, R.T.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Roussin, R.W.; Trubey, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    The activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are being utilized in support of fusion reactor technology. The major activities of RSIC include the operation of a computer-based information storage and retrieval system, the collection, packaging, and distribution of large computer codes, and the compilation and dissemination of processed and evaluated data libraries, with particular emphasis on neutron and gamma-ray cross-section data. The Center has acquired thirteen years of experience in serving fission reactor, weapons, and accelerator shielding research communities, and the extension of its technical base to fusion reactor research represents a logical progression. RSIC is currently working with fusion reactor researchers and contractors in computer code development to provide tested radiation transport and shielding codes and data library packages. Of significant interest to the CTR community are the 100 energy group neutron and 21 energy group gamma-ray coupled cross-section data package (DLC-37) for neutronics studies, a comprehensive 171 energy group neutron and 36 energy group gamma-ray coupled cross-section data base with retrieval programs, including resonance self-shielding, that are tailored to CTR application, and a data base for the generation of energy-dependent atomic displacement and gas production cross sections and heavy-particle-recoil spectra for estimating radiation damage to CTR structural components

  2. neutron radiography

    Barton, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron radiography (or radiology) is a diverse filed that uses neutrons of various energies, subthermal, thermal, epithermal or fast in either steady state or pulsed mode to examine objects for industrial, medical, or other purposes, both microscopic and macroscopic. The applications include engineering design, biological studies, nondestructive inspection and materials evaluation. In the past decade, over 100 different centers in some 30 countries have published reports of pioneering activities using reactors, accelerators and isotopic neutron sources. While film transparency and electronic video are most common imaging methods for static or in motion objects respectively, there are other important data gathering techniques, including track etch, digital gauging and computed tomography. A survey of the world-wide progress shows the field to be gaining steadily in its diversity, its sophistication and its importance. (author)

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  4. Neutron dosimeter

    Bartko, J.; Schoch, K.F. Jr.; Congedo, T.V.; Anderson, S.L. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor. It comprises a reactor core; a thermal shield surrounding the reactor core; a pressure vessel surrounding the thermal shield; a neutron dosimeter positioned outside of the thermal shield, the neutron dosimeter comprising a layer of fissile material and a second layer made of a material having an electrical conductivity which permanently varies as a function of its cumulative ion radiation dose; and means, outside the pressure vessel and electrically connected to the layer of second material, for measuring electrical conductivity of the layer of second material

  5. Quantitative neutron radiography using neutron absorbing honeycomb

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Oda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kohei; Tasaka, Kanji; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1993-01-01

    This investigation concerns quantitative neutron radiography and computed tomography by using a neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator. By setting the neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator between object and imaging system, neutrons scattered in the object were absorbed by the honeycomb material and eliminated before coming to the imaging system, but the neutrons which were transmitted the object without interaction could reach the imaging system. The image by purely transmitted neutrons gives the quantitative information. Two honeycombs were prepared with coating of boron nitride and gadolinium oxide and evaluated for the quantitative application. The relation between the neutron total cross section and the attenuation coefficient confirmed that they were in a fairly good agreement. Application to quantitative computed tomography was also successfully conducted. The new neutron radiography method using the neutron-absorbing honeycomb collimator for the elimination of the scattered neutrons improved remarkably the quantitativeness of the neutron radiography and computed tomography. (author)

  6. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    Watanabe, N

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, po...

  7. Measurement and analysis of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor, UTR-KINKI

    Ogawa, Y; Sagawa, H; Tsujimoto, T

    2002-01-01

    The highly sensitive cylindrical multi-moderator type neutron spectrometer was constructed for measurement of low level environmental neutrons. This neutron spectrometer was applied for the determination of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor. The analysis of the leakage neutron energy spectra was performed by MCNP Monte Carlo code. From the obtained results, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is fairly good, which indicates the MCNP model is correctly simulating the UTR-KINKI.

  8. Neutronic reactor

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  9. Neutron reflectivity

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  10. Investigation of the 232Th neutron cross-sections in resonance energy range

    Grigoriev, Yu.V.; Kitaev, V.Ya.; Sinitsa, V.V.; Zhuravlev, B.V.; Borzakov, S.B.; Faikov-Stanchik, H.; Ilchev, G.L.; Panteleev, Ts.Ts.; Kim, G.N.

    2001-01-01

    The alternative path in the development of atomic energy is the uranium-thorium cycle. In connection with this, the measurements of the 232 Th neutron capture and total cross-sections and its resonance self-shielding coefficients in resonance energy range are necessary because of their low accuracy. In this work, the results of the investigations of the thorium-232 neutron cross-sections are presented. The measurements have been carried out on the gamma-ray multisection liquid detector and neutron detector as a battery of boron counters on the 120 m flight path of the pulsed fast reactor IBR-30. As the filter samples were used the metallic disks of various thickness and diameter of 45 mm. Two plates from metallic thorium with thickness of 0.2 mm and with the square of 4.5x4.5 cm 2 were used as the radiator samples. The group neutron total and capture cross-sections within the accuracy of 2-7% in the energy range of (10 eV-10 keV) were obtained from the transmissions and the sum spectra of g-rays from the fourth multiplicity to the seventh one. The neutron capture group cross-sections of 238 U were used as the standard for obtaining of thorium ones. Analogous values were calculated on the GRUCON code with the ENDF/B-6, JENDL-3 evaluated data libraries. Within the limits of experimental errors an agreement between the experiment and calculation is observed, but in some groups the experimental values are larger than the calculated ones. (author)

  11. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  12. Background subtraction system for pulsed neutron logging of earth boreholes

    Hertzog, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a method for determining the characteristics of earth formations surrounding a well borehole comprising the steps of: repetitively irradiating the earth formations surrounding the well bore with relatively short duration pulses of high energy neutrons; detecting during each pulse of high energy neutrons, gamma radiation due to the inelastic scattering of neutrons by materials comprising the earth formations surrounding the borehole and providing information representative thereof; detecting immediately following each such pulse of high energy neutrons, background gamma radiation due to thermal neutron capture and providing information representative thereof; and correcting the inelastic gamma representative information to compensate for said background representative information

  13. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  14. Neutron stars as cosmic neutron matter laboratories

    Pines, D.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments which have radically changed our understanding of the dynamics of neutron star superfluids and the free precession of neutron stars are summarized, and the extent to which neutron stars are cosmic neutron matter laboratories is discussed. 17 refs., 1 tab

  15. Inventory verification measurements using neutron multiplicity counting

    Ensslin, N.; Foster, L.A.; Harker, W.C.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a series of neutron multiplicity measurements of large plutonium samples at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The measurements were corrected for bias caused by neutron energy spectrum shifts and nonuniform multiplication, and are compared with calorimetry/isotopics. The results show that multiplicity counting can increase measurement throughput and yield good verification results for some inventory categories. The authors provide recommendations on the future application of the technique to inventory verification

  16. Basic of Neutron NDA

    Trahan, Alexis Chanel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives of this presentation are to introduce the basic physics of neutron production, interactions and detection; identify the processes that generate neutrons; explain the most common neutron mechanism, spontaneous and induced fission and (a,n) reactions; describe the properties of neutron from different sources; recognize advantages of neutron measurements techniques; recognize common neutrons interactions; explain neutron cross section measurements; describe the fundamental of 3He detector function and designs; and differentiate between passive and active assay techniques.

  17. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    1991-01-01

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ''The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.'' The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers

  18. A universal PWR spectral history correction

    Hutt, P.K.; Nunn, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of a form of universal correction for the difference between depletion conditions assumed in PWR assembly lattice calculations and those experienced in a reactor burn-up is investigated. The correction is based on lattice calculations in which only one such depletion history difference, depletion at two different water densities, is explicitly represented by lattice calculations. The assumption is made that other historical effects bear the same relationship to an appropriate time-average of the two-group neutron flux spectrum. The correction is shown to be accurate for the most important historical effects, depletion with burnable absorbers inserted, control rods inserted or at a different soluble boron level, in addition to density itself. The correction is less accurate for representing depletion at a different fuel or coolant temperature but even in these cases gives an improvement over no correction. In addition it is argued that these historic temperature effects are likely to be of minor importance. (author)

  19. NEUTRON SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS USING MULTIPLE THRESHOLD DETECTORS

    Gerken, William W.; Duffey, Dick

    1963-11-15

    From American Nuclear Society Meeting, New York, Nov. 1963. The use of threshold detectors, which simultaneously undergo reactions with thermal neutrons and two or more fast neutron threshold reactions, was applied to measurements of the neutron spectrum in a reactor. A number of different materials were irradiated to determine the most practical ones for use as multiple threshold detectors. These results, as well as counting techniques and corrections, are presented. Some materials used include aluminum, alloys of Al -Ni, aluminum-- nickel oxides, and magesium orthophosphates. (auth)

  20. Examination of total cross section resonance structure of niobium and silicon in neutron transmission experiments

    Andrianova, Olga; Lomakov, Gleb; Manturov, Gennady

    2017-09-01

    The neutron transmission experiments are one of the main sources of information about the neutron cross section resonance structure and effect in the self-shielding. Such kind of data for niobium and silicon nuclides in energy range 7 keV to 3 MeV can be obtained from low-resolution transmission measurements performed earlier in Russia (with samples of 0.027 to 0.871 atom/barn for niobium and 0.076 to 1.803 atom/barn for silicon). A significant calculation-to-experiment discrepancy in energy range 100 to 600 keV and 300 to 800 keV for niobium and silicon, respectively, obtained using the evaluated nuclear data library ROSFOND, were found. The EVPAR code was used for estimation the average resonance parameters in energy range 7 to 600 keV for niobium. For silicon a stochastic optimization method was used to modify the resolved resonance parameters in energy range 300 to 800 keV. The improved ROSFOND evaluated nuclear data files were tested in calculation of ICSBEP integral benchmark experiments.

  1. ENDF/B-IV representation of the 238U total neutron cross section in the resolved resonance energy region

    de Saussure, G.; Olsen, D.K.; Perez, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    The ENDF/B-IV prescription fails to represent correctly the 238 U total (and scattering) cross section between the levels of the resolved range. It is shown how this representation can be improved by properly accounting for the contribution of levels outside the resolved region to the cross section at energies inside the resolved region, and by substituting the more precise multilevel Breit-Wigner formula for the presently used single-level formula. The importance of computing accurately the minima in the total cross section is illustrated by comparing values of the self-shielded capture resonance integral computed with ENDF/B-IV and with a more accurate cross section model

  2. BPS Skyrmions as neutron stars

    Adam, C., E-mail: adam@fpaxp1.usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Vazquez, R. [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Wereszczynski, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków (Poland)

    2015-03-06

    The BPS Skyrme model has been demonstrated already to provide a physically intriguing and quantitatively reliable description of nuclear matter. Indeed, the model has both the symmetries and the energy–momentum tensor of a perfect fluid, and thus represents a field theoretic realization of the “liquid droplet” model of nuclear matter. In addition, the classical soliton solutions together with some obvious corrections (spin–isospin quantization, Coulomb energy, proton-neutron mass difference) provide an accurate modeling of nuclear binding energies for heavier nuclei. These results lead to the rather natural proposal to try to describe also neutron stars by the BPS Skyrme model coupled to gravity. We find that the resulting self-gravitating BPS Skyrmions provide excellent results as well as some new perspectives for the description of bulk properties of neutron stars when the parameter values of the model are extracted from nuclear physics. Specifically, the maximum possible mass of a neutron star before black-hole formation sets in is a few solar masses, the precise value of which depends on the precise values of the model parameters, and the resulting neutron star radius is of the order of 10 km.

  3. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic neutron scattering, strongly correlated electrons, polymer dynamics, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  4. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron scattering in contemporary research, neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  5. Pulsed neutron generator

    Bespalov, D.F.; Bykovskii, Yu.A.; Vergun, I.I.; Kozlovskii, K.I.; Kozyrev, Yu.P.; Leonov, R.K.; Simagin, B.I.; Tsybin, A.S.; Shikanov, A.Ie.

