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Sample records for corrected specific activity

  1. Three-dimensional autoradiographic localization of quench-corrected glycine receptor specific activity in the mouse brain using sup 3 H-strychnine as the ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, W.F.; O' Gorman, S.; Roe, A.W. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The autoradiographic analysis of neurotransmitter receptor distribution is a powerful technique that provides extensive information on the localization of neurotransmitter systems. Computer methodologies are described for the analysis of autoradiographic material which include quench correction, 3-dimensional display, and quantification based on anatomical boundaries determined from the tissue sections. These methodologies are applied to the problem of the distribution of glycine receptors measured by 3H-strychnine binding in the mouse CNS. The most distinctive feature of this distribution is its marked caudorostral gradient. The highest densities of binding sites within this gradient were seen in somatic motor and sensory areas; high densities of binding were seen in branchial efferent and special sensory areas. Moderate levels were seen in nuclei related to visceral function. Densities within the reticular formation paralleled the overall gradient with high to moderate levels of binding. The colliculi had low and the diencephalon had very low levels of binding. No binding was seen in the cerebellum or the telencephalon with the exception of the amygdala, which had very low levels of specific binding. This distribution of glycine receptors correlates well with the known functional distribution of glycine synaptic function. These data are illustrated in 3 dimensions and discussed in terms of the significance of the analysis techniques on this type of data as well as the functional significance of the distribution of glycine receptors.

  2. Bunch mode specific rate corrections for PILATUS3 detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueb, P., E-mail: peter.trueb@dectris.com [DECTRIS Ltd, 5400 Baden (Switzerland); Dejoie, C. [ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Kobas, M. [DECTRIS Ltd, 5400 Baden (Switzerland); Pattison, P. [EPF Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Peake, D. J. [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Radicci, V. [DECTRIS Ltd, 5400 Baden (Switzerland); Sobott, B. A. [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Walko, D. A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Broennimann, C. [DECTRIS Ltd, 5400 Baden (Switzerland)

    2015-04-09

    The count rate behaviour of PILATUS3 detectors has been characterized for seven bunch modes at four different synchrotrons. The instant retrigger technology of the PILATUS3 application-specific integrated circuit is found to reduce the dependency of the required rate correction on the synchrotron bunch mode. The improvement of using bunch mode specific rate corrections based on a Monte Carlo simulation is quantified. PILATUS X-ray detectors are in operation at many synchrotron beamlines around the world. This article reports on the characterization of the new PILATUS3 detector generation at high count rates. As for all counting detectors, the measured intensities have to be corrected for the dead-time of the counting mechanism at high photon fluxes. The large number of different bunch modes at these synchrotrons as well as the wide range of detector settings presents a challenge for providing accurate corrections. To avoid the intricate measurement of the count rate behaviour for every bunch mode, a Monte Carlo simulation of the counting mechanism has been implemented, which is able to predict the corrections for arbitrary bunch modes and a wide range of detector settings. This article compares the simulated results with experimental data acquired at different synchrotrons. It is found that the usage of bunch mode specific corrections based on this simulation improves the accuracy of the measured intensities by up to 40% for high photon rates and highly structured bunch modes. For less structured bunch modes, the instant retrigger technology of PILATUS3 detectors substantially reduces the dependency of the rate correction on the bunch mode. The acquired data also demonstrate that the instant retrigger technology allows for data acquisition up to 15 million photons per second per pixel.

  3. Lmx1a is an activator of Rgs4 and Grb10 and is responsible for the correct specification of rostral and medial mdDA neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Elisa J; von Oerthel, Lars; van der Linden, Annemarie J A; Schellevis, Raymond D; Scheppink, Gerard; Holstege, Frank C P; Groot-Koerkamp, Marian J; van der Heide, Lars P; Smidt, Marten P

    2013-01-01

    The LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lmx1a is a very potent inducer of stem cells towards dopaminergic neurons. Despite several studies on the function of this gene, the exact in vivo role of Lmx1a in mesodiencephalic dopamine (mdDA) neuronal specification is still not understood. To analyse the genes functioning downstream of Lmx1a, we performed expression microarray analysis of LMX1A-overexpressing MN9D dopaminergic cells. Several interesting regulated genes were identified, based on their regulation in other previously generated expression arrays and on their expression pattern in the developing mdDA neuronal field. Post analysis through in vivo expression analysis in Lmx1a mouse mutant (dr/dr) embryos demonstrated a clear decrease in expression of the genes Grb10 and Rgs4, in and adjacent to the rostral and dorsal mdDA neuronal field and within the Lmx1a expression domain. Interestingly, the DA marker Vmat2 was significantly up-regulated as a consequence of increased LMX1A dose, and subsequent analysis on Lmx1a-mutant E14.5 and adult tissue revealed a significant decrease in Vmat2 expression in mdDA neurons. Taken together, microarray analysis of an LMX1A-overexpression cell system resulted in the identification of novel direct or indirect downstream targets of Lmx1a in mdDA neurons: Grb10, Rgs4 and Vmat2.

  4. A patient-specific scatter artifacts correction method

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Kai; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a fast and patient-specific scatter artifact correction method for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) used in image-guided interventional procedures. Due to increased irradiated volume of interest in CBCT imaging, scatter radiation has increased dramatically compared to 2D imaging, leading to a degradation of image quality. In this study, we propose a scatter artifact correction strategy using an analytical convolution-based model whose free parameters are estimated using a rough estimation of scatter profiles from the acquired cone-beam projections. It was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations with both monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray sources. The results demonstrated that the proposed method significantly reduced the scatter-induced shading artifacts and recovered CT numbers.

  5. Coloured Petri Net Refinement Specification and Correctness Proof with Coq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choppy, Christine; Mayero, Micaela; Petrucci, Laure

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we address the formalisation of symmetric nets, a subclass of coloured Petri nets, refinement in COQ. We first provide a formalisation of the net models, and of their type refinement in COQ. Then the COQ proof assistant is used to prove the refinement correctness lemma. An example adapted from a protocol example illustrates our work.

  6. NDetermin: Inferring Nondeterministic Sequential Specifications for Parallelism Correctness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    raytracer ray tracing 1900 1 0 1 9125k 8960k - - raytracer (fixed) corrected ray tracing 1900 1 0 1 9125k 8960k 0 yes montecarlo Monte Carlo...bodies of structured cobegin’s or coforeach’s.) Note that benchmarks raytracer and phylogeny both con- tain parallelism errors. Thus, we apply NDETERMIN...to both the original version of each benchmark, and a version in which the er- ror has been fixed. (For raytracer , we modify a synchronized block to

  7. Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.].......[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.]....

  8. Corrections in the gold foil activation method for determination of neutron beam density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1967-01-01

    example for a reactor beam transmitted through a 30 cm Bi filter. The effective cross section differs 0.5% from the capture cross section at 2200 m/s. For a 20 mg/cm2 Au foil the correction for beam attenuation and hardening through the foil is 0.7% and the activity correction is 1.5%.......A finite foil thickness and deviation in the cross section from the 1ν law imply corrections in the determination of neutron beam densities by means of foil activation. These corrections, which depend on the neutron velocity distribution, have been examined in general and are given in a specific...

  9. Correction: Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfateβ-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugahara Kazuyuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After the publication of the work entitled "Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfateβ-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity", by Kozlowski et al., BMC Biochemistry 2011, 12:29, we found that the legends to Figures 2 to 5 contain serious mistakes that compromise the comprehension of the work. This correction article contains the correct text of the legends to Figures 2 to 5.

  10. 77 FR 3636 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Brand-Name Specifications; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... Acquisition Regulation; Brand-Name Specifications; Correction AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD), General... Management and Budget memoranda on brand-name specifications, FAR Case 2005-037, Brand-Name...

  11. Non-specific Adaptive Reactions of Athletes: Evaluation and Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Naumova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work studies changes in non-specific adaptive reactions (NSAR of athletes who practice Wushu and Qigong and take Kladorod, a biological product made from plant material. The results of our study demonstrate the effectiveness of Kladorod as a remedy to enhance adaptive capacity with the possibility of application for training of athletes without any restrictions within the criteria of doping control.

  12. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  13. 77 FR 46948 - Respiratory Protection; Mechanical Power Presses; Scaffold Specifications; Correction and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Power Presses; Scaffold Specifications; Correction and Technical Amendment AGENCY: Occupational Safety... subpart L of its scaffold standards for construction. DATES: The effective date for the corrections and... requirements. C. Appendix A (Non-mandatory) to 29 CFR 1926, Subpart L (Scaffolds) On August 30, 1996,...

  14. Specification Search for Identifying the Correct Mean Trajectory in Polynomial Latent Growth Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-Man; Yoon, Myeongsun; Willson, Victor; Lai, Mark H. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the optimal strategy for model specification search under the latent growth modeling (LGM) framework, specifically on searching for the correct polynomial mean or average growth model when there is no a priori hypothesized model in the absence of theory. In this simulation study, the effectiveness of different starting…

  15. New frontier in regenerative medicine: site-specific gene correction in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate, Zita; Davis, Brian R; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2013-06-01

    Advances in cell and gene therapy are opening up new avenues for regenerative medicine. Because of their acquired pluripotency, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising source of autologous cells for regenerative medicine. They show unlimited self-renewal while retaining the ability, in principle, to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. Since Yamanaka and colleagues first reported the generation of hiPSCs in 2007, significant efforts have been made to understand the reprogramming process and to generate hiPSCs with potential for clinical use. On the other hand, the development of gene-editing platforms to increase homologous recombination efficiency, namely DNA nucleases (zinc finger nucleases, TAL effector nucleases, and meganucleases), is making the application of locus-specific gene therapy in human cells an achievable goal. The generation of patient-specific hiPSC, together with gene correction by homologous recombination, will potentially allow for their clinical application in the near future. In fact, reports have shown targeted gene correction through DNA-Nucleases in patient-specific hiPSCs. Various technologies have been described to reprogram patient cells and to correct these patient hiPSCs. However, no approach has been clearly more efficient and safer than the others. In addition, there are still significant challenges for the clinical application of these technologies, such as inefficient differentiation protocols, genetic instability resulting from the reprogramming process and hiPSC culture itself, the efficacy and specificity of the engineered DNA nucleases, and the overall homologous recombination efficiency. To summarize advances in the generation of gene corrected patient-specific hiPSCs, this review focuses on the available technological platforms, including their strengths and limitations regarding future therapeutic use of gene-corrected hiPSCs.

  16. Correction

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  17. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  18. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Gorelik, G., & Shackelford, T.K. (2011. Human sexual conflict from molecules to culture. Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 564–587: The authors wish to correct an omission in citation to the existing literature. In the final paragraph on p. 570, we neglected to cite Burch and Gallup (2006 [Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2006. The psychobiology of human semen. In S. M. Platek & T. K. Shackelford (Eds., Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty (pp. 141–172. New York: Cambridge University Press.]. Burch and Gallup (2006 reviewed the relevant literature on FSH and LH discussed in this paragraph, and should have been cited accordingly. In addition, Burch and Gallup (2006 should have been cited as the originators of the hypothesis regarding the role of FSH and LH in the semen of rapists. The authors apologize for this oversight.

  19. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In the article by Quintavalle et al (Quintavalle C, Anselmi CV, De Micco F, Roscigno G, Visconti G, Golia B, Focaccio A, Ricciardelli B, Perna E, Papa L, Donnarumma E, Condorelli G, Briguori C. Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2015;8:e002673. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.115.002673.), which published online September 2, 2015, and appears in the September 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed. On page 1, the institutional affiliation for Elvira Donnarumma, PhD, “SDN Foundation,” has been changed to read, “IRCCS SDN, Naples, Italy.” The institutional affiliation for Laura Papa, PhD, “Institute for Endocrinology and Experimental Oncology, National Research Council, Naples, Italy,” has been changed to read, “Institute of Genetics and Biomedical Research, Milan Unit, Milan, Italy” and “Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy.” The authors regret this error.

  20. Plate-specific gain map correction for the improvement of detective quantum efficiency in computed radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnell, Erich A.; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T. [Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering, and Physics, and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to improve the noise power spectrum (NPS), and thus the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), of computed radiography (CR) images by correcting for spatial gain variations specific to individual imaging plates. CR devices have not traditionally employed gain-map corrections, unlike the case with flat-panel detectors, because of the multiplicity of plates used with each reader. The lack of gain-map correction has limited the DQE(f) at higher exposures with CR. This current work describes a feasible solution to generating plate-specific gain maps. Methods: Ten high-exposure open field images were taken with an RQA5 spectrum, using a sixth generation CR plate suspended in air without a cassette. Image values were converted to exposure, the plates registered using fiducial dots on the plate, the ten images averaged, and then high-pass filtered to remove low frequency contributions from field inhomogeneity. A gain-map was then produced by converting all pixel values in the average into fractions with mean of one. The resultant gain-map of the plate was used to normalize subsequent single images to correct for spatial gain fluctuation. To validate performance, the normalized NPS (NNPS) for all images was calculated both with and without the gain-map correction. Variations in the quality of correction due to exposure levels, beam voltage/spectrum, CR reader used, and registration were investigated. Results: The NNPS with plate-specific gain-map correction showed improvement over the noncorrected case over the range of frequencies from 0.15 to 2.5 mm{sup -1}. At high exposure (40 mR), NNPS was 50%-90% better with gain-map correction than without. A small further improvement in NNPS was seen from carefully registering the gain-map with subsequent images using small fiducial dots, because of slight misregistration during scanning. Further improvement was seen in the NNPS from scaling the gain map about the mean to account for different beam

  1. Plate-specific gain map correction for the improvement of detective quantum efficiency in computed radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Erich A; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve the noise power spectrum (NPS), and thus the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), of computed radiography (CR) images by correcting for spatial gain variations specific to individual imaging plates. CR devices have not traditionally employed gain-map corrections, unlike the case with flat-panel detectors, because of the multiplicity of plates used with each reader. The lack of gain-map correction has limited the DQE(f) at higher exposures with CR. This current work describes a feasible solution to generating plate-specific gain maps. Ten high-exposure open field images were taken with an RQA5 spectrum, using a sixth generation CR plate suspended in air without a cassette. Image values were converted to exposure, the plates registered using fiducial dots on the plate, the ten images averaged, and then high-pass filtered to remove low frequency contributions from field inhomogeneity. A gain-map was then produced by converting all pixel values in the average into fractions with mean of one. The resultant gain-map of the plate was used to normalize subsequent single images to correct for spatial gain fluctuation. To validate performance, the normalized NPS (NNPS) for all images was calculated both with and without the gain-map correction. Variations in the quality of correction due to exposure levels, beam voltage/spectrum, CR reader used, and registration were investigated. The NNPS with plate-specific gain-map correction showed improvement over the noncorrected case over the range of frequencies from 0.15 to 2.5 mm(-1). At high exposure (40 mR), NNPS was 50%-90% better with gain-map correction than without. A small further improvement in NNPS was seen from carefully registering the gain-map with subsequent images using small fiducial dots, because of slight misregistration during scanning. Further improvement was seen in the NNPS from scaling the gain map about the mean to account for different beam spectra. This study

  2. Calculator for the correction of the experimental specific migration for comparison with the legislative limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens Højslev; Hoekstra, Eddo J.

    The EURL-NRL-FCM Taskforce on the Fourth Amendment of the Plastic Directive 2002/72/EC developed a calculator for the correction of the test results for comparison with the specific migration limit (SML). The calculator calculates the maximum acceptable specific migration under the given...... experimental conditions in food or food stimulant and indicates whether the test result is in compliance with the legislation. This calculator includes the Fat Reduction Factor, the simulant D Reduction Factor and the factor of the difference in surface-to-volume ratio between test and real food contact....

  3. MODEL FOR THE CORRECTION OF THE SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF BIODIESEL FROM RESIDUAL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Aparecida Rosa da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a important fuel with economic benefits, social and environmental. The production cost of the biodiesel can be significantly lowered if the raw material is replaced by a alternative material as residual oil. In this study, the variation of specific gravity with temperature increase for diesel and biodiesel from residual oil obtained by homogeneous basic catalysis. All properties analyzed for biodiesel are within specification Brazil. The determination of the correction algorithm for the specific gravity function of temperature is also presented, and the slope of the line to diesel fuel, methylic biodiesel (BMR and ethylic biodiesel (BER from residual oil were respectively the values -0.7089, -0.7290 and -0.7277. This demonstrates the existence of difference of the model when compared chemically different fuels, like diesel and biodiesel from different sources, indicating the importance of determining the specific algorithm for the operations of conversion of volume to the reference temperature.

  4. IONOSPHERIC CORRECTION METHOD FOR PRECISE POSITIONING WITH GPS ACTIVE NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOShan; CHENWu; HUCong-wei; CHENYong-qi; DINGXiao-li

    2005-01-01

    The ionospheric delay error is a major error source which degrades the positioning accuracy in network real time kinematic (RTK) positioning over a long distance. Different approaches are proposed to estimate GPS errors based on GPS reference network, such as virtual reference stations (VRSs) and network corrections. A new method is used to model the ionospheric total electronic content (TEC) distribution in space. Unlike most ionospheric models, only the ionospheric delays along the satellite tracks are modelled. Therefore, the models are of high precise resolution of the ionospheric TEC distribution in both spatial and temporal scales. A new algorithm is used to solve the equation singularity problem. Experiments demonstrate that the new ionospheric correction method can be used to describe the ionospheric variation at a low latitude area where ionospheric activities are strong. Also, the accuracy of the ionospheric model is enough to support centimeter-level positioning within the network. As ionospheric models are satellite-based models (each satellite has one model), the model parameters can be easily incorporated with the existing differential GPS Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Service (DGPS RTCM) 104 format.

  5. Travel time source-specific station corrections related to lithospheric structures in the Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, A.; Materni, V.; Console, R.; Chiappini, S.; Chiappini, M.

    2017-01-01

    We compare the locations obtained from arrival times collected by the International Seismological Centre from a network of regional and teleseismic stations for a cluster of Italian earthquakes with the locations of the same events obtained by the dense national seismic network operated by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. We find mislocations on the order of 15 km for epicentral coordinates and on the order of 25 km for depths calculated from the regional and teleseismic network and using the standard IASP91 travel times. These mislocations are generally larger than the sizes of the respective error ellipse semi-axes. We then show that systematic shifts of hypocentral coordinates can be substantially reduced by applying source-specific station corrections. Moreover, we find that the size of error ellipses characterizing the teleseismic locations is significantly reduced by the application of such corrections. Our travel time corrections are compared and found fairly consistent with information available in the literature on tomographic studies on the crust and upper mantle in the European-Mediterranean region.

  6. Detector to detector corrections: a comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azangwe, Godfrey; Grochowska, Paulina; Georg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially u...... measurements, the authors recommend the use of detectors that require relatively little correction, such as unshielded diodes, diamond detectors or microchambers, and solid state detectors such as alanine, TLD, Al2O3:C, or scintillators.......Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially...... useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm2 to 4.2 × 4.2 cm2 and the measurements were extended to larger fields...

  7. Generation of healthy mice from gene-corrected disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Wu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the murine model of tyrosinemia type 1 (fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase [FAH] deficiency; FAH⁻/⁻ mice as a paradigm for orphan disorders, such as hereditary metabolic liver diseases, we evaluated fibroblast-derived FAH⁻/⁻-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells as targets for gene correction in combination with the tetraploid embryo complementation method. First, after characterizing the FAH⁻/⁻ iPS cell lines, we aggregated FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cells with tetraploid embryos and obtained entirely FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cell-derived mice that were viable and exhibited the phenotype of the founding FAH⁻/⁻ mice. Then, we transduced FAH cDNA into the FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cells using a third-generation lentiviral vector to generate gene-corrected iPS cells. We could not detect any chromosomal alterations in these cells by high-resolution array CGH analysis, and after their aggregation with tetraploid embryos, we obtained fully iPS cell-derived healthy mice with an astonishing high efficiency for full-term development of up to 63.3%. The gene correction was validated functionally by the long-term survival and expansion of FAH-positive cells of these mice after withdrawal of the rescuing drug NTBC (2-(2-nitro-4-fluoromethylbenzoyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that both a liver-specific promoter (transthyretin, TTR-driven FAH transgene and a strong viral promoter (from spleen focus-forming virus, SFFV-driven FAH transgene rescued the FAH-deficiency phenotypes in the mice derived from the respective gene-corrected iPS cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that a lentiviral gene repair strategy does not abrogate the full pluripotent potential of fibroblast-derived iPS cells, and genetic manipulation of iPS cells in combination with tetraploid embryo aggregation provides a practical and rapid approach to evaluate the efficacy of gene correction of human diseases in mouse models.

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  9. Clearing the waters: Evaluating the need for site-specific field fluorescence corrections based on turbidity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceno, John F.; Shanley, James B.; Downing, Bryan D.; Pellerin, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    In situ fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM) measurements have gained increasing popularity as a proxy for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in streams. One challenge to accurate fDOM measurements in many streams is light attenuation due to suspended particles. Downing et al. (2012) evaluated the need for corrections to compensate for particle interference on fDOM measurements using a single sediment standard in a laboratory study. The application of those results to a large river improved unfiltered field fDOM accuracy. We tested the same correction equation in a headwater tropical stream and found that it overcompensated fDOM when turbidity exceeded ∼300 formazin nephelometric units (FNU). Therefore, we developed a site-specific, field-based fDOM correction equation through paired in situ fDOM measurements of filtered and unfiltered streamwater. The site-specific correction increased fDOM accuracy up to a turbidity as high as 700 FNU, the maximum observed in this study. The difference in performance between the laboratory-based correction equation of Downing et al. (2012) and our site-specific, field-based correction equation likely arises from differences in particle size distribution between the sediment standard used in the lab (silt) and that observed in our study (fine to medium sand), particularly during high flows. Therefore, a particle interference correction equation based on a single sediment type may not be ideal when field sediment size is significantly different. Given that field fDOM corrections for particle interference under turbid conditions are a critical component in generating accurate DOC estimates, we describe a way to develop site-specific corrections.

  10. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, D.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Brzezinski, M.A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Marine Biotechnology Center

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  11. An Undergraduate Laboratory Activity Demonstrating Bacteriophage Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Allen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students’ use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50. Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01 and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002. At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51.

  12. Effects of Degree of Surgical Correction for Flatfoot Deformity in Patient-Specific Computational Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratley, E M; Matheis, E A; Hayes, C W; Adelaar, R S; Wayne, J S

    2015-08-01

    A cohort of adult acquired flatfoot deformity rigid-body models was developed to investigate the effects of isolated tendon transfer with successive levels of medializing calcaneal osteotomy (MCO). Following IRB approval, six diagnosed flatfoot sufferers were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their scans used to derive patient-specific models. Single-leg stance was modeled, constrained solely through physiologic joint contact, passive soft-tissue tension, extrinsic muscle force, body weight, and without assumptions of idealized mechanical joints. Surgical effect was quantified using simulated mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) X-rays, pedobarography, soft-tissue strains, and joint contact force. Radiographic changes varied across states with the largest average improvements for the tendon transfer (TT) + 10 mm MCO state evidenced through ML and AP talo-1st metatarsal angles. Interestingly, 12 of 14 measures showed increased deformity following TT-only, though all increases disappeared with inclusion of MCO. Plantar force distributions showed medial forefoot offloading concomitant with increases laterally such that the most corrected state had 9.0% greater lateral load. Predicted alterations in spring, deltoid, and plantar fascia soft-tissue strain agreed with prior cadaveric and computational works suggesting decreased strain medially with successive surgical repair. Finally, joint contact force demonstrated consistent medial offloading concomitant with variable increases laterally. Rigid-body modeling thus offers novel advantages for the investigation of foot/ankle biomechanics not easily measured in vivo.

  13. Biologic activity of digoxin-specific antisera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J F; Butler, V P

    1972-03-01

    Digoxin-specific antibodies are capable of removing essentially all intracellular digoxin from rat renal cortical slices or from human erythrocytes. In removing digoxin from erythrocytes, these antibodies are capable of reversing an effect of the drug on cellular potassium transport. This study provides direct evidence that antibodies are capable of removing, and thereby reversing the biological effect of, physiologically active low molecular weight substances after they have been taken up by mammalian cells. This biologic property of digoxin-specific antibodies suggests that autidigoxin sera may prove useful in the reversal of digoxin toxicity. Rapid and essentially quantitative removal of digoxin from red cells by antibody is not accompanied by an immediate restoration of patassium influx to normal levels. Identification of the mechanism of this phenomenon may provide useful information concerning the mode of action not only of digoxin, but also of the cation transport system of human erythrocytes.

  14. Perturbative universal state-selective correction for state-specific multi-reference coupled cluster methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Jiri; Banik, Subrata; Kowalski, Karol; Pittner, Jiří

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we report an extension of our previous development of the universal state-selective (USS) multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) formalism. It was shown [Brabec et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 124102 (2012)] and [Banik et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 114106 (2015)] that the USS(2) approach significantly improves the accuracy of Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee MRCC formulations, however, the numerical and storage costs associated with calculating highly excited intermediates pose a significant challenge, which can restrict the applicability of the USS(2) method. Therefore, we introduce a perturbative variant of the USS(2) approach (USS(pt)), which substantially reduces numerical overhead of the full USS(2) correction while preserving its accuracy. Since the new USS(pt) implementation calculates the triple and quadruple projections in on-the-fly manner, the memory bottleneck associated with the need of storing expensive recursive intermediates is entirely eliminated. On the example of several benchmark systems, we demonstrate accuracies of USS(pt) and USS(2) approaches and their efficiency in describing quasidegenerate electronic states. It is also shown that the USS(pt) method significantly alleviates problems associated with the lack of invariance of MRCC theories upon the rotation of active orbitals.

  15. Correction: Expected values for pedometer-determined physical activity in older populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Teresa L

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Correction to Tudor-Locke C, Hart TL, Washington TL: Expected values for pedometer-determined physical activity in older populations. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2009, 6:59

  16. Specific classification of financial analysis of enterprise activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synkevych Nadiia I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that one can find a big variety of classifications of types of financial analysis of enterprise activity, which differ with their approach to classification and a number of classification features and their content, in modern scientific literature, their complex comparison and analysis of existing classification have not been done. This explains urgency of this study. The article studies classification of types of financial analysis of scientists and presents own approach to this problem. By the results of analysis the article improves and builds up a specific classification of financial analysis of enterprise activity and offers classification by the following features: objects, subjects, goals of study, automation level, time period of the analytical base, scope of study, organisation system, classification features of the subject, spatial belonging, sufficiency, information sources, periodicity, criterial base, method of data selection for analysis and time direction. All types of financial analysis significantly differ with their inherent properties and parameters depending on the goals of financial analysis. The developed specific classification provides subjects of financial analysis of enterprise activity with a possibility to identify a specific type of financial analysis, which would correctly meet the set goals.

  17. Perturbative universal state-selective correction for state-specific multi-reference coupled cluster methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brabec, Jiri; Banik, Subrata; Kowalski, Karol; Pittner, Jiří

    2016-10-28

    The implementation details of the universal state-selective (USS) multi-reference coupled cluster (MRCC) formalism with singles and doubles (USS(2)) are discussed on the example of several benchmark systems. We demonstrate that the USS(2) formalism is capable of improving accuracies of state specific multi-reference coupled-cluster (MRCC) methods based on the Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee’s sufficiency conditions. Additionally, it is shown that the USS(2) approach significantly alleviates problems associated with the lack of invariance of MRCC theories upon the rotation of active orbitals. We also discuss the perturbative USS(2) formulations that significantly reduce numerical overhead of the full USS(2) method.

  18. Redrawing the US Obesity Landscape: Bias-Corrected Estimates of State-Specific Adult Obesity Prevalence

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Zachary J.; Long, Michael W.; Resch, Stephen C.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Cradock, Angie L.; Catherine Giles; Amber Hsiao; Y Claire Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background: State-level estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) underestimate the obesity epidemic because they use self-reported height and weight. We describe a novel bias-correction method and produce corrected state-level estimates of obesity and severe obesity. Methods: Using non-parametric statistical matching, we adjusted self-reported data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) 2013 (n = 386,795) using measured data from the National He...

  19. EFFICACY OF POSTURAL CORRECTION SUIT ON GAIT PARAMETERS AND EXECUTIVE MOBILITY ACTIVITIES IN DIPLEGIC CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Ali Elshafey

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spastic diplegic children walk with abnormal gait pattern, suit therapy used for treatment and rehabilitation of diplegic children as it improved gross motor development and corrected abnormal posture via its elastic strapping system, but there was no suit designed especially for postural correction. Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of the postural correction suit on gait parameters and executive mobility activities in diplegic ...

  20. Detector to detector corrections: A comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azangwe, Godfrey, E-mail: g.azangwe@iaea.org; Grochowska, Paulina; Izewska, Joanna; Meghzifene, Ahmed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Lechner, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria and Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Andersen, Claus E.; Beierholm, Anders R.; Helt-Hansen, Jakob [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukumura, Akifumi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Yajima, Kaori [Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine, 7-16, Nihonbashikodenmacho, chuou-ku, Tokyo 103-0001 (Japan); Gouldstone, Clare; Sharpe, Peter [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Medical Physics Department, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm{sup 2} to 4.2 × 4.2 cm{sup 2} and the measurements were extended to larger fields of up to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. Measurements were performed at 5 cm depth, in a 6 MV photon beam. Detectors used included alanine, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), stereotactic diode, electron diode, photon diode, radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPLDs), radioluminescence detector based on carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm{sup 3} to 0.3 cm{sup 3}). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios determined from alanine to derive a detector correction factors that account for beam perturbation related to nonwater equivalence of the detector materials. Results: For the detectors used in this study, volume averaging corrections ranged from unity for the smallest detectors such as the diodes, 1.148 for the 0.14 cm{sup 3} air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: The results demonstrate

  1. Analysis of surface error correction capability of 1.2m active support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu; Fan, Bin; Li, Chaoqiang; Liu, Haitao

    2016-10-01

    The surface error correction ability is one of the important indicators to measure the performance of the active support system. In this paper, the correction force algorithm for the active support system of 1.2m thin meniscus mirror is introduced. Based on this algorithm, a simulation analysis is made. The simulation results show that the 1.2m active support system has excellent correction ability for Zernike polynomials term 4, 5, 6, 10 and 11, and has a good effect on the Zernike polynomials term 7 and 8.

  2. 78 FR 35318 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Corrections-Specific Resources for Extended Stakeholder...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... research. In addition, expertise in some aspect of media production (Web, mobile, broadcast, social media...) describing or explaining concepts in corrections, (3) 26 weeks of bi-weekly media (such as audio, photo... realistic, does it provide a sufficient cost detail/narrative, and does it represent good value relative...

  3. 78 FR 39968 - Flight Data Recorder Airplane Parameter Specification Omissions and Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 91, 121 and 125 RIN 2120-AK27 Flight Data Recorder... for flight data recorders by correcting errors in recording rates in three different appendices. These... when the applicable flight data recorder parameter requirements were adopted, but which have...

  4. Data correction for seven activity trackers based on regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalibi, Vafa; Honko, Harri; Christophe, Francois; Viik, Jari

    2015-08-01

    Using an activity tracker for measuring activity-related parameters, e.g. steps and energy expenditure (EE), can be very helpful in assisting a person's fitness improvement. Unlike the measuring of number of steps, an accurate EE estimation requires additional personal information as well as accurate velocity of movement, which is hard to achieve due to inaccuracy of sensors. In this paper, we have evaluated regression-based models to improve the precision for both steps and EE estimation. For this purpose, data of seven activity trackers and two reference devices was collected from 20 young adult volunteers wearing all devices at once in three different tests, namely 60-minute office work, 6-hour overall activity and 60-minute walking. Reference data is used to create regression models for each device and relative percentage errors of adjusted values are then statistically compared to that of original values. The effectiveness of regression models are determined based on the result of a statistical test. During a walking period, EE measurement was improved in all devices. The step measurement was also improved in five of them. The results show that improvement of EE estimation is possible only with low-cost implementation of fitting model over the collected data e.g. in the app or in corresponding service back-end.

  5. EFFICACY OF POSTURAL CORRECTION SUIT ON GAIT PARAMETERS AND EXECUTIVE MOBILITY ACTIVITIES IN DIPLEGIC CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Elshafey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spastic diplegic children walk with abnormal gait pattern, suit therapy used for treatment and rehabilitation of diplegic children as it improved gross motor development and corrected abnormal posture via its elastic strapping system, but there was no suit designed especially for postural correction. Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of the postural correction suit on gait parameters and executive mobility activities in diplegic children. Materials and methods: Thirty ambulant spastic diplegic children, their age ranges from four to six years old participated in this study. They were randomly divided into two matched groups (control and study. The control group received a selected postural correction program includes, stretching exercises, strengthening exercises, balance exercises and posture and gait correction exercises, while the study group received the same selected postural correction program with the postural correction suit. All children received the treatment for two hours, three times weekly for three successive months. Kinematic gait parameter (hip, knee, and ankle joints angular displacement during mid stance phase were evaluated by 3D gait analysis. Executive mobility activities at home were evaluated by MobQues28. Results: There was a significant improvement in all measured variables for both groups in favor of the study group. Conclusion: The postural correction suit through its elastic strapping system allows the child’s body to be aligned as close to normal as possible. This restoration of the posture and proper function of postural muscles allowed the patients to learn proper patterns of movement thus improving gait patterns and excutive mobility activities in diplegic children. Brief summary: postural correction suit used to treat crouch gait pattern of spastic diplegic children, kinematic gait parameters and executive nobilities activities were measured for both groups

  6. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Ruber Internacional, Madrid 28034 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782, Spain and Laboratorio de Radiofisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middx TW11 OLW (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782, Spain and Laboratorio de Radiofisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between

  7. The effect of postural correction on muscle activation amplitudes recorded from the cervicobrachial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Linda

    2005-12-01

    In clinical practice, postural correction is a common treatment approach for individuals with neck and shoulder pain. As chronic static muscle use is thought to be associated with the onset of some neck and shoulder pain syndromes, it is important to understand the impact a postural correction program might have on muscle activation amplitudes in the neck and shoulder regions. Normalized surface electromyographic data were recorded from the levator scapulae, upper trapezius, supraspinatus, posterior deltoid, masseter, rhomboid major, cervical erector spinae, and sternocleidomastoid muscles of the dominant side of each of eighteen healthy subjects. Subjects performed five repetitions of each of four seated typing postures (habitual, corrected, head-forward and slouched) and four standing postures (habitual, corrected, and head-forward and slouched). Repeated-measures analysis of variance models (alpha=0.05) revealed that in sitting postural correction tended to decreased the level of muscle activation required in all muscles studied during seated computer work, however this finding was not statistically significant. Corrected posture in sitting did, however produce a statistically significant reduction in muscle activity compared to forward head posture. Corrected posture in standing required more muscle activity than habitual or forward head posture in the majority of cervicobrachial and jaw muscles, suggesting that a graduated approach to postural correction exercises might be required in order to train the muscles to appropriately withstand the requirements of the task. A surprising finding was that muscle activity levels and postural changes had the largest impact on the masseter muscle, which demonstrated activation levels in the order of 20% maximum voluntary electrical activation.

  8. Suppressive effects of antigens on the activity of specific activated lymphocytes: A test to define the specificity of activated lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jun; PAN Sheng-jun; CAI Zhen-jie; GUAN De-lin; LIU Xiao-cheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective:With the regular mixed lymphocytes culture (MLC) to detect the allograft rejection, the reactivity of the activated lymphocytes (primed lymphocytes) of a recipient shows sometimes increase and sometimes decrease against the antigens from the donor, which is inconsistent with the clinical results. In order to establish a convenient method for testing the specificity of the activated lymphocytes in vitro, so as to know the rejection occurred or not by testing the existence of the specific activated lymphocytes against donor's HLA antigens in the recipient's peripheral blood. Methods: Anti-IL-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (anti-IL-2 N-mAb) and immunosuppressors were introduced in this test system in the presence of specific stimulators and activated lymphocytes. Results: When the activated lymphocytes were chosen from the one-way MLC 4 d to undergo re-stimulation by specific stimulators, the activity of activated lymphocytes in the treatment group was suppressed significantly compared with that in the control group. The result of this test method is consistent with the biopsy in the clinical diagnosis of rejection.Conclusion :It suggests that the activated lymphocytes can be inactivated by specific antigens in certain conditions. This can be a useful tool to define the specificity of the activated lymphocytes.

  9. Simulation of ionospheric corrections regarding of solar activity on GNSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, S.; Engler, E. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Neustrelitz (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Future use of satellite navigation systems in transportation, especially in aviation and shipping, will make great demands on precision and integrity of existing new systems. As a first step in the direction of a GNSS, the US, Japan and Europe are building up the GPS augmentation systems WAAS, MSAS and EGNOS to improve the current situation in navigation and positioning. The improvement of existing as well as the development of new systems needs suitable simulation tools for design and validation. In this context the projects NavSim and SatNav SIMplus have to be seen. They are parts of the cooperation agreements between DLR (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt) and DSS (Daymler Chrysler Aerospace, Dornier Satellitensystem GmbH). Both projects complement on another on the way to establish and end-to-end software simulator for navigation systems. Here we present some preliminary simulations based on the ionospheric module of the NavSim simulator taking into account the situation of high solar activity in the years 2000-2001. (orig.)

  10. In situ beamline analysis and correction of active optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon; Sawhney, Kawal

    2012-11-01

    At the Diamond Light Source, pencil-beam measurements have enabled long-wavelength slope errors on X-ray mirror surfaces to be examined under ultra-high vacuum and beamline mounting without the need to remove the mirror from the beamline. For an active mirror an automated procedure has been implemented to calculate the actuator settings that optimize its figure. More recently, this in situ pencil-beam method has been applied to additional uses for which ex situ measurements would be inconvenient or simply impossible. First, it has been used to check the stability of the slope errors of several bimorph mirrors at intervals of several weeks or months. Then, it also proved useful for the adjustment of bender and sag compensation actuators on mechanically bent mirrors. Fits to the bending of ideal beams have been performed on the slope errors of a mechanically bent mirror in order to distinguish curvatures introduced by the bending actuators from gravitational distortion. Application of the optimization procedure to another mechanically bent mirror led to an improvement of its sag compensation mechanism.

  11. Episodic outbreaks bias estimates of age-specific force of infection: a corrected method using measles as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, M J; Djibo, A; Grais, R F; Grenfell, B T; Bjørnstad, O N

    2010-01-01

    Understanding age-specific differences in infection rates can be important in predicting the magnitude of and mortality in outbreaks and targeting age groups for vaccination programmes. Standard methods to estimate age-specific rates assume that the age-specific force of infection is constant in time. However, this assumption may easily be violated in the face of a highly variable outbreak history, as recently observed for acute immunizing infections like measles, in strongly seasonal settings. Here we investigate the biases that result from ignoring such fluctuations in incidence and present a correction based on the epidemic history. We apply the method to data from a measles outbreak in Niamey, Niger and show that, despite a bimodal age distribution of cases, the estimated age-specific force of infection is unimodal and concentrated in young children (<5 years) consistent with previous analyses of age-specific rates in the region.

  12. Corrective Osteotomy for Malunited Diaphyseal Forearm Fractures Using Preoperative 3-Dimensional Planning and Patient-Specific Surgical Guides and Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Ann-Maria; Impelmans, Bianca; Bertrand, Veronique; Van Haver, Annemieke; Verstreken, Frederik

    2017-07-11

    Three-dimensional planning based on computed tomography images of the malunited and the mirrored contralateral forearm allows preoperative simulations of corrective osteotomies, the fabrication of patient-specific osteotomy guides, and custom-made 3-dimensional printed titanium plates. This study aims to assess the precision and clinical outcome of this technique. This was a prospective pilot study with 5 consecutive patients. The mean age at initial injury was 11 years (range, 4-16 years), and the mean interval from the time of injury to the time of corrective surgery was 32 months (range, 7-107 months). Patient-specific osteotomy guides and custom-made plates were used for multiplanar corrective osteotomies of both forearm bones at the distal level in 1 patient and at the middle-third level in 4 patients. Patients were assessed before and after surgery after a mean follow-up of 42 months (range, 29-51 months). The mean planned angular corrections of the ulna and radius before surgery were 9.9° and 10.0°, respectively. The mean postoperative corrections obtained were 10.1° and 10.8° with corresponding mean errors in correction of 1.8° (range, 0.3°-5.2°) for the ulna and 1.4° (range, 0.2°-3.3°) for the radius. Forearm supination improved significantly from 47° (range, 25°-75°) before surgery to 89° (range, 85°-90°) at final review. Forearm pronation improved from 68° (range, 45°-84°) to 87° (range, 82°-90°). In addition, there was a statistically significant improvement in pain and grip strength. This study demonstrates that 3-dimensional planned patient-specific guides and implants allow the surgeon to perform precise corrective osteotomies of complex multiplanar forearm deformities with satisfactory preliminary results. Therapeutic V. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Splicing-correcting therapeutic approaches for retinal dystrophies: where endogenous gene regulation and specificity matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Niccolò; Casarosa, Simona; Denti, Michela A

    2014-05-27

    Splicing is an important and highly regulated step in gene expression. The ability to modulate it can offer a therapeutic option for many genetic disorders. Antisense-mediated splicing-correction approaches have recently been successfully exploited for some genetic diseases, and are currently demonstrating safety and efficacy in different clinical trials. Their application for the treatment of retinal dystrophies could potentially solve a vast panel of cases, as illustrated by the abundance of mutations that could be targeted and the versatility of the technique. In this review, we will give an insight of the different therapeutic strategies, focusing on the current status of their application for retinal dystrophies.

  14. Passive and active mechanisms of correction of thoracic idiopathic scoliosis with a rigid brace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwicki, Tomasz; Cheneau, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary bracing developed numerous novel technical solutions to most of main aspects of the correction of structural progressive idiopathic scoliosis. This paper presents a short review on principal biomechanical rules for the three dimensional scoliosis correction. Apart from the tissue transfer, which is a known passive mechanism of rigid bracing, the other passive mechanisms are described, containing the "cherry stone" distraction effect, the thoracic derotation and the bending. A demanding technical construction of the orthosis enables active mechanisms to develop: the corrective factor of the vertebral growth, hypercorrection-oriented trunk movements and respiration, as well as the anti-gravitational mechanism, by which postural reflexes maintain the curve correction, proximally and distally out of the limits of the brace. We believe that systematic investigations unfolded in the area of neurophysiological aspects of postural control of the spinal balance will continuously improve the fascinating capabilities of the active scoliosis autocorrrection assisted by the brace.

  15. Human task-specific somatosensory activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, M D; Yoshii, F; Vibulsresth, S; Chang, J Y; Duara, R; Barker, W W; Boothe, T E

    1987-08-01

    We used positron emission tomography to study normal patterns of local cortical metabolic activation induced by somatosensory stimuli. Palpation and sorting of mah-jongg tiles by textured design increased local glucose metabolic rate (lCMRgl), by 18% on average, in contralateral somatosensory cortex. A graphesthesia task gave a similar result. In contrast, vigorous vibrotactile stimulation of fingers, face, or knee did not produce a consistent focus of activation. Our results indicate that lCMRgl activation is best achieved by somatosensory tasks requiring an active perceptual effort.

  16. In situ genetic correction of F8 intron 22 inversion in hemophilia A patient-specific iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Hu, Zhiqing; Li, Zhuo; Pang, Jialun; Feng, Mai; Hu, Xuyun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin-Peng, Siyuan; Liu, Bo; Chen, Fangping; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2016-01-08

    Nearly half of severe Hemophilia A (HA) cases are caused by F8 intron 22 inversion (Inv22). This 0.6-Mb inversion splits the 186-kb F8 into two parts with opposite transcription directions. The inverted 5' part (141 kb) preserves the first 22 exons that are driven by the intrinsic F8 promoter, leading to a truncated F8 transcript due to the lack of the last 627 bp coding sequence of exons 23-26. Here we describe an in situ genetic correction of Inv22 in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). By using TALENs, the 627 bp sequence plus a polyA signal was precisely targeted at the junction of exon 22 and intron 22 via homologous recombination (HR) with high targeting efficiencies of 62.5% and 52.9%. The gene-corrected iPSCs retained a normal karyotype following removal of drug selection cassette using a Cre-LoxP system. Importantly, both F8 transcription and FVIII secretion were rescued in the candidate cell types for HA gene therapy including endothelial cells (ECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the gene-corrected iPSCs. This is the first report of an efficient in situ genetic correction of the large inversion mutation using a strategy of targeted gene addition.

  17. A correction factor to f-chart predictions of active solar fraction in active-passive heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B. L.; Beckman, W. A.; Duffie, J. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Klein, S. A.

    1983-11-01

    The extent to which a passive system degrades the performance of an active solar space heating system was investigated, and a correction factor to account for these interactions was developed. The transient system simulation program TRNSYS is used to simulate the hour-by-hour performance of combined active-passive (hybrid) space heating systems in order to compare the active system performance with simplified design method predictions. The TRNSYS simulations were compared to results obtained using the simplified design calculations of the f-Chart method. Comparisons of TRNSYS and f-Chart were used to establish the accuracy of the f-Charts for active systems. A correlation was then developed to correct the monthly loads input into the f-Chart method to account for controller deadbands in both hybrid and active only buildings. A general correction factor was generated to be applied to the f-Chart method to produce more accurate and useful results for hybrid systems.

  18. PAIN IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: SPECIFIC FEATURES OF ITS DEVELOPMENT AND METHODS OF CORRECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The pain syndrome holds a central position in the clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Articular inflammation is an essential, but not the only, factor that determines the occurrence of pain. Extraarticular soft tissue pathology can play an important role in the formation of pain perceptions in RA. The pain that increases on movement with involvement of affected structures, as well as local tenderness on palpation and dysfunction of an altered segment are the major clinical manifestations of extraarticular soft tissue involvement in RA. Swelling in the area of appropriate tendons and synovial bursae can be seen when superficially located anatomic formations are involved. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography permit more accurate determination of the site and pattern of an involvement. The pain and functional impairments associated with extraarticular soft tissue pathology determine a need for additional therapy that can correct the existing disorders and improve the quality of life in patients. The major components of this treatment are sparing routine and systemic and local drug therapy. Diclofenac sodium is one of the most universal agents that allow simultaneous monitoring of various pathogenetic mechanisms of the disease. Local glucocorticoids may be used if the sparing routine and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs fail to control the pain syndrome effectively.

  19. The effect of a scapular postural correction strategy on trapezius activity in patients with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Sally; Jull, Gwendolen; O'Leary, Shaun; Johnston, Venerina

    2010-12-01

    Extensive computer use amongst office workers has lead to an increase in work-related neck pain. Aberrant activity within the three portions of the trapezius muscle and associated changes in scapular posture have been identified as potential contributing factors. This study compared the activity (surface electromyography) of the three portions of the trapezius in healthy controls (n = 20) to a neck pain group with poor scapular posture (n = 18) during the performance of a functional typing task. A scapular postural correction strategy was used to correct scapular orientation in the neck pain group and electromyographic recordings were repeated. During the typing task, the neck pain group generated greater activity in the middle trapezius (MT) (p = 0.02) and less activity in the lower trapezius (LT) (p = 0.03) than the control group. Following correction of the scapula, activity recorded by the neck pain group was similar to the control group for the middle and lower portions (p = 0.09; p = 0.91). These findings indicate that a scapular postural correction exercise may be effective in altering the distribution of activity in the trapezius to better reflect that displayed by healthy individuals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 76 FR 59304 - 2011-2012 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... for those activities, and amended certain regulations on other refuges that pertain to migratory game bird hunting, upland game hunting, big game hunting, and sport fishing for the 2011-2012 season... National Wildlife Refuge in the State of Texas, which printed at page 56086. Amendment 30f. reads, in part...

  1. The Specific Features of the Pathogenesis and Correction of Critical Conditions in Obstetric Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Podolsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the research areas determining the pathogenesis and correction of critical conditions in obstetric care in the past 15 years on the basis of the dissertations made at the V. A. Negovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology. Subjects and methods. Nine hundred and twenty-nine pregnant women, parturients, and puerperas were examined; the latter were allocated to comparison groups in terms of age, weight, comorbidity, performed intensive therapy and underwent both retrospective and prospective analysis from 1981 to 2010. The comparison group comprised 44 nonobstetric patients while examining multiple organ dysfunction (MOD in the purperas. The latter with massive blood loss were separately identified when evaluating the impaired oxygen status in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and MOD. According to the pathology and indicators under study, the puerperas with MOD were examined in a few steps (2 to 7. Water sectoral disorders were detected in three steps: on days 1, 3, and 5; these were identified in four steps in case of eclamptic coma (EC, regional anesthesia, and impaired oxygen status. Results. The findings are suggestive of significant impairments in central hemodynamics (CHD in the severe forms of gestosis, which are caused by reductions in cardiac index and circulating blood volume, the basis for these is hypovolemia. Dyshidrosis appears as an increased extracellular sector mainly due to interstitial hyperhydration. The low values of arterial blood oxygen, its delivery and uptake, oxygen extract coefficient and the high value of oxygen debt (OD confirmed blood shunting or circulatory centralization, which was indicative of visceral hypoxia. Determination of the level of cerebral blood flow (CBF in puerperas with coma showed its diminution due to reduced blood flow in the cortical structures. Regional anesthesia in complicated pregnancy and delivery stabilized CHD, dropped the level of

  2. Activity Theory in Spanish Mixed Classrooms: Exploring Corrective Feedback as an Artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín-Rivera, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This study draws upon activity theory to better understand the implications of corrective feedback (CF) as an artifact on (1) the coconstruction of knowledge and (2) the action-oriented decisions of 10 mixed pairs comprising a foreign language learner (FLL) and a heritage language learner (HLL) of Spanish. To this end, the dyads were divided into…

  3. Low Capacitive Inductors for Fast Switching Devices in Active Power Factor Correction Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Petersen, Lars Press; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines different winding strategies for reduced capacitance inductors in active power factor correction circuits (PFC). The effect of the parasitic capacitance is analyzed from an electro magnetic compatibility (EMI) and efficiency point of views. The purpose of this work is to inves...

  4. Pile-up correction method for fission work with active targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroux, B.; Caitucoli, F.; Audouard, P.; Asghar, M.; Barreau, G.; Doan, T.P.; Sicre, A. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33 - Gradignan (France))

    1983-02-15

    A method which forms a part of a multiparametric set-up for fission work on very ..cap alpha..-particle active fissile targets is presented here. It helps to identify a piled-up fission event and to correct off-line for the amount of pile-up present. Some results are presented for the spontaneous fission of /sup 244/Cm.

  5. Aberration-corrected imaging of active sites on industrial catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Chang, L-Y; Hetherington, CJD

    2007-01-01

    Picture perfect: Information about the local topologies of active sites on commercial nanoparticles can be gained with atomic resolution through spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A powder of Pt nanoparticles on carbon black was examined with two advanced TEM t...

  6. Aberration-corrected imaging of active sites on industrial catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Chang, L-Y; Hetherington, CJD;

    2007-01-01

    Picture perfect: Information about the local topologies of active sites on commercial nanoparticles can be gained with atomic resolution through spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A powder of Pt nanoparticles on carbon black was examined with two advanced TEM t...

  7. Active vibration control with model correction on a flexible laboratory grid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, George C., II; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and computational comparisons of three active damping control laws applied to a complex laboratory structure. Two reduced structural models were used with one model being corrected on the basis of measured mode shapes and frequencies. Three control laws were investigated, a time-invariant linear quadratic regulator with state estimation and two direct rate feedback control laws. Experimental results for all designs were obtained with digital implementation. It was found that model correction improved the agreement between analytical and experimental results. The best agreement was obtained with the simplest direct rate feedback control.

  8. Subject-specific bone attenuation correction for brain PET/MR: can ZTE-MRI substitute CT scan accurately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifé, Maya; Fernandez, Brice; Jaubert, Olivier; Soussan, Michael; Brulon, Vincent; Buvat, Irène; Comtat, Claude

    2017-10-01

    In brain PET/MR applications, accurate attenuation maps are required for accurate PET image quantification. An implemented attenuation correction (AC) method for brain imaging is the single-atlas approach that estimates an AC map from an averaged CT template. As an alternative, we propose to use a zero echo time (ZTE) pulse sequence to segment bone, air and soft tissue. A linear relationship between histogram normalized ZTE intensity and measured CT density in Hounsfield units (HU ) in bone has been established thanks to a CT-MR database of 16 patients. Continuous AC maps were computed based on the segmented ZTE by setting a fixed linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) to air and soft tissue and by using the linear relationship to generate continuous μ values for the bone. Additionally, for the purpose of comparison, four other AC maps were generated: a ZTE derived AC map with a fixed LAC for the bone, an AC map based on the single-atlas approach as provided by the PET/MR manufacturer, a soft-tissue only AC map and, finally, the CT derived attenuation map used as the gold standard (CTAC). All these AC maps were used with different levels of smoothing for PET image reconstruction with and without time-of-flight (TOF). The subject-specific AC map generated by combining ZTE-based segmentation and linear scaling of the normalized ZTE signal into HU was found to be a good substitute for the measured CTAC map in brain PET/MR when used with a Gaussian smoothing kernel of 4~mm corresponding to the PET scanner intrinsic resolution. As expected TOF reduces AC error regardless of the AC method. The continuous ZTE-AC performed better than the other alternative MR derived AC methods, reducing the quantification error between the MRAC corrected PET image and the reference CTAC corrected PET image.

  9. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, N.; Daemen, T.; Helfrich, W.; Boezen, H. M.; Cohlen, B. J.; Melief, Cornelis; Nijman, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce a tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess feasibility of antigen-specific ac

  10. Patient-specific scatter correction for flat-panel detector-based cone-beam CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Brunner, Stephen; Niu, Kai; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-02-07

    A patient-specific scatter correction algorithm is proposed to mitigate scatter artefacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The approach belongs to the category of convolution-based methods in which a scatter potential function is convolved with a convolution kernel to estimate the scatter profile. A key step in this method is to determine the free parameters introduced in both scatter potential and convolution kernel using a so-called calibration process, which is to seek for the optimal parameters such that the models for both scatter potential and convolution kernel is able to optimally fit the previously known coarse estimates of scatter profiles of the image object. Both direct measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been proposed by other investigators to achieve the aforementioned rough estimates. In the present paper, a novel method has been proposed and validated to generate the needed coarse scatter profile for parameter calibration in the convolution method. The method is based upon an image segmentation of the scatter contaminated CBCT image volume, followed by a reprojection of the segmented image volume using a given x-ray spectrum. The reprojected data is subtracted from the scatter contaminated projection data to generate a coarse estimate of the needed scatter profile used in parameter calibration. The method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated using numerical simulations and experimental CBCT data acquired on a clinical CBCT imaging system. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artefacts and recover the correct CT number. Numerical simulation results show the method is patient specific, can accurately estimate the scatter, and is robust with respect to segmentation procedure. For experimental and in vivo human data, the results show the CT number can be successfully recovered and anatomical structure visibility can be significantly improved.

