WorldWideScience

Sample records for correct taxonomic identification

  1. Brine shrimp bioassay: importance of correct taxonomic identification of Artemia (Anostraca) species.

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    Ruebhart, David R; Cock, Ian E; Shaw, Glen R

    2008-08-01

    Despite the common use of the brine shrimp bioassay in toxicology, there is confusion in the literature regarding citation of the correct taxonomic identity of the Artemia species used. The genus Artemia, once thought to be represented by a single species Artemia salina, is now known to be composed of several bisexual species as well as parthenogenetic populations. Artemia franciscana is the best studied of the Artemia species and is considered to represent the vast majority of studies in which Artemia is used as an experimental test organism. We found that in studies referring to the use of A. salina, the zoogeography of the cyst harvest site indicated that the species used was actually A. franciscana. Those performing bioassays with Artemia need to exercise diligence in assigning correct species identification, as the identity of the test organism is an important parameter in assuring the validity of the results of the assay.

  2. Taxonomic scheme for the identification of marine bacteria

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    Oliver, James D.

    1982-06-01

    A recently developed taxonomic scheme for the identification of marine bacteria is presented. The scheme is based on numerous reviews and monographs on marine bacteria, as well as Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. While fairly extensive, the scheme is designed to identify marine bacteria using relatively few tests.

  3. WEVOTE: Weighted Voting Taxonomic Identification Method of Microbial Sequences

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    Metwally, Ahmed A.; Dai, Yang; Finn, Patricia W.; Perkins, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metagenome shotgun sequencing presents opportunities to identify organisms that may prevent or promote disease. The analysis of sample diversity is achieved by taxonomic identification of metagenomic reads followed by generating an abundance profile. Numerous tools have been developed based on different design principles. Tools achieving high precision can lack sensitivity in some applications. Conversely, tools with high sensitivity can suffer from low precision and require long computation time. Methods In this paper, we present WEVOTE (WEighted VOting Taxonomic idEntification), a method that classifies metagenome shotgun sequencing DNA reads based on an ensemble of existing methods using k-mer-based, marker-based, and naive-similarity based approaches. Our evaluation on fourteen benchmarking datasets shows that WEVOTE improves the classification precision by reducing false positive annotations while preserving a high level of sensitivity. Conclusions WEVOTE is an efficient and automated tool that combines multiple individual taxonomic identification methods to produce more precise and sensitive microbial profiles. WEVOTE is developed primarily to identify reads generated by MetaGenome Shotgun sequencing. It is expandable and has the potential to incorporate additional tools to produce a more accurate taxonomic profile. WEVOTE was implemented using C++ and shell scripting and is available at www.github.com/aametwally/WEVOTE. PMID:27683082

  4. Taxonomic identification of algae (morphological and molecular): species concepts, methodologies, and their implications for ecological bioassessment.

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    Manoylov, Kalina M

    2014-06-01

    Algal taxonomy is a key discipline in phycology and is critical for algal genetics, physiology, ecology, applied phycology, and particularly bioassessment. Taxonomic identification is the most common analysis and hypothesis-testing endeavor in science. Errors of identification are often related to the inherent problem of small organisms with morphologies that are difficult to distinguish without research-grade microscopes and taxonomic expertise in phycology. Proposed molecular approaches for taxonomic identification from environmental samples promise rapid, potentially inexpensive, and more thorough culture-independent identification of all algal species present in a sample of interest. Molecular identification has been used in biodiversity and conservation, but it also has great potential for applications in bioassessment. Comparisons of morphological and molecular identification of benthic algal communities are improved by the identification of more taxa; however, automated identification technology does not allow for the simultaneous analysis of thousands of samples. Currently, morphological identification is used to verify molecular taxonomic identities, but with the increased number of taxa verified in algal gene libraries, molecular identification will become a universal tool in biological studies. Thus, in this report, successful application of molecular techniques related to algal bioassessment is discussed.

  5. Selection and taxonomic identification of carotenoid-producing marine actinomycetes.

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    Romero, Francisco; Fernández-Chimeno, Rosa Isabel; de la Fuente, Juan Luis; Barredo, José-Luis

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids are important pigments produced by plants and many microorganisms, including fungi, microalgae, cyanobacteria, and bacteria. Marine actinomycetes are a group of bacteria that produce a variety of metabolites with economic potential. Here, we describe a general method of selecting marine actinomycetes as carotenoids' producers. The screening is carried out at two levels: the first one involves a quick selection of strains by visual color inspection, and the second consists in the analysis of the extracts by HPLC. The taxonomic analysis of the producing strains gives us an overview of the groups of actinomycetes in which carotenoids can be found.

  6. Phytoliths as Emerging Taxonomic Tools for Identification of Plants: An Overview

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    Sheikh Abdul Shakoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent advancements in identification of plant species, phytoliths have found an immense role in the identification of plants at different levels of taxonomic hierarchy. Many plant groups are known to accumulate silica in solid form in and between the cells and tissues and hence create the structures commonly known as phytoliths. These phytoliths create replicas of the structures where they are deposited. The shapes of phytolith replicas, their size dimensions (morphometric parameters, surface features (ornamentation, distribution, and orientation pattern in epidermal layers of vegetative and reproductive structures as well as their frequency are highly important for characterization of species. Monocotyledonous families particularly the family Poaceae (Gramineae are known to produce diverse phytolith types that can serve as diagnostic markers for characterization of different taxa at different levels of taxonomic hierarchy. The present paper highlights the importance of phytoliths in taxonomic analysis of plants particularly in the family Poaceae.

  7. Nomenclatural corrections to the taxonomic revision of The Old World species of Boehmeria (Urticaceae, tribus Boehmeriae) by Wilmot-Dear and Friis (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilmot-Dear, Christine Melanie; Friis, Ib; Govaerts, R. H. A.

    2014-01-01

    This nomenclatural note, a sequel to a recently published taxonomic revision of the Old World species of the genus Boehmeria (Urticaceae), establishes: (1) a holotype of B. maugeretii, synonym of taxon no. 8b in the revision (B. clidemioides var. diffusa), (2) B. 15 zollingeriana Wedd. var. blinii...... in the revision in synonymy of B. japonica (L. f.) Miq. and in an attached note, (4) a corrected synonymy 20 for B. splitgerbera Koidz. and the designation of a lectotype for Splitgerbera japonica Miq. and its nomenclatural synonyms, and (5) identifications of types for a number of excluded names: Boehmeria...

  8. Collaborative processes in species identification using an internet-based taxonomic resource

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    Kontkanen, Jani; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick; Hartikainen-Ahia, Anu; Åhlberg, Mauri

    2016-01-01

    Visual databases are increasingly important resources through which individuals and groups can undertake species identification. This paper reports research on the collaborative processes undertaken by pre-service teacher students when working in small groups to identify birds using an Internet-based taxonomic resource. The student groups are conceptualised as 'knowledge-building communities' working in a 'joint problem space' comprising the collective knowledge of the participants interacting with the taxonomic database. Collaborative group work and associated dialogue were recorded with digital video. The recordings were analysed for the categories of dialogue and the categories of knowledge used by the students as they interacted with the taxonomic database and how they drew on their previous experiences of identifying birds. The outcomes are discussed in the context of the interplay of individual and social processes and the interplay between abstraction and lived experience in the joint problem space.

  9. Towards Utilization of Neurofuzzy Systems for Taxonomic Identification Using Psittacines as a Case Study

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    Shahram Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Demonstration of the neurofuzzy application to the task of psittacine (parrot taxonomic identification is presented in this paper. In this work, NEFCLASS-J neurofuzzy system is utilized for classification of parrot data for 141 and 183 groupings, using 68 feature points or qualities. The reported results display classification accuracies of above 95%, which is strongly tied to the setting of certain parameters of the neurofuzzy system. Rule base sizes were in the range of 1,750 to 1,950 rules.

  10. An integrated approach to the taxonomic identification of prehistoric shell ornaments.

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    Beatrice Demarchi

    Full Text Available Shell beads appear to have been one of the earliest examples of personal adornments. Marine shells identified far from the shore evidence long-distance transport and imply networks of exchange and negotiation. However, worked beads lose taxonomic clues to identification, and this may be compounded by taphonomic alteration. Consequently, the significance of this key early artefact may be underestimated. We report the use of bulk amino acid composition of the stable intra-crystalline proteins preserved in shell biominerals and the application of pattern recognition methods to a large dataset (777 samples to demonstrate that taxonomic identification can be achieved at genus level. Amino acid analyses are fast (<2 hours per sample and micro-destructive (sample size <2 mg. Their integration with non-destructive techniques provides a valuable and affordable tool, which can be used by archaeologists and museum curators to gain insight into early exploitation of natural resources by humans. Here we combine amino acid analyses, macro- and microstructural observations (by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy to try to identify the raw material used for beads discovered at the Early Bronze Age site of Great Cornard (UK. Our results show that at least two shell taxa were used and we hypothesise that these were sourced locally.

  11. An integrated approach to the Taxonomic identification of prehistoric shell ornaments

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    Demarchi, Beatrice; O'Connor, Sonia; Ponzoni, Andre de Lima; Ponzoni, Raquel de Almeida Roch; Sheridan, Alison; Penkman, Kirsty; Hancock, Y.; Wilson, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Shell beads appear to have been one of the earliest examples of personal adornments. Marine shells identified far from the shore evidence long-distance transport and imply networks of exchange and negotiation. However, worked beads lose taxonomic clues to identification, and this may be compounded by taphonomic alteration. Consequently, the significance of this key early artefact may be underestimated. We report the use of bulk amino acid composition of the stable intra-crystalline proteins preserved in shell biominerals and the application of pattern recognition methods to a large dataset (777 samples) to demonstrate that taxonomic identification can be achieved at genus level. Amino acid analyses are fast (<2 hours per sample) and micro-destructive (sample size <2 mg). Their integration with non-destructive techniques provides a valuable and affordable tool, which can be used by archaeologists and museum curators to gain insight into early exploitation of natural resources by humans. Here we combine amino acid analyses, macro- and microstructural observations (by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and Raman spectroscopy to try to identify the raw material used for beads discovered at the Early Bronze Age site of Great Cornard (UK). Our results show that at least two shell taxa were used and we hypothesise that these were sourced locally.

  12. The Bias-Corrected Taxonomic Distribution of Mission-Accessible Small Near-Earth Objects

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    Hinkle, Mary L.; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Trilling, David; Binzel, Richard P.; Thomas, Cristina; Christensen, Eric; DeMeo, Francesca; Person, Michael J.; Polishook, David; Willman, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Although they are thought to compose the majority of the Near-Earth object (NEO) population, the small (d GMOS at Gemini North & South observatories as well as the DeVeny spectrograph at Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope. Archival data of 43 objects from the MIT-UH-IRTF Joint Campaign for NEO Spectral Reconnaissance (PI R. Binzel) were also used. Taxonomic classifications were obtained by fitting our spectra to the mean reflectance spectra of the Bus asteroid taxonomy (Bus & Binzel 2002). Small NEAs are the likely progenitors of meteorites; an improved understanding of the abundance of meteorite parent body types in the NEO population improves understanding of how the two populations are related as well as the biases Earth's atmosphere imposes upon the meteorite collection.We present classifications for these objects as well as results for the debiased distribution of taxa(as a proxy for composition) as a function of object size and compare to the observed fractions of ordinary chondritemeteorites and asteroids with d > 1 km. Amongst the smallest NEOs we find an unexpected distribution of taxonomic types that differs from both large NEOs and meteorites.We acknowledge funding support from NASA NEOO grant number NNX14AN82G.

  13. Taxonomic corrections to species of Rhyparochromidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) described by Carl Peter Thunberg.

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    Kondorosy, Előd; Rédei, Dávid; Mejlon, Hans

    2014-07-22

    Types of Rhyparochromidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Lygaeoidea) species described by Carl Peter Thunberg, deposited in the Museum of Evolution (formerly Zoologiska Institut), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, were reexamined and the taxonomic and nomenclatural problems that existed among those species discussed and resolved as required. Lectotypes are designated for Cimex caffer Thunberg, 1784, Lygaeus ater Thunberg, 1822, Lygaeus biguttatus Thunberg, 1822, and Pendulinus guttatus Thunberg, 1825. The lectotype of Pendulinus (now Metochus) guttatus is designated as neotype of Pendulinus (now Metochus) uniguttatus Thunberg, 1822; as a result the former name becomes junior objective synonym of the latter. The following taxonomic changes are proposed: Lethaeus ater (Thunberg, 1822), new combination (from Lygaeus); Migdilybs biguttatus (Thunberg, 1822), new combination (from Lygaeus) = Migdilybs furcifer Hesse, 1925, new subjective synonym; Metochus uniguttatus (Thunberg, 1822) = Metochus bengalensis (Dallas, 1852), confirmed subjective synonym = Metochus yeh (Dohrn, 1860), confirmed subjective synonym; Raglius alboacuminatus (Goeze, 1778) = Cimex caffer Thunberg, 1874, confirmed subjective synonym. Lethaeus barberi Slater, 1964 does not belong to Lethaeus Dallas, 1852 but currently it cannot be placed with confidence in any existing genus. 

  14. Streptococcal Diversity of Human Milk and Comparison of Different Methods for the Taxonomic Identification of Streptococci.

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    Martín, Virginia; Mediano, Pilar; Del Campo, Rosa; Rodríguez, Juan M; Marín, María

    2016-11-01

    The genus Streptococcus is 1 of the dominant bacterial groups in human milk, but the taxonomic identification of some species remains difficult. The objective of this study was to investigate the discriminatory ability of different methods to identify streptococcal species in order to perform an assessment of the streptococcal diversity of human milk microbiota as accurately as possible. The identification of 105 streptococcal strains from human milk was performed by 16S rRNA, tuf, and sodA gene sequencing, phylogenetic analysis, and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus parasanguinis were the streptococcal dominant species in the human milk microbiota. Sequencing of housekeeping genes allowed the classification of 96.2% (16S rRNA), 84.8% ( sodA), and 88.6% ( tuf) of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed 3 main streptococcal clusters corresponding with the mitis (73 isolates), salivarius (29), mutans (1)-pyogenic (2) groups, but many of the mitis group isolates (36) could not be assigned to any species. The application of the MALDI-TOF Bruker Biotyper system resulted in the identification of 56 isolates (53.33%) at the species level, but it could not discriminate between S pneumoniae and S mitis isolates, in contrast to the Vitek-MS system. There was a good agreement among the different methods assessed in this study to identify those isolates of the salivarius, mutans, and pyogenic groups, whereas unambiguous discrimination could not be achieved concerning some species of the mitis group ( S mitis, S pneumoniae, S pseudopneumoniae, S oralis).

  15. Identification and conservation application of signal, noise, and taxonomic effects in diversity patterns

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    Fleishman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing research on butterflies and birds in the Great Basin has identified biogeographic patterns while elucidating how dynamic measures of diversity (species richness and turnover affect inferences for conservation planning and adaptive management. Nested subsets analyses suggested that processes influencing predictability of assemblage composition differ among taxonomic groups, and the relative importance of those processes may vary spatially within a taxonomic group. There may be a time lag between deterministic environmental changes and a detectable faunal response, even for taxonomic groups that are known to be sensitive to changes in climate and land cover. Measures of beta diversity were sensitive to correlations between sampling resolution and local environmental heterogeneity. Temporal and spatial variation in species composition indicated that spatially extensive sampling is more effective for drawing inferences about biodiversity responses to environmental change than intensive sampling at relatively few, smaller sites.

  16. Calibrating snakehead diversity with DNA barcodes: expanding taxonomic coverage to enable identification of potential and established invasive species.

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    Natasha R Serrao

    Full Text Available Detecting and documenting the occurrence of invasive species outside their native range requires tools to support their identification. This can be challenging for taxa with diverse life stages and/or problematic or unresolved morphological taxonomies. DNA barcoding provides a potent method for identifying invasive species, as it allows for species identification at all life stages, including fragmentary remains. It also provides an efficient interim taxonomic framework for quantifying cryptic genetic diversity by parsing barcode sequences into discontinuous haplogroup clusters (typical of reproductively isolated species and labelling them with unique alphanumeric identifiers. Snakehead fishes are a diverse group of opportunistic predators endemic to Asia and Africa that may potentially pose significant threats as aquatic invasive species. At least three snakehead species (Channa argus, C. maculata, and C. marulius are thought to have entered North America through the aquarium and live-food fish markets, and have established populations, yet their origins remain unclear. The objectives of this study were to assemble a library of DNA barcode sequences derived from expert identified reference specimens in order to determine the identity and aid invasion pathway analysis of the non-indigenous species found in North America using DNA barcodes. Sequences were obtained from 121 tissue samples representing 25 species and combined with public records from GenBank for a total of 36 putative species, which then partitioned into 49 discrete haplogroups. Multiple divergent clusters were observed within C. gachua, C. marulius, C. punctata and C. striata suggesting the potential presence of cryptic species diversity within these lineages. Our findings demonstrate that DNA barcoding is a valuable tool for species identification in challenging and under-studied taxonomic groups such as snakeheads, and provides a useful framework for inferring invasion pathway

  17. Calibrating snakehead diversity with DNA barcodes: expanding taxonomic coverage to enable identification of potential and established invasive species.

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    Serrao, Natasha R; Steinke, Dirk; Hanner, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Detecting and documenting the occurrence of invasive species outside their native range requires tools to support their identification. This can be challenging for taxa with diverse life stages and/or problematic or unresolved morphological taxonomies. DNA barcoding provides a potent method for identifying invasive species, as it allows for species identification at all life stages, including fragmentary remains. It also provides an efficient interim taxonomic framework for quantifying cryptic genetic diversity by parsing barcode sequences into discontinuous haplogroup clusters (typical of reproductively isolated species) and labelling them with unique alphanumeric identifiers. Snakehead fishes are a diverse group of opportunistic predators endemic to Asia and Africa that may potentially pose significant threats as aquatic invasive species. At least three snakehead species (Channa argus, C. maculata, and C. marulius) are thought to have entered North America through the aquarium and live-food fish markets, and have established populations, yet their origins remain unclear. The objectives of this study were to assemble a library of DNA barcode sequences derived from expert identified reference specimens in order to determine the identity and aid invasion pathway analysis of the non-indigenous species found in North America using DNA barcodes. Sequences were obtained from 121 tissue samples representing 25 species and combined with public records from GenBank for a total of 36 putative species, which then partitioned into 49 discrete haplogroups. Multiple divergent clusters were observed within C. gachua, C. marulius, C. punctata and C. striata suggesting the potential presence of cryptic species diversity within these lineages. Our findings demonstrate that DNA barcoding is a valuable tool for species identification in challenging and under-studied taxonomic groups such as snakeheads, and provides a useful framework for inferring invasion pathway analysis.

  18. [Molecular taxonomic identification of Trichinella spp. from the Arctic coasts of the Russian Federation].

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    Odoevskaia, I M; Bukina, L A; Khiliuta, N V; Spiridonov, S É

    2013-01-01

    Epizootological surveys on the Arctic coasts of the Russian Federation revealed 8 terrestrial andmarine mammal species that were Trichinella carriers. The infection rate varied with the animal species from 1.6 to 92.8%. Analysis of the taxonomic affiliation of Trichinella isolated from the muscles of the terrestrial and marine mammals indicated that the Trichinella species T. nativa was widespread in the arctic areas of the Russian Federation. Analysis of sequences in the Cob gene of mtDNA revealed nucleotide differences between several isolates of this species.

  19. Identification of teratogenic polymethoxy-1-alkenes from Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, and taxonomically diverse freshwater cyanobacteria and green algae.