    1986-03-01

    The paper describes a new device for generating pulsed neutron fields, utilized in nuclear geophysics for carrying out pulsed neutron logging and activation analysis under field conditions. The invention employs a sealed-off neutron tube with a laser ion source which increases neutron yield to the level of 10 neutrons per second or higher. 2 refs., 1 fig

  6. Thermal neutron flux measurements using neutron-electron converters; Mesure de flux de neutrons thermiques avec des convertisseurs neutrons electrons

    Le Meur, R; Lecomte, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The operation of neutron-electron converters designed for measuring thermal neutron fluxes is examined. The principle is to produce short lived isotopes emitting beta particles, by activation, and to measure their activity not by extracting them from the reactor, but directly in the reactor using the emitted electrons to deflect the needle of a galvanometer placed outside the flux. After a theoretical study, the results of the measurements are presented; particular attention is paid to a new type of converter characterized by a layer structure. The converters are very useful for obtaining flux distributions with more than 10{sup 7} neutrons cm{sup -2}*sec{sup -1}. They work satisfactorily in pressurized carbon dioxide at 400 Celsius degrees. Some points still have to be cleared up however concerning interfering currents in the detectors and the behaviour of the dielectrics under irradiation. (authors) [French] On examine le fonctionnement de convertisseurs neutrons electrons destines a des mesures de flux de neutrons thermiques. Le principe est de former par activation des isotopes a periodes courtes et a emission beta et de mesurer leur activite non pas en les sortant du reacteur, mais directement en pile, utilisant les electrons emis pour faire devier l'aiguille d'un galvanometre place hors flux. Apres une etude theorique, on indique des resultats de mesures obtenus, en insistant particulierement sur un nouveau type de convertisseur, caracterise par sa structure stratifiee. Les convertisseurs sont tres interessants pour tracer, des cartes de flux a partir de 10{sup 7} neutrons cm{sup -2}*s{sup -1}. Ils sont utilisables pour des flux de 10{sup 14} neutrons cm{sup -2}*s{sup -1}. Ils fonctionnent correctement dans du gaz carbonique sous pression a 400 C. Des points restent cependant a eclaircir concernant les courants parasites dans les detecteurs et le comportement des dielectriques pendant leur irradiation. (auteur)

  7. Method and apparatus for determining the dose value of neutrons

    Burgkhardt, B.; Piesch, E.

    1976-01-01

    A method is provided for determining the dose value of neutrons leaving a body as thermal and intermediate neutrons after having been scattered in the body. A first dose value of thermal and intermediate neutrons is detected on the surface of the body by means of a first detector for neutrons which is shielded against thermal and intermediate neutrons not emerging from the body. A second detector is used to measure a second dose value of the thermal and intermediate neutrons not emerging from the body. A first correction factor based on the first and second values is obtained from a calibration diagram and is applied to the first dose value to determine a first corrected first dose value. 21 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures

  8. 3D Monte-Carlo transport calculations of whole slab reactor cores: validation of deterministic neutronic calculation routes

    Palau, J M [CEA Cadarache, Service de Physique des Reacteurs et du Cycle, Lab. de Projets Nucleaires, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents how Monte-Carlo calculations (French TRIPOLI4 poly-kinetic code with an appropriate pre-processing and post-processing software called OVNI) are used in the case of 3-dimensional heterogeneous benchmarks (slab reactor cores) to reduce model biases and enable a thorough and detailed analysis of the performances of deterministic methods and their associated data libraries with respect to key neutron parameters (reactivity, local power). Outstanding examples of application of these tools are presented regarding the new numerical methods implemented in the French lattice code APOLLO2 (advanced self-shielding models, new IDT characteristics method implemented within the discrete-ordinates flux solver model) and the JEFF3.1 nuclear data library (checked against JEF2.2 previous file). In particular we have pointed out, by performing multigroup/point-wise TRIPOLI4 (assembly and core) calculations, the efficiency (in terms of accuracy and computation time) of the new IDT method developed in APOLLO2. In addition, by performing 3-dimensional TRIPOLI4 calculations of the whole slab core (few millions of elementary volumes), the high quality of the new JEFF3.1 nuclear data files and revised evaluations (U{sup 235}, U{sup 238}, Hf) for reactivity prediction of slab cores critical experiments has been stressed. As a feedback of the whole validation process, improvements in terms of nuclear data (mainly Hf capture cross-sections) and numerical methods (advanced quadrature formulas accounting validation results, validation of new self-shielding models, parallelization) are suggested to improve even more the APOLLO2-CRONOS2 standard calculation route. (author)

  9. 3D Monte-Carlo transport calculations of whole slab reactor cores: validation of deterministic neutronic calculation routes

    Palau, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents how Monte-Carlo calculations (French TRIPOLI4 poly-kinetic code with an appropriate pre-processing and post-processing software called OVNI) are used in the case of 3-dimensional heterogeneous benchmarks (slab reactor cores) to reduce model biases and enable a thorough and detailed analysis of the performances of deterministic methods and their associated data libraries with respect to key neutron parameters (reactivity, local power). Outstanding examples of application of these tools are presented regarding the new numerical methods implemented in the French lattice code APOLLO2 (advanced self-shielding models, new IDT characteristics method implemented within the discrete-ordinates flux solver model) and the JEFF3.1 nuclear data library (checked against JEF2.2 previous file). In particular we have pointed out, by performing multigroup/point-wise TRIPOLI4 (assembly and core) calculations, the efficiency (in terms of accuracy and computation time) of the new IDT method developed in APOLLO2. In addition, by performing 3-dimensional TRIPOLI4 calculations of the whole slab core (few millions of elementary volumes), the high quality of the new JEFF3.1 nuclear data files and revised evaluations (U 235 , U 238 , Hf) for reactivity prediction of slab cores critical experiments has been stressed. As a feedback of the whole validation process, improvements in terms of nuclear data (mainly Hf capture cross-sections) and numerical methods (advanced quadrature formulas accounting validation results, validation of new self-shielding models, parallelization) are suggested to improve even more the APOLLO2-CRONOS2 standard calculation route. (author)

  10. Neutron scattering

    1991-02-01

    The annual report on hand gives an overview of the research work carried out in the Laboratory for Neutron Scattering (LNS) of the ETH Zuerich in 1990. Using the method of neutron scattering, it is possible to examine in detail the static and dynamic properties of the condensed material. In accordance with the multidisciplined character of the method, the LNS has for years maintained a system of intensive co-operation with numerous institutes in the areas of biology, chemistry, solid-state physics, crystallography and materials research. In 1990 over 100 scientists from more than 40 research groups both at home and abroad took part in the experiments. It was again a pleasure to see the number of graduate students present, who were studying for a doctorate and who could be introduced into the neutron scattering during their stay at the LNS and thus were in the position to touch on central ways of looking at a problem in their dissertation using this modern experimental method of solid-state research. In addition to the numerous and interesting ways of formulating the questions to explain the structure, nowadays the scientific programme increasingly includes particularly topical studies in connection with high temperature-supraconductors and materials research

  11. Neutron radiotherapy

    Thomas, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    The rationale for the application of neutron radiation for the treatment of malignancies is well established based on radiobiological studies. These factors include the presence of tissue hypoxia, radiation response as a function of cell cycle kinetics, the repair capacity of the malignant cells and the regeneration of malignant cells during a fractionated course of radiation. Despite the constraints under which the clinical trials to date have been conducted, promising results have been obtained. Randomized trials have demonstrated that neutron therapy is the treatment of choice for inoperable salivary gland carcinomas. A randomized trial of the RTOG has demonstrated a probable advantage for neutron radiation in the treatment of advanced prostate carcinomas but is yet to be confirmed. An improvement in local control has also been observed for selected sarcomas. Equivocal or contradictory results have been obtained for squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, bronchogenic carcinomas, advanced rectal, transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder and cervical carcinomas. The practical consequences of these radiobiological and clinical observations on the current generation of clinical trials is discussed

  12. Radiation hygiene aspects of mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry

    Nikodemova, O.; Hrabovcova, A.

    1982-01-01

    Various possibilities are analyzed of determining the dose equivalent of neutrons, as is the reliability of the techniques and the correct interpretation for the purposes of radiation hygiene. (author)

  13. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  14. Characterization of neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites of a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am-Be isotopic source

    Yücel, Haluk [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Budak, Mustafa Guray, E-mail: mbudak@gazi.edu.tr [Gazi University, Gazi Education Faculty, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Karadag, Mustafa [Gazi University, Gazi Education Faculty, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Yüksel, Alptuğ Özer [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • An irradiation unit was installed using a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. • The source neutrons moderated by using both water and paraffin. • Irradiation unit was shielded by boron oxide and lead against neutrons and gammas. • There are two sites for irradiations, one of them has a pneumatic transfer system. • Cadmium ratio method was used for irradiation site characterization. - Abstract: For the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique, an irradiation unit with a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source was installed at Institute of Nuclear Sciences of Ankara University. Design and configuration properties of the irradiation unit are described. It has two different sample irradiation positions, one is called site #1 having a pneumatic sample transfer system and the other is site #2 having a location for manual use. In order to characterize neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites, the measurement results were obtained for thermal (φ{sub th}) and epithermal neutron fluxes (φ{sub epi}), thermal to epithermal flux ratio (f) and epithermal spectrum shaping factors (α) by employing cadmium ratios of gold (Au) and molybdenum (Mo) monitors. The activities produced in these foils were measured by using a p-type, 44.8% relative efficiency HPGe well detector. For the measured γ-rays, self-absorption and true coincidence summing effects were taken into account. Additionally, thermal neutron self-shielding and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in the measured results. For characterization of site #1, the required parameters were found to be φ{sub th} = (2.11 ± 0.05) × 10{sup 3} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, φ{sub epi} = (3.32 ± 0.17) × 10{sup 1} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, f = 63.6 ± 1.5, α = 0.045 ± 0.009, respectively. Similarly, those parameters were measured in site #2 as φ{sub th} = (1.49 ± 0.04) × 10{sup 3} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, φ{sub epi} = (2.93 ± 0

  15. Experimental techniques for the consolidation of the neutron spectrum

    Chiaraviglio, N.; Bazzana, S.

    2013-01-01

    Unfolding techniques are widely known but their use is not widespread due to their complexity. Such procedure consists in the adjustment of calculated quantities to experimental results by the modification of the neutron spectrum, getting correction factors for the calculated quantities. In this work we describe the general procedure that must be executed for a neutron spectrum unfolding. (author) [es

  16. Accurate measurements of neutron activation cross sections

    Semkova, V.

    1999-01-01

    The applications of some recent achievements of neutron activation method on high intensity neutron sources are considered from the view point of associated errors of cross sections data for neutron induced reaction. The important corrections in -y-spectrometry insuring precise determination of the induced radioactivity, methods for accurate determination of the energy and flux density of neutrons, produced by different sources, and investigations of deuterium beam composition are considered as factors determining the precision of the experimental data. The influence of the ion beam composition on the mean energy of neutrons has been investigated by measurement of the energy of neutrons induced by different magnetically analysed deuterium ion groups. Zr/Nb method for experimental determination of the neutron energy in the 13-15 MeV energy range allows to measure energy of neutrons from D-T reaction with uncertainty of 50 keV. Flux density spectra from D(d,n) E d = 9.53 MeV and Be(d,n) E d = 9.72 MeV are measured by PHRS and foil activation method. Future applications of the activation method on NG-12 are discussed. (author)

  17. Image correction during large and rapid B(0) variations in an open MRI system with permanent magnets using navigator echoes and phase compensation.

    Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yu; Xie, Haibin; Li, Gengying

    2009-09-01

    An open permanent magnet system with vertical B(0) field and without self-shielding can be quite susceptible to perturbations from external magnetic sources. B(0) variation in such a system located close to a subway station was measured to be greater than 0.7 microT by both MRI and a fluxgate magnetometer. This B(0) variation caused image artifacts. A navigator echo approach that monitored and compensated the view-to-view variation in magnetic resonance signal phase was developed to correct for image artifacts. Human brain imaging experiments using a multislice gradient-echo sequence demonstrated that the ghosting and blurring artifacts associated with B(0) variations were effectively removed using the navigator method.