  11. Measurement error of self-reported physical activity levels in New York City: assessment and correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sungwoo; Wyker, Brett; Bartley, Katherine; Eisenhower, Donna

    2015-05-01

    Because it is difficult to objectively measure population-level physical activity levels, self-reported measures have been used as a surveillance tool. However, little is known about their validity in populations living in dense urban areas. We aimed to assess the validity of self-reported physical activity data against accelerometer-based measurements among adults living in New York City and to apply a practical tool to adjust for measurement error in complex sample data using a regression calibration method. We used 2 components of data: 1) dual-frame random digit dialing telephone survey data from 3,806 adults in 2010-2011 and 2) accelerometer data from a subsample of 679 survey participants. Self-reported physical activity levels were measured using a version of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire, whereas data on weekly moderate-equivalent minutes of activity were collected using accelerometers. Two self-reported health measures (obesity and diabetes) were included as outcomes. Participants with higher accelerometer values were more likely to underreport the actual levels. (Accelerometer values were considered to be the reference values.) After correcting for measurement errors, we found that associations between outcomes and physical activity levels were substantially deattenuated. Despite difficulties in accurately monitoring physical activity levels in dense urban areas using self-reported data, our findings show the importance of performing a well-designed validation study because it allows for understanding and correcting measurement errors.

  12. POP-ART: thermodynamically correct activated event sampling in complex materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubynsky, M. V.; Vocks, Henk; Mousseau, Normand; Barkema, G. T.

    2006-03-01

    Dynamics of complex systems with a rugged energy landscape can be represented as a sequence of rare activated events during which the system jumps between different potential energy minima. The activation-relaxation technique (ART) [1] is an efficient method of sampling such events; however, because of an unknown bias in selecting these events it cannot easily provide thermodynamical information. We present a modification of ART, the properly obeying probability ART (POP-ART) [2]. POP-ART combines short molecular dynamics runs with ART-like activated moves, with an additional accept/reject step designed to satisfy detailed balance and thus reproduce correct thermodynamics. Both correctness and efficiency of the method have been tested using a variety of systems. We mention briefly some ways of extending the approach to obtain correct dynamics as well.[1] G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4358 (1996)[2] H. Vocks, M.V. Chubynsky, G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, J. Chem. Phys., accepted

  13. An approach for activity-based DEVS model specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alshareef, Abdurrahman; Sarjoughian, Hessam S.; Zarrin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    activity-based behavior modeling of parallel DEVS atomic models. We consider UML activities and actions as fundamental units of behavior modeling, especially in the presence of recent advances in the UML 2.5 specifications. We describe in detail how to approach activity modeling with a set of elemental...

  14. Active self-correction of spinal posture in pain-free women in response to the command "straighten your back".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyk-Pawelec, Katarzyna; Sipko, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    Evidence is limited regarding the regional changes in spinal posture after self-correction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether active self-correction improved standing and sitting spinal posture. Photogrammetry was used to assess regional spinal curvatures and vertical global spine orientation (GSO) in 42 asymptotic women aged 20-24 years. Upper thoracic spine angle and GSO increased in response to self-correction, while the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral angles decreased. Self-correction in the standing position resulted in decreased inclination of the upper thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal angles. Correction of sitting posture reduced the angle of the upper thoracic spine and GSO. The effects of active self-correction on spinal curvature and GSO were different for the standing versus sitting position; the greatest effects of active correction were noted in the thoracic spine. Balanced and lordotic postures were most prevalent in the habitual and actively self-corrected standing positions, whereas the kyphotic posture was most prevalent in the habitual sitting position, indicative that self-correction back posture in the standing position could be an important health-related daily activity, especially during prolonged sitting.

  15. Musculoskeletal modelling of muscle activation and applied external forces for the correction of scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Maurice; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2014-04-07

    This study uses biomechanical modelling and computational optimization to investigate muscle activation in combination with applied external forces as a treatment for scoliosis. Bracing, which incorporates applied external forces, is the most popular non surgical treatment for scoliosis. Non surgical treatments which make use of muscle activation include electrical stimulation, postural control, and therapeutic exercises. Electrical stimulation has been largely dismissed as a viable treatment for scoliosis, although previous studies have suggested that it can potentially deliver similarly effective corrective forces to the spine as bracing. The potential of muscle activation for scoliosis correction was investigated over different curvatures both with and without the addition of externally applied forces. The five King's classifications of scoliosis were investigated over a range of Cobb angles. A biomechanical model of the spine was used to represent various scoliotic curvatures. Optimization was applied to the model to reduce the curves using combinations of both deep and superficial muscle activation and applied external forces. Simulating applied external forces in combination with muscle activation at low Cobb angles (forces were applied in combination, lower levels of muscle activation or less external force was required to reduce the curvature of the spine, when compared with either muscle activation or external force applied in isolation. The results of this study suggest that activation of superficial and deep muscles may be effective in reducing spinal curvature at low Cobb angles when muscle groups are selected for activation based on the curve type. The findings further suggest the potential for a hybrid treatment involving combined muscle activation and applied external forces at larger Cobb angles.

  16. Influence of kyphosis correction in thoracolumber spine on physical activity of children with infantile cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Umnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective - to determinate the influence of kyphosis correction in thoracic spine on the ability to have vertical balance of the body in patients with cerebral palsy. Material and methods. The authors have performed a comprehensive survey of 17 patients with cerebral palsy aged from 6 to 17 years with the generated non-fixed "habitual" thoracolumbar kyphosis associated with joint contractures of the lower extremities. The analysis of the radiological data was carried out to determine the dependence of severity of kyphosis on the position of the body. The state of the vertical stability of children before and after thoracolumbar orthosis with body corset were evaluated by means of computed stabilometrics. Results. Radiological findings in all children have shown a normal correlation of changes in the degree of kyphosis - its reduction if there was an exclusion of the vertical load on the spine, as well as the trunk orthosis. In this case correction of sagittal profile of the spine occurred mainly due to the lumbar area. This feature of spinal biomechanics in patients with infantile cerebral palsy unpredictably reflected on the motor activity of patients. After correction of kyphosis with corset only 29.4% of the children surveyed with stabilometrics demonstrated the improvement in the function of maintaining the vertical position of the body. In 70.6% of patients the correction of sagittal profile of the spine has led to a deterioration of the vertical balance of the body. Negative dynamics of test research in this group presupposes the exhaustion of children’s adaptive capacity, which indicates the risk of developing abnormal compensatory reactions because of corset bracing. Conclusion. The advanced integrated observation of the patients with cerebral palsy can improve the prediction of outcomes in planning of the correction of kyphosis in thoracolumbar spine.

  17. The specific activation of TRPC4 by Gi protein subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Pyo; Lee, Kyu Pil; Park, Eun Jung; Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Byung Joo; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2008-12-12

    The classical type of transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) is a molecular candidate for Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels in mammalian cells. Especially, TRPC4 has the similar properties to Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) activated by muscarinic stimulation in visceral smooth muscles. In visceral smooth muscles, NSCCs activated by muscarinic stimulation were blocked by anti-Galphai/o antibodies. However, there is still no report which Galpha proteins are involved in the activation process of TRPC4. Among Galpha proteins, only Galphai protein can activate TRPC4 channel. The activation effect of Galphai was specific for TRPC4 because Galphai has no activation effect on TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPV6. Coexpression with muscarinic receptor M2 induced TRPC4 current activation by muscarinic stimulation with carbachol, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin. These results suggest that Galphai is involved specifically in the activation of TRPC4.

  18. Active self-correction of back posture in children instructed with 'straighten your back' command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaprowski, Dariusz; Pawłowska, Paulina; Stoliński, Lukasz; Kotwicki, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    The ability to adopt the properly corrected body posture is one of the factors determining the effectiveness of therapeutic programmes. This study determined the active self-correction expressed by the change of sagittal spinal curvatures (in standing and sitting positions) in 249 children (136 females, 113 males, aged 10-14 years) instructed with 'straighten your back' command (SYB). Spinal curvatures (sacral slope-SS, lumbar lordosis-LL, global, lower and upper thoracic kyphosis-TK, LK, UK, respectively) were assessed using Saunders inclinometer. The assessment was done in spontaneous standing and sitting positions and in the positions adopted after the SYB. In a standing position SYB led to the significant (P back' command leads to moving the spine away from mid-range towards end range of motion. Therefore, the command should not be used to elicit the most optimal back posture. Further studies are needed to determine if the active self-correction is different in females and males. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. "Right-sourcing" or obtaining the correct balance between in-house activity and the purchase of external services

    CERN Document Server

    Ninin, P

    2003-01-01

    During the last few years, and more particularly to face the LHC construction, several Information Technology activities of the ST Division have been outsourced. This concerns various domains such as desktop support, application software development, system maintenance as well as turn-key control systems. Among other motivations, this tactical approach was seen as a way to achieve higher product quality and service rationalization. The outsourcing success of IT activities resides in the mastering of a complex process that includes amongst other specification, purchasing, negotiation, contract management skills on top of advanced technical knowledge. The perception of the success of outsourcing differs also from one stakeholder to another. Nowadays, as CERN encounters a cash-flow issue, in-sourcing is investigated as an alternative path for savings. From this experience and the survey of current practice in industry, this paper analyses various parameters that should be considered to find the correct balance b...

  20. Piecing together the X-ray background: bolometric corrections for active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, R. V.; Fabian, A. C.

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray background can be used to constrain the accretion history of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGN), with the SMBH mass density related to the energy density due to accretion. A knowledge of the hard X-ray bolometric correction, κ2-10keV, is a vital input into these studies, as it allows us to constrain the parameters of the accretion responsible for SMBH growth. Earlier studies assumed a constant bolometric correction for all AGN, and more recent work has suggested accounting for a dependence on AGN luminosity. Until recently, the variations in the disc emission in the ultraviolet (UV) have not been taken into account in this calculation; we show that such variations are important by construction of optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions for 54 AGN. In particular, we use Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) UV and X-ray data from the literature to constrain the disc emission as well as possible. We find evidence for very significant spread in the bolometric corrections, with no simple dependence on luminosity being evident. Populations of AGN such as narrow-line Seyfert 1 nuclei, radio-loud and X-ray-weak AGN may have bolometric corrections which differ systematically from the rest of the AGN population. We identify other sources of uncertainty including intrinsic extinction in the optical-UV, X-ray and UV variability and uncertainties in SMBH mass estimates. Our results suggest a more well-defined relationship between the bolometric correction and Eddington ratio in AGN, with a transitional region at an Eddington ratio of ~0.1, below which the bolometric correction is typically 15-25, and above which it is typically 40-70. We consider the potential-implied parallels with the low/hard and high/soft states in Galactic black hole (GBH) accretion, and present bolometric corrections for the GBH binary GX 339-4 for comparison. Our findings reinforce previous studies proposing a multistate description of AGN

  1. Ground target localization algorithm for semi-active laser terminal correction projectile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A target localization algorithm, which uses the measurement information from onboard GPS and onboard laser detector to acquire the target position, is proposed to obtain the accurate position of ground target in real time in the trajectory correction process of semi-active laser terminal correction projectile. A target localization model is established according to projectile position, attitude and line-of-sight angle. The effects of measurement errors of projectile position, attitude and line-of-sight angle on localization accuracy at different quadrant elevation angles are analyzed through Monte-Carlo simulation. The simulation results show that the measurement error of line-of-sight angle has the largest influence on the localization accuracy. The localization accuracy decreases with the increase in quadrant elevation angle. However, the maximum localization accuracy is less than 7 m. The proposed algorithm meets the accuracy and real-time requirements of target localization.

  2. Changes in specific activity of ascorbate peroxidase during seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... modes of application of SA, it was observed that maximum specific activity of .... One gram seeds were homogenized at 4°C with pestle and mortar .... properties and distribution of ascorbate peroxidase in legume root nodules.

  3. Specific activity of radioiodine-labelled human chorionic gonadotropin ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M. (South African Inst. for Medical Research, Sandringham. National Inst. for Virology); Kay, G.W.; Van der Walt, L.A. (South African Inst. for Medical Research, Johannesburg. Dept. of Pathology)

    1983-10-01

    The article deals with the determination of the specific activity of radioiodine-labelled human chorionic gonadotropin ligand. The iodiation of human chorionic gonadotropin and the counting efficiency of /sup 125/I are discussed.

  4. Fast analytical approach of application specific dose efficient spectrum selection for diagnostic CT imaging and PET attenuation correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xue; Jin, Yannan; FitzGerald, Paul F.; Wu, Mingye; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used for a variety of applications, two of which include diagnostic imaging and attenuation correction for PET or SPECT imaging. Ideally, the x-ray tube spectrum should be optimized for the specific application to minimize the patient radiation dose while still providing the necessary information. In this study, we proposed a projection-based analytic approach for the analysis of contrast, noise, and bias. Dose normalized contrast to noise ratio (CNRD), inverse noise normalized by dose (IND) and bias are used as evaluation metrics to determine the optimal x-ray spectrum. Our simulation investigated the dose efficiency of the x-ray spectrum ranging from 40 kVp to 200 kVp. Water cylinders with diameters of 15 cm, 24 cm, and 35 cm were used in the simulation to cover a variety of patient sizes. The effects of electronic noise and pre-patient copper filtration were also evaluated. A customized 24 cm CTDI-like phantom with 13 mm diameter inserts filled with iodine (10 mg ml-1), tantalum (10 mg ml-1), water, and PMMA was measured with both standard (1.5 mGy) and ultra-low (0.2 mGy) dose to verify the simulation results at tube voltages of 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. For contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging, the simulation results indicated that for high dose without filtration, the optimal kVp for water contrast is approximately 100 kVp for a 15 cm water cylinder. However, the 60 kVp spectrum produces the highest CNRD for bone and iodine. The optimal kVp for tantalum has two selections: approximately 50 and 100 kVp. The kVp that maximizes CNRD increases when the object size increases. The trend in the CTDI phantom measurements agrees with the simulation results, which also agrees with previous studies. Copper filtration improved the dose efficiency for water and tantalum, but reduced the iodine and bone dose efficiency in a clinically-relevant range (70-140 kVp). Our study also shows that for CT-based attenuation

  5. UML activity diagrams in requirements specification of logic controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobelna, Iwona; Grobelny, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller specification can be prepared using various techniques. One of them is the wide understandable and user-friendly UML language and its activity diagrams. Using formal methods during the design phase increases the assurance that implemented system meets the project requirements. In the approach we use the model checking technique to formally verify a specification against user-defined behavioral requirements. The properties are usually defined as temporal logic formulas. In the paper we propose to use UML activity diagrams in requirements definition and then to formalize them as temporal logic formulas. As a result, UML activity diagrams can be used both for logic controller specification and for requirements definition, what simplifies the specification and verification process.

  6. Method Specific Calibration Corrects for DNA Extraction Method Effects on Relative Telomere Length Measurements by Quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Rebecca; Underwood, Sarah; Fairlie, Jennifer; Psifidi, Androniki; Ilska, Joanna J.; Bagnall, Ainsley; Whitelaw, Bruce; Coffey, Mike; Banos, Georgios; Nussey, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is increasingly being used as a biomarker in epidemiological, biomedical and ecological studies. A wide range of DNA extraction techniques have been used in telomere experiments and recent quantitative PCR (qPCR) based studies suggest that the choice of DNA extraction method may influence average relative TL (RTL) measurements. Such extraction method effects may limit the use of historically collected DNA samples extracted with different methods. However, if extraction method effects are systematic an extraction method specific (MS) calibrator might be able to correct for them, because systematic effects would influence the calibrator sample in the same way as all other samples. In the present study we tested whether leukocyte RTL in blood samples from Holstein Friesian cattle and Soay sheep measured by qPCR was influenced by DNA extraction method and whether MS calibration could account for any observed differences. We compared two silica membrane-based DNA extraction kits and a salting out method. All extraction methods were optimized to yield enough high quality DNA for TL measurement. In both species we found that silica membrane-based DNA extraction methods produced shorter RTL measurements than the non-membrane-based method when calibrated against an identical calibrator. However, these differences were not statistically detectable when a MS calibrator was used to calculate RTL. This approach produced RTL measurements that were highly correlated across extraction methods (r > 0.76) and had coefficients of variation lower than 10% across plates of identical samples extracted by different methods. Our results are consistent with previous findings that popular membrane-based DNA extraction methods may lead to shorter RTL measurements than non-membrane-based methods. However, we also demonstrate that these differences can be accounted for by using an extraction method-specific calibrator, offering researchers a simple means of accounting for

  7. Method Specific Calibration Corrects for DNA Extraction Method Effects on Relative Telomere Length Measurements by Quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeker, Luise A; Holland, Rebecca; Underwood, Sarah; Fairlie, Jennifer; Psifidi, Androniki; Ilska, Joanna J; Bagnall, Ainsley; Whitelaw, Bruce; Coffey, Mike; Banos, Georgios; Nussey, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is increasingly being used as a biomarker in epidemiological, biomedical and ecological studies. A wide range of DNA extraction techniques have been used in telomere experiments and recent quantitative PCR (qPCR) based studies suggest that the choice of DNA extraction method may influence average relative TL (RTL) measurements. Such extraction method effects may limit the use of historically collected DNA samples extracted with different methods. However, if extraction method effects are systematic an extraction method specific (MS) calibrator might be able to correct for them, because systematic effects would influence the calibrator sample in the same way as all other samples. In the present study we tested whether leukocyte RTL in blood samples from Holstein Friesian cattle and Soay sheep measured by qPCR was influenced by DNA extraction method and whether MS calibration could account for any observed differences. We compared two silica membrane-based DNA extraction kits and a salting out method. All extraction methods were optimized to yield enough high quality DNA for TL measurement. In both species we found that silica membrane-based DNA extraction methods produced shorter RTL measurements than the non-membrane-based method when calibrated against an identical calibrator. However, these differences were not statistically detectable when a MS calibrator was used to calculate RTL. This approach produced RTL measurements that were highly correlated across extraction methods (r > 0.76) and had coefficients of variation lower than 10% across plates of identical samples extracted by different methods. Our results are consistent with previous findings that popular membrane-based DNA extraction methods may lead to shorter RTL measurements than non-membrane-based methods. However, we also demonstrate that these differences can be accounted for by using an extraction method-specific calibrator, offering researchers a simple means of accounting for

  8. Automated determination of beta-galactosidase specific activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, P R; Weinstock, G M

    1994-11-01

    We describe a modification of an automated kinetic assay for beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) activity. This modification includes an assay to quantitate the amount of protein added to each assay. The determination of specific activity includes the amount of protein in the calculation which produces a specific activity with units of pmol product produced/minute/mg protein. In addition to this modification, we present a series of macros written in Microsoft Excel for either the Macintosh or Windows on the PC. These macros decrease the amount of time required to analyze the data from beta-gal assays.

  9. Some aspects of the design of the ITER NBI Active Correction and Compensation Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Javier, E-mail: javier.alonso@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barrera, Germán; Cabrera, Santiago; Rincón, Esther; Ríos, Luis; Soleto, Alfonso [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); El-Ouazzani, Anass; Graceffa, Joseph; Shah, Darshan; Urbani, Marc [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Agarici, Gilbert [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3 – 07/08, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Water cooled coil design. • Magnetic shielding of the plasma heating Neutral Beam Injection System. • Active coils for magnetic field compensation. - Abstract: The neutral beam system for ITER consists of two heating and current drive injectors plus a diagnostic neutral beam injector. The proposed physical plant layout allows for a possible third heating injector to be installed later. For correct operation of the beam source, and to avoid deflections of the charged fraction of the beam, the magnetic field along the beam path must be very low. To minimize the stray ITER field in critical areas (ion source, acceleration grids, neutralizer, residual ion dump), a Magnetic Field Reduction System will envelop the beam vessels and the high voltage transmission lines to ion source. This whole system comprises the Passive Magnetic Shield, a set of thick steel plates, and the Active Correction and Compensation Coils, a set of coils carrying currents which depend on the tokamak stray field. This paper describes the status of the coil design, terminals and support structures, as well as a description of the calculations carried out. Most coils are suitable for removal from their final position to be replaced in case of a fault. Conclusions of the chosen design highlight the strategy for the system feasibility.

  10. Active shape correction of a thin glass/plastic x-ray mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D.; Barbera, M.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M.; Collura, A.; Dell'Agostino, S.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lullo, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Riva, M.; Salmaso, B.; Sciortino, L.

    2014-09-01

    Optics for future X-ray telescopes will be characterized by very large aperture and focal length, and will be made of lightweight materials like glass or plastic in order to keep the total mass within acceptable limits. Optics based on thin slumped glass foils are currently in use in the NuSTAR telescope and are being developed at various institutes like INAF/OAB, aiming at improving the angular resolution to a few arcsec HEW. Another possibility would be the use of thin plastic foils, being developed at SAO and the Palermo University. Even if relevant progresses in the achieved angular resolution were recently made, a viable possibility to further improve the mirror figure would be the application of piezoelectric actuators onto the non-optical side of the mirrors. In fact, thin mirrors are prone to deform, so they require a careful integration to avoid deformations and even correct forming errors. This however offers the possibility to actively correct the residual deformation. Even if other groups are already at work on this idea, we are pursuing the concept of active integration of thin glass or plastic foils with piezoelectric patches, fed by voltages driven by the feedback provided by X-rays, in intra-focal setup at the XACT facility at INAF/OAPA. In this work, we show the preliminary simulations and the first steps taken in this project.

  11. Intraperitoneal alpha-radioimmunotherapy in mice using different specific activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Andersson, Håkan; Haglund, Elin;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of the alpha-radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in mice, using different specific activities. This study was performed by using the monoclonal antibody, MX35 F(ab')(2), labeled with the alpha-particle-emitter, 211At.......The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of the alpha-radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in mice, using different specific activities. This study was performed by using the monoclonal antibody, MX35 F(ab')(2), labeled with the alpha-particle-emitter, 211At....

  12. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  13. Liver-specific activities of FGF19 require Klotho beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Benjamin C; Wang, Manping; Blackmore, Craig; Desnoyers, Luc R

    2007-09-14

    Hepatocyte function is regulated by members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of proteins, but little is known about the specific molecular mechanisms of this endocrine pathway. FGF19 regulates bile acid homeostasis and gall bladder filling; FGF19 binds only to FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4), but its liver-specific activity cannot be explained solely by the distribution of this receptor. Although it has been suggested that Klotho beta (KLB) may have a role in mediating FGF19 activity, we have provided for the first time definitive evidence that KLB is required for FGF19 binding to FGFR4, intracellular signaling, and downstream modulation of gene expression. We have shown that FGFR4 is widely distributed in mouse, whereas KLB distribution is more restricted. Liver was the only organ in which both genes were abundantly expressed. We show that in mice, FGF19 injection triggers liver-specific induction of c-Fos and repression of CYP7A1. The tissue-specific activity of FGF19 supports the unique intersection of KLB and FGFR4 distribution in liver. These studies define KLB as a novel FGFR4 coreceptor required for FGF19 liver specific functions.

  14. Unconscious Semantic Activation Depends on Feature-Specific Attention Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruyt, Adriaan; De Houwer, Jan; Everaert, Tom; Hermans, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether semantic activation by subliminally presented stimuli is dependent upon the extent to which participants assign attention to specific semantic stimulus features and stimulus dimensions. Participants pronounced visible target words that were preceded by briefly presented, masked prime words. Both affective and non-affective…

  15. 40 CFR 60.759 - Specifications for active collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., fiberglass, stainless steel, or other nonporous corrosion resistant material of suitable dimensions to... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specifications for active collection systems. 60.759 Section 60.759 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  16. Specific Activity and Impurities in Irradiated Natural Nickel Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the specific activity of the 63Ni which is produced by irradiating natural nickel in a nuclear reactor is calculated. And in the 1 g irradiated natural nickel target, the species of the key impurity nuclides were analyzed,

  17. Active correction of aperture discontinuities (ACAD) for space telescope pupils: a parametic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; Choquet, Élodie; Carlotti, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    As the performance of coronagraphs improves, the achievable contrast is more and more dependent of the shape of the pupil. The future generation of space and ground based coronagraphic instruments will have to achieve high contrast levels on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes. To correct for the high amplitude aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror, we explore a two deformable mirror (DM) method. The major difficulty of several DM methods is the non-linear relation linking actuator strokes to the point spread function in the coronagraph focal plane. The Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) method is achieving this minimization by solving a non linear differential Monge Ampere equation. Once this open loop method have reached the minimum, a close-loop stroke minimization method can be applied to correct for phase and amplitude aberrations to achieve the ultimate contrast. In this paper, I describe the results of the parametric analysis that that I have undertaken on this method. After recalling the principle of the method, I will described the explored parameter space (deformable mirror set-up, shape of the pupil, bandwidth, coronagraph designs). I will precisely described the way I simulated the Vortex coronagraph for this numerical simulation. Finally I will present the preliminary results of this parametric analysis for space telescope pupils only.

  18. Active shape correction of a thin glass/plastic X-ray mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Spiga, D; Basso, S; Civitani, M; Collura, A; Dell'Agostino, S; Cicero, U Lo; Lullo, G; Pelliciari, C; Riva, M; Salmaso, B; Sciortino, L

    2015-01-01

    Optics for future X-ray telescopes will be characterized by very large aperture and focal length, and will be made of lightweight materials like glass or plastic in order to keep the total mass within acceptable limits. Optics based on thin slumped glass foils are currently in use in the NuSTAR telescope and are being developed at various institutes like INAF/OAB, aiming at improving the angular resolution to a few arcsec HEW. Another possibility would be the use of thin plastic foils, being developed at SAO and the Palermo University. Even if relevant progresses in the achieved angular resolution were recently made, a viable possibility to further improve the mirror figure would be the application of piezoelectric actuators onto the non-optical side of the mirrors. In fact, thin mirrors are prone to deform, so they require a careful integration to avoid deformations and even correct forming errors. This however offers the possibility to actively correct the residual deformation. Even if other groups are alre...

  19. Active site of bimetallic heterogeneous catalyst by atomic resolution aberration-corrected STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Chien-Nan, E-mail: 0209347@narlabs.org.tw; Lin, Chun-Ting

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Up to fifth order aberration coefficients of STEM had been compensated. • The core-shell structural catalyst was identified by Z-contrast image. • Atomic twinning in nanoparticle was revealed by aberration-corrected STEM. - Abstract: The localized defect of Au–Pd bimetallic heterogeneous nanoparticles catalyst was investigated using HRTEM and aberration-corrected HRSTEM. The phase plates were calculated from the aberration coefficients of the measured probe tableau for various outer tilt angle of the optical axis and the accuracy required for the compensation of the various residual aberration coefficients in order to achieve sub-angstrom resolution with the electron optics system was evaluated up to the fifth order aberrations. It is found that the interplanar spacing of the Au–Pd nanoparticle (1 1 1) planes observed along the [1 1 0] zone axis was approximately 0.24 nm measured by HRTEM. In addition, the HRSTEM HAADF image demonstrated that the twin boundaries on the surfaces of heterogeneous nanoparticles catalysts at atomic scale. These defects might be introduced during the growth to alleviate the internal stress caused by the 4.6% lattice mismatch of Au–Pd bimetallic system. Current research could be applied to the study of active sites in nanocatalysts.

  20. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of

  1. PROFILIN ACTIVATES BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS PHOSPHOINOSITIDE SPECIFIC PHOSPHOLIPASE C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeepta Burgula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many extracellular signaling molecules including hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters andimmunoglobulins elicit intracellular responses by activating phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLCupon binding to their cell surface receptors. Activated PLC catalyses the hydrolysis of Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 to generate DAG and IP3 , which act as signaling molecules that control various cellular processes.Exploring the mechanism of regulation of PLC activity may lead to understanding various signaling events thatregulate cell growth and differentiation. One of the dramatic effects of profilin is inhibition of PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC-γ in eukaryotic cells. In the present study, the effect of profilin on Phosphotidylinositol specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC purified from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt was examined. Assay of PI-PLC activity indicated that Bovine profilinactivated the hydrolysis of phosphotidylinositol (PI by BtPI-PLC in a concentration dependent manner under in vitroconditions. A 250 % increase in activity was noted in the presence of profilin but not in presence of phosphoprofilin. Inthe presence of profilin more proteins are observed in the soluble fraction. In conclusion it can be stated that thatprofilin activates bacterial PLC activity towards PI hydrolysis

  2. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  3. Archimedes' law and its corrections for an active particle in a granular sea

    CERN Document Server

    Maes, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We study the origin of buoyancy forces acting on a larger particle moving in a granular medium subject to horizontal shaking and its corrections before fluidization. In the fluid limit Archimedes' law is verified; before the limit memory effects counteract buoyancy, as also found experimentally. The origin of the friction is an excluded volume effect between active particles, which we study more exactly for a random walker in a random environment. The same excluded volume effect is also responsible for the mutual attraction between bodies moving in the granular medium. Our theoretical modeling proceeds via an asymmetric exclusion process, i.e., via a dissipative lattice gas dynamics simulating the position degrees of freedom of a low density granular sea.

  4. Correction of Pulmonary Oxygenizing Dysfunction in the Early Activation of Cardiosurgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to justify a comprehensive approach to preventing and correcting pulmonary oxygenizing dysfunction requiring prolonged artificial ventilation in patients operated on under extracorporeal circulation for coronary heart disease. Subjects and methods. One hundred and twenty-three patients aged 55±0.6 years were examined. The study excluded patients with a complicated course of operations (perioperative myocardial infarction, acute cardiovascular insufficiency, hemorrhage, and long extracorporeal circulation. Stimulating spirometry was initiated 2 days before surgery. An alveolar opening maneuver was performed using a continuous dynamic thoracopulmonary compliance monitoring. The parameters of lung oxygenizing function and biomechanics were analyzed. Results. In 78% of the patients, preoperative inspiratory lung capacity was 5—30% lower than the age-related normal values. After extracorporeal circulation, pulmonary oxygenizing dysfunction was diagnosed in 40.9% of cases; at the same time PaO2/FiO2 was associated with an intrapulmonary shunt fraction (Qs/St (r=-0.53; p=0.002 and Qs/Qt was related to static thoracopulmonary compliance (Cst (r=-0.39; p=0.03. Preoperative stimulating spirometry provided a considerable increase in intraoperative PaO2/FiO2 values (p<0.05; improved Cst and decreased Qs/Qt. After extracorporeal circulation, the incidence of pulmonary oxygenizing dysfunction was decreased by more than twice (p<0.05. Patients with relative arterial hypoxemia showed a noticeable relationship to the magnitudes of a reduction in Cst and a rise in Qs/Qt (r=0.72; p=0.008, which served as the basis for applying the alveolar opening maneuver. This type of lung support corrected arterial hypoxemia in 67% of cases. Conclusion. In car-diosurgical patients with coronary heart disease, effective prophylaxis and correction of relative arterial hypoxemia caused by the interrelated impairments of pulmonary biomechanical properties and

  5. Papain-specific activating esters in aqueous dipeptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Roseri J A C; Zarzycka, Barbara; Mariman, Michiel; Amatdjais-Groenen, Helene I V; Mulders, Marc J; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; van Delft, Floris L; Nabuurs, Sander B; Rutjes, Floris P J T

    2012-06-18

    Enzymatic peptide synthesis has the potential to be a viable alternative for chemical peptide synthesis. Because of the increasing commercial interest in peptides, new and improved enzymatic synthesis methods are desirable. In recently developed enzymatic strategies such as substrate mimetic approaches and enzyme-specific activation, use of the guanidinophenyl ester (OGp) group has been shown to suffer from some drawbacks. OGp esters are sensitive to spontaneous chemical hydrolysis and the group is expensive to synthesize and therefore not suitable for large-scale applications. On the basis of earlier computational studies, we hypothesized that OGp might be replaceable by simpler ester groups to make the enzyme-specific activation approach to peptide bond formation more accessible. To this end, a set of potential activating esters (Z-Gly-Act) was designed, synthesized, and evaluated. Both the benzyl (OBn) and the dimethylaminophenyl (ODmap) esters gave promising results. For these esters, the scope of a model dipeptide synthesis reaction under aqueous conditions was investigated by varying the amino acid donor. The results were compared with those obtained from a previous study of Z-X(AA) -OGp esters. Computational docking analysis of the set of esters was performed in order to provide insight into the differences in the reactivities of all the potential activating esters. Finally, selected ODmap- and OBn-activated amino acids were applied in the synthesis of two biologically active dipeptides on preparative scales. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Correction of Thermal Deviations of Fabry-Perot Resonator Based Measurements of Specific Gases in Millimeter Wave Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Libich

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the thermal expansivity of the material used in the Fabry-Perot resonator mirrors, the resonator cavity length can change and this might therefore have an impact on the resonant frequency during high-resolution spectroscopy measurements. Based on measurements and simulations, this paper discusses the influences of temperature on the precise determination of gas attenuation measured in a Fabry-Perot resonator. Several measures to mitigate such influence and to correct the measured results were tested. A correction method for the measured data was proposed.

  7. Ocular correction effects on EMG activity of stomatognathic muscles in children with functional mandibular lateral- deviation: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, A; Cattaneo, R; Spadaro, A; D'Andrea, P; Marzo, G; Gatto, R

    2006-06-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the ocular correction effects on electromyography activity of anterior temporal, masseter, sternocleidomastoid and anterior digastric muscles in children with functional mandibular lateral-deviation. This study was performed on 32 subjects, aged between 8 and 12 years with functional lateral deviation of mandible and oculo-extrinsic muscular tone disorders. After complete ophthalmologic evaluation and ocular correction prescription, the children were randomly divided into two groups: study and control. In the study group (16 subjects) EMG activity at rest was recorded in the following conditions: with eyes closed; with eyes open; with ocular correction modified through electromyographic control. In the control group (16 subjects) EMG activity at rest was recorded in the following conditions: with eyes closed; with eyes open; with conventional ocular correction. Data were acquired in 15-seconds trial using a SEMG K7, while the subjects maintained rest dental position. Both groups presented a significative correlation between value of lateral-deviation and the degree of ocular-extrinsic muscular tone disorders (r=0.69). In addition, a significant statistical increase of EMG activity at rest with eyes open in both groups was observed in the anterior temporal left and right. A significant decrease of EMG activity with open eyes was observed only with ocular correction upon electromyographic control (study group). The findings, expressed as Symmetry Index, showed a significant increase of muscles imbalance right/left with conventional methods of ocular correction (p corrective lenses, could have an important consequence in clinical diagnostic and therapeutic behaviour because anterior temporal muscles are important in postural position of the mandible. Instead EMG corrective lenses could improve tonus and balance of stomatognathic muscles and, therefore, support the functionality of orthodontic treatment. Moreover, the data

  8. Functional Specificity of the Visual Word Form Area: General Activation for Words and Symbols but Specific Network Activation for Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Karen; Fernandes, Myra; Schwindt, Graeme; O'Craven, Kathleen; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2008-01-01

    The functional specificity of the brain region known as the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) was examined using fMRI. We explored whether this area serves a general role in processing symbolic stimuli, rather than being selective for the processing of words. Brain activity was measured during a visual 1-back task to English words, meaningful symbols…

  9. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from...... and pelvis scan were simulated within 2% statistical uncertainty in two hours per scan. Within the same time, the ray tracing algorithm provided the primary signal for each of the projections. Thus, all the data needed for MC-based scatter correction in clinical CBCT imaging was obtained within two hours per...

  10. Phosphoinositide isoforms determine compartment-specific ion channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Xinran; Xu, Haoxing

    2012-07-10

    Phosphoinositides serve as address labels for recruiting peripheral cytoplasmic proteins to specific subcellular compartments, and as endogenous factors for modulating the activity of integral membrane proteins. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) is a plasma-membrane (PM)-specific phosphoinositide and a positive cofactor required for the activity of most PM channels and transporters. This requirement for phosphoinositide cofactors has been proposed to prevent PM channel/transporter activity during passage through the biosynthetic/secretory and endocytic pathways. To determine whether intracellularly localized channels are similarly "inactivated" at the PM, we studied PIP(2) modulation of intracellular TRPML1 channels. TRPML1 channels are primarily localized in lysosomes, but can also be detected temporarily in the PM upon lysosomal exocytosis. By directly patch-clamping isolated lysosomes, we previously found that lysosomal, but not PM-localized, TRPML1 is active with PI(3,5)P(2), a lysosome-specific PIP(2), as the underlying positive cofactor. Here we found that "silent" PM-localized TRPML1 could be activated by depleting PI(4,5)P(2) levels and/or by adding PI(3,5)P(2) to inside-out membrane patches. Unlike PM channels, surface-expressed TRPML1 underwent a unique and characteristic run-up upon patch excision, and was potently inhibited by a low micromolar concentration of PI(4,5)P(2). Conversely, depletion of PI(4,5)P(2) by either depolarization-induced activation or chemically induced translocation of 5'-phosphatase potentiated whole-cell TRPML1 currents. PI(3,5)P(2) activation and PI(4,5)P(2) inhibition of TRPML1 were mediated by distinct basic amino acid residues in a common PIP(2)-interacting domain. Thus, PI(4,5)P(2) may serve as a negative cofactor for intracellular channels such as TRPML1. Based on these results, we propose that phosphoinositide regulation sets compartment-specific activity codes for membrane channels and transporters.

  11. Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dong

    2012-12-13

    We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

  12. Specific activation of the paralemniscal pathway during nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangeul, Laura; Porrero, Cesar; Garcia-Amado, Maria; Maimone, Benedetta; Maniglier, Madlyne; Clascá, Francisco; Jabaudon, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Two main neuronal pathways connect facial whiskers to the somatosensory cortex in rodents: (i) the lemniscal pathway, which originates in the brainstem principal trigeminal nucleus and is relayed in the ventroposterior thalamic nucleus and (ii) the paralemniscal pathway, originating in the spinal trigeminal nucleus and relayed in the posterior thalamic nucleus. While lemniscal neurons are readily activated by whisker contacts, the contribution of paralemniscal neurons to perception is less clear. Here, we functionally investigated these pathways by manipulating input from the whisker pad in freely moving mice. We report that while lemniscal neurons readily respond to neonatal infraorbital nerve sectioning or whisker contacts in vivo, paralemniscal neurons do not detectably respond to these environmental changes. However, the paralemniscal pathway is specifically activated upon noxious stimulation of the whisker pad. These findings reveal a nociceptive function for paralemniscal neurons in vivo that may critically inform context-specific behaviour during environmental exploration.

  13. Accelerator Production and Separations for High Specific Activity Rhenium-186

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurisson, Silvia S. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Wilbur, D. Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten and osmium targets were evaluated for the production of high specific activity rhenium-186. Rhenium-186 has potential applications in radiotherapy for the treatment of a variety of diseases, including targeting with monoclonal antibodies and peptides. Methods were evaluated using tungsten metal, tungsten dioxide, tungsten disulfide and osmium disulfide. Separation of the rhenium-186 produced and recycling of the enriched tungsten-186 and osmium-189 enriched targets were developed.

  14. SEVERAL ASPECTS REGARDING THE SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES FROM MUREŞ DEFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George-Bogdan TOFAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The geographical location, as well as the natural conditions (the relief’s morphometry, less than favourable climatic conditions, as well as the presence of shallow soils played a deciding role in developing some activities characteristic to mountain areas, mainly represented by forestry and animal husbandry, with peaks and lows caused by social and historical factors that also affected the population of the area. Agriculture became one of the most important components of the defile’s economy, and still remains the main source of nourishment and income for a rather significant part of the population. When it comes to industry, it developed based on the extraction and exploitation of the area’s natural riches (construction rocks, mineral waters, timber, which are then incorporated into the economic circuit. The tertiary activities, in a strong correlation with the territory’s specificity, are less representative, trade being the one activity that stands out (timber, mineral water, construction rocks.

  15. Improving the specificity of R2' to the deoxyhaemoglobin content of brain tissue: Prospective correction of macroscopic magnetic field gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockley, Nicholas P; Stone, Alan J

    2016-07-15

    The reversible transverse relaxation rate, R2', is sensitive to the deoxyhaemoglobin content of brain tissue, enabling information about the oxygen extraction fraction to be obtained. However, R2' is also sensitive to macroscopic magnetic field gradients, particularly at air-tissue interfaces where a large susceptibility difference is present. It is important that this latter effect is minimised in order to produce meaningful estimates of blood oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to implement a technique to prospectively correct for the effect of susceptibility induced magnetic field gradients on R2' weighted data. This was achieved by combining the Gradient-Echo Slice Excitation Profile Imaging (GESEPI) technique with an Asymmetric Spin Echo (ASE) pulse sequence. The main advantages of this approach are (i) shorter acquisition times, since a separately acquired magnetic field map is not required and (ii) simpler analysis, since retrospective correction for the effects of magnetic field gradients in postprocessing is not required. In these experiments we show that with this newly developed technique it is possible to correct the majority of grey matter voxels for the expected distribution of through-slice magnetic field gradients to produce maps of R2' in a short scan duration.

  16. [Specific risks of physical activity in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the specific risks of physical activity in elderly subjects. These risks mainly consist of the loss of physical integrity and the weakening of the capabilities of metabolic regulation. The risk of impairment of physical integrity (e.g. injury) related to regular physical activity is not overall greater in elderly subjects than in young subjects. The choice of a physical activity that is suited to the elderly subject's physical and cognitive abilities largely limits these risks. When physical activity is adapted to suit elderly subjects, the number of accidents in relation to the number of participants is actually very low. In fact, participation in a program of education for prevention related to physical activity reduces the risk of accidents and injuries (and, thus, falls) occurring thereafter. In the case of metabolic risks, isometric muscular contractions carried out under certain conditions (duration: > 6 seconds; intensity: > 50% of maximal voluntary contraction) are inappropriate. Physical activity carried out in extreme thermal atmospheres (0-5° 25-30°) should be avoided. Hydration is very important and liquids should be drunk well before any thirst sensation occurs.

  17. GTP-specific fab fragment-based GTPase activity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopra, Kari; Rozwandowicz-Jansen, Anita; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Ligabue, Alessio; Veltel, Stefan; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2015-03-17

    GTPases are central cellular signaling proteins, which cycle between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformation in a controlled manner. Ras GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer and so far only few experimental inhibitors exist. The most common methods for monitoring GTP hydrolysis rely on luminescent GDP- or GTP-analogs. In this study, the first GTP-specific Fab fragment and its application are described. We selected Fab fragments using the phage display technology. Six Fab fragments were found against 2'/3'-GTP-biotin and 8-GTP-biotin. Selected antibody fragments allowed specific detection of endogenous, free GTP. The most potent Fab fragment (2A4(GTP)) showed over 100-fold GTP-specificity over GDP, ATP, or CTP and was used to develop a heterogeneous time-resolved luminescence based assay for the monitoring of GTP concentration. The method allows studying the GEF dependent H-Ras activation (GTP binding) and GAP-catalyzed H-Ras deactivation (GTP hydrolysis) at nanomolar protein concentrations.

  18. Practice induces function-specific changes in brain activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar R van Raalten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Practice can have a profound effect on performance and brain activity, especially if a task can be automated. Tasks that allow for automatization typically involve repeated encoding of information that is paired with a constant response. Much remains unknown about the effects of practice on encoding and response selection in an automated task. METHODOLOGY: To investigate function-specific effects of automatization we employed a variant of a Sternberg task with optimized separation of activity associated with encoding and response selection by means of m-sequences. This optimized randomized event-related design allows for model free measurement of BOLD signals over the course of practice. Brain activity was measured at six consecutive runs of practice and compared to brain activity in a novel task. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prompt reductions were found in the entire cortical network involved in encoding after a single run of practice. Changes in the network associated with response selection were less robust and were present only after the third run of practice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows that automatization causes heterogeneous decreases in brain activity across functional regions that do not strictly track performance improvement. This suggests that cognitive performance is supported by a dynamic allocation of multiple resources in a distributed network. Our findings may bear importance in understanding the role of automatization in complex cognitive performance, as increased encoding efficiency in early stages of practice possibly increases the capacity to otherwise interfering information.

  19. Fundamental Activity Constraints Lead to Specific Interpretations of the Connectome

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Albada, Sacha J.; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    The continuous integration of experimental data into coherent models of the brain is an increasing challenge of modern neuroscience. Such models provide a bridge between structure and activity, and identify the mechanisms giving rise to experimental observations. Nevertheless, structurally realistic network models of spiking neurons are necessarily underconstrained even if experimental data on brain connectivity are incorporated to the best of our knowledge. Guided by physiological observations, any model must therefore explore the parameter ranges within the uncertainty of the data. Based on simulation results alone, however, the mechanisms underlying stable and physiologically realistic activity often remain obscure. We here employ a mean-field reduction of the dynamics, which allows us to include activity constraints into the process of model construction. We shape the phase space of a multi-scale network model of the vision-related areas of macaque cortex by systematically refining its connectivity. Fundamental constraints on the activity, i.e., prohibiting quiescence and requiring global stability, prove sufficient to obtain realistic layer- and area-specific activity. Only small adaptations of the structure are required, showing that the network operates close to an instability. The procedure identifies components of the network critical to its collective dynamics and creates hypotheses for structural data and future experiments. The method can be applied to networks involving any neuron model with a known gain function. PMID:28146554

  20. Piecing Together the X-ray Background: Bolometric Corrections for Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Vasudevan, R V

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) The X-ray background can be used to constrain the accretion history of Supermassive Black Holes (SMBHs) in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). A knowledge of the hard X-ray bolometric correction, \\kappa_{2-10keV} is a vital input into these studies. Variations in the disk emission in the UV have not previously been taken into account in calculating \\kappa_{2-10keV}; we show that such variations are important by constructing optical--to--X-ray SEDs for 54 AGN. In particular, we use FUSE UV and X-ray data from the literature to constrain the disk emission as well as possible. Previous work has suggested a dependence of \\kappa_{2-10keV} on AGN luminosity, but we find significant spread in \\kappa_{2-10keV} with no simple dependence on luminosity. Populations such as Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 nuclei (NLS1s), Radio Loud and X-ray Weak AGN may have values of \\kappa_{2-10keV} differing systematically from the rest of the AGN population. Other sources of uncertainty include intrinsic extinction in the optical--UV, X-...

  1. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features.

  2. Production of N-13 labeled compounds with high specific activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Sasaki, Motoji; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Haradahira, Terushi; Inoue, Osamu [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Nitrogen-13 was produced by irradiating ultra pure water saturated with a pure gas (N2, O2, He, H2) with 18 MeV protons. Ion species generated by irradiation were analyzed with radio ion chromatography systems. An automated equipment was developed to synthesize anhydrous (13N)NH3 as a synthetic precursor and (13N)p-nitrophenyl carbamate ((13N)NPC) as a model compound, using the (13N)NH3. The radiochemical yield and specific activity of (13N)NPC was high enough to carry out the receptor study with PET. (author)

  3. Persistent activation of microglia and NADPH oxidase [corrected] drive hippocampal dysfunction in experimental multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, Massimiliano; de Iure, Antonio; Giampà, Carmela; Chiasserini, Davide; Tozzi, Alessandro; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Tantucci, Michela; Durante, Valentina; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Mancini, Andrea; Costa, Cinzia; Sarchielli, Paola; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Calabresi, Paolo

    2016-02-18

    Cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Unfortunately, the synaptic and molecular mechanisms underlying MS-associated cognitive dysfunction are largely unknown. We explored the presence and the underlying mechanism of cognitive and synaptic hippocampal dysfunction during the remission phase of experimental MS. Experiments were performed in a chronic-relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS, after the resolution of motor deficits. Immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings were performed in the CA1 hippocampal area. The hole-board was utilized as cognitive/behavioural test. In the remission phase of experimental MS, hippocampal microglial cells showed signs of activation, CA1 hippocampal synapses presented an impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and an alteration of spatial tests became evident. The activation of hippocampal microglia mediated synaptic and cognitive/behavioural alterations during EAE. Specifically, LTP blockade was found to be caused by the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. We suggest that in the remission phase of experimental MS microglia remains activated, causing synaptic dysfunctions mediated by NADPH oxidase. Inhibition of microglial activation and NADPH oxidase may represent a promising strategy to prevent neuroplasticity impairment associated with active neuro-inflammation, with the aim to improve cognition and counteract MS disease progression.

  4. Activities and specificities of homodimeric TALENs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-10-01

    The development of highly efficient genome engineering reagents is of paramount importance to launch the next wave of biotechnology. TAL effectors have been developed as an adaptable DNA binding scaffold that can be engineered to bind to any user-defined sequence. Thus, TAL-based DNA binding modules have been used to generate chimeric proteins for a variety of targeted genome modifications across eukaryotic species. For example, TAL effectors fused to the catalytic domain of FokI endonuclease (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs), the repair of which can be harnessed to dictate user-desired, genome-editing outcomes. To cleave DNA, FokI endonuclease must dimerize which can be achieved using a pair of TALENs that bind to the DNA targeted in a tail-to-tail orientation with proper spacing allowing the dimer formation. Because TALENs binding to DNA are dependent on their repeat sequences and nucleotides binding specificities, homodimers and heterodimers binding can be formed. In the present study, we used several TALEN monomers with increased repeats binding degeneracy to allow homodimer formation at increased number of genomic loci. We assessed their binding specificities and genome modification activities. Our results indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to modify the yeast genome in a site-specific manner and their binding to the promoter regions might modulate the expression of target genes. Taken together, our data indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to achieve different engineering possibilities of biotechnological applications and that their transcriptional modulations need to be considered when analyzing their phenotypic effects. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Activity of Pyramidal Tract Neurons in the Cat During Postural Corrections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    I. N. Beloozerova; M. G. Sirota; G. N. Orlovsky; T. G. Deliagina

    ...) from limb representations of the motor cortex during postural corrections. The cat was standing on the platform periodically tilting in the frontal plane, and maintained equilibrium at different body configurations...

  6. Viral and murine interleukin-10 are correctly processed and retain their biological activity when produced in tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avesani Linda

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, with therapeutic applications in several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Oral administration of this cytokine alone, or in combination with disease-associated autoantigens could confer protection form the onset of a specific autoimmune disease through the induction of oral tolerance. Transgenic plants are attractive systems for production of therapeutic proteins because of the ability to do large scale-up at low cost, and the low maintenance requirements. They are highly amenable to oral administration and could become effective delivery systems without extensive protein purification. We investigated the ability of tobacco plants to produce high levels of biologically-active viral and murine IL-10. Results Three different subcellular targeting strategies were assessed in transient expression experiments, and stable transgenic tobacco plants were generated with the constructs that yielded the highest accumulation levels by targeting the recombinant proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. The best yields using this strategy in T1 plants were 10.8 and 37.0 μg/g fresh leaf weight for viral and murine IL-10, respectively. The recombinant proteins were purified from transgenic leaf material and characterized in terms of their N-glycan composition, dimerization and biological activity in in vitro assays. Both molecules formed stable dimers, were able to activate the IL-10 signaling pathway and to induce specific anti-inflammatory responses in mouse J774 macrophage cells. Conclusion Tobacco plants are able to correctly process viral and murine IL-10 into biologically active dimers, therefore representing a suitable platform for the production for these cytokines. The accumulation levels obtained are high enough to allow delivery of an immunologically relevant dose of IL-10 in a reasonable amount of leaf material, without extensive purification. This study paves the

  7. Bioreactor Transient Exposure Activates Specific Neurotrophic Pathway in Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmitti, V.; Benedetti, E.; Caracciolo, V.; Sebastiani, P.; Di Loreto, S.

    2010-02-01

    Altered gravity forces might influence neuroplasticity and can provoke changes in biochemical mechanisms. In this contest, neurotrophins have a pivotal role, particularly nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A suspension of dissociated cortical cells from rat embryos was exposed to 24 h of microgravity before plating in normal adherent culture system. Expression and transductional signalling pathways of NGF and BDNF were assessed at the end of maturational process (8-10 days in vitro). Rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWV) pre-exposition did not induce changes in NGF expression and its high affinity receptor TrkA. On the contrary both BDNF expression and its high affinity receptor TrkB were strongly up-regulated, inducing Erk-5, but not Erk-1/2 activation and, in turn, MEF2C over-expression and activation. According to our previous and present results, we postulate that relatively short microgravitational stimuli, applied to neural cells during the developmental stage, exert a long time activation of specific neurotrophic pathways.

  8. The effects of specific preconditioning activities on acute sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenheimer, Joshua D; Dickin, D Clark; Reyes, Gabriel F; Dolny, Dennis G

    2009-07-01

    Previous research suggests that specific preconditioning activities such as whole-body vibration (WBV) and resistance training may play an important role in ensuing dynamic activities. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 2 preconditioning activities, WBV and power cleans (PC), on acute sprint performance. Two studies were conducted in which 14 (WBV) and 9 (PC) male track and field athletes were subjects. The WBV treatment consisted of 4 bouts of 5 seconds of high-knee running on a vibrating platform at 0, 30, 40, or 50 Hz. The PC treatment consisted of 3 PC reps at 90% 1RM. In both cases, acute sprint performance was the dependent variable of interest. For WBV, split times were recorded at 10, 20, and 40 m. Reaction times (RXN) as well as 5-, 10-, and 40-m split times were recorded for the PC study. Results indicated no significant differences between treatment and nontreatment groups for both studies. However, significant correlations were present between RXN and 5-m splits (r = 0.65) and RXN and 10-m splits (r = 0.63), although they decreased as a function of sprint distance to r = 0.43 at 40 m. These results suggest little efficacy for the use of WBV and PC as a means of augmenting acute sprint performance. However, a trend within the 30-Hz protocol may suggest that WBV as part of a warm-up for sprinting activities greater than 40 m (i.e., 100 m) could potentially result in a decreased sprint time of nearly 1/10th of a second, which is worth future consideration.

  9. Increased antitumor activity of tumor-specific peptide modified thymopentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Xingzhen; Li, Bin; Liu, Meng; Chen, Jiao; Gao, Xiangdong; Zheng, Heng

    2014-12-01

    Thymopoietin pentapeptide (thymopentin, TP5), an immunomodulatory peptide, has been successfully used as an immune system enhancer for treating immune deficiency, cancer, and infectious diseases. However, poor penetration into tumors remains a key limitation to the efficacy and application of TP5. iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC) has been introduced to certain anticancer agents, and increased specific tumor penetrability of drugs and cell internalization have been observed. In the present study, we fused this iRGD fragment with the C-terminal of TP5 to yield a new product, TP5-iRGD. Cell attachment assay showed that TP5-iRGD exhibits more extensive attachment to the melanoma cell line B16F10 than wild-type TP5. Tumor cell viability assay showed that iRGD conjugation with the TP5 C-terminus increases the basal antiproliferative activity of the pentapeptide against the melanoma cell line B16F10, the human lung cancer cell line H460, and the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Subsequent injections of TP5-iRGD inhibited in vivo melanoma progression more efficiently than the native TP5. Murine spleen lymphocyte proliferation assay also showed that TP5-iRGD and the parent pentapeptide feature nearly identical spleen lymphocyte proliferation activities. We built an integrin αvβ3 and TP5-iRGD computational binding model to investigate the mechanism by which TP5-iRGD promotes increased activity further. Conjugation with iRGD promotes binding to integrin αvβ3, thereby increasing the tumor-homing efficiency of the resultant peptide. These experimental and computational observations of increased TP5-iRGD activity help broaden the usage of TP5 and reflect the great application potential of the peptide as an anticancer agent.