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    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Saez, Christopher; Sanchez, Kristel; Gantar, Miroslav; Berry, John P

    2015-11-01

    Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is among the most commonly recognized toxigenic cyanobacteria associated with harmful algal blooms (HAB) in freshwater systems, and specifically associated with multiple water-soluble toxins. Lipophilic metabolites from C. raciborskii, however, were previously shown to exert teratogenicity (i.e. inhibition of vertebrate development) in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model, specifically suggesting the presence of additional bioactive compounds unrelated to the currently known toxins. In the present study, a series of known teratogenic polymethoxy-1-alkenes (PMA) were identified, purified and chemically characterized from an otherwise well-characterized strain of toxigenic C. raciborskii. Although PMA have been previously identified in other cyanobacteria, this is the first time they have been identified from this recognized HAB species. Following their identification from C. raciborskii, the taxonomic distribution of the PMA was additionally investigated by chemical screening of a freshwater algal (i.e. cyanobacteria, green algal) culture collection. Screening suggests that these compounds are distributed among phylogenetically diverse taxa. Furthermore, parallel screening of the algal culture collection, using the zebrafish embryo model of teratogenicity, the presence of PMA was found to closely correlate with developmental toxicity of these diverse algal isolates. Taken together, the data suggest PMA contribute to the toxicity of C. raciborskii, as well as apparently several other taxonomically disparate cyanobacterial and green algal genera, and may, accordingly, contribute to the toxicity of diverse freshwater HAB.

  20. Barcoding the largest animals on Earth: ongoing challenges and molecular solutions in the taxonomic identification of ancient cetaceans

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    Speller, Camilla; van den Hurk, Youri; Charpentier, Anne; Rodrigues, Ana; Gardeisen, Armelle; Wilkens, Barbara; McGrath, Krista; Rowsell, Keri; Spindler, Luke; Collins, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few centuries, many cetacean species have witnessed dramatic global declines due to industrial overharvesting and other anthropogenic influences, and thus are key targets for conservation. Whale bones recovered from archaeological and palaeontological contexts can provide essential baseline information on the past geographical distribution and abundance of species required for developing informed conservation policies. Here we review the challenges with identifying whale bones through traditional anatomical methods, as well as the opportunities provided by new molecular analyses. Through a case study focused on the North Sea, we demonstrate how the utility of this (pre)historic data is currently limited by a lack of accurate taxonomic information for the majority of ancient cetacean remains. We then discuss current opportunities presented by molecular identification methods such as DNA barcoding and collagen peptide mass fingerprinting (zooarchaeology by mass spectrometry), and highlight the importance of molecular identifications in assessing ancient species’ distributions through a case study focused on the Mediterranean. We conclude by considering high-throughput molecular approaches such as hybridization capture followed by next-generation sequencing as cost-effective approaches for enhancing the ecological informativeness of these ancient sample sets. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481784

  1. Quality score based identification and correction of pyrosequencing errors.

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    Iyer, Shyamala; Bouzek, Heather; Deng, Wenjie; Larsen, Brendan; Casey, Eleanor; Mullins, James I

    2013-01-01

    Massively-parallel DNA sequencing using the 454/pyrosequencing platform allows in-depth probing of diverse sequence populations, such as within an HIV-1 infected individual. Analysis of this sequence data, however, remains challenging due to the shorter read lengths relative to that obtained by Sanger sequencing as well as errors introduced during DNA template amplification and during pyrosequencing. The ability to distinguish real variation from pyrosequencing errors with high sensitivity and specificity is crucial to interpreting sequence data. We introduce a new algorithm, CorQ (Correction through Quality), which utilizes the inherent base quality in a sequence-specific context to correct for homopolymer and non-homopolymer insertion and deletion (indel) errors. CorQ also takes uneven read mapping into account for correcting pyrosequencing miscall errors and it identifies and corrects carry forward errors. We tested the ability of CorQ to correctly call SNPs on a set of pyrosequences derived from ten viral genomes from an HIV-1 infected individual, as well as on six simulated pyrosequencing datasets generated using non-zero error rates to emulate errors introduced by PCR. When combined with the AmpliconNoise error correction method developed to remove ambiguities in signal intensities, we attained a 97% reduction in indel errors, a 98% reduction in carry forward errors, and >97% specificity of SNP detection. When compared to four other error correction methods, AmpliconNoise+CorQ performed at equal or higher SNP identification specificity, but the sensitivity of SNP detection was consistently higher (>98%) than other methods tested. This combined procedure will therefore permit examination of complex genetic populations with improved accuracy.

  2. A molecular approach towards taxonomic identification of elasmobranch species from Maltese fisheries landings.

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    Vella, Adriana; Vella, Noel; Schembri, Sarah

    2017-09-08

    The mitochondrial genome, through the application of DNA barcoding, provides a powerful tool for identifying species even when specimens are either incomplete or belong to species that exhibit cryptic diversity. In fisheries management accurate identification of whole or part of the specimens landed is a fundamental requirement for the conservation of species affected directly or indirectly by the fisheries activities. In this study cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) sequences were used to genetically distinguish 36 elasmobranch species collected from Maltese (Central Mediterranean) commercial fisheries landings. Each species was analysed using these two mtDNA loci where COI (610bp) and ND2 (990bp) efficiently distinguished between the various species studied, leading to the identification of 101 haplotypes, with the intraspecific p-distance ranging between 0 and 0.75% (mean 0.10%, SD ±0.13%). This study enhances the molecular data available on elasmobranchs by providing new ND2 sequences for various species, while providing both COI and ND2 data for poorly studied Mediterranean species including: the large pelagic sharks Alopias vulpinus, A. superciliosus, Carcharhinus altimus, C. plumbeus, Carcharadon carcharias, Isurus oxyrinchus, Prionace glauca and Odontaspis ferox; the smaller demersal sharks Somniosus rostratus, Squatina aculeata, S. oculata and Squalus sp.; and the endemic stingray Dasyatis tortonesei. It also confirmed the landings of species whose identification relies strongly on molecular tools, namely Squalus sp. and D. tortonesei, which are both first confirmed records amongst Maltese fisheries landings. Morphologically, the latter two species, can be easily misidentified with S. blainville and D. pastinaca respectively. Additionally, this study evaluated the genetic differences between different polychromatic forms of Raja clavata, R. radula and Dipturus oxyrinchus. Based on the currently analysed specimens

  3. The SPECIES and ORGANISMS Resources for Fast and Accurate Identification of Taxonomic Names in Text

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    Pafilis, Evangelos; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Fanini, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The exponential growth of the biomedical literature is making the need for efficient, accurate text-mining tools increasingly clear. The identification of named biological entities in text is a central and difficult task. We have developed an efficient algorithm and implementation of a dictionary......-based approach to named entity recognition, which we here use to identify names of species and other taxa in text. The tool, SPECIES, is more than an order of magnitude faster and as accurate as existing tools. The precision and recall was assessed both on an existing gold-standard corpus and on a new corpus...

  4. Molecular and biochemical taxonomic tools for the identification and classification of plant-pathogenic Penicillium species

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    Mohamed A. Mahmoud

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Five species of Penicillium (Penicillium chrysogenum, P. funiculosum, P. griseofulvum, P. implicatum and P. oxalicum are implicated in seed-borne diseases. Here, we report the discovery of molecular markers based on the internal transcribed spacer regions of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA, which are described as primary DNA barcode markers of fungi, for rapid diagnosis and early detection of Penicillium spp. The present markers are expected to be useful for the prevention of seedling and systemic plant diseases associated with Penicillium spp. Our findings, which provide valuable insights into the taxonomy of Penicillium spp., should contribute to improve safety of agricultural produce, thereby protecting both humans and animals from harmful food contaminants such as mycotoxins. In addition, we examined the cellular fatty acid composition of five species of Penicillium. The species studied were found to possess similar fatty acid composition; however, they differed in terms of relative concentration. The principal fatty acids were oleic acid (C18:1 and linoleic acid (C18:2, comprising 80% or more of the total fatty acid composition of these species. These fatty acid profiles may be useful for characterization and identification of fungi. Data derived from the present study highlight the importance of using polyphasic methods for accurate species-level identification of Penicillium.

  5. Corrections in the taxonomic position in the helminth-fauna of Apodemus spp. (Rodentia in the Czech Republic

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    František Tenora

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1955 as yet in the territory of the Czech Republic in 4 species of the genus Apodemus (namely A. flavicollis, A. sylvaticus, A. microps and A. agrarius, 49 species of parasitic worms were registered in total. At their revision, comparing with the modern literature from the last five decades, the author has approached to several corrections. Subjects are, first of all, several opinions on the species from the genera Plagiorchis, Echinostoma, Aprostatandrya, Catenotaenia, Hymenolepis, Syphacia, Heligmosomum, Heligmosomoides, Ganguleterakis and Aonchotheca. Of highly characteristic helminths parasitizing Apodemus spp. in Czech Republic, they are from the class Trematoda: Brachylaemus recurvus; from the class Cestoda: Paranoplocephala omphalodes, Skrjabinotaenia lobata, Catenotaenia sp., Hymenolepis straminea; from the class Nematoda: Syphacia stroma, S. frederici, S. agraria, Heligmosomum pseudocostellatum, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Aonchotheca murissylvatici, Calodium hepaticum, Trichocephalus muris; from the class Acanthocephala: Moniliformis moniliformis. A number of species has to be verified, in a future, by methods of molecular biology.

  6. From GenBank to GBIF: Phylogeny-Based Predictive Niche Modeling Tests Accuracy of Taxonomic Identifications in Large Occurrence Data Repositories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Eugene Smith

    Full Text Available Accuracy of taxonomic identifications is crucial to data quality in online repositories of species occurrence data, such as the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF, which have accumulated several hundred million records over the past 15 years. These data serve as basis for large scale analyses of macroecological and biogeographic patterns and to document environmental changes over time. However, taxonomic identifications are often unreliable, especially for non-vascular plants and fungi including lichens, which may lack critical revisions of voucher specimens. Due to the scale of the problem, restudy of millions of collections is unrealistic and other strategies are needed. Here we propose to use verified, georeferenced occurrence data of a given species to apply predictive niche modeling that can then be used to evaluate unverified occurrences of that species. Selecting the charismatic lichen fungus, Usnea longissima, as a case study, we used georeferenced occurrence records based on sequenced specimens to model its predicted niche. Our results suggest that the target species is largely restricted to a narrow range of boreal and temperate forest in the Northern Hemisphere and that occurrence records in GBIF from tropical regions and the Southern Hemisphere do not represent this taxon, a prediction tested by comparison with taxonomic revisions of Usnea for these regions. As a novel approach, we employed Principal Component Analysis on the environmental grid data used for predictive modeling to visualize potential ecogeographical barriers for the target species; we found that tropical regions conform a strong barrier, explaining why potential niches in the Southern Hemisphere were not colonized by Usnea longissima and instead by morphologically similar species. This approach is an example of how data from two of the most important biodiversity repositories, GenBank and GBIF, can be effectively combined to remotely address the problem

  7. Taxonomic identification of mediterranean pines and their hybrids based on the high resolution melting (HRM and trnL approaches: from cytoplasmic inheritance to timber tracing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Ganopoulos

    Full Text Available Fast and accurate detection of plant species and their hybrids using molecular tools will facilitate the assessment and monitoring of local biodiversity in an era of climate and environmental change. Herein, we evaluate the utility of the plastid trnL marker for species identification applied to Mediterranean pines (Pinus spp.. Our results indicate that trnL is a very sensitive marker for delimiting species biodiversity. Furthermore, High Resolution Melting (HRM analysis was exploited as a molecular fingerprint for fast and accurate discrimination of Pinus spp. DNA sequence variants. The trnL approach and the HRM analyses were extended to wood samples of two species (Pinus nigra and Pinus sylvestris with excellent results, congruent to those obtained using leaf tissue. Both analyses demonstrate that hybrids from the P. brutia (maternal parent × P. halepensis (paternal parent cross, exhibit the P. halepensis profile, confirming paternal plastid inheritance in Group Halepensis pines. Our study indicates that a single one-step reaction method and DNA marker are sufficient for the identification of Mediterranean pines, their hybrids and the origin of pine wood. Furthermore, our results underline the potential for certain DNA regions to be used as novel biological information markers combined with existing morphological characters and suggest a relatively reliable and open taxonomic system that can link DNA variation to phenotype-based species or hybrid assignment status and direct taxa identification from recalcitrant tissues such as wood samples.

  8. Taxonomic identification, phenanthrene uptake activity, and membrane lipid alterations of the PAH degrading Arthrobacter sp. strain Sphe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallimanis, A.; Drainas, C.; Koukkou, A.I. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Sector of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry; Frillingos, S. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Lab. of Biological Chemistry

    2007-09-15

    This report describes phenanthrene uptake as well as the effect of phenanthrene on the membrane phospholipid and fatty acid composition in a newly isolated bacterial strain, Sphe3, that we taxonomically identified as Arthrobacter sp. Strain Sphe3 is able to utilize phenanthrene as a carbon source at high rates and appears to internalize phenanthrene with two mechanisms: a passive diffusion when cells are grown on glucose, and an inducible active transport system when cells are grown on phenanthrene as a sole carbon source. Active transport followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and it was amenable to inhibition by 2,4-dinitrophenol and sodium azide. Evidence provided here indicates that apart from inducing an active PAH uptake, the presence of phenanthrene elicits significant changes in membrane fluidity.

  9. Nomenclatural corrections to the taxonomic revision of The Old World species of Boehmeria (Urticaceae, tribus Boehmeriae) by Wilmot-Dear and Friis (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilmot-Dear, Christine Melanie; Friis, Ib; Govaerts, R. H. A.

    2014-01-01

    This nomenclatural note, a sequel to a recently published taxonomic revision of the Old World species of the genus Boehmeria (Urticaceae), establishes: (1) a holotype of B. maugeretii, synonym of taxon no. 8b in the revision (B. clidemioides var. diffusa), (2) B. 15 zollingeriana Wedd. var. blini...

  10. Nomenclatural corrections to the taxonomic revision of The Old World species of Boehmeria (Urticaceae, tribus Boehmerieae) by Wilmot-Dear & Friis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilmot-Dear, C.M.; Friis, I.; Govaerts, R.H.A.

    2014-01-01

    This nomenclatural note, a sequel to a recently published taxonomic revision of the Old World species of the genus Boehmeria (Urticaceae), establishes: 1) a holotype of B. maugereti, synonym of taxon no. 8b in the revision (B. clidemioides var. diffusa); 2) B. zollingeriana Wedd. var. blinii (H.Lév.

  11. Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.].......[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.]....

  12. Taxonomic novelties in Plantago section Virginica (Plantaginaceae) and an updated identification key

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassemer, Gustavo; Trevisan, Rafael; Meudt, Heidi;

    2015-01-01

    This study raises two rather poorly understood subspecies to the rank of species, and revalidates two subspecies in Plantago (Plantaginaceae) section Virginica. Plantago napiformis, formerly P. tomentosa subsp. napiformis, is an uncommon species from grasslands in northeastern Argentina, southern...... an updated identification key to all 22 Plantago species and subspecies in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and northeastern Argentina....

  13. A Taxonomic Search Engine: Federating taxonomic databases using web services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Roderic DM

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The taxonomic name of an organism is a key link between different databases that store information on that organism. However, in the absence of a single, comprehensive database of organism names, individual databases lack an easy means of checking the correctness of a name. Furthermore, the same organism may have more than one name, and the same name may apply to more than one organism. Results The Taxonomic Search Engine (TSE is a web application written in PHP that queries multiple taxonomic databases (ITIS, Index Fungorum, IPNI, NCBI, and uBIO and summarises the results in a consistent format. It supports "drill-down" queries to retrieve a specific record. The TSE can optionally suggest alternative spellings the user can try. It also acts as a Life Science Identifier (LSID authority for the source taxonomic databases, providing globally unique identifiers (and associated metadata for each name. Conclusion The Taxonomic Search Engine is available at http://darwin.zoology.gla.ac.uk/~rpage/portal/ and provides a simple demonstration of the potential of the federated approach to providing access to taxonomic names.

  14. 34 CFR 200.37 - Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... no later than 14 calendar days before, the start of the school year so that parents have adequate time to exercise their choice option before the school year begins. (5)(i) If the school is in its... Lea and School Improvement § 200.37 Notice of identification for improvement, corrective action,...

  15. Dichotomous electrophoretic taxonomic key for identification of sibling species A, B, and C of the Anopheles quadrimaculatus complex (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, S K; Kaiser, P E; Seawright, J A

    1989-03-01

    Samples of 17 populations of Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say from Florida, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, New York, and New Jersey were analyzed for genetic variability at 33 enzyme loci. Statistical analysis of electromorph frequency distributions indicated that sympatric sibling (morphologically indistinguishable) species occurred in about 59% of the populations tested. The association of polytene chromosome and electrophoretic patterns of individual field-collected females confirmed species-specific diagnostic allozymes, which were useful in identifying sibling species A, B, and C and in estimating the proportions of each species at the 17 collection sites. A dichotomous electrophoretic key is presented for the identification of sibling species of the An. quadrimaculatus complex. The electrophoretic method is better than the ovarian polytene chromosome method, because mosquitoes of both sexes and females irrespective of their gonotrophic condition can be identified.

  16. Identification and Correction for MT Static Shift Using TEM Inversion Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The inversion of TEM data, using the observed magnetic fields instead of that of apparent resistivities data in this paper, avoids the errors caused by the definition of the apparent resistivity. The inversed results by fitting the magnetic fields of the transmitter sources image with the observed magnetic fields are relalively less affected by the conductivity inhomogeneity. The MT apparent curve is calculated on the basis of the conductivity model constructed from the TEM inversion results. This curve is used as a reference curve for the correction of MT static shift, which makes the correction more reliable.Meanwhile, the domain transformation is also achieved from time to frequency between the two kinds of electromaguetic data. Therefore, the correction of the MT static shift is actualized using TEM inversion method, The corresponding application research shows that this method is very effective for the identification and correction of the MT static shift.``

  17. Faults Identification and Corrective Actions in Rotating Machinery at Rated Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Bachschmid

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Malfunction identification in rotor systems by means of a model based approach in the frequency domain during long lasting speed transients (coast-down procedures in large turbo-generators, where a huge amount of vibration data at different rotating speeds is usually collected, has proved to be very effective. This paper explores the possibility to adapt this method to the situation when the vibration data are available at one rotating speed only, which in real machines is generally the normal operating speed. It results that single speed fault identification can be successful, but does not allow to discriminate between different malfunctions that generate similar symptoms. Neverthless the identification results can be used to define corrective balancing masses.

  18. Biopsy site selfies--a quality improvement pilot study to assist with correct surgical site identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Lee, Erica H; Nehal, Kishwer S

    2015-04-01

    Determining the biopsy site location of a skin cancer before treatment is often challenging. To study the implementation and effectiveness of biopsy site selfies as a quality improvement measure for correct surgical site identification. In the first phase, the ability of dermatologic surgeon and patient to definitively identify the biopsy site and whether photography was needed to ensure site agreement were recorded. In the second phase, patients were requested to take biopsy site selfies, and after implementation, similar data were collected including whether a biopsy site selfie was helpful for definitive site identification. In the first phase, the physician and patient were unable to identify the biopsy site 17.6% (49/278) and 25.5% (71/278) of cases, respectively. A photograph was needed in 22.7% of cases (63/278). After implementation of biopsy site selfies, the physician and patient were unable to identify the biopsy site 17.4% (23/132) and 15.2% (20/132) of cases, respectively. Biopsy site selfies were available for 64.1% of cases for which no internal image was available and critical for site identification in 21.4% of these cases. Biopsy site selfies has proven to be helpful for correct surgical site identification by both the physician and the patient and may also provide further reassurance and confidence for patients.

  19. Correction

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  20. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  1. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Gorelik, G., & Shackelford, T.K. (2011. Human sexual conflict from molecules to culture. Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 564–587: The authors wish to correct an omission in citation to the existing literature. In the final paragraph on p. 570, we neglected to cite Burch and Gallup (2006 [Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2006. The psychobiology of human semen. In S. M. Platek & T. K. Shackelford (Eds., Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty (pp. 141–172. New York: Cambridge University Press.]. Burch and Gallup (2006 reviewed the relevant literature on FSH and LH discussed in this paragraph, and should have been cited accordingly. In addition, Burch and Gallup (2006 should have been cited as the originators of the hypothesis regarding the role of FSH and LH in the semen of rapists. The authors apologize for this oversight.