  18. Simulations of the neutronic REP behaviour using the codes DRAGON/DONJON

    Le Mer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron flux calculation is necessary to understand how a nuclear reactor works. This flux is derived from the transport equation on the whole core. Because of its really complex structure and the angular dependence of the transport equation, it is impossible to compute the flux directly and several neutronic calculation codes must be used to solve the equation for different discretizations which require different modelisations. This chain of successive models, known as a calculation scheme, compute the neutron flux of a reactor from its geometry, its isotopic compositions and a cross-section library. Pressurised light Water Reactor (PWR) are the most common nuclear reactor used today. It is necessary for each neutronic code to be validated for this type of reactor. The goal of this work is to create a complete calculation scheme which can be applied to the evolution of the core of a pressurised light water nuclear reactor using the lattice code DRAGON and the reactor code DONJON. Each step of this scheme will be validated by comparisons with other codes or with experimental results. The unit cell calculation will be computed for a benchmark submitted by R. Mosteller. The assembly calculations will be used to compare the results given by DRAGON, APOLLO2 and MCNP for an assembly used by EDF for code testing. The core calculations will show that the codes DRAGON and DONJON can produce accurate macroscopic results for a real core. Those studies will be used to show the effects of many factors on the flux distribution including the cross section library, the number of energy groups, spatial discretization of the unit cell, the tracking model, the self-shielding of the resonant isotopes or the burnup steps. (author)

  19. High energy neutron radiography

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-01-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos

  20. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  1. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  2. Testing of a Code for the Calculation of Spectra of Neutrons Produced in a Target of a Neutron Generator

    Gaganov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    The correctness of calculations performed with the SRIANG code for modeling the spectra of DT neutrons is estimated by comparing the obtained spectra to the results of calculations carried out with five different codes based on the Monte Carlo method.

  3. Method and apparatus for producing a porosity log of a subsurface formation corrected for detector standoff

    Allen, L.S.; Leland, F.P.; Lyle, W.D. Jr.; Stromswold, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole logging tool with a pulsed source of fast neutrons is lowered into a borehole traversing a subsurface formation, and a neutron detector measures the die-away of nuclear radiation in the formation. A model of the die-away is produced using exponential terms varying as the sum of borehole, formation and thermal neutron background components. Exponentially weighted moments of both the die-away measurements and a model are determined and equated. The formation decay constant is determined from the formation and thermal neutron background. An epithermal neutron lifetime is determined from the formation decay constant and is used with the amplitude ratio by a trained neural network to determine a lifetime correction. A standoff corrected lifetime is determined from the epithermal neutron lifetime and the lifetime correction. (author)

  4. SAMMY, Multilevel R-Matrix Fits to Neutron and Charged-Particle Cross-Section Data Using Bayes' Equations

    Larson, Nancy M.

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The purpose of the code is to analyze time-of-flight cross section data in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions, where the incident particle is either a neutron or a charged particle (p, alpha, d,...). Energy-differential cross sections and angular-distribution data are treated, as are certain forms of energy-integrated data. In the resolved resonance region (RRR), theoretical cross sections are generated using the Reich-Moore approximation to R-matrix theory (and extensions thereof). Sophisticated models are used to describe the experimental situation: Data-reduction parameters (e.g. normalization, background, sample thickness) are included. Several options are available for both resolution and Doppler broadening, including a crystal-lattice model for Doppler broadening. Self-shielding and multiple-scattering correction options are available for analysis of capture cross sections. Multiple isotopes and impurities within a sample are handled accurately. Cross sections in the unresolved resonance region (URR) can also be analyzed using SAMMY. The capability was borrowed from Froehner's FITACS code; SAMMY modifications for the URR include more exact calculation of partial derivatives, normalization options for the experimental data, increased flexibility for input of experimental data, introduction of user-friendly input options. In both energy regions, values for resonance parameters and for data-related parameters (such as normalization, sample thickness, effective temperature, resolution parameters) are determined via fits to the experimental data using Bayes' method (see below). Final results may be reported in ENDF format for inclusion in the evaluated nuclear data files. The manner in which SAMMY 7 (released in 2006) differs from the previous version (SAMMY-M6) is itemized in Section I.A of the SAMMY users' manual. Details of the 7.0.1 update are documented in an errata SAMMY 7.0.1 Errata (http://www.ornl.gov/sci

  5. Earth formation porosity log using measurement of neutron energy spectrum

    1981-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for measuring the porosity of subsurface earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole by means of neutron well logging techniques. All the commercial techniques for measuring porosity currently available are not as accurate as desirable due to variations in the borehole wall diameter, in the borehole fluids (e.g. with chlorine content) in the casings of the borehole etc. This invention seeks to improve accuracy by using a measurement of the epithermal neutron population at one detector and the fast neutron population at a second detector, spaced approximately the same distance from a neutron source. The latter can be detected either by a fast neutron detector or indirectly by an inelastic gamma ray detector. Background correction can be made, and special detectors used, to discriminate against the detection of thermal neutrons or their resultant capture gamma rays. These fluctuations affect the measurement of thermal neutron populations. (U.K.)

  6. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  7. Fundamental Problems of Neutron Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source at the ORNL

    Gudkov, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    We propose to provide theoretical support for the experimental program in fundamental neutron physics at the SNS. This includes the study of neutron properties, neutron beta-decay, parity violation effects and time reversal violation effects. The main purpose of the proposed research is to work on theoretical problems related to experiments which have a high priority at the SNS. Therefore, we will make a complete analysis of beta-decay process including calculations of radiative corrections and recoil corrections for angular correlations for polarized neutron decay, with an accuracy better that is supposed to be achieved in the planning experiments. Based on the results of the calculations, we will provide analysis of sensitivity of angular correlations to be able to search for the possible extensions of the Standard model. Also we will help to plan other experiments to address significant problems of modern physics and will work on their theoretical support.

  8. UNR. A code for processing unresolved resonance data for MCNP

    Hogenbirk, A.

    1994-09-01

    In neutron transport problems the correct treatment of self-shielding is important for those nuclei present in large concentrations. Monte Carlo calculations using continuous-energy cross section data, such as calculations with the code MCNP, offer the advantage that neutron transport is calculated in a very accurate way. Self-shielding in the resolved resonance region is taken into account exactly in MCNP. However, self-shielding in the unresolved resonance region can not be taken into account by MCNP, although the effect of it may be important in many applications. In this report a description is given of the computer code UNR. With this code problem-dependent cross section libraries can be produced for MCNP. In these libraries self-shielded cross section data in the unresolved resonance range are given, which are produced by NJOY-module UNRESR. It is noted, that the treatment for resonance self-shielding presented in this report is approximate. However, the current version of MCNP does not allow the use of probability tables, which would be a general solution. (orig.)

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  10. Calculations of neutron spectra after neutron-neutron scattering

    Crawford, B E [Gettysburg College, Box 405, Gettysburg, PA 17325 (United States); Stephenson, S L [Gettysburg College, Box 405, Gettysburg, PA 17325 (United States); Howell, C R [Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Mitchell, G E [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Tornow, W [Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Furman, W I [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Lychagin, E V [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Muzichka, A Yu [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Nekhaev, G V [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Strelkov, A V [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Sharapov, E I [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Shvetsov, V N [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2004-09-01

    A direct neutron-neutron scattering length, a{sub nn}, measurement with the goal of 3% accuracy (0.5 fm) is under preparation at the aperiodic pulsed reactor YAGUAR. A direct measurement of a{sub nn} will not only help resolve conflicting results of a{sub nn} by indirect means, but also in comparison to the proton-proton scattering length, a{sub pp}, shed light on the charge-symmetry of the nuclear force. We discuss in detail the analysis of the nn-scattering data in terms of a simple analytical expression. We also discuss calibration measurements using the time-of-flight spectra of neutrons scattered on He and Ar gases and the neutron activation technique. In particular, we calculate the neutron velocity and time-of-flight spectra after scattering neutrons on neutrons and after scattering neutrons on He and Ar atoms for the proposed experimental geometry, using a realistic neutron flux spectrum-Maxwellian plus epithermal tail. The shape of the neutron spectrum after scattering is appreciably different from the initial spectrum, due to collisions between thermal-thermal and thermal-epithermal neutrons. At the same time, the integral over the Maxwellian part of the realistic scattering spectrum differs by only about 6 per cent from that of a pure Maxwellian nn-scattering spectrum.

  11. Digital neutron dosimeter

    Ramondetta, P.W.; Groeber, E.O.Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Design features for a portable battery-operated neutron dosimeter are described. The system employs a 50-mil PIN detector diode, whose forward voltage increases with exposure to fast neutrons. Because this change is permanent and cumulative, the system is able to integrate small doses (from 0 to 1000 rad) over long periods of time. The system is temperature compensated over its operating range of -40 C to +52C. Display accuracies of +-20 rad for readings below 100 rad and +-20% for readings above 100 rad are maintained throughout the range. Temperature correction is performed digitally after an initial analog-to-digital conversion of both the forward diode voltage and the ambient temperature. System flexibility is promoted with the use of a replaceable ROM for the final voltage-to-dose conversion table. This digital approach to temperature compensation, combined with the extensive use of CMOS circuitry, suggests the use of custom large-scale integration as a means of further reducing system weight and size. This possibility, as well as others, is discussed as a means of reducing system size. Test and evaluation results are also included. (author)

  12. Neutron monitoring system

    Okido, Fumiyasu; Arita, Setsuo.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns neutron monitoring for monitoring reactor power, and presents a generation state of abnormal signals by monitoring output signals from neutron sensors, judges abnormal signals at an excessively high level outputted from the sensors to a measuring operator or a reactor operator. That is, a threshold value judging means judges whether a sensor signal exceeds a predetermined threshold value or not. When it exceeds the value, recognition signals are outputted to a memory means. The memory means memorizes the times of input of the recognition signals on every period of interval signals outputted from a reference signal generation means. The memory content of the memory means and the previously inputted hysteresis of the sensor are compared and judged, to determine the extent of the degradation of the sensors and output the result of the judgement and hysteresis information to the display means. The input means accesses to the judging means and the memory means to retrieve and correct the content of the memory means and the hysteresis information inputted to the judging means. (I.S.)

  13. Matrix effects corrections in DDT assay of {sup 239}Pu with the CTEN instrument

    Hollas, C.L.; Arnone, G.; Brunson, G.; Coop, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The accuracy of transuranic (TRU) waste assay using the differential die-away technique depends upon significant corrections to compensate for the effects of the matrix material in which the TRU waste is located. We have used a new instrument, the combined thermal/epithermal neutron (CTEN) instrument for the assay of TRU waste, to develop methods to improve the accuracy of these corrections. Neutrons from a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator are moderated in the walls of the CTEN cavity and induce fission in the TRU material. The prompt neutrons from these fission events are detected in cadmium-wrapped {sup 3}He neutron detectors. We have developed methods of data acquisition and analysis to extract correlation in the neutron signals resulting from fission during active interrogation. This correlation information, in conjunction with the total number of neutrons detected, is used to determine the fraction of fission neutrons transmitted through the matrix material into the {sup 3}He detectors. This determination allows us to cleanly separate the matrix effects into two processes: matrix modification upon the neutron interrogating flux and matrix modification upon the fraction of fission neutrons transmitted to the neutron detectors. Recent results indicate that for some matrix systems, corrections for position dependent effects within the matrix are possible. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Measurable distributions of unpolarized neutron decay

    Glueck, F.

    1992-05-01

    Several two- and one-dimensional distributions of unpolarized free neutron decay are calculated. The results of the order-α model independent radiative correction calculations are tabulated numerically. With these corrections the theoretical distributions become precise enough to make possible the determination of the ratio of the axial-vector to the vector weak coupling constants to a precision of ∼0.001. (author) 39 refs.; 7 tabs

  15. Neutron activation analysis-comparative (NAAC)

    Zimmer, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    A software system for the reduction of comparative neutron activation analysis data is presented. Libraries are constructed to contain the elemental composition and isotopic nuclear data of an unlimited number of standards. Ratios to unknown sample data are performed by standard calibrations. Interfering peak corrections, second-order activation-product corrections, and deconvolution of multiplets are applied automatically. Passive gamma-energy analysis can be performed with the same software. 3 figures

  16. Adjustment and start-up of an irradiator self shielding model Isogamma LL.CO. in the Centre of Technological Applications and Nuclear Development; Ajuste y puesta en marcha en el centro de aplicaciones tecnologicas y desarrollo nuclear de un irradiador autoblindado modelo Isogamma LL.CO.