  10. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  11. Location specific forecasting of maximum and minimum temperatures over India by using the statistical bias corrected output of global forecasting system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V R Durai; Rashmi Bhardwaj

    2014-07-01

    The output from Global Forecasting System (GFS) T574L64 operational at India Meteorological Department (IMD), New Delhi is used for obtaining location specific quantitative forecast of maximum and minimum temperatures over India in the medium range time scale. In this study, a statistical bias correction algorithm has been introduced to reduce the systematic bias in the 24–120 hour GFS model location specific forecast of maximum and minimum temperatures for 98 selected synoptic stations, representing different geographical regions of India. The statistical bias correction algorithm used for minimizing the bias of the next forecast is Decaying Weighted Mean (DWM), as it is suitable for small samples. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the skill of Direct Model Output (DMO) and Bias Corrected (BC) GFS for location specific forecast of maximum and minimum temperatures over India. The performance skill of 24–120 hour DMO and BC forecast of GFS model is evaluated for all the 98 synoptic stations during summer (May–August 2012) and winter (November 2012–February 2013) seasons using different statistical evaluation skill measures. The magnitude of Mean Absolute Error (MAE) and Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) for BC GFS forecast is lower than DMO during both summer and winter seasons. The BC GFS forecasts have higher skill score as compared to GFS DMO over most of the stations in all day-1 to day-5 forecasts during both summer and winter seasons. It is concluded from the study that the skill of GFS statistical BC forecast improves over the GFS DMO remarkably and hence can be used as an operational weather forecasting system for location specific forecast over India.

  12. Immediate effects of scoliosis-specific corrective exercises on the Cobb angle after one week and after one year of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Zapata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We are unaware of any studies describing the immediate effects of scoliosis-specific exercises on the Cobb angle measured by radiograph. This study aimed to describe the differences between radiographs obtained with and without corrective exercises after initial training and after one year. Methods A female with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was first seen at age 13 years, 0 months with a Risser 0. She had a 43o left lumbar, 15o right thoracic curve. She was seen again after 6, 18 and 30 months and performed exercises from 18 to 30 months. She performed Barcelona Scoliosis Physical Therapy School (BSPTS exercises for a four-curve type (lumbar dominant with pelvis deviation to the lumbar concave side. At 18 and 30 months, x-rays were obtained with and without performing corrective exercises. Results At 6 months, her lumbar and thoracic curves measured 41o and 28o, respectively. At 18 months, her lumbar and thoracic curves measured 47 o and 30o, respectively. Also at 18 months, immediately after her x-ray in the relaxed standing position, she performed her corrective exercises in standing with arms lowered for a second x-ray. Her lumbar and thoracic curves remained similar and measured 43o and 32o, respectively. At 30 months, she performed unsolicited corrective exercises during the x-ray. Her lumbar and thoracic curves measured 26o and 41o, respectively. Another x-ray in the relaxed position revealed lumbar and thoracic curves measuring 39o and 35o, respectively. The immediate effect of corrective exercises after a year of training was a 33 % improvement at the lumbar spine compared to only a 9 % improvement the previous year. Conclusion After initial training, corrective exercises during a standing x-ray did not significantly improve the Cobb angle for the major lumbar curve compared to the relaxed standing x-ray. However, a year after performing exercises, unsolicited corrective exercises resulted in a

  13. Correction factors for A1SL ionization chamber dosimetry in TomoTherapy: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Rodriguez-Romero, Ruth; Sanchez-Rubio, Patricia; Miguel Gonzalez-Castano, Diego; Gomez, Faustino; Nunez, Luis; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Pardo-Montero, Juan [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Madrid 28222 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain) and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, 28222 (Spain); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middx, TW11 OLW (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, an international working group on nonstandard fields presented a new formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [Alfonso et al., Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] which has been adopted by AAPM TG-148. This work presents an experimental determination of the correction factors for reference dosimetry with an Exradin A1SL thimble ionization chamber in a TomoTherapy unit, focusing on: (i) machine-specific reference field, (ii) plan-class-specific reference field, and (iii) two clinical treatments. Methods: Ionization chamber measurements were performed in the TomoTherapy unit for intermediate (machine-specific and plan-class-specific) calibration fields, based on the reference conditions defined by AAPM TG-148, and two clinical treatments (lung and head-and-neck). Alanine reference dosimetry was employed to determine absorbed dose to water at the point of interest for the fields under investigation. The corresponding chamber correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber measurements ratios. Results: Two different methods of determining the beam quality correction factor k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for the A1SL ionization chamber in this TomoTherapy unit, where reference conditions for conventional beam quality determination cannot be met, result in consistent values. The observed values of overall correction factors obtained for intermediate and clinical fields are consistently around 0.98 with a typical expanded relative uncertainty of 2% (k = 2), which when considered make such correction factors compatible with unity. However, all of them are systematically lower than unity, which is shown to be significant when a hypothesis test assuming a t-student distribution is performed (p=1.8x10{sup -2}). Correction factors k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub p{sub c{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub p}{sub c}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}} and k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s

  14. Correction factor to account for dispersion in sharp-interface models of terrestrial freshwater lenses and active seawater intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Adrian D.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a recent analytical solution that describes the steady-state extent of freshwater lenses adjacent to gaining rivers in saline aquifers is improved by applying an empirical correction for dispersive effects. Coastal aquifers experiencing active seawater intrusion (i.e., seawater is flowing inland) are presented as an analogous situation to the terrestrial freshwater lens problem, although the inland boundary in the coastal aquifer situation must represent both a source of freshwater and an outlet of saline groundwater. This condition corresponds to the freshwater river in the terrestrial case. The empirical correction developed in this research applies to situations of flowing saltwater and static freshwater lenses, although freshwater recirculation within the lens is a prominent consequence of dispersive effects, just as seawater recirculates within the stable wedges of coastal aquifers. The correction is a modification of a previous dispersive correction for Ghyben-Herzberg approximations of seawater intrusion (i.e., stable seawater wedges). Comparison between the sharp interface from the modified analytical solution and the 50% saltwater concentration from numerical modelling, using a range of parameter combinations, demonstrates the applicability of both the original analytical solution and its corrected form. The dispersive correction allows for a prediction of the depth to the middle of the mixing zone within about 0.3 m of numerically derived values, at least on average for the cases considered here. It is demonstrated that the uncorrected form of the analytical solution should be used to calculate saltwater flow rates, which closely match those obtained through numerical simulation. Thus, a combination of the unmodified and corrected analytical solutions should be utilized to explore both the saltwater fluxes and lens extent, depending on the dispersiveness of the problem. The new method developed in this paper is simple to apply and offers a

  15. Codependent activators direct myoblast-specific MyoD transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Geles, Kenneth G; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A; Tjian, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Although FoxO and Pax proteins represent two important families of transcription factors in determining cell fate, they had not been functionally or physically linked together in mediating regulation of a common target gene during normal cellular transcription programs. Here, we identify MyoD, a key regulator of myogenesis, as a direct target of FoxO3 and Pax3/7 in myoblasts. Our cell-based assays and in vitro studies reveal a tight codependent partnership between FoxO3 and Pax3/7 to coordinately recruit RNA polymerase II and form a preinitiation complex (PIC) to activate MyoD transcription in myoblasts. The role of FoxO3 in regulating muscle differentiation is confirmed in vivo by observed defects in muscle regeneration caused by MyoD downregulation in FoxO3 null mice. These data establish a mutual interdependence and functional link between two families of transcription activators serving as potential signaling sensors and regulators of cell fate commitment in directing tissue specific MyoD transcription.

  16. Activities-Specific Balance Confidence in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylva Nilsagård

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the validity of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS. Design. A multicentre, cross-sectional study. Setting. Six rural and urban Swedish sites, including specialized units at hospitals and primary care centers. Participants. A sample of 84 PwMS with subjective gait and balance impairment but still able to walk 100 m (comparable with EDSS 1–6. Outcome Measures. Timed Up and Go, Timed Up and Gocog, 25-foot Timed Walk Test, Four Square Step Test, Dynamic Gait Index, Chair Stand Test, 12-item MS Walking Scale, self-reported falls, and use of assistive walking device were used for validation. Results. The concurrent convergent validity was moderate to good (0.50 to −0.75 with the highest correlation found for the 12-item MS Walking Scale. The ABC discriminated between multiple fallers and nonfallers but not between men and women. Ecological validity is suggested since ABC discriminated between users of assistive walking device and nonusers. The internal consistency was high at α=0.95, and interitem correlations were between 0.30 and 0.83. Conclusion. This study supports the validity of the ABC for persons with mild-to-moderate MS. The participants lacked balance confidence in many everyday activities, likely restricting their participation in society.

  17. Activities-specific balance confidence in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsagård, Ylva; Carling, Anna; Forsberg, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the validity of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design. A multicentre, cross-sectional study. Setting. Six rural and urban Swedish sites, including specialized units at hospitals and primary care centers. Participants. A sample of 84 PwMS with subjective gait and balance impairment but still able to walk 100 m (comparable with EDSS 1-6). Outcome Measures. Timed Up and Go, Timed Up and Go(cog), 25-foot Timed Walk Test, Four Square Step Test, Dynamic Gait Index, Chair Stand Test, 12-item MS Walking Scale, self-reported falls, and use of assistive walking device were used for validation. Results. The concurrent convergent validity was moderate to good (0.50 to -0.75) with the highest correlation found for the 12-item MS Walking Scale. The ABC discriminated between multiple fallers and nonfallers but not between men and women. Ecological validity is suggested since ABC discriminated between users of assistive walking device and nonusers. The internal consistency was high at α = 0.95, and interitem correlations were between 0.30 and 0.83. Conclusion. This study supports the validity of the ABC for persons with mild-to-moderate MS. The participants lacked balance confidence in many everyday activities, likely restricting their participation in society.

  18. Survey of ONERA activities on adaptive-wall applications and computation of residual corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The research undertaken concerning the computation and/or reduction of wall interference follows two main axes: improvement of wall correction determinations, and use of adaptive flexible walls. The use of wall-measured data to compute interference effects is reliable when the model representation is assessed by signatures with known boundary conditions. When the computed interferences are not easily applicable to correcting the results (especially for gradients in two-dimensional cases), the flexible adaptive walls in operation in T2 are an efficient and assessed means of reducing the boundary effects to a negligible level, if the direction and speed of the flow are accurately measured on the boundary. The extension of the use of adaptive walls to three-dimensional cases may be attempted since the residual corrections are assumed to be small and are computable.

  19. In Operation Detection and Correction of Rotor Imbalance in Jet Engines Using Active Vibration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchala, Daniel W.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Brown, Gerald V.; Lawrence, Charles; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Jet Engines may experience severe vibration due to the sudden imbalance caused by blade failure. This research investigates employment of on board magnetic bearings or piezoelectric actuators to cancel these forces in flight. This operation requires identification of the source of the vibrations via an expert system, determination of the required phase angles and amplitudes for the correction forces, and application of the desired control signals to the magnetic bearings or piezo electric actuators. This paper will show the architecture of the software system, details of the control algorithm used for the sudden imbalance correction project described above, and the laboratory test results.

  20. In Operation Detection and Correction of Rotor Imbalance in Jet Engines Using Active Vibration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchala, Daniel W.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Brown, Gerald V.; Lawrence, Charles; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Jet Engines may experience severe vibration due to the sudden imbalance caused by blade failure. This research investigates employment of on board magnetic bearings or piezoelectric actuators to cancel these forces in flight. This operation requires identification of the source of the vibrations via an expert system, determination of the required phase angles and amplitudes for the correction forces, and application of the desired control signals to the magnetic bearings or piezo electric actuators. This paper will show the architecture of the software system, details of the control algorithm used for the sudden imbalance correction project described above, and the laboratory test results.

  1. LOOKING INTO THE EFL STUDENTS TYPE OF FEEDBACKS ON PEER CORRECTION ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunisrina Qismullah Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research studies the types of feedbacks made by EFL students in a writing class. A number of 25 students essays were collected and analysed. The results revealed that a number of 61 responding feedbacks were found in the types of support, sharing knowledge, negotiation, appreciation and criticism. Meanwhile, 142 correcting feedbacks were found in the types of coded, uncoded, a combination of coded and uncoded and direct answer. The type most used in responding feedback was support, which indicates that it is an important pursuit in these students learning to drive each other into improving their writing skills with confidence. Whilst the least used was criticism, and this indicates that it was not considerably favoured to be given in the peer correction feedbacks since they restrain encouragement and cause social anxiety. The type most used in correcting feedbacks was a combination of coded and uncoded. This signifies that to provide both mark and symbol on an error can avoid confusion between the student corrector and the student writer. The least used was direct answer, which signified that it was only done by students who had high English proficiency and confidence to provide the correct answer directly on the errors.

  2. Corrective Action Management Unit Report of Post-Closure Care Activities Calendar Year 2016.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Little, Bonnie Colleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) consisted of a containment cell, two treatment systems, four associated waste staging and storage areas, and support areas; all were used for management of remediation wastes between 1997 and 2003.

  3. Three maize root-specific genes are not correctly expressed in regenerated caps in the absence of the quiescent center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, G; Luján, R; Campos, M E; Reyes, A; Nieto-Sotelo, J; Feldman, L J; Cassab, G I

    2000-06-01

    The quiescent center is viewed as an architectural template in the root apical meristem of all angiosperm and gymnosperm root tips. In roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the quiescent center inhibits differentiation of contacting initial cells and maintains the surrounding initial cells as stem cells. Here, the role of the quiescent center in the development of the maize (Zeca mays L.) root cap has been further explored. Three maize root-specific genes were identified. Two of these were exclusively expressed in the root cap and one of them encoded a GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase. Most likely these two genes are structural, tissue-specific markers of the cap. The third gene, a putative glycine-rich cell wall protein, was expressed in the cap and in the root epidermis and, conceivably is a positional marker of the cap. Microsurgical and molecular data indicate that the quiescent center and cap initials may regulate the positional and structural expression of these genes in the cap and thereby control root cap development.

  4. Is active participation in specific sport activities linked with back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, A.M.; Gausel, AM; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2007-01-01

    specific kinds of sports and self-reported back problems. Back pain is a common complaint in young people and physical inactivity is generally thought to contribute to this. However, some specific sport activities may be detrimental or beneficial to the spine. Information was collected through a semi......-structured interview, a physical examination, and a questionnaire. Associations for back pain, low back pain, mid back pain and neck pain in the preceding month were investigated in relation to specific sports. Associations were controlled for body mass index, puberty stage and sex. There was no association between...

  5. Shh and ZRS enhancer colocalisation is specific to the zone of polarising activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Iain; Lettice, Laura A; Hill, Robert E; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2016-08-15

    Limb-specific Shh expression is regulated by the (∼1 Mb distant) ZRS enhancer. In the mouse, limb bud-restricted spatiotemporal Shh expression occurs from ∼E10 to E11.5 at the distal posterior margin and is essential for correct autopod formation. Here, we have analysed the higher-order chromatin conformation of Shh in expressing and non-expressing tissues, both by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and by chromosome conformation capture (5C). Conventional and super-resolution light microscopy identified significantly elevated frequencies of Shh/ZRS colocalisation only in the Shh-expressing regions of the limb bud, in a conformation consistent with enhancer-promoter loop formation. However, in all tissues and at all developmental stages analysed, Shh-ZRS spatial distances were still consistently shorter than those to a neural enhancer located between Shh and ZRS in the genome. 5C identified a topologically associating domain (TAD) over the Shh/ZRS genomic region and enriched interactions between Shh and ZRS throughout E11.5 embryos. Shh/ZRS colocalisation, therefore, correlates with the spatiotemporal domain of limb bud-specific Shh expression, but close Shh and ZRS proximity in the nucleus occurs regardless of whether the gene or enhancer is active. We suggest that this constrained chromatin configuration optimises the opportunity for the active enhancer to locate and instigate the expression of Shh.

  6. Very high specific activity ⁶⁶/⁶⁸Ga from zinc targets for PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, J W; Lopez-Rodriguez, V; Gaspar-Carcamo, R E; Valdovinos, H F; Valle-Gonzalez, M; Trejo-Ballado, F; Severin, G W; Barnhart, T E; Nickles, R J; Avila-Rodriguez, M A

    2012-08-01

    This work describes the production of very high specific activity (66/68)Ga from (nat)Zn(p,n) and (66)Zn(p,n) using proton irradiations between 7 and 16 MeV, with emphasis on (66)Ga for use with common bifunctional chelates. Principal radiometallic impurities are (65)Zn from (p,x) and (67)Ga from (p,n). Separation of radiogallium from target material is accomplished with cation exchange chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution. Efficient recycling of Zn target material is possible using electrodeposition of Zn from its chloride form, but these measures are not necessary to achieve high specific activity or near-quantitative radiolabeling yields from natural targets. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) measures less than 2 ppb non-radioactive gallium in the final product, and the reactivity of (66)Ga with common bifunctional chelates, decay corrected to the end of irradiation, is 740 GBq/μmol (20 Ci/μmol) using natural zinc as a target material. Recycling enriched (66)Zn targets increased the reactivity of (66)Ga with common bifunctional chelates. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G.; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:26411903

  8. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Canals

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  9. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-10-13

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  10. Active correction of the tilt angle of the surface plane with respect to the rotation axis during azimuthal scan

    CERN Document Server

    Sereno, M; Debiossac, M; Kalashnyk, N; Roncin, P

    2016-01-01

    A procedure to measure the residual tilt angle $\\tau$ between a flat surface and the azimuthal rotation axis of the sample holder is described. When the incidence angle $\\theta$ and readout of the azimuthal angle $\\phi$ are controlled by motors, an active compensation mechanism can be implemented to reduce the effect of the tilt angle during azimuthal motion. After this correction, the effective angle of incidence is kept fixed, and only the small residual oscillation of the scattering plane remains.

  11. Active correction of aperture discontinuities (ACAD) for space telescope pupils: a parametic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shaklan, Stuart; Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; Choquet, Élodie; Carlotti, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    As the performance of coronagraphs improves, the achievable contrast is more and more dependent of the shape of the pupil. The future generation of space and ground based coronagraphic instruments will have to achieve high contrast levels on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes. To correct for the high amplitude aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror, we explore a two deformable mirror (DM) method. The major difficulty of several DM methods...

  12. Increased parasellar activity on gallium SPECT is not specific for active cluster headache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sianard-Gainko, J.; Milet, J.; Ghuysen, V.; Schoenen, J. (Univ. Departments of Neurology and Nuclear Medicine, Liege (Belgium))

    1994-04-01

    The authors have performed gallium SPECT head scans in 30 successive cluster headache (CH) patients and in 7 migraineurs without aura. Parasellar hyperactivity was judged as present in 81% of chronic CH patients. 54% of episodic CH patients in an active period, 56% of episodic CH patients in remission and 71% of migraineurs. No significant correlations were found between the SPECT images and the duration of the disease, of cluster periods or of remissions. Increased parasellar activity on gallium SPECT is thus not specific for CH, nor for the active period of episodic CH. The method lacks reliability for investigation of putative cavernous sinus inflammation. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Mitotic activity and specification of fibrocyte subtypes in the developing rat cochlear lateral wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutai, H; Nagashima, R; Fujii, M; Matsunaga, T

    2009-11-10

    Spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs) in the mammalian cochlear lateral wall participate in K(+) recycling; they are classified into five subtypes based on their morphology, distribution, and function. Regeneration of SLFs is a potential therapeutic strategy for correcting several types of hearing loss, prompting us to investigate how SLF subtypes are established during development. We compared transitional SLF-type marker expression with mitotic activity to evaluate proliferation-differentiation relationships in SLFs from postnatal rat cochleae. I.p. injection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) demonstrated that the overall mitotic activity of SLFs decreased significantly between postnatal day 7 (P7) and P10. For all developmental periods, BrdU incorporation was weakest in the area where type I SLFs reside. The onset of expression of markers for type II/IV SLFs followed the reduced mitotic activity of the cells, whereas that of aquaporin-1, a marker for type III SLFs, was already detectable at P7, when the type III SLFs were still proliferating vigorously. Distribution of BrdU(+) cells increased in the area of type I SLFs between P7 and P10, suggesting migration of SLFs from adjacent areas. We conclude that the time course of development of SLFs is subtype-specific.

  14. "Using recruitment source timing and diagnosticity to enhance applicants' occupation-specific human capital": Correction to Campion, Ployhart, and Campion (2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Reports an error in "Using Recruitment Source Timing and Diagnosticity to Enhance Applicants' Occupation-Specific Human Capital" by Michael C. Campion, Robert E. Ployhart and Michael A. Campion (Journal of Applied Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Feb 02, 2017, np). In the article, the following headings were inadvertently set at the wrong level: Method, Participants and Procedure, Measures, Occupation specific human capital, Symbolic jobs, Relevant majors, Occupation-specific capital hotspots, Source timing, Source diagnosticity, Results, and Discussion. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2017-04566-001.) This study proposes that reaching applicants through more diagnostic recruitment sources earlier in their educational development (e.g., in high school) can lead them to invest more in their occupation-specific human capital (OSHC), thereby making them higher quality candidates. Using a sample of 78,157 applicants applying for jobs within a desirable professional occupation in the public sector, results indicate that applicants who report hearing about the occupation earlier, and applicants who report hearing about the occupation through more diagnostic sources, have higher levels of OSHC upon application. Additionally, source timing and diagnosticity affect the likelihood of candidates applying for jobs symbolic of the occupation, selecting relevant majors, and attending educational institutions with top programs related to the occupation. These findings suggest a firm's recruiting efforts may influence applicants' OSHC investment strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Effect of ultrasonic specific energy on waste activated sludge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-22

    Mar 22, 2010 ... Full Length Research Paper. Effect of ultrasonic ... Key word: Waste activated sludge (WAS), ultrasonic, solubilization, disintegration degree, enzyme activity. ... burning and land filling, have been carried out for the disposal of ...

  16. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery over turbid coastal waters using active and passive remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaoling; ZHANG Tinglu; GONG Wei; CHEN Liqiong; LU Jianzhong; ZHAO Xi; ZHANG Wei; YU Zhifeng

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an atmospheric correction method to process MODIS/Aqua (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) ocean color imagery over turbid coastal waters with the aid of concurrent CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) aerosol data, assuming that there exists "nonturbid" water in the study area where MODIS aerosol optical properties can be retrieved accurately. Aerosol properties from CALIOP measurements were obtained and related to those from MODIS. This relationship, combined with CALIOP aerosol data, was extended to turbid water to derive MODIS aerosol properties, where atmospheric correction using MODIS data alone often fails. By combining MODIS and CALIOP data, aerosol signals were separated from the total signals at the satellite level, and water-leaving radiances in turbid waters were subsequently derived. This method was tested on several MODIS/Aqua ocean color images over South China turbid waters. Comparison with field data shows that this method was effective in reducing the errors in the retrieved water-leaving radiance values to some extent. In the Zhujiang (Pearl) River Estuary, this method did not overestimate the aerosol effects as severely, and provided far fewer negative water-leaving radiance values than the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) default methods that used MODIS data alone.

  17. Specific Energy Characteristics of Nanoporous Carbon Activated by Orthophosphoric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.I. Rachiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of the amount of phosphoric acid on the structure nanoporous carbon materials (NCM obtained from raw materials of plant origin. The results voltammetry defined specific capacitance characteristics of NCM and conditions its synthesis with optimal energy parameters established. It is shown that reducing the number of lignin-cellulose materials in precursor volume due to carbonization leads to a decline in specific capacity of NCM approximately 6-20 %.

  18. Synthesis of a high specific activity methyl sulfone tritium isotopologue of fevipiprant (NVP-QAW039).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Van T; Goujon, Jean-Yves; Meisterhans, Christian; Frommherz, Matthias; Bauer, Carsten

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a triple tritiated isotopologue of the CRTh2 antagonist NVP-QAW039 (fevipiprant) with a specific activity >3 TBq/mmol is described. Key to the high specific activity is the methylation of a bench-stable dimeric disulfide precursor that is in situ reduced to the corresponding thiol monomer and methylated with [(3)H3]MeONos having per se a high specific activity. The high specific activity of the tritiated active pharmaceutical ingredient obtained by a build-up approach is discussed in the light of the specific activity usually to be expected if hydrogen tritium exchange methods were applied.

  19. Lightweight Specifications for Parallel Correctness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    series (series), encryption and decryption (crypt), and LU factorization (lufact) — as well as a parallel molecular dynamic simulator (moldyn), ray...111, 57, 132]). The PJ benchmarks include an app computing a Monte Carlo approximation of π (pi), a parallel cryptographic key cracking app (keysearch3...an app for parallel rendering Mandelbrot Set images (mandelbrot), and a parallel branch-and-bound search for optimal phylogenetic trees (phylogeny

  20. 50 CFR 635.32 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for chartering arrangements. (2) Activities subject to the provisions of this section include, but are... approved food bank networks; or chartering arrangements. Such activities must be authorized in writing and... permit, display permit, chartering permit, or shark research permit issued in response to requests for...

  1. Gene program-specific regulation of PGC-1{alpha} activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Søren F; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) activation coordinates induction of the hepatic fasting response through coactivation of numerous transcription factors and gene programs. In the June 15, 2011, issue of Genes & Development, Lustig and colleagues (pp...

  2. Stimulus-specific delay activity in human primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serences, John T; Ester, Edward F; Vogel, Edward K; Awh, Edward

    2009-02-01

    Working memory (WM) involves maintaining information in an on-line state. One emerging view is that information in WM is maintained via sensory recruitment, such that information is stored via sustained activity in the sensory areas that encode the to-be-remembered information. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we observed that key sensory regions such as primary visual cortex (V1) showed little evidence of sustained increases in mean activation during a WM delay period, though such amplitude increases have typically been used to determine whether a region is involved in on-line maintenance. However, a multivoxel pattern analysis of delay-period activity revealed a sustained pattern of activation in V1 that represented only the intentionally stored feature of a multifeature object. Moreover, the pattern of delay activity was qualitatively similar to that observed during the discrimination of sensory stimuli, suggesting that WM representations in V1 are reasonable "copies" of those evoked during pure sensory processing.

  3. Induction of AMPK activity corrects early pathophysiological alterations in the subtotal nephrectomy model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriano, Joseph; Sharma, Kumar; Blantz, Roland C; Deng, Aihua

    2013-09-01

    The rat kidney ablation and infarction (A/I) model of subtotal or 5/6th nephrectomy is the most commonly studied model of nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD). The A/I kidney at 1 wk exhibits reductions in kidney function, as determined by glomerular filtration rate, and diminished metabolic efficiency as determined by oxygen consumption per sodium transport (QO2/TNa). As renoprotective AMPK activity is affected by metabolic changes and cellular stress, we evaluated AMPK activity in this model system. We show that these early pathophysiological changes are accompanied by a paradoxical decrease in AMPK activity. Over time, these kidney parameters progressively worsen with extensive kidney structural, functional, metabolic, and fibrotic changes observed at 4 wk after A/I. We show that induction of AMPK activity with either metformin or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide increases AMPK activity in this model and also corrects kidney metabolic inefficiency, improves kidney function, and ameliorates kidney fibrosis and structural alterations. We conclude that AMPK activity is reduced in the subtotal nephrectomy model of nondiabetic CKD, that altered regulation of AMPK is coincident with the progression of disease parameters, and that restoration of AMPK activity can suppress the progressive loss of function characteristic of this model. We propose that induction of AMPK activity may prove an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of nondiabetic CKD.

  4. Cell type-specific neuroprotective activity of untranslocated prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Restelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A key pathogenic role in prion diseases was proposed for a cytosolic form of the prion protein (PrP. However, it is not clear how cytosolic PrP localization influences neuronal viability, with either cytotoxic or anti-apoptotic effects reported in different studies. The cellular mechanism by which PrP is delivered to the cytosol of neurons is also debated, and either retrograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum or inefficient translocation during biosynthesis has been proposed. We investigated cytosolic PrP biogenesis and effect on cell viability in primary neuronal cultures from different mouse brain regions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mild proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of an untranslocated form of cytosolic PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, but not in cerebellar granules. A cyclopeptolide that interferes with the correct insertion of the PrP signal sequence into the translocon increased the amount of untranslocated PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, and induced its synthesis in cerebellar neurons. Untranslocated PrP boosted the resistance of cortical and hippocampal neurons to apoptotic insults but had no effect on cerebellar cells. SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate cell type-dependent differences in the efficiency of PrP translocation, and argue that cytosolic PrP targeting might serve a physiological neuroprotective function.

  5. Evaluation of tumor-specific promoter activities in melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, B; Makhija, SK; Nettelbeck, DM; Rivera, AA; Komarova, S; Zhou, F; Yamamoto, M; Haisma, HJ; Alvarez, RD; Curiel, DT; Zhu, ZB

    Gene therapy is a novel therapy for melanoma. To date, however, there is still no powerful tumor specific promoter (TSP) to restrict the transgene expression in melanoma cells. In order to define a useful TSP for targeting in the context of melanoma gene therapy, four promoters, the cyclooxygenase-2

  6. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  7. Analysis of active closed cross-section slender beams based on asymptotically correct thin-wall beam theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouli, F.; Langlois, R. G.; Afagh, F. F.

    2007-02-01

    An asymptotically correct theory for multi-cell thin-wall anisotropic slender beams that includes the shell bending strain measures is extended to include embedded active fibre composites (AFCs). A closed-form solution of the asymptotically correct cross-sectional actuation force and moments is obtained. Active thin-wall beam theories found in the literature neglect the shell bending strains, which lead to incorrect predictions for certain cross-sections, while the theory presented is shown to overcome this shortcoming. The theory is implemented and verified against single-cell examples that were solved using the University of Michigan/Variational Beam Sectional Analysis (UM/VABS) software. The stiffness constants and the actuation vector are obtained for two-cell and three-cell active cross-sections. The theory is argued to be reliable for efficient initial design analysis and interdisciplinary parametric or optimization studies of thin-wall closed cross-section slender beams with no initial twist or obliqueness.

  8. Mutation specific functions of EGFR result in a mutation-specific downstream pathway activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Eraslan-Erdem (Lale); Y. Gao; N.K. Kloosterhof (Nanne); Y. Atlasi (Yaser); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); A. Sacchetti (Andrea); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); J.G.J.V. Aerts (Joachim); P.J. French (Pim)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently mutated in various types of cancer. Although all oncogenic mutations are considered activating, different tumour types have different mutation spectra. It is possible that functional differences underlie this tumour-ty

  9. A new active method to correct for the effects of complex apertures on coronagraph performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Fogarty, Kevin; Perrin, Marshall D.; Soummer, Remi; Norman, Colin Arthur

    2017-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the aperture geometry of the future space (WFIRST, LUVOIR) and ground based-telescope (E-ELT, TMT) will limit the performance of the next generation of coronagraphic instruments for high contrast imaging of exoplanets.We propose here a new closed-loop optimization technique to use the deformable mirrors to correct for the effects of complex apertures on coronagraph performance. This method is a new alternative to the ACAD technique previously developed by our group. This technique allows the use of any coronagraph designed for continuous apertures, with complex, segmented, apertures, maintaining high performance in contrast and throughput. Finally, this closed loop technique allows flexibility to adapt for changing pupil geometries (e.g. in case of segment failure or maintenance for ground-based telescopes), or "manufacturing imperfections in the coronagraph assembly and alignment.We present a numerical study on several pupil geometries (segmented LUVOIR type aperture, WFIRST, ELTs) for which we obtained high contrast levels with several deformable mirror setups (size, number of actuators, separation between them), coronagraphs (apodized pupil lyot and vortex coronagraphs) and spectral bandwidths. Finally, using the results of this study, we will present recommendations for future coronagraphic instruments.

  10. Active stream segregation specifically involves the left human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deike, Susann; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André

    2010-06-14

    An important aspect of auditory scene analysis is the sequential grouping of similar sounds into one "auditory stream" while keeping competing streams separate. In the present low-noise fMRI study we presented sequences of alternating high-pitch (A) and low-pitch (B) complex harmonic tones using acoustic parameters that allow the perception of either two separate streams or one alternating stream. However, the subjects were instructed to actively and continuously segregate the A from the B stream. This was controlled by the additional instruction to listen for rare level deviants only in the low-pitch stream. Compared to the control condition in which only one non-separable stream was presented the active segregation of the A from the B stream led to a selective increase of activation in the left auditory cortex (AC). Together with a similar finding from a previous study using a different acoustic cue for streaming, namely timbre, this suggests that the left auditory cortex plays a dominant role in active sequential stream segregation. However, we found cue differences within the left AC: Whereas in the posterior areas, including the planum temporale, activation increased for both acoustic cues, the anterior areas, including Heschl's gyrus, are only involved in stream segregation based on pitch.

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of hypnosis effects on gastric myoelectrical activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Enck

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The effects of hypnosis on physiological (gastrointestinal functions are incompletely understood, and it is unknown whether they are hypnosis-specific and gut-specific, or simply unspecific effects of relaxation. DESIGN: Sixty-two healthy female volunteers were randomly assigned to either a single session of hypnotic suggestion of ingesting an appetizing meal and an unappetizing meal, or to relax and concentrate on having an appetizing or unappetizing meal, while the electrogastrogram (EGG was recorded. At the end of the session, participants drank water until they felt full, in order to detect EGG-signal changes after ingestion of a true gastric load. During both conditions participants reported their subjective well-being, hunger and disgust at several time points. RESULTS: Imagining eating food induced subjective feelings of hunger and disgust as well as changes in the EGG similar to, but more pronounced than those seen with a real gastric water load during both hypnosis and relaxation conditions. These effects were more pronounced when imagining an appetizing meal than with an unappetizing meal. There was no significant difference between the hypnosis and relaxation conditions. CONCLUSION: Imagination with and without hypnosis exhibits similar changes in subjective and objective measures in response to imagining an appetizing and an unappetizing food, indicating high sensitivity but low specificity.

  12. Activity Specific Knowledge Characteristics in the Internationalization Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate differences in the characteristics of knowledge, which is very important for the internationalization of different business activities. In particular, the focus is on internationalization in emerging markets such as China and India. Design/methodology....../approach – The paper presents a framework primarily based on knowledge management theory, which is illustrated in relation to interesting cases of four companies that are global leaders. Findings – An R&D knowledge gap still exists in China and India. Differences across business activities exist in terms...... is developed that illustrates differences between the most important knowledge for the internationalization of key business activities within MNCs. It is proposed that the technical dimension of tacit knowledge is more easily codified than the cognitive dimension of tacit knowledge. The cognitive dimension...

  13. DemTect, PANDA, EASY, and MUSIC: cognitive screening tools with age correction and weighting of subtests according to their sensitivity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbe, Elke; Calabrese, Pasquale; Fengler, Sophie; Kessler, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Many cognitive screening instruments have been developed during the last decades to detect mild cognitive dysfunction and dementia, and there is an ongoing discussion as to which tool should be used in which setting and which challenges have to be considered. Among other aspects, dependence on age is a recognized problem in screening tools which still has not found its way into common scoring procedures. Another aspect which has been handled very heterogeneously is which domain is represented in which proportion in the total score. Furthermore, screening ethnic minority patients has been identified as an important but so far widely unresolved matter. In this review, four cognitive screening tools that all follow a common, stringent concept and pay regard to some critical aspects are described: the DemTect, a "generic" tool; the PANDA for Parkinson's disease patients; the EASY, a non-verbal, culture-fair screening test for patients with migration background; and the MUSIC for patients with multiple sclerosis. All of these screening instruments have an age-correction, provide a total score in which the different subtests are weighted according to their individual sensitivity and specificity, and include tasks that are specifically aligned to the cognitive profile of the target group, including the EASY with non-verbal, culture-fair tasks to overcome language and cultural barriers. The development, main characteristics, data, and limitations of these tools are presented and discussed against the background of the current landscape of cognitive screening tools.

  14. Ileal brake activation: macronutrient-specific effects on eating behavior?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avesaat, van M.; Troost, F.J.; Ripken, D.; Hendriks, H.F.; Masclee, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background:Activation of the ileal brake, by infusing lipid directly into the distal part of the small intestine, alters gastrointestinal (GI) motility and inhibits food intake. The ileal brake effect on eating behavior of the other macronutrients is currently unknown.Objective:The objective of this

  15. Location and activity specific site-management for military locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, L.; Hulst, M. van; Meuken, D.

    2009-01-01

    pace is limited in the Netherlands and military activities, that may cause nuisance or environmental hazards, should therefore be considered and evaluated during the use of military locations. The last few years TNO and Deltares have worked on a research program on environmental effects due to milit

  16. Ileal brake activation: Macronutrient-specific effects on eating behavior?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avesaat, M. van; Troost, F.J.; Ripken, D.; Hendriks, H.F.; Aam, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of the ileal brake, by infusing lipid directly into the distal part of the small intestine, alters gastrointestinal (GI) motility and inhibits food intake. The ileal brake effect on eating behavior of the other macronutrients is currently unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective of t

  17. 10 CFR 810.8 - Activities requiring specific authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-nuclear-weapon states that do not have full-scope IAEA safeguards agreements in force. Afghanistan Albania...-Bissau* Haiti* India* Iran Iraq* Israel* Kazakhstan Kenya* Korea, People's Democratic Republic of* Kuwait... technology for an activity in any foreign country. (c) Engaging in or providing assistance or training in any...

  18. Ileal brake activation: macronutrient-specific effects on eating behavior?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avesaat, van M.; Troost, F.J.; Ripken, D.; Hendriks, H.F.; Masclee, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background:Activation of the ileal brake, by infusing lipid directly into the distal part of the small intestine, alters gastrointestinal (GI) motility and inhibits food intake. The ileal brake effect on eating behavior of the other macronutrients is currently unknown.Objective:The objective of this

  19. The specific activation of TRPC4 by Gi protein subtype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeon, J.P.; Lee, K.P.; Park, E.J.; Sung, T.S.; Kim, B.J.; Jeon, J.H.; So, I.

    2008-01-01

    The classical type of transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) is a molecular candidate for Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels in mammalian cells. Especially, TRPC4 has the similar properties to Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) activated by muscarinic stimulation in visceral sm

  20. Sensory feedback, error correction, and remapping in a multiple oscillator model of place cell activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Monaco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammals navigate by integrating self-motion signals (‘path integration’ and occasionally fixing on familiar environmental landmarks. The rat hippocampus is a model system of spatial representation in which place cells are thought to integrate both sensory and spatial information from entorhinal cortex. The localized firing fields of hippocampal place cells and entorhinal grid cells demonstrate a phase relationship with the local theta (6–10 Hz rhythm that may be a temporal signature of path integration. However, encoding self-motion in the phase of theta oscillations requires high temporal precision and is susceptible to idiothetic noise, neuronal variability, and a changing environment. We present a model based on oscillatory interference theory, previously studied in the context of grid cells, in which transient temporal synchronization among a pool of path-integrating theta oscillators produces hippocampal-like place fields. We hypothesize that a spatiotemporally extended sensory interaction with external cues modulates feedback to the theta oscillators. We implement a form of this cue-driven feedback and show that it can retrieve fixed points in the phase code of position. A single cue can smoothly reset oscillator phases to correct for both systematic errors and continuous noise in path integration. Further, simulations in which local and global cues are rotated against each other reveal a phase-code mechanism in which conflicting cue arrangements can reproduce experimentally observed distributions of ‘partial remapping’ responses. This abstract model demonstrates that phase-code feedback can provide stability to the temporal coding of position during navigation and may contribute to the context-dependence of hippocampal spatial representations. While the anatomical substrates of these processes have not been fully characterized, our findings suggest several signatures that can be evaluated in future experiments.

  1. A MCP1 fusokine with CCR2-specific tumoricidal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liangping

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CCL2 chemokine is involved in promoting cancer angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis by malignancies that express CCR2 receptor. Thus the CCL2/CCR2 axis is an attractive molecular target for anticancer drug development. Methods We have generated a novel fusion protein using GMCSF and an N-terminal truncated version of MCP1/CCL2 (6-76 [hereafter GMME1] and investigated its utility as a CCR2-specific tumoricidal agent. Results We found that distinct to full length CCL2 or its N-truncated derivative (CCL2 5-76, GMME1 bound to CCR2 on mouse lymphoma EG7, human multiple myeloma cell line U266, or murine and human medulloblastoma cell lines, and led to their death by apoptosis. We demonstrated that GMME1 specifically blocked CCR2-associated STAT3 phosphorylation and up-regulated pro-apoptotic BAX. Furthermore, GMME1 significantly inhibited EG7 tumor growth in C57BL/6 mice, and induced apoptosis of primary myeloma cells from patients. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that GMME1 is a fusokine with a potent, CCR2 receptor-mediated pro-apoptotic effect on tumor cells and could be exploited as a novel biological therapy for CCR2+ malignancies including lymphoid and central nervous system malignancies.

  2. Corrective sitting strategies: An examination of muscle activity and spine loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanharo, Raquel; Duarte, Marcos; McGill, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the load on the lumbar spine of subjects when they are asked to adjust from a slouched sitting posture into an upright posture with one of three different strategies: "free" (no instruction) and two coached patterns: "lumbopelvic" dominant and "thoracic" dominant. The activity of selected muscles and kinematic data was recorded from 20 volunteers while performing the three movement patterns to adjust sitting posture. Moments and forces at the lumbar spine were computed from an anatomically detailed model that uses kinematics and muscle activation as input variables. The lumbopelvic pattern produces less joint moment on the lumbar spine (on average 31.2±3.9Nm) when compared to the thoracic pattern (43.8±5.8Nm). However, the joint compression force was similar for these two patterns, but it was smaller in the free pattern, when no coaching was given (lumbopelvic: 1279±112N, thoracic: 1367±(125N, free: 1181±118N). Lower thoracic erector muscle activity and higher lumbar erector activity were measured in the lumbopelvic pattern in comparison with the other two. In summary the lumbopelvic pattern strategy using predominantly the movement of anterior pelvic tilt results in smaller joint moments on the lumbar spine and also positions the lumbar spine closest to the neutral posture minimizing passive tissue stress. This may be the strategy of choice for people with low back flexion intolerance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-03

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  4. The spatiotemporal pattern of Src activation at lipid rafts revealed by diffusion-corrected FRET imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoying Lu

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET have been widely applied to visualize the molecular activity in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. However, the rapid diffusion of biosensor proteins hinders a precise reconstruction of the actual molecular activation map. Based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP experiments, we have developed a finite element (FE method to analyze, simulate, and subtract the diffusion effect of mobile biosensors. This method has been applied to analyze the mobility of Src FRET biosensors engineered to reside at different subcompartments in live cells. The results indicate that the Src biosensor located in the cytoplasm moves 4-8 folds faster (0.93+/-0.06 microm(2/sec than those anchored on different compartments in plasma membrane (at lipid raft: 0.11+/-0.01 microm(2/sec and outside: 0.18+/-0.02 microm(2/sec. The mobility of biosensor at lipid rafts is slower than that outside of lipid rafts and is dominated by two-dimensional diffusion. When this diffusion effect was subtracted from the FRET ratio images, high Src activity at lipid rafts was observed at clustered regions proximal to the cell periphery, which remained relatively stationary upon epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulation. This result suggests that EGF induced a Src activation at lipid rafts with well-coordinated spatiotemporal patterns. Our FE-based method also provides an integrated platform of image analysis for studying molecular mobility and reconstructing the spatiotemporal activation maps of signaling molecules in live cells.

  5. Effect of the difficulty level of a biofeedback device for postural correction on the orbicularis oculi and upper trapezius muscle activity and trunk flexion angle during computer work

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the difficulty level of a biofeedback device for postural correction on the orbicularis oculi and upper trapezius muscle activity and trunk...

  6. Correction: Membrane-active macromolecules resensitize NDM-1 gram-negative clinical isolates to tetracycline antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakara S S M Uppu

    Full Text Available Gram-negative 'superbugs' such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1 producing pathogens have become world's major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the 'old antibiotics' and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMsthat restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates.Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracyclinein the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover,bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs.

  7. Increased amylosucrase activity and specificity, and identification of regions important for activity, specificity and stability through molecular evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Veen, Bart A; Skov, Lars K; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2006-01-01

    Amylosucrase is a transglycosidase which belongs to family 13 of the glycoside hydrolases and transglycosidases, and catalyses the formation of amylose from sucrose. Its potential use as an industrial tool for the synthesis or modification of polysaccharides is hampered by its low catalytic...... variants of the enzyme. This resulted in isolation of the most active amylosucrase (Asn387Asp) characterized to date, with a 60% increase in activity and a highly efficient polymerase (Glu227Gly) that produces a longer polymer than the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, judged from the screening results...

  8. Correction of Abdominal Distention by Biofeedback-Guided Control of Abdominothoracic Muscular Activity in a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Elizabeth; Accarino, Anna; Azpiroz, Fernando

    2017-07-11

    Abdominal distention is produced by abnormal somatic postural tone. We developed an original biofeedback technique based on electromyography-guided control of abdominothoracic muscular activity. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled study to demonstrate the superiority of biofeedback to placebo for the treatment of abdominal distention. At a referral center in Spain, we enrolled consecutive patients with visible abdominal distention who fulfilled the Rome III criteria for functional intestinal disorders (47 women, 1 man; 21-74 years old); 2 patients assigned to the placebo group withdrew and 2 patients assigned to biofeedback were not valid for analysis. Abdominothoracic muscle activity was recorded by electromyography. The patients in the biofeedback group were shown the signal and instructed to control muscle activity, whereas patients in the placebo received no instructions and were given oral simethicone. Each patient underwent 3 sessions over a 10-day period. The primary outcomes were subjective sensation of abdominal distention, measured by graphic rating scales for 10 consecutive days before and after the intervention. Patients in the biofeedback group effectively learned to reduce intercostal activity (by a mean 45% ± 3%), but not patients in the placebo group (reduced by a mean 5% ± 2%; P corrected by biofeedback-guided control of abdominothoracic muscular activity, compared with placebo. ClincialTrials.gov no: NCT01205100. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of specific activity of 230Th in uranium ore samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new method suitable for determining specific activity of 230Th in uranium ore samples is built. The method is characterized by adding the 230Th/ 232Th standard dilution agent with lower activity ratio (Its 230Th/ 232Th activity ratio and 230Th have been known) to the samples and using isotopic dilution analysis. The method can be applied to analyses of 230Th specific activity in various 230Th/ 232Th activity ratio samples. The precision can also be improved.

  10. Mechanisms by Which Interleukin-12 Corrects Defective NK Cell Anticryptococcal Activity in HIV-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen K. Kyei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast and a leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in AIDS patients. Natural killer (NK cells are important immune effector cells that directly recognize and kill C. neoformans via a perforin-dependent cytotoxic mechanism. We previously showed that NK cells from HIV-infected patients have aberrant anticryptococcal killing and that interleukin-12 (IL-12 restores the activity at least partially through restoration of NKp30. However, the mechanisms causing this defect or how IL-12 restores the function was unknown. By examining the sequential steps in NK cell killing of Cryptococcus, we found that NK cells from HIV-infected patients had defective binding of NK cells to C. neoformans. Moreover, those NK cells that bound to C. neoformans failed to polarize perforin-containing granules to the microbial synapse compared to healthy controls, suggesting that binding was insufficient to restore a defect in perforin polarization. We also identified lower expression of intracellular perforin and defective perforin release from NK cells of HIV-infected patients in response to C. neoformans. Importantly, treatment of NK cells from HIV-infected patients with IL-12 reversed the multiple defects in binding, granule polarization, perforin content, and perforin release and restored anticryptococcal activity. Thus, there are multiple defects in the cytolytic machinery of NK cells from HIV-infected patients, which cumulatively result in defective NK cell anticryptococcal activity, and each of these defects can be reversed with IL-12.

  11. Dental and skeletal contributions to occlusal correction in patients treated with the high-pull headgear-activator combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerström, L O; Nielsen, I L; Lee, R; Isaacson, R J

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine dental and skeletal changes in patients treated with the high-pull headgear-activator combination. A group of 40 consecutively treated subjects with a Class II molar relationship and a minimum of 5 mm overjet was used for this study. The results showed that Class II correction often was achieved by distal repositioning of the maxillary teeth (mean, 0.07 mm) and mesial repositioning of the mandibular teeth (mean, 3.3 mm) with a wide range of variation. Correlation of maxillary molar repositioning with total interarch occlusal change showed a positive relationship; however, a weak correlation suggested that other variables were contributing factors, in addition to distal upper molar positioning. The change in mandibular molar position compared with the movement of pogonion strongly suggests that forward growth of the mandible is important to the correction of the Class II malocclusion. When total molar repositioning in the upper jaw was correlated with total molar repositioning in the lower jaw, a strong inverse correlation was found, indicating that upper molar movement parallels lower molar movement.

  12. [A dynamic model of the extravehicular (correction of extravehicuar) activity space suit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Yuan, Xiu-gan

    2002-12-01

    Objective. To establish a dynamic model of the space suit base on the particular configuration of the space suit. Method. The mass of the space suit components, moment of inertia, mobility of the joints of space suit, as well as the suit-generated torques, were considered in this model. The expressions to calculate the moment of inertia were developed by simplifying the geometry of the space suit. A modified Preisach model was used to mathematically describe the hysteretic torque characteristics of joints in a pressurized space suit, and it was implemented numerically basing on the observed suit parameters. Result. A dynamic model considering mass, moment of inertia and suit-generated torques was established. Conclusion. This dynamic model provides some elements for the dynamic simulation of the astronaut extravehicular activity.

  13. Detection of Colorectal Adenomas Using a Bioactivatable Probe Specific for Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie L. Clapper

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A significant proportion of colorectal adenomas, in particular those that lack an elevated growth component, continue to escape detection during endoscopic surveillance. Elevation of the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a large family of zinc endopeptidases, in adenomas serves as a biomarker of early tumorigenesis. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using a newly developed near-infrared bioactivatable probe (MMPSense 680 that reports the activity of a broad array of MMP isoforms to detect early colorectal adenomas. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc+/Min-FCCC mice that spontaneously develop multiple colorectal adenomas were injected with MMPSense 680, and the colons were imaged in an IVIS Spectrum system ex vivo. Image analyses were correlated with histopathologic findings for all regions of interest (ROIs. The biochemical basis of fluorescent signal was investigated by immunohistochemical staining of MMP-7 and -9. A strong correlation (Kendall = 0.80 was observed between a positive signal and the presence of pathologically confirmed colonic adenomas; 92.9% of the 350 ROIs evaluated were classified correctly. The correlation between two independent observers was 0.87. MMP-7 expression was localized to epithelial cells of adenomas and microadenomas, whereas staining of MMP-9 was found in infiltrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes within the adenomas. MMPSense 680 identifies colorectal adenomas, both polypoid and nonpolypoid, in Apc+/Min-FCCC mice with high specificity. Use of this fluorescent probe in combination with colonoscopy could aid in preventing colorectal neoplasias by providing new opportunities for early detection and therapeutic intervention.

  14. Age-related changes of task-specific brain activity in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Chung; Chou, Chia-Yi; Huang, Chin-Fei; Lin, Yu-Te; Shih, Ching-Sen; Han, Shiang-Yi; Shen, Ming-Hsun; Chen, Tsung-Ching; Liang, Chi-lin; Lu, Ming-Chi; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2012-01-17

    An important question in healthcare for older patients is whether age-related changes in cortical reorganization can be measured with advancing age. This study investigated the factors behind such age-related changes, using time-frequency analysis of event-related potentials (ERPs). We hypothesized that brain rhythms was affected by age-related changes, which could be reflected in the ERP indices. An oddball task was conducted in two experimental groups, namely young participants (N=15; mean age 23.7±2.8 years) and older participants (N=15; mean age 70.1±7.9 years). Two types of stimuli were used: the target (1 kHz frequency) and standard (2 kHz frequency). We scrutinized three ERP indices: event-related spectral power (ERPSP), inter-trial phase-locking (ITPL), and event-related cross-phase coherence (ERPCOH). Both groups performed equally well for correct response rate. However, the results revealed a statistically significant age difference for inter-trial comparison. Compared with the young, the older participants showed the following age-related changes: (a) power activity decreased; however, an increase was found only in the late (P3, 280-450 ms) theta (4-7 Hz) component over the bilateral frontal and temporo-frontal areas; (b) low phase-locking in the early (N1, 80-140 ms) theta band over the parietal/frontal (right) regions appeared; (c) the functional connections decreased in the alpha (7-13 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) bands, but no difference emerged in the theta band between the two groups. These results indicate that age-related changes in task-specific brain activity for a normal aging population can be depicted using the three ERP indices.

  15. Chronic Stress Causes Sex-Specific and Structure-Specific Alterations in Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activity in Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Mota, Carina; Weis, Simone Nardin; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Dalmaz, Carla; Guma, Fátima Therezinha Costa; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira

    2017-09-14

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces a variety of changes in brain function, some of which are mediated by glucocorticoids. The response to stress occurs in a sex-specific way, and may include mitochondrial and synaptic alterations. The synapse is highly dependent on mitochondrial energy supply, and when mitochondria become dysfunctional, they orchestrate cell death. This study aimed to investigate the CRS effects on mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, as well as mitochondrial potential and mass in cell body and synapses using hippocampus, cortex and striatum of male and female rats. Rats were divided into non-stressed (control) and stressed group (CRS during 40 days). Results showed that CRS increased complex I-III activity in hippocampus. We also observed an interaction between CRS and sex in the striatal complex II activity, since CRS induced a reduction in complex II activity in males, while in females this activity was increased. Also an interaction was observed between stress and sex in cortical complex IV activity, since CRS induced increased activity in females, while it was reduced in males. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) content in cortex and hippocampus was sexually dimorphic, with female rats presenting higher levels compared to males. No changes were observed in GR content, mitochondrial potential or mass of animals submitted to CRS. It was concluded that CRS induced changes in respiratory chain complex activities, and some of these changes are sex-dependent: these activities are increased in the striatal mitochondria by CRS protocol mainly in females, while in males it is decreased.

  16. Determination of ring correction factors for leaded gloves used in grab sampling activities at Hanford tank farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RATHBONE, B.A.

    1999-06-24

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of lead lined gloves in reducing extremity dose from two sources specific to tank waste sampling activities: (1) sludge inside glass sample jars and (2) sludge as thin layer contamination on the exterior surface of sample jars. The response of past and present Hanford Extremity Dosimeters (ring) designs under these conditions is also evaluated.