  2. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  3. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In the article by Quintavalle et al (Quintavalle C, Anselmi CV, De Micco F, Roscigno G, Visconti G, Golia B, Focaccio A, Ricciardelli B, Perna E, Papa L, Donnarumma E, Condorelli G, Briguori C. Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2015;8:e002673. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.115.002673.), which published online September 2, 2015, and appears in the September 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed. On page 1, the institutional affiliation for Elvira Donnarumma, PhD, “SDN Foundation,” has been changed to read, “IRCCS SDN, Naples, Italy.” The institutional affiliation for Laura Papa, PhD, “Institute for Endocrinology and Experimental Oncology, National Research Council, Naples, Italy,” has been changed to read, “Institute of Genetics and Biomedical Research, Milan Unit, Milan, Italy” and “Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy.” The authors regret this error.

  4. Sensor-fingerprint based identification of images corrected for lens distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goljan, Miroslav; Fridrich, Jessica

    2012-03-01

    Computational photography is quickly making its way from research labs to the market. Recently, camera manufacturers started using in-camera lens-distortion correction of the captured image to give users more powerful range of zoom in compact and affordable cameras. Since the distortion correction (barrel/pincushion) depends on the zoom, it desynchronizes the pixel-to-pixel correspondence between images taken at two different focal lengths. This poses a serious problem for digital forensic methods that utilize the concept of sensor fingerprint (photo-response non-uniformity), such as "image ballistic" techniques that can match an image to a specific camera. Such techniques may completely fail. This paper presents an extension of sensor-based camera identification to images corrected for lens distortion. To reestablish synchronization between an image and the fingerprint, we adopt a barrel distortion model and search for its parameter to maximize the detection statistic, which is the peak to correlation energy ratio. The proposed method is tested on hundreds of images from three compact cameras to prove the viability of the approach and demonstrate its efficiency.

  5. Taxonomic studies of Phlebotomus sergenti(parrot)(dip-tera:psychodidae)and its evolutionary relationship with its closest allies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juma Khan Kakarsulemankhel

    2008-01-01

    In the survey,the work was done to develop taxonomic record of sand fly Phlebotomus (paaphlebotomus)ser-genti (Parrot)collected for the first time from new epidemic localities of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan).In view of the published reports about the detection of Leishmania major,the causative a-gent of cutaneous leishmaniasis from this species in many countries,the correct identification of this species becomes of significant value in the study of epidemiology of leishmaniasis.Therefore,in order to facilitate zool-ogists and medical researchers in its correct identification,taxonomic characters of P.sergenti (parrot)is studied in details with special reference to its mouth parts,male and female genitalia.A key is also given to P. sergentii (parrot)and its closest allies.In this light its relationships with its closest allies is also briefly dis-cussed.

  6. A Falsification of the Citation Impediment in the Taxonomic Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Florian M.; Pautasso, Marco; Zettel, Herbert; Moder, Karl; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C.

    2015-01-01

    Current science evaluation still relies on citation performance, despite criticisms of purely bibliometric research assessments. Biological taxonomy suffers from a drain of knowledge and manpower, with poor citation performance commonly held as one reason for this impediment. But is there really such a citation impediment in taxonomy? We compared the citation numbers of 306 taxonomic and 2291 non-taxonomic research articles (2009–2012) on mosses, orchids, ciliates, ants, and snakes, using Web of Science (WoS) and correcting for journal visibility. For three of the five taxa, significant differences were absent in citation numbers between taxonomic and non-taxonomic papers. This was also true for all taxa combined, although taxonomic papers received more citations than non-taxonomic ones. Our results show that, contrary to common belief, taxonomic contributions do not generally reduce a journal's citation performance and might even increase it. The scope of many journals rarely featuring taxonomy would allow editors to encourage a larger number of taxonomic submissions. Moreover, between 1993 and 2012, taxonomic publications accumulated faster than those from all biological fields. However, less than half of the taxonomic studies were published in journals in WoS. Thus, editors of highly visible journals inviting taxonomic contributions could benefit from taxonomy's strong momentum. The taxonomic output could increase even more than at its current growth rate if: (i) taxonomists currently publishing on other topics returned to taxonomy and (ii) non-taxonomists identifying the need for taxonomic acts started publishing these, possibly in collaboration with taxonomists. Finally, considering the high number of taxonomic papers attracted by the journal Zootaxa, we expect that the taxonomic community would indeed use increased chances of publishing in WoS indexed journals. We conclude that taxonomy's standing in the present citation-focused scientific landscape could

  7. Identification and correction of previously unreported spatial phenomena using raw Illumina BeadArray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavaré Simon

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key stage for all microarray analyses is the extraction of feature-intensities from an image. If this step goes wrong, then subsequent preprocessing and processing stages will stand little chance of rectifying the matter. Illumina employ random construction of their BeadArrays, making feature-intensity extraction even more important for the Illumina platform than for other technologies. In this paper we show that using raw Illumina data it is possible to identify, control, and perhaps correct for a range of spatial-related phenomena that affect feature-intensity extraction. Results We note that feature intensities can be unnaturally high when in the proximity of a number of phenomena relating either to the images themselves or to the layout of the beads on an array. Additionally we note that beads neighbour beads of the same type more often than one might expect, which may cause concern in some models of hybridization. We highlight issues in the identification of a bead's location, and in particular how this both affects and is affected by its intensity. Finally we show that beads can be wrongly identified in the image on either a local or array-wide scale, with obvious implications for data quality. Conclusions The image processing issues identified will often pass unnoticed by an analysis of the standard data returned from an experiment. We detail some simple diagnostics that can be implemented to identify problems of this nature, and outline approaches to correcting for such problems. These approaches require access to the raw data from the arrays, not just the summarized data usually returned, making the acquisition of such raw data highly desirable.

  8. Taxonomic revision of the New World genus Callotillus Wolcott (Cleridae, Tillinae), with the description of the new genus Neocallotillus, and an illustrated key of identification to species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alan F.; Zolnerowich, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The New World checkered beetle genus Callotillus Wolcott, 1911 is revised and the new genus Neocallotillus established. The subspecies Callotillus elegans vafer Wolcott is synonymized with the nominal subspecies, Callotillus elegans elegans (Erichson), which is transferred to, and designated as the type species of Neocallotillus gen. n. as Neocallotillus elegans (Erichson, 1847), comb. n. Two additional species are transferred from Callotillus to the new genus: Neocallotillus intricatus (Wolcott & Dybas, 1947), comb. n. and Neocallotillus crusoe (Wolcott, 1923), comb. n., the latter tentatively and based on Wolcott’s original description. Callotillus is now composed of two species: Callotillus eburneocinctus Wolcott, 1911 and Callotillus bahamensis Vaurie, 1952. All abovementioned species except Neocallotillus crusoe are diagnosed and redescribed. In the absence of reference material of Neocallotillus crusoe, Wolcott’s original description is transcribed. An illustrated key to species is provided. Characters of taxonomic relevance are illustrated and discussed. Updated distribution maps and locality data for all specimens examined are presented. PMID:27667955

  9. DNA-based taxonomic identification of basidiospores in hallucinogenic mushrooms cultivated in "grow-kits" seized by the police: LC-UV quali-quantitative determination of psilocybin and psilocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambaro, Veniero; Roda, Gabriella; Visconti, Giacomo Luca; Arnoldi, Sebastiano; Casagni, Eleonora; Dell'Acqua, Lucia; Farè, Fiorenza; Paladino, Eleonora; Rusconi, Chiara; Arioli, Stefania; Mora, Diego

    2016-06-01

    The taxonomic identification of the biological material contained in the hallucinogenic mushrooms culture media, was carried out using a DNA-based approach, thus highlighting the usefulness of this approach in the forensic identification of illegal samples also when they are present as basidiospores mixed in culture media and spore-bearing fruiting body are not present. This approach is very useful as it allows the unequivocal identification of potentially illicit material before the cultivation and it enables to stop the material to the Customs and to destroy it due to its dangerousness without cultivating the "grow-kits" and without instructing a criminal case. In fact, even if psilocin and psilocybin and the whole mushrooms are illegal in many countries, there is no specific indication in the law about the so called "grow-kits", containing the spores. To confirm the data obtained by the taxonomic identification, a simple, reliable, efficient LC-UV method, using tryptamine as internal standard, suitable for the forensic quali-quantitative determination of psilocin and psilocybin in hallucinogenic mushroom was optimized, validated and applied to the mushrooms grown after the cultivation of the grow-kits seized by the judicial authority, with the authorization of the Ministry of Health. A cation exchange column was used in a gradient elution mode (Phase A: 50mMK2HPO4; 100mM NaCl pH=3 Phase B: methanol). The developed method was linear over the calibration range with a R(2)>0.9992 for both the analytes. The detection and quantification limits were respectively 0.01 and 0.1μg/mL for psilocybin and 0.05μg/mL and 0.1μg/mL for psilocin and the intra- and inter-day precision was satisfactory (coefficients of variation psilocybin in the mushrooms grown from the seized "grow-kits" ranged from 1.02 to 7.60mg/g of dry vegetable material, while the content of psilocin from 0.415 to 8.36mg/g.

  10. Does taxonomic diversity in indicator groups influence their effectiveness in identifying priority areas for species conservation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Jesper Stentoft; Larsen, Frank Wugt; Rahbek, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    the taxonomic diversity in species indicator groups influence their effectiveness in the identification of priority areas for species conservation. We tested whether indicator groups comprising a higher taxonomic diversity (i.e. indicator groups consisting of species from many different taxonomic groups...

  11. Some notes on taxonomic methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der L.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper constitutes an introduction to taxonomic methodology. After an analysis of taxonomic practice, and a brief survey of kinds of attributes, the paper deals with observation, description, comparison, arrangement and classification, hypothesis construction, deduction, model, experiment

  12. Taxonomic identification of the Megaloolithid egg and eggshells from the Cretaceous Bauru Basin (Minas Gerais, Brazil: comparison with the Auca Mahuevo (Argentina titanosaurid eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Grellet-Tinner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomically (titanosaurid identified eggs and eggshells of Auca Mahuevo (Patagonia, Argentina provide an opportunity to compare and identify orphan megaloolithid eggs found elsewhere. Previous investigation determined that the oological material from Neuquén (Megaloolithus patagonicus and Peru (M. pseudomamillare are related to titanosaurid dinosaurs. Examination of an egg and several (megaloolithid eggshell fragments from the Upper Cretaceous Marilia Formation strongly suggests, as oological characters are at least genus specific, that the same group of titanosaur dinosaurs, which lived in the Neuquén Basin during the Late Campanian, were also present and reproducing in the Cretaceous Bauru Basin (Brazil. Furthermore, it has been suggested that these titanosaurs, based on the site of Auca Mahuevo, demonstrated colonial nesting and nesting fidelity. These reproductive behaviors would advocate that similar nesting sites should exist in the Upper Cretaceous formations of the Bauru Basin and remain to be discovered, as the present Peiropolis locality represents a secondary deposit where fossils have been transported by high-energy fluvial system.Os ovos e cascas de ovos provenientes de Auca Mahuevo (Patagonia, Argentina e identificados taxonomicamente como sendo de titanossaurídeos servem de base para comparação e identificação de ovos megaloolithídeos encontrados em outras localidades. Investigações prévias detreminaram que os materialis oológicos encontrados em Neuquén (Megaloolithus patagonicus e no Peru (M. pseudomamillare estão na realidade relacionados à dinossauros titanossaurídeos. O estudo de um ovo e diversos fragmentos de cascas de ovos (megaloolithídeo provenientes do Cretáceo Superior da Formação Marília sugere que o mesmo grupo taxonômico de dinossauros titanossauros que ocorria no Campaniano tardio da Bacia Neuquén também estava presente e se reproduzia durante o Cretáceo na Bacia Bauru, isto porque os

  13. Identification of shared single copy nuclear genes in Arabidopsis, Populus, Vitis and Oryza and their phylogenetic utility across various taxonomic levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Hong

    2010-02-01

    genes are valuable for phylogenetic and comparative analyses. Eighteen of the APVO SSC single copy genes were amplified in the Brassicaceae using RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Alignments of these sequences provide improved resolution of Brassicaceae phylogeny compared to recent studies using plastid and ITS sequences. An analysis of sequences from 13 APVO SSC genes from 69 species of seed plants, derived mainly from public EST databases, yielded a phylogeny that was largely congruent with prior hypotheses based on multiple plastid sequences. Whereas single gene phylogenies that rely on EST sequences have limited bootstrap support as the result of limited sequence information, concatenated alignments result in phylogenetic trees with strong bootstrap support for already established relationships. Overall, these single copy nuclear genes are promising markers for phylogenetics, and contain a greater proportion of phylogenetically-informative sites than commonly used protein-coding sequences from the plastid or mitochondrial genomes. Conclusions Putatively orthologous, shared single copy nuclear genes provide a vast source of new evidence for plant phylogenetics, genome mapping, and other applications, as well as a substantial class of genes for which functional characterization is needed. Preliminary evidence indicates that many of the shared single copy nuclear genes identified in this study may be well suited as markers for addressing phylogenetic hypotheses at a variety of taxonomic levels.

  14. Identification of shared single copy nuclear genes in Arabidopsis, Populus, Vitis and Oryza and their phylogenetic utility across various taxonomic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    phylogenetic and comparative analyses. Eighteen of the APVO SSC single copy genes were amplified in the Brassicaceae using RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Alignments of these sequences provide improved resolution of Brassicaceae phylogeny compared to recent studies using plastid and ITS sequences. An analysis of sequences from 13 APVO SSC genes from 69 species of seed plants, derived mainly from public EST databases, yielded a phylogeny that was largely congruent with prior hypotheses based on multiple plastid sequences. Whereas single gene phylogenies that rely on EST sequences have limited bootstrap support as the result of limited sequence information, concatenated alignments result in phylogenetic trees with strong bootstrap support for already established relationships. Overall, these single copy nuclear genes are promising markers for phylogenetics, and contain a greater proportion of phylogenetically-informative sites than commonly used protein-coding sequences from the plastid or mitochondrial genomes. Conclusions Putatively orthologous, shared single copy nuclear genes provide a vast source of new evidence for plant phylogenetics, genome mapping, and other applications, as well as a substantial class of genes for which functional characterization is needed. Preliminary evidence indicates that many of the shared single copy nuclear genes identified in this study may be well suited as markers for addressing phylogenetic hypotheses at a variety of taxonomic levels. PMID:20181251

  15. Batch correction of microarray data substantially improves the identification of genes differentially expressed in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupfer Peter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Batch effects due to sample preparation or array variation (type, charge, and/or platform may influence the results of microarray experiments and thus mask and/or confound true biological differences. Of the published approaches for batch correction, the algorithm “Combating Batch Effects When Combining Batches of Gene Expression Microarray Data” (ComBat appears to be most suitable for small sample sizes and multiple batches. Methods Synovial fibroblasts (SFB; purity > 98% were obtained from rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA patients (n = 6 each and stimulated with TNF-α or TGF-β1 for 0, 1, 2, 4, or 12 hours. Gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 chips, an alternative chip definition file, and normalization by Robust Multi-Array Analysis (RMA. Data were batch-corrected for different acquiry dates using ComBat and the efficacy of the correction was validated using hierarchical clustering. Results In contrast to the hierarchical clustering dendrogram before batch correction, in which RA and OA patients clustered randomly, batch correction led to a clear separation of RA and OA. Strikingly, this applied not only to the 0 hour time point (i.e., before stimulation with TNF-α/TGF-β1, but also to all time points following stimulation except for the late 12 hour time point. Batch-corrected data then allowed the identification of differentially expressed genes discriminating between RA and OA. Batch correction only marginally modified the original data, as demonstrated by preservation of the main Gene Ontology (GO categories of interest, and by minimally changed mean expression levels (maximal change 4.087% or variances for all genes of interest. Eight genes from the GO category “extracellular matrix structural constituent” (5 different collagens, biglycan, and tubulointerstitial nephritis antigen-like 1 were differentially expressed between RA and OA (RA

  16. Beam-Based Error Identification and Correction Methods for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)692826; Tomas, Rogelio; Nilsson, Thomas

    2014-06-10

    Modern particle accelerators have tight tolerances on the acceptable deviation from their desired machine parameters. The control of the parameters is of crucial importance for safe machine operation and performance. This thesis focuses on beam-based methods and algorithms to identify and correct errors in particle accelerators. The optics measurements and corrections of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in an unprecedented low β-beat for a hadron collider is described. The transverse coupling is another parameter which is of importance to control. Improvement in the reconstruction of the coupling from turn-by-turn data has resulted in a significant decrease of the measurement uncertainty. An automatic coupling correction method, which is based on the injected beam oscillations, has been successfully used in normal operation of the LHC. Furthermore, a new method to measure and correct chromatic coupling that was applied to the LHC, is described. It resulted in a decrease of the chromatic coupli...

  17. Taxonomic abstraction in psychobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S H; Chafetz, M D; Gage, F H

    1984-10-01

    If a body of knowledge in a scientific discipline is to be extended beyond empirical observation and into the realm of laws and principles, one of the fundamental requirements is a taxonomy which supports the systematic integration of observations. Psychobiology benefits from taxonomies provided by biology and chemistry, which include not only object oriented taxonomies such as species or chemical elements, but also process oriented taxonomies, such as oxidation, metabolism, phototaxis, or predation. Psychobiology has yet to provide equivalent taxonomies for its behavioral observations, although the common use of terms such as fear, anger, arousal, stress, and memory might lead one to suppose that these are based on a well established taxonomy of behavioral measures. In this report the logical and quantitative requirements for treating behavioral measures in terms of taxonomic classes are reviewed. A sample of studies representing recent research in psychobiology was examined to assess interest in such a taxonomy and to identify elements of current practice which might contribute to its development. Recent practice displays some evidence of interest in behavioral classes, in choice of language, and in frequent use of multiple dependent measures. Multivariate methods, which might elicit from such data evidence contributing to the development of a taxonomy, are rarely used. Recommendations are given on some appropriate analytic methods for data resulting from current practice and for new exploratory paradigms which could aim directly at the establishment of taxonomic classes for behaviors.