    Gonzalez, Dania Soguero; Ardanza, Armando Chavez, E-mail: sdania@ceaden.edu.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the process of installation of a self-shielded irradiator category I, model ISOGAMMA LL.Co of {sup 60}Co, with a nominal 25 kCi activity, rate of absorbed dose 8 kG/h and 5 L workload. The stages are describe step by step: import, the customs procedure which included the interview with the master of the vessel transporter, the monitoring of the entire process by the head of radiological protection of the importing Center, control of the levels of surface contamination of the shipping container of the sources before the removal of the ship, the supervision of the national regulatory authority and the transportation to the final destination. Details of assembling of the installation and the opening of the container for transportation of supplies is outlined. The action plan previously developed for the case of occurrence of radiological successful events is presented, detailing the phase of the load of radioactive sources by the specialists of the company selling the facility (IZOTOP). Finally describes the setting and implementation of the installation and the procedure of licensing for exploitation.

  17. Dispersion relation for long-wave neutrons and the possibility of its precise experimental verification

    Frank, A.I.; Nosov, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    Modern theoretical concepts concerning the dispersion relation for slow neutrons in matter are considered. The generally accepted optical-potential model is apparently not quite accurate and should be supplemented with some small corrections in the energy range attainable in experiments. For ultracold neutrons, these corrections are related to the proximity of the applicability boundary of the theory; for cold neutrons, these corrections are due to correlations in the positions of scatters. The accuracy of existing experiments is insufficient for confirmation or refutation these conclusions. A precision experiment is proposed to verify the dispersion relation for long-wave neutrons. 30 refs., 3 figs

  18. Calibration of the nuclear power channels of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor obtained from the measurements of the spatial thermal neutron flux distribution in the reactor core through the irradiation of infinitely diluted gold foils

    Goncalves, Lucas Batista

    2008-01-01

    Several nuclear parameters are obtained through the gamma spectrometry of targets irradiated in a research reactor core and this is the case of the activation foils which make possible, through the measurements of the activity induced, to determine the neutron flux in the place where they had been irradiated. The power level operation of the reactor is a parameter directly proportional to the average neutron flux in the core. This work aims to get the power operation of the reactor through of spatial neutron flux distribution in the core of IPEN/MB-01 reactor by the irradiation of infinitely diluted gold foils and prudently located in its interior. These foils were made in the form of metallic alloy in concentration levels such that the phenomena of flux disturbance, as the self-shielding factors to neutrons become worthless. These activation foils has only 1% of dispersed gold atoms in an aluminium matrix content of 99% of this element. The irradiations of foils have been carried through with and without cadmium plate. The total correlation between the average thermal neutron flux obtained by irradiation of infinitely diluted activation foils and the average digital value of current of the nuclear power channels 5 and 6 (non-compensated ionization chambers - CINC), allow the calibration of the nuclear channels of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. (author)

  19. The secondary neutrons spectra of 235U, 238U for incident energy range 1-2.5 MeV

    Kornilov, N.V.; Kagalenko, A.B.; Balitsky, A.V.; Baryba, V.Ja.; Androsenko, P.A.; Androsenko, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Spectra of inelastic scattered neutrons and fission neutrons were measured with neutron time of flight spectrometer. The solid tritium target was used as a neutron source. The energy distribution of neutrons on the sample was calculated with Monte-Carlo code, taking into account interaction income protons inside target and reaction kinematics. The detector efficiency was determined with 252 Cf source. The multiple scattering and absorption corrections were calculated with codes packet BRAND. Our results confirm ENDF/B-6 data library. (author)

  20. Neutron reflection effect on total absorption detector method used in SWINPC neutron multiplication experiment for beryllium

    Tian Dongfeng; Ho Yukun; Yang Fujia

    2001-01-01

    The SWINPC integral experiment on neutron multiplication in bulk beryllium showed that there were marked discrepancies between experimental data and calculated values with the ENDF/B-VI data. The calculated values become higher than experimental ones as the sample thickness increases. Several works had been devoted to find problems existing in the experiment. This paper discusses the neutron reflection effect on the total absorption detector method which was used in the experiment to measure the neutron leakage from samples. One systematic correction is suggested to make the experimental values agree with the calculated ones with the ENDF/B-VI data within experimental errors. (author)

  1. Performance review: neutron hodoscope at TREAT

    Stanford, G.S.; DeVolpi, A.; Fink, C.L.; Regis, J.P.; Rhodes, E.A.; Stewart, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The current fuel-motion-detection capabilities of the neutron hodoscopes at TREAT are outlined and discussed, including such topics as spatial and fuel-density resolution, dynamic range, and corrections for detector dead time and supralinearity. Capabilities and analytical techniques are illustrated with examples from several of the power-transient experiments that have been run in the TREAT reactor

  2. Damping of forward neutrons in pp collisions

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, J.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate absorptive corrections to single pion exchange in the production of leading neutrons in pp collisions. Contrary to the usual procedure of convolving the survival probability with the cross section, we apply corrections to the spin amplitudes. The nonflip amplitude turns out to be much more suppressed by absorption than the spin-flip one. We identify the projectile proton Fock state responsible for the absorptive corrections as a color octet-octet 5-quarks configuration. Calculations within two very different models, color-dipole light-cone description, and in hadronic representation, lead to rather similar absorptive corrections. We found a much stronger damping of leading neutrons than in some of previous estimates. Correspondingly, the cross section is considerably smaller than was measured at ISR. However, comparison with recent measurements by the ZEUS collaboration of neutron production in deep-inelastic scattering provides a strong motivation for challenging the normalization of the ISR data. This conjecture is also supported by preliminary data from the NA49 experiment for neutron production in pp collisions at SPS.

  3. Mathematical processing of experimental data on neutron yield from separate fission fragments

    Basova, B.G.; Rabinovich, A.D.; Ryazanov, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The algorithm is described for processing the multi-dimensional experiments on measurements of prompt emission of neutrons from separate fission fragments. While processing the data the effect of a number of experimental corrections is correctly taken into account; random coincidence background, neutron spectrum, neutron detector efficiency, instrument angular resolution. On the basis of the described algorithm a program for BESM-4 computer is realized and the treatment of experimental data is performed according to the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf

  4. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    Stefano, Gandolfi [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Steiner, Andrew W [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  5. Directional epithermal neutron detector

    Givens, W.W.; Mills, W.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A borehole tool for epithermal neutron die-away logging of subterranean formations surrounding a borehole is described which consists of: (a) a pulsed source of fast neutrons for irradiating the formations surrounding a borehole, (b) at least one neutron counter for counting epithermal neutrons returning to the borehole from the irradiated formations, (c) a neutron moderating material, (d) an outer thermal neutron shield providing a housing for the counter and the moderating material, (e) an inner thermal neutron shield dividing the housing so as to provide a first compartment bounded by the inner thermal neutron shield and a first portion of the outer thermal neutron shield and a second compartment bounded by the inner thermal neutron shield and a second portion of the outer thermal neutron shield, the counter being positioned within the first compartment and the moderating material being positioned within the second compartment, and (f) means for positioning the borehole tool against one side of the borehole wall and azimuthally orienting the borehole tool such that the first chamber is in juxtaposition with the borehole wall, the formation epithermal neutrons penetrating into the first chamber through the first portion of the outer thermal neutron shield are detected by the neutron counter for die-away measurement, thereby maximizing the directional sensitivty of the neutron counter to formation epithermal neutrons, the borehole fluid epithermal neutrons penetrating into the second chamber through the second chamber through the second portion of the outer thermal neutron shield are largely slowed down and lowered in energy by the moderating material and absorbed by the inner thermal neutron shield before penetrating into the first chamber, thereby minimizing the directional sensitivity of the neutron counter to borehole fluid epithermal neutrons

  6. Powder neutron diffractometers

    Adib, M.

    2002-01-01

    Basic properties and applications of powder neutron Diffractometers are described for optimum use of the continuous neutron beams. These instruments are equipped with position sensitive detectors, neutron guide tubes, and both high intensity and high resolution modes of operation are possible .The principles of both direct and Fourier reverse time-of-flight neutron Diffractometers are also given

  7. Neutron dosimetry - A review

    Baum, J W

    1955-03-29

    This review summarizes information on the following subjects: (1) physical processes of importance in neutron dosimetry; (2) biological effects of neutrons; (3) neutron sources; and (4) instruments and methods used in neutron dosimetry. Also, possible improvements in dosimetry instrumentation are outlined and discussed. (author)

  8. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner [eds.

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  9. Neutron generator control system

    Peelman, H.E.; Bridges, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described of controlling the neutron output of a neutron generator tube used in neutron well logging. The system operates by monitoring the target beam current and comparing a function of this current with a reference voltage level to develop a control signal used in a series regulator to control the replenisher current of the neutron generator tube. (U.K.)

  10. Genetic effect of neutrons

    Luchnik, N.V.; Sevan'kaev, A.V.; Fesenko, Eh.V.

    1984-01-01

    Gene mutations resulting from neutron effect are considered, but attention is focused on chromosome mutations. Dose curves for different energy of neutrons obtained at different objects are obtained which makes it possible to consider RBE of neutrons depending on their energy and radiation dose and to get some information on the neutron effect on heredity

  11. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  12. Direct Discrete Method for Neutronic Calculations

    Vosoughi, Naser; Akbar Salehi, Ali; Shahriari, Majid

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a new direct method for neutronic calculations. This method which is named Direct Discrete Method, is simpler than the neutron Transport equation and also more compatible with physical meaning of problems. This method is based on physic of problem and with meshing of the desired geometry, writing the balance equation for each mesh intervals and with notice to the conjunction between these mesh intervals, produce the final discrete equations series without production of neutron transport differential equation and mandatory passing from differential equation bridge. We have produced neutron discrete equations for a cylindrical shape with two boundary conditions in one group energy. The correction of the results from this method are tested with MCNP-4B code execution. (authors)

  13. The neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    Schreyer, Wolfgang [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: PENeLOPE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The neutron lifetime τ{sub n}=880.3±1.1 s is an important parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics and in Big Bang cosmology. Several systematic corrections of previously published results reduced the PDG world average by several σ in the last years and call for a new experiment with complementary systematics. The experiment PENeLOPE, currently under construction at the Physik-Department of Technische Universitaet Muenchen, aims to determine the neutron lifetime with a precision of 0.1 s. It will trap ultra-cold neutrons in a magneto-gravitational trap using a large superconducting magnet and will measure their lifetime by both neutron counting and online proton detection. This presentation gives an overview over the latest developments of the experiment.

  14. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    Watanabe, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, poisoning, etc are discussed, aiming at a high performance pulsed spallation source

  15. Procedures for measurement of anisotropy factor of neutron sources

    Creazolla, P.G.; Camargo, A.; Astuto, A.; Silva, F.; Pereira, W.W.

    2017-01-01

    Radioisotope sources of neutrons allow the production of reference fields for calibration of neutron measurement devices for radioprotection and analysis purposes. When the emission rate of these sources is isotropic, no correction is necessary. However, variations in the source capsule material and variations in the concentration of the emitting material may produce differences in its neutron emission rate relative to the source axis, this effect is called anisotropy. A proposed procedure for measuring the anisotropy factor of the sources belonging to the IRD/LNMRI/LN Neutron Metrology Laboratory using a Precision Long Counter (PLC) detector will be presented

  16. Neutron β Decay: Status and Future of the Asymmetry Measurement

    Ito, Takeyasu M.

    2007-01-01

    With more intense sources of cold and ultracold neutrons becoming available and with improved experimental techniques being developed, determination of IV ud l from neutron β decay with a similar precision to that from from superallowed β decays is within reach. Determination of IV ud l from neutron β decay, free from nuclear corrections, holds the most promise for a further improvement of the determination of IV ud I l· The current and future neutron β decay correlation experiments including the UCNA experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory are reviewed.

  17. Neutron shieldings

    Tarutani, Kohei

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the stresses resulted by the core bendings to the base of an entrance nozzle. Constitution: Three types of round shielding rods of different diameter are arranged in a hexagonal tube. The hexagonal tube is provided with several spacer pads receiving the loads from the core constrain mechanism at its outer circumference, a handling head for a fuel exchanger at its top and an entrance nozzle for self-holding the neutron shieldings and flowing heat-removing coolants at its bottom. The diameters for R 1 , R 2 and R 3 for the round shielding rods are designed as: 0.1 R 1 2 1 and 0.2 R 1 2 1 . Since a plurality of shielding rods of small diameter are provided, soft structure are obtained and a plurality of coolant paths are formed. (Furukawa, Y.)

  18. More accurate thermal neutron coincidence counting technique

    Baron, N.