  17. Quantum error correction for beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2013-07-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) and fault-tolerant quantum computation represent one of the most vital theoretical aspects of quantum information processing. It was well known from the early developments of this exciting field that the fragility of coherent quantum systems would be a catastrophic obstacle to the development of large-scale quantum computers. The introduction of quantum error correction in 1995 showed that active techniques could be employed to mitigate this fatal problem. However, quantum error correction and fault-tolerant computation is now a much larger field and many new codes, techniques, and methodologies have been developed to implement error correction for large-scale quantum algorithms. In response, we have attempted to summarize the basic aspects of quantum error correction and fault-tolerance, not as a detailed guide, but rather as a basic introduction. The development in this area has been so pronounced that many in the field of quantum information, specifically researchers who are new to quantum information or people focused on the many other important issues in quantum computation, have found it difficult to keep up with the general formalisms and methodologies employed in this area. Rather than introducing these concepts from a rigorous mathematical and computer science framework, we instead examine error correction and fault-tolerance largely through detailed examples, which are more relevant to experimentalists today and in the near future.

  18. High-contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: active correction of aperture discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie

    2013-09-01

    We present a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of Deformable Mirror Surfaces that yield high contrast Point Spread Functions is not linear, and non-linear methods are needed to find the true minimum in the optimization topology. We solve the highly non-linear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential Deformable Mirror system and show that high-throughput and high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We show that for geometries similar to JWST, ACAD can attain at least 10-7 in contrast and an order of magnitude higher for future Extremely Large Telescopes, even when the pupil features a missing segment" . We show that the converging non-linear mappings resulting from our Deformable Mirror shapes actually damp near-field diffraction artifacts in the vicinity of the discontinuities. Thus ACAD actually lowers the chromatic ringing due to diffraction by segment gaps and strut's while not amplifying the diffraction at the aperture edges beyond the Fresnel regime and illustrate the broadband properties of ACAD in the case of the pupil configuration corresponding to the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. Since details about these telescopes are not yet available to the broader astronomical community, our test case is based on a geometry mimicking the actual one, to the best of our knowledge.

  19. Broad-based nutritional supplementation in 3xTg mice corrects mitochondrial function and indicates sex-specificity in response to Alzheimer's disease intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrew B; Braden, B Blair; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather; Kusne, Yael; Young, Nicole; Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth; Garcia, Alexandra N; Walker, Douglas G; Moses, Guna S D; Tran, Hung; LaFerla, Frank; Lue, LihFen; Emerson Lombardo, Nancy; Valla, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition has been highlighted as a potential factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk and decline and has been investigated as a therapeutic target. Broad-based combination diet therapies have the potential to simultaneously effect numerous protective and corrective processes, both directly (e.g., neuroprotection) and indirectly (e.g., improved vascular health). Here we administered either normal mouse chow with a broad-based nutritional supplement or mouse chow alone to aged male and female 3xTg mice and wildtype (WT) controls. After approximately 4 months of feeding, mice were given a battery of cognitive tasks and then injected with a radiolabeled glucose analog. Brains were assessed for differences in regional glucose uptake and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity, AD pathology, and inflammatory markers. Supplementation induced behavioral changes in the 3xTg, but not WT, mice, and the mode of these changes was influenced by sex. Subsequent analyses indicated that differential response to supplementation by male and female 3xTg mice highlighted brain regional strategies for the preservation of function. Several regions involved have been shown to mediate responses to steroid hormones, indicating a mechanism for sex-based vulnerability. Thus, these findings may have broad implications for the human response to future therapeutics.

  20. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihu Gong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 [4] (Fig. 1. Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7–18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1 recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I, and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering [19]; (2 formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3 solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19,20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19].

  1. Unique palindromic sequences in synthetic oligonucleotides are required to induce IFN [correction of INF] and augment IFN-mediated [correction of INF] natural killer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S; Yamamoto, T; Kataoka, T; Kuramoto, E; Yano, O; Tokunaga, T

    1992-06-15

    Thirty-mer single-stranded oligonucleotides, with a sequence chosen from the known cDNA encoding the 64-kDa protein named Ag A or the MPB-70 protein of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and the human cellular proteins such as complement component 1 inhibitor and Ig rearranged lambda-chain, were used to dissect the capability to induce IFN and to augment NK cell activity of mouse spleen cells by coincubation in vitro. Three with the hexamer palindromic sequence as GACGTC were active, whereas two kinds of oligonucleotides with no palindrome were inactive. The oligonucleotides containing at least one of the different palindromic sequences showed no activity. When a portion of the sequence of the inactive oligonucleotides was substituted with either palindromic sequence of GACGTC, AGCGCT, or AACGTT, the oligonucleotide acquired the ability to augment NK activity. In contrast, the oligonucleotides substituted with another palindromic sequence such as ACCGGT was without effect. Furthermore, exchange of two neighboring mononucleotides within, but not outside, the active palindromic sequence destroyed the ability of the oligonucleotides to augment NK cell activity. Stimulation of spleen cells with the substituted oligonucleotide, A4a-AAC, induced production of significant amounts of IFN-alpha/beta and small amounts of IFN-gamma. Augmentation of NK activity of the cells by the oligonucleotide was ascribed to IFN-alpha/beta production. These results strongly suggest that the presence of the unique palindromic sequences, such as GACGTC, AGCGCT, and AACGTT, but not ACCGGT, is essential for the immunostimulatory activity of oligonucleotides.

  2. Comparison between In-house developed and Diamond commercial software for patient specific independent monitor unit calculation and verification with heterogeneity corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Nagarajan, Vivekanandan; Jeevanandam, Prakash; Murugan, Lavanya

    2016-02-01

    The study was aimed to compare two different monitor unit (MU) or dose verification software in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using modified Clarkson's integration technique for 6 MV photons beams. In-house Excel Spreadsheet based monitor unit verification calculation (MUVC) program and PTW's DIAMOND secondary check software (SCS), version-6 were used as a secondary check to verify the monitor unit (MU) or dose calculated by treatment planning system (TPS). In this study 180 patients were grouped into 61 head and neck, 39 thorax and 80 pelvic sites. Verification plans are created using PTW OCTAVIUS-4D phantom and also measured using 729 detector chamber and array with isocentre as the suitable point of measurement for each field. In the analysis of 154 clinically approved VMAT plans with isocentre at a region above -350 HU, using heterogeneity corrections, In-house Spreadsheet based MUVC program and Diamond SCS showed good agreement TPS. The overall percentage average deviations for all sites were (-0.93% + 1.59%) and (1.37% + 2.72%) for In-house Excel Spreadsheet based MUVC program and Diamond SCS respectively. For 26 clinically approved VMAT plans with isocentre at a region below -350 HU showed higher variations for both In-house Spreadsheet based MUVC program and Diamond SCS. It can be concluded that for patient specific quality assurance (QA), the In-house Excel Spreadsheet based MUVC program and Diamond SCS can be used as a simple and fast accompanying to measurement based verification for plans with isocentre at a region above -350 HU.

  3. The Rasch-built Pompe-specific activity (R-PAct) scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.M.E. van der Beek (Nadine); M.L.C. Hagemans (Marloes); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe constructed a patient-based interval scale using Rasch analysis, specifically suited to quantify the effects of Pompe disease on patient's ability to carry out daily life activities and their social participation: Rasch-built Pompe-specific Activity scale. Between July 2005 and April

  4. 46 CFR 148.04-1 - Radioactive material, Low Specific Activity (LSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radioactive material, Low Specific Activity (LSA). 148... § 148.04-1 Radioactive material, Low Specific Activity (LSA). (a) Authorized materials are limited to..., natural thorium metal and alloys of these metals; and (3) Material of low radioactive concentration,...

  5. Genetic and Chemical Correction of Cholesterol Accumulation and Impaired Autophagy in Hepatic and Neural Cells Derived from Niemann-Pick Type C Patient-Specific iPS Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Maetzel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a fatal inherited lipid storage disorder causing severe neurodegeneration and liver dysfunction with only limited treatment options for patients. Loss of NPC1 function causes defects in cholesterol metabolism and has recently been implicated in deregulation of autophagy. Here, we report the generation of isogenic pairs of NPC patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs. We observed decreased cell viability, cholesterol accumulation, and dysfunctional autophagic flux in NPC1-deficient human hepatic and neural cells. Genetic correction of a disease-causing mutation rescued these defects and directly linked NPC1 protein function to impaired cholesterol metabolism and autophagy. Screening for autophagy-inducing compounds in disease-affected human cells showed cell type specificity. Carbamazepine was found to be cytoprotective and effective in restoring the autophagy defects in both NPC1-deficient hepatic and neuronal cells and therefore may be a promising treatment option with overall benefit for NPC disease.

  6. A situation-specific theory of Midlife Women's Attitudes Toward Physical Activity (MAPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Stuifbergen, Alexa K; Walker, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a situation specific theory-the Midlife Women's Attitudes Toward Physical Activity (MAPA) theory-that explains how women's attitudes toward physical activity influence their participation in physical activity. Using the integrative approach of Im, the theory was developed based on the Attitude, Social Influence, and Self Efficacy Model; a review of the related literature; and a study of women's attitudes toward physical activity. As a situation-specific theory, the MAPA theory can be linked easily to nursing practice and research projects related to physical activity in midlife women, especially interventions aimed at increasing midlife women's participation in physical activity.

  7. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design.

  8. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A.; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  9. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu; Shao, Yiping

    2008-08-01

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of 176Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts—the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications.

  10. Modulating anti-MicroRNA-21 activity and specificity using oligonucleotide derivatives and length optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munoz-Alarcon, Andres; Guterstam, Peter; Romero, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    but reduced specificity when incorporating locked nucleic acid monomers, whereas the opposite was observed when introducing unlocked nucleic acid monomers. Our data suggest that phosphorothioate anti-microRNA oligonucleotides yield a greater activity than their phosphodiester counterparts and that a moderate...... truncation of the anti-microRNA oligonucleotide improves specificity without significantly losing activity. These results provide useful insights for design of anti-microRNA oligonucleotides to achieve both high activity as well as efficient mismatch discrimination....

  11. Managing Complexity in Activity Specifications by Separation of Concerns and Reusability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Forbrig

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The specification of activities of the different stakeholders is an important activity for software development. Currently, a lot of specification languages like task models, activity diagrams, state charts, and business specifications are used to document the results of the analysis of the domain in most projects. The paper discusses the aspect of reusability by considering generic submodels. This approach increases the quality of models. Additionally, the separation of concerns of cooperation and individual work by subject-oriented specifications is discussed. It will be demonstrated how task models can be used to support subject-oriented specification by so called team models and role models in a more precise way than S-BPM specifications. More precise restrictions on instances of roles can be specified.

  12. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M. Keane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis.

  13. A Classroom Research Study on Oral Error Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    This study has the main objective to present the findings of a small-scale classroom research carried out to collect data about my spoken error correction behaviors by means of self-observation. With this study, I aimed to analyze how and which spoken errors I corrected during a specific activity in a beginner's class. I used Lyster and Ranta's…

  14. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.

    2014-01-01

    n combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental...... artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient...... anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset...

  15. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using Active Shape Models and k-Nearest-Neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.;

    2014-01-01

    n combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental...... artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient...... vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume...

  16. Validation of pooled genotyping on the Affymetrix 500 k and SNP6.0 genotyping platforms using the polynomial-based probe-specific correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Fook Tim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of pooled DNA on SNP microarrays (SNP-MaP has been shown to be a cost effective and rapid manner to perform whole-genome association evaluations. While the accuracy of SNP-MaP was extensively evaluated on the early Affymetrix 10 k and 100 k platforms, there have not been as many similarly comprehensive studies on more recent platforms. In the present study, we used the data generated from the full Affymetrix 500 k SNP set together with the polynomial-based probe-specific correction (PPC to derive allele frequency estimates. These estimates were compared to genotyping results of the same individuals on the same platform, as the basis to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of pooled genotyping on these high-throughput platforms. We subsequently extended this comparison to the new SNP6.0 platform capable of genotyping 1.8 million genetic variants. Results We showed that pooled genotyping on the 500 k platform performed as well as those previously shown on the relatively lower throughput 10 k and 100 k array sets, with high levels of accuracy (correlation coefficient: 0.988 and low median error (0.036 in allele frequency estimates. Similar results were also obtained from the SNP6.0 array set. A novel pooling strategy of overlapping sub-pools was attempted and comparison of estimated allele frequencies showed this strategy to be as reliable as replicate pools. The importance of an appropriate reference genotyping data set for the application of the PPC algorithm was also evaluated; reference samples with similar ethnic background to the pooled samples were found to improve estimation of allele frequencies. Conclusion We conclude that use of the PPC algorithm to estimate allele frequencies obtained from pooled genotyping on the high throughput 500 k and SNP6.0 platforms is highly accurate and reproducible especially when a suitable reference sample set is used to estimate the beta values for PPC.

  17. Genetic correction of β-thalassemia patient-specific iPS cells and its use in improving hemoglobin production in irradiated SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixuan; Zheng, Chen-Guang; Jiang, Yonghua; Zhang, Jiqin; Chen, Jiayu; Yao, Chao; Zhao, Qingguo; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Ke; Du, Juan; Yang, Ze; Gao, Shaorong

    2012-04-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated somatic cells by over-expression of several transcription factors has the potential to cure many genetic and degenerative diseases currently recalcitrant to traditional clinical approaches. One such genetic disease is β-thalassemia major (Cooley's anemia). This disease is caused by either a point mutation or the deletion of several nucleotides in the β-globin gene, and it threatens the lives of millions of people in China. In the present study, we successfully generated iPSCs from fibroblasts collected from a 2-year-old patient who was diagnosed with a homozygous 41/42 deletion in his β-globin gene. More importantly, we successfully corrected this genetic mutation in the β-thalassemia iPSCs by homologous recombination. Furthermore, transplantation of the genetically corrected iPSCs-derived hematopoietic progenitors into sub-lethally irradiated immune deficient SCID mice showed improved hemoglobin production compared with the uncorrected iPSCs. Moreover, the generation of human β-globin could be detected in the mice transplanted with corrected iPSCs-derived hematopietic progenitors. Our study provides strong evidence that iPSCs generated from a patient with a genetic disease can be corrected by homologous recombination and that the corrected iPSCs have potential clinical uses.

  18. Genetic correction of β-thalassemia patient-specific iPS cells and its use in improving hemoglobin production in irradiated SCID mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixuan Wang; Juan Du; Ze Yang; Shaorong Gao; Chen-Guang Zheng; Yonghua Jiang; Jiqin Zhang; Jiayu Chen; Chao Yao; Qingguo Zhao; Sheng Liu; Ke Chen

    2012-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated somatic cells by over-expression of several transcription factors has the potential to cure many genetic and degenerative diseases currently recalcitrant to traditional clinical approaches.One such genetic disease is β-thalassemia major (Cooley's anemia).This disease is caused by either a point mutation or the deletion of several nucleotides in the β-globin gene,and it threatens the lives of millions of people in China.In the present study,we successfully generated iPSCs from fibroblasts collected from a 2-year-old patient who was diagnosed with a homozygous 41/42 deletion in his β-globin gene.More importantly,we successfully corrected this genetic mutation in the β-thalassemia iPSCs by homologous recombination.Furthermore,transplantation of the genetically corrected iPSCs-derived hematopoietic progenitors into sub-lethally irradiated immune deficient SCID mice showed improved hemoglobin production compared with the uncorrected iPSCs.Moreover,the generation of human β-globin could be detected in the mice transplanted with corrected iPSCs-derived hematopietic progenitors.Our study provides strong evidence that iPSCs generated from a patient with a genetic disease can be corrected by homologous recombination and that the corrected iPSCs have potential clinical uses.

  19. The Activity Chain Safety and Liveness Specification of Composite Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Xiaomei

    Web service composition is most impressing method for development and deployment of e-business. Description and modeling the behavior requirements of composite Web services for users and verifying composite Web service compliance to specific requirements is an important key in design of services. But most work does not address the issue of how to model the requirements that the BPEL4WS processes are supposed to satisfy. The specifications in verification works are general temporal relation based on activity or scenario in essence. Distinguish with these work, we propose a novel concept of behavior specification based on activity chain in which granularity is between activity and scenario. Chain existence mode, chain absence mode are designed to express such behavioral requirements based on activity chain that is similar with safety or liveness specification based on activity respectively. Encode them on Labeled Transition System LTS and then give them exact operation semantics. Finally, an example is illustrated.

  20. Future of low specific activity molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, A

    2012-10-01

    In last few years, the shortage of molybdenum-99 (99Mo) was felt in the developed and developing countries hospitals, where diagnostic nuclear medicine is practiced. To overcome the shortage of 99Mo various routes of its production by accelerators and reactors generating low and high specific activity products have been planned. High specific activity 99Mo obtained by fission of uranium-235 (235U) has completely dominated in the manufacturing of technetium-99m (99mTc) generators in last 3-4 decades, but due to proliferation and dirty bomb, issues non fission routes of 99Mo production are emphasized. Future of low specific activity 99Mo is discussed.

  1. A quantitative method for the specific assessment of caspase-6 activity in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Skotte, Niels H; Savill, Jane

    2011-01-01

    are not well suited to specifically assess caspase-6 activity in the presence of other, confounding protease activities, as often encountered in cell and tissue samples. Here we report the development of a method that overcomes this limitation by using a protein substrate, lamin A, which is highly specific...... for caspase-6 cleavage at amino acid 230. Using a neo-epitope antibody against cleaved lamin A, we developed an electrochemiluminescence-based ELISA assay that is suitable to specifically detect and quantify caspase-6 activity in highly apoptotic cell extracts. The method is more sensitive than VEID...

  2. A breast-specific, negligible-dose scatter correction technique for dedicated cone-beam breast CT: a physics-based approach to improve Hounsfield Unit accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Burkett, George, Jr.; Boone, John M.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a method to correct the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and to achieve consistent Hounsfield Unit (HU) values of breast tissues for a dedicated breast CT (bCT) system. The use of a beam passing array (BPA) composed of parallel-holes has been previously proposed for scatter correction in various imaging applications. In this study, we first verified the efficacy and accuracy using BPA to measure the scatter signal on a cone-beam bCT system. A systematic scatter correction approach was then developed by modeling the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) in projection images acquired with and without BPA. To quantitatively evaluate the improved accuracy of HU values, different breast tissue-equivalent phantoms were scanned and radially averaged HU profiles through reconstructed planes were evaluated. The dependency of the correction method on object size and number of projections was studied. A simplified application of the proposed method on five clinical patient scans was performed to demonstrate efficacy. For the typical 10-18 cm breast diameters seen in the bCT application, the proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact and reduce the variation of HU values of breast equivalent material from 150 to 40 HU. The measured HU values of 100% glandular tissue, 50/50 glandular/adipose tissue, and 100% adipose tissue were approximately 46, -35, and -94, respectively. It was found that only six BPA projections were necessary to accurately implement this method, and the additional dose requirement is less than 1% of the exam dose. The proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and retain consistent HU values of breast tissues.

  3. Active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device during comprehensive Class II correction in growing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Giorgio; Alvetro, Lisa; Defraia, Efisio; Ghislanzoni, Luis Tomas Huanc; Franchi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device (Forsus) during comprehensive correction of Class II malocclusion in growing patients. Fifty-four patients (mean age, 12.5 ± 1.2 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion were consecutively treated with fixed app-liances in combination with Forsus. Lateral cephalograms were analyzed at the beginning of the fixed treatment (T1), Forsus insertion (T2), its removal (T3), and end of the comprehensive therapy (T4). Statistical comparisons were carried out by repeated-measures ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc test (p overjet and overbite decreased significantly (-3.5 and -1.5 mm, respectively) and the molar relationship improved by 4.3 mm. These changes were associated with significant retroclination of the maxillary incisors (-3.1°), proclination and intrusion of the mandibular incisors (+5.0° and -1.5 mm, respectively), and mesialization of the mandibular molars (+2.0 mm). Forsus had mainly dentoalveolar effects and contributed largely to the overall therapeutic outcome.

  4. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a deformable mirror in a woofer-tweeter configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's segmented mirror telescope (SMT) was developed using prototype silicon carbide active hybrid mirror technology to demonstrate lower cost and rapid manufacture of primary mirror segments for a space telescope. The developmental mirror segments used too few actuators limiting the ability to adequately correct the surface figure error. To address the unintended shortfall of the developmental mirrors, a deformable mirror is added to the SMT and control techniques are developed. The control techniques are similar to woofer-tweeter adaptive optics, where the SMT segment represents the woofer and the deformable mirror represents the tweeter. The optical design of an SMT woofer-tweeter system is presented, and the impacts of field angle magnification on the placement and size of the deformable mirror are analyzed. A space telescope woofer-tweeter wavefront control technique is proposed using a global influence matrix and closed-loop constrained minimization controller. The control technique simultaneously manipulates the woofer and tweeter mirrors. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in wavefront error of the primary mirror and the control technique shows significant wavefront error improvement compared to sequentially controlling the woofer and tweeter mirrors.

  5. Shh and ZRS enhancer colocalisation is specific to the zone of polarising activity

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, Iain; Lettice, Laura A.; Hill, Robert E.; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2016-01-01

    Limb-specific Shh expression is regulated by the (∼1 Mb distant) ZRS enhancer. In the mouse, limb bud-restricted spatiotemporal Shh expression occurs from ∼E10 to E11.5 at the distal posterior margin and is essential for correct autopod formation. Here, we have analysed the higher-order chromatin conformation of Shh in expressing and non-expressing tissues, both by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and by chromosome conformation capture (5C). Conventional and super-resolution light mi...

  6. Physical activity and cancer risk: dose-response and cancer, all sites and site-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thune, I; Furberg, A S

    2001-06-01

    The association between physical activity and overall and site-specific cancer risk is elaborated in relation to whether any observed dose-response association between physical activity and cancer can be interpreted in terms of how much physical activity (type, intensity, duration, frequency) is needed to influence site- and gender-specific cancer risk. Observational studies were reviewed that have examined the independent effect of the volume of occupational physical activity (OPA) and/or leisure time physical activity (LPA) on overall and site-specific cancer risk. The evidence of cohort and case-control studies suggests that both leisure time and occupational physical activity protect against overall cancer risk, with a graded dose-response association suggested in both sexes. Confounding effects such as diet, body weight, and parity are often included as a covariate in the analyses, with little influence on the observed associations. A crude graded inverse dose-response association was observed between physical activity and colon cancer in 48 studies including 40,674 colon/colorectal cancer cases for both sexes. A dose-response effect of physical activity on colon cancer risk was especially observed, when participation in activities of at least moderate activity (>4.5 MET) and demonstrated by activities expressed as MET-hours per week. An observed inverse association with a dose-response relationship between physical activity and breast cancer was also identified in the majority of the 41 studies including 108,031 breast cancer cases. The dose-response relationship was in particular observed in case-control studies and supported by observations in cohort studies when participation in activities of at least moderate activity (>4.5 MET) and demonstrated by activities expressed by MET-hours per week. This association between physical activity and breast cancer risk is possibly dependent on age at exposure, age at diagnosis, menopausal status and other effect

  7. SPECIFICS OF MARKETING ACTIVITY IN THE PROPERTY MARKET, TO IMPLEMENT INNOVATIVE PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Malla Osman Shadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with marketing activities, in terms of project management in the field of real estate and associated works. The specificity of the activities of the developer of combining marketing and design activities at different stages of the innovation project. The main feature of the result of the acts and flexible model for the implementation of project activities, depending on the view of the preferences and expectations of the customer in real estate.

  8. Pedagogical terms of correction of motive sphere of persons of ripe years with the purchased blindness by facilities of playing activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemkina V.I.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of correction of motive sphere of adults blind facilities of playing activity is considered. The pedagogical terms of correction of motive sphere of adults with the purchased blindness are considered. In experiment took part blind adults at the age 22-35 years. It is set that correction-developing teaching the motive actions of blind adults must be concertedly with the level of their development and the differentiated individual approach is foreseen. It is recommended to be oriented on the level of general development of these people, exposure of their potential and actual motive possibilities. It is well-proven that systematic application of facilities of motive activity is provided by the valuable mastering of vitally important motions, development of motive capabilities and capacity for an orientation in space.

  9. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation proceeds normally following disruption of patterned spontaneous retinal activity

    OpenAIRE

    Speer, Colenso M.; Sun, Chao; Liets, Lauren C.; Stafford, Ben K; CHAPMAN, BARBARA; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous retinal activity (SRA) is important during eye-specific segregation within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), but the feature(s) of activity critical for retinogeniculate refinement are controversial. Pharmacologically or genetically manipulating cholinergic signaling during SRA perturbs correlated retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spiking and disrupts eye-specific retinofugal refinement in vivo, consistent with an instructive role for SRA during visual system dev...

  10. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien;

    2014-01-01

    their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator...

  11. RhoA/ROCK pathway activity is essential for the correct localization of the germ plasm mRNAs in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Rodríguez, Jerónimo Roberto; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Lomelí, Hilda; Zurita, Mario; Schnabel, Denhi

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish germ plasm is composed of mRNAs such as vasa and nanos and of proteins such as Bucky ball, all of which localize symmetrically in four aggregates at the distal region of the first two cleavage furrows. The coordination of actin microfilaments, microtubules and kinesin is essential for the correct localization of the germ plasm. Rho-GTPases, through their effectors, coordinate cytoskeletal dynamics. We address the participation of RhoA and its effector ROCK in germ plasm localization during the transition from two- to eight-cell embryos. We found that active RhoA is enriched along the cleavage furrow during the first two division cycles, whereas ROCK localizes at the distal region of the cleavage furrows in a similar pattern as the germ plasm mRNAs. Specific inhibition of RhoA and ROCK affected microtubules organization at the cleavage furrow; these caused the incorrect localization of the germ plasm mRNAs. The incorrect localization of the germ plasm led to a dramatic change in the number of germ cells during the blastula and 24hpf embryo stages without affecting any other developmental processes. We demonstrate that the Rho/ROCK pathway is intimately related to the determination of germ cells in zebrafish embryos.

  12. Echicetin coated polystyrene beads: a novel tool to investigate GPIb-specific platelet activation and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navdaev, Alexey; Subramanian, Hariharan; Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-04-01

    The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels (PALs) agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC specifically discusses the radiological PALs and their application to the findings of the CAU 204 corrective action investigation. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204.

  14. A constitutively active Gαi3 protein corrects the abnormal retinal pigment epithelium phenotype of Oa1-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Young

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Ocular Albinism type 1 (OA1 is a disease caused by mutations in the OA1 gene and characterized by the presence of macromelanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE as well as abnormal crossing of the optic axons at the optic chiasm. We showed in our previous studies in mice that Oa1 activates specifically Gαi3 in its signaling pathway and thus, hypothesized that a constitutively active Gαi3 in the RPE of Oa1-/- mice might keep on the Oa1 signaling cascade and prevent the formation of macromelanosomes. To test this hypothesis, we have generated transgenic mice that carry the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L protein in the RPE of Oa1-/- mice and are now reporting the effects that the transgene produced on the Oa1-/- RPE phenotype. METHODS: Transgenic mice carrying RPE-specific expression of the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L were generated by injecting fertilized eggs of Oa1-/- females with a lentivirus containing the Gαi3 (Q204L cDNA. PCR, Southern blots, Western blots and confocal microscopy were used to confirm the presence of the transgene in the RPE of positive transgenic mice. Morphometrical analyses were performed using electron microscopy to compare the size and number of melanosomes per RPE area in putative Oa1-/-, Gαi3 (Q204L transgenic mice with those of wild-type NCrl and Oa1-/- mice. RESULTS: We found a correlation between the presence of the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L transgene and the rescue of the normal phenotype of RPE melanosomes in Oa1-/-, Gαi3 (Q204L mice. These mice have higher density of melanosomes per RPE area and a larger number of small melanosomes than Oa1-/- mice, and their RPE phenotype is similar to that of wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that a constitutively active Gαi3 protein can by-pass the lack of Oa1 protein in Oa1-/- mice and consequently rescue the RPE melanosomal phenotype.

  15. Efficacy,safety and tolerance of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator intravenous administration on anemia correction in dialysis patients with chronic renal anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱家麒

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy,safety and toler-ance of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator(CE-RA) once every 2 weeks intravenous injection on anemia correction in dialysis patients compared to Epoetin-β(EPO-β) administration. Methods An open label,

  16. Correction: A strongly greenish-blue-emitting Cu4Cl4 cluster with an efficient spin-orbit coupling (SOC): fast phosphorescence versus thermally activated delayed fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu-Lin; Yu, Rongmin; Wu, Xiao-Yuan; Liang, Dong; Jia, Ji-Hui; Lu, Can-Zhong

    2016-06-21

    Correction for 'A strongly greenish-blue-emitting Cu4Cl4 cluster with an efficient spin-orbit coupling (SOC): fast phosphorescence versus thermally activated delayed fluorescence' by Xu-Lin Chen et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 6288-6291.

  17. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-04-27

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system.

  18. Ambulatory activity monitoring: Progress in measurement of activity, posture, and specific motion patterns in daily life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); U.W. Ebner-Priemer (Ulrich); J. Fahrenberg (Jochen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBehavior is central to psychology in almost any definition. Although observable activity is a core aspect of behavior, assessment strategies have tended to focus on emotional, cognitive, or physiological responses. When physical activity is assessed, it is done so mostly with questionnai

  19. Ambulatory activity monitoring: Progress in measurement of activity, posture, and specific motion patterns in daily life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); U.W. Ebner-Priemer (Ulrich); J. Fahrenberg (Jochen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBehavior is central to psychology in almost any definition. Although observable activity is a core aspect of behavior, assessment strategies have tended to focus on emotional, cognitive, or physiological responses. When physical activity is assessed, it is done so mostly with questionnai

  20. Reported frequency of physical activity in a large epidemiological study: relationship to specific activities and repeatability over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeves Gillian K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How overall physical activity relates to specific activities and how reported activity changes over time may influence interpretation of observed associations between physical activity and health. We examine the relationships between various physical activities self-reported at different times in a large cohort study of middle-aged UK women. Methods At recruitment, Million Women Study participants completed a baseline questionnaire including questions on frequency of strenuous and of any physical activity. About 3 years later 589,896 women also completed a follow-up questionnaire reporting the hours they spent on a range of specific activities. Time spent on each activity was used to estimate the associated excess metabolic equivalent hours (MET-hours and this value was compared across categories of physical activity reported at recruitment. Additionally, 18,655 women completed the baseline questionnaire twice, at intervals of up to 4 years; repeatability over time was assessed using the weighted kappa coefficient (κweighted and absolute percentage agreement. Results The average number of hours per week women reported doing specific activities was 14.0 for housework, 4.5 for walking, 3.0 for gardening, 0.2 for cycling, and 1.4 for all strenuous activity. Time spent and the estimated excess MET-hours associated with each activity increased with increasing frequency of any or strenuous physical activity reported at baseline (tests for trend, P weighted = 0.71 for questionnaires administered less than 6 months apart, and 52% (κweighted = 0.51 for questionnaires more than 2 years apart. Corresponding values for any physical activity were 57% (κweighted = 0.67 and 47% (κweighted = 0.58. Conclusions In this cohort, responses to simple questions on the frequency of any physical activity and of strenuous activity asked at baseline were associated with hours spent on specific activities and the associated estimated excess MET

  1. Twisted trees and inconsistency of tree estimation when gaps are treated as missing data - The impact of model mis-specification in distance corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Steel, Mike; Holder, Mark T

    2015-12-01

    Statistically consistent estimation of phylogenetic trees or gene trees is possible if pairwise sequence dissimilarities can be converted to a set of distances that are proportional to the true evolutionary distances. Susko et al. (2004) reported some strikingly broad results about the forms of inconsistency in tree estimation that can arise if corrected distances are not proportional to the true distances. They showed that if the corrected distance is a concave function of the true distance, then inconsistency due to long branch attraction will occur. If these functions are convex, then two "long branch repulsion" trees will be preferred over the true tree - though these two incorrect trees are expected to be tied as the preferred true. Here we extend their results, and demonstrate the existence of a tree shape (which we refer to as a "twisted Farris-zone" tree) for which a single incorrect tree topology will be guaranteed to be preferred if the corrected distance function is convex. We also report that the standard practice of treating gaps in sequence alignments as missing data is sufficient to produce non-linear corrected distance functions if the substitution process is not independent of the insertion/deletion process. Taken together, these results imply inconsistent tree inference under mild conditions. For example, if some positions in a sequence are constrained to be free of substitutions and insertion/deletion events while the remaining sites evolve with independent substitutions and insertion/deletion events, then the distances obtained by treating gaps as missing data can support an incorrect tree topology even given an unlimited amount of data.

  2. Development of isoform-specific sensors of polypeptide GalNAc-transferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Clausen, Henrik; Linstedt, Adam D

    2014-10-31

    Humans express up to 20 isoforms of GalNAc-transferase (herein T1-T20) that localize to the Golgi apparatus and initiate O-glycosylation. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and diseases arise upon misregulation of specific isoforms. Surprisingly, molecular probes to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity are lacking and there exist no effective global or isoform-specific inhibitors. Here we describe the development of T2- and T3-isoform specific fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway. Each sensor yielded little signal when glycosylated but was strongly activated in the absence of its glycosylation. Specificity of each sensor was assessed in HEK cells with either the T2 or T3 enzymes deleted. Although the sensors are based on specific substrates of the T2 and T3 enzymes, elements in or near the enzyme recognition sequence influenced their activity and required modification, which we carried out based on previous in vitro work. Significantly, the modified T2 and T3 sensors were activated only in cells lacking their corresponding isozymes. Thus, we have developed T2- and T3-specific sensors that will be valuable in both the study of GalNAc-transferase regulation and in high-throughput screening for potential therapeutic regulators of specific GalNAc-transferases.

  3. Specific activity and activity ratios of radionuclides in soil collected about 20 km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant: Radionuclide release to the south and southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Uchihori, Yukio; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-15

    Soil samples at different depths (0-2, 5-7 and 10-12cm) were collected from J Village, about 20km south of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) to determine their radionuclide specific activities and activity ratios. The concentrations and activity ratios of (131)I, (134, 136, 137)Cs and (129m)Te were obtained, but only trace amounts of (95)Nb, (110m)Ag and (140)La were detected which were too low to provide accurate concentrations. Radionuclides such as (95)Zr, (103, 106)Ru and (140)Ba that were found in Chernobyl fallout, were not found in these soil samples. This suggests that noble gasses and volatile radionuclides predominated in the releases from FNPP to the terrestrial environment. The average activity ratios of (131)I/(137)Cs, (134)Cs/(137)Cs, (136)Cs/(137)Cs and (129m)Te/(137)Cs were 55, 0.90, 0.22 and 4.0 (corrected to March 11, 2011) in the 0-2cm soil samples of April 20 and 28, 2011.

  4. A Comparison of Alternative Specifications of the College Attendance Equation with an Extension to two-stage Selectivity-Correction Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmer, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Estimates a college-attendance equation for a common set of students (from the High School and Beyond Survey) using three popular econometric specifications: the multinomial logit, the ordered probit, and the bivariate probit. Estimated marginal effects do not differ significantly across the three specifications. Choice of specification may not…

  5. Effects of icariin on cGMP—specific PDE5 and cAMP—specific PDE4 activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZCXin; EKKim; CSLin; WJLiu; LTian; YMYuan; JFu

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To clarify the mechanism of the therapeutic action of icariin on erectlile dysfunction(ED).Methods:PDE5 was isolated from the human platelet and PDE4 form the rat liver tissue using the FPLC system (Pharmacia,Milton Keynes,UK)and the Mono Q column.The inhibitory effects of icariin on PDE5 and PDE4 activities were investigated by the two-step radioisotope procedure with [3H]-c GMP/[3H]-cAMP.Papaverine served as the control drug.Results:Icariin and papaverine showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on PDE5 and PDE4 activities.The IC50 of Icariin and papaverine on PDE5 were 0.432μ mol/L and 0.680μmol/L,respectively and those on PDE4,73.50μmol/L and 3.07μmol/L,respectively.The potencies of selectivity of icariin and papaverine on PDE5(PDE4/PDE5 of IC50)were 167.67 times and 4.54 times,respectively.Conclusion:Icariin is a cGMP-specific PDE5 inhibitor that may be developed into an oral effective agent for the treatment of ED.

  6. Toxicity of ionic liquids: eco(cyto)activity as complicated, but unavoidable parameter for task-specific optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Ksenia S; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2014-02-01

    Rapid progress in the field of ionic liquids in recent decades led to the development of many outstanding energy-conversion processes, catalytic systems, synthetic procedures, and important practical applications. Task-specific optimization emerged as a sharpening stone for the fine-tuning of structure of ionic liquids, which resulted in unprecedented efficiency at the molecular level. Ionic-liquid systems showed promising opportunities in the development of green and sustainable technologies; however, the chemical nature of ionic liquids is not intrinsically green. Many ionic liquids were found to be toxic or even highly toxic towards cells and living organisms. In this Review, we show that biological activity and cytotoxicity of ionic liquids dramatically depend on the nature of a biological system. An ionic liquid may be not toxic for particular cells or organisms, but may demonstrate high toxicity towards another target present in the environment. Thus, a careful selection of biological activity data is a must for the correct assessment of chemical technologies involving ionic liquids. In addition to the direct biological activity (immediate response), several indirect effects and aftereffects are of primary importance. The following principal factors were revealed to modulate toxicity of ionic liquids: i) length of an alkyl chain in the cation; ii) degree of functionalization in the side chain of the cation; iii) anion nature; iv) cation nature; and v) mutual influence of anion and cation.

  7. Combining active-space coupled-cluster methods with moment energy corrections via the CC(P;Q) methodology, with benchmark calculations for biradical transition states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jun; Piecuch, Piotr

    2012-04-01

    We have recently suggested the CC(P;Q) methodology that can correct energies obtained in the active-space coupled-cluster (CC) or equation-of-motion (EOM) CC calculations, which recover much of the nondynamical and some dynamical electron correlation effects, for the higher-order, mostly dynamical, correlations missing in the active-space CC/EOMCC considerations. It is shown that one can greatly improve the description of biradical transition states, both in terms of the resulting energy barriers and total energies, by combining the CC approach with singles, doubles, and active-space triples, termed CCSDt, with the CC(P;Q)-style correction due to missing triple excitations defining the CC(t;3) approximation.

  8. CanScript, an 18-Base pair DNA sequence, boosts tumor cell-specific promoter activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Cozzitorto, Joseph A; Richards, Nathan G; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Yeo, Charles J; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Brody, Jonathan R

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy protocols for the treatment of cancer often employ gene promoter sequences that are known to be overexpressed in specific tumor cell types relative to normal cells. These promoters, while specific, are often weakly active. It would be desirable to increase the activity of such promoters, while at the same time retain specificity, so that the therapeutic gene is more robustly expressed. Using a luciferase reporter DNA construct in both in vitro cell transfection assays and in vivo mouse tumor models, we have determined that in the absence of any other DNA sequence, a previously identified 18-base pair enhancer sequence called CanScript, lying upstream of the MSLN gene, has ∼25% of the promoter activity of CAG, a very strong non-specific promoter/enhancer, in tumor cells in which MSLN is highly expressed. Furthermore, tandem repeat copies of CanScript enhance transcription in a dose-dependent manner and, when coupled with promoter sequences that are active in tumor cells, increase promoter activity. These findings suggest that the incorporation of CanScript into gene constructs may have application in enhancing activity of promoters used in cancer-targeting gene therapy strategies, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20798601

  9. Cell-free activation of phagocyte NADPH-oxidase: tissue and differentiation-specific expression of cytosolic cofactor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, J F; Akard, L P; Schell, M J; Gabig, T G

    1987-06-30

    We examined a variety of tissues for the presence of cytosolic cofactor activity that would support arachidonate-dependent cell-free activation of NADPH-oxidase in isolated human neutrophil membranes. Cofactor activity was not found in cytosol isolated from erythrocytes, lymphocytes, placenta, brain, liver, or the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL-60. Induction of differentiation in HL-60 cells led to expression of cytosolic cofactor activity. In dimethylsulphoxide-induced HL-60 cells the level of cytosolic cofactor activity was closely correlated with phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated whole cell superoxide production. These results strongly suggest that the cytosolic cofactor is a phagocyte-specific regulatory protein of physiologic importance in NADPH-oxidase activation.

  10. Antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies isolated from B cells expressing constitutively active STAT5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc A Scheeren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against specific pathogens have a high therapeutic potential, but are difficult to generate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Memory B cells were immortalized by expressing an inducible active mutant of the transcription factor Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5. Active STAT5 inhibits the differentiation of B cells while increasing their replicative life span. We obtained cloned B cell lines, which produced antibodies in the presence of interleukin 21 after turning off STAT5. We used this method to obtain monoclonal antibodies against the model antigen tetanus toxin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we describe a novel and relatively simple method of immortalizing antigen-specific human B cells for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. These results show that STAT5 overexpression can be employed to isolate antigen specific antibodies from human memory B cells.

  11. Reduced Treponema pallidum–Specific Opsonic Antibody Activity in HIV-Infected Patients With Syphilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Christina M.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Dunaway, Shelia B.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals may have poorer serological responses to syphilis treatment and may be more likely to experience neurosyphilis. Treponema pallidum is cleared from sites of infection by opsonization, ingestion, and killing by macrophages. Methods. Serum samples from 235 individuals with syphilis were tested for T. pallidum–specific opsonic activity. Blood T. pallidum concentrations were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of the tp0574 gene, and T. pallidum was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of 16S ribosomal RNA. Results. Opsonic activity was higher with higher serum rapid plasma reagin titers (P VDRL reactivity. Conclusions. Serum T. pallidum–specific opsonic activity is significantly lower in HIV-infected individuals. Impaired T. pallidum–specific immune responses could contribute to differences in the course of disease or treatment response. PMID:26655298

  12. Echicetin coated polystyrene beads: a novel tool to investigate GPIb-specific platelet activation and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Navdaev

    Full Text Available von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways.

  13. Echicetin Coated Polystyrene Beads: A Novel Tool to Investigate GPIb-Specific Platelet Activation and Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J.; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways. PMID:24705415

  14. Influence of operational conditions on biofilm specific activity of an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, J L; Romero, L I; Sales, D

    2003-01-01

    A key parameter in water and wastewater treatment technology is the biomass activity in terms of substrate removal ability. The effects of organic load rate and percentage of bed expansion on biofilm specific methanogenic activity were determined in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor treating wine-distillery wastes in the thermophilic range (55 degrees C). The proposed activity tests are highly reproducible: an experiment with three identical tests has shown that the standard deviation with respect to the mean values is less than 3%. Specific tests are applied to measure the maximum methanogenic activities of the biomass carrier in lab-scale anaerobic biofilm reactors. These tests have been successfully applied for monitoring the support colonization process and the evolution of biofilm activity in reactors, anaerobic filter and fluidized bed, with different operating conditions. The results show a dependence between the percentage of bed expansion and the specific activity of methanogenic microbiote on biofilm. There is a relationship between the percentage of bed expansion, the sheer stress on the biofilm and the hydrodynamic conditions in the system. Initial biofilm detachment can be compensated with the increase of biomass and of its activity due to the reduction of the substrate diffusional limitations to the microorganism growth inside the support pores.

  15. Towards the development of activity-based probes for detection of lysine-specific demethylase-1 activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ourailidou, Maria E.; Lenoci, Alessia; Zwergel, Clemens; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Dekker, Frank J

    2017-01-01

    The implications of lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) in tumorigenesis have urged scientists to develop diagnostic tools in order to explore the function of this enzyme. In this work, we present our efforts on the development of tranylcypromine (TCP)-based functionalized probes for activity-based

  16. Self-regulation of circumscribed brain activity modulates spatially selective and frequency specific connectivity of distributed resting state networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias eVukelić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of learning involved in brain self-regulation have still to be unveiled to exploit the full potential of this methodology for therapeutic interventions. This skill of volitionally changing brain activity presumably resembles motor skill learning which in turn is accompanied by plastic changes modulating resting state networks. Along these lines, we hypothesized that brain regulation and neurofeedback would similarly modify intrinsic networks at rest while presenting a distinct spatio-temporal pattern. High-resolution EEG preceded and followed a single neurofeedback training intervention of modulating circumscribed sensorimotor low β -activity by motor imagery in eleven healthy participants. They were kept in the deliberative phase of skill acquisition with high demands for learning self-regulation through stepwise increases of task difficulty. By applying the corrected imaginary part of the coherency function, we observed increased functional connectivity of both the primary motor and the primary somatosensory cortex with their respective contralateral homologous cortices in the low β-frequency band which was self-regulated during feedback. At the same time, the primary motor cortex - but none of the surrounding cortical areas - showed connectivity to contralateral supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas in the high β-band. Simultaneously, the neurofeedback target displayed a specific increase of functional connectivity with an ipsilateral fronto-parietal network in the α-band while presenting a de-coupling with contralateral primary and secondary sensorimotor areas in the very same frequency band.Brain self-regulating modifies resting state connections spatially selective to the neurofeedback target of the dominant hemisphere. These are anatomically distinct with regard to the cortico-cortical connectivity pattern and are functionally specific with regard to the time domain of coherent activity consistent with a Hebbian

  17. Classic Galactosemia: Study on the Late Prenatal Development of GALT Specific Activity in a Sheep Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ana I; Bierau, Jörgen; Lindhout, Martijn; Achten, Jelle; Kramer, Boris W; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2017-09-01

    Classic galactosemia results from deficient activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), a key enzyme of galactose metabolism. Despite early diagnosis and early postnatal therapeutic intervention, patients still develop neurologic and fertility impairments. Prenatal developmental toxicity has been hypothesized as a determinant factor of disease. In order to shed light on the importance of prenatal GALT activity, several studies have examined GALT activity throughout development. GALT was shown to increase with gestational age in 7-28 weeks human fetuses; later stages were not investigated. Prenatal studies in animals focused exclusively on brain and hepatic GALT activity. In this study, we aim to examine GALT specific activity in late prenatal and adult stages, using a sheep model. Galactosemia acute target-organs-liver, small intestine and kidney-had the highest late prenatal activity, whereas the chronic target-organs-brain and ovary-did not exhibit a noticeable pre- or postnatal different activity compared with nontarget organs. This is the first study on GALT specific activity in the late prenatal stage for a wide variety of organs. Our findings suggest that GALT activity cannot be the sole pathogenic factor accounting for galactosemia long-term complications, and that some organs/cells might have a greater susceptibility to galactose toxicity. Anat Rec, 300:1570-1575, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Specificity and mechanism of protein kinase C activation by sn-1,2-diacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, B R; Loomis, C R; Hannun, Y A; Bell, R M

    1986-01-01

    The specificity of protein kinase C activation by sn-1,2-diacylglycerols and analogues was investigated by using a Triton X-100 mixed micellar assay [Hannun, Y. A., Loomis, C. R. & Bell, R. M. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 10039-10043]. Analogues containing acyl or alkyl chains eight carbons in length were synthesized because sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol is an effective cell-permeant activator of protein kinase C. These analogues were tested as activators and antagonists of rat brain protein kinase C to determine the exact structural features important for activity. The analogues established that activation of protein kinase C by diacylglycerols is highly specific. Several analogues established that both carbonyl moieties of the oxygen esters are required for maximal activity and that the 3-hydroxyl moiety is also required. None of the analogues were antagonists. These data, combined with previous investigations, permitted formulation of a model of protein kinase C activation. A three-point attachment of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol to the surface-bound protein kinase C-phosphatidylserine-Ca2+ complex is envisioned to cause activation. Direct ligation of diacylglycerol to Ca2+ is proposed to be an essential step in the mechanism of activation of protein kinase C. Images PMID:3456578

  19. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrusiak, Matthew G; Jin, Yishi

    2016-04-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundwormCaenorhabditis eleganswas developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics ofC. elegansin combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components inC. elegans.

  20. Mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are regulated through formation of specific kinase-activator complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanke, B W; Rubie, E A; Winnett, E; Chan, J; Randall, S; Parsons, M; Boudreau, K; McInnis, M; Yan, M; Templeton, D J; Woodgett, J R

    1996-11-22

    Mammalian cells contain at least three signaling systems which are structurally related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Growth factors acting through Ras primarily stimulate the Raf/MEK/MAPK cascade of protein kinases. In contrast, many stress-related signals such as heat shock, inflammatory cytokines, and hyperosmolarity induce the MEKK/SEK(MKK4)/SAPK(JNK) and/or the MKK3 or MKK6/p38(hog) pathways. Physiological agonists of these pathway types are either qualitatively or quantitatively distinct, suggesting few common proximal signaling elements, although past studies performed in vitro, or in cells using transient over-expression, reveal interaction between the components of all three pathways. These studies suggest a high degree of cross-talk apparently not seen in vivo. We have examined the possible molecular basis of the differing agonist profiles of these three MAPK pathways. We report preferential association between MAP kinases and their activators in eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, using the yeast 2-hybrid system, we show that association between these components can occur independent of additional eukaryotic proteins. We show that SAPK(JNK) or p38(hog) activation is specifically impaired by co-expression of cognate dominant negative MAP kinase kinase mutants, demonstrating functional specificity at this level. Further divergence and insulation of the stress pathways occurs proximal to the MAPK kinases since activation of the MAPK kinase kinase MEKK results in SAPK(JNK) activation but does not cause p38(hog) phosphorylation. Therefore, in intact cells, the three MAPK pathways may be independently regulated and their components show specificity in their interaction with cognate cascade members. The degree of intermolecular specificity suggests that mammalian MAPK signaling pathways may remain distinct without the need for specific scaffolding proteins to sequester components of individual pathways.

  1. Comparing Domain-Specific Physical Activity Efficacy Level between Turkish Adolescent Girls and Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çatikkas, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    The adolescence period is a very critical developmental period for personality, socializing and promotion of physical activity. In this regard, the aim of this study was to compare domain-specific physical activity efficacy level between adolescent boys and girls. A total of 219 girls (body weight: 57.50 ± 10.44 kg, height: 160.30 ± 7.40 cm, age…

  2. Time-invariant person-specific frequency templates in human brain activity

    CERN Document Server

    Doron, I; Baruchi, I; Towle, V L; Ben-Jacob, E; Doron, Itai; Hulata, Eyal; Baruchi, Itay; Towle, Vernon L.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2006-01-01

    The various human brain tasks are performed at different locations and time scales. Yet, we discovered the existence of time-invariant (above an essential time scale) partitioning of the brain activity into person-specific frequency bands. For that, we perform temporal and ensemble averaging of best wavelet packet bases from multi-electrode EEG recordings. These personal frequency-bands provide new templates for quantitative analyses of brain function, e.g., normal vs. epileptic activity.

  3. 77 FR 19033 - Effect of Adding References to HS 6104.32 To Correct the U.S.-Korea FTA Product-Specific Rules of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Leaders Heidi Colby-Oizumi (202-205-3391 or heidi.colby@usitc.gov ) or Kimberlie Freund (202-708- 5402 or kimberlie.freund@usitc.gov ) for information specific to this investigation. For information on the...

  4. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation proceeds normally following disruption of patterned spontaneous retinal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Colenso M; Sun, Chao; Liets, Lauren C; Stafford, Ben K; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2014-11-07

    Spontaneous retinal activity (SRA) is important during eye-specific segregation within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), but the feature(s) of activity critical for retinogeniculate refinement are controversial. Pharmacologically or genetically manipulating cholinergic signaling during SRA perturbs correlated retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spiking and disrupts eye-specific retinofugal refinement in vivo, consistent with an instructive role for SRA during visual system development. Paradoxically, ablating the starburst amacrine cells (SACs) that generate cholinergic spontaneous activity disrupts correlated RGC firing without impacting retinal activity levels or eye-specific segregation in the dLGN. Such experiments suggest that patterned SRA during retinal waves is not critical for eye-specific refinement and instead, normal activity levels are permissive for retinogeniculate development. Here we revisit the effects of ablating the cholinergic network during eye-specific segregation and show that SAC ablation disrupts, but does not eliminate, retinal waves with no concomitant impact on normal eye-specific segregation in the dLGN. We induced SAC ablation in postnatal ferret pups beginning at birth by intraocular injection of a novel immunotoxin selective for the ferret vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Ferret VAChT-Sap). Through dual-patch whole-cell and multi-electrode array recording we found that SAC ablation altered SRA patterns and led to significantly smaller retinal waves compared with controls. Despite these defects, eye-specific segregation was normal. Further, interocular competition for target territory in the dLGN proceeded in cases where SAC ablation was asymmetric in the two eyes. Our data demonstrate normal eye-specific retinogeniculate development despite significant abnormalities in patterned SRA. Comparing our current results with earlier studies suggests that defects in retinal wave size, absolute levels of SRA, correlations between RGC

  5. Activity Recognition in Individuals Walking With Assistive Devices: The Benefits of Device-Specific Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonini, Luca; Gupta, Aakash; Deems-Dluhy, Susan; Hoppe-Ludwig, Shenan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-08-10

    Wearable sensors gather data that machine-learning models can convert into an identification of physical activities, a clinically relevant outcome measure. However, when individuals with disabilities upgrade to a new walking assistive device, their gait patterns can change, which could affect the accuracy of activity recognition. The objective of this study was to assess whether we need to train an activity recognition model with labeled data from activities performed with the new assistive device, rather than data from the original device or from healthy individuals. Data were collected from 11 healthy controls as well as from 11 age-matched individuals with disabilities who used a standard stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO), and then a computer-controlled adaptive KAFO (Ottobock C-Brace). All subjects performed a structured set of functional activities while wearing an accelerometer on their waist, and random forest classifiers were used as activity classification models. We examined both global models, which are trained on other subjects (healthy or disabled individuals), and personal models, which are trained and tested on the same subject. Median accuracies of global and personal models trained with data from the new KAFO were significantly higher (61% and 76%, respectively) than those of models that use data from the original KAFO (55% and 66%, respectively) (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P=.006 and P=.01). These models also massively outperformed a global model trained on healthy subjects, which only achieved a median accuracy of 53%. Device-specific models conferred a major advantage for activity recognition. Our results suggest that when patients use a new assistive device, labeled data from activities performed with the specific device are needed for maximal precision activity recognition. Personal device-specific models yield the highest accuracy in such scenarios, whereas models trained on healthy individuals perform poorly and should not be

  6. Highly integrated application specific MMICs for active phased array radar applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    1999-01-01

    Application specific MMIC solutions for active array radar, developed at TNO-FEL, are presented. The use and application of these MMICs in their respective radar systems will be shown. These MMICs address the needs for current and future phased-array topologies as for example the concept of "smart

  7. Highly Integrated Application Specific MMICS for Active Phased Array Radar Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    2000-01-01

    Application specific MMIC solutions for active array radar, developed at TNO-FEL. are presented. The use and application of these MMICs in their respective radar systems will be shown. These MMICs address the needs for current and future phased-array topologies as for example the concept of "smart

  8. Synthesis of high-specific activity [15,16-{sup 3}H{sub 2}]buprenorphine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oetvoes, F.; Toth, G. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged (Hungary). Isotope Lab.; Hosztafi, S.; Simon, C. [Alkaloida Chemical Factory Ltd., Tiszavasvari (Hungary)

    1995-01-01

    Tritium labelling of buprenorphine, a mixed agonist-antagonist opioid ligand, was performed with a specific activity of 2.35 TBq/mmol (63.6 Ci/mmol) starting with 15,16-didehydrobuprenorphine. Labels at positions 15 and 16 of the morphine skeleton proved to be sufficiently stable under strong acidic or basic conditions. (Author).