  18. Spatial distortion correction and crystal identification for MRI-compatible position-sensitive avalanche photodiode-based PET scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Joshi, Anand A; Wu, Yibao; Leahy, Richard M; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) are gaining widespread acceptance in modern PET scanner designs, and owing to their relative insensitivity to magnetic fields, especially in those that are MRI-compatible. Flood histograms in PET scanners are used to determine the crystal of annihilation photon interaction and hence, for detector characterization and routine quality control. For PET detectors that use PSAPDs, flood histograms show a characteristic pincushion distortion when Anger logic is used for event positioning. A small rotation in the flood histogram is also observed when the detectors are placed in a magnetic field. We first present a general purpose automatic method for spatial distortion correction for flood histograms of PSAPD-based PET detectors when placed both inside and outside a MRI scanner. Analytical formulae derived for this scheme are based on a hybrid approach that combines desirable properties from two existing event positioning schemes. The rotation of the flood histogram due to the magnetic field is determined iteratively and is accounted for in the scheme. We then provide implementation details of a method for crystal identification we have previously proposed and evaluate it for cases when the PET detectors are both outside and in a magnetic field. In this scheme, Fourier analysis is used to generate a lower-order spatial approximation of the distortion-corrected PSAPD flood histogram, which we call the 'template'. The template is then registered to the flood histogram using a diffeomorphic iterative intensity-based warping scheme. The calculated deformation field is then applied to the segmentation of the template to obtain a segmentation of the flood histogram. A manual correction tool is also developed for exceptional cases. We present a quantitative assessment of the proposed distortion correction scheme and crystal identification method against conventional methods. Our results indicate that our proposed methods lead to

  19. Lactobacillus species: taxonomic complexity and controversial susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M

    2015-05-15

    The genus Lactobacillus is a taxonomically complex and is composed of over 170 species that cannot be easily differentiated phenotypically and often require molecular identification. Although they are part of the normal human gastrointestinal and vaginal flora, they can also be occasional human pathogens. They are extensively used in a variety of commercial products including probiotics. Their antimicrobial susceptibilities are poorly defined in part because of their taxonomic complexity and are compounded by the different methods recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and International Dairy Foundation. Their use as probiotics for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection is prevalent among consumers worldwide but raises the question of will the use of any concurrent antibiotic effect their ability to survive. Lactobacillus species are generally acid resistant and are able to survive ingestion. They are generally resistant to metronidazole, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin with L. acidophilus being susceptible to penicillin and vancomycin, whereas L. rhamnosus and L. casei are resistant to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  20. New variables in M5 (NGC 5904) and some identification corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Ferro, A Arellano; Giridhar, S; Luna, A; Muneer, S

    2015-01-01

    We report twelve variables not previously detected in the globular cluster M5 (NGC 5904); one SX Phe and eleven semi-regular variables (SR). Their identifications, equatorial coordinates, ephemerides, and light curves are given. Furthermore, we have explored the light curves of a group of stars whose variability has not been confirmed and that are marked as probable non- variables in the CVSGC. Finally, we offer detailed identifications for some of the known variables in crowded regions that were misidentified in previous studies. We shall also address the cases of the cataclysmic variable or U Gem type V101 and of the variable blue straggler V159.

  1. Planning the Surgical Correction of Spinal Deformities: Toward the Identification of the Biomechanical Principles by Means of Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Bassani, Tito; La Barbera, Luigi; Ottardi, Claudia; Schlager, Benedikt; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Villa, Tomaso; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    In decades of technical developments after the first surgical corrections of spinal deformities, the set of devices, techniques, and tools available to the surgeons has widened dramatically. Nevertheless, the rate of complications due to mechanical failure of the fixation or the instrumentation remains rather high. Indeed, basic and clinical research about the principles of deformity correction and the optimal surgical strategies (i.e., the choice of the fusion length, the most appropriate instrumentation, and the degree of tolerable correction) did not progress as much as the implantable devices and the surgical techniques. In this work, a software approach for the biomechanical simulation of the correction of patient-specific spinal deformities aimed to the identification of its biomechanical principles is presented. The method is based on three-dimensional reconstructions of the spinal anatomy obtained from biplanar radiographic images. A user-friendly graphical user interface allows for the planning of the desired deformity correction and to simulate the implantation of pedicle screws. Robust meshing of the instrumented spine is provided by using consolidated computational geometry and meshing libraries. Based on a finite element simulation, the program is able to predict the loads and stresses acting in the instrumentation as well as those in the biological tissues. A simple test case (reduction of a low-grade spondylolisthesis at L3–L4) was simulated as a proof of concept, and showed plausible results. Despite the numerous limitations of this approach which will be addressed in future implementations, the preliminary outcome is promising and encourages a wide effort toward its refinement. PMID:26579518

  2. Combining EEG and eye tracking: Identification, characterization and correction of eye movement artifacts in electroencephalographic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael ePlöchl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Eye movements introduce large artifacts to electroencephalographic recordings (EEG and thus render data analysis difficult or even impossible. Trials contaminated by eye movement and blink artifacts have to be discarded, hence in standard EEG-paradigms subjects are required to fixate on the screen. To overcome this restriction, several correction methods including regression and blind source separation have been proposed. Yet, there is no automated standard procedure established. By simultaneously recording eye movements and 64-channel-EEG during a guided eye movement paradigm, we show that eye movement artifacts consist of several components, which arise from different sources. These include corneo-retinal dipole changes, saccadic spike potentials and eyelid movements. Moreover, we demonstrate that depending on electrode site, gaze direction and choice of reference these components contribute differently to the measured signal. Therefore they cannot be removed by regression-based correction methods, as these inevitably over- or under-correct individual artifact components. Finally we propose a correction procedure based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA. This procedure uses eye tracker information to reliably and objectively identify eye-artifact related ICA-components in an automated manner. We demonstrate that this approach allows removing or substantially reducing ocular artifacts including microsaccades without affecting the signal originating from brain sources. In conclusion the proposed method does not only provide a tool for detecting and correcting eye artifacts in standard EEG-paradigms but it also permits to study EEG-activity during eye tracking experiments and thus to investigate neural mechanisms of eye movement control and visual attention under natural conditions.

  3. The "residential" effect fallacy in neighborhood and health studies: formal definition, empirical identification, and correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Basile; Duncan, Dustin; Vallée, Julie; Vernez-Moudon, Anne; Benmarhnia, Tarik; Kestens, Yan

    2017-07-31

    Because of confounding from the urban/rural and socioeconomic organizations of territories and resulting correlation between residential and nonresidential exposures, classically estimated residential neighborhood-outcome associations capture nonresidential environment effects, overestimating residential intervention effects. Our study diagnosed and corrected this "residential" effect fallacy bias applicable to a large fraction of neighborhood and health studies. Our empirical application investigated the effect that hypothetical interventions raising the residential number of services would have on the probability that a trip is walked. Using global positioning systems (GPS) tracking and mobility surveys over 7 days (227 participants, 7440 trips), we employed a multilevel linear probability model to estimate the trip-level association between residential number of services and walking to derive a naïve intervention effect estimate; and a corrected model accounting for numbers of services at the residence, trip origin, and trip destination to determine a corrected intervention effect estimate (true effect conditional on assumptions). There was a strong correlation in service densities between the residential neighborhood and nonresidential places. From the naïve model, hypothetical interventions raising the residential number of services to 200, 500, and 1000 were associated with an increase by 0.020, 0.055, and 0.109 of the probability of walking in the intervention groups. Corrected estimates were of 0.007, 0.019, and 0.039. Thus, naïve estimates were overestimated by multiplicative factors of 3.0, 2.9, and 2.8. Commonly estimated residential intervention-outcome associations substantially overestimate true effects. Our somewhat paradoxical conclusion is that, to estimate residential effects, investigators critically need information on nonresidential places visited.

  4. Retrospective analysis of Mexican National Addictions Survey, 2008. Bias identification and correction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Romero-Martínez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the presence of bias on the estimation of the consumption sometime in life of alcohol, tobacco or illegal drugs and inhalable substances, and to propose a correction for this in the case it is present. Materials and methods. Mexican National Addictions Surveys (NAS 2002, 2008, and 2011 were analyzed to compare population estimations of consumption sometime in life of tobacco, alcohol or illegal drugs and inhalable substances. A couple of alternative approaches for bias correction were developed. Results. Estimated national prevalences of consumption sometime in life of alcohol and tobacco in the NAS 2008 are not plausible. There was no evidence of bias on the consumption sometime in life of illegal drugs and inhalable substances. New estimations for tobacco and alcohol consumption sometime in life were made, which resulted in plausible values when compared to other data available. Conclusion. Future analyses regarding tobacco and alcohol using NAS 2008 data will have to rely on these newly generated data weights, that are able to reproduce the new (plausible estimations.

  5. Identification and correction of abnormal, incomplete and mispredicted proteins in public databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bányai László

    2008-08-01

    -predicted entries. Conclusion MisPred works efficiently in identifying errors in predictions generated by the most reliable gene prediction tools such as the EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON pipelines and also guides the correction of errors. We suggest that application of the MisPred approach will significantly improve the quality of gene predictions and the associated databases.

  6. Predictive Method for Correct Identification of Archaeological Charred Grape Seeds: Support for Advances in Knowledge of Grape Domestication Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Ucchesu

    Full Text Available The identification of archaeological charred grape seeds is a difficult task due to the alteration of the morphological seeds shape. In archaeobotanical studies, for the correct discrimination between Vitis vinifera subsp. sylvestris and Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera grape seeds it is very important to understand the history and origin of the domesticated grapevine. In this work, different carbonisation experiments were carried out using a hearth to reproduce the same burning conditions that occurred in archaeological contexts. In addition, several carbonisation trials on modern wild and cultivated grape seeds were performed using a muffle furnace. For comparison with archaeological materials, modern grape seed samples were obtained using seven different temperatures of carbonisation ranging between 180 and 340ºC for 120 min. Analysing the grape seed size and shape by computer vision techniques, and applying the stepwise linear discriminant analysis (LDA method, discrimination of the wild from the cultivated charred grape seeds was possible. An overall correct classification of 93.3% was achieved. Applying the same statistical procedure to compare modern charred with archaeological grape seeds, found in Sardinia and dating back to the Early Bronze Age (2017-1751 2σ cal. BC, allowed 75.0% of the cases to be identified as wild grape. The proposed method proved to be a useful and effective procedure in identifying, with high accuracy, the charred grape seeds found in archaeological sites. Moreover, it may be considered valid support for advances in the knowledge and comprehension of viticulture adoption and the grape domestication process. The same methodology may also be successful when applied to other plant remains, and provide important information about the history of domesticated plants.

  7. Predictive Method for Correct Identification of Archaeological Charred Grape Seeds: Support for Advances in Knowledge of Grape Domestication Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucchesu, Mariano; Orrù, Martino; Grillo, Oscar; Venora, Gianfranco; Paglietti, Giacomo; Ardu, Andrea; Bacchetta, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The identification of archaeological charred grape seeds is a difficult task due to the alteration of the morphological seeds shape. In archaeobotanical studies, for the correct discrimination between Vitis vinifera subsp. sylvestris and Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera grape seeds it is very important to understand the history and origin of the domesticated grapevine. In this work, different carbonisation experiments were carried out using a hearth to reproduce the same burning conditions that occurred in archaeological contexts. In addition, several carbonisation trials on modern wild and cultivated grape seeds were performed using a muffle furnace. For comparison with archaeological materials, modern grape seed samples were obtained using seven different temperatures of carbonisation ranging between 180 and 340ºC for 120 min. Analysing the grape seed size and shape by computer vision techniques, and applying the stepwise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method, discrimination of the wild from the cultivated charred grape seeds was possible. An overall correct classification of 93.3% was achieved. Applying the same statistical procedure to compare modern charred with archaeological grape seeds, found in Sardinia and dating back to the Early Bronze Age (2017–1751 2σ cal. BC), allowed 75.0% of the cases to be identified as wild grape. The proposed method proved to be a useful and effective procedure in identifying, with high accuracy, the charred grape seeds found in archaeological sites. Moreover, it may be considered valid support for advances in the knowledge and comprehension of viticulture adoption and the grape domestication process. The same methodology may also be successful when applied to other plant remains, and provide important information about the history of domesticated plants. PMID:26901361

  8. Hitting the right target: taxonomic challenges for, and of, plant invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyšek, Petr; Hulme, Philip E.; Meyerson, Laura A.; Smith, Gideon F.; Boatwright, James S.; Crouch, Neil R.; Figueiredo, Estrela; Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Richardson, David M.; Suda, Jan; Wilson, John R. U.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores how a lack of taxonomic expertise, and by implication a dearth of taxonomic products such as identification tools, has hindered progress in understanding and managing biological invasions. It also explores how the taxonomic endeavour could benefit from studies of invasive species. We review the literature on the current situation in taxonomy with a focus on the challenges of identifying alien plant species and explore how this has affected the study of biological invasions. Biosecurity strategies, legislation dealing with invasive species, quarantine, weed surveillance and monitoring all depend on accurate and rapid identification of non-native taxa. However, such identification can be challenging because the taxonomic skill base in most countries is diffuse and lacks critical mass. Taxonomic resources are essential for the effective management of invasive plants and incorrect identifications can impede ecological studies. On the other hand, biological invasions have provided important tests of basic theories about species concepts. Better integration of classical alpha taxonomy and modern genetic taxonomic approaches will improve the accuracy of species identification and further refine taxonomic classification at the level of populations and genotypes in the field and laboratory. Modern taxonomy therefore needs to integrate both classical and new concepts and approaches. In particular, differing points of view between the proponents of morphological and molecular approaches should be negotiated because a narrow taxonomic perspective is harmful; the rigour of taxonomic decision-making clearly increases if insights from a variety of different complementary disciplines are combined and confronted. Taxonomy plays a critical role in the study of plant invasions and in turn benefits from the insights gained from these studies.

  9. Taxonomic notes on several wild relatives of Solanum melongena L. (Solanaceae): comments on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, John

    2013-04-01

    In the recent paper by Meyer et al. (2012) some of the taxonomic assumptions relating to the closest wild relatives of Solanum melongena L., the brinjal eggplant, are unsupported. This group is well-known for its taxonomic difficulties, therefore a consistent approach to the identification, nomenclature and species concepts of experimental plant material is essential to the fullest interpretation of the results of a genomic study such as theirs. Effectively, Meyer et al., treat several of the brinjal wild relatives in their study as being conspecific. Neither their nrITS nor AFLP analysis gives confirmation of this. On this basis, the correct name for the taxon known as S. melongena group F is S. cumingii Dunal. This species is distinct from S. incanum L., which is found only as far eastwards as northern India. S. incanum and S. insanum sensu Lester and Hasan are distinct taxa. Meyer et al. hypothesise that there were two separate domestication events for brinjal; re-examination of their data suggests that there was a single domestication event, that took place in India. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. NoisyGOA: Noisy GO annotations prediction using taxonomic and semantic similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Zili; Yang, Pengyi; Yu, Guoxian

    2016-12-01

    Gene Ontology (GO) provides GO annotations (GOA) that associate gene products with GO terms that summarize their cellular, molecular and functional aspects in the context of biological pathways. GO Consortium (GOC) resorts to various quality assurances to ensure the correctness of annotations. Due to resources limitations, only a small portion of annotations are manually added/checked by GO curators, and a large portion of available annotations are computationally inferred. While computationally inferred annotations provide greater coverage of known genes, they may also introduce annotation errors (noise) that could mislead the interpretation of the gene functions and their roles in cellular and biological processes. In this paper, we investigate how to identify noisy annotations, a rarely addressed problem, and propose a novel approach called NoisyGOA. NoisyGOA first measures taxonomic similarity between ontological terms using the GO hierarchy and semantic similarity between genes. Next, it leverages the taxonomic similarity and semantic similarity to predict noisy annotations. We compare NoisyGOA with other alternative methods on identifying noisy annotations under different simulated cases of noisy annotations, and on archived GO annotations. NoisyGOA achieved higher accuracy than other alternative methods in comparison. These results demonstrated both taxonomic similarity and semantic similarity contribute to the identification of noisy annotations. Our study shows that annotation errors are predictable and removing noisy annotations improves the performance of gene function prediction. This study can prompt the community to study methods for removing inaccurate annotations, a critical step for annotating gene and pathway functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TaxMan: a taxonomic database manager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaxter Mark

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic analysis of large, multiple-gene datasets, assembled from public sequence databases, is rapidly becoming a popular way to approach difficult phylogenetic problems. Supermatrices (concatenated multiple sequence alignments of multiple genes can yield more phylogenetic signal than individual genes. However, manually assembling such datasets for a large taxonomic group is time-consuming and error-prone. Additionally, sequence curation, alignment and assessment of the results of phylogenetic analysis are made particularly difficult by the potential for a given gene in a given species to be unrepresented, or to be represented by multiple or partial sequences. We have developed a software package, TaxMan, that largely automates the processes of sequence acquisition, consensus building, alignment and taxon selection to facilitate this type of phylogenetic study. Results TaxMan uses freely available tools to allow rapid assembly, storage and analysis of large, aligned DNA and protein sequence datasets for user-defined sets of species and genes. The user provides GenBank format files and a list of gene names and synonyms for the loci to analyse. Sequences are extracted from the GenBank files on the basis of annotation and sequence similarity. Consensus sequences are built automatically. Alignment is carried out (where possible, at the protein level and aligned sequences are stored in a database. TaxMan can automatically determine the best subset of taxa to examine phylogeny at a given taxonomic level. By using the stored aligned sequences, large concatenated multiple sequence alignments can be generated rapidly for a subset and output in analysis-ready file formats. Trees resulting from phylogenetic analysis can be stored and compared with a reference taxonomy. Conclusion TaxMan allows rapid automated assembly of a multigene datasets of aligned sequences for large taxonomic groups. By extracting sequences on the basis of

  12. Developing green supply chain management strategies: A taxonomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mutingi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this research is to explore the empirical green supply chain activities found in literature, and to develop a taxonomic framework that can be used for formulating appropriate strategies for green supply chains, based on characteristic dimensions for the green supply chain. Design/methodology/approach: The taxonomic framework is developed through (i analysis of green supply chain activities found in existing empirical work or case studies recorded in literature, (ii identification of key dimensions that influence green supply chain management strategies, and (iii development of a taxonomic scheme for selecting or developing green strategies. Findings: The paper finds that this study yielded: a set of three characteristic dimensions that influence strategic green supply chain management, and a guided structured approach selecting appropriate green strategies, providing managerial insights. Research limitations/implications: This paper shows that future work includes development of specific performance management indices according to the taxonomy of green strategies developed in this study. Practical implications: This research provided a practical guided approach that enhances appropriate formulation of green strategies for green supply chain management, while providing sound managerial insights for the supply chain decision maker. The choice of supply chain strategy directly impacts the overall environmental, economic and operations performance of the supply chain. Originality/value: This study presents to supply chain decision makers a new taxonomic framework that simplifies and enhances the formulation of green strategies, and to researchers a comparative understanding of various strategies applicable to green supply chains.

  13. Artificial Neural Network applied as a methodology of mosquito species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Camila; Ferraudo, Antonio Sergio; Suesdek, Lincoln

    2015-12-01

    There are about 200 species of mosquitoes (Culicidae) known to be vectors of pathogens that cause diseases in humans. Correct identification of mosquito species is an essential step in the development of effective control strategies for these diseases; recognizing the vectors of pathogens is integral to understanding transmission. Unfortunately, taxonomic identification of mosquitoes is a laborious task, which requires trained experts, and it is jeopardized by the high variability of morphological and molecular characters found within the Culicidae family. In this context, the development of an automatized species identification method would be a valuable and more accessible resource to non-taxonomist and health professionals. In this work, an artificial neural network (ANN) technique was proposed for the identification and classification of 17 species of the genera Anopheles, Aedes, and Culex, based on wing shape characters. We tested the hypothesis that classification using ANN is better than traditional classification by discriminant analysis (DA). Thirty-two wing shape principal components were used as input to a Multilayer Perceptron Classification ANN. The obtained ANN correctly identified species with accuracy rates ranging from 85.70% to 100%, and classified species more efficiently than did the traditional method of multivariate discriminant analysis. The results highlight the power of ANNs to diagnose mosquito species and to partly automatize taxonomic identification. These findings also support the hypothesis that wing venation patterns are species-specific, and thus should be included in taxonomic keys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring historical trends using taxonomic name metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schenk Ryan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Authority and year information have been attached to taxonomic names since Linnaean times. The systematic structure of taxonomic nomenclature facilitates the ability to develop tools that can be used to explore historical trends that may be associated with taxonomy. Results From the over 10.7 million taxonomic names that are part of the uBio system 4, approximately 3 million names were identified to have taxonomic authority information from the years 1750 to 2004. A pipe-delimited file was then generated, organized according to a Linnaean hierarchy and by years from 1750 to 2004, and imported into an Excel workbook. A series of macros were developed to create an Excel-based tool and a complementary Web site to explore the taxonomic data. A cursory and speculative analysis of the data reveals observable trends that may be attributable to significant events that are of both taxonomic (e.g., publishing of key monographs and societal importance (e.g., world wars. The findings also help quantify the number of taxonomic descriptions that may be made available through digitization initiatives. Conclusion Temporal organization of taxonomic data can be used to identify interesting biological epochs relative to historically significant events and ongoing efforts. We have developed an Excel workbook and complementary Web site that enables one to explore taxonomic trends for Linnaean taxonomic groupings, from Kingdoms to Families.