    1978-01-01

    Using passive thermal neutron coincidence counting techniques, the accuracy of nondestructive assays of fertile material can be improved significantly using a two-ring detector. It was shown how the use of a function of the coincidence count rate ring-ratio can provide a detector response rate that is independent of variations in neutron detection efficiency caused by varying sample moderation. Furthermore, the correction for multiplication caused by SF- and (α,n)-neutrons is shown to be separable into the product of a function of the effective mass of 240 Pu (plutonium correction) and a function of the (α,n) reaction probability (matrix correction). The matrix correction is described by a function of the singles count rate ring-ratio. This correction factor is empirically observed to be identical for any combination of PuO 2 powder and matrix materials SiO 2 and MgO because of the similar relation of the (α,n)-Q value and (α,n)-reaction cross section among these matrix nuclei. However the matrix correction expression is expected to be different for matrix materials such as Na, Al, and/or Li. Nevertheless, it should be recognized that for comparison measurements among samples of similar matrix content, it is expected that some function of the singles count rate ring-ratio can be defined to account for variations in the matrix correction due to differences in the intimacy of mixture among the samples. Furthermore the magnitude of this singles count rate ring-ratio serves to identify the contaminant generating the (α,n)-neutrons. Such information is useful in process control

  19. Miscellaneous neutron techniques

    Iddings, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    Attention is brought to the less often uses of neutrons in the areas of neutron radiography, well logging, and neutron gaging. Emphasis on neutron radiography points toward the isotopic sensitivity of the method versus the classical bulk applications. Also recognized is the ability of neutron radiography to produce image changes that correspond to thickness and density changes obtained in photon radiography. Similarly, neutron gaging applications center on the measurement of radiography. Similarly, neutron gaging applications center on the measurement of water, oil, or plastics in industrial samples. Well logging extends the neutron gaging to encompass many neutron properties and reactions besides thermalization and capture. Neutron gaging also gives information on organic structure and concentrations of a variety of elements or specific compounds in selected matrices

  20. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  1. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    Verbeke, J.M., E-mail: verbeke2@llnl.gov; Glenn, A.M., E-mail: glenn22@llnl.gov; Keefer, G.J., E-mail: keefer1@llnl.gov; Wurtz, R.E., E-mail: wurtz1@llnl.gov

    2016-07-21

    A time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  2. Neutron source investigations in support of the cross section program at the Argonne Fast-Neutron Generator

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    Experimental methods related to the production of neutrons for cross section studies at the Argonne Fast-Neutron Generator are reviewed. Target assemblies commonly employed in these measurements are described, and some of the relevant physical properties of the neutron source reactions are discussed. Various measurements have been performed to ascertain knowledge about these source reaction that is required for cross section data analysis purposes. Some results from these studies are presented, and a few specific examples of neutron-source-related corrections to cross section data are provided. 16 figures, 3 tables

  3. Neutron and proton optical potentials

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-11-01

    The neutron and proton optical model potentials (OMP) are discussed in terms of microscopic (MOMP) and phenomenological (POMP) models. For the MOMP, two approaches are discussed, the nucleus matter approach [Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux (JLM) and Brieva-Rook-von Geramb (BRVG), potentials] and the finite nuclei approach (Osterfeld and Madsen). For the POMP, the Lane charge-exchange potential and its validity over a wide mass range is reviewed. In addition to the Lane symmetry term, the Coulomb correction to both the real and imaginary parts of the OMP is discussed for the above models. The use of the OMP to calculate collective inelastic scattering and observed differences between the neutron- and proton-deformation parameters is also illustrated. 25 refs., 3 figs

  4. Tissue equivalence in neutron dosimetry

    Nutton, D.H.; Harris, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the essential features of neutron tissue equivalence for radiotherapy and gives the results of a computation of relative absorbed dose for 14 MeV neutrons, using various tissue models. It is concluded that for the Bragg-Gray equation for ionometric dosimetry it is not sufficient to define the value of W to high accuracy and that it is essential that, for dosimetric measurements to be applicable to real body tissue to an accuracy of better than several per cent, a correction to the total absorbed dose must be made according to the test and tissue atomic composition, although variations in patient anatomy and other radiotherapy parameters will often limit the benefits of such detailed dosimetry. (U.K.)

  5. Role of magnetic interactions in neutron stars

    Adhya Souvik Priyam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a calculation of the non-Fermi liquid correction to the specific heat of magnetized degenerate quark matter present at the core of the neutron star. The role of non-Fermi liquid corrections to the neutrino emissivity has been calculated beyond leading order. We extend our result to the evaluation of the pulsar kick velocity and cooling of the star due to such anomalous corrections and present a comparison with the simple Fermi liquid case.

  6. Evaluation of room-scattered neutrons at the JNC Tokai neutron reference field

    Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Tsujimura, Norio [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Oyanagi, Katsumi [Japan Radiation Engineering Co., Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Neutron reference fields for calibrating neutron-measuring devices in JNC Tokai Works are produced by using radionuclide neutron sources, {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 252}Cf sources. The reference field for calibration includes scattered neutrons from the material surrounding sources, wall, floor and ceiling of the irradiation room. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the scattered neutrons contribution and their energy spectra at reference points. Spectral measurements were performed with a set of Bonner multi-sphere spectrometers and the reference fields were characterized in terms of spectral composition and the fractions of room-scattered neutrons. In addition, two techniques stated in ISO 10647, the shadow-cone method and the polynomial fit method, for correcting the contributions from the room-scattered neutrons to the readings of neutron survey instruments were compared. It was found that the two methods gave an equivalent result within a deviation of 3.3% at a source-to-detector distance from 50cm to 500cm. (author)

  7. Evaluation of room-scattered neutrons at the JNC Tokai neutron reference field

    Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Tsujimura, Norio

    2002-01-01

    Neutron reference fields for calibrating neutron-measuring devices in JNC Tokai Works are produced by using radionuclide neutron sources, 241 Am-Be and 252 Cf sources. The reference field for calibration includes scattered neutrons from the material surrounding sources, wall, floor and ceiling of the irradiation room. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the scattered neutrons contribution and their energy spectra at reference points. Spectral measurements were performed with a set of Bonner multi-sphere spectrometers and the reference fields were characterized in terms of spectral composition and the fractions of room-scattered neutrons. In addition, two techniques stated in ISO 10647, the shadow-cone method and the polynomial fit method, for correcting the contributions from the room-scattered neutrons to the readings of neutron survey instruments were compared. It was found that the two methods gave an equivalent result within a deviation of 3.3% at a source-to-detector distance from 50cm to 500cm. (author)

  8. The representation of neutron polarization

    Byrne, J.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron beam polarization representation is discussed under the headings; transfer matrices, coherent parity violation for neutrons, neutron spin rotation in helical magnetic fields, polarization and interference. (UK)

  9. Pulsed neutron sources for epithermal neutrons

    Windsor, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown how accelerator based neutron sources, giving a fast neutron pulse of short duration compared to the neutron moderation time, promise to open up a new field of epithermal neutron scattering. The three principal methods of fast neutron production: electrons, protons and fission boosters will be compared. Pulsed reactors are less suitable for epithermal neutrons and will only be briefly mentioned. The design principle of the target producing fast neutrons, the moderator and reflector to slow them down to epithermal energies, and the cell with its beam tubes and shielding will all be described with examples taken from the new Harwell electron linac to be commissioned in 1978. A general comparison of pulsed neutron performance with reactors is fraught with difficulties but has been attempted. Calculation of the new pulsed source fluxes and pulse widths is now being performed but we have taken the practical course of basing all comparisons on extrapolations from measurements on the old 1958 Harwell electron linac. Comparisons for time-of-flight and crystal monochromator experiments show reactors to be at their best at long wavelengths, at coarse resolution, and for experiments needing a specific incident wavelength. Even existing pulsed sources are shown to compete with the high flux reactors in experiments where the hot neutron flux and the time-of-flight methods can be best exploited. The sources under construction can open a new field of inelastic neutron scattering based on energy transfer up to an electron volt and beyond

  10. Latest developments of neutron scattering instrumentation at the Juelich Centre for Neutron Science

    Ioffe, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) is operating a number of world-class neutron scattering instruments situated at the most powerful and advanced neutron sources (FRM II, ILL and SNS) and is continuously undertaking significant efforts in the development and upgrades to keep this instrumentation in line with the continuously changing scientific request. These developments are mostly based upon the latest progress in neutron optics and polarized neutron techniques. For example, the low-Q limit of the suite of small angle-scattering instruments has been extended to 4·10 -5 Å -1 by the successful use of focusing optics. A new generation of correction elements for the neutron spin-echo spectrometer has allowed for the use of the full field integral available, thus pushing further the instrument resolution. A significant progress has been achieved in the developments of 3 He neutron spin filters for purposes of the wide-angle polarization analysis for off-specular reflectometry and (grazing incidence) small-angle neutron scattering, e.g. the on-beam polarization of 3 He in large cells is allowing to achieve a high neutron beam polarization without any degradation in time. The wide Q-range polarization analysis using 3 He neutron spin filters has been implemented for small-angle neutron scattering that lead to the reduction up to 100 times of the intrinsic incoherent background from non-deuterated biological molecules. Also the work on wide-angle XYZ magnetic cavities (Magic PASTIS) will be presented. (author)

  11. Study of a Loop Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    C. Thomas Conroy; A. A. El-Ganayni; David R. Riley; John M. Cimbala; Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.; Abel Po-Ya Chuang; Shane Hanna

    2001-01-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, has been identified with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design

  12. Development of advanced radiation monitors for pulsed neutron fields

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081895

    The need of radiation detectors capable of efficiently measuring in pulsed neutron fields is attracting widespread interest since the 60s. The efforts of the scientific community substantially increased in the last decade due to the increasing number of applications in which this radiation field is encountered. This is a major issue especially at particle accelerator facilities, where pulsed neutron fields are present because of beam losses at targets, collimators and beam dumps, and where the correct assessment of the intensity of the neutron fields is fundamental for radiation protection monitoring. LUPIN is a neutron detector that combines an innovative acquisition electronics based on logarithmic amplification of the collected current signal and a special technique used to derive the total number of detected neutron interactions, which has been specifically conceived to work in pulsed neutron fields. Due to its special working principle, it is capable of overcoming the typical saturation issues encountere...

  13. NWS Corrections to Observations

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Form B-14 is the National Weather Service form entitled 'Notice of Corrections to Weather Records.' The forms are used to make corrections to observations on forms...

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Full Text Available ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ...

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Full Text Available ... Jaw Surgery Download Download the ebook for further information Corrective jaw, or orthognathic surgery is performed by ... your treatment. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities ​ ​ The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  16. Neutron in biology

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Neutron in biology can provide an experimental method of directly locating relationship of proteins and DNA. However, there are relatively few experimental study of such objects since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections and inelastic spectra due to the low flux of neutron illuminating the sample. Since a next generation neutron source of JAERI will be 5MW spallation neutron source and its effective neutron flux will be 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} times higher than the one of JRR-3M, neutron in biology will open a completely new world for structural biology. (author)

  17. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  18. Neutron in biology

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Neutron in biology can provide an experimental method of directly locating relationship of proteins and DNA. However, there are relatively few experimental study of such objects since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections and inelastic spectra due to the low flux of neutron illuminating the sample. Since a next generation neutron source of JAERI will be 5MW spallation neutron source and its effective neutron flux will be 10 2 to 10 3 times higher than the one of JRR-3M, neutron in biology will open a completely new world for structural biology. (author)

  19. A neutron activation detector

    Ambardanishvili, T.S.; Kolomiitsev, M.A.; Zakharina, T.Y.; Dundua, V.J.; Chikhladze, N.V.

    1973-01-01

    The present invention concerns a neutron activation detector made from a moulded and hardened composition. According to the invention, that composition contains an activable substance constituted by at least two chemical elements and/or compounds of at least two chemical elements. Each of these chemical elements is capable of reacting with the neutrons forming radio-active isotopes with vatious levels of energy during desintegration. This neutron detector is mainly suitable for measuring integral thermal neutron and fast neutron fluxes during irradiation of the sample, and also for measuring the intensities of neutron fields [fr

  20. Very slow neutrons

    Frank, A.

    1983-01-01

    The history is briefly presented of the research so far of very slow neutrons and their basic properties are explained. The methods are described of obtaining very slow neutrons and the problems of their preservation are discussed. The existence of very slow neutrons makes it possible to perform experiments which may deepen the knowledge of the fundamental properties of neutrons. Their wavelength approximates that of visible radiation. The possibilities and use are discussed of neutron optical systems (neutron microscope) which could be an effective instrument for the study of the detailed arrangement, especially of organic substances. (B.S.)