  9. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  10. Mammalian fatty acid activation : studies on substrate specificity and subcellular localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.E. Groot

    1975-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is dealing with two aspects of the ATPdependent fatty acid activation in mammalian tissues: a) the fatty acid substrate specificity of the different type of acyl-CoA synthetases, b) the tissue- and intracellular localization of acyl-CoA synthetases

  11. Context Fear Learning Specifically Activates Distinct Populations of Neurons in Amygdala and Hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogrlic, Lidia; Wilson, Yvette M.; Newman, Andrew G.; Murphy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The identity and distribution of neurons that are involved in any learning or memory event is not known. In previous studies, we identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral amygdala that show learning-specific activation of a c-"fos"-regulated transgene following context fear conditioning. Here, we have extended these studies to…

  12. Synthesis of tritium-labelled imipramine and desipramine with high specific activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovleva, L.A.; Kaminski, Ju.L.; Sosnova, L.P.; Kudelin, B.K. (Khlopin Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    1992-09-01

    [G-[sup 3]H]imipramine and [G-[sup 3]H] desipramine with specific activities 110-160 and 80-100 kCi/mol, respectively were synthesized by high temperature solid-phase catalytic isotope exchange with gaseous tritium. (author).

  13. Highly Integrated Application Specific MMICS for Active Phased Array Radar Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    2000-01-01

    Application specific MMIC solutions for active array radar, developed at TNO-FEL. are presented. The use and application of these MMICs in their respective radar systems will be shown. These MMICs address the needs for current and future phased-array topologies as for example the concept of "smart s

  14. Highly integrated application specific MMICs for active phased array radar applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    1999-01-01

    Application specific MMIC solutions for active array radar, developed at TNO-FEL, are presented. The use and application of these MMICs in their respective radar systems will be shown. These MMICs address the needs for current and future phased-array topologies as for example the concept of "smart s

  15. Cooperative activation of tissue-specific genes by pRB and E2F1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Stephen; Xu, Fuhua; Moran, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein pRB is conventionally regarded as an inhibitor of the E2F family of transcription factors. Conversely, pRB is also recognized as an activator of tissue-specific gene expression along various lineages including osteoblastogenesis. During osteoblast differentiation, pRB directly targets Alpl and Bglap, which encode the major markers of osteogenesis alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Surprisingly, p130 and repressor E2Fs were recently found to cooccupy and repress Alpl and Bglap in proliferating osteoblast precursors before differentiation. This raises the further question of whether these genes convert to E2F activation targets when differentiation begins, which would constitute a remarkable situation wherein pRB and E2F would be cotargeting genes for activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis in an osteoblast differentiation model shows that Alpl and Bglap are indeed targeted by an activator E2F, i.e., is E2F1. Promoter occupation of Alpl and Bglap by E2F1 occurs specifically during activation, and depletion of E2F1 severely impairs their induction. Mechanistically, promoter occupation by E2F1 and pRB is mutually dependent, and without this cooperative effect, activation steps previously shown to be dependent on pRB, including recruitment of RNA polymerase II, are impaired. Myocyte- and adipocyte-specific genes are also cotargeted by E2F1 and pRB during differentiation along their respective lineages. The finding that pRB and E2F1 cooperate to activate expression of tissue-specific genes is a paradigm distinct from the classical concept of pRB as an inhibitor of E2F1, but is consistent with the observed roles of these proteins in physiological models.

  16. Neural network versus activity-specific prediction equations for energy expenditure estimation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, Nicole; Joss, Franziska; Jimmy, Gerda; Melzer, Katarina; Hänggi, Johanna; Mäder, Urs

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the energy expenditure (EE) estimations of activity-specific prediction equations (ASPE) and of an artificial neural network (ANNEE) based on accelerometry with measured EE. Forty-three children (age: 9.8 ± 2.4 yr) performed eight different activities. They were equipped with one tri-axial accelerometer that collected data in 1-s epochs and a portable gas analyzer. The ASPE and the ANNEE were trained to estimate the EE by including accelerometry, age, gender, and weight of the participants. To provide the activity-specific information, a decision tree was trained to recognize the type of activity through accelerometer data. The ASPE were applied to the activity-type-specific data recognized by the tree (Tree-ASPE). The Tree-ASPE precisely estimated the EE of all activities except cycling [bias: -1.13 ± 1.33 metabolic equivalent (MET)] and walking (bias: 0.29 ± 0.64 MET; P MET) and walking (bias: 0.61 ± 0.72 MET) and underestimated the EE of cycling (bias: -0.90 ± 1.18 MET; P MET, Tree-ASPE: 0.08 ± 0.21 MET) and walking (ANNEE 0.61 ± 0.72 MET, Tree-ASPE: 0.29 ± 0.64 MET) were significantly smaller in the Tree-ASPE than in the ANNEE (P < 0.05). The Tree-ASPE was more precise in estimating the EE than the ANNEE. The use of activity-type-specific information for subsequent EE prediction equations might be a promising approach for future studies.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities.

  18. EFFECTS OF DYNAMIC AND STATIC STRETCHING WITHIN GENERAL AND ACTIVITY SPECIFIC WARM-UP PROTOCOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Samson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1 general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2 general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3 general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4 general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested for movement time (kicking movement of leg over 0.5 m distance, countermovement jump height, sit and reach flexibility and 6 repetitions of 20 metre sprints. Results indicated that when a sport specific warm-up was included, there was an 0.94% improvement (p = 0.0013 in 20 meter sprint time with both the dynamic and static stretch groups. No such difference in sprint performance between dynamic and static stretch groups existed in the absence of the sport specific warm-up. The static stretch condition increased sit and reach range of motion (ROM by 2.8% more (p = 0.0083 than the dynamic condition. These results would support the use of static stretching within an activity specific warm-up to ensure maximal ROM along with an enhancement in sprint performance

  19. Synthesis of high specific activity (1- sup 3 H) farnesyl pyrophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saljoughian, M.; Morimoto, H.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-08-01

    The synthesis of tritiated farnesyl pyrophosphate with high specific activity is reported. trans-trans Farnesol was oxidized to the corresponding aldehyde followed by reduction with lithium aluminium tritide (5%-{sup 3}H) to give trans-trans (1-{sup 3}H)farnesol. The specific radioactivity of the alcohol was determined from its triphenylsilane derivative, prepared under very mild conditions. The tritiated alcohol was phosphorylated by initial conversion to an allylic halide, and subsequent treatment of the halide with tris-tetra-n-butylammonium hydrogen pyrophosphate. The hydride procedure followed in this work has advantages over existing methods for the synthesis of tritiated farnesyl pyrophosphate, with the possibility of higher specific activity and a much higher yield obtained. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Screening of DUB activity and specificity by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritorto, Maria Stella; Ewan, Richard; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Knebel, Axel; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Wightman, Melanie; Kelly, Sharon M.; Wood, Nicola T.; Virdee, Satpal; Gray, Nathanael S.; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Alessi, Dario R.; Trost, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Deubiquitylases (DUBs) are key regulators of the ubiquitin system which cleave ubiquitin moieties from proteins and polyubiquitin chains. Several DUBs have been implicated in various diseases and are attractive drug targets. We have developed a sensitive and fast assay to quantify in vitro DUB enzyme activity using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Unlike other current assays, this method uses unmodified substrates, such as diubiquitin topoisomers. By analysing 42 human DUBs against all diubiquitin topoisomers we provide an extensive characterization of DUB activity and specificity. Our results confirm the high specificity of many members of the OTU and JAB/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme DUB families and highlight that all USPs tested display low linkage selectivity. We also demonstrate that this assay can be deployed to assess the potency and specificity of DUB inhibitors by profiling 11 compounds against a panel of 32 DUBs. PMID:25159004

  1. Efficacy of kinesio taping versus postural correction exercises on pain intensity and axioscapular muscles activation in mechanical neck dysfunction: a randomized blinded clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Abd, Aliaa M; Ibrahim, Abeer R; El-Hafez, Haytham M

    2017-10-01

    While postural correction is commonly used for mechanical neck dysfunction (MND), efficacy of KT has received considerable attention. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of kinesio taping (KT) versus postural correction exercises on pain intensity and axioscapular muscles activation in patients with MND. Randomized clinical trial for which forty six patients with MND were randomly assigned in to 1 of 2 groups received 4 weeks treatment; KT group: received kinesio taping, PCE group: performed postural correction exercises. Neck pain and axioscapular muscles activation in form of normalized root mean square of dominant upper trapezius and levator scapula muscles were measured pre- and post-treatment by visual analogue scale and electromyography. Two ways MANOVA was used to examine the effects of treatment on outcome measures. The variable of interest was the group-by-time interaction at an a priori alpha level of 0.05. Intragroup comparisons were performed using paired t-tests. Group by time interaction was statistically significant in multivariate test (F=3.114, P=0.031). KT produced more pain reduction than postural exercises (Ppostural exercises to reduce neck pain. However, both modalities have similar effects to reduce axioscapular muscles activation.

  2. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

  3. Health State Monitoring of Bladed Machinery with Crack Growth Detection in BFG Power Plant Using an Active Frequency Shift Spectral Correction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifang Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Power generation using waste-gas is an effective and green way to reduce the emission of the harmful blast furnace gas (BFG in pig-iron producing industry. Condition monitoring of mechanical structures in the BFG power plant is of vital importance to guarantee their safety and efficient operations. In this paper, we describe the detection of crack growth of bladed machinery in the BFG power plant via vibration measurement combined with an enhanced spectral correction technique. This technique enables high-precision identification of amplitude, frequency, and phase information (the harmonic information belonging to deterministic harmonic components within the vibration signals. Rather than deriving all harmonic information using neighboring spectral bins in the fast Fourier transform spectrum, this proposed active frequency shift spectral correction method makes use of some interpolated Fourier spectral bins and has a better noise-resisting capacity. We demonstrate that the identified harmonic information via the proposed method is of suppressed numerical error when the same level of noises is presented in the vibration signal, even in comparison with a Hanning-window-based correction method. With the proposed method, we investigated vibration signals collected from a centrifugal compressor. Spectral information of harmonic tones, related to the fundamental working frequency of the centrifugal compressor, is corrected. The extracted spectral information indicates the ongoing development of an impeller blade crack that occurred in the centrifugal compressor. This method proves to be a promising alternative to identify blade cracks at early stages.

  4. Health State Monitoring of Bladed Machinery with Crack Growth Detection in BFG Power Plant Using an Active Frequency Shift Spectral Correction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weifang; Yao, Bin; He, Yuchao; Chen, Binqiang; Zeng, Nianyin; He, Wangpeng

    2017-08-09

    Power generation using waste-gas is an effective and green way to reduce the emission of the harmful blast furnace gas (BFG) in pig-iron producing industry. Condition monitoring of mechanical structures in the BFG power plant is of vital importance to guarantee their safety and efficient operations. In this paper, we describe the detection of crack growth of bladed machinery in the BFG power plant via vibration measurement combined with an enhanced spectral correction technique. This technique enables high-precision identification of amplitude, frequency, and phase information (the harmonic information) belonging to deterministic harmonic components within the vibration signals. Rather than deriving all harmonic information using neighboring spectral bins in the fast Fourier transform spectrum, this proposed active frequency shift spectral correction method makes use of some interpolated Fourier spectral bins and has a better noise-resisting capacity. We demonstrate that the identified harmonic information via the proposed method is of suppressed numerical error when the same level of noises is presented in the vibration signal, even in comparison with a Hanning-window-based correction method. With the proposed method, we investigated vibration signals collected from a centrifugal compressor. Spectral information of harmonic tones, related to the fundamental working frequency of the centrifugal compressor, is corrected. The extracted spectral information indicates the ongoing development of an impeller blade crack that occurred in the centrifugal compressor. This method proves to be a promising alternative to identify blade cracks at early stages.

  5. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-12-09

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10.

  6. A sandwich ELISA for the conformation-specific quantification of the activated form of human Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijido, Oscar; Ganesan, Yogesh Tengarai; Llanos, Raul; Peton, Ashley; Urtecho, Jean-Baptiste; Soprani, Adauri; Villamayor, Aimee; Antonsson, Bruno; Manon, Stéphen; Dejean, Laurent

    2016-03-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins are critical regulators of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which represents the point of no return of apoptotic cell death. The exposure of the Bax N-terminus at the mitochondria reflects Bax activation; and this activated configuration of the Bax protein is associated with MOMP. N-terminal exposure can be detected using specific monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies, and the onset of activated Bax has extensively been used as an early marker of apoptosis. The protocols of immunoprecipitation and/or immunocytochemistry commonly used to detect activated Bax are long and tedious, and allow semiquantification of the antigen at best. The sandwich ELISA protocol we developed has a 5 ng/mL detection limit and is highly specific for the activated conformation of Bax. This ELISA allows a rapid quantification of activated human Bax in whole cells and isolated mitochondria protein extracts. These properties grant this assay the potential to further clarify the prognostic and diagnostic value of activated Bax in disorders associated with deregulated apoptotic pathways such as degenerative diseases or cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Age-specific activation of cerebral areas in motor imagery - a fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing (China); Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Image, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Qiu, Mingguo; Zhang, Jingna; Zhang, Ye; Sang, Linqiong [Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Image, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Liu, Chen; Yang, Jun [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Yan, Rubing [Third Military Medical University, Department of Rehabilitation, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Zheng, Xiaolin [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing (China)

    2014-04-15

    The objectives of this study were to study the age-specific activation patterns of cerebral areas during motor execution (ME) and motor imaging (MI) of the upper extremities and to discuss the age-related neural mechanisms associated with ME or MI. The functional magnetic resonance imaging technique was used to monitor the pattern and intensity of brain activation during the ME and MI of the upper extremities in 20 elderly (>50 years) and 19 young healthy subjects (<25 years). No major differences were identified regarding the activated brain areas during ME or MI between the two groups; however, a minor difference was noted. The intensity of the activated brain area during ME was stronger in the older group than in the younger group, while the results with MI were the opposite. The posterior central gyrus and supplementary motor area during MI were more active in the younger group than in the older group. The putamen, lingual, and so on demonstrated stronger activation during dominant hand MI in the older group. The results of this study revealed that the brain structure was altered and that neuronal activity was attenuated with age, and the cerebral cortex and subcortical tissues were found to be over-activated to achieve the same level of ME and MI, indicating that the activating effects of the left hemisphere enhanced with age, whereas the inhibitory effects declined during ME, and activation of the right hemisphere became more difficult during MI. (orig.)

  8. Tumor-Specific Multiple Stimuli-Activated Dendrimeric Nanoassemblies with Metabolic Blockade Surmount Chemotherapy Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yachao; Xu, Xianghui; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Yunkun; Zhang, Zhijun; Gu, Zhongwei

    2017-01-24

    Chemotherapy resistance remains a serious impediment to successful antitumor therapy around the world. However, existing chemotherapeutic approaches are difficult to cope with the notorious multidrug resistance in clinical treatment. Herein, we developed tumor-specific multiple stimuli-activated dendrimeric nanoassemblies with a metabolic blockade to completely combat both physiological barriers and cellular factors of multidrug resistance. With a sophisticated molecular and supramolecular engineering, this type of tumor-specific multiple stimuli-activated nanoassembly based on dendrimeric prodrugs can hierarchically break through the sequential physiological barriers of drug resistance, including stealthy dendritic PEGylated corona to optimize blood transportation, robust nanostructures for efficient tumor passive targeting and accumulation, enzyme-activated tumor microenvironment targeted to deepen tumor penetration and facilitate cellular uptake, cytoplasmic redox-sensitive disintegration for sufficient release of encapsulated agents, and lysosome acid-triggered nucleus delivery of antitumor drugs. In the meantime, we proposed a versatile tactic of a tumor-specific metabolism blockade for provoking several pathways (ATP restriction, apoptotic activation, and anti-apoptotic inhibition) to restrain multiple cellular factors of drug resistance. The highly efficient antitumor activity to drug-resistant MCF-7R tumor in vitro and in vivo supports this design and strongly defeats both physiological barriers and cellular factors of chemotherapy resistance. This work sets up an innovative dendrimeric nanosystem to surmount multidrug resistance, contributing to the development of a comprehensive nanoparticulate strategy for future clinical applications.

  9. Proximity-activated nanoparticles: in vitro performance of specific structural modification by enzymatic cleavage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Adam Smith

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available R Adam Smith, Sarah L Sewell, Todd D GiorgioDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: The development and in vitro performance of a modular nanoscale system capable of specific structural modification by enzymatic activity is described in this work. Due to its small physical size and adaptable characteristics, this system has the potential for utilization in targeted delivery systems and biosensing. Nanoparticle probes were synthesized containing two distinct fluorescent species including a quantum dot base particle and fluorescently labeled cleavable peptide substrate. Activity of these probes was monitored by gel electrophoresis with quantitative cleavage measurements made by fluorometric analysis. The model proximity-activated nanoparticles studied here exhibit significant susceptibility to cleavage by matrix metalloprotease-7 (MMP-7 at physiologically relevant concentrations, with nearly complete cleavage of available substrate molecules after 24 hours. This response is specific to MMP-7 enzyme activity, as cleavage is completely inhibited with the addition of EDTA. Utilization of enzyme-specific modification is a sensitive approach with broad applications for targeted therapeutics and biosensing. The versatility of this nanoparticle system is highlighted in its modular design, as it has the capability to integrate characteristics for detection, biosensing, targeting, and payload delivery into a single, multifunctional nanoparticle structure.Keywords: quantum dot, MMP-7, protease, proximity activated nanoparticle

  10. Curcumin inhibits srebp-2 expression in activated hepatic stellate cells in vitro by reducing the activity of specificity protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qiaohua; Chen, Anping

    2009-12-01

    Elevated levels of cholesterol/low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a risk factor for the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and its associated hepatic fibrosis. However, underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We previously reported that curcumin induced gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma and stimulated its activity, leading to the inhibition of the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the major effector cells during hepatic fibrogenesis. We recently showed that curcumin suppressed gene expression of LDL receptor in activated HSCs in vitro by repressing gene expression of the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), leading to the reduction in the level of intracellular cholesterol in HSCs and to the attenuation of the stimulatory effects of LDL on HSCs activation. The current study aimed at exploring molecular mechanisms by which curcumin inhibits srebp-2 expression in HSCs. Promoter deletion assays, mutagenesis assays, and EMSAs localize a specificity protein-1 (SP-1) binding GC-box in the srebp-2 promoter, which is responsible for enhancing the promoter activity and responding to curcumin in HSCs. Curcumin suppresses gene expression of SP-1 and reduces its trans-activation activity, which are mediated by the activation of PPARgamma. The inhibitory effect of curcumin on SP-1 binding to the GC-box is confirmed by chromatin immuno-precipitation. In summary, our results demonstrate that curcumin inhibits srebp-2 expression in cultured HSCs by activating PPARgamma and reducing the SP-1 activity, leading to the repression of ldlr expression. These results provide novel insights into molecular mechanisms by which curcumin inhibits LDL-induced HSC activation.

  11. Elimination of dendritic spines with long-term memory is specific to active circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jeff; Cowansage, Kiriana; Baumgärtel, Karsten; Mayford, Mark

    2012-09-05

    Structural changes in brain circuits active during learning are thought to be important for long-term memory storage. If these changes support long-term information storage, they might be expected to be present at distant time points after learning, as well as to be specific to the circuit activated with learning, and sensitive to the contingencies of the behavioral paradigm. Here, we show such changes in the hippocampus as a result of contextual fear conditioning. There were significantly fewer spines specifically on active neurons of fear-conditioned mice. This spine loss did not occur in homecage mice or in mice exposed to the training context alone. Mice exposed to unpaired shocks showed a generalized reduction in spines. These learning-related changes in spine density could reflect a direct mechanism of encoding or alternately could reflect a compensatory adaptation to previously described enhancement in transmission due to glutamate receptor insertion.

  12. Human PHOSPHO1 exhibits high specific phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine phosphatase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Human PHOSPHO1 is a phosphatase enzyme for which expression is upregulated in mineralizing cells. This enzyme has been implicated in the generation of Pi for matrix mineralization, a process central to skeletal development. PHOSPHO1 is a member of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of Mg2+-dependent hydrolases. However, substrates for PHOSPHO1 are, as yet, unidentified and little is known about its activity. We show here that PHOSPHO1 exhibits high specific activities toward phosphoethanolamine (PEA) and phosphocholine (PCho). Optimal enzymic activity was observed at approx. pH 6.7. The enzyme shows a high specific Mg2+-dependence, with apparent Km values of 3.0 μM for PEA and 11.4 μM for PCho. These results provide a novel mechanism for the generation of Pi in mineralizing cells from PEA and PCho. PMID:15175005

  13. The development and characterization of an ELISA specifically detecting the active form of cathepsin K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, S; Karsdal, M A; Bay-Jensen, A C;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cathepsin K plays essential roles in bone resorption and is intensely investigated as a therapeutic target for the treatment of osteoporosis. Hence an assessment of the active form of cathepsin K may provide important biological information in metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporo......OBJECTIVE: Cathepsin K plays essential roles in bone resorption and is intensely investigated as a therapeutic target for the treatment of osteoporosis. Hence an assessment of the active form of cathepsin K may provide important biological information in metabolic bone diseases......, such as osteoporosis or ankylosing spondylitis. METHODS: Presently there are no robust assays for the assessment of active cathepsin K in serum, and therefore an ELISA specifically detecting the N-terminal of the active form of cathepsin K was developed. RESULTS: The assay was technically robust, with a lowest limit...... form. Quantification of the levels of active cathepsin K in supernatants of purified human osteoclasts compared to corresponding macrophages showed a 30-fold induction (p...

  14. Increased Local Spontaneous Neural Activity in the Left Precuneus Specific to Auditory Verbal Hallucinations of Schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Jun Zhuo; Jia-Jia Zhu; Chun-Li Wang; Li-Na Wang; Jie Li; Wen Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background:Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) of schizophrenia have been associated with structural and functional alterations of some brain regions.However,the brain regional homogeneity (ReHo) alterations specific to AVHs of schizophrenia remain unclear.In the current study,we aimed to investigate ReHo alterations specific to schizophrenic AVHs.Methods:Thirty-five schizophrenic patients with AVH,41 schizophrenic patients without AVHs,and fifty healthy subjects underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.ReHo differences across the three groups were tested using a voxel-wise analysis.Results:Compared with the healthy control group,the two schizophrenia groups showed significantly increased ReHo in the right caudate and inferior temporal gyrus and decreased ReHo in the bilateral postcentral gyrus and thalamus and the right inferior occipital gyrus (false discovery rate corrected,P < 0.05).More importantly,the AVH group exhibited significantly increased ReHo in the left precuneus compared with the non-AVH group.However,using correlation analysis,we did not find any correlation between the auditory hallucination rating scale score and the ReHo of brain regions.Conclusions:Our results suggest that increased ReHo in the left precuneus may be a pathological feature exclusive to schizophrenic AVHs.

  15. β-noradrenergic receptor activation specifically modulates the generation of sighs in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Charles eViemari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC, an area that is critical for generating breathing (eupnea, gasps and sighs is continuously modulated by catecholamines. These amines and the generation of sighs have also been implicated in the regulation of arousal. Here we studied the catecholaminergic modulation of sighs not only in anesthetized freely breathing mice (in vivo, but also in medullary slice preparations that contain the preBötC and that generate fictive eupneic and sigh rhythms in vitro. We demonstrate that activating -noradrenergic receptors (B-NR specifically increases the frequency of sighs, while eupnea remains unaffected both in vitro and in vivo. B-NR activation specifically increased the frequency of intrinsically bursting pacemaker neurons that rely on persistent sodium current (INap. By contrast, all parameters of bursting pacemakers that rely on the non-specific cation current (ICAN remained unaffected. Moreover, riluzole, which blocks bursting in INap pacemakers abolished sighs altogether, while flufenamic acid which blocks the ICAN current did not alter the sigh-increasing effect caused by B-NR. Our results suggest that the selective B-NR action of sighs may result from the modulation of INap pacemaker activity and that disturbances in noradrenergic system may contribute to abnormal arousal response. The B-NR action on the preBötC may be an important mechanism in modulating behaviors that are specifically associated with sighs, such as the regulation of the early events leading to the arousal response.

  16. Tissue specificity of enhancer and promoter activities of a HERV-K(HML-2) LTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda, V M; Akopov, S B; Trubetskoy, D O; Manuylov, N L; Vetchinova, A S; Zavalova, L L; Nikolaev, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2004-08-01

    Transient expression of a luciferase reporter gene was used to evaluate tissue-specific promoter and enhancer activities of a solitary extraviral long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) in several human and CHO cell lines. The promoter activity of the LTR varied from virtually not detectable (GS and Jurkat cells) to as high as that of the SV40 early promoter (Tera-1 human testicular embryonal carcinoma cells). The negative regulatory element (NRE) of the LTR retained its activity in all cell lines where the LTR could act as a promoter, and was also capable of binding host cell nuclear proteins. The enhancer activity of the LTR towards the SV40 early promoter was detected only in Tera-1 cells and was not observed in a closely related human testicular embryonal carcinoma cell line of different origin, NT2/D1. A comparison of proteins bound to central part of the LTR in nuclear extracts from Tera-1 and NT2/D1 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed striking differences that could be determined by different LTR enhancer activities in these cells. Tissue specificity of the SV40 early promoter activity was also revealed.

  17. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.; Beyer, Thomas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Lauze, François

    2014-03-01

    In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume in the bottom part of a maxillary sinus in two patients without any artifacts, due to their abnormal location, it succeeded in filling all dental artifact regions in all patients. In conclusion, we propose a method, which combines ASM and kNN into a simple approach which, as the results show, succeeds to find and correct the dental artifacts within the anatomical surface.

  18. Mercury specifically induces LINE-1 activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Laleh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Tabrizi, Mina; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    L1 retro-elements comprise 17% of the human genome. Approximately 100 copies of these autonomous mobile elements are active in our DNA and can cause mutations, gene disruptions, and genomic instability. Therefore, human cells control the activities of L1 elements, in order to prevent their deleterious effects through different mechanisms. However, some toxic agents increase the retrotransposition activity of L1 elements in somatic cells. In order to identify specific effects of neurotoxic metals on L1 activity in neuronal cells, we studied the effects of mercury and cobalt on L1-retroelement activity by measuring levels of cellular transcription, protein expression, and genomic retrotransposition in a neuroblastoma cell line compared with the effects in three non-neuronal cell lines. Our results show that mercury increased the expression of L1 RNA, the activity of the L1 5'UTR, and L1 retrotransposition exclusively in the neuroblastoma cell line but not in non-neuronal cell lines. However, cobalt increased the expression of L1 RNA in neuroblastoma cells, HeLa cells, and wild-type human fibroblasts, and also increased the activity of the L1 5'UTR as well as the SV40 promoter in HeLa cells but not in neuroblastoma cells. Exposure to cobalt did not result in increased retrotransposition activity in HeLa cells or neuroblastoma cells. We conclude that non-toxic levels of the neurotoxic agent mercury could influence DNA by increasing L1 activities, specifically in neuronal cells, and may make these cells susceptible to neurodegeneration over time.

  19. Specific Sirt1 Activator-mediated Improvement in Glucose Homeostasis Requires Sirt1-Independent Activation of AMPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jun Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The specific Sirt1 activator SRT1720 increases mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, presumably by activating Sirt1. However, Sirt1 gain of function does not increase mitochondrial function, which raises a question about the central role of Sirt1 in SRT1720 action. Moreover, it is believed that the metabolic effects of SRT1720 occur independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, an important metabolic regulator that increases mitochondrial function. Here, we show that SRT1720 activates AMPK in a Sirt1-independent manner and SRT1720 activates AMPK by inhibiting a cAMP degrading phosphodiesterase (PDE in a competitive manner. Inhibiting the cAMP effector protein Epac prevents SRT1720 from activating AMPK or Sirt1 in myotubes. Moreover, SRT1720 does not increase mitochondrial function or improve glucose tolerance in AMPKα2 knockout mice. Interestingly, weight loss induced by SRT1720 is not sufficient to improve glucose tolerance. Therefore, contrary to current belief, the metabolic effects produced by SRT1720 require AMPK, which can be activated independently of Sirt1.

  20. Specific Sirt1 Activator-mediated Improvement in Glucose Homeostasis Requires Sirt1-Independent Activation of AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jun; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Um, Jee-Hyun; Brown, Alexandra L; Xu, Xihui; Kang, Hyeog; Ke, Hengming; Feng, Xuesong; Ryall, James; Philp, Andrew; Schenk, Simon; Kim, Myung K; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Chung, Jay H

    2017-04-01

    The specific Sirt1 activator SRT1720 increases mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, presumably by activating Sirt1. However, Sirt1 gain of function does not increase mitochondrial function, which raises a question about the central role of Sirt1 in SRT1720 action. Moreover, it is believed that the metabolic effects of SRT1720 occur independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important metabolic regulator that increases mitochondrial function. Here, we show that SRT1720 activates AMPK in a Sirt1-independent manner and SRT1720 activates AMPK by inhibiting a cAMP degrading phosphodiesterase (PDE) in a competitive manner. Inhibiting the cAMP effector protein Epac prevents SRT1720 from activating AMPK or Sirt1 in myotubes. Moreover, SRT1720 does not increase mitochondrial function or improve glucose tolerance in AMPKα2 knockout mice. Interestingly, weight loss induced by SRT1720 is not sufficient to improve glucose tolerance. Therefore, contrary to current belief, the metabolic effects produced by SRT1720 require AMPK, which can be activated independently of Sirt1. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Proteolytic activity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA towards protein substrates and effect of peptides stimulating PSA activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Mattsson

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3 exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA.

  2. GPS2/KDM4A Pioneering Activity Regulates Promoter-Specific Recruitment of PPARγ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dafne Cardamone

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Timely and selective recruitment of transcription factors to their appropriate DNA-binding sites represents a critical step in regulating gene activation; however, the regulatory strategies underlying each factor’s effective recruitment to specific promoter and/or enhancer regions are not fully understood. Here, we identify an unexpected regulatory mechanism by which promoter-specific binding, and therefore function, of peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor γ (PPARγ in adipocytes requires G protein suppressor 2 (GPS2 to prime the local chromatin environment via inhibition of the ubiquitin ligase RNF8 and stabilization of the H3K9 histone demethylase KDM4A/JMJD2. Integration of genome-wide profiling data indicates that the pioneering activity of GPS2/KDM4A is required for PPARγ-mediated regulation of a specific transcriptional program, including the lipolytic enzymes adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL. Hence, our findings reveal that GPS2 exerts a biologically important function in adipose tissue lipid mobilization by directly regulating ubiquitin signaling and indirectly modulating chromatin remodeling to prime selected genes for activation.

  3. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna Wiktoria

    2015-06-17

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein ‘nanomachines’ to become activated in a site-specific manner.

  4. Relative specificities of water and ammonia losses from backbone fragments in collision-activated dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank; Nielsen, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of a database containing over 20,000 high-resolution collision-activation mass spectra of tryptic peptide dications was employed to study the relative specificity of neutral losses from backbone fragments. The high resolution of the FTMS instrument allowed for the first time the first...... isotope of the water loss and the monoisotope of the ammonia loss to be distinguished. Contrary to a popular belief, water losses from y' ions are not specific enough to rely upon for detecting the presence of amino acids with oxygen in the side chains. At the same time, ammonia loss from b ions...

  5. HIV-specific cytotoxic T-cell activity in an HIV-exposed but uninfected infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland-Jones, S L; Nixon, D F; Aldhous, M C; Gotch, F; Ariyoshi, K; Hallam, N; Kroll, J S; Froebel, K; McMichael, A

    1993-04-03

    The factors necessary for protective immunity against HIV-1 are unknown. Important information about these factors should come from study of people at high risk of HIV infection who have not apparently become infected. Among these are the estimated 60-85% of children who may be exposed in utero or perinatally to HIV-1 but do not become infected. We observed the transient appearance of HIV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity in a baby born to HIV-1-infected parents, in whom all standard markers of infection remained negative. These findings suggest that HIV-specific CTLs may be a marker for recently exposed, but uninfected, individuals.

  6. StrigoQuant: A genetically encoded biosensor for quantifying strigolactone activity and specificity

    KAUST Repository

    Samodelov, S. L.

    2016-11-05

    Strigolactones are key regulators of plant development and interaction with symbiotic fungi; however, quantitative tools for strigolactone signaling analysis are lacking. We introduce a genetically encoded hormone biosensor used to analyze strigolactone-mediated processes, including the study of the components involved in the hormone perception/signaling complex and the structural specificity and sensitivity of natural and synthetic strigolactones in Arabidopsis, providing quantitative insights into the stereoselectivity of strigolactone perception. Given the high specificity, sensitivity, dynamic range of activity, modular construction, ease of implementation, and wide applicability, the biosensor StrigoQuant will be useful in unraveling multiple levels of strigolactone metabolic and signaling networks.

  7. The Amino Acid Specificity for Activation of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Matches the Specificity for Stabilization of Regulatory Domain Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengnan; Hinck, Andrew P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-08-25

    Liver phenylalanine hydroxylase is allosterically activated by phenylalanine. The structural changes that accompany activation have not been identified, but recent studies of the effects of phenylalanine on the isolated regulatory domain of the enzyme support a model in which phenylalanine binding promotes regulatory domain dimerization. Such a model predicts that compounds that stabilize the regulatory domain dimer will also activate the enzyme. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation were used to determine the ability of different amino acids and phenylalanine analogues to stabilize the regulatory domain dimer. The abilities of these compounds to activate the enzyme were analyzed by measuring their effects on the fluorescence change that accompanies activation and on the activity directly. At concentrations of 10-50 mM, d-phenylalanine, l-methionine, l-norleucine, and (S)-2-amino-3-phenyl-1-propanol were able to activate the enzyme to the same extent as 1 mM l-phenylalanine. Lower levels of activation were seen with l-4-aminophenylalanine, l-leucine, l-isoleucine, and 3-phenylpropionate. The ability of these compounds to stabilize the regulatory domain dimer agreed with their ability to activate the enzyme. These results support a model in which allosteric activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase is linked to dimerization of regulatory domains.

  8. The possibility of harmonizing the recombinant erythropoietin specific activity determination method with European Pharmacopoeia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Yakovlev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. The task of import substitution in health care and the development of normative legal acts in the framework of the Eurasian Economic Community raises the questions of harmonization of national requirements with international ones, including the standardization of drugs. Thereby, the assessment of the quality of domestic recombinant human erythropoietin in accordance with European Pharmacopoeia requirements is very actual. The main indicator of drug quality is specific activity of drug (rhepo. In Russian Federation it is determined by the influence of the drug on erythropoiesis stimulation. This effect of erythropoietin is measured by counting the number of reticulocytes using the flow cytometry and light microscopy. The latter method of calculation is not included in European Pharmacopoeia. Adequate assessment of this indicator is required for the development of national requirements for quality control of drugs rhepo harmonized with European Pharmacopoeia. Purpose of the work. The study aimed the comparative evaluation of the accuracy of the specific erythropoietin activity determination method using the flow cytometry and light microscopy data to provide the harmonization of the draft General monograph with European Pharmacopoeia. Research methods. The erythropoietin specific activity was determined in vivo in normocythaemic mice using the flow cytometry in accordance with the European Pharmacopoeia and light microscopy. We have compared the effects of two independent dilution series of erythropoietin European Pharmacopoeia standard sample. Results. The results of specific erythropoietin activity determination obtained by two different methods of measurement differed in the offset from the reference value (certified value. In flow cytometry data, the offset varied between 1-8%, the results of light microscopy showed higher variability ranging from 4 to 31%. The estimation of intermediate precision showed twice lower dispersion of

  9. Distal hinge of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 involves its latency transition and specificities toward serine proteases

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    Shaltiel Shmuel

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 spontaneously converts from an inhibitory into a latent form. Specificity of PAI-1 is mainly determined by its reactive site (Arg346-Met347, which interacts with serine residue of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA with concomitant formation of SDS-stable complex. Other sites may also play roles in determining the specificity of PAI-1 toward serine proteases. Results To understand more about the role of distal hinge for PAI-1 specificities towards serine proteases and for its conformational transition, wild type PAI-1 and its mutants were expressed in baculovirus system. WtPAI-1 was found to be about 12 fold more active than the fibrosarcoma PAI-1. Single site mutants within the Asp355-Arg356-Pro357 segment of PAI-1 yield guanidine activatable inhibitors (a that can still form SDS stable complexes with tPA and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA, and (b that have inhibition rate constants towards plasminogen activators which resemble those of the fibrosarcoma inhibitor. More importantly, latency conversion rate of these mutants was found to be ~3–4 fold faster than that of wtPAI-1. We also tested if Glu351 is important for serine protease specificity. The functional stability of wtPAI-1, Glu351Ala, Glu351Arg was about 18 ± 5, 90 ± 8 and 14 ± 3 minutes, respectively, which correlated well with both their corresponding specific activities (84 ± 15 U/ug, 112 ± 18 U/ug and 68 ± 9 U/ug, respectively and amount of SDS-stable complex formed with tPA after denatured by Guanidine-HCl and dialyzed against 50 mM sodium acetate at 4°C. The second-order rate constants of inhibition for uPA, plasmin and thrombin by Glu351Ala and Glu351Arg were increased about 2–10 folds compared to wtPAI-1, but there was no change for tPA. Conclusion The Asp355-Pro357 segment and Glu351 in distal hinge are involved in maintaining the inhibitory conformation of PAI-1. Glu351 is a specificity

  10. Missense mutations in SLC26A8, encoding a sperm-specific activator of CFTR, are associated with human asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirami, Thassadite; Rode, Baptiste; Jollivet, Mathilde; Da Silva, Nathalie; Escalier, Denise; Gaitch, Natacha; Norez, Caroline; Tuffery, Pierre; Wolf, Jean-Philippe; Becq, Frédéric; Ray, Pierre F; Dulioust, Emmanuel; Gacon, Gérard; Bienvenu, Thierry; Touré, Aminata

    2013-05-02

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in mature sperm and is required for sperm motility and capacitation. Both these processes are controlled by ions fluxes and are essential for fertilization. We have shown that SLC26A8, a sperm-specific member of the SLC26 family of anion exchangers, associates with the CFTR channel and strongly stimulates its activity. This suggests that the two proteins cooperate to regulate the anion fluxes required for correct sperm motility and capacitation. Here, we report on three heterozygous SLC26A8 missense mutations identified in a cohort of 146 men presenting with asthenozoospermia: c.260G>A (p.Arg87Gln), c.2434G>A (p.Glu812Lys), and c.2860C>T (p.Arg954Cys). These mutations were not present in 121 controls matched for ethnicity, and statistical analysis on a control population of 8,600 individuals (from dbSNP and 1000 Genomes) showed them to be associated with asthenozoospermia with a power > 95%. By cotransfecting Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells with SLC26A8 variants and CFTR, we showed that the physical interaction between the two proteins was partly conserved but that the capacity to activate CFTR-dependent anion transport was completely abolished for all mutants. Biochemical studies revealed the presence of much smaller amounts of protein for all variants, but these amounts were restored to wild-type levels upon treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Immunocytochemistry also showed the amounts of SLC26A8 in sperm to be abnormally small in individuals carrying the mutations. These mutations might therefore impair formation of the SLC26A8-CFTR complex, principally by affecting SLC26A8 stability, consistent with an impairment of CFTR-dependent sperm-activation events in affected individuals.

  11. Single stage single phase active power factor corrected Ĉuk Topology Based AC-DC Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ismail Hossain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the analysis of a power factor correction (PFC converter using close loop Ĉuk topology. Regardless of the input line voltage and output load variations, input current drawn by the buck or buck-boost converter is always discontinuous. The Boost converter suffers from high voltage stresses across the power electronic devices. The input current in Ĉuk converter is comparable to boost converter’s input current. In this paper output voltage is controlled by inner current and outer voltage control loop along with power factor correction (PFC. It shows less input current THD, nearly unity power factor and better output voltage regulation of AC-DC converter under variable input voltage and output load. In this paper the relative performance between normal diode rectifier, open loop Ĉuk rectifier and close loop Ĉuk rectifier is presented. An algorithm for implementing close loop Ĉuk rectifier in digital domain is developed and simulated.

  12. Species-specific activation time-lags can explain habitat restrictions in hydrophilic lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidén, Marlene; Jonsson Cabrajić, Anna V; Ottosson-Löfvenius, Mikaell; Palmqvist, Kristin; Lundmark, Tomas

    2010-05-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) activation after hydration with water or humid air was measured in four hydrophilic and a generalist lichen to test the hypothesis that slow activation might explain habitat restriction in the former group. For the hydrophilic species, activation was after 4 h nearly completed in Lobaria amplissima and Platismatia norvegica, while only c. 50% for Bryoria bicolor and Usnea longissima. The generalist Platismatia glauca was activated instantaneously. The effect of this on lichen field performance was investigated using a dynamic model separating the two water sources rain and humid air. Model simulations were made using the species-specific characteristics and climate data from 12 stream microhabitats. For U. longissima, slow PSII activation could reduce realized photosynthesis by a factor of five. Bryoria bicolor was almost as severely affected, while P. norvegica displayed moderate reductions. Lobaria amplissima displayed longer realized activity periods even in unfavourable microclimates, possibly because of a higher water loss resistance. Both close proximity to streams and presence of turbulent water had a positive impact on realized activity among the slowly activated species, coinciding with observed distribution patterns of hydrophilic species. The results presented here may thus partly explain observed habitat restrictions of rare hydrophilic lichens.

  13. Conformational adaptation of Asian macaque TRIMCyp directs lineage specific antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M J Ylinen

    Full Text Available TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5alpha but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations.

  14. Transient activation of specific neurons in mice by selective expression of the capsaicin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Ali D.; Rainwater, Aundrea; Parker, Jones G.; Jones, Graham L.; Argilli, Emanuela; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.; Ehlers, Michael D.; Bonci, Antonello; Zweifel, Larry s.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control the electrical activity of a neuronal subtype is a valuable tool in deciphering the role of discreet cell populations in complex neural circuits. Recent techniques that allow remote control of neurons are either labor intensive and invasive or indirectly coupled to neural electrical potential with low temporal resolution. Here we show the rapid, reversible and direct activation of genetically identified neuronal subpopulations by generating two inducible transgenic mouse models. Confined expression of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, allows cell-specific activation after peripheral or oral delivery of ligand in freely moving mice. Capsaicin-induced activation of dopaminergic or serotonergic neurons reversibly alters both physiological and behavioural responses within minutes, and lasts ~10 min. These models showcase a robust and remotely controllable genetic tool that modulates a distinct cell population without the need for invasive and labour-intensive approaches. PMID:22434189

  15. Load-specific physical activity scores are related to tibia bone architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Joseph M; Ross, Hannah L; Laing, Emma M; Modlesky, Christopher M; Pollock, Norman K; Baile, Clifton A; Lewis, Richard D

    2015-04-01

    Assessment of physical activity in clinical bone studies is essential. Two bone-specific physical activity scoring methods, the Bone Loading History Questionnaire (BLHQ) and Bone-Specific Physical Activity Questionnaire (BPAQ), have shown correlations with bone density and geometry, but not architecture. The purpose of this study was to determine relationships between physical activity scoring methods and bone architecture in non-Hispanic white adolescent females (N = 24; 18-19 years of age). Bone loading scores (BLHQ [hip and spine] and past BPAQ) and energy expenditure (7-day physical activity recall) were determined from respective questionnaires. Estimates of trabecular and cortical bone architecture at the nondominant radius and tibia were assessed via magnetic resonance imaging. Total body and regional areal bone mineral density (aBMD), as well as total body fat mass and fat-free soft tissue (FFST) mass were assessed via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Pearson's correlations and partial correlations adjusting for height, total body fat mass, and FFST were performed. Hip BLHQ scores were correlated with midtibia cortical volume (r = .43; p = .03). Adjusted hip and spine BLHQ scores were correlated with all midtibia cortical measures (r = .50-0.58; p < .05) and distal radius apparent trabecular number (r = .46-0.53; p < .05). BPAQ scores were correlated with all midtibia cortical (r = .41-0.51; p < .05) and most aBMD (r = .47-0.53; p < .05) measures. Energy expenditure was inversely associated with femoral neck aBMD only after statistical adjustment (r = .49, p < .05). These data show that greater load-specific physical activity scores, but not energy expenditure, are indicative of greater midtibia cortical bone quality, thus supporting the utility of these instruments in musculoskeletal research.

  16. Structural basis for the activity and substrate specificity of fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase FlK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Marcio V B; Huang, Fanglu; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Tosin, Manuela; Spiteller, Dieter; Dry, Emily F V; Leadlay, Peter F; Spencer, Jonathan B; Blundell, Tom L

    2010-07-16

    The thioesterase FlK from the fluoroacetate-producing Streptomyces cattleya catalyzes the hydrolysis of fluoroacetyl-coenzyme A. This provides an effective self-defense mechanism, preventing any fluoroacetyl-coenzyme A formed from being further metabolized to 4-hydroxy-trans-aconitate, a lethal inhibitor of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, FlK does not accept acetyl-coenzyme A as a substrate. Crystal structure analysis shows that FlK forms a dimer, in which each subunit adopts a hot dog fold as observed for type II thioesterases. Unlike other type II thioesterases, which invariably utilize either an aspartate or a glutamate as catalytic base, we show by site-directed mutagenesis and crystallography that FlK employs a catalytic triad composed of Thr(42), His(76), and a water molecule, analogous to the Ser/Cys-His-acid triad of type I thioesterases. Structural comparison of FlK complexed with various substrate analogues suggests that the interaction between the fluorine of the substrate and the side chain of Arg(120) located opposite to the catalytic triad is essential for correct coordination of the substrate at the active site and therefore accounts for the substrate specificity.

  17. Correlates of children’s time-specific physical activity: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Rebecca M

    2012-04-01

    . This highlights the infancy of this area and a need for further investigation into time-specific physical activity behaviour so that interventions designed for these specific periods can target the important correlates.

  18. Korean immigrant women's physical activity experience: a situation-specific theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chang, Sun Ju; Nguyen, Giang; Stringer, Lynn; Chee, Wonshik; Chee, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    To develop successful physical activity promotion programs for midlife immigrant women, especially for Korean immigrant midlife women, concrete theoretical bases are needed. However, virtually no theoretical frameworks and/or theories exist that can explain the influences of immigration transition on the physical activity experience of midlife immigrant women in general or Korean immigrant midlife women in specific. The purpose of this article is to present a situation-specific theory on physical activity experience of Korean immigrant midlife women (SPAKIM) with its development process. An integrative approach was used to develop the theory based on the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity (MAPA) theory, the transitions theory, a review of the relevant literature, and two studies on midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity. The proposed theory includes nature of transitions, nonmodifiable and modifiable transition conditions, contexts of daily life, patterns of response, and nursing therapeutics as major concepts, and each major concept includes several related subconcepts. Because several concepts of the theory were developed mainly based on the literature review, the major concepts and related subconcepts need to be further developed and evaluated in future studies.

  19. PEGylated DX-1000: Pharmacokinetics and Antineoplastic Activity of a Specific Plasmin Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Devy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel inhibitors of the urokinase-mediated plasminogen (plg activation system are potentially of great clinical benefit as anticancer treatments. Using phage display, we identified DX-1000 a tissue factor pathway inhibitor-derived Kunitz domain protein which is a specific high-affinity inhibitor of plasmin (pin (Ki = 99 pM. When tested in vitro, DX-1000 blocks plasminmediated pro-matrix metal loproteinase-9 (proMMP-9 activation on cells and dose-dependently inhibits tube formation, while not significantly affecting hemostasis and coagulation. However, this low-molecular weight protein inhibitor (~ 7 kDa exhibits rapid plasma clearance in mice and rabbits, limiting its potential clinical use in chronic diseases. After site-specific PEGylation, DX-1000 retains its activity and exhibits a decreased plasma clearance. This PEGylated derivative is effective in vitro, as well as potent in inhibiting tumor growth of green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled MDA-MB-231 cells. 4PEG-DX-1000 treatment causes a significant reduction of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen expressions, a reduction of tumor proliferation, and vascularization. 4PEG-DX-1000 treatment significantly decreases the level of active mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK in the primary tumors and reduces metastasis incidence. Together, our results demonstrate the potential value of plasmin inhibitors as therapeutic agents for blocking breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  20. Removal of damaged proteins during ES cell fate specification requires the proteasome activator PA28

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernebring, Malin; Fredriksson, Asa; Liljevald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, removal of oxidatively damaged proteins is triggered upon the first signs of cell fate specification but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, we report that this phase of differentiation encompasses an unexpected induction of genes encoding the proteasome activator...... PA28aß (11S), subunits of the immunoproteasome (20Si), and the 20Si regulator TNFa. This induction is accompanied by assembly of mature PA28-20S(i) proteasomes and elevated proteasome activity. Inhibiting accumulation of PA28a using miRNA counteracted the removal of damaged proteins demonstrating...

  1. CLK-1 protein has DNA binding activity specific to O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2002-04-10

    Mutations in the clk-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans extend worm life span and slow down a variety of physiological processes. Here we report that C. elegans CLK-1 as well as its mouse homologue have DNA binding activity that is specific to the O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA. DNA binding activity of CLK-1 is inhibited by ADP, and is altered by mutations that extend nematode life span. Our results suggest that, in addition to its enzymatic function in ubiquinone biosynthesis, CLK-1 is involved in the regulation of mtDNA replication or transcription.

  2. The level of cholinergic nucleus basalis activation controls the specificity of auditory associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Norman M; Miasnikov, Alexandre A; Chen, Jemmy C

    2006-11-01

    Learning involves not only the establishment of memory per se, but also the specific details of its contents. In classical conditioning, the former concerns whether an association was learned while the latter discloses what was learned. The neural bases of associativity have been studied extensively while neural mechanisms of memory specificity have been neglected. Stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis (NBs) paired with a preceding tone induces CS-specific associative memory. As different levels of acetylcholine may be released naturally during different learning situations, we asked whether the level of activation of the cholinergic neuromodulatory system can control the degree of detail that is encoded and retrieved. Adult male rats were tested pre- and post-training for behavioral responses (interruption of ongoing respiration) to tones of various frequencies (1-15 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s). Training consisted of 200 trials/day of tone (8.0 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s) either paired or unpaired with NBs (CS-NBs = 1.8 s) at moderate (65.7+/-9.0 microA, one day) or weak (46.7+/-12.1 microA, three training days) levels of stimulation, under conditions of controlled behavioral state (pre-trial stable respiration rate). Post-training (24 h) responses to tones revealed that moderate activation induced both associative and CS-specific behavioral memory, whereas weak activation produced associative memory lacking frequency specificity. The degree of memory specificity 24 h after training was positively correlated with the magnitude of CS-elicited increase in gamma activity within the EEG during training, but only in the moderate NBs group. Thus, a low level of acetylcholine released by the nucleus basalis during learning is sufficient to induce associativity whereas a higher level of release enables the storage of greater experiential detail. gamma waves, which are thought to reflect the coordinated activity of cortical cells, appear to index the encoding of CS detail. The findings

  3. Body side-specific control of motor activity during turning in a walking animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, Matthias; Rosenbaum, Philipp; Bockemühl, Till; Büschges, Ansgar

    2016-04-27

    Animals and humans need to move deftly and flexibly to adapt to environmental demands. Despite a large body of work on the neural control of walking in invertebrates and vertebrates alike, the mechanisms underlying the motor flexibility that is needed to adjust the motor behavior remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated optomotor-induced turning and the neuronal mechanisms underlying the differences between the leg movements of the two body sides in the stick insect Carausius morosus. We present data to show that the generation of turning kinematics in an insect are the combined result of descending unilateral commands that change the leg motor output via task-specific modifications in the processing of local sensory feedback as well as modification of the activity of local central pattern generating networks in a body-side-specific way. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the specificity of such modifications in a defined motor task.

  4. Specifics of the Activity-Based Costing applications in Hospital Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Popesko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The current paper analyses the specifics of the application of Activity-Based Costing method in hospital management. Primary objective of the paper is to outline the methodology of the ABC application in hospitals. First part of the paper analyzes the ways of ABC implementation in published foreign studies. Second part describes the individual steps in ABC application and discusses the differences in the application procedures between the manufacturing and hospital organization.

  5. Specific features of domestic banks activity in the factoring services market

    OpenAIRE

    Trygub Olena V.

    2014-01-01

    The article analyses specific features of formation and development of the domestic factoring market. In the result of the study the article establishes that development of factoring in Ukraine took place due to active participation of banking institutions in this process and nowadays they are leaders in the domestic factoring services market due to possessing significant competitive advantages if compared with non-banking companies that specialise in factoring. The article detects that nowad...

  6. А new Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin from the mussel Mytilus trossulus: Structure, tissue specificity, antimicrobial and antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikalovets, Irina V; Kovalchuk, Svetlana N; Litovchenko, Alina P; Molchanova, Valentina I; Pivkin, Mikhail V; Chernikov, Oleg V

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, a new Gal/GalNAc specific lectin from the mussel Mytilus trossulus (designated as MTL) was identified, and its expression levels, both in tissues and toward pathogen stimulation, were then characterized. The MTL primary structure was determined via cDNA sequencing. Deduced sequence of 150 amino acid residues showed 89% similarity to lectins from the mussels Crenomytilus grayanus and Mytilus galloprovincialis that were the first members of a new family of zoolectins. The results indicated that the MTL might be involved in immune response toward pathogen infection, and it might perform different recognition specificity toward bacteria or fungi.

  7. Inhibitory effect of ammonia nitrogen on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A series of batch experiments were conducted in 125 mL serum bottles to assess the toxicity of different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen to the specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge from upflow anaerobic sludge bed(UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed(EGSB) reactors. The effects of pH value and temperature on toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to anaerobes were investigated. The results show that the specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge suffers inhibition from ammonia nitrogen, the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen that produce 50% inhibition of specific methanogenic activity for sludge from UASB and EGSB reactor are 2.35 and 2.75 g/L, respectively. Hydrogen utilizing methanogens suffers less inhibition from ammonia nitrogen than that of acetate utilizing methanogens. Hydrogen-producing acetogens that utilize propionate and butyrate as substrates suffer serious inhibition from ammonia nitrogen. The toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to anaerobic granular sludge enhances when pH value and temperature increase. Anaerobic granular sludge can bear higher concentrations of ammonia nitrogen after being acclimated by ammonia nitrogen for 7 d.