  15. Exploring historical trends using taxonomic name metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Indra Neil; Schenk, Ryan; Norton, Catherine N

    2008-05-13

    Authority and year information have been attached to taxonomic names since Linnaean times. The systematic structure of taxonomic nomenclature facilitates the ability to develop tools that can be used to explore historical trends that may be associated with taxonomy. From the over 10.7 million taxonomic names that are part of the uBio system 4, approximately 3 million names were identified to have taxonomic authority information from the years 1750 to 2004. A pipe-delimited file was then generated, organized according to a Linnaean hierarchy and by years from 1750 to 2004, and imported into an Excel workbook. A series of macros were developed to create an Excel-based tool and a complementary Web site to explore the taxonomic data. A cursory and speculative analysis of the data reveals observable trends that may be attributable to significant events that are of both taxonomic (e.g., publishing of key monographs) and societal importance (e.g., world wars). The findings also help quantify the number of taxonomic descriptions that may be made available through digitization initiatives. Temporal organization of taxonomic data can be used to identify interesting biological epochs relative to historically significant events and ongoing efforts. We have developed an Excel workbook and complementary Web site that enables one to explore taxonomic trends for Linnaean taxonomic groupings, from Kingdoms to Families.

  16. Controlling the taxonomic variable: Taxonomic concept resolution for a southeastern United States herbarium portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Franz

    2016-09-01

    the Euler/X logic reasoning toolkit to provide comprehensive genus- to variety-level concept alignments for at least 10 major flora treatments with highest relevance to SERNEC. The visualizations and estimated > 1 billion inferred concept-to-concept relations will effectively drive specimen data integration in the transformed portal. (3 We will expand Symbiota's taxonomy and occurrence schemas and related user interfaces to support the new concept data, including novel batch and map-based specimen determination modules, with easy output options in Darwin Core Archive format. (4 Through combinations of the new technology, enlisted taxonomic expertise, and SERNEC's large image resources, we will upgrade minimally 80% of all SERNEC specimen identifications from names to the narrowest suitable TCLs, or add "uncertainty" flags to specimens needing further study. (5 We will utilize the novel tools and data to demonstrate how controlling for the taxonomic variable in 12 use cases variously drives the outcomes of evolutionary, ecological, and conservation-based research hypotheses. Broader impacts. Our project is focused on just one herbarium network, but the potential impact is as wide as Darwin Core or even comparative biology. We believe that trust in networked biodiversity data depends on open and dynamic system designs, allowing expert access and resolution of multiple conflicting views that reflect the complex realities of ongoing taxonomic research. Taking well over 1 million SERNEC records from name- to TCL-resolution will show that "big" specimen data can pass the credibility threshold needed to validate the substantive data mobilization investment. We will mentor one postdoctoral researcher (UNC, two Ph.D. students (ASU, UIUC, and at least 15 undergraduate students (ASU. Each of our workshops will capacitate 10-15 SERNEC experts, who in turn can recruit colleagues and students at their home collections. We will incorporate the project theme and use cases into

  17. Phytoplankton Identification Manual

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Desai, S.R.

    of Environment & Forests, New Delhi 3 FOREWORD Since its inception in 1966 the National Institute of Oceanography is involved in taxonomic classification of marine phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos and other flora and fauna under the Project ? Measurement... details of taxonomic classification and description of the concerned organisms / species. All the figures are well illustrated and detailed identification key is provided. This should surely guide even a beginner to understand the identification...

  18. Reference databases for taxonomic assignment in metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Monica; Fosso, Bruno; Consiglio, Arianna; De Caro, Giorgio; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Liuni, Sabino; Marzano, Marinella; Alonso-Alemany, Daniel; Valiente, Gabriel; Pesole, Graziano

    2012-11-01

    Metagenomics is providing an unprecedented access to the environmental microbial diversity. The amplicon-based metagenomics approach involves the PCR-targeted sequencing of a genetic locus fitting different features. Namely, it must be ubiquitous in the taxonomic range of interest, variable enough to discriminate between different species but flanked by highly conserved sequences, and of suitable size to be sequenced through next-generation platforms. The internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal DNA operon and one or more hyper-variable regions of 16S ribosomal RNA gene are typically used to identify fungal and bacterial species, respectively. In this context, reliable reference databases and taxonomies are crucial to assign amplicon sequence reads to the correct phylogenetic ranks. Several resources provide consistent phylogenetic classification of publicly available 16S ribosomal DNA sequences, whereas the state of ribosomal internal transcribed spacers reference databases is notably less advanced. In this review, we aim to give an overview of existing reference resources for both types of markers, highlighting strengths and possible shortcomings of their use for metagenomics purposes. Moreover, we present a new database, ITSoneDB, of well annotated and phylogenetically classified ITS1 sequences to be used as a reference collection in metagenomic studies of environmental fungal communities. ITSoneDB is available for download and browsing at http://itsonedb.ba.itb.cnr.it/.

  19. DNA Barcoding Evaluation and Its Taxonomic Implications in the Recently Evolved Genus Oberonia Lindl. (Orchidaceae) in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuling; Tong, Yi; Xing, Fuwu

    2016-01-01

    The orchid genus Oberonia Lindl., is a taxonomically complex genus characterized by recent species radiations and many closely related species. All Oberonia species are under conservation as listed in the CITES and the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. Given its difficulties in taxonomy and conservation status, Oberonia is an excellent model for developing DNA barcodes. Three analytical methods and five DNA barcoding regions (rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA, ITS, and ITS2) were evaluated on 127 individuals representing 40 species and 1 variety of Oberonia from China. All the three plastid candidates tested (rbcL, matK, and trnH-psbA) have a lower discriminatory power than the nuclear regions (ITS and ITS2), and ITS had the highest resolution rate (82.14%). Two to four combinations of these gene sets were not better than the ITS alone, but when considering modes of inheritance, rbcL+ITS and matK+ITS were the best barcodes for identifying Oberonia species. Furthermore, the present barcoding system has many new insights in the current Oberonia taxonomy, such as correcting species identification, resolving taxonomic uncertainties, and the underlying presence of new or cryptic species in a genus with a complex speciation history. PMID:27994608

  20. Integrating DNA barcode data and taxonomic practice: determination, discovery, and description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Paul Z; DeSalle, Rob

    2011-02-01

    DNA barcodes, like traditional sources of taxonomic information, are potentially powerful heuristics in the identification of described species but require mindful analytical interpretation. The role of DNA barcoding in generating hypotheses of new taxa in need of formal taxonomic treatment is discussed, and it is emphasized that the recursive process of character evaluation is both necessary and best served by understanding the empirical mechanics of the discovery process. These undertakings carry enormous ramifications not only for the translation of DNA sequence data into taxonomic information but also for our comprehension of the magnitude of species diversity and its disappearance. This paper examines the potential strengths and pitfalls of integrating DNA sequence data, specifically in the form of DNA barcodes as they are currently generated and analyzed, with taxonomic practice.

  1. Identification of mistakes and their correction by a small group discussion as a revision exercise at the end of a teaching module in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobby, Zachariah; Nandeesha, H; Sridhar, M G; Soundravally, R; Setiya, Sajita; Babu, M Sathish; Niranjan, G

    2014-01-01

    Graduate medical students often get less opportunity for clarifying their doubts and to reinforce their concepts after lecture classes. The Medical Council of India (MCI) encourages group discussions among students. We evaluated the effect of identifying mistakes in a given set of wrong statements and their correction by a small group discussion by graduate medical students as a revision exercise. At the end of a module, a pre-test consisting of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) was conducted. Later, a set of incorrect statements related to the topic was given to the students and they were asked to identify the mistakes and correct them in a small group discussion. The effects on low, medium and high achievers were evaluated by a post-test and delayed post-tests with the same set of MCQs. The mean post-test marks were significantly higher among all the three groups compared to the pre-test marks. The gain from the small group discussion was equal among low, medium and high achievers. The gain from the exercise was retained among low, medium and high achievers after 15 days. Identification of mistakes in statements and their correction by a small group discussion is an effective, but unconventional revision exercise in biochemistry. Copyright 2014, NMJI.

  2. [Taxonomic theory for non-classical systematics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlinov, I Ia

    2012-01-01

    Outlined briefly are basic principles of construing general taxonomic theory for biological systematics considered in the context of non-classical scientific paradigm. The necessity of such kind of theory is substantiated, and some key points of its elaboration are exposed: its interpretation as a framework concept for the partial taxonomic theories in various schools of systematics; elaboration of idea of cognitive situation including three interrelated components, namely subject, object, and epistemic ones; its construing as a content-wisely interpreted quasi-axiomatics, with strong structuring of its conceptual space including demarcation between axioms and inferring rules; its construing as a "conceptual pyramid" of concepts of various levels of generality; inclusion of a basic model into definition of the taxonomic system (classification) regulating its content. Two problems are indicated as fundamental: definition of taxonomic diversity as a subject domain for the systematics as a whole; definition of onto-epistemological status of taxonomic system (classification) in general and of taxa in particular.

  3. SLIMM: species level identification of microorganisms from metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temesgen Hailemariam Dadi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification and quantification of microorganisms is a significant step in studying the alpha and beta diversities within and between microbial communities respectively. Both identification and quantification of a given microbial community can be carried out using whole genome shotgun sequences with less bias than when using 16S-rDNA sequences. However, shared regions of DNA among reference genomes and taxonomic units pose a significant challenge in assigning reads correctly to their true origins. The existing microbial community profiling tools commonly deal with this problem by either preparing signature-based unique references or assigning an ambiguous read to its least common ancestor in a taxonomic tree. The former method is limited to making use of the reads which can be mapped to the curated regions, while the latter suffer from the lack of uniquely mapped reads at lower (more specific taxonomic ranks. Moreover, even if the tools exhibited good performance in calling the organisms present in a sample, there is still room for improvement in determining the correct relative abundance of the organisms. We present a new method Species Level Identification of Microorganisms from Metagenomes (SLIMM which addresses the above issues by using coverage information of reference genomes to remove unlikely genomes from the analysis and subsequently gain more uniquely mapped reads to assign at lower ranks of a taxonomic tree. SLIMM is based on a few, seemingly easy steps which when combined create a tool that outperforms state-of-the-art tools in run-time and memory usage while being on par or better in computing quantitative and qualitative information at species-level.

  4. SLIMM: species level identification of microorganisms from metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Bernhard Y.; Wieler, Lothar H.; Semmler, Torsten; Reinert, Knut

    2017-01-01

    Identification and quantification of microorganisms is a significant step in studying the alpha and beta diversities within and between microbial communities respectively. Both identification and quantification of a given microbial community can be carried out using whole genome shotgun sequences with less bias than when using 16S-rDNA sequences. However, shared regions of DNA among reference genomes and taxonomic units pose a significant challenge in assigning reads correctly to their true origins. The existing microbial community profiling tools commonly deal with this problem by either preparing signature-based unique references or assigning an ambiguous read to its least common ancestor in a taxonomic tree. The former method is limited to making use of the reads which can be mapped to the curated regions, while the latter suffer from the lack of uniquely mapped reads at lower (more specific) taxonomic ranks. Moreover, even if the tools exhibited good performance in calling the organisms present in a sample, there is still room for improvement in determining the correct relative abundance of the organisms. We present a new method Species Level Identification of Microorganisms from Metagenomes (SLIMM) which addresses the above issues by using coverage information of reference genomes to remove unlikely genomes from the analysis and subsequently gain more uniquely mapped reads to assign at lower ranks of a taxonomic tree. SLIMM is based on a few, seemingly easy steps which when combined create a tool that outperforms state-of-the-art tools in run-time and memory usage while being on par or better in computing quantitative and qualitative information at species-level.

  5. De Garengeot’s Hernia: Two Case Reports with Correct Preoperative Identification of the Vermiform Appendix in the Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaosheng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of incarcerated de Garengeot’s hernia. This anatomical phenomenon is thought to occur in as few as 0.5% of femoral hernia cases and is a rare cause of acute appendicitis. Risk factors include a long pelvic appendix, abnormal embryological bowel rotation, and a large mobile caecum. In earlier reports operative treatment invariably involves simultaneous appendicectomy and femoral hernia repair. Both patients were correctly diagnosed preoperatively with computed tomography (CT. Both had open femoral hernia repair, one with appendectomy and one with the appendix left in situ. Both patients recovered without complications. Routine diagnostic imaging modalities such as ultrasonography and standard CT have previously shown little success in identifying de Garengeot’s hernia preoperatively. We believe this to be the first documented case of CT with concurrent oral and intravenous contrast being used to confidently and correctly diagnose de Garengeot’s hernia prior to surgery. We hope that this case report adds to the growing literature on this condition, which will ultimately allow for more detailed case-control studies and systematic reviews in order to establish gold-standard diagnostic studies and optimal surgical management in future.

  6. De Garengeot's Hernia: Two Case Reports with Correct Preoperative Identification of the Vermiform Appendix in the Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Muhammad Rafiz; Nnajiuba, Henry; Samlalsingh, Suzette; Ojo, Akinyede

    2016-01-01

    We present two cases of incarcerated de Garengeot's hernia. This anatomical phenomenon is thought to occur in as few as 0.5% of femoral hernia cases and is a rare cause of acute appendicitis. Risk factors include a long pelvic appendix, abnormal embryological bowel rotation, and a large mobile caecum. In earlier reports operative treatment invariably involves simultaneous appendicectomy and femoral hernia repair. Both patients were correctly diagnosed preoperatively with computed tomography (CT). Both had open femoral hernia repair, one with appendectomy and one with the appendix left in situ. Both patients recovered without complications. Routine diagnostic imaging modalities such as ultrasonography and standard CT have previously shown little success in identifying de Garengeot's hernia preoperatively. We believe this to be the first documented case of CT with concurrent oral and intravenous contrast being used to confidently and correctly diagnose de Garengeot's hernia prior to surgery. We hope that this case report adds to the growing literature on this condition, which will ultimately allow for more detailed case-control studies and systematic reviews in order to establish gold-standard diagnostic studies and optimal surgical management in future. PMID:28070438

  7. [Reason analysis of inadaptability and its correction research on the authenticity identification model of West Lake Longjing tea based on LVF micro-NIR spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Pan, Li-Gang; Wang, Ji-Hua; Li, An; Jin, Xin-Xin; Zhu, Ye-Wei; Ma, Zhi-Hong

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper, the micro-NIR spectrometer with the splitter of linear variable filter was used to develop the recognition models of the West Lake Longjing tea and the ordinary flat tea of the year 2012 and 2013. The NIR spectral data of different years and different storage times were decomposed by PCA algorithm. The PLS-DA models were developed by the representative samples selected by the mathematical characteristics of PCA-scores' distribution in order to analyze the reason for the inadaptability of the models according to mathematical principles and find out the solution for its correction. Being examined by the external validation set, the adaptability of the authenticity identification model was enhanced effectively. The result of this research indicated that, for the West Lake Longjing tea and the ordinary flat tea, the correct recognition rate of the model developed by all different-year samples' NIR spectral data would be enhanced effectively. The model developed by the NIR spectral data of different storage time samples indicated that the physicochemical properties of the ordinary flat tea have changed remarkably after cryopreservation for 3 months, while the physicochemical properties of the West Lake Longjing tea are relatively stable. The model adaptabilities for different years and different storage times were studied according to the mathematical perspective of the principal component characteristics of spectral data. After the authenticity identification model of West Lake Longjing tea was developed, the prediction accuracy was enhanced effectively. This research would provide reference for not only the application of NIR spectroscopy in quality grading and safety of agricultural products, but also the enhancement of the prediction accuracy of the NIR grading models for agricultural products.

  8. Genome-based Taxonomic Classification of Bacteroidetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Hahnke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes, characterized by a distinct gliding motility, occurs in a broad variety of ecosystems, habitats, life styles and physiologies. Accordingly, taxonomic classification of the phylum, based on a limited number of features, proved difficult and controversial in the past, for example, when decisions were based on unresolved phylogenetic trees of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Here we use a large collection of type-strain genomes from Bacteroidetes and closely related phyla for assessing their taxonomy based on the principles of phylogenetic classification and trees inferred from genome-scale data. No significant conflict between 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome phylogenetic analysis is found, whereas many but not all of the involved taxa are supported as monophyletic groups, particularly in the genome-scale trees. Phenotypic and phylogenomic features support the separation of Balneolaceae as new phylum Balneolaeota from Rhodothermaeota and of Saprospiraceae as new class Saprospiria from Chitinophagia. Epilithonimonas is nested within the older genus Chryseobacterium and without significant phenotypic differences; thus merging the two genera is proposed. Similarly, Vitellibacter is proposed to be included in Aequorivita. Flexibacter is confirmed as being heterogeneous and dissected, yielding six distinct genera. Hallella seregens is a later heterotypic synonym of Prevotella dentalis. Compared to values directly calculated from genome sequences, the G+C content mentioned in many species descriptions is too imprecise; moreover, corrected G+C content values have a significantly better fit to the phylogeny. Corresponding emendations of species descriptions are provided where necessary. Whereas most observed conflict with the current classification of Bacteroidetes is already visible in 16S rRNA gene trees, as expected whole-genome phylogenies are much better resolved.

  9. Genome-Based Taxonomic Classification of Bacteroidetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnke, Richard L; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; García-López, Marina; Mukherjee, Supratim; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes, characterized by a distinct gliding motility, occurs in a broad variety of ecosystems, habitats, life styles, and physiologies. Accordingly, taxonomic classification of the phylum, based on a limited number of features, proved difficult and controversial in the past, for example, when decisions were based on unresolved phylogenetic trees of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Here we use a large collection of type-strain genomes from Bacteroidetes and closely related phyla for assessing their taxonomy based on the principles of phylogenetic classification and trees inferred from genome-scale data. No significant conflict between 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome phylogenetic analysis is found, whereas many but not all of the involved taxa are supported as monophyletic groups, particularly in the genome-scale trees. Phenotypic and phylogenomic features support the separation of Balneolaceae as new phylum Balneolaeota from Rhodothermaeota and of Saprospiraceae as new class Saprospiria from Chitinophagia. Epilithonimonas is nested within the older genus Chryseobacterium and without significant phenotypic differences; thus merging the two genera is proposed. Similarly, Vitellibacter is proposed to be included in Aequorivita. Flexibacter is confirmed as being heterogeneous and dissected, yielding six distinct genera. Hallella seregens is a later heterotypic synonym of Prevotella dentalis. Compared to values directly calculated from genome sequences, the G+C content mentioned in many species descriptions is too imprecise; moreover, corrected G+C content values have a significantly better fit to the phylogeny. Corresponding emendations of species descriptions are provided where necessary. Whereas most observed conflict with the current classification of Bacteroidetes is already visible in 16S rRNA gene trees, as expected whole-genome phylogenies are much better resolved.

  10. A fatal case of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum pulmonary infection and brain abscess: taxonomic characterization by molecular techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranaz Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a rare case of pulmonary Nocardiosis and brain abscess caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an elderly woman with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Taxonomic identification involved phenotypic testing, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP, and complete 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  11. Reciclagem de materiais plásticos: a importância da identificação correta Plastic materials recycling: the importance of the correct identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leda Coltro

    2008-06-01

    important for the plastic recycling chain. In the present study, a survey was carried out with 177 rigid plastic packages for food and non-food products available in the Brazilian market. Although the identification code was a requirement from the ABNT NBR 13230 Brazilian standard issued 14 years ago, there are still problems with the resin identification code. Only approximately 80% of the evaluated packages had the resin identification code. Furthermore, up to 40% of packages had incorrect material identification. Therefore, misinformation still occurs in the Brazilian market concerning plastic packaging material type - including lack of resin identification code - as well as lack of information regarding the correct way to display the resin identification code in plastic packages. Both of these factors have negative effect on the plastic recycling chain.