  1. Reactor neutron dosimetry

    Najzer, M.; Pauko, M.; Glumac, B.; Acquah, I.N.; Moskon, F.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of requirements and possibilities for experimental neutron spectrum determination during the reactor pressure vessel surveil lance programme is given. Fast neutron spectrum and neutron dose rate were measured in the Fast neutron irradiation facility of our TRIGA reactor. It was shown that the facility can be used for calibration of neutron dosimeters and for irradiation of samples sensitive to neutron radiation. The investigation of the unfolding algorithm ITER was continued. Based on this investigations are two specialized unfolding program packages ITERAD and ITERGS written this year. They are able to unfold data from activation detectors and NaI(T1) gamma spectrometer respectively

  2. A new expression for determination of fluences from a spherical moderator neutron source for the calibration of spherical neutron measuring devices

    Khoshnoodi, M.; Sohrabi, M.

    1997-01-01

    A new expression modifying the inverse square law for determination of neutron fluences from spherical moderator neutron sources is reported. The formalism is based on the neutron fluence at a point outside the moderator as the summation of fluxes of two groups of neutrons: direct neutrons from the central region of the moderator, and moderated neutrons which, to a first approximation, are scattered from the outermost layers of the spherical moderator. The expression has been further developed for spherical neutron measuring devices with an appropriate geometry factor which corrects the reading of the device for non-uniform irradiation of the detector. The combination of the new fluence function and those of the air and room scattered components introduce a calibration model. The fluence relationship obtained for moderated sources may conveniently be used for calculating the more rapid change of neutron dose at close distances than that which is based on the inverse square dependence. (author)

  3. Thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral measurements of {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La and {sup 140}Ce(n, γ){sup 141}Ce using a Am-Be neutron source

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Karnataka (India)

    2017-03-15

    Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and resonance integrals of {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La and {sup 140}Ce (n, γ){sup 141}Ce are measured with respect to reference reactions {sup 197}Au(n, γ){sup 198}Au and {sup 55}Mn(n, γ){sup 56}Mn using the neutron activation technique. Measurements are carried out using neutrons from an Am-Be source located inside a concrete bunker. Two different methods are used for determining self-shielding factors of activation foils as well as for finding the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor. For {sup 139}La with reference to {sup 197}Au and {sup 55}Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 9.24 ± 0.25 b and 9.28 ± 0.37 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 12.18 ± 0.67 b and 11.81 ± 0.94 b, respectively. For {sup 140}Ce with reference to {sup 197}Au and {sup 55}Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 0.44 ± 0.01 b and 0.44 ± 0.02 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 0.55 ± 0.03 b and 0.54 ± 0.04 b, respectively. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements and evaluations. Presently estimated values confirm the established {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La cross-sections. The presently measured thermal capture cross-section {sup 140}Ce(n, γ){sup 141}Ce, though lower than the evaluated data, is having higher accuracy compared to previous measurements with large uncertainties. The resonance integral measured is higher (like most previous measurements) than most evaluations requiring a revision of the evaluated data. (orig.)

  4. Neutron stochastic transport theory with delayed neutrons

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Verdu, G.

    1987-01-01

    From the stochastic transport theory with delayed neutrons, the Boltzmann transport equation with delayed neutrons for the average flux emerges in a natural way without recourse to any approximation. From this theory a general expression is obtained for the Feynman Y-function when delayed neutrons are included. The single mode approximation for the particular case of a subcritical assembly is developed, and it is shown that Y-function reduces to the familiar expression quoted in many books, when delayed neutrons are not considered, and spatial and source effects are not included. (author)

  5. Cosmic-ray neutron simulations and measurements in Taiwan

    Chen, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2014-01-01

    This study used simulations of galactic cosmic ray in the atmosphere to investigate the neutron background environment in Taiwan, emphasising its altitude dependence and spectrum variation near interfaces. The calculated results were analysed and compared with two measurements. The first measurement was a mobile neutron survey from sea level up to 3275 m in altitude conducted using a car-mounted high-sensitivity neutron detector. The second was a previous measured result focusing on the changes in neutron spectra near air/ground and air/water interfaces. The attenuation length of cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere was estimated to be 163 g cm -2 in Taiwan. Cosmic-ray neutron spectra vary with altitude and especially near interfaces. The determined spectra near the air/ground and air/water interfaces agree well with measurements for neutrons below 10 MeV. However, the high-energy portion of spectra was observed to be much higher than our previous estimation. Because high-energy neutrons contribute substantially to a dose evaluation, revising the annual sea-level effective dose from cosmic-ray neutrons at ground level in Taiwan to 35 μSv, which corresponds to a neutron flux of 5.30 x 10 -3 n cm -2 s -1 , was suggested. The cosmic-ray neutron background in Taiwan was studied using the FLUKA simulations and field measurements. A new measurement was performed using a car-mounted high-efficiency neutron detector, re-coding real-time neutron counting rates from sea level up to 3275 m. The attenuation of cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere exhibited an effective attenuation length of 163 g cm -2 . The calculated neutron counting rates over predicted the measurements by ∼32 %, which leaded to a correction factor for the FLUKA-calculated cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere in Taiwan. In addition, a previous measurement regarding neutron spectrum variation near the air/ground and air/water interfaces was re-evaluated. The results showed that the

  6. The determination of sulphur in materials of high neutron absorption cross-section by fast-neutron activation analysis; Determination du soufre dans les matieres de forte section efficace d'absorption neutronique, au moyen d'une analyse par activation avec des neutrons rapides; Opredelenie sery v materialakh s bol'shim secheniem pogloshcheniya nejtronov metodom aktivatsionnogo analiza bystrykh nejtronov; Determinacion del azufre en sustancias de elevada seccion eficaz de absorcion neutronica mediante analisis por activacion con neutrones rapidos

    Gibbons, D; Simpson, H [Wantage Research Laboratory (A.E.R.E.), Wantage, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1962-01-15

    The production of radiophosphorus by the fast neutron (n, p) reaction on sulphur is used for the determination of sulphur by activation analysis. Using this technique it is possible to determine sulphur in materials of high thermal-neutron absorption cross-section because the absorption cross-sections for fast neutrons are, in general, much lower than those for slow neutrons, so that self-shielding errors are considerably reduced. Interference due to the slow neutron (n, {gamma}) reaction on neutral phosphorus is eliminated by a double irradiation technique involving irradiation in regions of differing slow/fast flux-ratios. The method has been applied to the determination of sulphur in chromium and arsenic. (author) [French] La production de radiophosphore par reaction (n, p) de neutrons rapides sur le soufre est utilisee pour la determination du soufre au moyen d'une analyse par activation. Cette methode permet la determination du soufre dans les matieres de forte section efficace d'absorption des neutrons thermiques; en effet, les sections efficaces d'absorption des neutrons rapides sont, d'une maniere generale, beaucoup plus faibles que pour les neutrons lents, de sorte que les erreurs d'autoprotection se trouvent considerablement reduites. L'interference due a la reaction (n, {gamma}) des neutrons lents sur le phosphore naturel est eliminee par une double irradiation, qui implique une irradiation dans les regions ou le rapport du flux de neutrons lents au flux de neutrons rapides a des valeurs differentes. La methode a ete appliquee a la determination du soufre dans le chrome et l'arsenic. (author) [Spanish] La formacion de fosforo radiactivo por la accion de los neutrones rapidos sobre el azufre, reaccion (n, p), puede servir para determinar este elemento mediante analisis por activacion. El empleo de esta tecnica permite efectuar determinaciones de azufre en materiales de elevada seccion eficaz de absorcion de neutrones termicos porque, en general, las

  7. Radiation transport and shielding information, computer codes, and nuclear data for use in CTR neutronics research and development

    Santoro, R.T.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Roussin, R.W.; Trubey, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    The activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are being utilized in support of fusion reactor technology. The major activities of RSIC include the operation of a computer-based information storage and retrieval system, the collection, packaging, and distribution of large computer codes, and the compilation and dissemination of processed and evaluated data libraries, with particular emphasis on neutron and gamma-ray cross-section data. The Center has acquired thirteen years of experience in serving fission reactor, weapons, and accelerator shielding research communities, and the extension of its technical base to fusion reactor research represents a logical progression. RSIC is currently working with fusion reactor researchers and contractors in computer code development to provide tested radiation transport and shielding codes and data library packages. Of significant interest to the CTR community are the 100 energy group neutron and 21 energy group gamma-ray coupled cross-section data package (DLC-37) for neutronics studies, a comprehensive 171 energy group neutron and 36 energy group gamma-ray coupled cross-section data base with retrieval programs, including resonance self-shielding, that are tailored to CTR application, and a data base for the generation of energy-dependent atomic displacement and gas production cross sections and heavy-particle-recoil spectra for estimating radiation damage to CTR structural components. Since 1964, the Center has been involved in the international exchange of information, encouraged and supported by both government and interagency agreements; and to achieve an equally viable and successful program in fusion research, the reciprocal exchange of CTR data and computing technology is encouraged and welcomed

  8. Neutron Interferometry at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Huber, M. G.; Sarenac, D.; Nsofini, J.; Pushin, D. A.; Arif, M.; Wood, C. J.; Cory, D. G.; Shahi, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron interferometry has proved to be a very precise technique for measuring the quantum mechanical phase of a neutron caused by a potential energy difference between two spatially separated neutron paths inside interferometer. The path length inside the interferometer can be many centimeters (and many centimeters apart) making it very practical to study a variety of samples, fields, potentials, and other macroscopic medium and quantum effects. The precision of neutron interferometry comes at a cost; neutron interferometers are very susceptible to environmental noise that is typically mitigated with large, active isolated enclosures. With recent advances in quantum information processing especially quantum error correction (QEC) codes we were able to demonstrate a neutron interferometer that is insensitive to vibrational noise. A facility at NIST’s Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) has just been commissioned with higher neutron flux than the NCNR’s older interferometer setup. This new facility is based on QEC neutron interferometer, thus improving the accessibility of neutron interferometry to the greater scientific community and expanding its applications to quantum computing, gravity, and material research

  9. Testing for moisture content in foods by neutron gaging

    Helf, S.

    1976-01-01

    Neutron gaging was applied to the testing for moisture content in bulk powdered foods and in canned Army field rations. The technique is based on the moderation or thermalization of fast neutrons by hydrogenous matter and the measurement of thermal neutron intensity as a function of moisture content. A small californium-252 capsule, of approximate output 10 7 neutrons per second, was used as the source of fast neutrons. It is concluded that a fast neutron moderation technique is feasible for the nondestructive measurement or control of moisture or both in near-dry bulk powdered foods. Samples must be measured under identical geometric conditions, that is, uniform bulk density and volume using a standard metal container or cell. For canned or otherwise prepacked rations, measurement of moisture is interfered with by variations in fill weight among cans or packages of the same product. A gamma-ray attenuation gaging method proved to be of insufficient sensitivity to correct for fill weight variation and was further complicated by nonuniformity in can wall dimensions. Neutron gaging, however, appears to be quite useful for monitoring a standard packaged item for fill weight since the neutron signal is virtually unaffected by variations in container dimensions. The radiation dose imparted to a sample or package of food subjected to such a test is judged to pose no threat to humans from subsequent consumption of the food. An estimate is given for the cost range of a commercial neutron gage and of encapsulated radioisotopic neutron sources

  10. Procedure for measurement of anisotropy factor for neutron sources

    Creazolla, Prycylla Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Radioisotope neutron sources allow the production of reference fields for calibration of neutron detectors for radiation protection and analysis purposes. When the emission rate of these sources is isotropic, no correction is necessary. However, variations in source encapsulation and in the radioactive material concentration produce differences in its neutron emission rate, relative to the source axis, this effect is called anisotropy. In this study, is describe a procedure for measuring the anisotropy factor of neutron sources performed in the Laboratório de Metrologia de Neutrons (LN) using a Precision Long Counter (PLC) detector. A measurement procedure that takes into account the anisotropy factor of neutron sources contributes to solve some issues, particularly with respect to the high uncertainties associated with neutron dosimetry. Thus, a bibliographical review was carried out based on international standards and technical regulations specific to the area of neutron fields, and were later reproduced in practice by means of the procedure for measuring the anisotropy factor in neutron sources of the LN. The anisotropy factor is determined as a function of the angle of 90° in relation to the cylindrical axis of the source. This angle is more important due to its high use in measurements and also of its higher neutron emission rate if compared with other angles. (author)

  11. Heavy nucleus resonance absorption in heterogeneous lattices

    Coste, M.; Tellier, H.; Brienne-Raepsaet, C.; Van Der Gucht, C.