  8. Selective radiolabeling of cell surface proteins to a high specific activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.A.; Lau, A.L.; Cunningham, D.D.

    1987-02-10

    A procedure was developed for selective radiolabeling of membrane proteins on cells to higher specific activities than possible with available techniques. Cell surface amino groups were derivatized with /sup 125/I-(hydroxyphenyl)propionyl groups via /sup 125/I-sulfosuccinimidyl (hydroxyphenyl)propionate (/sup 125/II-sulfo-SHPP). This reagent preferentially labeled membrane proteins exposed at the cell surface of erythrocytes as assessed by the degree of radiolabel incorporation into erythrocyte ghost proteins and hemoglobin. Comparison with the lactoperoxidase-(/sup 125/I)iodide labeling technique revealed that /sup 125/I-sulfo-SHPP labeled cell surface proteins to a much higher specific activity and hemoglobin to a much lower specific activity. Additionally, this reagent was used for selective radiolabeling of membrane proteins on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane by blocking exofacial amino groups with uniodinated sulfo-SHPP, lysing the cells, and then incubating them with /sup 125/I-sulfo-SHPP. Exclusive labeling of either side of the plasma membrane was demonstrated by the labeling of some marker proteins with well-defined spacial orientations on erythroctyes. Transmembrane proteins such as the epidermal growth factor receptor on cultured cells could also be labeled differentially from either side of the plasma membrane.

  9. The length of a lantibiotic hinge region has profound influence on antimicrobial activity and host specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang eZhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized (methyllanthionine containing peptides which can efficiently inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. As lantibiotics kill bacteria efficiently and resistance to them is difficult to be obtained, they have the potential to be used in many applications, e.g. in pharmaceutical industry or food industry. Nisin can inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to lipid II and by making pores in their membrane. The C-terminal part of nisin is known to play an important role during translocation over the membrane and forming pore complexes. However, as the thickness of bacterial membranes varies between different species and environmental conditions, this property could have an influence on the pore forming activity of nisin. To investigate this, the so-called hinge region of nisin (residues NMK was engineered to vary from one to six amino acid residues and specific activity against different indicators was compared. Antimicrobial activity in liquid culture assays showed that wild type nisin is most active, while truncation of the hinge region dramatically reduced the activity of the peptide. However, one or two amino acids extensions showed only slightly reduced activity against most indicator strains. Notably, some variants (+2, +1, -1, -2 exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than nisin in agar well diffusion assays against Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis VE14089, Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4 and Bacillus cereus 4153 at certain temperatures.

  10. The length of a lantibiotic hinge region has profound influence on antimicrobial activity and host specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liang; van Heel, Auke J; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized (methyl)lanthionine containing peptides which can efficiently inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. As lantibiotics kill bacteria efficiently and resistance to them is difficult to be obtained, they have the potential to be used in many applications, e.g., in pharmaceutical industry or food industry. Nisin can inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to lipid II and by making pores in their membrane. The C-terminal part of nisin is known to play an important role during translocation over the membrane and forming pore complexes. However, as the thickness of bacterial membranes varies between different species and environmental conditions, this property could have an influence on the pore forming activity of nisin. To investigate this, the so-called "hinge region" of nisin (residues NMK) was engineered to vary from one to six amino acid residues and specific activity against different indicators was compared. Antimicrobial activity in liquid culture assays showed that wild type nisin is most active, while truncation of the hinge region dramatically reduced the activity of the peptide. However, one or two amino acids extensions showed only slightly reduced activity against most indicator strains. Notably, some variants (+2, +1, -1, -2) exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than nisin in agar well diffusion assays against Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis VE14089, Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4 and Bacillus cereus 4153 at certain temperatures.

  11. A benefit-cost framework of motivation for a specific activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, B; Knecht, S

    2016-01-01

    How can an individual be motivated to perform a target exercise or activity? This question arises in training, therapeutic, and education settings alike, yet despite-or even because of-the large range of extant motivation theories, finding a clear answer to this question can be challenging. Here we propose an application-friendly framework of motivation for a specific activity or exercise that incorporates core concepts from several well-regarded psychological and economic theories of motivation. The key assumption of this framework is that motivation for performing a given activity is determined by the expected benefits and the expected costs of (performance of) the activity. Benefits comprise positive feelings, gains, and rewards experienced during performance of the activity (intrinsic benefits) or achieved through the activity (extrinsic benefits). Costs entail effort requirements, time demands, and other expenditure (intrinsic costs) as well as unwanted associated outcomes and missing out on alternative activities (extrinsic costs). The expected benefits and costs of a given exercise are subjective and state dependent. We discuss convergence of the proposed framework with a selection of extant motivation theories and briefly outline neurobiological correlates of its main components and assumptions. One particular strength of our framework is that it allows to specify five pathways to increasing motivation for a target exercise, which we illustrate and discuss with reference to previous empirical data. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineering neprilysin activity and specificity to create a novel therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl I Webster

    Full Text Available Neprilysin is a transmembrane zinc metallopeptidase that degrades a wide range of peptide substrates. It has received attention as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease due to its ability to degrade the peptide amyloid beta. However, its broad range of peptide substrates has the potential to limit its therapeutic use due to degradation of additional peptides substrates that tightly regulate many physiological processes. We sought to generate a soluble version of the ectodomain of neprilysin with improved activity and specificity towards amyloid beta as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease. Extensive amino acid substitutions were performed at positions surrounding the active site and inner surface of the enzyme and variants screened for activity on amyloid beta 1-40, 1-42 and a variety of other physiologically relevant peptides. We identified several mutations that modulated and improved both enzyme selectivity and intrinsic activity. Neprilysin variant G399V/G714K displayed an approximately 20-fold improved activity on amyloid beta 1-40 and up to a 3,200-fold reduction in activity on other peptides. Along with the altered peptide substrate specificity, the mutant enzyme produced a markedly altered series of amyloid beta cleavage products compared to the wild-type enzyme. Crystallisation of the mutant enzyme revealed that the amino acid substitutions result in alteration of the shape and size of the pocket containing the active site compared to the wild-type enzyme. The mutant enzyme offers the potential for the more efficient degradation of amyloid beta in vivo as a therapeutic for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States); Ruggli, Nicolas [Institute of Virology and Immunology, CH-3147 Mittelhäusern (Switzerland); Choi, Kyung H., E-mail: kychoi@utmb.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  14. Synthesis and investigation of the specific activity of the DNA-doxorubicin conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokorev, A. V.; Zaborovskiy, A. V.; Kotlyarov, A. A.; Balykova, L. A.; Malkina, M. A.; Kargina, I. V.; Gromova, E. V.; Medvezhonkov, V. Yu; Gurevich, K. G.; Shchukin, S. A.; Pyataev, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the method of obtaining the conjugate of the anticancer chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin to the exogenous double-stranded DNA of the sturgeons is proposed (the source: commercial drug “Derinat”). The optimal conditions for synthesis of conjugate (pH, temperature and the mass ratio of the components), ensuring the highest degree of binding the chemotherapeutic agent to a carrier, were picked out. Clearing the conjugate from the non-encapsulated chemotherapeutic agent was being made by ultrafiltration method. The investigation of the toxicity and specific antineoplastic activity of the synthesized complex was conducted. The performance of the drug toxicity were established on the intact mice in compliance with the accepted standards. The antineoplastic activity was evaluated upon the Tumor Growth Inhibition Index and Metastasis Inhibition Index on mice with the transplanted Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC). It was demonstrated that the conjugate toxicity is approximately lower that the one of the unconjugated doxorubicin (LD 50 was equal 14.6 mg/kg and 9.9 mg/kg for the conjugate and doxorubicin, respectively). The specific antineoplastic activity was investigated in equitoxic doses of the drug. It was established that the conjugate being administered in equitoxic doses possesses a stronger antineoplastic activity, than the water-soluble drug (maximum 35% more as to the tumor volume and 51% more as to the Tumor Growth Inhibition index).

  15. Dansylglycine, a fluorescent probe for specific determination of halogenating activity of myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozo, Luiza de Carvalho; Zeraik, Maria Luiza; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias

    2017-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are enzymes present in neutrophil and eosinophil leukocytes, respectively. Here, we present the development of a sensitive and specific assay for determination of the halogenating enzymatic activity of MPO and EPO based on the electrophilic attack of HOCl and HOBr on aromatic ring of dansylglycine (DG). We found that the intrinsic fluorescence of DG was promptly depleted by the action of these acids. In the presence of the enzymes, the fluorescence bleaching was dependent of chloride (Cl(-)) and bromide (Br(-)), which makes the assay able to distinguish the halogenating from the peroxidase activity. A linear correlation was obtained between the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration and the fluorescent decay. Similarly, the enzyme activity was measured by keeping constant H2O2. The method was applied for studding MPO/EPO specific inhibitors as 5-fluortryptamine (reversible inhibitor) and 4-hydroxybenzhydrazide (irreversible inhibitor). Differently of the taurine chloramine/3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine assay, which is among the most used technique, the dansylglycine assay was able to differentiate these inhibitors based on their kinetic behavior. In conclusion, this assay can differentiate the peroxidase and halogenating activity of MPO and EPO. Moreover, the method is adequate for real-time measurement of the production of HOCl and HOBr. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-10-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554.

  17. Physical activity estimated by the bone-specific physical activity questionnaire is also associated with cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Benjamin K; Purvis, Meredith; Beck, Belinda R

    2016-11-01

    The nature of physical activity that benefits bone is traditionally thought to differ from that benefiting cardiovascular health. Accordingly, exercise recommendations for improving bone health and cardiovascular health are largely incongruent. Our aim was to determine the associations between high-impact physical activity participation and both cardiovascular disease risk factors and bone mass. We recruited 94 men and women (age 34.0 ± 13.3 years) to undergo measures of cardiovascular disease risk (BMI, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, waist-to-hip ratio, and mean arterial pressure) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA XR-800, Norland) measures of bone mass (femoral neck, lumbar spine, and whole body BMD) and body composition (whole body lean mass and fat mass). Physical activity participation was estimated using the bone-specific physical activity questionnaire (BPAQ). Those in the upper tertile for current BPAQ score exhibited lower total cholesterol, waist-to-hip ratio, and mean arterial pressure than those in the lower tertiles (P high-impact physical activity as captured by the BPAQ may be beneficial for both bone health and for attenuating cardiovascular disease risk.

  18. Tonotopic and field-specific representation of long-lasting sustained activity in rat auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyo Isoguchi Shiramatsu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortical information processing of the onset, offset, and continuous plateau of an acoustic stimulus should play an important role in acoustic object perception. To date, transient activities responding to the onset and offset of a sound have been well investigated and cortical subfields and topographic representation in these subfields, such as place code of sound frequency, have been well characterized. However, whether these cortical subfields with tonotopic representation are inherited in the sustained activities that follow transient activities and persist during the presentation of a long-lasting stimulus remains unknown, because sustained activities do not exhibit distinct, reproducible, and time-locked responses in their amplitude to be characterized by grand averaging. To address this gap in understanding, we attempted to decode sound information from densely mapped sustained activities in the rat auditory cortex using a sparse parameter estimation method called sparse logistic regression (SLR, and investigated whether and how these activities represent sound information. A microelectrode array with a grid of 10 × 10 recording sites within an area of 4.0 × 4.0 mm2 was implanted in the fourth layer of the auditory cortex in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Sustained activities in response to long-lasting constant pure tones were recorded. SLR then was applied to discriminate the sound-induced band-specific power or phase-locking value from those of spontaneous activities. The highest decoding performance was achieved in the high-gamma band, indicating that cortical inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the sparse tonotopic representation in sustained activities by mediating synchronous activities. The estimated parameter in the SLR decoding revealed that the informative recording site had a characteristic frequency close to the test frequency. In addition, decoding of the four test frequencies demonstrated that the decoding

  19. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  20. Proportion-corrected scaled voxel models for Japanese children and their application to the numerical dosimetry of specific absorption rate for frequencies from 30 MHz to 3 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Etsuo; Watanabe, Soichi

    2008-12-01

    The development of high-resolution anatomical voxel models of children is difficult given, inter alia, the ethical limitations on subjecting children to medical imaging. We instead used an existing voxel model of a Japanese adult and three-dimensional deformation to develop three voxel models that match the average body proportions of Japanese children at 3, 5 and 7 years old. The adult model was deformed to match the proportions of a child by using the measured dimensions of various body parts of children at 3, 5 and 7 years old and a free-form deformation technique. The three developed models represent average-size Japanese children of the respective ages. They consist of cubic voxels (2 mm on each side) and are segmented into 51 tissues and organs. We calculated the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rates (WBA-SARs) and tissue-averaged SARs for the child models for exposures to plane waves from 30 MHz to 3 GHz; these results were then compared with those for scaled down adult models. We also determined the incident electric-field strength required to produce the exposure equivalent to the ICNIRP basic restriction for general public exposure, i.e., a WBA-SAR of 0.08 W kg-1.

  1. Preparation, Characterization, and Determination of Immunological Activities of Transfer Factor Specific to Human Sperm Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF specific to human sperm antigen (HSA for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. Methods. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT, leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT, and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ-IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0±0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μg/mL and 36.3 μg/mL, resp.. Results. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34±0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717±0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ-IFN and IL-21 (P0.05. Conclusion. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  2. Sex-specific foraging behavior in response to fishing activities in a threatened seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tarrasón, Manuel; Bécares, Juan; Bateman, Santiago; Arcos, José Manuel; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carolina

    2015-06-01

    Some seabird species have learnt to efficiently exploit fishing discards from trawling activities. However, a discard ban has been proposed as necessary in Europe to ensure the sustainability of the seas. It is of crucial importance for the management and conservation purposes to study the potential consequences of a discard ban on the foraging ecology of threatened seabirds. We assessed the influence of fishing activities on the feeding habits of 22 male and 15 female Audouin's gulls (Larus audouinii) from the Ebro Delta (Mediterranean Sea) during the breeding period using GPS loggers together with Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA), which provided new insights into their foraging behavior and trophic ecology, respectively. GPS data revealed different sex-specific foraging patterns between workdays and weekends. Females were highly consistent in that they foraged at sea throughout the week even though discarding stops at weekends. In contrast, males switched from foraging at sea during the week (when discards are produced) to an increased use of rice field habitats at weekends (when fishermen do not work). This sex-specific foraging behavior could be related to specific nutritional requirements associated with previous egg production, an energetically demanding period for females. However, on a broader time scale integrated by the SIA, both sexes showed a high degree of individual specialization in their trophic ecology. The need to obtain detailed information on the dependence and response of seabirds to fishing activities is crucial in conservation sciences. In this regard, sex-specific foraging behavior in relation to fisheries has been overlooked, despite the ecological and conservation implications. For instance, this situation may lead to sex differentiation in bycatch mortality in longlines when trawlers do not operate. Moreover, any new fisheries policy will need to be implemented gradually to facilitate the adaptation of a specialized species to a discard ban

  3. Active training and driving-specific feedback improve older drivers' visual search prior to lane changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavallière Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some effects of aging that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there is evidence that classroom programs (driving refresher courses do not improve the driving performance of older drivers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify visual search behaviors of older drivers while changing lanes in urban driving. Methods In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the video-based feedback training, 10 older drivers who received a driving refresher course and feedback about their driving performance were tested with an on-road standardized evaluation before and after participating to a simulator training program (Feedback group. Their results were compared to a Control group (12 older drivers who received the same refresher course and in-simulator active practice as the Feedback group without receiving driving-specific feedback. Results After attending the training program, the Control group showed no increase in the frequency of the visual inspection of three regions of interests (rear view and left side mirrors, and blind spot. In contrast, for the Feedback group, combining active training and driving-specific feedbacks increased the frequency of blind spot inspection by 100% (32.3 to 64.9% of verification before changing lanes. Conclusions These results suggest that simulator training combined with driving-specific feedbacks helped older drivers to improve their visual inspection strategies, and that in-simulator training transferred positively to on-road driving. In order to be effective, it is claimed that driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving-specific feedbacks. Simulators offer a unique environment for developing such programs adapted to older drivers' needs.

  4. moco: Fast Motion Correction for Calcium Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eDubbs

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Motion correction is the first step in a pipeline of algorithms to analyze calcium imaging videos and extract biologically relevant information, for example the network structure of the neurons therein. Fast motion correction is especially critical for closed-loop activity triggered stimulation experiments, where accurate detection and targeting of specific cells in necessary. We introduce a novel motion-correction algorithm that uses a Fourier-transform approach, and a combination of judicious downsampling and the accelerated computation of many $L_2$ norms using dynamic programming and two-dimensional, fft-accelerated convolutions, to enhance its efficiency. Its accuracy is comparable to that of established community-used algorithms, and it is more stable to large translational motions. It is programmed in Java and is compatible with ImageJ.

  5. moco: Fast Motion Correction for Calcium Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbs, Alexander; Guevara, James; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Motion correction is the first step in a pipeline of algorithms to analyze calcium imaging videos and extract biologically relevant information, for example the network structure of the neurons therein. Fast motion correction is especially critical for closed-loop activity triggered stimulation experiments, where accurate detection and targeting of specific cells in necessary. We introduce a novel motion-correction algorithm which uses a Fourier-transform approach, and a combination of judicious downsampling and the accelerated computation of many L 2 norms using dynamic programming and two-dimensional, fft-accelerated convolutions, to enhance its efficiency. Its accuracy is comparable to that of established community-used algorithms, and it is more stable to large translational motions. It is programmed in Java and is compatible with ImageJ.

  6. Single-molecule catalysis mapping quantifies site-specific activity and uncovers radial activity gradient on single 2D nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoy, Nesha May; Zhou, Xiaochun; Choudhary, Eric; Shen, Hao; Liu, Guokun; Chen, Peng

    2013-02-06

    Shape-controlled metal nanocrystals are a new generation of nanoscale catalysts. Depending on their shapes, these nanocrystals exhibit various surface facets, and the assignments of their surface facets have routinely been used to rationalize or predict their catalytic activity in a variety of chemical transformations. Recently we discovered that for 1-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals (Au nanorods), the catalytic activity is not constant along the same side facets of single nanorods but rather differs significantly and further shows a gradient along its length, which we attributed to an underlying gradient of surface defect density resulting from their linear decay in growth rate during synthesis (Nat. Nanotechnol.2012, 7, 237-241). Here we report that this behavior also extends to 2D nanocrystals, even for a different catalytic reaction. By using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to map out the locations of catalytic events within individual triangular and hexagonal Au nanoplates in correlation with scanning electron microscopy, we find that the catalytic activity within the flat {111} surface facet of a Au nanoplate exhibits a 2D radial gradient from the center toward the edges. We propose that this activity gradient results from a growth-dependent surface defect distribution. We also quantify the site-specific activity at different regions within a nanoplate: The corner regions have the highest activity, followed by the edge regions and then the flat surface facets. These discoveries highlight the spatial complexity of catalytic activity at the nanoscale as well as the interplay amid nanocrystal growth, morphology, and surface defects in determining nanocatalyst properties.

  7. Activity of the glutathione antioxidant system and NADPH-generating enzymes in blood serum of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus after administration of melatonin-correcting drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarkov, A A; Popova, T N; Verevkin, A N; Matasova, L V

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effects of epifamin and melaxen on serum content of reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and NADPH-generating enzymes (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase) in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The concentration of reduced glutathione was decreased in rats with this disease (by 1.8 times), but increased after treatment with epifamin and melaxen (by 1.6 and 1.7 times, respectively). Activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and NADPH-generating enzymes returned to the control level. Correction of melatonin concentration after treatment with the test drugs was probably followed by inhibition of free radical processes. The observed changes were accompanied by normalization of activity of the glutathione antioxidant system and NADPH-generating enzymes required for normal function of this system.

  8. Issues for the selection of wheelchair-specific activity and participation outcome measures: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortenson, William B; Miller, William C; Auger, Claudine

    2008-06-01

    To use the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a framework to identify and to evaluate wheelchair-specific outcome instruments that are useful for measuring activity and participation. CINHAL, PsychInfo, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Dissertation Abstracts Medline databases, and conference proceedings. Activity and participation measures that were specifically intended for adults who use wheelchairs and that were published in English in a peer-reviewed journal were included in this review. Based on electronic database searches using a variety of search terms, articles were identified by title, and appropriate abstracts were retrieved. Articles were obtained for all relevant abstracts. For peer-reviewed measures included in the review, we obtained any instruction manuals and related publications, frequently published in conference proceedings and theses or available electronically, on the development and testing of the measure. Tools included in the review were evaluated based on their conceptual coverage, reliability, validity, responsiveness, usefulness, and wheelchair contribution, which indicated how well the tool isolated the effect of the wheelchair on activity and participation outcomes. A number of conceptual, psychometric, and applicability issues were identified with the 11 wheelchair-specific measures included in the review. A majority of the measures were mobility focused. No single tool received excellent ratings in all areas of the review. Some of the most frequent issues identified included a failure to account for differences attributable to different wheelchairs and wheelchair seating, limited psychometric testing, and high administrative and respondent burden. Good reliability evidence was reported for most of the measures, but validity information was only available for 6 of the 11 measures, and responsiveness information for 3. This review suggests that these measures could be improved with

  9. A new high-performance AC/DC power factor correction switching converter based on one-cycle control technology and active floating-charge technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chao

    2008-01-01

    A new family of converters, high-performance AC/DC power factor correction (PFC) switching converters with one-cycle control technology and active floating-charge technology, was derived and experimentally verified. The topology of a single-phase CCM and DCM Boost-PFC switching converter was also analyzed. Its operating prniciples and control methods were expounded. Based on these, a new type of AC/DC switching converter circuits for PFC combined with one-cycle control technology was presented herein. The proposed AC/DC switching converter significantly helps improve the converter efficiency and its power factor value.

  10. Second-site suppressors of HIV-1 capsid mutations: restoration of intracellular activities without correction of intrinsic capsid stability defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ruifeng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disassembly of the viral capsid following penetration into the cytoplasm, or uncoating, is a poorly understood stage of retrovirus infection. Based on previous studies of HIV-1 CA mutants exhibiting altered capsid stability, we concluded that formation of a capsid of optimal intrinsic stability is crucial for HIV-1 infection. Results To further examine the connection between HIV-1 capsid stability and infectivity, we isolated second-site suppressors of HIV-1 mutants exhibiting unstable (P38A or hyperstable (E45A capsids. We identified the respective suppressor mutations, T216I and R132T, which restored virus replication in a human T cell line and markedly enhanced the fitness of the original mutants as revealed in single-cycle infection assays. Analysis of the corresponding purified N-terminal domain CA proteins by NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the E45A and R132T mutations induced structural changes that are localized to the regions of the mutations, while the P38A mutation resulted in changes extending to neighboring regions in space. Unexpectedly, neither suppressor mutation corrected the intrinsic viral capsid stability defect associated with the respective original mutation. Nonetheless, the R132T mutation rescued the selective infectivity impairment exhibited by the E45A mutant in aphidicolin-arrested cells, and the double mutant regained sensitivity to the small molecule inhibitor PF74. The T216I mutation rescued the impaired ability of the P38A mutant virus to abrogate restriction by TRIMCyp and TRIM5α. Conclusions The second-site suppressor mutations in CA that we have identified rescue virus infection without correcting the intrinsic capsid stability defects associated with the P38A and E45A mutations. The suppressors also restored wild type virus function in several cell-based assays. We propose that while proper HIV-1 uncoating in target cells is dependent on the intrinsic stability of the viral capsid, the

  11. Activity of increased specific and non-specific esterases and glutathione transferases associated with resistance to permethrin in pediculus humanus capitis (phthiraptera: pediculidae) from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Silvia; Zerba, Eduardo; Picollo, Maria I; Audino, Paola Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced metabolism by oxidative enzymes is a major cause of pyrethroid resistance in insects. In this work, we evaluated the role of specific and non-specific esterases in head louse populations from Buenos Aires with different levels of resistance to permethrin. As esterase activity is substrate-dependent, four different esters were used as unspecific substrates in order to obtain a better characterization of the possible role of these enzymes in the resistance phenomenon. The unspecific substrates were phenylthioacetate, 1- and 2-naphtyl-acetate, and p-nitrophenyl acetate. A 7-coumaryl permethrate was synthesized and used as a specific substrate to measure pyrethroid esterases by a very sensitive microfluorometric method. The results on pyrethroid esterase activity obtained with this substrate showed that these enzymes contribute to the detoxifying activity in resistant populations, although no correlation was found between pyrethroid esterase activity and resistance ratios. In this study, we established that the activity of esterase against specific and non-specific substrates is increased in pyrethroid-resistant populations of head lice from Buenos Aires. Also, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) resistance values demonstrated that there is a DDT cross-resistance phenomenon in pyrethroid-resistant head louse populations and suggested that an alteration in the receptor of the nervous system (kdr gen) is a key factor of the resistance phenomena in these head louse populations.

  12. Polyfunctional Specific Response to Echinococcus Granulosus Associates to the Biological Activity of the Cysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Petrone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a complex disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus (E.granulosus, and its immunophatogenesis is still not clearly defined. A peculiar feature of chronic CE is the coexistence of Th1 and Th2 responses. It has been suggested that Th1 cytokines are related to disease resistance, whereas Th2 cytokines are related to disease susceptibility and chronicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by multi-parametric flow cytometry (FACS, the presence of CE specific immune signatures.We enrolled 54 subjects with suspected CE; 42 of them had a confirmed diagnosis, whereas 12 were classified as NO-CE. Based on the ultrasonography images, CE patients were further categorized as being in "active stages" (25 and "inactive stages" (17. The ability of CD4+ T-cells to produce IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, Th2 cytokines or IL-10 was assessed by FACS on antigen-specific T-cells after overnight stimulation with Antigen B (AgB of E.granulosus. Cytokine profiles were evaluated in all the enrolled subjects. The results show that none of the NO-CE subjects had a detectable AgB-specific response. Among the CE patients, the frequency and proportions of AgB-specific CD4+ T-cells producing IL-2+TNF-α+Th2+ or TNF-α+Th2+ were significantly increased in the "active stages" group compared to the "inactive stages" group. Moreover, an increased proportion of the total polyfunctional subsets, as triple-and double-functional CD4 T-cells, was found in CE patients with active disease. The response to the mitogen, used as a control stimulus to evaluate the immune competence status, was characterized by the same cytokine subsets in all the subjects enrolled, independent of CE.We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that polyfunctional T-cell subsets as IL-2+TNF-α+Th2+ triple-positive and TNF-α+Th2+ double-positive specific T-cells associate with cyst biological activity. These results contribute to increase knowledge of CE immunophatogenesis and

  13. Biocatalytically Oligomerized Epicatechin with Potent and Specific Anti-proliferative Activity for Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Nagarajan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Catechins, naturally occurring flavonoids derived from wine and green tea, are known to exhibit multiple health benefits. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is one of the most widely investigated catechins, but its efficacy in cancer therapy is still inconsistent and limited. The poor stability of EGCG has contributed to the disparity in the reported anti-cancer activity and other beneficial properties. Here we report an innovative enzymatic strategy for the oligomerization of catechins (specifically epicatechin that yields stable, water-soluble oligomerized epicatechins with enhanced and highly specific anti-proliferative activity for human breast cancer cells. This one-pot oxidative oligomerization is carried out in ambient conditions using Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP as a catalyst yielding water-soluble oligo(epicatechins. The oligomerized epicatechins obtained exhibit excellent growth inhibitory effects against human breast cancer cells with greater specificity towards growth-inhibiting cancer cells as opposed to normal cells, achieving a high therapeutic differential. Our studies indicate that water-soluble oligomeric epicatechins surpass EGCG in stability, selectivity and efficacy at lower doses.

  14. Comparison of the inhibition of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) activity by monoclonal antibodies specific for u-PA as assessed by different assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boheemen, P.A. van; Hoogen, N.M. van den; Koolwijk, N.

    1995-01-01

    Six murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) were tested for their ability to inhibit u-PA activity in three different assays with respect to amidolytic activity, plasminogen activation and fibrinolytic activity. Two of the MAbs were able to inhibi

  15. Endurance exercise training induces fat depot-specific differences in basal autophagic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Goki; Kato, Hisashi; Izawa, Tetsuya, E-mail: tizawa@mail.doshisha.ac.jp

    2015-10-23

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the effect of exercise training on the expression of autophagy marker proteins in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), inguinal WAT (iWAT), and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) collected from eWAT. Male Wistar rats aged 4–5 weeks were randomly divided into two groups, sedentary control (n = 7) and exercise-trained (n = 7). Rats in the exercise-trained group were exercised on a treadmill set at a 5° incline 5 days/week for 9 weeks. We determined that the expression levels of an autophagosome-associating form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II and of p62 were significantly higher in eWAT from exercise-trained than from control rats, while those of adipose-specific deletion of autophagy-related protein (ATG7) and lysosomal-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP2a) showed no difference between groups. However, in iWAT, the expression levels of LC3-II and ATG7 were significantly higher in exercise-trained than in control rats. The expression of p62 was highly correlated with that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, in both WAT types (eWAT, r = 0.856, P < 0.05; iWAT, r = 0.762, P < 0.05), whereas LC3-II and PPARγ levels were highly correlated in eWAT (r = 0.765, P < 0.05) but not in iWAT (r = −0.306, ns). In SVF, the expression levels of LC3II, ATG7, and LAMP2a were significantly higher in exercise-trained than in control rats. These results suggest that exercise training suppresses basal autophagy activity in eWAT, but that this activity is enhanced in iWAT and SVF collected from eWAT. Thus, the adaptation of basal autophagic activity following exercise training exhibits fat depot-specific differences. - Highlights: • Autophagy has been associated with obesity and associated diseases. • We examined exercise-associated rat white adipose tissue (WAT) autophagy markers. • Exercise increased

  16. Additive antimicrobial [corrected] effects of the active components of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris--chemotype carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iten, Felix; Saller, Reinhard; Abel, Gudrun; Reichling, Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Herbal remedies are multicomponent mixtures by their nature as well as by pharmaceutical definition. Being a multicomponent mixture is not only a crucial property of herbal remedies, it also represents a precondition for interactions such as synergism or antagonism. Until now, only a few phytomedicines are accurately described concerning the interactions of their active components. The aim of this study was to search for interactions within such a naturally given multi-component mixture and to discuss the pharmaceutical and clinical impacts. The thyme oil chosen for the examination belongs to the essential oils with the most pronounced antimicrobial activity. Antibiotic activity of thyme oil and single active components were tested against six different strains of microorganisms. The checkerboard assay was used to search for interactions. The time-kill assay was used to verify the observed effects and to get information about the temporal resolution of the antimicrobial activity. The degree of the detected interactions corresponded with the demarcating FICI measure of 0.5, which separates the additive from the over-additive (synergistic) effects. Therefore, the observed effect was called a "borderline case of synergism" or, respectively, "partial synergism". Partial synergism was observed only in the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Additive antimicrobial activity was observed for the combination of the two monosubstances carvacrol plus linalool and thymol plus linalool as well as with the combination of the two essential oils of the carvacrol and linalool chemotypes. An increase of the carvacrol oil concentration from one to two times the MIC resulted in a considerable acceleration of the kill-rate. Thyme oil is composed of several different components that show antimicrobial activity (at least: carvacrol, thymol and linalool). The antimicrobial activity of thyme oil is partly based on additive effects, which might especially enhance the rapidity of the

  17. Specific activation of human interleukin-5 depends on de novo synthesis of an AP-1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Gretchen T F; Kok, Chee Choy; Arthaningtyas, Estri; Thomas, Marc A; Sanderson, Colin J; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2002-12-06

    It is clear from the biology of eosinophilia that a specific regulatory mechanism must exist. Because interleukin-5 (IL5) is the key regulatory cytokine, it follows that a gene-specific control of IL5 expression must exist that differs even from closely related cytokines such as IL4. Two features of IL5 induction make it unique compared with other cytokines; first, induction by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which inhibits other T-cell-derived cytokines, and second, sensitivity to protein synthesis inhibitors, which have no effect on other cytokines. This study has utilized the activation of different transcription factors by different stimuli in a human T-cell line to study the role of conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0) in the specific induction of IL5. In unstimulated cells the ubiquitous Oct-1 binds to CLE0. Stimulation induces de novo synthesis of the AP-1 members JunD and Fra-2, which bind to CLE0. The amount of IL5 produced correlates with the production of the AP-1 complex, suggesting a key role in IL5 expression. The formation of the AP-1 complex is essential, but the rate-limiting step is the synthesis of AP-1, especially Fra-2. This provides an explanation for the sensitivity of IL5 to protein synthesis inhibitors and a mechanism for the specific induction of IL5 compared with other cytokines.

  18. Module-assisted preparation of {sup 64}Cu with high specific activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, S. [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Walther, M., E-mail: m.walther@hzdr.de [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Pietzsch, H.-J. [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Henniger, J. [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, University of Technology Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Preusche, S.; Maeding, P.; Steinbach, J. [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    In this work the production of {sup 64}Cu via the {sup 64}Ni(p,n){sup 64}Cu reaction with optimized conditions for low current irradiation is presented. Different target setups and cleaning steps for lowering metal contaminations in the product were applied. {sup 64}Cu with high specific activities up to 1685 GBq/{mu}mol was produced despite low overall activity ({approx}4.2 GBq per run). The module processing leads to a highly reproducible, reliable product quality (<1 {mu}g Cu and <7 {mu}g Ni). Besides its diagnostic value {sup 64}Cu may be of interest even for therapeutic purposes due to its decay characteristics. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical comparison of {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Cu for therapeutical use. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of different target setups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different specific activity determination methods in comparison. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed description of module operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized {sup 64}Ni recycling and purification.

  19. Cell-specific production and antimicrobial activity of naphthoquinones in roots of lithospermum erythrorhizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham; Michaels; Flores

    1999-02-01

    Pigmented naphthoquinone derivatives of shikonin are produced at specific times and in specific cells of Lithospermum erythrorhizon roots. Normal pigment development is limited to root hairs and root border cells in hairy roots grown on "noninducing" medium, whereas induction of additional pigment production by abiotic (CuSO4) or biotic (fungal elicitor) factors increases the amount of total pigment, changes the ratios of derivatives produced, and initiates production of pigment de novo in epidermal cells. When the biological activity of these compounds was tested against soil-borne bacteria and fungi, a wide range of sensitivity was recorded. Acetyl-shikonin and beta-hydroxyisovaleryl-shikonin, the two most abundant derivatives in both Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed "hairy-root" cultures and greenhouse-grown plant roots, were the most biologically active of the seven compounds tested. Hyphae of the pathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium aphanidermatum, and Nectria hematococca induced localized pigment production upon contact with the roots. Challenge by R. solani crude elicitor increased shikonin derivative production 30-fold. We have studied the regulation of this suite of related, differentially produced, differentially active compounds to understand their role(s) in plant defense at the cellular level in the rhizosphere.

  20. Mirror movements in unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: Specific negative impact on bimanual activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Caroline; Berweck, Steffen; Lidzba, Karen; Becher, Thomas; Staudt, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Mirror movements are involuntary movements of the other hand during voluntary unimanual movements. Some, but not all children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP) show this phenomenon. In this observational study, we investigated whether these mirror movements have a specific negative impact on bimanual activities of daily living. Eighteen children (six girls; age range, 6-16 years; mean age, 12 years 1 month; SD, 3 years 3 month) with USCP, nine with and nine without mirror movements, underwent the Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test (unimanual capacity) and the Assisting Hand Assessment (bimanual performance). In addition, we measured the time the participants needed for the completion of five activities we had identified as particularly difficult for children with mirror movements. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that mirror movements indeed have a specific negative impact on bimanual performance (Assisting Hand Assessment) and on the time needed for the completion of these five particularly difficult activities. This effect was independent from unimanual capacity. Functional therapies in children with USCP and mirror movements should address this phenomenon. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Specificity and structural analysis of a guinea pig transfer factor-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, W A; Bach, F H

    1977-06-01

    A transfer factor-like activity was prepared by Sephadex G-25 chromatography of immune guinea pig leukocyte lysates. This isolated material leads to antigen-dependent migration inhibition and thymidine uptake by nonimmune lymphoid cells. Tests of the "transfer factor" from guinea pigs immunized to either ovalbumin or bovine gamma-globulin demonstrated the donor specificity of the in vitro activity. The activity is susceptible to heat (56 degrees C), alkali (0.5 M sodium hydroxide), pronase, and phosphodiesterase. The pronase susceptibility is blocked by traysylol, a protease inhibitor; the phosphodiesterase susceptibility is not bocked by traysylol. The guinea pig factor was purified further by alkaline phosphatase treatment. Sephadex G-25 chromatography, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The final product, active in vitro, represents about 0.03% of the cellular material absorbing 260 nm light, and contains polymerized amines and phosphate. Gel electrophoresis of the fluram-reactive components suggests a limited heterogeneity of the DEAE-cellulose-purified material. These data are consistent with the active "transfer factor" molecule including both peptide and phosphate-containing components.

  2. Aberrant Oscillatory Activity during Simple Movement in Task-Specific Focal Hand Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Dolberg, Rebecca; Honma, Susanne; Findlay, Anne; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2012-01-01

    In task-specific focal hand dystonia (tspFHD), the temporal dynamics of cortical activity in the motor system and how these processes are related to impairments in sensory and motor function are poorly understood. Here, we use time-frequency reconstructions of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data to elaborate the temporal and spatial characteristics of cortical activity during movement. A self-paced finger tapping task during MEG recording was performed by 11 patients with tspFHD and 11 matched healthy controls. In both groups robust changes in beta (12-30 Hz) and high gamma (65-90 Hz) oscillatory activity were identified over sensory and motor cortices during button press. A significant decrease [p press. Furthermore, an increase (p press in patients with tspFHD. Oscillatory activity within in the tspFHD group was however not correlated with clinical measures. Understanding these aberrant oscillatory dynamics can provide the groundwork for interventions that focus on modulating the timing of this activity.

  3. Seeing Touch Is Correlated with Content-Specific Activity in Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jonas T.; Essex, Ryan; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that primary sensory cortices can become active in the absence of external stimulation in their respective modalities. This occurs, for example, when stimuli processed via one sensory modality imply features characteristic of a different modality; for instance, visual stimuli that imply touch have been observed to activate the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). In the present study, we addressed the question of whether such cross-modal activations are content specific. To this end, we investigated neural activity in the primary somatosensory cortex of subjects who observed human hands engaged in the haptic exploration of different everyday objects. Using multivariate pattern analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, we were able to predict, based exclusively on the activity pattern in SI, which of several objects a subject saw being explored. Along with previous studies that found similar evidence for other modalities, our results suggest that primary sensory cortices represent information relevant for their modality even when this information enters the brain via a different sensory system. PMID:21330469

  4. Specific activation of dendritic cells enhances clearance of Bacillus anthracis following infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain J T Thompson

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are potent activators of the immune system and have a key role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses. In the current study we have used ex vivo pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC in a novel adoptive transfer strategy to protect against challenge with Bacillus anthracis, in a murine model. Pre-pulsing murine BMDC with either recombinant Protective Antigen (PA or CpG significantly upregulated expression of the activation markers CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. Passive transfusion of mice with pulsed BMDC, concurrently with active immunisation with rPA in alum, significantly enhanced (p<0.001 PA-specific splenocyte responses seven days post-immunisation. Parallel studies using ex vivo DCs expanded from human peripheral blood and activated under the same conditions as the murine DC, demonstrated that human DCs had a PA dose-related significant increase in the markers CD40, CD80 and CCR7 and that the increases in CD40 and CD80 were maintained when the other activating components, CpG and HK B. anthracis were added to the rPA in culture. Mice vaccinated on a single occasion intra-muscularly with rPA and alum and concurrently transfused intra-dermally with pulsed BMDC, demonstrated 100% survival following lethal B. anthracis challenge and had significantly enhanced (p<0.05 bacterial clearance within 2 days, compared with mice vaccinated with rPA and alum alone.

  5. Gender specific changes in cortical activation patterns during exposure to artificial gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stefan; Robinson, Ryan; Smith, Craig; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Goswami, Nandu

    2014-11-01

    Keeping astronauts healthy during long duration spaceflight remains a challenge. Artificial gravity (AG) generated by a short arm human centrifuges (SAHC) is proposed as the next generation of integrated countermeasure devices that will allow human beings to safely spend extended durations in space, although comparatively little is known about any psychological side effects of AG on brain function. 16 participants (8 male and 8 female, GENDER) were exposed to 10 min at a baseline gravitational load (G-Load) of +.03 Gz, then 10 min at +.6 Gz for females and +.8 Gz for males, before being exposed to increasing levels of AG in a stepped manner by increasing the acceleration by +.1 Gz every 3 min until showing signs of pre-syncope. EEG recordings were taken of brain activity during 2 min time periods at each AG level. Analysing the results of the mixed total population of participants by two way ANOVA, a significant effect of centrifugation on alpha and beta activity was found (p<.01). Furthermore results revealed a significant interaction between G-LOAD and GENDER alpha-activity (p<.01), but not for beta-activity. Although the increase in alpha and beta activity with G-LOAD does not reflect a general model of cortical arousal and therefore cannot support previous findings reporting that AG may be a cognitively arousing environment, the gender specific responses identified in this study may have wider implications for EEG and AG research.

  6. Food systems in correctional settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smoyer, Amy; Kjær Minke, Linda

    Food is a central component of life in correctional institutions and plays a critical role in the physical and mental health of incarcerated people and the construction of prisoners' identities and relationships. An understanding of the role of food in correctional settings and the effective mana......, including a case study of food-related innovation in the Danish correctional system. It offers specific conclusions for policy-makers, administrators of correctional institutions and prison-food-service professionals, and makes proposals for future research....

  7. Recurrent activity in higher order, modality non-specific brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Hans Olav Christensen; Joensson, Morten; Biermann-Ruben, Katja

    2011-01-01

    in the visual system as a response to visual stimulation. In contrast recurrent activity has never been demonstrated before in higher order modality non-specific regions. Using magneto-encephalography and Granger causality analysis, we tested in a paralimbic network the hypothesis that stimulation may enhance...... causal recurrent interaction between higher-order, modality non-specific regions. The network includes anterior cingulate/medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate/medial parietal cortices together with pulvinar thalami, a network known to be effective in autobiographic memory retrieval and self......-awareness. Autobiographic memory retrieval of previous personal judgments of visually presented words was used as stimuli. It is demonstrated that the prestimulus condition is characterized by causal, recurrent oscillations which are maximal in the lower gamma range. When retrieving previous judgments of visually presented...

  8. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19 is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%-0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. CONCLUSION: This is the first example to our knowledge of an "acute" human viral infection inducing a persistent activated CD8+ T cell response. The likely explanation--analogous to that for cytomegalovirus infection--is that this persistent response is due to low-level antigen exposure. CD8+ T cells may contribute to the long-term control of this significant pathogen and should be considered during vaccine development.

  9. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  10. EFFECT OF POSTURAL CORRECTION WITH DIFFERENT TAPING MATERIALS ON SCAPULAR KINEMATICS AND MYOELECTRIC ACTIVITIES OF SCAPULAR ROTATORS IN SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME A RANDOMIZED PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Mohamad Abd Al-Gawad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rigid and kinesio tapings are commonly used in the rehabilitation of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS. Yet; the effect of postural correction with the two taping materials in SIS has not been extensively studied. The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of postural correction with two different taping materials on scapular kinematics and electromyography of scapular upward rotators in patients with SIS. Methods: Twenty female patients with SIS participated in this study. Their age ranged from 30-60 years. Participants were randomly assigned into: Group I (Kinesio tape, n=10 and Group II (rigid tape, n=10. Thoracic and scapular taping with posture correction was applied to both groups. Scapular upward rotation at 0˚, 60˚, 90˚ and 120˚ of shoulder elevation and the activity level of the upper fibers of trapezius (UT, lower fibers of trapezius (LT and serratus anterior (SA muscles were measured before and immediately after taping application. Results: Both taping materials significantly increased scapular upward rotation at 60°, 90° and 120° angles (P =.004,.002 and .047 respectively after the application of tape as compared to the before. In addition, significantly greater muscle activity of the LT and SA muscles (P =.027 and 0.05 respectively were demonstrated by the kinesio-taping group as compared to rigid taping group during real taping condition. Conclusion: Both taping materials are effective in restoring scapular kinematics. Furthermore, kinesio taping has a facilitatory effect on the LT and SA muscles. Kinesio taping may be considered an alternative to rigid taping in patients with SIS.

  11. Specific activities of radium-226 in vegetables grown in Na Mom District, Songkhla Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angkunrat, S.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific activity of radium-226 in 13 types of vegetables grown in Namom district, Songkhla province, were analyzed using a low background gamma-ray spectrometer. The analyzed vegetables included Ivy Gourd, Yellow Cassia, White Popinac, Yard Long Bean, Rice, Peanut, Egg Plant, Spineless Amaranth, Swamp Cabbage, Mustart, Chinese Cabbage, Collards and Cucumbers. The control vegetables were taken from Bangklum district, 40 km south of Namom district. The samples were weighed, dried in an oven and finally burnt to ash in a furnace before being analyzed for a gamma ray of 186.2 keV emitted from Radium-226. The results showed that the geometrical means of specific activity of radium-226 of vegetables grown in Pijit, Namom, Klongrang and Thungkamin sub-district and over the Namom district were 1082, 1220, 1457, 1253 and 1250 mBq/kg, respectively. The highest and lowest values were 7882 and 26 mBq/kg, found in Ivy Gourd and Yard Long Bean, respectively. The high specific activities of radium-226 in vegetables were found to be distributed uniformly in the area. This probably indicated the source of radium-226 was also distributed uniformly in the shallow granitic bedrock throughout the area. We concluded that the radium-226 contents in vegetables grown in Namom district depended on the absorbability of alkaline earth metals in vegetables themselves, geographic features and radium content in natural water in the area. The estimated annual effective dose averaged over Namom district was 21 μSv. Consumption of Ivy Gourd may receive the maximum annual effective dose of 132 μSv.

  12. Neutral phospholipids stimulate Na,K-ATPase activity: a specific lipid-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Haim; Habeck, Michael; Kanai, Ryuta; Toyoshima, Chikashi; Karlish, Steven J D

    2013-04-05

    Membrane proteins interact with phospholipids either via an annular layer surrounding the transmembrane segments or by specific lipid-protein interactions. Although specifically bound phospholipids are observed in many crystal structures of membrane proteins, their roles are not well understood. Na,K-ATPase is highly dependent on acid phospholipids, especially phosphatidylserine, and previous work on purified detergent-soluble recombinant Na,K-ATPase showed that phosphatidylserine stabilizes and specifically interacts with the protein. Most recently the phosphatidylserine binding site has been located between transmembrane segments of αTM8-10 and the FXYD protein. This paper describes stimulation of Na,K-ATPase activity of the purified human α1β1 or α1β1FXYD1 complexes by neutral phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine, or phosphatidylethanolamine. In the presence of phosphatidylserine, soy phosphatidylcholine increases the Na,K-ATPase turnover rate from 5483 ± 144 to 7552 ± 105 (p phospholipids shows that the stimulatory effect is structurally selective for neutral phospholipids with polyunsaturated fatty acyl chains, especially dilinoleoyl phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine. By contrast to phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine destabilizes the Na,K-ATPase. Structural selectivity for stimulation of Na,K-ATPase activity and destabilization by neutral phospholipids distinguish these effects from the stabilizing effects of phosphatidylserine and imply that the phospholipids bind at distinct sites. A re-examination of electron densities of shark Na,K-ATPase is consistent with two bound phospholipids located between transmembrane segments αTM8-10 and TMFXYD (site A) and between TM2, -4, -6, -and 9 (site B). Comparison of the phospholipid binding pockets in E2 and E1 conformations suggests a possible mechanism of stimulation of Na,K-ATPase activity by the neutral phospholipid.

  13. Subtle Changes in Motif Positioning Cause Tissue-Specific Effects on Robustness of an Enhancer's Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg, Jelena; Saunders, Timothy E.; Girardot, Charles; Devos, Damien P.; Hufnagel, Lars; Furlong, Eileen E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the specific contribution of individual motifs within cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is crucial to understanding how gene expression is regulated and how this process is affected by sequence variation. But despite vast improvements in the ability to identify where transcription factors (TFs) bind throughout the genome, we are limited in our ability to relate information on motif occupancy to function from sequence alone. Here, we engineered 63 synthetic CRMs to systematically assess the relationship between variation in the content and spacing of motifs within CRMs to CRM activity during development using Drosophila transgenic embryos. In over half the cases, very simple elements containing only one or two types of TF binding motifs were capable of driving specific spatio-temporal patterns during development. Different motif organizations provide different degrees of robustness to enhancer activity, ranging from binary on-off responses to more subtle effects including embryo-to-embryo and within-embryo variation. By quantifying the effects of subtle changes in motif organization, we were able to model biophysical rules that explain CRM behavior and may contribute to the spatial positioning of CRM activity in vivo. For the same enhancer, the effects of small differences in motif positions varied in developmentally related tissues, suggesting that gene expression may be more susceptible to sequence variation in one tissue compared to another. This result has important implications for human eQTL studies in which many associated mutations are found in cis-regulatory regions, though the mechanism for how they affect tissue-specific gene expression is often not understood. PMID:24391522

  14. Allorestricted cytotoxic T cells specific for human CD45 show potent antileukemic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrolia, Persis J; Reid, Steven D; Gao, Liquan; Schultheis, Beate; Dotti, Gianpietro; Brenner, Malcolm K; Melo, Junia V; Goldman, John M; Stauss, Hans J

    2003-02-01

    Recent advances have made haploidentical transplantation for leukemia feasible, but the rigorous T-cell depletion used contributes to the high relapse rates observed. We have attempted to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect by generating allorestricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed against human CD45. Such CTLs should recognize patient hematopoietic cells including leukemia, enhancing donor cell engraftment and improving the GVL effect, but they should not recognize host nonhematopoietic tissues or donor cells from the graft. Using the T2 binding assay, 4 CD45-derived peptides were found to bind HLA-A2 molecules. These peptides were used to generate cytotoxic T-cell lines from HLA-A2(-) donors by sequential stimulation with peptide-pulsed HLA-A2(+) stimulators, and the lines obtained were screened for peptide-specific cytotoxicity. Using one of these peptides (P1218), it was possible to generate peptide-specific, allorestricted CTLs in 3 of 7 responders. P1218-specific CTL lines show potent cytotoxicity against hematopoietic cell lines coexpressing HLA-A2 and CD45 but not CD45 loss variants. Studies with stable transfectants of 293 cells demonstrated recognition by P1218-specific CTLs of endogenously expressed CD45. Likewise P1218-specific CTLs recognized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HLA-A2(+) patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and leukemic blasts in HLA-A2(+) patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but they were unable to lyse HLA-A2(+) fibroblasts or HLA-A2(-) normal PBMCs. Coculture of CD34(+) PBMCs and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) with P1218-specific CTL significantly inhibited colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) formation in HLA-A2(+) healthy controls and CML patients but resulted in no significant inhibition in HLA-A2(-) healthy controls. These studies demonstrate that P1218-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) have potent activity against leukemic progenitors and suggest that

  15. Tissue-specific metabolic activation and mutagenicity of 3-nitrobenzanthrone in MutaMouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guosheng; Gingerich, John; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R; White, Paul A

    2008-10-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a mutagen and suspected human carcinogen detected in diesel exhaust, airborne particulate matter, and urban soil. We investigated the tissue specific mutagenicity of 3-NBA at the lacZ locus of transgenic MutaMouse following acute single dose or 28-day repeated-dose oral administration. In the acute high dose (50 mg/kg) exposure, increased lacZ mutant frequency was observed in bone marrow and colonic epithelium, but not in liver and bladder. In the repeated-dose study, a dose-dependent increase in lacZ mutant frequency was observed in bone marrow and liver (2- and 4-fold increase above control), but not in lung or intestinal epithelium. In addition, a concentration-dependent increase in mutant frequency (8.5-fold above control) was observed for MutaMouse FE1 lung epithelial cells exposed in vitro. 1-Nitropyrene reductase, 3-NBA reductase, and acetyltransferase activities were measured in a variety of MutaMouse specimens in an effort to link metabolic activation and mutagenicity. High 3-NBA nitroreductase activities were observed in lung, liver, colon and bladder, and detectable N-acetyltransferase activities were found in all tissues except bone marrow. The relatively high 3-NBA nitroreductase activity in MutaMouse tissues, as compared with those in Salmonella TA98 and TA100, suggests that 3-NBA is readily reduced and activated in vivo. High 3-NBA nitroreductase levels in liver and colon are consistent with the elevated lacZ mutant frequency values, and previously noted inductions of hepatic DNA adducts. Despite an absence of induced lacZ mutations, the highest 3-NBA reductase activity was detected in lung. Further studies are warranted, especially following inhalation or intratracheal exposures. Published 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) Product Specification Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassy, Joe; Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas; Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project.

  17. Calcineurin activation influences muscle phenotype in a muscle-specific fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lees Simon J

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The calcium activated protein phosphatase 2B, also known as calcineurin, has been implicated as a cell signaling molecule involved with transduction of physiological signals (free cytosolic Ca2+ into molecular signals that influence the expression of phenotype-specific genes in skeletal muscle. In the present study we address the role of calcineurin in mediating adaptations in myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform expression and muscle mass using 3-month old wild-type (WT and transgenic mice displaying high-level expression of a constitutively active form of calcineurin (MCK-CN* mice. Results Slow muscles, e.g., soleus, were significantly larger (by ~24%, whereas fast muscles, e.g., medial gastrocnemius (MG and tibialis anterior were significantly smaller (by ~26 and ~16%, respectively in MCK-CN* mice compared to WT. The masses of mixed phenotype muscles, such as the plantaris and the extensor digitorum longus, were not significantly changed from WT. The soleus, plantaris, MG and diaphragm displayed shifts toward slower MHC isoforms, e.g., soleus from WT mice contained ~52% MHC-I, ~39% MHC-IIa, and ~9% MHC-IIx, whereas MCK-CN* mice had ~67% MHC-I, ~26% MHC-IIa, and ~7% MHC-IIx. The specific isoforms that were either up or down-regulated were muscle-specific. For instance, the proportion of MHC-IIa was decreased in the soleus and diaphragm, but increased in the plantaris and MG of MCK-CN* mice. Also, the proportion of MHC-IIx was unchanged in the soleus, decreased in the diaphragm and increased in the plantaris and MG of MCK-CN* relative to WT mice. Fast to slow shifts in fiber type proportions were evident for the plantaris, but not the soleus. Fast, but not slow, plantaris fibers of MCK-CN* mice had higher oxidative and lower glycolytic properties than WT. Conclusion These data suggest that calcineurin activation can influence muscle phenotype and that the specific influence of calcineurin activation on the phenotypic and mass

  18. Research activities at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for the regional ionospheric specification and forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouya, Zahra; Terkildsen, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Australian Space Forecast Centre (ASFC) provides space weather forecasts to a diverse group of customers. Space Weather Services (SWS) within the Australian Bureau of Meteorology is focussed both on developing tailored products and services for the key customer groups, and supporting ASFC operations. Research in SWS is largely centred on the development of data-driven models using a range of solar-terrestrial data. This paper will cover some data requirements , approaches and recent SWS activities for data driven modelling with a focus on the regional Ionospheric specification and forecasting.