  12. Taxonomic names, metadata, and the Semantic Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderic D. M. Page

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Life Science Identifiers (LSIDs offer an attractive solution to the problem of globally unique identifiers for digital objects in biology. However, I suggest that in the context of taxonomic names, the most compelling benefit of adopting these identifiers comes from the metadata associated with each LSID. By using existing vocabularies wherever possible, and using a simple vocabulary for taxonomy-specific concepts we can quickly capture the essential information about a taxonomic name in the Resource Description Framework (RDF format. This opens up the prospect of using technologies developed for the Semantic Web to add ``taxonomic intelligence" to biodiversity databases. This essay explores some of these ideas in the context of providing a taxonomic framework for the phylogenetic database TreeBASE.

  13. Asteroid taxonomic signatures from photometric phase curves

    CERN Document Server

    Oszkiewicz, D A; Wasserman, L H; Muinonen, K; Penttilä, A; Pieniluoma, T; Trilling, D E; Thomas, C A

    2012-01-01

    We explore the correlation between an asteroid's taxonomy and photometric phase curve using the H, G12 photometric phase function, with the shape of the phase function described by the single parameter G12. We explore the usability of G12 in taxonomic classification for individual objects, asteroid families, and dynamical groups. We conclude that the mean values of G12 for the considered taxonomic complexes are statistically different, and also discuss the overall shape of the G12 distribution for each taxonomic complex. Based on the values of G12 for about half a million asteroids, we compute the probabilities of C, S, and X complex membership for each asteroid. For an individual asteroid, these probabilities are rather evenly distributed over all of the complexes, thus preventing meaningful classification. We then present and discuss the G12 distributions for asteroid families, and predict the taxonomic complex preponderance for asteroid families given the distribution of G12 in each family. For certain ast...

  14. A reappraisal of the Pleurotus eryngii complex - new species and taxonomic combinations based on the application of a polyphasic approach, and an identification key to Pleurotus taxa associated with Apiaceae plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervakis, Georgios I; Ntougias, Spyridon; Gargano, Maria Letizia; Besi, Maria I; Polemis, Elias; Typas, Milton A; Venturella, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The Pleurotus eryngii species-complex comprises choice edible mushrooms growing on roots and lower stem residues of Apiaceae (umbellifers) plants. Material deriving from extensive sampling was studied by mating compatibility, morphological and ecological criteria, and through analysis of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and IGS1 rRNA sequences. Results revealed that P. eryngii sensu stricto forms a diverse and widely distributed aggregate composed of varieties elaeoselini, eryngii, ferulae, thapsiae, and tingitanus. Pleurotuseryngii subsp. tuoliensis comb. nov. is a phylogenetically sister group to the former growing only on various Ferula species in Asia. The existence of Pleurotusnebrodensis outside of Sicily (i.e., in Greece) is reported for the first time on the basis of molecular data, while P. nebrodensis subsp. fossulatus comb. nov. is a related Asiatic taxon associated with the same plant (Prangos ferulacea). Last, Pleurotusferulaginis sp. nov. grows on Ferulago campestris in northeast Italy, Slovenia and Hungary; it occupies a distinct phylogenetic position accompanied with significant differences in spore size and mating incompatibility versus other Pleurotus populations. Coevolution with umbellifers and host/substrate specificity seem to play key roles in speciation processes within this fungal group. An identification key to the nine Pleurotus taxa growing in association with Apiaceae plants is provided.

  15. ETHNOPRED: a novel machine learning method for accurate continental and sub-continental ancestry identification and population stratification correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Population stratification is a systematic difference in allele frequencies between subpopulations. This can lead to spurious association findings in the case–control genome wide association studies (GWASs) used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with disease-linked phenotypes. Methods such as self-declared ancestry, ancestry informative markers, genomic control, structured association, and principal component analysis are used to assess and correct population stratification but each has limitations. We provide an alternative technique to address population stratification. Results We propose a novel machine learning method, ETHNOPRED, which uses the genotype and ethnicity data from the HapMap project to learn ensembles of disjoint decision trees, capable of accurately predicting an individual’s continental and sub-continental ancestry. To predict an individual’s continental ancestry, ETHNOPRED produced an ensemble of 3 decision trees involving a total of 10 SNPs, with 10-fold cross validation accuracy of 100% using HapMap II dataset. We extended this model to involve 29 disjoint decision trees over 149 SNPs, and showed that this ensemble has an accuracy of ≥ 99.9%, even if some of those 149 SNP values were missing. On an independent dataset, predominantly of Caucasian origin, our continental classifier showed 96.8% accuracy and improved genomic control’s λ from 1.22 to 1.11. We next used the HapMap III dataset to learn classifiers to distinguish European subpopulations (North-Western vs. Southern), East Asian subpopulations (Chinese vs. Japanese), African subpopulations (Eastern vs. Western), North American subpopulations (European vs. Chinese vs. African vs. Mexican vs. Indian), and Kenyan subpopulations (Luhya vs. Maasai). In these cases, ETHNOPRED produced ensembles of 3, 39, 21, 11, and 25 disjoint decision trees, respectively involving 31, 502, 526, 242 and 271 SNPs, with 10-fold cross validation accuracy of

  16. Converting Taxonomic Descriptions to New Digital Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Cui

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.--The majority of taxonomic descriptions is currently in print format. The majority of digital descriptions are in formats such as DOC, HTML, or PDF and for human readers. These formats do not convey rich semantics in taxonomic descriptions for computer-aided process. Newer digital formats such as XML and RDF accommodate semantic annotations that allow computers to process the rich semantics on human's behalf, thus open up opportunities for a wide range of innovative usages of taxonomic descriptions, such as searching in more precise and flexible ways, integrating with gnomic and geographic information, generating taxonomic keys automatically, and text data mining and information visualization etc. This paper discusses the challenges in automated conversion of multiple collections of descriptions to XML format and reports an automated system, MARTT. MARTT is a machine-learning system that makes use of training examples to tag new descriptions into XML format. A number of utilities are implemented as solutions to the challenges. The utilities are used to reduce the effort for training example preparation, to facilitate the creation of a comprehensive schema, and to predict system performance on a new collection of descriptions. The system has been tested with several plant and alga taxonomic publications including Flora of China and Flora of North America.

  17. Species delimitation in taxonomically difficult fungi: the case of Hymenogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Stielow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: False truffles are ecologically important as mycorrhizal partners of trees and evolutionarily highly interesting as the result of a shift from epigeous mushroom-like to underground fruiting bodies. Since its first description by Vittadini in 1831, inappropriate species concepts in the highly diverse false truffle genus Hymenogaster has led to continued confusion, caused by a large variety of prevailing taxonomical opinions. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we reconsidered the species delimitations in Hymenogaster based on a comprehensive collection of Central European taxa comprising more than 140 fruiting bodies from 20 years of field work. The ITS rDNA sequence dataset was subjected to phylogenetic analysis as well as clustering optimization using OPTSIL software. CONCLUSIONS: Among distinct species concepts from the literature used to create reference partitions for clustering optimization, the broadest concept resulted in the highest agreement with the ITS data. Our results indicate a highly variable morphology of H. citrinus and H. griseus, most likely linked to environmental influences on the phenology (maturity, habitat, soil type and growing season. In particular, taxa described in the 19(th century frequently appear as conspecific. Conversely, H. niveus appears as species complex comprising seven cryptic species with almost identical macro- and micromorphology. H. intermedius and H. huthii are described as novel species, each of which with a distinct morphology intermediate between two species complexes. A revised taxonomy for one of the most taxonomically difficult genera of Basidiomycetes is proposed, including an updated identification key. The (semi-automated selection among species concepts used here is of importance for the revision of taxonomically problematic organism groups in general.

  18. Plant DNA barcodes, taxonomic management, and species discovery in tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Christopher W; Webb, Campbell O

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcodes have great potential for species identification and taxonomic discovery in tropical forests. This use of DNA barcodes requires a reference DNA library of known taxa with which to match DNA from unidentified specimens. At an even more basic level, it presupposes that the species in the regional species pool have Latin binomials. This is not the case in species-rich tropical forests in which many species are new to science or members of poorly circumscribed species complexes. This chapter describes a workflow geared toward taxonomic discovery, which includes the discovery of new species, distribution records, and hybrid forms, and to management of taxonomic entities in forest inventory plots. It outlines the roles of laboratory technicians, field workers and herbarium-based taxonomists, and concludes with a discussion of potential multilocus nuclear DNA approaches for identifying species in recently evolved clades.

  19. Taxonomic Study of the Genus Abundisporus in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargalmaa, Suldbold; Park, Myung Soo; Park, Jae Young; Fong, Jonathan J; Jang, Yeongseon; Lim, Young Woon

    2015-09-01

    The polypore genus Abundisporus Ryvarden is characterized by resupinate to pileate fruitbodies with a purplish brown hymenophore, slightly thick-walled, pale yellowish and non-dextrinoid basidiospores, and causing white rot. A purple color hymenophore, an easily observable and striking character, was considered the main distinctive feature at the generic level within polypores. However, due to highly similar basidiocarp features, species identification within these purple polypores is particularly difficult. Three species of purple colored polypores have been reported in Korea (Abundisporus fuscopurpureus, A. pubertatis, and Fomitopsis rosea). Based on morphological re-examination, ecological information, and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer, we showed that previous classification was incorrect and there is only one species (A. pubertatis) in Korea. We provide a detailed description of A. pubertatis in Korea, as well as a taxonomic key to distinguish wood rot fungi with a purple hymenophore.

  20. A taxonomic revision of Harpullia (Sapindaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, P.W.; Vente, Magda

    1982-01-01

    The present taxonomic revision of Harpullia was started by the second author as the main part of her work for a M. Sc. in biology at Leiden University. She concentrated on a revision of the species occurring in New Guinea, paid only a more superficial attention to the rest of the genus. The first

  1. Taxonomic features and identification of Oxycephalidae (Platysceloidea, Physocephalata, Hyperiidea, Amphipoda)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, K.K.C.

    of the species. Taxonomy of the family is discussed with notes on inter- and intra-specific variations. Geographical distribution, ecophenotypic variations and biology of the species involved are mentioned. A detailed bibliographic account on the family is also...

  2. Morphometric Wing Characters as a Tool for Mosquito Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Rafael de Oliveira; Multini, Laura Cristina; Vidal, Paloma Oliveira; Wilk-da-Silva, Ramon; de Carvalho, Gabriela Cristina; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes are responsible for the transmission of important infectious diseases, causing millions of deaths every year and endangering approximately 3 billion people around the world. As such, precise identification of mosquito species is crucial for an understanding of epidemiological patterns of disease transmission. Currently, the most common method of mosquito identification relies on morphological taxonomic keys, which do not always distinguish cryptic species. However, wing geometric morphometrics is a promising tool for the identification of vector mosquitoes, sibling and cryptic species included. This study therefore sought to accurately identify mosquito species from the three most epidemiologically important mosquito genera using wing morphometrics. Twelve mosquito species from three epidemiologically important genera (Aedes, Anopheles and Culex) were collected and identified by taxonomic keys. Next, the right wing of each adult female mosquito was removed and photographed, and the coordinates of eighteen digitized landmarks at the intersections of wing veins were collected. The allometric influence was assessed, and canonical variate analysis and thin-plate splines were used for species identification. Cross-validated reclassification tests were performed for each individual, and a Neighbor Joining tree was constructed to illustrate species segregation patterns. The analyses were carried out and the graphs plotted with TpsUtil 1.29, TpsRelw 1.39, MorphoJ 1.02 and Past 2.17c. Canonical variate analysis for Aedes, Anopheles and Culex genera showed three clear clusters in morphospace, correctly distinguishing the three mosquito genera, and pairwise cross-validated reclassification resulted in at least 99% accuracy; subgenera were also identified correctly with a mean accuracy of 96%, and in 88 of the 132 possible comparisons, species were identified with 100% accuracy after the data was subjected to reclassification. Our results showed that Aedes, Culex

  3. FANTOM: Functional and taxonomic analysis of metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanli Kemal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpretation of quantitative metagenomics data is important for our understanding of ecosystem functioning and assessing differences between various environmental samples. There is a need for an easy to use tool to explore the often complex metagenomics data in taxonomic and functional context. Results Here we introduce FANTOM, a tool that allows for exploratory and comparative analysis of metagenomics abundance data integrated with metadata information and biological databases. Importantly, FANTOM can make use of any hierarchical database and it comes supplied with NCBI taxonomic hierarchies as well as KEGG Orthology, COG, PFAM and TIGRFAM databases. Conclusions The software is implemented in Python, is platform independent, and is available at http://www.sysbio.se/Fantom.

  4. Registros de sanguijuelas de Costa Rica y clave para la identificación de las especies con redescripción de Cylicobdella costaricae Records of leeches from Costa Rica and taxonomic key for species identification with a redescription of Cylicobdella costaricae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Oceguera-Figueroa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En contraste con los enormes esfuerzos realizados por caracterizar la fauna y flora de Costa Rica, con excepción de algunos registros aislados, muy poco se sabe sobre las sanguijuelas (Annelida: Clitellata en este país. En este trabajo, presentamos la redescripción de una especie terrestre muy poco conocida: Cylicobdella costaricae, caracterizando su morfología externa e interna; esta última se mantenía completamente desconocida hasta la fecha. Adicionalmente, presentamos la primera lista de especies de sanguijuelas para Costa Rica con un total de 12 taxones registrados en las 7 provincias del país. Se incluye una breve descripción de su morfología, fotografías y localidades para cada taxón. Los registros que presentamos son el resultado del estudio de los ejemplares depositados en el Museo de Zoología de la Universidad de Costa Rica así como de recolectas recientes. Finalmente, incluimos una clave taxonómica para la identificación de las especies de sanguijuelas de Costa Rica.In contrast to the enormous efforts made to characterize the fauna and flora from Costa Rica, except for a few isolated records, very little is known about leeches (Annelida: Clitellata in the country. In this paper, we present the redescription of a poorly known terrestrial leech: Cylicobdella costaricae, characterizing its external and internal morphology, the latter, completely unknown to date. In addition, we report the first list of leech species for Costa Rica, including in total 12 taxa with records from the 7 provinces of the country. We provide a brief description of the leech morphology, pictures and localities for each taxon. The information shown here is the result of the study of both, specimens deposited at the Museo de Zoología of the Universidad de Costa Rica and the new collections. Finally, we provide a taxonomic key for species identification.

  5. [Analysis, identification and correction of some errors of model refseqs appeared in NCBI Human Gene Database by in silico cloning and experimental verification of novel human genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Li; Ji, Liang; Li, Yan-Da

    2004-05-01

    reference sequences predicted from NCBI contig NT_010808 by automated computational analysis using gene prediction method. Therefore, the correct identification and annotation of novel human genes may be still a heavy task, which can be finished within a long period of time. So human genome coding regions annotated by computer should be used with caution. The articles published in the past did not clearly point out the existence of mistakes in the NCBI human gene mode reference sequence. At the Seventh International Human Genome Conference held in April 2002, we first published the researching result on this aspect in the communication form of Posterly insert a base or one section of cDNA in the ORF, wrongly causing unwanted termination codon before the insertion, so the coding protein lacks the first part of the amino acids. For example, the GenBank Acc. No. AL096883 ( LOCUS No. HS323M22B) is wrong form of an experimentally verified human NM_012263 with mouse ortholog of BC010510 determined. (7) It may regard the polluted genomic sequence as complete gene cDNA sequence and anticipate the so-called single exon gene, even the real one, only a small ORF in the very long single exon mRNA, while there really exists termination code in the same phase of the upper part of the ORF initiation code, no other characters accord with the gene's condition. For example, LOC91126 is wrong form of ZNF362. (8) The anticipated genes only have ORF which has no EST proofs on both terminal sides. Depending on this ORF, a complete gene cDNA with double support of EST and human genome (there are termination codes at the same phase of the upper part of ORF) which indicates the anticipated ORF reference sequence may be incorrect. For example, LOC164395 may be wrong form of novel human gene bankit4590055. (9) A similar but smaller protein-coding gene is anticipated in the range of the human genome sequence that has the support of EST experimental proof, so other new anticipated gene may be incorrect

  6. Pyrosequencing as a tool for the detection of Phytophthora species: error rate and risk of false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vettraino, A.M.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Tomassini, A.; Bruni, N.; Vannini, A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the accuracy of pyrosequencing for the description of Phytophthora communities in terms of taxa identification and risk of assignment for false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs). Methods and Results: Pyrosequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons was u

  7. FURTHER TAXONOMIC STUDIES ON STRAIGHT TO FLEXUOUS STREPTOMYCETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRIDHAM, T G; LYONS, A J

    1965-02-01

    Pridham, Thomas G. (Northern Regional Research Laboratory, Peoria, Ill.), and Allister J. Lyons. Further taxonomic studies on straight to flexuous streptomycetes. J. Bacteriol. 89:331-342. 1965.-The best way to handle streptomycete classification, nomenclature, and identification is through application of a genus-species-subspecies concept. To establish a species, principal criteria are morphology of chains of spores and nature of spore-wall surfaces. Subspecies can be differentiated one from another by other criteria, such as chromogenicity, colors of sporulating aerial mycelium and of vegetative mycelium, carbon-utilization patterns, and assessment of qualitative production of antibiotics and sensitivity and resistance to antibacterial antibiotics. A literature study and laboratory studies of some strains suggested that streptomycetes with straight chains of spores could easily be differentiated from those with flexuous chains of spores. An intensive study of about 75 holotype and potential neotype strains indicated that such a differentiation is difficult to accomplish with confidence. Only 19 of the strains had straight chains of spores. These strains are considered, at this time, to be members of the species Streptomyces venezuelae Ehrlich et al. Forty-two of the strains had flexuous chains of spores and were assigned to the species Streptomyces griseus (Krainsky) Waksman and Henrici. Six of the strains had unusual spore-chain morphology. Classic taxonomic procedures allowed the separation of all the strains into a number of categories. The results suggest that more precise information on relationships of strains and qualitative antibiotic production will allow clarification of their sub-specific status. Consideration of the results obtained with strains having aberrant morphology allows some speculation on ranges of variations in morphology that might be encountered with the streptomycetes.

  8. Further Taxonomic Studies on Straight to Flexuous Streptomycetes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridham, Thomas G.; Lyons, Allister J.

    1965-01-01

    Pridham, Thomas G. (Northern Regional Research Laboratory, Peoria, Ill.), and Allister J. Lyons. Further taxonomic studies on straight to flexuous streptomycetes. J. Bacteriol. 89:331–342. 1965.—The best way to handle streptomycete classification, nomenclature, and identification is through application of a genus-species-subspecies concept. To establish a species, principal criteria are morphology of chains of spores and nature of spore-wall surfaces. Subspecies can be differentiated one from another by other criteria, such as chromogenicity, colors of sporulating aerial mycelium and of vegetative mycelium, carbon-utilization patterns, and assessment of qualitative production of antibiotics and sensitivity and resistance to antibacterial antibiotics. A literature study and laboratory studies of some strains suggested that streptomycetes with straight chains of spores could easily be differentiated from those with flexuous chains of spores. An intensive study of about 75 holotype and potential neotype strains indicated that such a differentiation is difficult to accomplish with confidence. Only 19 of the strains had straight chains of spores. These strains are considered, at this time, to be members of the species Streptomyces venezuelae Ehrlich et al. Forty-two of the strains had flexuous chains of spores and were assigned to the species Streptomyces griseus (Krainsky) Waksman and Henrici. Six of the strains had unusual spore-chain morphology. Classic taxonomic procedures allowed the separation of all the strains into a number of categories. The results suggest that more precise information on relationships of strains and qualitative antibiotic production will allow clarification of their sub-specific status. Consideration of the results obtained with strains having aberrant morphology allows some speculation on ranges of variations in morphology that might be encountered with the streptomycetes. PMID:14255699

  9. Recent Taxonomic Developments with Candida and Other Opportunistic Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Mary E; Lockhart, Shawn R

    2012-09-01

    Increases in susceptible patient populations and advances in identification methods have resulted in the continued recognition of novel yeasts as agents of human infection. Most of these agents are members of the well-recognized genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon, and Rhodotorula. Some of these agents are "cryptic species," members of species complexes, and may not be detectable using classical carbohydrate assimilation-based methods of yeast identification. Such species require DNA- or MALDI-based methods for correct identification, although sporadic isolates may not routinely require delineation to the individual species level. The coming end of the fungal taxonomy rules requiring separate names for sexual and asexual forms of the same fungus will hopefully allow greater clarity, as names for medically important yeast can now be based on the needs of the medical mycology community and the common goal of better communication between laboratory and clinician.