    1992-01-01

    To compute easily the neutron reaction rates in the resonance energy range, the reactor physicists use the self-shielding formalism and the effective cross-section concept. Usually, for these calculations, and equivalence process is used, in such a way that the absorption rate is correctly computed for the whole fuel pin. This procedure does not allow to preserve the spatial absorption rate distribution inside the pin. It is an important handicap if we want to reproduce the plutonium distribution in a spent fuel. To avoid this inconvenience, new improvements of the self-shielding formalism have been recently introduced in the new assembly calculation code of the French Atomic Energy Commission, APOLLO 2. With this improved formalism, it is now possible to represent the spatial and energetic dependence of the heavy nucleus absorption inside the fuel pin and to use a fine energy dependent equivalence process. As it does not exist clean experimental results for the spatial and energetic dependence of the absorption, the authors used reference calculations to qualify the self-shielding formalism. For the strongly self-shielded nuclei of interest in reactor physics, U238, Pu240 and Th232, the agreement between the self-shielding calculation and the reference ones is fairly good for the spatial and energetic dependence of the absorption rate

  12. Neutron Beam Filters

    Adib, M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of filters is to transmit neutrons with selected energy, while remove unwanted ones from the incident neutron beam. This reduces the background, and the number of spurious. The types of commonly used now-a-day neutron filters and their properties are discussed in the present work. There are three major types of neutron filters. The first type is filter of selective thermal neutron. It transmits the main reflected neutrons from a crystal monochromate, while reject the higher order contaminations accompanying the main one. Beams coming from the moderator always contain unwanted radiation like fast neutrons and gamma-rays which contribute to experimental background and to the biological hazard potential. Such filter type is called filter of whole thermal neutron spectrum. The third filter type is it transmits neutrons with energies in the resonance energy range (En . 1 KeV). The main idea of such neutron filter technique is the use of large quantities of a certain material which have the deep interference minima in its total neutron cross-section. By transmitting reactor neutrons through bulk layer of such material, one can obtain the quasimonochromatic neutron lines instead of white reactor spectrum.

  13. Neutron anatomy

    Bacon, G.E. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone.

  14. Neutron anatomy

    Bacon, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone

  15. Basics of Neutrons for First Responders

    Rees, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-05

    These are slides from a presentation on the basics of neutrons. A few topics covered are: common origins of terrestrial neutron radiation, neutron sources, neutron energy, interactions, detecting neutrons, gammas from neutron interactions, neutron signatures in gamma-ray spectra, neutrons and NaI, neutron fluence to dose (msV), instruments' response to neutrons.

  16. Development, improvement and calibration of neutronic reaction rates measurements: elaboration of a standard techniques basis

    Hudelot, J.P.

    1998-06-01

    In order to improve and to validate the neutronics calculation schemes, perfecting integral measurements of neutronics parameters is necessary. This thesis focuses on the conception, the improvement and the development of neutronics reaction rates measurements, and aims at building a base of standard techniques. Two subjects are discussed. The first one deals with direct measurements by fission chambers. A short presentation of the different usual techniques is given. Then, those last ones are applied through the example of doubling time measurements on the EOLE facility during the MISTRAL 1 experimental programme. Two calibration devices of fission chambers are developed: a thermal column located in the central part of the MINERVE facility, and a calibration cell using a pulsed high flux neutron generator and based on the discrimination of the energy of the neutrons with a time-of-flight method. This second device will soon allow to measure the mass of fission chambers with a precision of about 1 %. Finally, the necessity of those calibrations will be shown through spectral indices measurements in core MISTRAL 1 (UO 2 ) and MISTRAL 2 (MOX) of the EOLE facility. In each case, the associated calculation schemes, performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code with the ENDF-BV library, will be validated. Concerning the second one, the goal is to develop a method for measuring the modified conversion ratio of 238 U (defined as the ratio of 238 U capture rate to total fission rate) by gamma-ray spectrometry of fuel rods. Within the framework of the MISTRAL 1 and MISTRAL 2 programmes, the measurement device, the experimental results and the spectrometer calibration are described. Furthermore, the MCNP calculations of neutron self-shielding and gamma self-absorption are validated. It is finally shown that measurement uncertainties are better than 1 %. The extension of this technique to future modified conversion ratio measurements for 242 Pu (on MOX rods) and 232 Th (on

  17. Development, improvement and calibration of neutronic reaction rate measurements: elaboration of a base of standard techniques

    Hudelot, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve and to validate the neutronic calculation schemes, perfecting integral measurements of neutronic parameters is necessary. This thesis focuses on the conception, the improvement and the development of neutronic reaction rates measurements, and aims at building a base of standard techniques. Two subjects are discussed. The first one deals with direct measurements by fission chambers. A short presentation of the different usual techniques is given. Then, those last ones are applied through the example of doubling time measurements on the EOLE facility during the MISTRAL 1 experimental programme. Two calibration devices of fission chambers are developed: a thermal column located in the central part of the MINERVE facility, and a calibration cell using a pulsed high flux neutron generator and based on the discrimination of the energy of the neutrons with a time-of-flight method. This second device will soon allow to measure the mass of fission chambers with a precision of about 1 %. Finally, the necessity of those calibrations will be shown through spectral indices measurements in core MISTRAL 1 (UO 2 ) and MISTRAL 2 (MOX) of the EOLE facility. In each case, the associated calculation schemes, performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code with the ENDF-BV library, will be validated. Concerning the second one, the goal is to develop a method for measuring the modified conversion ratio of 238 U (defined as the ratio of 238 U capture rate to total fission rate) by gamma-ray spectrometry of fuel rods. Within the framework of the MISTRAL 1 and MISTRAL 2 programmes, the measurement device, the experimental results and the spectrometer calibration are described. Furthermore, the MCNP calculations of neutron self-shielding and gamma self-absorption are validated. It is finally shown that measurement uncertainties are better than 1 %. The extension of this technique to future modified conversion ratio measurements for 242 Pu (on MOX rods) and 232 Th (on Thorium

  18. Neutron spectrometry with organic scintillation detector

    Butragueno Casado, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    This work describes a fast neutron spectrometer using a stilbene crystal as head detector with pulse shape discrimination (P.S.D.) to reject gamma background. Tre experimental procedure involves the P.S.D., the measurements to calibrate the spectrometer and the corrections for several factors, mainly the non-linear response of the stilbene. Results of the measurements with the reaction D 2 (d,n)He 3 , and with an Am-Be neutron source are presented. It is also presented the measurement of the spectrum of the fast reactor CCRAl-1. (Author) 17 refs

  19. Neutron radiography using neutron imaging plate

    Chankow, Nares; Wonglee, Sarinrat

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aims of this research are to study properties of neutron imaging plate, to obtain a suitable condition for neutron radiography and to use the neutron imaging plate for testing of materials nondestructively. The experiments were carried out by using a neutron beam from the Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1 at a power of 1.2 MW. A BAS-ND 2040 FUJI neutron imaging plate and a MX125 Kodak X-ray film/Gadolinium neutron converter screen combination were tested for comparison. It was found that the photostimulated light (PSL) read out of the imaging plate was directly proportional to the exposure time. It was also found that radiography with neutron using the imaging plate was approximately 40 times faster than the conventional neutron radiography using x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination. The sensitivity of the imaging plate to gamma-rays was investigated by using gamma-rays from an 192 Ir and a 60 Co radiographic sources. The imaging plate was found to be 5-6 times less sensitive to gamma-rays than a FUJI BAS-MS 2040 gamma-ray imaging plate. Finally, some specimens were selected to be radiographed with neutrons using the imaging plate and the x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination in comparison to x-rays. Parts containing light elements could be clearly observed by the two neutron radiographic techniques. It could be concluded that the image quality from the neutron imaging plate was comparable to the conventional x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination but the exposure time could be approximately reduced by a factor of 40

  20. Sources of polarized neutrons

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  1. Neutron delayed choice experiments

    Bernstein, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Delayed choice experiments for neutrons can help extend the interpretation of quantum mechanical phenomena. They may also rule out alternative explanations which static interference experiments allow. A simple example of a feasible neutron test is presented and discussed. (orig.)

  2. Neutron radiation capture

    1986-01-01

    For all stable and experimentally studied radionuclides evaluated data are presented on cross sections of thermal neutrons, on resonance integrals and medium neutron cross sections with energy of 30 KeV. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Neutron radiography in metallurgy

    Rant, J.; Ilic, R.

    1977-01-01

    The review surveys microneutronographic and neutron-induced autoradiographic techniques and their applications in metallurgy. A brief survey of applications of neutron radiography as a method of non-destructive testing to some macroscopic problems in metallurgy is included. (author)

  4. The use of extinction corrections in neutron diffraction experiments

    Delapalme, A.

    1987-08-01

    Extinction can be treated through various models originating in either kinematical (intensity coupling) or dynamical (wave coupling) theories. For most crystals the situation is intermediate between these two extreme cases and extinction models are necessary to obtain precise Fourier components (structure factors) and the electronic and magnetic distribution in molecules and crystals. New models reveal new parameters and new effects of their role in the Extinction phenomena, but the phenomenological aspect of the solutions shows the difficulty to describe adequately what happens in real crystals

  5. Applications of neutron irradiation

    Ito, Yasuo

    1999-01-01

    The present state of art of applications of neutron irradiation is overviewed taking neutron activation analysis, prompt gamma-ray analysis, fission/alpha track methods, boron neutron capture therapy as examples. What is common among them is that the technologies are nearly matured for wide use by non- nuclear scientists. But the environment around research reactors is not prospective. These applications should be encouraged by incorporating in the neutron science society. (author)

  6. Neutron beams for therapy

    Kuplenikov, Eh.L.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Tsymbal, V.A.; Kandybej, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    It was given the analysis and generalization of the study results carried out during some decades in many world countries on application of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons for neutron, gamma-neutron and neutron-capture therapy. The main attention is focused on the practical application possibility of the accumulated experience for the base creation for medical research and the cancer patients effective treatment.

  7. Polarimetric neutron scattering

    Tasset, F.

    2001-01-01

    Polarimetric Neutron Scattering in introduced, both by, explaining methodological issues and the corresponding instrumental developments. After a short overview of neutron spin polarization and the neutron polarization 3d-vector a pictorial approach of the microscopic theory is used to show how a polarized beam interacts with lattice and magnetic Fourier components in a crystal. Examples are given of using Spherical Neutron Polarimetry (SNP) and the corresponding Cryopad polarimeter for the investigation of non-collinear magnetic structures. (R.P.)

  8. Reactor Neutron Sources

    Aksenov, V.L.

    1994-01-01

    The present status and the prospects for development of reactor neutron sources for neutron scattering research in the world are considered. The fields of application of neutron scattering relative to synchrotron radiation, the creation stages of reactors (steady state and pulsed) and their position in comparison with spallation neutron sources at present and in the foreseen future are discussed. (author). 15 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  9. Properties of neutron sources

    1987-03-01

    The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: white neutron sources, primarily pulsed (6 papers); fast neutron fields (5 papers); Californium-252 prompt fission neutron spectra (14 papers); monoenergetic sources and filtered beams (11 papers); 14 MeV neutron sources (10 papers); selected special application (one paper); and a general interest session (4 papers). Individual abstracts were prepared separately for the papers

  10. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-01-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10 15 -10 21 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10 20 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  11. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  12. Polarized neutron spectrometer

    Abov, Yu.G.; Novitskij, V.V.; Alfimenkov, V.P.; Galinskij, E.M.; Mareev, Yu.D.; Pikel'ner, L.B.; Chernikov, A.N.; Lason', L.; Tsulaya, V.M.; Tsulaya, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    The polarized neutron spectrometer, intended for studying the interaction of polarized neutrons with nuclei and condensed media in the area of energies from thermal up to several electron-volt, is developed at the IBR-2 reactor (JINR, Dubna). Diffraction on the Co(92%)-Fe(8%) magnetized monocrystals is used for the neutron polarization and polarization analysis. The neutron polarization within the whole energy range equals ∼ 95% [ru

  13. Isotopic neutron sources for neutron activation analysis

    Hoste, J.