  19. The effect of operational conditions on the sludge specific methanogenic activity and sludge biodegradability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R. C.; Santaella, S. T.; Haandel, A. C. van; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2009-07-01

    The Specific Methanogenic Activity (SMA) and sludge biodegradability of an anaerobic sludge depends on various operational and environmental conditions imposed to the anaerobic reactor. However, the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent COD concentration (COD{sub i}nf) and sludge retention time (SRT) on those two parameters need to be elucidated. This knowledge about SMA can provide insights about the capacity of the UASB reactors to withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads, whereas the biodegradability gives information necessary for final disposal of the sludge. (Author)

  20. The Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Determines Synaptic Excitability, Calcium Activity and Specific Viability of Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Carbone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Differential vulnerability between Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNpc and Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA dopaminergic (DAergic neurons is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Understanding the molecular bases of this key histopathological aspect would foster the development of much-needed disease-modifying therapies. Non-heterogeneous DAergic degeneration is present in both toxin-based and genetic animal models, suggesting that cellular specificity, rather than causing factors, constitutes the background for differential vulnerability. In this regard, we previously demonstrated that MPP+, a neurotoxin able to cause selective nigrostriatal degeneration in animal rodents and primates, inhibits the Hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih in SNpc DAergic neurons and that pharmacological Ih antagonism causes potentiation of evoked Excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSPs. Of note, the magnitude of such potentiation is greater in the SNpc subfield, consistent with higher Ih density. In the present work, we show that Ih block-induced synaptic potentiation leads to the amplification of somatic calcium responses (SCRs in vitro. This effect is specific for the SNpc subfield and largely mediated by L-Type calcium channels, as indicated by sensitivity to the CaV 1 blocker isradipine. Furthermore, Ih is downregulated by low intracellular ATP and determines the efficacy of GABAergic inhibition in SNpc DAergic neurons. Finally, we show that stereotaxic administration of Ih blockers causes SNpc-specific neurodegeneration and hemiparkinsonian motor phenotype in rats. During PD progression, Ih downregulation may result from mitochondrial dysfunction and, in concert with PD-related disinhibition of excitatory inputs, determine a SNpc-specific disease pathway.

  1. Correction: five-year predictors of physical activity decline among adults in low-income communities: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Platt Robert W; O'Loughlin Jennifer L; Weiss Deborah R; Paradis Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Abstract After publication it was brought to our attention that the information for one of the variables in Table 1 was incorrect (Weiss, O'Loughlin et al. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2007, 4:2). The variable in question is "Use of a neighborhood facility for activity". In the first column, the first row should read "yes", and the second row, "no". In the second column, the first row should read 25.8 (41) and the second row, 41.3 (152). Table 1 Unad...

  2. Correction: five-year predictors of physical activity decline among adults in low-income communities: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Platt Robert W; O'Loughlin Jennifer L; Weiss Deborah R; Paradis Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Abstract After publication it was brought to our attention that the information for one of the variables in Table 1 was incorrect (Weiss, O'Loughlin et al. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2007, 4:2). The variable in question is "Use of a neighborhood facility for activity". In the first column, the first row should read "yes", and the second row, "no". In the second column, the first row should read 25.8 (41) and the second row, 41.3 (152). Table 1 Unad...

  3. Active route learning in virtual environments: disentangling movement control from intention, instruction specificity, and navigation control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stülpnagel, Rul; Steffens, Melanie C

    2013-09-01

    Active navigation research examines how physiological and psychological involvement in navigation benefits spatial learning. However, existing conceptualizations of active navigation comprise separable, distinct factors. This research disentangles the contributions of movement control (i.e., self-contained vs. observed movement) as a central factor from learning intention (Experiment 1), instruction specificity and instruction control (Experiment 2), as well as navigation control (Experiment 3) to spatial learning in virtual environments. We tested the effects of these factors on landmark recognition (landmark knowledge), tour-integration and route navigation (route knowledge). Our findings suggest that movement control leads to robust advantages in landmark knowledge as compared to observed movement. Advantages in route knowledge do not depend on learning intention, but on the need to elaborate spatial information. Whenever the necessary level of elaboration is assured for observed movement, too, the development of route knowledge is not inferior to that for self-contained movement.

  4. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Man-Ho; Wu, Xia; Kim, Hyoung Seok; Harper, Jeffrey F; Zielinski, Raymond E; Clouse, Steven D; Huber, Steven C

    2012-11-30

    Although calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases, autophosphorylation on tyrosine residues was observed for soybean CDPKβ and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34). We identified Ser-8, Thr-17, Tyr-24 (in the kinase domain), Ser-304, and Ser-358 as autophosphorylation sites of His(6)-GmCDPKβ. Overall autophosphorylation increased kinase activity with synthetic peptides, but autophosphorylation of Tyr-24 appears to attenuate kinase activity based on studies with the Y24F directed mutant. While much remains to be done, it is clear that several CDPKs are dual-specificity kinases, which raises the possibility that phosphotyrosine signaling may play a role in Ca(2+)/CDPK-mediated processes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A site-specific curated database for the microorganisms of activated sludge and anaerobic digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; McIlroy, Bianca

    the composition and dynamics of the most abundant organisms. However, to understand the relationship between the population dynamics and operational parameters of the system, a functional role must be attributed to each organism. The Microbial Database for Activated Sludge (MiDAS) and Anaerobic Digesters (AD......) presented here provides a site specific curated taxonomy for abundant and important microorganisms and integrates it into a community knowledge web platform about the microbes in activated sludge (AS) and their associated ADs (www.midasfieldguide.org). The MiDAS taxonomy, a manual curation of the SILVA......, to improve the classification of unknown organisms and link these names to the wealth of present and future functional information about their ecology....

  6. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA of industrial sludge from the aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli Schneiders

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, specific methanogenic activity (SMA tests were performed on textile sludge and food industry sludge. The textile sludge from an activated sludge was collected at the entrance of the secondary biologic clarifier and the food sludge was collected in a UASB reactor. Once collected, the sludges were characterized and tested for SMA. It was found that the microrganisms present in the food sludge had SMA of 0.17 gCOD-CH4 gSSV.d-1 and 337.05 mL of methane production, while the microrganisms of the textile sludge presented 0.10 gCOD-CH4 gSSV.d-1 of SMA and 3.04 mL of methane production. Therefore, the food sludge was more suitable to be used as a starting inoculum in UASB.

  7. Effects of oxytetracycline, tylosin, and amoxicillin antibiotics on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin

    2012-01-01

    Materials and Methods: To evaluate the inhibitory antibiotics amoxicillin, tetracycline, and tylosin on biomass activity, specific methanogenic activity (SMA using anerobic biomass batch; into 120 ml vials: 30 ml biomass and 70 ml substrate including volatile fatty acids, mainly acetic acid and various concentrations of antibiotics were added. Methane gas production replacement through solution of KOH (2 N as an absorber of CO 2 and bromine thymol blue as indicator was measured. Each batch was tested for 10 days. Results: Based on the findings, inhibitory concentration of oxytetracycline, amoxicillin, and tylosin were 8000, 9000, and 9000 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that with increasing concentrations of antibiotics, the produced biogas volume from biomass per unit weight is decreased. COD removal was 42-82 % due to long retention time and adsorption to flocks.

  8. Food systems in correctional settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smoyer, Amy; Kjær Minke, Linda

    Food is a central component of life in correctional institutions and plays a critical role in the physical and mental health of incarcerated people and the construction of prisoners' identities and relationships. An understanding of the role of food in correctional settings and the effective...... management of food systems may improve outcomes for incarcerated people and help correctional administrators to maximize their health and safety. This report summarizes existing research on food systems in correctional settings and provides examples of food programmes in prison and remand facilities......, including a case study of food-related innovation in the Danish correctional system. It offers specific conclusions for policy-makers, administrators of correctional institutions and prison-food-service professionals, and makes proposals for future research....

  9. Effects of active vs. passive recovery on repeated rugby-specific exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jougla, A; Micallef, J P; Mottet, D

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of active vs. passive recovery on performance of a rugby-specific intermittent test in rugby union players. Seven male rugby players (20.6+/-0.5 yrs; 181.9+/-10.0 cm; 94.5+/-12.8 kg) performed in random order, over two separate sessions, a specific repeated-sprint rugby test, the Narbonne test (6 x 4 consecutive actions: 1, scrummaging; 2, agility sprinting; 3, tackling; 4, straight sprinting) with 30s of passive or active recovery (running at 50% of maximal aerobic speed). The Narbonne tests were completed before (pre-test) and after (post-test) a 30-min rugby match. During the Narbonne test, scrum forces, agility and sprint times, heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were measured. Scrum forces were lower in active (74.9+/-13.4 kg) than in passive recovery (90.4+/-20.9 kg), only during the post-test (p<0.05). Fatigue index (%) (p<0.05) and total sprint time (s) (p<0.01) were significantly greater in active than in passive recovery, both during the pre-test (11.5+/-5.7% vs. 6.7+/-4.5% and 18.1+/-1.3s vs. 16.9+/-0.9s) and the post-test (7.3+/-3.3% vs. 4.3+/-1.5% and 18.3+/-1.6s vs. 16.9+/-1.1s). Consequently, the results indicated that passive recovery enabled better performance during the Narbonne test. However, it is obviously impractical to suggest that players should stand still during and following repeated-sprint bouts: the players have to move to ensure they have taken an optimal position.

  10. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

  11. Dynamic Changes, Cut-Off Points, Sensitivity, and Specificity of Laboratory Data to Differentiate Macrophage Activation Syndrome from Active Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Assari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the laboratory data and changes in these data between patients with MAS and patients with flare-up of the autoimmune diseases. Methods. In a prospective study, the static laboratory data and dynamic changes in the selected data in 17 consecutive patients with MAS and 53 patients with active disease of SJIA, PJIA, Kawasaki disease, and SLE were compared. The ROC curve analysis was used to evaluate cut-off points, sensitivity, and specificity of the static and dynamic laboratory data to differentiate between MAS and active disease. Results. In the MAS group, the mean CRP3, ALT, AST, total bilirubin, ferritin, LDH, PT, PTT, and INR were significantly higher and the mean WBC2, PMN2, Lymph2, Hgb1, 2, 3, ESR2, serum albumin, and sodium were significantly lower than in control group. Some of the important cut-off points were PLT2 38.5, ALT > 38, WBC 5277 ng/mL. Conclusion. The dynamic changes in some laboratory data, especially PLT, can differentiate between MAS and active disease. The changes in WBC, PMN, and ESR and the levels of the liver enzymes may also be helpful in the early differentiation. Very high levels of ferritin may also help the diagnosis along with other clinical and laboratory signs.

  12. Activation of transcriptional activity of HSE by a novel mouse zinc finger protein ZNFD specifically expressed in testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fengqin; Wang, Weiping; Lei, Chen; Liu, Qingmei; Qiu, Hao; Muraleedharan, Vinaydhar; Zhou, Bin; Cheng, Hongxia; Huang, Zhongkai; Xu, Weian; Li, Bichun; Wang, Minghua

    2012-04-01

    Zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) that contain multiple cysteine and/or histidine residues perform important roles in various cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The Cys-Cys-His-His (C(2)H(2)) type of ZFPs are the well-defined members of this super family and are the largest and most complex proteins in eukaryotic genomes. In this study, we identified a novel C(2)H(2) type of zinc finger gene ZNFD from mice which has a 1,002 bp open reading frame and encodes a protein with 333 amino acid residues. The predicted 37.4 kDa protein contains a C(2)H(2) zinc finger domain. ZNFD gene is located on chromosome 18qD1. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the ZNFD gene was specifically expressed in mouse testis but not in other tissues. Subcellular localization analysis demonstrated that ZNFD was localized in the nucleus. Reporter gene assays showed that overexpression of ZNFD in the COS7 cells activates the transcriptional activities of heat shock element (HSE). Overall, these results suggest that ZNFD is a member of the zinc finger transcription factor family and it participates in the transcriptional regulation of HSE. Many heat shock proteins regulated by HSE are involved in testicular development. Therefore, our results suggest that ZNFD may probably participate in the development of mouse testis and function as a transcription activator in HSE-mediated gene expression and signaling pathways.

  13. Does Spinal Fusion and Scoliosis Correction Improve Activity and Participation for Children With GMFCS level 4 and 5 Cerebral Palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Mathew David; Wallace, Charlie; Malagelada, Francesc; Gibson, Alex; Noordeen, Hilali; Tucker, Stewart; Molloy, Sean; Lehovsky, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Spinal fusion is used to treat scoliosis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Following intervention, the WHO considers activity and participation should be assessed to guide intervention and assess the effects. This study assesses whether spinal fusion for scoliosis improves activity and participation for children with severe CP.Retrospective cohort study of 70 children (39M:31F) with GMFCS level 4/5 CP and significant scoliosis. Thirty-six underwent observational and/or brace treatment as the sole treatment for their scoliosis, and 34 underwent surgery. Children in the operative group were older and had worse scoliosis than those in the observational group. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded over a 2-year period. The ASKp was used to measure activity and participation.In the observational group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity increased from 51 (40-90) and 10 (0-30) to 70 (43-111) and 14 (0-37). Mean ASKp decreased from 16.3 (1-38) to 14.2 (1-36). In the operative group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity decreased from 81 (50-131) and 14 (1-35) to 38 (10-76) and 9 (0-24). Mean ASKp increased from 10.5 (0-29) to 15.9 (3-38). Spinal-related pain correlated most with change in activity and participation in both groups. There was no difference in mobility, GMFCS level, feeding or communication in either group before and after treatment.In children with significant scoliosis and CP classified within GMFCS levels 4 and 5, spinal fusion was associated with an improvement in activity and participation, whereas nonoperative treatment was associated with a small reduction. Pain should be carefully assessed to guide intervention.

  14. Is generic physical activity or specific exercise associated with motor abilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Marjo; Pasanen, Matti; Miilunpalo, Seppo; Mälkiä, Esko

    2010-09-01

    Evidence of the effect of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) modes on the motor abilities of a mature population is scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare the motor abilities of physically active and inactive men and women and to examine the associations of different exercise modes and former and recent LTPA (R-LTPA) with motor ability and various physical tests. The LTPA of the participants (men n = 69, women n = 79; aged 41-47 yr) was ascertained by a modified Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire, including questions on the frequency, duration, and intensity of R-LTPA and former LTPA and on exercise modes. Motor abilities in terms of balance, agility, and coordination were assessed with a battery of nine tests supplemented with five physical fitness tests. Multiple statistical methods were used in analyses that were conducted separately for men and women. The MET-hours per week of R-LTPA correlated statistically significantly with the tests of agility and static balance (rs = -0.28, P = 0.022; rs = -0.25, P = 0.043, respectively) among men and with the static balance (rs = 0.41), 2-km walking (rs = 0.36), step squat (rs = 0.36) (P exercise including both specific training and general activity develops both motor abilities and physical fitness.

  15. The evolution of lineage-specific regulatory activities in the human embryonic limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotney, Justin; Leng, Jing; Yin, Jun; Reilly, Steven K; DeMare, Laura E; Emera, Deena; Ayoub, Albert E; Rakic, Pasko; Noonan, James P

    2013-07-03

    The evolution of human anatomical features likely involved changes in gene regulation during development. However, the nature and extent of human-specific developmental regulatory functions remain unknown. We obtained a genome-wide view of cis-regulatory evolution in human embryonic tissues by comparing the histone modification H3K27ac, which provides a quantitative readout of promoter and enhancer activity, during human, rhesus, and mouse limb development. Based on increased H3K27ac, we find that 13% of promoters and 11% of enhancers have gained activity on the human lineage since the human-rhesus divergence. These gains largely arose by modification of ancestral regulatory activities in the limb or potential co-option from other tissues and are likely to have heterogeneous genetic causes. Most enhancers that exhibit gain of activity in humans originated in mammals. Gains at promoters and enhancers in the human limb are associated with increased gene expression, suggesting they include molecular drivers of human morphological evolution.

  16. Rapid direct methods for enumeration of specific, active bacteria in water and biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFeters, G. A.; Pyle, B. H.; Lisle, J. T.; Broadaway, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional methods for detecting indicator and pathogenic bacteria in water may underestimate the actual population due to sublethal environmental injury, inability of the target bacteria to take up nutrients and other physiological factors which reduce bacterial culturability. Rapid and direct methods are needed to more accurately detect and enumerate active bacteria. Such a methodological advance would provide greater sensitivity in assessing the microbiological safety of water and food. The principle goal of this presentation is to describe novel approaches we have formulated for the rapid and simultaneous detection of bacteria plus the determination of their physiological activity in water and other environmental samples. The present version of our method involves the concentration of organisms by membrane filtration or immunomagnetic separation and combines an intracellular fluorochrome (CTC) for assessment of respiratory activity plus fluorescent-labelled antibody detection of specific bacteria. This approach has also been successfully used to demonstrate spatial and temporal heterogeneities of physiological activities in biofilms when coupled with cryosectioning. Candidate physiological stains include those capable of determining respiratory activity, membrane potential, membrane integrity, growth rate and cellular enzymatic activities. Results obtained thus far indicate that immunomagnetic separation can provide a high degree of sensitivity in the recovery of seeded target bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) in water and hamburger. The captured and stained target bacteria are then enumerated by either conventional fluorescence microscopy or ChemScan(R), a new instrument that is very sensitive and rapid. The ChemScan(R) laser scanning instrument (Chemunex, Paris, France) provides the detection of individual fluorescently labelled bacterial cells using three emission channels in less than 5 min. A high degree of correlation has been demonstrated between

  17. Organ-specific systemic lupus erythematosus activity during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Sara K; Guan, Hongshu; Fine, Alexander; Costenbader, Karen H; Bermas, Bonnie

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease of reproductive-age women, and thus questions regarding how disease influences pregnancy outcomes arise. We investigated whether five specific types of SLE activity during the 6 months before conception or during pregnancy (nephritis, cytopenias, skin disease, arthritis, serositis) were associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcomes among women with SLE at the Brigham and Women's Hospital Lupus Center. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included pre-eclampsia, pre-term delivery, elective termination due to SLE, spontaneous miscarriage at weeks 12-20, and stillbirth. SLE and obstetric history, laboratories, and medications were obtained from electronic medical records. Generalized linear mixed models adjusting for potential confounders were used to identify predictors of any adverse pregnancy outcome. Most pregnancies resulted in a live term delivery (76.5 %). After adjustment for Hispanic ethnicity, prior adverse pregnancy outcome and medication use 6 months before conception, nephritis during pregnancy (odds ratio (OR) 3.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-12.8), cytopenias during pregnancy (OR 3.9, 95 % CI 1.3-11.4), and serositis during pregnancy (OR 5.9, 95 % CI 1.0-34.0) were significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Specific types of SLE disease activity during pregnancy were related to adverse pregnancy outcome. Nephritis, cytopenias, and serositis carried a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, suggesting that these abnormalities should be carefully monitored during pregnancy.

  18. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damián ePérez-Mazliah

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  19. Time, space and emotion: fMRI reveals content-specific activation during text comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Evelyn C; von Cramon, D Yves

    2007-11-12

    Story comprehension involves building a situation model of the text, i.e., a representation containing information on the who, where, when and why of the story. Using fMRI at 3T, domain-specific activations for three different information aspects were sought. Twenty participants read two sentence stories half of which contained inconsistencies concerning emotional, temporal or spatial information. Partly replicating previous results [E.C. Ferstl, M. Rinck, D.Y. von Cramon, Emotional and temporal aspects of situation model processing during text comprehension: an event-related fMRI study, J. Cogn. Neurosci. 17 (2005) 724-739], the anterior lateral prefrontal cortex/orbito-frontal cortex proved important for processing temporal information. The left anterior temporal lobe was particularly important during emotional stories. Most importantly, spatial information elicited bilateral activation in the collateral sulci and the posterior cingulate cortex, areas important for visuo-spatial cognition. These findings provide further evidence for content-specific processes during text comprehension.

  20. Activity-specific aquatic therapy targeting gait for a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Tracy; Falvo, Lisa; Kesten, Adam

    2017-04-01

    Aquatic therapy can lead to improved mobility and health in individuals with various conditions. This case report looks at an activity-specific aquatic therapy targeting gait for a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). The patient participated in an individualized aquatic therapy program two times a week for 6 weeks. Assessment occurred prior to the intervention. There were two follow-up assessments after the intervention. Follow-up assessment 1 was completed within the same week as the final intervention. Follow-up assessment 2 was completed 4 weeks after the first follow-up to assess for carryover. Improvements that met minimal detectable change and minimal clinically important difference were noted in The Walking for Spinal Cord Injury Index-II, Spinal Cord Injury Functional Ambulation Index gait parameters, and gait speed. An activity-specific aquatic therapy program improved gait in a patient with iSCI. The properties of water create a practical environment for safe practice of skills. Further studies are warranted in large samples.

  1. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes.

  2. Plasticity during Sleep Is Linked to Specific Regulation of Cortical Circuit Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Niethard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is thought to be involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in two ways: by enhancing local plastic processes underlying the consolidation of specific memories and by supporting global synaptic homeostasis. Here, we briefly summarize recent structural and functional studies examining sleep-associated changes in synaptic morphology and neural excitability. These studies point to a global down-scaling of synaptic strength across sleep while a subset of synapses increases in strength. Similarly, neuronal excitability on average decreases across sleep, whereas subsets of neurons increase firing rates across sleep. Whether synapse formation and excitability is down or upregulated across sleep appears to partly depend on the cell’s activity level during wakefulness. Processes of memory-specific upregulation of synapse formation and excitability are observed during slow wave sleep (SWS, whereas global downregulation resulting in elimination of synapses and decreased neural firing is linked to rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep. Studies of the excitation/inhibition balance in cortical circuits suggest that both processes are connected to a specific inhibitory regulation of cortical principal neurons, characterized by an enhanced perisomatic inhibition via parvalbumin positive (PV+ cells, together with a release from dendritic inhibition by somatostatin positive (SOM+ cells. Such shift towards increased perisomatic inhibition of principal cells appears to be a general motif which underlies the plastic synaptic changes observed during sleep, regardless of whether towards up or downregulation.

  3. Toxins of Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin Systems with Sequence-Specific Endoribonuclease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hisako; Inouye, Masayori

    2017-01-01

    Protein translation is the most common target of toxin-antitoxin system (TA) toxins. Sequence-specific endoribonucleases digest RNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby blocking translation. While past studies mainly focused on the digestion of mRNA, recent analysis revealed that toxins can also digest tRNA, rRNA and tmRNA. Purified toxins can digest single-stranded portions of RNA containing recognition sequences in the absence of ribosome in vitro. However, increasing evidence suggests that in vivo digestion may occur in association with ribosomes. Despite the prevalence of recognition sequences in many mRNA, preferential digestion seems to occur at specific positions within mRNA and also in certain reading frames. In this review, a variety of tools utilized to study the nuclease activities of toxins over the past 15 years will be reviewed. A recent adaptation of an RNA-seq-based technique to analyze entire sets of cellular RNA will be introduced with an emphasis on its strength in identifying novel targets and redefining recognition sequences. The differences in biochemical properties and postulated physiological roles will also be discussed. PMID:28420090

  4. PCR-based site-specific mutagenesis of peptide antibiotics FALL-39 and its biologic activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-xia YANG; Yun FENG; Bo-yao WANG; Qi WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct PGEX-1λT-FALL-39 expression vector and its mutant vector, and study the relationship of function and structure. METHODS: A cDNA encoding mature FALL-39 was cloned from SPCA- 1 cell mRNA and the prokaryotic expression vector PGEX- 1λT-FALL-39 was constructed. Two kinds of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the site-direction mutagenesis were used to construct FALL-39 mutant expression vector, FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys-24. Minimal effective concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and minimal bactericidal concentration were used to assay the antibacterial activities of these peptides. Effects of different solution on the antibacterial activity of FALL-39 and FALL-39-Lys-32 were observed by CFU determination. The hemolytic effects of these peptides were also examined on human red blood cells. RESULTS: Two site-specific mutants FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys24 were obtained by PCR-induced mutagenesis. In comparison with two-step PCR which required two pairs of primers, one step PCR which required one pair of primers is a simple and efficient method for the PCR based site-specific mutagenesis. Using the prokaryotic expression system, the E coli-based products of recombinant FALL39 and its mutant peptides were also obtained. The antibacterial assay showed that FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys24 were more potential in the antibacterial activity against E coli ML35p and Pseltdomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 than that of FALL-39, and no increase in hemolysis was observed at the antibacterial concentrations. The antibacterial activity of FALL-39-Lys-32 against E coli was more potent than that of FALL-39 in NaCl-containing LB medium, while its activity was almost the same as FALL-39 in SO2-4 containing Medium E. CONCLUSION: PCR-based mutagensis is a useful model system for studying the structure and function relationship of antimicrobial peptides. Keeping α-helical conformation of FALL-39 and increasing net positive charge can increase the

  5. Integrative assessment of kick boxers’ brain blood circulation and bio-electrical activity in conditions of correction technologies’ application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanov Y.N.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to scientifically substantiate the role of para-vertebral impacts on blood circulation and bio-electrical activity of kick boxers’ cortex. Material: in the research participated kick boxers (main group, n=62 and university students (control group, n=25 of 18-23 years’ age. Assessment of para-vertebral impacts with device Armos and classic massage was fulfilled with the help of the following methodic: trans-cranial dopplerography of head main arteries and cortex EEG of the tested. Results: it was found that with the help of para-vertebral impacts by device Armos linear velocity of cerebral blood flow reduces to normal limits and in- and inter-hemispheres’ interaction strength increases. Conclusions: para-vertebral impacts by device Armos activate integrative processes and inter-hemispheres’ interactions of different cortex areas of kick boxers. It can witness about better formation of functional systems, ensuring sports efficiency.

  6. SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Miller (JNJ), John M. [JNJ-Miller PLC

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

  7. Correction of a Space Telescope Active Primary Mirror Using Adaptive Optics in a Woofer-Tweeter Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    controller. The controllers are simulated using 100 Monte- Carlo runs where the noise is varied. The update gain for the integral control and...are simulated using 100 Monte Carlo runs and the mean steady state RMS and peak-to-valley wavefront error are presented. Appendix A contains error...vol. 38, no. 4, Feb. 1999, pp. 704-713. [9] S. A. Lane, S. L. Lacy, V. Babuska, S. Hanes, K. Schrader, and R. Fuentes , “Active vibration control

  8. A non-randomized [corrected] controlled trial of the active music engagement (AME) intervention on children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sheri L; Clair, Alicia A; Watanabe, Masayo; Monahan, Patrick O; Azzouz, Faouzi; Stouffer, Janice W; Ebberts, Allison; Darsie, Emily; Whitmer, Courtney; Walker, Joey; Nelson, Kirsten; Hanson-Abromeit, Deanna; Lane, Deforia; Hannan, Ann

    2008-07-01

    Coping theorists argue that environmental factors affect how children perceive and respond to stressful events such as cancer. However, few studies have investigated how particular interventions can change coping behaviors. The active music engagement (AME) intervention was designed to counter stressful qualities of the in-patient hospital environment by introducing three forms of environmental support. The purpose of this multi-site randomized controlled trial was to determine the efficacy of the AME intervention on three coping-related behaviors (i.e. positive facial affect, active engagement, and initiation). Eighty-three participants, ages 4-7, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: AME (n = 27), music listening (ML; n = 28), or audio storybooks (ASB; n = 28). Conditions were videotaped to facilitate behavioral data collection using time-sampling procedures. After adjusting for baseline differences, repeated measure analyses indicated that AME participants had a significantly higher frequency of coping-related behaviors compared with ML or ASB. Positive facial affect and active engagement were significantly higher during AME compared with ML and ASB (p<0.0001). Initiation was significantly higher during AME than ASB (p<0.05). This study supports the use of the AME intervention to encourage coping-related behaviors in hospitalized children aged 4-7 receiving cancer treatment. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Domain-specific physical activity and health-related quality of life in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedišić, Zeljko; Rakovac, Marija; Titze, Sylvia; Jurakić, Danijel; Oja, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Information on the relationship between domain-specific physical activity (PA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the general population and specific groups is still scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between PA in work, transport, domestic and leisure-time domains and HRQoL among university students. PA and HRQoL were assessed in a random stratified sample of 1750 university students using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire - long form and 12-item Short Form Health Survey, respectively. The Spearman's rank correlations, adjusted for age, community size, personal monthly budget, body mass index, smoking habits and alcohol intake ranged from -0.11 to 0.18 in female students and -0.29 to 0.19 in male students. Leisure-time, domestic, transport-related PA and total PA were positively related to HRQoL. Inverse correlations with HRQoL were only found for work-related PA in male students. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only leisure-time PA was related to the Physical Summary Component score (β = 0.08 for females and β = 0.10 for males, P HRQoL, future studies should not only analyse total PA levels but also domain-specific PA levels. The evidence on the positive relationship of leisure-time, transport and domestic PA with HRQoL can potentially be used to support evidence-based promotion of PA in a university setting, and as a hypothesis for future longitudinal studies on such potential causal relationships.

  10. Sex-specific associations of moderate and vigorous physical activity with physical fitness in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidokoro, T; Tanaka, H; Naoi, K; Ueno, K; Yanaoka, T; Kashiwabara, K; Miyashita, M

    2016-11-01

    The present study examined the sex-specific associations of moderate and vigorous physical activity (VPA) with physical fitness in 300 Japanese adolescents aged 12-14 years. Participants were asked to wear an accelerometer to evaluate physical activity (PA) levels of various intensities (i.e. moderate PA (MPA), 3-5.9 metabolic equivalents (METs); VPA, ≥6 METs; moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA), ≥3 METs). Eight fitness items were assessed (grip strength, bent-leg sit-up, sit-and-reach, side step, 50 m sprint, standing long jump, handball throw, and distance running) as part of the Japanese standardised fitness test. A fitness composite score was calculated using Japanese fitness norms, and participants were categorised according to their score from category A (most fit) to category E (least fit), with participants in categories D and E defined as having low fitness. It was found that for boys, accumulating more than 80.7 min/day of MVPA may reduce the probability of low fitness (odds ratio (ORs) [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 0.17 [0.06-0.47], p = .001). For girls, accumulating only 8.4 min of VPA could reduce the likelihood of exhibiting low fitness (ORs [95% CI] = 0.23 [0.05-0.89], p = .032). These results reveal that there are sex-specific differences in the relationship between PA and physical fitness in adolescents, suggesting that sex-specific PA recommendation may be needed to improve physical fitness in adolescents.

  11. 17β-Estradiol suppresses visceral adipogenesis and activates brown adipose tissue-specific gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Saad Misfer; Bryzgalova, Galyna; Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Korach-André, Marion; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Efendić, Suad; Berggren, Per-Olof; Portwood, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Both functional ovaries and estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Understanding the mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) may permit the development of a molecular targeting strategy for the treatment of metabolic disease. This study examines how the promotion of insulin sensitivity and weight loss by E2 treatment in high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed mice involve several anti-adipogenic processes in the visceral adipose tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed specific reductions in visceral adipose tissue volume in HFD+E2 mice, compared with HFD mice. This loss of adiposity was associated with diminished visceral adipocyte size and reductions in expression of lipogenic genes, adipokines and of the nuclear receptor nr2c2/tr4. Meanwhile, expression levels of adipose triglyceride lipase/pnpla2 and leptin receptor were increased. As mRNA levels of stat3, a transcription factor involved in brown adipose tissue differentiation, were also increased in visceral adipose, the expression of other brown adipose-specific markers was assessed. Both expression and immunohistochemical staining of ucp-1 were increased, and mRNA levels of dio-2, and of adrβ3, a regulator of ucp-1 expression during the thermogenic response, were increased. Furthermore, expression of cpt-1b, a brown adipose-specific gene involved in fatty acid utilization, was also increased. Methylation studies demonstrated that the methylation status of both dio-2 and adrβ3 was significantly reduced. These results show that improved glycemic control and weight loss due to E2 involve anti-adipogenic mechanisms which include suppressed lipogenesis and augmented fatty acid utilization, and in addition, the activation of brown adipose tissue-specific gene expression in association with E2-dependent epigenetic modifications in these genes.

  12. Diagnostic performance and therapeutic consequence of thromboelastometry activated by kaolin versus a panel of specific reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Fenger-Eriksen, Christian; Christiansen, Kirsten; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Sørensen, Benny

    2011-08-01

    Thromboelastography/metry (TEG®; Haemoscope, Niles, IL/ROTEM®; Tem International GmbH, Munich, Germany) is increasingly used to guide transfusion therapy. This study investigated the diagnostic performance and therapeutic consequence of using kaolin-activated whole blood compared with a panel of specific TEM®-reagents to distinguish: dilutional coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, hyperfibrinolysis, and heparinization. Blood was drawn from 11 healthy volunteers. Dilutional coagulopathy was generated by 50% dilution with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 whereas thrombocytopenia (mean platelet count 20 ×10⁹/l) was induced using a validated model. Hyperfibrinolysis and heparin contamination were generated by tissue plasminogen activator 2 nM and unfractionated heparin 0.1U/ml, respectively. Coagulation tests were run on ROTEM® delta. Kaolin-activated whole blood showed no differences between dilutional coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia (mean clotting time 450 s vs. 516 s, α-angle 47.1° vs. 41.5°, maximum clot firmness 35.0 mm vs. 34.2 mm, all P values ≥0.14). Hyperfibrinolysis specifically disclosed an increased maximum lysis (median: 100%, all P values less than 0.001), and heparin induced a distinctly prolonged clotting time (2283 s, all P values less than 0.02). The coagulopathies were readily distinguishable using a panel of TEM-reagents. In particular, dilutional coagulopathy was separated from thrombocytopenia using FIBTEM (maximum clot firmness 1.9 mm vs. 11.2 mm, P kaolin suggested platelets in case of dilutional coagulopathy, whereas an algorithm applying TEM-reagents suggested fibrinogen. Monoanalysis with kaolin was unable to distinguish coagulopathies caused by dilution from that of thrombocytopenia. Algorithms based on the use of kaolin may lead to unnecessary transfusion with platelets, whereas the application of TEM-reagents may result in goal-directed fibrinogen substitution.

  13. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-07-28

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases.

  14. Foxi3 deficiency compromises hair follicle stem cell specification and activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C.; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K.; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2017-01-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ. Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary hair germ marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary hair germ activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. PMID:26992132

  15. Understanding adaptogenic activity: specificity of the pharmacological action of adaptogens and other phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panossian, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Adaptogens are stress-response modifiers that increase an organism's nonspecific resistance to stress by increasing its ability to adapt and survive. The classical reductionist model is insufficiently complex to explain the mechanistic aspects of the physiological notion of "adaptability" and the adaptogenic activity of adaptogens. Here, I demonstrate that (1) the mechanisms of action of adaptogens are impossible to rationally describe using the reductionist concept of pharmacology, whereas the network pharmacology approach is the most suitable method; and (2) the principles of systems biology and pharmacological networks appear to be more suitable for conceptualizing adaptogen function and are applicable to any phytochemical. Molecular targets, signaling pathways, and networks common to adaptogens have been identified. They are associated with stress hormones and key mediators of the regulation of homeostasis. In this context, the mechanisms of action of adaptogens are specifically related to stress-protective activity and increased adaptability of the organism. Consequently, adaptogens exhibit polyvalent beneficial effects against chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative cognitive impairment, metabolic disorders, cancer, and other aging-related diseases. Current and potential uses of adaptogens are mainly related to stress-induced fatigue and cognitive function, mental illness, and behavioral disorders. Their prophylactic use by healthy subjects to ameliorate stress and prevent age-related diseases appears to be justified. It is very unlikely that the pharmacological activity of any phytochemical is specific and associated only with one type of receptor, particularly adaptogenic compounds, which affect key mediators of the adaptive stress response at intracellular and extracellular levels of communication. © 2017 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of

  16. Purkinje cell activity during classical conditioning with different conditional stimuli explains central tenet of Rescorla–Wagner model [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Anders; Zucca, Riccardo; Johansson, Fredrik; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Hesslow, Germund

    2015-11-10

    A central tenet of Rescorla and Wagner's model of associative learning is that the reinforcement value of a paired trial diminishes as the associative strength between the presented stimuli increases. Despite its fundamental importance to behavioral sciences, the neural mechanisms underlying the model have not been fully explored. Here, we present findings that, taken together, can explain why a stronger association leads to a reduced reinforcement value, within the context of eyeblink conditioning. Specifically, we show that learned pause responses in Purkinje cells, which trigger adaptively timed conditioned eyeblinks, suppress the unconditional stimulus (US) signal in a graded manner. Furthermore, by examining how Purkinje cells respond to two distinct conditional stimuli and to a compound stimulus, we provide evidence that could potentially help explain the somewhat counterintuitive overexpectation phenomenon, which was derived from the Rescorla-Wagner model.

  17. Molecular evolution of the porcine type I interferon family: subtype-specific expression and antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Sang

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs, key antiviral cytokines, evolve to adapt with ever-changing viral threats during vertebrate speciation. Due to novel pathogenic pressure associated with Suidae speciation and domestication, porcine IFNs evolutionarily engender both molecular and functional diversification, which have not been well addressed in pigs, an important livestock species and animal model for biomedical sciences. Annotation of current swine genome assembly Sscrofa10.2 reveals 57 functional genes and 16 pseudogenes of type I IFNs. Subfamilies of multiple IFNA, IFNW and porcine-specific IFND genes are separated into four clusters with ∼ 60 kb intervals within the IFNB/IFNE bordered region in SSC1, and each cluster contains mingled subtypes of IFNA, IFNW and IFND. Further curation of the 57 functional IFN genes indicates that they include 18 potential artifactual duplicates. We performed phylogenetic construction as well as analyses of gene duplication/conversion and natural selection and showed that porcine type I IFN genes have been undergoing active diversification through both gene duplication and conversion. Extensive analyses of the non-coding sequences proximal to all IFN coding regions identified several genomic repetitive elements significantly associated with different IFN subtypes. Family-wide studies further revealed their molecular diversity with respect to differential expression and restrictive activity on the resurgence of a porcine endogenous retrovirus. Based on predicted 3-D structures of representative animal IFNs and inferred activity, we categorized the general functional propensity underlying the structure-activity relationship. Evidence indicates gene expansion of porcine type I IFNs. Genomic repetitive elements that associated with IFN subtypes may serve as molecular signatures of respective IFN subtypes and genomic mechanisms to mediate IFN gene evolution and expression. In summary, the porcine type I IFN profile has

  18. Rifaximin is a gut-specific human pregnane X receptor activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaochao; Shah, Yatrik M; Guo, Grace L; Wang, Ting; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2007-07-01

    Rifaximin, a rifamycin analog approved for the treatment of travelers' diarrhea, is also beneficial in the treatment of multiple chronic gastrointestinal disorders. However, the mechanisms contributing to the effects of rifaximin on chronic gastrointestinal disorders are not fully understood. In the current study, rifaximin was investigated for its role in activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that regulates genes involved in xenobiotic and limited endobiotic deposition and detoxication. PXR-humanized (hPXR), Pxr-null, and wild-type mice were treated orally with rifaximin, and rifampicin, a well characterized human PXR ligand. Rifaximin was highly concentrated in the intestinal tract compared with rifampicin. Rifaximin treatment resulted in significant induction of PXR target genes in the intestine of hPXR mice, but not in wild-type and Pxr-null mice. However, rifaximin treatment demonstrated no significant effect on hepatic PXR target genes in wild-type, Pxr-null, and hPXR mice. Consistent with the in vivo data, cell-based reporter gene assay revealed rifaximin-mediated activation of human PXR, but not the other xenobiotic nuclear receptors constitutive androstane receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma, and farnesoid X receptor. Pretreatment with rifaximin did not affect the pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam, but it increased the C(max) and decreased T(max) of 1'-hydroxymidazolam. Collectively, the current study identified rifaximin as a gut-specific human PXR ligand, and it provided further evidence for the utility of hPXR mice as a critical tool for the study of human PXR activators. Further human studies are suggested to assess the potential role of rifaximin-mediated gut PXR activation in therapeutics of chronic gastrointestinal disorders.

  19. Specific hunger- and satiety-induced tuning of guinea pig enteric nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosen, Lina; Boesmans, Werend; Dondeyne, Marjan; Depoortere, Inge; Tack, Jan; Vanden Berghe, Pieter

    2012-09-01

    Although hunger and satiety are mainly centrally regulated, there is convincing evidence that also gastrointestinal motor activity and hormone fluctuations significantly contribute to appetite signalling. In this study, we investigated how motility and enteric nerve activity are set by fasting and feeding. By means of video-imaging, we tested whether peristaltic activity differs in ex vivo preparations from fasted and re-fed guinea pigs. Ca(2+) imaging was used to investigate whether the feeding state directly alters neuronal activity, either occurring spontaneously or evoked by (an)orexigenic signalling molecules. We found that pressure-induced (2 cmH(2)O) peristaltic activity occurs at a higher frequency in ileal segments from re-fed animals (re-fed versus fasted, 6.12 ± 0.22 vs. 4.84 ± 0.52 waves min(-1), P = 0.028), even in vitro hours after death. Myenteric neuronal responses were tuned to the feeding status, since neurons in tissues from re-fed animals remained hyper-responsive to high K(+)-evoked depolarization (P < 0.001) and anorexigenic molecules (P < 0.001), while being less responsive to orexigenic ghrelin (P = 0.013). This illustrates that the feeding status remains ‘imprinted' ex vivo. We were able to reproduce this feeding state-related memory in vitro and found humoral feeding state-related factors to be implicated. Although the molecular link with hyperactivity is not entirely elucidated yet, glucose-dependent pathways are clearly involved in tuning neuronal excitability. We conclude that a bistable memory system that tunes neuronal responses to fasting and re-feeding is present in the enteric nervous system, increasing responses to depolarization and anorexigenic molecules in the re-fed state, while decreasing responses to orexigenic ghrelin. Unlike the hypothalamus, where specific cell populations sensitive to either orexigenic or anorexigenic molecules exist, the enteric feeding state-related memory system is present at the functional level

  20. Optimized over-expression of [FeFe] hydrogenases with high specific activity in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Abendroth, Gregory; Stripp, Sven; Happe, Thomas [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Biochemie der Pflanzen, AG Photobiotechnologie, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Silakov, Alexey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Bioanorganische Chemie, 45470 Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Croux, Christian; Soucaille, Philippe; Girbal, Laurence [UMR5504, UMR792 Ingenierie des Systemes Biologiques et des Procedes, CNRS, INRA, INSA, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2008-11-15

    It was previously shown that Clostridium acetobutylicum is capable to over-express various [FeFe] hydrogenases although the protein yield was low. In this study we report on doubling the yield of the clostridial hydrogenase by replacing the native gene hydA1{sub Ca} with a recombinant one via homologous recombination. The purified protein HydA1{sub Ca} shows an unexpected high specific activity (up to 2257 {mu}mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mg{sup -1}) for hydrogen evolution. Furthermore, the highly active green algal hydrogenase HydA1{sub Cr} from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was heterologously expressed in C. acetobutylicum, and purified with increased yield (1 mg protein per liter of cells) and high activity (625 {mu}mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mg{sup -1}). EPR studies demonstrate intact H-clusters for homologously and heterologously expressed [FeFe] hydrogenases in the CO-inhibited oxidized redox state, and prove the high efficiency of the C. acetobutylicum expression system. (author)

  1. Activity and specificity of TRV-mediated gene editing in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir

    2015-06-03

    © 2015 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Plant trait engineering requires efficient targeted genome-editing technologies. Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/ CRISPR associated (Cas) type II system is used for targeted genome-editing applications across eukaryotic species including plants. Delivery of genome engineering reagents and recovery of mutants remain challenging tasks for in planta applications. Recently, we reported the development of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated genome editing in Nicotiana benthamiana. TRV infects the growing points and possesses small genome size; which facilitate cloning, multiplexing, and agroinfections. Here, we report on the persistent activity and specificity of the TRV-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted modification of the Nicotiana benthamiana genome. Our data reveal the persistence of the TRVmediated Cas9 activity for up to 30 d post-agroinefection. Further, our data indicate that TRV-mediated genome editing exhibited no off-target activities at potential off-targets indicating the precision of the system for plant genome engineering. Taken together, our data establish the feasibility and exciting possibilities of using virus-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted engineering of plant genomes.

  2. ChIP-seq Accurately Predicts Tissue-Specific Activity of Enhancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Blow, Matthew J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2009-02-01

    A major yet unresolved quest in decoding the human genome is the identification of the regulatory sequences that control the spatial and temporal expression of genes. Distant-acting transcriptional enhancers are particularly challenging to uncover since they are scattered amongst the vast non-coding portion of the genome. Evolutionary sequence constraint can facilitate the discovery of enhancers, but fails to predict when and where they are active in vivo. Here, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation with the enhancer-associated protein p300, followed by massively-parallel sequencing, to map several thousand in vivo binding sites of p300 in mouse embryonic forebrain, midbrain, and limb tissue. We tested 86 of these sequences in a transgenic mouse assay, which in nearly all cases revealed reproducible enhancer activity in those tissues predicted by p300 binding. Our results indicate that in vivo mapping of p300 binding is a highly accurate means for identifying enhancers and their associated activities and suggest that such datasets will be useful to study the role of tissue-specific enhancers in human biology and disease on a genome-wide scale.

  3. Penicillin V acylase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum exhibits high specific activity and unique kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, V S; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Suresh, C G; Pundle, Archana

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin V acylases (PVAs, E.C.3.5.11) belong to the Ntn hydrolase super family of enzymes that catalyze the deacylation of the side chain from phenoxymethyl penicillin (penicillin V). Penicillin acylases find use in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of semi-synthetic antibiotics. PVAs employ the N-terminal cysteine residue as catalytic nucleophile and are structurally and evolutionarily related to bile salt hydrolases (BSHs). Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a PVA enzyme from the Gram-negative plant pathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum (PaPVA). The enzyme was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli attaining a very high yield (250 mg/l) and a comparatively high specific activity (430 IU/mg). The enzyme showed marginally better pH and thermo-stability over PVAs characterized from Gram-positive bacteria. The enzyme also showed enhanced activity in presence of organic solvents and detergents. The enzyme kinetics turned out to be significantly different from that of previously reported PVAs, displaying positive cooperativity and substrate inhibition. The presence of bile salts had a modulating effect on PaPVA activity. Sequence analysis and characterization reveal the distinctive nature of these enzymes and underscore the need to study PVAs from Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Activity and specificity of TRV-mediated gene editing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zahir; Abul-Faraj, Aala; Piatek, Marek; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2015-01-01

    Plant trait engineering requires efficient targeted genome-editing technologies. Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/ CRISPR associated (Cas) type II system is used for targeted genome-editing applications across eukaryotic species including plants. Delivery of genome engineering reagents and recovery of mutants remain challenging tasks for in planta applications. Recently, we reported the development of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated genome editing in Nicotiana benthamiana. TRV infects the growing points and possesses small genome size; which facilitate cloning, multiplexing, and agroinfections. Here, we report on the persistent activity and specificity of the TRV-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted modification of the Nicotiana benthamiana genome. Our data reveal the persistence of the TRV- mediated Cas9 activity for up to 30 d post-agroinefection. Further, our data indicate that TRV-mediated genome editing exhibited no off-target activities at potential off-targets indicating the precision of the system for plant genome engineering. Taken together, our data establish the feasibility and exciting possibilities of using virus-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted engineering of plant genomes.

  5. Multiplex Detection of Protease Activity with Quantum Dot Nanosensors Prepared by Intein-Mediated Specific Bioconjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zuyong; Xing, Yun; So, Min-Kyung; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Rao, Jianghong

    2009-01-01

    We report here a protease sensing nanoplatform based on semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (QD-BRET) to detect the protease activity in complex biological samples. These nanosensors consist of bioluminescent proteins as the BRET donor, quantum dots as the BRET acceptor, and protease substrates sandwiched between the two as a sensing group. An intein-mediated conjugation strategy was developed for site-specific conjugation of proteins to QDs in preparing these QD nanosensors. In this traceless ligation, the intein itself is spliced out and excluded from the final conjugation product. With this method, we have synthesized a series of QD nanosensors for highly sensitive detection of an important class of protease matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. We demonstrated that these nanosensors can detect the MMP activity in buffers and in mouse serum with the sensitivity to a few ng/ml, and secreted proteases by tumor cells. The suitability of these nanosensors for a multiplex protease assay has also been shown. PMID:18922019

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Chinese Propolis on Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C Activity in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhuan Xuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory action of Chinese propolis, we investigated its effect on the activity of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC that plays critical roles in control of vascular endothelial cell (VEC function and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, p53 and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm were investigated. Our data indicated that treatment of Chinese propolis 6.25 and 12.5 μg/ml for 12 hours increased VEC viability obviously. Exposure to Chinese propolis 6.25, 12.5, and 25 μg/ml for 6 and 12 hours significantly decreased PC-PLC activity and p53 level, and ROS levels were depressed by Chinese propolis 12.5 μg/ml and 25 μg/ml dramatically. The Δψm of VECs was not affected by Chinese propolis at low concentration but disrupted by the propolis at 25 μg/ml significantly, which indicated that Chinese propolis depressed PC-PLC activity and the levels of p53 and ROS in VECs but disrupted Δψm at a high concentration.

  7. [Quorum sensing systems of regulation, synthesis of phenazine antibiotics, and antifungal (corrected) activity in rhizospheric bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselova, M a; Klein, Sh; Bass, I A; Lipasova, V A; Metlitskaia, A Z; Ovadis, M I; Chernin, L S; Khmel', I A

    2008-12-01

    Strain Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, an antagonist of a broad spectrum of phytopathogenic microorganisms isolated from the maize rhizosphere, was shown to produce three phenazine antibiotics: phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), 2-hydroxylphenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA), and 2-hydroxylphenazine (2-OH-PHZ). Two Quorum Sensing (QS) systems of regulation were identified: PhzIR and CsaI/R. Genes phzI and csaI were cloned and sequenced. Cells of strain 449 synthesize at least three types of AHL: N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-AHL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-AHL), and N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (30C6-AHL). Transposon mutagenesis was used to generate mutants of strain 449 deficient in synthesis of phenazines, which carried inactivated phzA and phzB genes of the phenazine operon and gene phzO. Mutations phzA- and phzB-caused a drastic reduction in the antagonistic activity of bacteria toward phytopathogenic fungi. Both mutants lost the ability to protect cucumber and leguminous plants against phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These results suggest a significant role of phenazines in the antagonistic activity of P. chlororaphis 449.

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Evans

    2004-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a

  9. Development of the radiosynthesis of high-specific-activity {sup 123}I-NKJ64

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S., E-mail: a.tavares.1@research.gla.ac.u [Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jobson, Nicola K. [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, The Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Dewar, Deborah [Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sutherland, Andrew [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, The Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Pimlott, Sally L. [West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, University of Glasgow and North Glasgow University Hospital NHS Trust, G11 6NT Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Introduction: {sup 123}I-NKJ64, a reboxetine analogue, is currently under development as a potential novel single photon emission computed tomography radiotracer for imaging the noradrenaline transporter in brain. This study describes the development of the radiosynthesis of {sup 123}I-NKJ64, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages, pitfalls and solutions encountered while developing the final radiolabelling methodology. Methods: The synthesis of {sup 123}I-NKJ64 was evaluated using an electrophilic iododestannylation method, where a Boc-protected trimethylstannyl precursor was radioiodinated using peracetic acid as an oxidant and deprotection was investigated using either trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl). Results: Radioiodination of the Boc-protected trimethylstannyl precursor was achieved with an incorporation yield of 92{+-}6%. Deprotection with 2 M HCl produced {sup 123}I-NKJ64 with the highest radiochemical yield of 98.05{+-}1.63% compared with 83.95{+-}13.24% with TFA. However, the specific activity of the obtained {sup 123}I-NKJ64 was lower when measured after using 2 M HCl (0.15{+-}0.23 Ci/{mu}mol) as the deprotecting agent in comparison to TFA (1.76{+-}0.60 Ci/{mu}mol). Further investigation of the 2 M HCl methodology found a by-product, identified as the deprotected proto-destannylated precursor, which co-eluted with {sup 123}I-NKJ64 during the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification. Conclusions: The radiosynthesis of {sup 123}I-NKJ64 was achieved with good isolated radiochemical yield of 68% and a high specific activity of 1.8 Ci/{mu}mol. TFA was found to be the most suitable deprotecting agent, since 2 M HCl generated a by-product that could not be fully separated from {sup 123}I-NKJ64 using the HPLC methodology investigated. This study highlights the importance of HPLC purification and accurate measurement of specific activity while developing new radiosynthesis methodologies.

  10. Orexin-dependent activation of layer VIb enhances cortical network activity and integration of non-specific thalamocortical inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Y Audrey; Andjelic, Sofija; Badr, Sammy; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Neocortical layer VI is critically involved in thalamocortical activity changes during the sleep/wake cycle. It receives dense projections from thalamic nuclei sensitive to the wake-promoting neuropeptides orexins, and its deepest part, layer VIb, is the only cortical lamina reactive to orexins. This convergence of wake-promoting inputs prompted us to investigate how layer VIb can modulate cortical arousal, using patch-clamp recordings and optogenetics in rat brain slices. We found that the majority of layer VIb neurons were excited by nicotinic agonists and orexin through the activation of nicotinic receptors containing α4-α5-β2 subunits and OX2 receptor, respectively. Specific effects of orexin on layer VIb neurons were potentiated by low nicotine concentrations and we used this paradigm to explore their intracortical projections. Co-application of nicotine and orexin increased the frequency of excitatory post-synaptic currents in the ipsilateral cortex, with maximal effect in infragranular layers and minimal effect in layer IV, as well as in the contralateral cortex. The ability of layer VIb to relay thalamocortical inputs was tested using photostimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing fibers from the orexin-sensitive rhomboid nucleus in the parietal cortex. Photostimulation induced robust excitatory currents in layer VIa neurons that were not pre-synaptically modulated by orexin, but exhibited a delayed, orexin-dependent, component. Activation of layer VIb by orexin enhanced the reliability and spike-timing precision of layer VIa responses to rhomboid inputs. These results indicate that layer VIb acts as an orexin-gated excitatory feedforward loop that potentiates thalamocortical arousal.