  10. Taxonomical developments in the family Polyomaviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne, Reimar; Buck, Christopher B; Allander, Tobias; Atwood, Walter J; Garcea, Robert L; Imperiale, Michael J; Major, Eugene O; Ramqvist, Torbjorn; Norkin, Leonard C

    2011-09-01

    The Polyomaviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) has recommended several taxonomical revisions, as follows: The family Polyomaviridae, which is currently constituted as a single genus (Polyomavirus), will be comprised of three genera: two containing mammalian viruses and one containing avian viruses. The two mammalian genera will be designated Orthopolyomavirus and Wukipolyomavirus, and the avian genus will be named Avipolyomavirus. These genera will be created by the redistribution of species from the current single genus (Polyomavirus) and by the inclusion of several new species. In addition, the names of several species will be changed to reflect current usage.

  11. Bacterial phospholipide antigens and their taxonomic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalnik, B V; Razbash, M P; Akhmetova, E A

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of interrelationships between the phospholipides of various microorganisms (33 strains of corynebacteria, mycobacteria and staphylococci) using crossed antibody neutralization reactions with phospholipide antigenic erythrocyte diagnostic was used for the assessment of the degree of antigenic propinquity and antigenic differences between the phospholipides of bacteria of the same species, genus, and of different genera. The role of the determinants of the corresponding (their own) and "foreign" genera in the antigenic differences between the phospholipides of the microorganisms investigated was established. On the basis of the results obtained the conclusion has been drawn that the method of assessment of antigenic interrelationships between phospholipides can be used for the study of some taxonomic problems.

  12. Accurate taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same efficiency as when mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor of all matching sequences in a reference taxonomy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several metagenomic datasets of marine and gut microbiota.

  13. Rotational Study of Ambiguous Taxonomic Classified Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Tyler R.; Sanchez, Rick; Wuerker, Wolfgang; Clayson, Timothy; Giles, Tucker

    2017-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) moving object catalog (MOC4) provided the largest ever catalog of asteroid spectrophotometry observations. Carvano et al. (2010), while analyzing MOC4, discovered that individual observations of asteroids which were observed multiple times did not classify into the same photometric-based taxonomic class. A small subset of those asteroids were classified as having both the presence and absence of a 1um silicate absorption feature. If these variations are linked to differences in surface mineralogy, the prevailing assumption that an asteroid’s surface composition is predominantly homogenous would need to be reexamined. Furthermore, our understanding of the evolution of the asteroid belt, as well as the linkage between certain asteroids and meteorite types may need to be modified.This research is an investigation to determine the rotational rates of these taxonomically ambiguous asteroids. Initial questions to be answered:Do these asteroids have unique or nonstandard rotational rates?Is there any evidence in their light curve to suggest an abnormality?Observations were taken using PROMPT6 a 0.41-m telescope apart of the SKYNET network at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). Observations were calibrated and analyzed using Canopus software. Initial results will be presented at AAS.

  14. Environmental metabarcodes for insects: in silico PCR reveals potential for taxonomic bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laurence J; Soubrier, Julien; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Studies of insect assemblages are suited to the simultaneous DNA-based identification of multiple taxa known as metabarcoding. To obtain accurate estimates of diversity, metabarcoding markers ideally possess appropriate taxonomic coverage to avoid PCR-amplification bias, as well as sufficient sequence divergence to resolve species. We used in silico PCR to compare the taxonomic coverage and resolution of newly designed insect metabarcodes (targeting 16S) with that of existing markers [16S and cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI)] and then compared their efficiency in vitro. Existing metabarcoding primers amplified in silico mitochondrial genomes available, whereas new primers targeting 16S provided >90% coverage. Furthermore, metabarcodes targeting COI appeared to introduce taxonomic PCR-amplification bias, typically amplifying a greater percentage of Lepidoptera and Diptera species, while failing to amplify certain orders in silico. To test whether bias predicted in silico was observed in vitro, we created an artificial DNA blend containing equal amounts of DNA from 14 species, representing 11 insect orders and one arachnid. We PCR-amplified the blend using five primer sets, targeting either COI or 16S, with high-throughput amplicon sequencing yielding more than 6 million reads. In vitro results typically corresponded to in silico PCR predictions, with newly designed 16S primers detecting 11 insect taxa present, thus providing equivalent or better taxonomic coverage than COI metabarcodes. Our results demonstrate that in silico PCR is a useful tool for predicting taxonomic bias in mixed template PCR and that researchers should be wary of potential bias when selecting metabarcoding markers.

  15. Identification of Amazonian trees with DNA barcodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mailyn Adriana Gonzalez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Large-scale plant diversity inventories are critical to develop informed conservation strategies. However, the workload required for classic taxonomic surveys remains high and is particularly problematic for megadiverse tropical forests. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on a comprehensive census of all trees in two hectares of a tropical forest in French Guiana, we examined whether plant DNA barcoding could contribute to increasing the quality and the pace of tropical plant biodiversity surveys. Of the eight plant DNA markers we tested (rbcLa, rpoC1, rpoB, matK, ycf5, trnL, psbA-trnH, ITS, matK and ITS had a low rate of sequencing success. More critically, none of the plastid markers achieved a rate of correct plant identification greater than 70%, either alone or combined. The performance of all barcoding markers was noticeably low in few species-rich clades, such as the Laureae, and the Sapotaceae. A field test of the approach enabled us to detect 130 molecular operational taxonomic units in a sample of 252 juvenile trees. Including molecular markers increased the identification rate of juveniles from 72% (morphology alone to 96% (morphology and molecular of the individuals assigned to a known tree taxon. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that while DNA barcoding is an invaluable tool for detecting errors in identifications and for identifying plants at juvenile stages, its limited ability to identify collections will constrain the practical implementation of DNA-based tropical plant biodiversity programs.

  16. Identification and correction of spectral contamination in 2H/1H and 18O/16O measured in leaf, stem, and soil water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Natalie M; Griffis, Timothy J; Lee, Xuhui; Baker, John M

    2011-11-15

    Plant water extracts typically contain organic materials that may cause spectral interference when using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS), resulting in errors in the measured isotope ratios. Manufacturers of IRIS instruments have developed post-processing software to identify the degree of contamination in water samples, and potentially correct the isotope ratios of water with known contaminants. Here, the correction method proposed by an IRIS manufacturer, Los Gatos Research, Inc., was employed and the results were compared with those obtained from isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Deionized water was spiked with methanol and ethanol to create correction curves for δ(18)O and δ(2)H. The contamination effects of different sample types (leaf, stem, soil) and different species from agricultural fields, grasslands, and forests were compared. The average corrections in leaf samples ranged from 0.35 to 15.73‰ for δ(2)H and 0.28 to 9.27‰ for δ(18)O. The average corrections in stem samples ranged from 1.17 to 13.70‰ for δ(2)H and 0.47 to 7.97‰ for δ(18)O. There was no contamination observed in soil water. Cleaning plant samples with activated charcoal had minimal effects on the degree of spectral contamination, reducing the corrections, by on average, 0.44‰ for δ(2)H and 0.25‰ for δ(18)O. The correction method eliminated the discrepancies between IRMS and IRIS for δ(18)O, and greatly reduced the discrepancies for δ(2)H. The mean differences in isotope ratios between IRMS and the corrected IRIS method were 0.18‰ for δ(18)O, and -3.39‰ for δ(2)H. The inability to create an ethanol correction curve for δ(2)H probably caused the larger discrepancies. We conclude that ethanol and methanol are the primary compounds causing interference in IRIS analyzers, and that each individual analyzer will probably require customized correction curves.

  17. Effect of taxonomic resolution on ecological and palaeoecological inference - a test using testate amoeba water table depth transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Payne, Richard J.; Mazei, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Sound taxonomy is a major requirement for quantitative environmental reconstruction using biological data. Transfer function performance should theoretically be expected to decrease with reduced taxonomic resolution. However for many groups of organisms taxonomy is imperfect and species level identification not always possible. We conducted numerical experiments on five testate amoeba water table (DWT) transfer function data sets. We sequentially reduced the number of taxonomic groups by successively merging morphologically similar species and removing inconspicuous species. We then assessed how these changes affected model performance and palaeoenvironmental reconstruction using two fossil data sets. Model performance decreased with decreasing taxonomic resolution, but this had only limited effects on patterns of inferred DWT, at least to detect major dry/wet shifts. Higher-resolution taxonomy may however still be useful to detect more subtle changes, or for reconstructed shifts to be significant.

  18. The Identification of Discriminating Patterns from 16S rRNA Gene to Generate Signature for Bacillus Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Ravi P; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-08-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene has been widely used for the taxonomic classification of bacteria. A molecular signature is a set of nucleotide patterns, which constitute a regular expression that is specific to each particular taxon. Our main goal was to identify discriminating nucleotide patterns in 16S rRNA gene and then to generate signatures for taxonomic classification. To demonstrate our approach, we used the phylum Firmicutes as a model using representative taxa Bacilli (class), Bacillales (order), Bacillaceae (family), and Bacillus (genus), according to their dominance at each hierarchical taxonomic level. We applied combined composite vector and multiple sequence alignment approaches to generate gene-specific signatures. Further, we mapped all the patterns into the different hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene and confirmed the most appropriate distinguishing region as V3-V4 for targeted taxa. We also examined the evolution in discriminating patterns of signatures across taxonomic levels. We assessed the comparative classification accuracy of signatures with other methods (i.e., RDP Classifier, KNN, and SINA). Results revealed that the signatures for taxa Bacilli, Bacillales, Bacillaceae, and Bacillus could correctly classify isolate sequences with sensitivity of 0.99, 0.97, 0.94, and 0.89, respectively, and specificity close to 0.99. We developed signature-based software DNA Barcode Identification (DNA BarID) for taxonomic classification that is available at website http://www.neeri.res.in/DNA_BarID.htm . This pattern-based study provides a deeper understanding of taxon-specific discriminating patterns in 16S rRNA gene with respect to taxonomic classification.

  19. A novel algorithm for establishing taxonomic relation of Chinese ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Bing-zhen; CHEN Xiao-rong; HU Yi; LU Ru-zhan

    2009-01-01

    Both a general domain-independent bottom-up multi-level model and an algorithm for establishing the taxonomic relation of Chinese ontology are proposed. The model consists of extracting domain vocabularies and establishing taxonomic relation, with the consideration of characteristics unique to Chinese natural language. By establishing the semantic forests of domain vocabularies and then using the existing semantic dictionary or ma-chine-readable dictionary (MRD), the proposed algorithm can integrate these semantic forests together to estab-lish the taxonomic relation. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is feasible and effective in es-tablishing the integrated taxonomic relation among domain vocabularies and concepts.

  20. Taxonomic etymology – in search of inspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Jozwiak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of the etymology of zoological taxonomic names with emphasis on the most unusual examples. The names were divided into several categories, starting from the most common – given after morphological features – through inspiration from mythology, legends, and classic literature but also from fictional and nonfictional pop-culture characters (e.g., music, movies or cartoons, science, and politics. A separate category includes zoological names created using word-play and figures of speech such as tautonyms, acronyms, anagrams, and palindromes. Our intention was to give an overview of possibilities of how and where taxonomists can find the inspirations that will be consistent with the ICZN rules and generate more detail afterthought about the naming process itself, the meaningful character of naming, as well as the recognition and understanding of names.

  1. Flexible taxonomic assignment of ambiguous sequencing reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To characterize the diversity of bacterial populations in metagenomic studies, sequencing reads need to be accurately assigned to taxonomic units in a given reference taxonomy. Reads that cannot be reliably assigned to a unique leaf in the taxonomy (ambiguous reads are typically assigned to the lowest common ancestor of the set of species that match it. This introduces a potentially severe error in the estimation of bacteria present in the sample due to false positives, since all species in the subtree rooted at the ancestor are implicitly assigned to the read even though many of them may not match it. Results We present a method that maps each read to a node in the taxonomy that minimizes a penalty score while balancing the relevance of precision and recall in the assignment through a parameter q. This mapping can be obtained in time linear in the number of matching sequences, because LCA queries to the reference taxonomy take constant time. When applied to six different metagenomic datasets, our algorithm produces different taxonomic distributions depending on whether coverage or precision is maximized. Including information on the quality of the reads reduces the number of unassigned reads but increases the number of ambiguous reads, stressing the relevance of our method. Finally, two measures of performance are described and results with a set of artificially generated datasets are discussed. Conclusions The assignment strategy of sequencing reads introduced in this paper is a versatile and a quick method to study bacterial communities. The bacterial composition of the analyzed samples can vary significantly depending on how ambiguous reads are assigned depending on the value of the q parameter. Validation of our results in an artificial dataset confirm that a combination of values of q produces the most accurate results.

  2. Global taxonomic diversity of living reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincheira-Donoso, Daniel; Bauer, Aaron M; Meiri, Shai; Uetz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Reptiles are one of the most ecologically and evolutionarily remarkable groups of living organisms, having successfully colonized most of the planet, including the oceans and some of the harshest and more environmentally unstable ecosystems on earth. Here, based on a complete dataset of all the world's diversity of living reptiles, we analyse lineage taxonomic richness both within and among clades, at different levels of the phylogenetic hierarchy. We also analyse the historical tendencies in the descriptions of new reptile species from Linnaeus to March 2012. Although (non-avian) reptiles are the second most species-rich group of amniotes after birds, most of their diversity (96.3%) is concentrated in squamates (59% lizards, 35% snakes, and 2% amphisbaenians). In strong contrast, turtles (3.4%), crocodilians (0.3%), and tuataras (0.01%) are far less diverse. In terms of species discoveries, most turtles and crocodilians were described early, while descriptions of lizards, snakes and amphisbaenians are multimodal with respect to time. Lizard descriptions, in particular, have reached unprecedented levels during the last decade. Finally, despite such remarkably asymmetric distributions of reptile taxonomic diversity among groups, we found that the distributions of lineage richness are consistently right-skewed, with most clades (monophyletic families and genera) containing few lineages (monophyletic genera and species, respectively), while only a few have radiated greatly (notably the families Colubridae and Scincidae, and the lizard genera Anolis and Liolaemus). Therefore, such consistency in the frequency distribution of richness among clades and among phylogenetic levels suggests that the nature of reptile biodiversity is fundamentally fractal (i.e., it is scale invariant). We then compared current reptile diversity with the global reptile diversity and taxonomy known in 1980. Despite substantial differences in the taxonomies (relative to 2012), the patterns of

  3. Correction for phylogeny, small number of observations and data redundancy improves the identification of coevolving amino acid pairs using mutual information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buslje, C.M.; Santos, J.; Delfino, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Mutual information (MI) theory is often applied to predict positional correlations in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) to make possible the analysis of those positions structurally or functionally important in a given fold or protein family. Accurate identification of coevolving...

  4. 40 CFR 725.12 - Identification of microorganisms for Inventory and other listing purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification of microorganisms for... MICROORGANISMS General Provisions and Applicability § 725.12 Identification of microorganisms for Inventory and...) Taxonomic designation. The taxonomic designation of a microorganism must be provided for the donor...

  5. Marine actinomycetes from Madeira Archipelago preliminary taxonomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilda Santos Sanches

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The oceans cover 70 % of the Earth´s surface and harbor most of the planet´s biodiversity. However the microbiological component of this diversity remains relatively unexplored. Marine actinomycetes, are a robust resource of chemically prolific novelty. Producing structurally unique biological active secondary metabolites, generating a valuable source for innovative biotechnology and drug discovery[1,2]. As a consequence, the ecological role of actinomycetes and their marine ecosystems may no longer be neglected. It is crucial to move our research efforts into ocean regions for which we know little or nothing about the indigenous microbial diversity. The Portuguese Archipelago, Madeira is located in the Macaronesian Atlantic region, emerging from the African tectonic plate, found in the extreme south of the Tore-Madeira ridge, has a unique biogeography and biodiversity. These distinctive characteristics combined with the fact that Madeira have never been explored, as far as indigenous marine actinomycetes are concerned, makes it from the scientific point of view, the perfect target for our studies. From 662 marine sediment samples collected along Madeira Archipelago (Figure 1 during June of 2012, covering depths from 10-1310 m, a total of 421 actinomycete strains were isolated. In a previous study, an assemblage of 82 strains was selected for taxonomic identification, having into account representative morphological diversity characteristics of the actinomycetes, isolated from Madeira Archipelago. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, it was observed that the genera Streptomyces, Micromonospora and Salinispora were predominant, 81% [3]. Additionally, in a recent study, our team selected 168 strains with Salinispora look-alike morphological features. From these 28 strains were identified as belonging to the seawater-obligate marine actinomycete genus Salinispora. Representing the first report of Salinispora spp. in the Macaronesian Atlantic Ocean

  6. Global pedodiversity, taxonomic distance, and the World Reference Base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minasny, B.; McBratney, A.B.; Hartemink, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the study of taxonomic distance and pedodiversity by (1) deriving taxonomic distances for the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB), (2) calculating pedodiversity indices at the global scale using the soil map of the world at a scale 1:25M, and (3) comparing traditional

  7. Preschool Children's Taxonomic Knowledge of Animal Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although taxonomic proficiency is a prerequisite for understanding ideas central to biology, previous research has established that learners frequently misclassify animals by not following the tenets of accepted taxonomic rubrics. This has immediate relevance with the recently revised English National Curriculum now requiring concepts of animal…

  8. Taxonomic resolutions based on 18S rRNA genes: a case study of subclass copepoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Wu

    Full Text Available Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1-9 within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%; and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2 nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9 of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%; 3 compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%; and 4 V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy.

  9. Taxonomic resolutions based on 18S rRNA genes: a case study of subclass copepoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1-9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy.

  10. A taxonomic revision of the type section of Pelargonium L’Hérit. (Geraniaceae

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    J. J. A. van der Walt

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty four species are recognized in this taxonomic treatment of the section Pelargonium which was last revised by Knuth in 1912, Most species occur in the south-western, southern and eastern Cape where they usually grow in rather moist, semi-shaded habitats, A key to the identification o f the species has been compiled, and at least one illustration as well as a distribution map is presented for each species. The section is considered to be the most primitive section of the genus with a basic chromosome number of x = 11.

  11. jMOTU and Taxonerator: turning DNA Barcode sequences into annotated operational taxonomic units.

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    Martin Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA barcoding and other DNA sequence-based techniques for investigating and estimating biodiversity require explicit methods for associating individual sequences with taxa, as it is at the taxon level that biodiversity is assessed. For many projects, the bioinformatic analyses required pose problems for laboratories whose prime expertise is not in bioinformatics. User-friendly tools are required for both clustering sequences into molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTU and for associating these MOTU with known organismal taxonomies. RESULTS: Here we present jMOTU, a Java program for the analysis of DNA barcode datasets that uses an explicit, determinate algorithm to define MOTU. We demonstrate its usefulness for both individual specimen-based Sanger sequencing surveys and bulk-environment metagenetic surveys using long-read next-generation sequencing data. jMOTU is driven through a graphical user interface, and can analyse tens of thousands of sequences in a short time on a desktop computer. A companion program, Taxonerator, that adds traditional taxonomic annotation to MOTU, is also presented. Clustering and taxonomic annotation data are stored in a relational database, and are thus amenable to subsequent data mining and web presentation. CONCLUSIONS: jMOTU efficiently and robustly identifies the molecular taxa present in survey datasets, and Taxonerator decorates the MOTU with putative identifications. jMOTU and Taxonerator are freely available from http://www.nematodes.org/.