    1988-06-01

    This User's Manual is an attempt to provide for teaching and training purposes, a series of well thought out demonstrative experiments in neutron activation analysis based on the utilization of an isotopic neutron source. In some cases, these ideas can be applied to solve practical analytical problems. 19 refs, figs and tabs

  14. Workshop on polarized neutron filters and polarized pulsed neutron experiments

    Itoh, Shinichi

    2004-07-01

    The workshop was held in KEK by thirty-three participants on April 26, 2004. The polarized neutron filter method was only discussed. It consists of three parts; the first part was discussed on the polarized neutron methods, the second part on the polarized neutron experiments and the third on the pulse neutron spectrometer and polarized neutron experiments. The six papers were presented such as the polarized 3 He neutron spin filter, neutron polarization by proton polarized filter, soft master and neutron scattering, polarized neutron in solid physics, polarization experiments by chopper spectroscope and neutron polarization system in superHRPD. (S.Y.)

  15. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  16. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh self powered neutron detector

    Juna, Byung Jin; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Sang Jun; Jung, Hoan Sung

    2012-01-01

    Rhodium (Rh) self powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) are widely used for on line monitoring of local neutron flux. Its signal is slower than the actual variation of neutron flux owing to a delayed β decay of the Rh activation product, but real time monitoring is possible by solving equations between the neutron reaction rate in the detector and its signal. While the measuring system is highly reliable, the accuracy depends on the method solving the equations and accuracy of the parameters in the equations. The uncertain parameters are the contribution of gamma rays to the signal, and the branching ratios of Rh 104 and Rh 104m after the neutron absorption of Rh 103. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh SPNDs has been quite successful for neutron transmutation doping (NTD) at HANARO. We revisited the initial data used for the verification of a real time monitoring system, to refine algorithm for a better solution and to check the parameters for correctness. As a result, we suggest an effective way to determine the prompt parameter

  17. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh self powered neutron detector

    Juna, Byung Jin; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Sang Jun; Jung, Hoan Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Rhodium (Rh) self powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) are widely used for on line monitoring of local neutron flux. Its signal is slower than the actual variation of neutron flux owing to a delayed {beta} decay of the Rh activation product, but real time monitoring is possible by solving equations between the neutron reaction rate in the detector and its signal. While the measuring system is highly reliable, the accuracy depends on the method solving the equations and accuracy of the parameters in the equations. The uncertain parameters are the contribution of gamma rays to the signal, and the branching ratios of Rh 104 and Rh 104m after the neutron absorption of Rh 103. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh SPNDs has been quite successful for neutron transmutation doping (NTD) at HANARO. We revisited the initial data used for the verification of a real time monitoring system, to refine algorithm for a better solution and to check the parameters for correctness. As a result, we suggest an effective way to determine the prompt parameter.

  18. Spallation neutron sources

    Fraser, J.S.; Bartholomew, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The principles and theory of spallation neutron sources are outlined and a comparison is given with other types of neutron source. A summary of the available accelerator types for spallation neutron sources and their advantages and disadvantages is presented. Suitable target materials are discussed for specific applications, and typical target assemblies shown. (U.K.)

  19. Shielded regenerative neutron detector

    Terhune, J.H.; Neissel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion chamber type neutron detector is disclosed which has a greatly extended lifespan. The detector includes a fission chamber containing a mixture of active and breeding material and a neutron shielding material. The breeding and shielding materials are selected to have similar or substantially matching neutron capture cross-sections so that their individual effects on increased detector life are mutually enhanced

  20. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    Mitchell, Stephen; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production (ship effect), (a, n) reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  1. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  2. Thermal neutron polarisation

    Satya Murthy, N.S.; Madhava Rao, L.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle for the production of polarised thermal neutrons is discussed and the choice of various crystal monochromators surveyed. Brief mention of broad-spectrum polarisers is made. The application of polarised neutrons to the study of magnetisation density distributions in magnetic crystals, the dynamic concept of polarisation, principle and use of polarisation analysis, the neutron spin-echo technique are discussed. (author)

  3. Fundamental neutron physics

    Deslattes, R.; Dombeck, T.; Greene, G.; Ramsey, N.; Rauch, H.; Werner, S.

    1984-01-01

    Fundamental physics experiments of merit can be conducted at the proposed intense neutron sources. Areas of interest include: neutron particle properties, neutron wave properties, and fundamental physics utilizing reactor produced γ-rays. Such experiments require intense, full-time utilization of a beam station for periods ranging from several months to a year or more

  4. Neutron detection and radiography

    Bollen, R.H.; Van Esch, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    An improved method of recording neutron images is described which comprises imagewise irradiating with neutrons an intensifying screen containing a gadolinium compound that fluoresces when struck by x-rays and subjecting the fluorescent light pattern resulting from the impact of the neutrons on the screen onto a photographic material. (auth)

  5. Neutron Scattering Software

    Home Page | Facilities | Reference | Software | Conferences | Announcements | Mailing Lists Neutron Scattering Banner Neutron Scattering Software A new portal for neutron scattering has just been established sets KUPLOT: data plotting and fitting software ILL/TAS: Matlab probrams for analyzing triple axis data

  6. International Neutron Radiography Newsletter

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    At the First World Conference on Neutron Radiography i t was decided to continue the "Neutron Radiography Newsletter", published previously by J.P. Barton, as the "International Neutron Radiography Newsletter" (INRNL), with J.C. Doraanus as editor. The British Journal of Non-Destructive Testing...

  7. Polarized Neutron Scattering

    Roessli, B.; Böni, P.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of polarized neutron scattering is reviewed with emphasis on applications. Many examples of the usefulness of the method in various fields of physics are given like the determination of spin density maps, measurement of complex magnetic structures with spherical neutron polarimetry, inelastic neutron scattering and separation of coherent and incoherent scattering with help of the generalized XYZ method.

  8. A neutron activation analyzer

    Westphal, G.P.; Lemmel, H.; Grass, F.; De Regge, P.P.; Burns, K.; Markowicz, A.

    2005-01-01

    Dubbed 'Analyzer' because of its simplicity, a neutron activation analysis facility for short-lived isomeric transitions is based on a low-cost rabbit system and an adaptive digital filter which are controlled by a software performing irradiation control, loss-free gamma-spectrometry, spectra evaluation, nuclide identification and calculation of concentrations in a fully automatic flow of operations. Designed for TRIGA reactors and constructed from inexpensive plastic tubing and an aluminum in-core part, the rabbit system features samples of 5 ml and 10 ml with sample separation at 150 ms and 200 ms transport time or 25 ml samples without separation at a transport time of 300 ms. By automatically adapting shaping times to pulse intervals the preloaded digital filter gives best throughput at best resolution up to input counting rates of 10 6 cps. Loss-free counting enables quantitative correction of counting losses of up to 99%. As a test of system reproducibility in sample separation geometry, K, Cl, Mn, Mg, Ca, Sc, and V have been determined in various reference materials at excellent agreement with consensus values. (author)

  9. Fully non-destructive elemental analyses of copper-alloy artefacts with neutron resonance capture between 1 eV and 10 keV

    Postma, H.; Blaauw, M.; Corvi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture resonance analysis (NRCA) using a pulsed neutron beam and the time-of-flight (ToF) technique is a new method to determine the elemental compositions of artifacts. Neutron capture by an object can be observed by detecting the prompt capture gamma-radiation. Energies of resonance peaks in the ToF spectrum are the 'fingerprints' for elements. Since it is not necessary to determine the energy of the gamma-rays with any precision, it is possible to use a detector system with high detection efficiency. It is not necessary to take parts from an object for the analysis or to clean the surface or to do other things which might damage the object. Therefore NRCA is especially of interest for studying fragile, small or valuable objects from which one does not want to, or cannot take samples, or for which cleaning of even a small part of a surface is not desirable. Knowledge of the elemental composition of artifacts might be useful for archaeological or historical studies or to check the authenticity of an artifact. Recent experiments at the GELINA facility in Geel, Belgium show that indeed NRCA is a useful way to recognize elements on the basis of the energies of resonance in the ToF spectrum. We applied NRCA to several copper-alloy artifacts. In the studied objects very little activity was induced, which also disappeared quickly. Thus resonance energies allow us to recognize elements of an object. In addition, a quantitative analysis is possible on the basis of resonance areas. In the case of our artefacts the amounts of several elements (notably Sn, As, Zn, Fe, Sb, Ag, Au) were determined as ratios to copper. For a strong resonance it is necessary to take self-shielding into account. The effect of self-shielding made it possible to determine the absolute amount of copper by comparing the areas of a weak and a strong copper resonance, and thus also absolute amounts of the other components could be determined. The method of NRCA is discussed in relation to the

  10. Refractive neutron lens

    Petrov, P.V.; Kolchevsky, N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Model of the refractive neutron lens is proposed. System of N lenses acts as one thin lens with a complex refraction index n*. The maximum number N max of individual lenses for 'thick' neutron lens is calculated. Refractive neutron lens properties (resolution, focal depth) as function of resolution factor F 0 =ρbc/μ and depth of field factor dF 0 =λF 0 =λρbc/μ are calculated. It is shown that micro resolution of the refractive neutron optics is far from the wavelength in size and its open possibilities for progress in refractive neutron optics. (authors)

  11. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  12. Activation neutron detector

    Ambardanishvili, T.S.; Kolomiitsev, M.A.; Zakharina, T.Y.; Dundua, V.J.; Chikhladze, N.V.

    1976-01-01

    An activation neutron detector made as a moulded and cured composition of a material capable of being neutron-activated is described. The material is selected from a group consisting of at least two chemical elements, a compound of at least two chemical elements and their mixture, each of the chemical elements and their mixture, each of the chemical elements being capable of interacting with neutrons to form radioactive isotopes having different radiation energies when disintegrating. The material capable of being neutron-activated is distributed throughout the volume of a polycondensation resin inert with respect to neutrons and capable of curing. 17 Claims, No Drawings

  13. High energy neutron dosimeter

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures

  14. Pulse neutron logging technique

    Bespalov, D.F.; Dylyuk, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    A new method of neutron-burst logging is proposed, residing in irradiating rocks with fast neutron bursts and registering the integrated flux burst of thermal and/or epithermal neutrons, from the moment of its initiation to that of full absorption. The obtaained value is representative of the rock properties (porosity, hydrogen content). The integrated flux in a burst of thermal and epithermal neutrons can be measured both by way of activation of a reference sample of a known chemical composition during the neutron burst and by recording the radiation of induced activity of the sample within an interval between two bursts. The proposed method features high informative value, accuracy and efficiency

  15. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, the neutron polarization analyzer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, the small-angle neutron diffractometers KWS-1/-2, the very-small-angle neutron diffractometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  16. Neutron techniques in Safeguards

    Zucker, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    An essential part of Safeguards is the ability to quantitatively and nondestructively assay those materials with special neutron-interactive properties involved in nuclear industrial or military technology. Neutron techniques have furnished most of the important ways of assaying such materials, which is no surprise since the neutronic properties are what characterizes them. The techniques employed rely on a wide selection of the many methods of neutron generation, detection, and data analysis that have been developed for neutron physics and nuclear science in general

  17. Nanosecond neutron generator

    Lobov, S.I.; Pavlovskaya, N.G.; Pukhov, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    High-voltage nanosecond neutron generator for obtaining neutrons in D-T reaction is described. Yield of 6x10 6 neutron/pulse was generated in a sealed gas-filled diode with a target on the cathode by accelerating pulse voltage of approximately 0.5 MV and length at half-height of 0.5 ns and deuterium pressure of 6x10 -2 Torr. Ways of increasing neutron yield and possibilities of creating generators of nanosecond neutron pulses with great service life are considered

  18. Principles of neutron reflection

    Felcher, G.P.

    1988-08-01

    Neutron reflection is perhaps the most developed branch of slow neutrons optics, which in itself is a direct consequence of the undulatory nature of the neutron. After reviewing the basic types of interactions (nuclear and magnetic) between neutrons and matter, the formalism is introduced to calculate the reflectivity from a sample composed of stacked flat layers and, inversely, to calculate the stacking from reflectivity measurements. Finally, a brief survey of the applications of neutron reflection is given, both in technology and in fundamental research. 32 refs., 6 figs

  19. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  20. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)