  11. Estimation of the hydrophobicity of 2,4-diphenyl-1,3-oxazoline analogs and QSAR analysis of their ovicidal activity against Tetranychus [corrected] urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakuchi, Chieka; Suzuki, Junji; Toda, Kazuya; Akamatsu, Miki; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki

    2006-08-01

    Partition coefficients of six 2-phenyl-1,3-oxazoline congeners containing 2-I, 2-NO2, 2-CF3, 2,6-(CH3)2, 2,6-F2, and 2-F-6-Cl substitutions on the phenyl moiety were measured in a 1-octanol/water system using the flask-shaking method. The effect on the hydrophobicity (LogP) of substituents on the phenyl moiety of 2-phenyl-1,3-oxazolines linearly correlated with that of benzamide congeners. logP values of other 2-(substituted phenyl)-1,3-oxazoline analogs were empirically estimated from the corresponding substituted benzamides. The ovicidal activity of 2-(substituted phenyl)-4-phenyl-1,3-oxazoline analogs against the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus [corrected] urticae was quantitatively analyzed using the classical QSAR (Hansch-Fujita) method. Results showed that ovicidal activity increases with hydrophobicity. The introduction of inductive electron-withdrawing groups at ortho-positions increased ovicidal activity, but addition of steric bulk was unfavorable. Substitution at either the meta- or para-position was detrimental to the acaricidal activity.

  12. Active Components of Fungus Shiraia bambusiscola Can Specifically Induce BGC823 Gastric Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shubing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Gastric cancer is a major health issue worldwide. Using a therapeutic approach, with minor side-effects, is very essential for the treatment of the gastric cancer. Shiraia bambusicola is a parasitic fungus which is widely used in China for curing several diseases with little side-effects. However, the mechanisms are not well understood yet. The aim of this study was to further understand the pharmacological mechanisms of Shiraia bambusicola and investigate whether it can be used for curing gastric cancer. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we mainly tested the effect of active components extracted from Shiraia bambusicola on BGC823, A549 and HepG2 cells. We used MTT assay to test cell viability. We also analyzed morphologic changes caused by apoptosis using Hoechst 33342 fluorescence staining, as well as cell cycle status and apoptosis ratio using flow-cytometer. In addition, protein expression level was tested by Western-blotting assay. Results BGC-823 cell proliferation was specifically inhibited by active components of Shiraia bambusicola. Meanwhile, these active components could induce BGC-823 cells apoptosis and retard the cell cycle in S/G2 phase. We also determined that two critical protein markers cleaved Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP, involved in apoptosis process, were regulated by these active components. Conclusion These data shed light on the treatment of human gastric cancer and conclude that Shiraia bambusicola can be a good therapeutic candidate for treatment of this malignancy.

  13. Novel cycloheximide derivatives targeting the moonlighting protein Mip exhibit specific antimicrobial activity against Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine eRasch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mip (macrophage infectivity potentiator and Mip-like proteins are virulence factors in a wide range of pathogens including Legionella pneumophila. These proteins belong to the FK506 binding protein (FKBP family of peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans-isomerases (PPIases. In L. pneumophila the PPIase activity of Mip is required for invasion of macrophages, transmigration through an in vitro lung-epithelial barrier, and full virulence in the guinea pig infection model. Additionally, Mip is a moonlighting protein that binds to collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. Here, we describe the development, and synthesis of cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties as novel FKBP ligands, and analyze their effect on the viability of L. pneumophila and other bacteria. All compounds efficiently inhibited PPIase activity of the prototypic human FKBP12 as well as Mip with IC50-values as low as 180 nM and 1.7 µM, respectively. Five of these derivatives inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila at concentrations of 30 to 40 µM, but exhibited no effect on other tested bacterial species indicating a specific spectrum of antibacterial activity. The derivatives carrying a 3,5‐dimethyladamantan‐1‐[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.32, and a 3‐ethyladamantan‐1‐[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.51 had the strongest effects in PPIase- and liquid growth assays. MT_30.32 and MT_30.51 were also inhibitory in macrophage infection studies without being cytotoxic. Accordingly, by applying a combinatorial approach we were able to generate novel, hybrid inhibitors consisting of cycloheximide and adamantane, two known FKBP inhibitors that interact with different parts of the PPIase domain, respectively. Interestingly, despite the proven Mip-inhibitory activity, the viability of a Mip-deficient strain was affected to the same degree as its wild type. Hence, we also propose that cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties are potent PPIase inhibitors with multiple

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-09-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

  15. Specific opsonic activity for staphylococci in peritoneal dialysis effluent during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Espersen, F; Kharazmi, A

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study of intraperitoneal opsonins in 30 patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), the IgG concentration, the fibronectin concentration, the specific antistaphylococcal antibody level, and the opsonic activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis were...... measured in peritoneal dialysis effluent from the initiation of CAPD and monthly for 6 months. Significant correlation was found between the four assays, but the interindividual and intraindividual variations were considerable. No statistically significant correlation was observed between susceptibility...... of the patients to CAPD-related infectious peritonitis and any of the above-mentioned parameters of humoral defense. We conclude that at the present time it is not feasible to use these assays for the establishment of prognosis with regard to peritonitis in CAPD....

  16. Structure and activity of NO synthase inhibitors specific to the L-arginine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, S Ya; Konoplyannikov, A G; Skvortsov, V G; Mandrugin, A A; Fedoseev, V M

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of compounds containing a fragment similar to the guanidine group of L-arginine, which is a substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is the main direction in creating NOS inhibitors. The inhibitory effect of such compounds is caused not only by their competition with the substrate for the L-arginine-binding site and/or oxidizing center of the enzyme (heme) but also by interaction with peptide motifs of the enzyme that influence its dimerization, affinity for cofactors, and interaction with associated proteins. Structures, activities, and relative in vitro and in vivo specificities of various NOS inhibitors (amino acid and non-amino acid) with linear or cyclic structure and containing guanidine, amidine, or isothiuronium group are considered. These properties are mainly analyzed by comparison with effects of the inhibitors on the inducible NOS.

  17. Teaching Sustainability Using an Active Learning Constructivist Approach: Discipline-Specific Case Studies in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kalamas Hedden

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our rationale for using an active learning constructivist approach to teach sustainability-related topics in a higher education. To push the boundaries of ecological literacy, we also develop a theoretical model for sustainability knowledge co-creation. Drawing on the experiences of faculty at a major Southeastern University in the United States, we present case studies in architecture, engineering, geography, and marketing. Four Sustainability Faculty Fellows describe their discipline-specific case studies, all of which are project-based learning experiences, and include details regarding teaching and assessment. Easily replicated in other educational contexts, these case studies contribute to the advancement of sustainability education.

  18. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  19. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a ...

  20. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana;

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression...

  1. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Jones, David N.M.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2011-06-18

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. In several cancers, CD147 expression is so high that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2 that is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2 that is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. Thus, here we have extensively characterized the CD147 Ig0 domain by elucidating its three-dimensional structure through crystallography and its solution behavior through several biophysical methods that include nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, we have utilized this data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6, which is a well-known contributor to retinoblastoma and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Furthermore, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation.

  2. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  3. Lobe-specific calcium binding in calmodulin regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Rung Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS requires calcium-bound calmodulin (CaM for electron transfer but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a series of CaM mutants with E to Q substitution at the four calcium-binding sites, we found that single mutation at any calcium-binding site (B1Q, B2Q, B3Q and B4Q resulted in ∼2-3 fold increase in the CaM concentration necessary for half-maximal activation (EC50 of citrulline formation, indicating that each calcium-binding site of CaM contributed to the association between CaM and eNOS. Citrulline formation and cytochrome c reduction assays revealed that in comparison with nNOS or iNOS, eNOS was less stringent in the requirement of calcium binding to each of four calcium-binding sites. However, lobe-specific disruption with double mutations in calcium-binding sites either at N- (B12Q or at C-terminal (B34Q lobes greatly diminished both eNOS oxygenase and reductase activities. Gel mobility shift assay and flavin fluorescence measurement indicated that N- and C-lobes of CaM played distinct roles in regulating eNOS catalysis; the C-terminal EF-hands in its calcium-bound form was responsible for the binding of canonical CaM-binding domain, while N-terminal EF-hands in its calcium-bound form controlled the movement of FMN domain. Limited proteolysis studies further demonstrated that B12Q and B34Q induced different conformational change in eNOS. CONCLUSIONS: Our results clearly demonstrate that CaM controls eNOS electron transfer primarily through its lobe-specific calcium binding.

  4. Standardized methods for the production of high specific-activity zirconium-89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Jason P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: hollanj3@mskcc.org; Sheh Yiauchung [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: shehy@mskcc.org; Lewis, Jason S. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: lewisj2@mskcc.org

    2009-10-15

    Zirconium-89 is an attractive metallo-radionuclide for use in immuno-PET due to favorable decay characteristics. Standardized methods for the routine production and isolation of high-purity and high-specific-activity {sup 89}Zr using a small cyclotron are reported. Optimized cyclotron conditions reveal high average yields of 1.52{+-}0.11 mCi/{mu}A.h at a proton beam energy of 15 MeV and current of 15 {mu}A using a solid, commercially available {sup 89}Y-foil target (0.1 mm, 100% natural abundance). {sup 89}Zr was isolated in high radionuclidic and radiochemical purity (>99.99%) as [{sup 89}Zr]Zr-oxalate by using a solid-phase hydroxamate resin with >99.5% recovery of the radioactivity. The effective specific-activity of {sup 89}Zr was found to be in the range 5.28-13.43 mCi/{mu}g (470-1195 Ci/mmol) of zirconium. New methods for the facile production of [{sup 89}Zr]Zr-chloride are reported. Radiolabeling studies using the trihydroxamate ligand desferrioxamine B (DFO) gave 100% radiochemical yields in <15 min at room temperature, and in vitro stability measurements confirmed that [{sup 89}Zr]Zr-DFO is stable with respect to ligand dissociation in human serum for >7 days. Small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies have demonstrated that free {sup 89}Zr(IV) ions administered as [{sup 89}Zr]Zr-chloride accumulate in the liver, whilst [{sup 89}Zr]Zr-DFO is excreted rapidly via the kidneys within <20 min. These results have important implication for the analysis of immuno-PET imaging of {sup 89}Zr-labeled monoclonal antibodies. The detailed methods described can be easily translated to other radiochemistry facilities and will facilitate the use of {sup 89}Zr in both basic science and clinical investigations.

  5. Expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C isoenzymes in cultured astrocytes activated after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Cocco, L

    2010-04-01

    Signal transduction pathways, involved in cell cycle and activities, depend on various components including lipid signalling molecules, such as phosphoinositides and related enzymes. Many evidences support the hypothesis that inositol lipid cycle is involved in astrocytes activation during neurodegeneration. Previous studies investigated the pattern of expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family isoforms in astrocytes, individuating in cultured neonatal rat astrocytes, supposed to be quiescent cells, the absence of some isoforms, accordingly to their well known tissue specificity. The same study was conducted in cultured rat astrocytoma C6 cells and designed a different pattern of expression of PI-PLCs in the neoplastic counterpart, accordingly to literature suggesting a PI signalling involvement in tumour progression. It is not clear the role of PI-PLC isoforms in inflammation; recent data demonstrate they are involved in cytokines production, with special regard to IL-6. PI-PLCs expression in LPS treated neonatal rat astrocytes performed by using RT-PCR, observed at 3, 6, 18 and 24 h intervals, expressed: PI-PLC beta1, beta4 and gamma1 in all intervals analysed; PI-PLC delta1 at 6, 18 and 24 h; PI-PLC delta3 at 6 h after treatment. PI-PLC beta3, delta4 and epsilon, present in untreated astrocytes, were not detected after LPS treatment. Immunocytochemical analysis, performed to visualize the sub-cellular distribution of the expressed isoforms, demonstrated different patterns of localisation at different times of exposure. These observations suggest that PI-PLCs expression and distribution may play a role in ongoing inflammation process of CNS. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report... substance activity took place on the property, the reporting agency must include information on the type and... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place...

  7. Context-dependent activation of reduced autobiographical memory specificity as an avoidant coping style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeer, Elise; Raes, Filip; Williams, J Mark G; Hermans, Dirk

    2011-12-01

    According to the affect-regulation hypothesis (Williams et al., 2007), reduced autobiographical memory specificity (rAMS) or overgeneral memory (OGM) might be considered a cognitive avoidance strategy; that is, people learn to avoid the emotionally painful consequences associated with the retrieval of specific negative memories. Based on this hypothesis, one would predict significant negative associations between AMS and avoidant coping. However, studies investigating this prediction have led to equivocal results. In the present study we tested a possible explanation for these contradictory findings. It was hypothesized that rAMS (in part) reflects an avoidant coping strategy, which might only become apparent under certain conditions, that is, conditions that signal the possibility of 'danger.' To test this hypothesis, we assessed AMS and behavioral avoidance but experimentally manipulated the instructions. In the neutral condition, two parallel versions of the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) were presented under neutral instructions. In the threat condition, the first AMT was presented under neutral instructions, while the second AMT was presented under 'threat instructions.' Results showed no significant correlations between avoidance and OGM under neutral conditions but significant and markedly stronger correlations under threat conditions, with more avoidance being associated with fewer specific and more categoric memories. In addition, high avoiders showed a stronger reduction in AMS in the threat condition as compared with the neutral condition, while low avoiders showed no such difference between conditions. The data confirm that OGM can be considered as part of a broader avoidant coping style. However, more importantly, they show that, at least in nonclinical individuals, the activation of this coping style may depend on the context.

  8. High contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: active correction of aperture discontinuities: fundamental limits and practical trade- offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Élodie; Hoffmann, Jordan; Carlotti, Alexis; Mawet, Dimitri

    2014-08-01

    We present a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and / or segment gaps. We solve the highly non-linear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential Deformable Mirror system and show that high-throughput and high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We show that for geometries similar to JWST, ACAD can attain at least 10-7 in contrast and an order of magnitude higher for future Extremely Large Telescopes, even when the pupil features a "missing segment" . Because the converging non-linear mappings resulting from our Deformable Mirror shapes damps near-field diffraction artifacts in the vicinity of the discontinuities this solution is particularly appealing in terms of spectral bandwidth. We present preliminary results that illustrate the performances of ACAD in the presence of diffraction for apertures for with secondary support structures of varying width and argue that the ultimate contrast achieved can by combining ACAD with modern wavefront control algorithms.

  9. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency causes organ-specific autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hase

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expressed by germinal center B cells is a central regulator of somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR. Humans with AID mutations develop not only the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2 associated with B cell hyperplasia, but also autoimmune disorders by unknown mechanisms. We report here that AID-/- mice spontaneously develop tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in non-lymphoid tissues including the stomach at around 6 months of age. At a later stage, AID-/- mice develop a severe gastritis characterized by loss of gastric glands and epithelial hyperplasia. The disease development was not attenuated even under germ-free (GF conditions. Gastric autoantigen -specific serum IgM was elevated in AID-/- mice, and the serum levels correlated with the gastritis pathological score. Adoptive transfer experiments suggest that autoimmune CD4+ T cells mediate gastritis development as terminal effector cells. These results suggest that abnormal B-cell expansion due to AID deficiency can drive B-cell autoimmunity, and in turn promote TLO formation, which ultimately leads to the propagation of organ-specific autoimmune effector CD4+ T cells. Thus, AID plays an important role in the containment of autoimmune diseases by negative regulation of autoreactive B cells.

  10. Specific interaction with cardiolipin triggers functional activation of Dynamin-Related Protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsasne Bustillo-Zabalbeitia

    Full Text Available Dynamin-Related Protein 1 (Drp1, a large GTPase of the dynamin superfamily, is required for mitochondrial fission in healthy and apoptotic cells. Drp1 activation is a complex process that involves translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM and assembly into rings/spirals at the MOM, leading to membrane constriction/division. Similar to dynamins, Drp1 contains GTPase (G, bundle signaling element (BSE and stalk domains. However, instead of the lipid-interacting Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain present in the dynamins, Drp1 contains the so-called B insert or variable domain that has been suggested to play an important role in Drp1 regulation. Different proteins have been implicated in Drp1 recruitment to the MOM, although how MOM-localized Drp1 acquires its fully functional status remains poorly understood. We found that Drp1 can interact with pure lipid bilayers enriched in the mitochondrion-specific phospholipid cardiolipin (CL. Building on our previous study, we now explore the specificity and functional consequences of this interaction. We show that a four lysine module located within the B insert of Drp1 interacts preferentially with CL over other anionic lipids. This interaction dramatically enhances Drp1 oligomerization and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis. Our results add significantly to a growing body of evidence indicating that CL is an important regulator of many essential mitochondrial functions.

  11. Papain-catalyzed peptide bond formation: enzyme-specific activation with guanidinophenyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Roseri J A C; Zarzycka, Barbara; Amatdjais-Groenen, Helene I V; Jans, Sander C B; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; van Delft, Floris L; Nabuurs, Sander B; Rutjes, Floris P J T

    2011-09-19

    The substrate mimetics approach is a versatile method for small-scale enzymatic peptide-bond synthesis in aqueous systems. The protease-recognized amino acid side chain is incorporated in an ester leaving group, the substrate mimetic. This shift of the specific moiety enables the acceptance of amino acids and peptide sequences that are normally not recognized by the enzyme. The guanidinophenyl group (OGp), a known substrate mimetic for the serine proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin, has now been applied for the first time in combination with papain, a cheap and commercially available cysteine protease. To provide insight in the binding mode of various Z-X(AA)-OGp esters, computational docking studies were performed. The results strongly point at enzyme-specific activation of the OGp esters in papain through a novel mode of action, rather than their functioning as mimetics. Furthermore, the scope of a model dipeptide synthesis was investigated with respect to both the amino acid donor and the nucleophile. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to prioritize 22 natural and unnatural amino acid donors for synthesis. Experimental results correlate well with the predicted ranking and show that nearly all amino acids are accepted by papain. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum β-glucosidase: a glucose-tolerant enzyme with high specific activity for cellobiose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Jianjun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-Glucosidase is an important component of the cellulase enzyme system. It does not only participate in cellulose degradation, it also plays an important role in hydrolyzing cellulose to fermentable glucose by relieving the inhibition of exoglucanase and endoglucanase from cellobiose. Therefore, the glucose-tolerant β-glucosidase with high specific activity for cellobiose might be a potent candidate for industrial applications. Results The β-glucosidase gene bgl that encodes a 443-amino-acid protein was cloned and over-expressed from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 in Escherichia coli. The phylogenetic trees of β-glucosidases were constructed using Neighbor-Joining (NJ and Maximum-Parsimony (MP methods. The phylogeny and amino acid analysis indicated that the BGL was a novel β-glucosidase. By replacing the rare codons for the N-terminal amino acids of the target protein, the expression level of bgl was increased from 6.6 to 11.2 U/mg in LB medium. Recombinant BGL was purified by heat treatment followed by Ni-NTA affinity. The optimal activity was at pH 6.4 and 70°C. The purified enzyme was stable over pH range of 5.2–7.6 and had a 1 h half life at 68°C. The activity of BGL was significantly enhanced by Fe2+ and Mn2+. The Vmax of 64 U/mg and 120 U/mg were found for p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (Km value of 0.62 mM and cellobiose (Km value of 7.9 mM, respectively. It displayed high tolerance to glucose and cellobiose. The Kcat for cellobiose was 67.7 s-1 at 60°C and pH 6.4, when the concentration of cellobiose was 290 mM. It was activated by glucose at concentrations lower that 200 mM. With glucose further increasing, the enzyme activity of BGL was gradually inhibited, but remained 50% of the original value in even as high as 600 mM glucose. Conclusions The article provides a useful novel β-glucosidase which displayed favorable properties: high glucose and cellobiose tolerance

  13. Sonographic decreased echogenicity of thyroid parenchyma in asymptomatic population: Correction with thyroid function and thyroid autoimmune activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Lee, Ji Ye [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Kyung Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University School of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Div. of Hematology-Oncology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Jin [Dept. of of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between decreased echogenicity of thyroid and thyroid hormones or autoantibodies. From January 2009 to December 2011, 543 patients with decreased parenchymal echogenicity [M:F = 133:410, median age: 42 years (range: 9-82 years)], who did not have solid nodule, symptom or medication related to thyroid and underwent thyroid function test were retrospectively reviewed. Images were classified based on the degree of hypoechogenicity, heterogenicity or thyroid size. 1) Group A: mild decreased echogenicity, group B: marked decreased echogenicity, 2) group Ho: homogeneous echogenicity, group He: heterogeneous echogenicity, 3) group 1: decreased size, group 2: normal size, group 3: increased size. Differences in triiodiothyronyne (T3), free-thyroxine (fT4), thyrotropin (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), and anti-TSH receptor antibody (TSH-rAb) were evaluated among groups. T3, fT4, and TSH levels differed between groups A and B (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, p < 0.001). TgAb and TPOAb of group B were higher than group A (p = 0.006, p < 0.001). TPOAb of group He was higher than group Ho (p < 0.001). TSH-rAb and TPOAb of group 3 were higher than group 2 (p = 0.017, p < 0.001). The patients with findings of markedly decreased, heterogeneous echogenicity or thyroid enlargement may have abnormal thyroid function and autoantibodies. These may facilitate the physicians' decision to order tests for thyroid function and autoimmune activity.

  14. Chronic agomelatine treatment corrects the abnormalities in the circadian rhythm of motor activity and sleep/wake cycle induced by prenatal restraint stress in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Jerome; Silletti, Viviana; Laloux, Charlotte; Zuena, Anna Rita; Giovine, Angela; Consolazione, Michol; van Camp, Gilles; Malagodi, Marithe; Gaetani, Silvana; Cianci, Silvia; Catalani, Assia; Mennuni, Gioacchino; Mazzetta, Alessandro; van Reeth, Olivier; Gabriel, Cecilia; Mocaër, Elisabeth; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Maccari, Stefania

    2013-03-01

    Agomelatine is a novel antidepressant acting as an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist/5-HT2C serotonin receptor antagonist. Because of its peculiar pharmacological profile, this drug caters the potential to correct the abnormalities of circadian rhythms associated with mood disorders, including abnormalities of the sleep/wake cycle. Here, we examined the effect of chronic agomelatine treatment on sleep architecture and circadian rhythms of motor activity using the rat model of prenatal restraint stress (PRS) as a putative 'aetiological' model of depression. PRS was delivered to the mothers during the last 10 d of pregnancy. The adult progeny ('PRS rats') showed a reduced duration of slow wave sleep, an increased duration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, an increased number of REM sleep events and an increase in motor activity before the beginning of the dark phase of the light/dark cycle. In addition, adult PRS rats showed an increased expression of the transcript of the primary response gene, c-Fos, in the hippocampus just prior to the beginning of the dark phase. All these changes were reversed by a chronic oral treatment with agomelatine (2000 ppm in the diet). The effect of agomelatine on sleep was largely attenuated by treatment with the MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor antagonist, S22153, which caused PRS-like sleep disturbances on its own. These data provide the first evidence that agomelatine corrects sleep architecture and restores circadian homeostasis in a preclinical model of depression and supports the value of agomelatine as a novel antidepressant that resynchronizes circadian rhythms under pathological conditions.

  15. Design and activity evaluation of deoxyribozymes specifically targeting hepatitis C virus RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于乐成; 王宇明; 王升启; 顾长海; 毛青; 陈忠斌; 刘鸿凌

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the cleaving and inhibitory activity of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific deoxyribozymes (DRz) at both molecular and transgeneic cellular levels. Methods: According to the secondary structure of HCV 5′-noncoding region (5′-NCR) and the sites characterized with 5′…Y↓R...3′(Y=A/G,R=U/C), HCV-specific naive deoxyribozymes were designed and named DRz-232, DRz-127, DRz-84, DRz1, and the phosphorothioate deoxyribozymes (PSDRz) and mutated phosphorothioate deoxyribozymes (MPSDRz) were also designed. HCV RNA 5′-NCR was transcribed in vitro from linearized plasmid pHCV-neo and radiolabelled at its 5′-end. DRz, PSDRz or MPSDRz was respectively mixed with the substrate RNA and incubated under appropriate conditions, the cleaved products were displayed by 8% denaturated polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and autoradiography, and the optical density of each band was measured to calculate cleavage rates. After that, every kind of DRz was added respectively to the cultured transgeneic HepG2 cells containing luciferase gene controlled by HCV 5′-NCR. The cells were lysed at intended time points and the activity of luciferase was measured with chemiluminescence method for calculating inhibition rates. Results: After incubated for 90 min in vitro, the cleavage rates of DRz-127, PSDRz-127, DRz1 and PSDRz1 reached 32.6%, 30.8%, 24.3% and 21.5%, respectively. No cleavage product was observed in any MPSDRz. DRz-127, PSDRz-127, DRz1 and PSDRz1 had an inhibitory rate of 53.2%, 50.6%, 44.7% and 43.3% respectively in transgeneic HepG2 cells in the first 24 h when the final dose of the DRz was 0.5 μmol/L, higher than that of the corresponding MPSDRz. There was no significant difference between the inhibitory effect of each DRz and its PSDRz in HepG2 cells, but the inhibitory rate of DRz decreased more rapidly than that of the latter with the elapse of time. The results from transfection groups were significantly better than those of non

  16. Co-dependent Activators Direct Myoblast Specific MyoD Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Geles, Kenneth G.; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Tjian, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although FoxO and Pax proteins represent two important families of transcription factors in determining cell fate, they had not been functionally or physically linked together in mediating regulation of a common target gene during normal cellular transcription programs. Here we identify MyoD, a key regulator of myogenesis, as a direct target of FoxO3 and Pax3/7 in myoblasts. Our cell based assays and in vitro studies reveal a tight co-dependent partnership between FoxO3 and Pax3/7 to coordinately recruit RNA polymerase II and form a pre-initiation complex (PIC) to activate MyoD transcription in myoblasts. The role of FoxO3 in regulating muscle differentiation is confirmed in vivo by observed defects in muscle regeneration caused by MyoD down-regulation in FoxO3 null mice. These data establish a mutual interdependence and functional link between two families of transcription activators serving as potential signaling sensors and regulators of cell fate commitment in directing tissue specific MyoD transcription. PMID:18854138

  17. Specific features of domestic banks activity in the factoring services market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygub Olena V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses specific features of formation and development of the domestic factoring market. In the result of the study the article establishes that development of factoring in Ukraine took place due to active participation of banking institutions in this process and nowadays they are leaders in the domestic factoring services market due to possessing significant competitive advantages if compared with non-banking companies that specialise in factoring. The article detects that nowadays the banks are not only offerers of factoring services and finance factoring operations of other market participants, but also take an active part in establishment of factoring branches and are consumers of factoring services. In order to accelerate development of international factoring in Ukraine, the article offers such forms of state support of banks, which render factoring services to domestic exporters. The article recommends to focus banks’ attention, under modern conditions that are characterised with volatility of financial markets, on factoring servicing of those clients, whom they have long business relations with, without jeopardising themselves through provision of factoring services to a big number of small debtors. The article provides schemes of banks’ co-operation in the sphere of “non-classic” factoring with accredited factoring companies.

  18. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse eYilbas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification.

  19. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Ayse; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl; Chen, Jihong; LI, Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification.

  20. Tissue Specific Expression of Cre in Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Dopamine Active Transporter-Positive Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyi Liu

    Full Text Available The rat is a preferred model system over the mouse for neurological studies, and cell type-specific Cre expression in the rat enables precise ablation of gene function in neurons of interest, which is especially valuable for neurodegenerative disease modeling and optogenetics. Yet, few such Cre rats are available. Here we report the characterization of two Cre rats, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-Cre and dopamine active transporter (DAT or Slc6a3-Cre, by using a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH as well as a fluorescent reporter for Cre activity. We detected Cre expression in expected neurons in both Cre lines. Interestingly, we also found that in Th-Cre rats, but not DAT-Cre rats, Cre is expressed in female germ cells, allowing germline excision of the floxed allele and hence the generation of whole-body knockout rats. In summary, our data demonstrate that targeted integration of Cre cassette lead to faithful recapitulation of expression pattern of the endogenous promoter, and mRNA FISH, in addition to IHC, is an effective method for the analysis of the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in the rat brain, alleviating the dependence on high quality antibodies that are often not available against rat proteins. The Th-Cre and the DAT-Cre rat lines express Cre in selective subsets of dopaminergic neurons and should be particularly useful for researches on Parkinson's disease.

  1. Structural determinants for activity and specificity of the bacterial toxin LlpA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten G K Ghequire

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lectin-like bacteriotoxic proteins, identified in several plant-associated bacteria, are able to selectively kill closely related species, including several phytopathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas species, but so far their mode of action remains unrevealed. The crystal structure of LlpABW, the prototype lectin-like bacteriocin from Pseudomonas putida, reveals an architecture of two monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL domains and a C-terminal β-hairpin extension. The C-terminal MMBL domain (C-domain adopts a fold very similar to MMBL domains from plant lectins and contains a binding site for mannose and oligomannosides. Mutational analysis indicates that an intact sugar-binding pocket in this domain is crucial for bactericidal activity. The N-terminal MMBL domain (N-domain adopts the same fold but is structurally more divergent and lacks a functional mannose-binding site. Differential activity of engineered N/C-domain chimers derived from two LlpA homologues with different killing spectra, disclosed that the N-domain determines target specificity. Apparently this bacteriocin is assembled from two structurally similar domains that evolved separately towards dedicated functions in target recognition and bacteriotoxicity.

  2. Effect of humic acid in leachate on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengfei; Xian, Ping; Yang, Longhui; Liu, Xi; Zhan, Longhui; Bu, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    In order to find out the effects of humic acid (HA) in anaerobic-treated landfill leachate on granular sludge, the anaerobic biodegradability of HA as well as the influences of HA on the total cumulative methane production, the anaerobic methanization process and the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of granular sludge are studied in this paper. Experimental results show that as a non-biodegradable organic pollutant, HA is also difficult to be decomposed by microbes in the anaerobic reaction process. Presence of HA and changes in the concentration have no significant influences on the total cumulative methane production and the anaerobic methanization process of granular sludge. Besides, the total cumulative methane production cannot reflect the inhibition of toxics on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge on the premise of sufficient reaction time. Results also show that HA plays a promoting role on SMA of granular sludge. Without buffering agent the SMA value increased by 19.2% on average due to the buffering and regulating ability of HA, while with buffering agent the SMA value increased by 5.4% on average due to the retaining effect of HA on the morphology of the sludge particles. However, in the presence of leachate the SMA value decreased by 27.6% on average, because the toxic effect of the toxics in the leachate on granular sludge is much larger than the promoting effect of HA.

  3. Directed evolution of a histone acetyltransferase--enhancing thermostability, whilst maintaining catalytic activity and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemhuis, Hans; Nightingale, Karl P; Hollfelder, Florian

    2008-11-01

    Histone acetylation plays an integral role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Transcriptional activity reflects the recruitment of opposing classes of enzymes to promoter elements; histone acetyltransferases (EC 2.3.1.48) that deposit acetyl marks at a subset of histone residues and histone deacetylases that remove them. Many histone acetyltransferases are difficult to study in solution because of their limited stability once purified. We have developed a directed evolution protocol that allows the screening of hundreds of histone acetyltransferase mutants for histone acetylating activity, and used this to enhance the thermostability of the human P/CAF histone acetyltransferase. Two rounds of directed evolution significantly stabilized the enzyme without lowering the catalytic efficiency and substrate specificity of the enzyme. Twenty-four variants with higher thermostability were identified. Detailed analysis revealed twelve single amino acid mutants that were found to possess a higher thermostability. The residues affected are scattered over the entire protein structure, and are different from mutations predicted by sequence alignment approaches, suggesting that sequence comparison and directed evolution methods are complementary strategies in engineering increased protein thermostability. The stabilizing mutations are predominately located at surface of the enzyme, suggesting that the protein's surface is important for stability. The directed evolution approach described in the present study is easily adapted to other histone modifying enzymes, requiring only appropriate peptide substrates and antibodies, which are available from commercial suppliers.

  4. Production study of high specific activity NCA Re-186g by proton and deuteron cyclotron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonardi, M.L., E-mail: mauro.bonardi@mi.infn.i [L.A.S.A., Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, UNIMI and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (Italy); Groppi, F.; Manenti, S.; Persico, E.; Gini, L. [L.A.S.A., Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, UNIMI and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Very high specific activity (A{sub S}) {sup 186g}Re could be produced by either proton or deuteron cyclotron irradiation on highly enriched {sup 186}W target in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, leading to a A{sub S} very close to the theoretical carrier free (CF) value of 6.88 GBq {mu}g{sup -1}. Thick target yields (TTYs), obtained irradiating both thick metal W targets of natural isotopic composition and highly enriched pressed powdered {sup 186}W targets, were measured at different particles energies taking into account high accuracy and precision on both yield and beam energy. The measurement of radionuclidic purity of {sup 186g}Re obtained activating highly enriched {sup 186}W by both p and d beams were also carried out and accurately compared. The excitation function as thin-target yields (tty, i.e. proportional to the reaction cross-sections) and the integrated TTYs for all Re (A=181, 182, 183, 184, 186 and their metastable levels), W and Ta co-produced radionuclides will be presented elsewhere in deep details.

  5. Preparation of a specific bamboo based activated carbon and its application for ciprofloxacin removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y X; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S

    2015-11-15

    The studied bamboo based activated carbon (BbAC) with high specific surface area (SSA) and high micro pore volume was prepared from bamboo scraps by the combined activation of H3PO4 and K2CO3. The BbAC was characterized based on the N2 adsorption isotherm at 77K. The results showed that the SSA and pore volume of BbAC increased with increasing impregnation ratio and reached maxima at the impregnation ratio of 3:1 at 750°C. Under these optimal conditions, the BbAC obtained could have a maximum SSA of 2237 m(2)/g and a maximum total pore volume of 1.23 cm(3)/g with the micro pore ratio of more than 90%. The adsorption performance of ciprofloxacin (CIP) on the BbAC was determined at 298 K. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were employed to describe the adsorption equilibrium and the kinetic data were fitted by pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order kinetic models. The results showed that the Langmuir model and the pseudo second-order kinetic model presented better fittings for the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data, respectively. The maximum adsorption amount of CIP (613 mg/g) on the BbAC was much higher than the report in the literature. Conclusively, the BbAC could be a promising adsorption material for CIP removal from water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inflammasome activation can mediate tissue-specific pathogenesis or protection in S. aureus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melehani, Jason H.; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive coccus that interacts with human hosts on a spectrum from quiet commensal to deadly pathogen. S. aureus is capable of infecting nearly every tissue in the body resulting in cellulitis, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, brain abscesses, bacteremia and more. S. aureus has a wide range factors that promote infection and each site of infection triggers a different response in the human host. In particular, the different patterns of inflammasome activation mediate tissue-specific pathogenesis in S. aureus infection. Although still a nascent field, understanding the unique host-pathogen interactions in each infection and the role of inflammasomes in mediating pathogenesis may lead to novel strategies for treating S. aureus infections. Reviews addressing S. aureus virulence and pathogenesis (Thammavongsa et al. 2015), as well as epidemiology and pathophysiology (Tong et al. 2015), have recently been published. This review will focus on S. aureus factors that activate inflammasomes and their impact on innate immune signaling and bacterial survival. PMID:27460814

  7. Tissue Specific Expression of Cre in Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Dopamine Active Transporter-Positive Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brown, Andrew; Fisher, Dan; Wu, Yumei; Warren, Joe; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a preferred model system over the mouse for neurological studies, and cell type-specific Cre expression in the rat enables precise ablation of gene function in neurons of interest, which is especially valuable for neurodegenerative disease modeling and optogenetics. Yet, few such Cre rats are available. Here we report the characterization of two Cre rats, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre and dopamine active transporter (DAT or Slc6a3)-Cre, by using a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as well as a fluorescent reporter for Cre activity. We detected Cre expression in expected neurons in both Cre lines. Interestingly, we also found that in Th-Cre rats, but not DAT-Cre rats, Cre is expressed in female germ cells, allowing germline excision of the floxed allele and hence the generation of whole-body knockout rats. In summary, our data demonstrate that targeted integration of Cre cassette lead to faithful recapitulation of expression pattern of the endogenous promoter, and mRNA FISH, in addition to IHC, is an effective method for the analysis of the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in the rat brain, alleviating the dependence on high quality antibodies that are often not available against rat proteins. The Th-Cre and the DAT-Cre rat lines express Cre in selective subsets of dopaminergic neurons and should be particularly useful for researches on Parkinson's disease.

  8. Effects of amino-terminal extensions and specific mutations on the activity of restrictocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Kenealy, W R

    1992-08-25

    The cytotoxic activities of restrictocin with aminoterminal extensions and specific mutations were investigated using in vivo and in vitro systems. Genes were constructed from the cDNA clone of restrictocin which encode: the native form of restrictocin (including the leader sequence); Met-prorestrictocin, in which a codon for methionine was placed before a putative pro region; Met-mature restrictocin, with a methionine codon prior to the mature form of restrictocin; and three mutated forms of Met-mature restrictocin, E95G, E115G/H136L, and H136L. These constructions were placed under the control of the GAL1 promoter and were transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transformants were killed, and a new RNA band formed when any of these genes except those containing the H136L mutation were expressed. Restrictocin protein was detected by immunoblot only in cells expressing the native form of restrictocin and the forms containing the H136L mutation. Native restrictocin, Met-prorestrictocin, and Met-mature restrictocin mRNA were translated in an in vitro system resulting in proteins of the expected molecular weight and inactivation of the translation system. Restrictocin was not inactivated by the presence of the leader sequence and the putative prosequence. Amino acid His136 is putatively in the active site of restrictocin by analogy to ribonuclease U2 and the elimination of toxic effects in the S. cerevisiae expression and in vitro translation systems.

  9. High contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: active correction of aperture discontinuities: fundamental limits and practical trades offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin Arthur; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall D.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper we discussed a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach, named Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) relies on two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of Deformable Mirror Surfaces that yield high contrast Point Spread Functions is not linear, and non-linear methods are needed to find the true minimum. In particular we showed that broadband high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies for a variety of telescope pupil geometries. In this paper we first focus on the fundamental limits and practical trade-offs associated with ACAD. In a first part we will study the fundamental limits and practical tradeoffs associated with ACAD, regardless of the downstream coronagraphic architecture. The mathematical techniques to finding ACAD DM shapes require to solve a complex differential equation. We will first discuss the scaling laws underlying this non-linear solution and their impact of DM placement and geometry wishing the optical design of an instrument. We will then consider the sensitivity to low order aberrations: in principle an ACAD solution that comprises large strokes will be more sensitive to these aberrations than one with smaller strokes. As a consequence, we will quantify this sensitive both using analytical models and numerical simulations. We will present diffractive end to end simulations and quantify the ultimate contrast and bandwidth achievable with ACAD, which can be reached by superposing using a classical linear wavefront control algorithms on top of the Monge Ampere solution. Finally, recent work has shown that coronagraph designs can also accommodate for secondary support structures and/or segments gaps, at a

  10. Activation of Adhesion G Protein-coupled Receptors: AGONIST SPECIFICITY OF STACHEL SEQUENCE-DERIVED PEPTIDES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demberg, Lilian M; Winkler, Jana; Wilde, Caroline; Simon, Kay-Uwe; Schön, Julia; Rothemund, Sven; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone; Liebscher, Ines

    2017-03-17

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) family carry an agonistic sequence within their large ectodomains. Peptides derived from this region, called the Stachel sequence, can activate the respective receptor. As the conserved core region of the Stachel sequence is highly similar between aGPCRs, the agonist specificity of Stachel sequence-derived peptides was tested between family members using cell culture-based second messenger assays. Stachel peptides derived from aGPCRs of subfamily VI (GPR110/ADGRF1, GPR116/ADGRF5) and subfamily VIII (GPR64/ADGRG2, GPR126/ADGRG6) are able to activate more than one member of the respective subfamily supporting their evolutionary relationship and defining them as pharmacological receptor subtypes. Extended functional analyses of the Stachel sequences and derived peptides revealed agonist promiscuity, not only within, but also between aGPCR subfamilies. For example, the Stachel-derived peptide of GPR110 (subfamily VI) can activate GPR64 and GPR126 (both subfamily VIII). Our results indicate that key residues in the Stachel sequence are very similar between aGPCRs allowing for agonist promiscuity of several Stachel-derived peptides. Therefore, aGPCRs appear to be pharmacologically more closely related than previously thought. Our findings have direct implications for many aGPCR studies, as potential functional overlap has to be considered for in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it also offers the possibility of a broader use of more potent peptides when the original Stachel sequence is less effective. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS with two active electrodes of the same polarity modulates bilateral cognitive processes differentially [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Klein

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is an innovative method to explore the causal structure-function relationship of brain areas. We investigated the specificity of bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS with two active electrodes of the same polarity (e.g., cathodal on both hemispheres applied to intraparietal cortices bilaterally using a combined between- and within-task approach. Regarding between-task specificity, we observed that bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS affected a numerical (mental addition but not a control task (colour word Stroop, indicating a specific influence of tDCS on numerical but not on domain general cognitive processes associated with the bilateral IPS. In particular, the numerical effect of distractor distance was more pronounced under cathodal than under anodal stimulation. Moreover, with respect to within-task specificity we only found the numerical distractor distance effect in mental addition to be modulated by direct current stimulation, whereas the effect of target identity was not affected. This implies a differential influence of bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS on the recruitment of different processing components within the same task (number magnitude processing vs. recognition of familiarity. In sum, this first successful application of bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS with two active electrodes of the same polarity in numerical cognition research corroborates the specific proposition of the Triple Code Model that number magnitude information is represented bilaterally in the intraparietal cortices.

  12. Responses of absolute and specific soil enzyme activities to long term additions of organic and mineral fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Dong, Wenyi; Dai, Xiaoqin; Schaeffer, Sean; Yang, Fengting; Radosevich, Mark; Xu, Lili; Liu, Xiyu; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    Long-term phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) applications may seriously affect soil microbial activity. A long-term field fertilizer application trial was established on reddish paddy soils in the subtropical region of southern China in 1998. We assessed the effects of swine manure and seven different rates or ratios of NPK fertilizer treatments on (1) the absolute and specific enzyme activities per unit of soil organic carbon (SOC) or microbial biomass carbon (MBC) involved in C, N, and P transformations and (2) their relationships with soil environmental factors and soil microbial community structures. The results showed that manure applications led to increases in the absolute and specific activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase(βG), β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The absolute and specific acid phosphatase (AP) activities decreased as mineral P fertilizer application rates and ratios increased. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that there were negative correlations between absolute and specific AP activities, pH, and total P contents, while there were positive correlations between soil absolute and specific βG, NAG, and LAP enzyme activities, and SOC and total N contents. RDA showed that the contents of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterium PLFA biomarkers are more closely related to the absolute and specific enzyme activities than the other PLFA biomarkers (Pfertilizer application rates to subtropical paddy soils should not exceed 44 kg P ha(-1) year(-1).

  13. 场景主动运动控制的非均匀性校正方法%Nonuniformity correction based on active movement-control of scene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昊; 刘振国; 胡晓梅; 卢进

    2011-01-01

    在分析IRFPA响应稳定性的基础上,针对现有的非均匀性校正方法的不足和实际工程需求,提出了一种自适应的基于场景主动运动控制的非均匀性校正方案.以传统的人工神经网络法(NN-NUC)为基础,针对其在实际应用中存在的不足进行了改进:加入了预校正环节降低固定图形噪声(FPN)、自适应的学习速率加快算法收敛速度、设置阈值识别场景静止以消除"鬼影",而且对场景进行了主动运动控制.针对算法进行功能和性能实验测试,结果表明:该方案可以有效地对非均匀性进行校正,主动控制方式提高了校正效率,加快了算法的收敛速度,能够有效地抑制"鬼影",获得了较好的校正效果,可以达到实用化的要求.%On the basis of analyzing IRFPA response stability, an adaptive scene-based nonuniformity correction (NUC) scheme, which could actively control the movement of scene, was presented according to the disadvantages of existing NUC algorithms and requirements of engineering applications. Aiming at the shortcomings of the artificial neural network nonuniformity correction (NN-NUC) algorithm, an improved NN-NUC algorithm was presented by adding reserved NUC to reduce the fixed pattern noise (FPN), designing adaptive step to accelerate convergence of algorithm coefficient, setting threshold to eliminate the "ghost" which can identify static scene. Active movement-control scheme not only improved existing NUC algorithms, but also actively controlled the movement of scene. The function and performance of the engineering scheme were tested. The test result indicates that the new scheme makes NUC more effective. Besides, active movement-control scheme completes convergence more rapidly than traditional scene-based NUC algorithms and suppresses the "ghost" phenomenon. Finally, the improved NN-NUC engineering scheme can satisfy the needs of project practicality.

  14. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  15. NITRIC OXIDE BINDS TO AND MODULATES THE ACTIVITY OF A POLLEN SPECIFIC ARABIDOPSIS DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO-sensors have remained somewhat elusive. Here, the findings of an NO-binding candidate, Arabidopsis thaliana DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE 4 (ATDGK4; AT5G57690) is presented. In addition to the annotated diacylglycerol kinase domain, this molecule also harbors a predicted heme-NO/oxygen (H-NOX) binding site and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain which have been identified based on the alignment of functionally conserved amino acid residues across species. A 3D model of the molecule was constructed, and from which the locations of the kinase catalytic center, the ATP-binding site, the GC and H-NOX domains were estimated. Docking of ATP to the kinase catalytic center was also modeled. The recombinant ATDGK4 demonstrated kinase activity in vitro, catalyzing the ATP-dependent conversion of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity was inhibited by the mammalian DAG kinase inhibitor R59949 and importantly also by the NO donors diethylamine NONOate (DEA NONOate) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Recombinant ATDGK4 also has GC activity in vitro, catalyzing the conversion of guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) to cGMP. The catalytic domains of ATDGK4 kinase and GC may be independently regulated since the kinase but not the GC, was inhibited by NO while Ca2+ only stimulates the GC. It is likely that the DAG kinase product, PA, causes the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores and Ca2+ in turn activates the GC domain of ATDGK4 through a feedback mechanism. Analysis of publicly available microarray data has revealed that ATDGK4 is highly expressed in the pollen. Here, the pollen tubes of mis-expressing atdgk4 recorded slower growth rates than the wild-type (Col-0) and importantly, they showed altered

  16. Motor Skill Development in Italian Pre-School Children Induced by Structured Activities in a Specific Playground

    OpenAIRE

    Patrizia Tortella; Monika Haga; Håvard Loras; Hermundur Sigmundsson; Guido Fumagalli

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects and specificity of structured and unstructured activities played at the playground Primo Sport 0246 in Northern Italy on motor skill competence in five years old children. The playground was specifically designed to promote gross motor skills in preschool children; in this study 71 children from local kindergartens came to the park once a week for ten consecutive weeks and were exposed to 30 minutes of free play and 30 minutes of structured activities. Before a...

  17. Impact of Physical Activity on Cancer-Specific and Overall Survival of Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetan Des Guetz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical activity (PA reduces incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC. Its influence on cancer-specific (CSS and overall survival (OS is controversial. Methods. We performed a literature-based meta-analysis (MA of observational studies, using keywords “colorectal cancer, physical activity, and survival” in PubMed and EMBASE. No dedicated MA was found in the Cochrane Library. References were cross-checked. Pre- and postdiagnosis PA levels were assessed by MET. Usually, “high” PA was higher than 17 MET hour/week. Hazard ratios (HRs for OS and CSS were calculated, with their 95% confidence interval. We used more conservative adjusted HRs, since variables of adjustment were similar between studies. When higher PA was associated with improved survival, HRs for detrimental events were set to <1. We used EasyMA software and fixed effect model whenever possible. Results. Seven studies (8056 participants were included, representing 3762 men and 4256 women, 5210 colon and 1745 rectum cancers. Mean age was 67 years. HR CSS for postdiagnosis PA (higher PA versus lower was 0.61 (0.44–0.86. The corresponding HR OS was 0.62 (0.54–0.71. HR CSS for prediagnosis PA was 0.75 (0.62–0.91. The corresponding HR OS was 0.74 (0.62–0.89. Conclusion. Higher PA predicted a better CSS. Sustained PA should be advised for CRC. OS also improved (reduced cardiovascular risk.

  18. Specific entrustable professional activities for undergraduate medical internships: a method compatible with the academic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia; Monterrosas-Rojas, Ana María; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando; Flores-Morones, Felipe; Torruco-García, Uri; Navarrete-Martínez, Andrea; Arrioja-Guerrero, Araceli

    2017-08-25

    Competency-based education has been considered the most important pedagogical trend in Medicine in the last two decades. In clinical contexts, competencies are implemented through Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) which are observable and measurable. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology used in the design of educational tools to assess students´ competencies in clinical practice during their undergraduate internship (UI). In this paper, we present the construction of specific APROCs (Actividades Profesionales Confiables) in Surgery (S), Gynecology and Obstetrics (GO) and Family Medicine (FM) rotations with three levels of performance. The study considered a mixed method exploratory type design, a qualitative phase followed by a quantitative validation exercise. In the first stage data was obtained from three rotations (FM, GO and S) through focus groups about real and expected activities of medical interns. Triangulation with other sources was made to construct benchmarks. In the second stage, narrative descriptions with the three levels were validated by professors who teach the different subjects using the Delphi technique. The results may be described both curricular and methodological wise. From the curricular point of view, APROCs were identified in three UI rotations within clinical contexts in Mexico City, benchmarks were developed by levels and validated by experts' consensus. In regard to methodological issues, this research contributed to the development of a strategy, following six steps, to build APROCs using mixed methods. Developing benchmarks provides a regular and standardized language that helps to evaluate student's performance and define educational strategies efficiently and accurately. The university academic program was aligned with APROCs in clinical contexts to assure the acquisition of competencies by students.

  19. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    KAUST Repository

    Rodrigo, María J.

    2013-09-04

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly ?-citraurin (3-hydroxy-?-apo-8?-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of ?-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in ?-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7?,8? double bond in zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin, confrming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7?,8? double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. The Author 2013.

  20. RNA-seq reveals activation of both common and cytokine-specific pathways following neutrophil priming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Wright

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are central to the pathology of inflammatory diseases, where they can damage host tissue through release of reactive oxygen metabolites and proteases, and drive inflammation via secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Many cytokines, such as those generated during inflammation, can induce a similar "primed" phenotype in neutrophils, but it is unknown if different cytokines utilise common or cytokine-specific pathways to induce these functional changes. Here, we describe the transcriptomic changes induced in control human neutrophils during priming in vitro with pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and GM-CSF using RNA-seq. Priming led to the rapid expression of a common set of transcripts for cytokines, chemokines and cell surface receptors (CXCL1, CXCL2, IL1A, IL1B, IL1RA, ICAM1. However, 580 genes were differentially regulated by TNF-α and GM-CSF treatment, and of these 58 were directly implicated in the control of apoptosis. While these two cytokines both delayed apoptosis, they induced changes in expression of different pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that these genes were regulated via differential activation of transcription factors by TNF-α and GM-CSF and these predictions were confirmed using functional assays: inhibition of NF-κB signalling abrogated the protective effect of TNF-α (but not that of GM-CSF on neutrophil apoptosis, whereas inhibition of JAK/STAT signalling abrogated the anti-apoptotic effect of GM-CSF, but not that of TNF-α (p<0.05. These data provide the first characterisation of the human neutrophil transcriptome following GM-CSF and TNF-α priming, and demonstrate the utility of this approach to define functional changes in neutrophils following cytokine exposure. This may provide an important, new approach to define the molecular properties of neutrophils after in vivo activation during inflammation.

  1. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  2. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy Gene in Nicotiana benthamiana Produces Active Phytase with Broad Specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Kyun Oh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A full-length phytase gene (phy of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5, an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F, the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs.

  3. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy gene in Nicotiana benthamiana produces active phytase with broad specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Kyun; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Park, Jae Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Jang, Kyung Min; Kim, Sei Chang; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Suk-Min; Jeong, Dong Kee; Udayakumar, Rajangam

    2014-09-03

    A full-length phytase gene (phy) of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa) was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa) was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5), an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs.

  4. Tissue-Specific Distribution of Ginsenosides in Different Aged Ginseng and Antioxidant Activity of Ginseng Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the effect of the cultivation year on the quality of different ginseng tissues. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of ginsenosides were conducted using a UPLC-UV-MS method. Eight main ginsenosides in three tissues (leaf, rhizome and main root and four parts (periderm, phloem, cambium and xylem of ginseng aged from 1 to 13 years were determined using a UPLC-PDA method. Additionally, the antioxidant capacities of ginseng leaves were analyzed by the DPPH, ABTS and HRSA methods. It was found that the contents of ginsenosides increased with cultivation years, causing a sequential content change of ginsenosides in an organ-specific manner: leaf > rhizome > main root. The ratio between protopanaxatriol (PPT, Rg1, Re and RF and protopanaxadiol (PPD, Rb1, Rb2, RC and Rd in the main root remained stable (about 1.0, while it increased in leaf from 1.37 to 3.14 and decreased in the rhizome from 0.99 to 0.72. The amount of ginsenosides accumulated in the periderm was 45.48 mg/g, which was more than twice as high compared with the other three parts. Furthermore, the antioxidant activities of ginseng leaves were measured as Trolox equivalents, showing that antioxidant activity increased along with time of cultivation. The results show that the best harvest time for shizhu ginseng is the fifth year of cultivation, and the root and rhizome could be used together within seven planting years for their similar PPT/PPD level. Besides, the quality of the ginseng products would be enhanced with the periderm. The ginseng leaf is rich in ginsenosides and has potential application for its antioxidant capacity.

  5. Determination of plasma lactic acid concentration and specific activity using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiberg, B; Steinberg, J J; Katz, S D; Wexler, J; LeJemtel, T

    1991-08-23

    Assessment of lactate metabolism is of particular interest during exercise and in disease states such as diabetes, shock, and absorptive abnormalities of short-chain fatty acids by the colon. We describe an analytical method that introduces radio-active tracers and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to simultaneously analyze concentrations and specific activities (SAs) of plasma lactate. The HPLC conditions included separation on a reversed-phase column (octadecylsilane) and an isocratic buffer (30% acetonitrile in water). [3H]Acetate served as an internal standard. Lactate and acetate were extracted from plasma samples with diethyl ether following a pH adjustment to less than 1.0 and back-extracted into a hydrophilic phase with sodium carbonate (2 mM, pH greater than 10.0). Lactate is detected in the ultraviolet range (242 and 320 nm) by derivatization with alpha-bromoacetophenone. Control plasma samples were studied after an overnight fast for precision and analytical recovery. Calibration curves were linear in the range 0.18-6.0 mM (r = 0.92). The precision was 3% and the analytical recovery was 87%. The detection limit of the method was 36 pmol. Determination of lactate metabolism was performed in a patient with chronic congestive heart failure who was administered primed-continuous L-[U-14C]lactate (10 microCi bolus and 0.3 microCi/min continuously) during a 60-min rest period. Mean arterial lactate concentration and SA were 1.69 +/- 0.2 mM and 253.8 +/- 22 dpm/mumol, respectively. Systemic lactate turnover was 25.65 mumol/kg per min. Lactic acid systemic turnover, organ uptake and release rates can be ac