  12. A taxonomic study on the diversity of Indian Knema Lour. (Myristicaceae

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    Dipanwita Banik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic study on the diversity of the genus Knema Lour. belonging to the family Myristicaceae R. Br. in India revealed the distribution of the ten taxa under four series in North East and Peninsular India and Andaman and Nicobar Islands including two endemic species. Knema ser. Obovoideae W.J. de Wilde is synonymised here under ser. Knema. Series Knema is represented by two species and ser. Glaucae W.J. de Wilde by one species in North East India, while ser. Laurinae W.J. de Wilde is represented by three species and two subspecies in North East India and Andaman and Nicobar Island, and ser. Glomeratae W.J. de Wilde by 2 species in South and NE India. This is the first taxonomic study on the genus in India. All the taxa are cited with updated nomenclature, diagnostic characters, distribution, phonological data, vernacular names, line drawings, photo plates and specimens examined in various herbaria. Taxonomic keys are provided for easy identification of these taxa.

  13. Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Gondwanan homoxylous woods: a nomenclatural revision of the genera with taxonomic notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, M K.; Philippe, M

    2001-04-01

    The homoxylous fossil woods occurring in the Gondwanan continents of South America, Australia, Africa, India and Antarctica during the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous period are considered here. Original descriptions of the genera and wherever possible, the type material, have been consulted. Applying the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, the generic names of the homoxylous woods have been revised from a nomenclatural point of view. According to this review, out of 31 generic names used for woods from the given time interval and area, 6 are illegitimate later nomenclatural synonyms, 1 is a later homonym, and 5 can be considered as taxonomical synonyms. Moreover, 9 genera have been used erroneously. We propose one new generic name (Protaxodioxylon n. gen.) and elsewhere we will propose for conservation, with a conserved type one of the illegitimate names and one of the taxonomic synonyms. As a result, we consider that there are only eighteen generic names correctly quoted for the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of Gondwana, and we provide a taxonomic key for the corresponding genera. This revision is the first step in systematically comparing northern and southern hemisphere woods.

  14. A taxonomic review of the dry-fruited species of Anemone (Ranunculaceae in southern Africa

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    J. C. Manning

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The three dry-fruited species of Anemone sect. Pulsatilloides subsect. Alchemillifoliae (Ranunculaceae from southern Africa are reviewed, with full descriptions and nomenclature, including complete synonomy, taxonomic history with nomenclatural corrections, ecological notes, and distribution. A. tenuifolia (L.f. DC. from the Cape Floristic Region is segregated as ser. Pinnatifoliae from the two summer rainfall species, A. caffra (Eckl. & Zeyh. Harv. and A. fanninnii Harv. ex Masters, which remain in ser. Alchemillifoliae, emphasising the strong vegetative differences between the two series.

  15. Taxonomic significance of trichomes micromorphology in cucurbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Ajmal; Al-Hemaid, Fahad M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on trichomes micromorphology using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were undertaken in 23 species with one variety under 13 genera of the family Cucurbitaceae (viz., Benincasa hispida (Thunb.) Cogn., Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai, Cucumis melo var. agrestis Naudin, Cucumis sativus L., Diplocyclos palmatus (L.) C. Jeffrey, Edgaria dargeelingensis C.B. Clarke, Gynostemma burmanicum King ex Chakr., Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino, Gynostemma pubescens (Gagnep.) C.Y. Wu, Hemsleya dipterygia Kuang & A.M. Lu, Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl., Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb., Luffa cylindrica M. Roem., Luffa echinata Roxb., Melothria heterophylla (Lour.) Cogn., Melothria leucocarpa (Blume) Cogn., Melothria maderspatana (L.) Cogn., Sechium edule (Jacq.) Sw., Thladiantha cordifolia (Blume) Cogn., Trichosanthes cucumerina L., T. cucumerina var. anguina (L.) Haines, Trichosanthes dioica Roxb., Trichosanthes lepiniana (Naudin) Cogn. and T. tricuspidata Lour.). The trichomes in the family Cucurbitaceae vary from unicellular to multicellular, conical to elongated, smooth to ridges, with or without flattened disk at base and cyctolithic appendages, thin to thick walled, curved at apices to blunt. Trichomes micromorphology in the family Cucurbitaceae was found significant taxonomically. PMID:23961108

  16. Karyomorphology of Taiwanese Begonia (Begoniaceae): taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginuma, Kazuo; Peng, Ching-I

    2002-06-01

    The karyomorphology of all 14 species of Taiwanese Begonia was investigated to elucidate their chromosome features and chromosomal evolution. Among all species investigated, differences in chromosome features are found in: (1) chromosome number 2 n = 22, 26, 36, 38, 52, 60, 64, 82, and (2) frequencies of chromosomes with secondary, tertiary, and/or small constrictions of polyploids, ranging from 23% to 63%, which is higher than the expected value of about 9%. It is suggested that after polyploidization from the diploid species (i.e., 2 n = 22 and frequencies of chromosomes with secondary, tertiary, and/or small constrictions of polyploids of about 9%), chromosome translocations occurred, followed by a decrease in chromosome number, and subsequently stabilized genomes were formed in various species in Taiwan. The karyomorphological evidence also suggested that the chromosome morphology has evolved in parallel in the begonias belonging to different sections in Taiwan. The variation in chromosomal features is more complex than the variation in floral and fruit morphologies. Karyomorphological data also supports the recognition of five new species in Taiwan: Begonia bouffordii, B. chuyunshanensis, B. pinglinensis, B. tengchiana, and B. wutaiana. Based on detailed karyomorphological analyses, the taxonomic implications, speciation, and chromosomal evolution in Taiwanese Begoniaare discussed.

  17. Taxonomic status of Pelargonium reniforme Curt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine E. Victor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pelargonium reniforme Curt. is a morphologically variable species that many authors have attempted to split or combine. Confusion relating to the differences between the two subspecies currently included under P. reniforme has impeded attempts to assess their conservation status.  Pelargonium reniforme is closely related to  Pelargonium sidoides;  the two species are indistinguishable when not flowering and their distributions overlap in some areas.Objectives: With this study, we aimed to clarify the taxonomic status of the two subspecies of P. reniforme, which has relevance in terms of their conservation status.Method: Leaf shape, petiole length, internode length and flower colour were assessed by studying herbarium specimens of the two subspecies of  P. reniforme and specimens of P. sidoides. Living specimens of the two subspecies were also examined in their natural habitat.Results: The current investigation showed that the morphological characters used to distinguish the two subspecies of P. reniforme are too variable to separate them. Variation in some morphological characters may be related to environmental conditions.Conclusion: The recognition of the two subspecies of P. reniforme as distinct taxa is no longer justified.

  18. Taxonomic significance of trichomes micromorphology in cucurbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Ajmal; Al-Hemaid, Fahad M A

    2011-01-01

    Studies on trichomes micromorphology using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were undertaken in 23 species with one variety under 13 genera of the family Cucurbitaceae (viz., Benincasa hispida (Thunb.) Cogn., Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai, Cucumis melo var. agrestis Naudin, Cucumis sativus L., Diplocyclos palmatus (L.) C. Jeffrey, Edgaria dargeelingensis C.B. Clarke, Gynostemma burmanicum King ex Chakr., Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino, Gynostemma pubescens (Gagnep.) C.Y. Wu, Hemsleya dipterygia Kuang & A.M. Lu, Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl., Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb., Luffa cylindrica M. Roem., Luffa echinata Roxb., Melothria heterophylla (Lour.) Cogn., Melothria leucocarpa (Blume) Cogn., Melothria maderspatana (L.) Cogn., Sechium edule (Jacq.) Sw., Thladiantha cordifolia (Blume) Cogn., Trichosanthes cucumerina L., T. cucumerina var. anguina (L.) Haines, Trichosanthes dioica Roxb., Trichosanthes lepiniana (Naudin) Cogn. and T. tricuspidata Lour.). The trichomes in the family Cucurbitaceae vary from unicellular to multicellular, conical to elongated, smooth to ridges, with or without flattened disk at base and cyctolithic appendages, thin to thick walled, curved at apices to blunt. Trichomes micromorphology in the family Cucurbitaceae was found significant taxonomically.

  19. Taxonomic indexing--extending the role of taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David J; Remsen, David; Marino, William A; Norton, Cathy

    2006-06-01

    Taxonomic indexing refers to a new array of taxonomically intelligent network services that use nomenclatural principles and elements of expert taxonomic knowledge to manage information about organisms. Taxonomic indexing was introduced to help manage the increasing amounts of digital information about biology. It has been designed to form a near basal layer in a layered cyberinfrastructure that deals with biological information. Taxonomic Indexing accommodates the special problems of using names of organisms to index biological material. It links alternative names for the same entity (reconciliation), and distinguishes between uses of the same name for different entities (disambiguation), and names are placed within an indefinite number of hierarchical schemes. In order to access all information on all organisms, Taxonomic indexing must be able to call on a registry of all names in all forms for all organisms. NameBank has been developed to meet that need. Taxonomic indexing is an area of informatics that overlaps with taxonomy, is dependent on the expert input of taxonomists, and reveals the relevance of the discipline to a wide audience.

  20. Identification of p38 MAPK and JNK as new targets for correction of Wilson disease‐causing ATP7B mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesi, Giancarlo; Hegde, Ramanath N.; Iacobacci, Simona; Concilli, Mafalda; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Festa, Beatrice Paola; Polishchuk, Elena V.; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Carissimo, Annamaria; Montefusco, Sandro; Canetti, Diana; Monti, Maria; Amoresano, Angela; Pucci, Piero; van de Sluis, Bart; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by the toxic accumulation of copper (Cu) in the liver. The ATP7B gene, which is mutated in WD, encodes a multitransmembrane domain adenosine triphosphatase that traffics from the trans‐Golgi network to the canalicular area of hepatocytes, where it facilitates excretion of excess Cu into the bile. Several ATP7B mutations, including H1069Q and R778L that are two of the most frequent variants, result in protein products, which, although still functional, remain in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, they fail to reach Cu excretion sites, resulting in the toxic buildup of Cu in the liver of WD patients. Therefore, correcting the location of these mutants by leading them to the appropriate functional sites in the cell should restore Cu excretion and would be beneficial to help large cohorts of WD patients. However, molecular targets for correction of endoplasmic reticulum‐retained ATP7B mutants remain elusive. Here, we show that expression of the most frequent ATP7B mutant, H1069Q, activates p38 and c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase signaling pathways, which favor the rapid degradation of the mutant. Suppression of these pathways with RNA interference or specific chemical inhibitors results in the substantial rescue of ATP7BH1069Q (as well as that of several other WD‐causing mutants) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the trans‐Golgi network compartment, in recovery of its Cu‐dependent trafficking, and in reduction of intracellular Cu levels. Conclusion: Our findings indicate p38 and c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase as intriguing targets for correction of WD‐causing mutants and, hence, as potential candidates, which could be evaluated for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat WD. (Hepatology 2016;63:1842‐1859) PMID:26660341

  1. Identification of p38 MAPK and JNK as new targets for correction of Wilson disease-causing ATP7B mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesi, Giancarlo; Hegde, Ramanath N; Iacobacci, Simona; Concilli, Mafalda; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Festa, Beatrice Paola; Polishchuk, Elena V; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Carissimo, Annamaria; Montefusco, Sandro; Canetti, Diana; Monti, Maria; Amoresano, Angela; Pucci, Piero; van de Sluis, Bart; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Luini, Alberto; Polishchuk, Roman S

    2016-06-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by the toxic accumulation of copper (Cu) in the liver. The ATP7B gene, which is mutated in WD, encodes a multitransmembrane domain adenosine triphosphatase that traffics from the trans-Golgi network to the canalicular area of hepatocytes, where it facilitates excretion of excess Cu into the bile. Several ATP7B mutations, including H1069Q and R778L that are two of the most frequent variants, result in protein products, which, although still functional, remain in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, they fail to reach Cu excretion sites, resulting in the toxic buildup of Cu in the liver of WD patients. Therefore, correcting the location of these mutants by leading them to the appropriate functional sites in the cell should restore Cu excretion and would be beneficial to help large cohorts of WD patients. However, molecular targets for correction of endoplasmic reticulum-retained ATP7B mutants remain elusive. Here, we show that expression of the most frequent ATP7B mutant, H1069Q, activates p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways, which favor the rapid degradation of the mutant. Suppression of these pathways with RNA interference or specific chemical inhibitors results in the substantial rescue of ATP7B(H1069Q) (as well as that of several other WD-causing mutants) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the trans-Golgi network compartment, in recovery of its Cu-dependent trafficking, and in reduction of intracellular Cu levels. Our findings indicate p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase as intriguing targets for correction of WD-causing mutants and, hence, as potential candidates, which could be evaluated for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat WD. (Hepatology 2016;63:1842-1859). © 2015 by The Authors. Hepatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. Taxonomic chauvinism revisited: insight from parental care research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary R Stahlschmidt

    Full Text Available Parental care (any non-genetic contribution by a parent that appears likely to increase the fitness of its offspring is a widespread trait exhibited by a broad range of animal taxa. In addition to influencing the fitness of parent(s and offspring, parental care may be inextricably involved in other evolutionary processes, such as sexual selection and the evolution of endothermy. Yet, recent work has demonstrated that bias related to taxonomy is prevalent across many biological disciplines, and research in parental care may be similarly burdened. Thus, I used parental care articles published in six leading journals of fundamental behavioral sciences (Animal Behaviour, Behavioral Ecology, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Ethology, Hormones and Behavior, and Physiology & Behavior from 2001-2010 (n = 712 to examine the year-to-year dynamics of two types of bias related to taxonomy across animals: (1 taxonomic bias, which exists when research output is not proportional to the frequency of organisms in nature, and (2 taxonomic citation bias, which is a proxy for the breadth of a given article-specifically, the proportion of articles cited that refer solely to the studied taxon. I demonstrate that research on birds likely represents a disproportionate amount of parental care research and, thus, exhibits taxonomic bias. Parental care research on birds and mammals also refers to a relatively narrow range of taxonomic groups when discussing its context and, thus, exhibits taxonomic citation bias. Further, the levels of taxonomic bias and taxonomic citation bias have not declined over the past decade despite cautionary messages about similar bias in related disciplines--in fact, taxonomic bias may have increased. As in Bonnet et al. (2002, my results should not be interpreted as evidence of an 'ornithological Mafia' conspiring to suppress other taxonomic groups. Rather, I generate several rational hypotheses to determine why bias persists and to

  3. [Taxonomic study of clinic isolates of Trichophyton in Rosario, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartabini, Mirta L; Bonino, Guillermo S; Racca, Liliana; Luque, Alicia G

    2013-01-01

    Due to the pleomorphism and cultural variability displayed by species of the genus Trichophyton, the identification methods based solely on morphological features are usually insufficient for their classification. The goal of the present work was to test a set of phenotypic methods in order to identify fungal isolates that belong to the aforementioned genus. These methods were based on a molecular taxonomic technique used as standard. Clinical isolates (56) were used as samples along with 6 reference strains. Macro and micromorphological studies were performed as well as biochemical and physiological tests such as in vitro hair perforation, nutritional requirements in Trichophyton agar media, urease production and growth on bromocresol purple-milk. solids-glucose (BCP-MS-G) agar. Additionally, PCR fingerprinting using the (GACA)4 primer was employed. As a result of the PCR method, specific profiles were observed for Microsporum canis, Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale. Identical profiles were obtained for Arthroderma benhamiae y Trichophyton erinacei. Of the total number of clinical isolates, 39 matched the T. rubrum profile while 13 corresponded to A. benhamiae and 4 to T. interdigitale. The most useful phenotypic test to differentiate between T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex strains was alkalinization of the BCP-MS-G medium. Phenotypic tests did not allow differentiation among the T. mentagrophytes complex species. On the other hand, the molecular technique allowed characterization of T. rubrum isolates as well as of those observed in our study and included in the T. mentagrophytes complex: T. interdigitale and Trichophyton sp., the anamorph of A. benhamiae.

  4. Approaching the taxonomic affiliation of unidentified sequences in public databases – an example from the mycorrhizal fungi

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    Ryberg Martin

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last few years, DNA sequence analysis has become one of the primary means of taxonomic identification of species, particularly so for species that are minute or otherwise lack distinct, readily obtainable morphological characters. Although the number of sequences available for comparison in public databases such as GenBank increases exponentially, only a minuscule fraction of all organisms have been sequenced, leaving taxon sampling a momentous problem for sequence-based taxonomic identification. When querying GenBank with a set of unidentified sequences, a considerable proportion typically lack fully identified matches, forming an ever-mounting pile of sequences that the researcher will have to monitor manually in the hope that new, clarifying sequences have been submitted by other researchers. To alleviate these concerns, a project to automatically monitor select unidentified sequences in GenBank for taxonomic progress through repeated local BLAST searches was initiated. Mycorrhizal fungi – a field where species identification often is prohibitively complex – and the much used ITS locus were chosen as test bed. Results A Perl script package called emerencia is presented. On a regular basis, it downloads select sequences from GenBank, separates the identified sequences from those insufficiently identified, and performs BLAST searches between these two datasets, storing all results in an SQL database. On the accompanying web-service http://emerencia.math.chalmers.se, users can monitor the taxonomic progress of insufficiently identified sequences over time, either through active searches or by signing up for e-mail notification upon disclosure of better matches. Other search categories, such as listing all insufficiently identified sequences (and their present best fully identified matches publication-wise, are also available. Discussion The ever-increasing use of DNA sequences for identification purposes

  5. Detecting taxonomic signal in an under-utilised character system: geometric morphometrics of the forcipular coxae of Scutigeromorpha (Chilopoda

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    Beatriz Lopez Gutierrez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, the forcipules have played almost no role in determining the systematics of scutigeromorph centipedes though in his 1974 review of taxonomic characters Markus Würmli suggested some potentially informative variation might be found in these structures. Geometric morphometric analyses were used to evaluate Würmli’s suggestion, specifically to determine whether the shape of the forcipular coxa contains information useful for diagnosing species. The geometry of the coxae of eight species from the genera Sphendononema, Scutigera, Dendrothereua, Thereuonema, Thereuopoda, Thereuopodina, Allothereua and Parascutigera was characterised using a combination of landmark- and semi-landmark-based sampling methods to summarize group-specific morphological variation. Canonical variates analysis of shape data characterizing the forcipular coxae indicates that these structures differ significantly between taxa at various systematic levels. Models calculated for the canonical variates space facilitate identification of the main shape differences between genera, including overall length/width, curvature of the external coxal margin, and the extent to which the coxofemoral condyle projects laterally. Jackknifed discriminant function analysis demonstrates that forcipular coxal training-set specimens were assigned to correct species in 61% of cases on average, the most accurate assignments being those of Parascutigera (P. guttata and Thereuonema (T. microstoma. The geographically widespread species Thereuopoda longicornis, Sphendononema guildingii, Scutigera coleoptrata, and Dendrothereua linceci exhibit the least diagnostic coxae in our dataset. Thereuopoda longicornis populations sampled from different parts of East and Southeast Asia were significantly discriminated from each other, suggesting that, in this case, extensive synonymy may be obscuring diagnosable inter-species coxal shape differences.

  6. DNA barcodes from four loci provide poor resolution of taxonomic groups in the genus Crataegus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrei, Mehdi; Talent, Nadia; Kuzmina, Maria; Lee, Jeanette; Lund, Jensen; Shipley, Paul R; Stefanović, Saša; Dickinson, Timothy A

    2015-04-28

    DNA barcodes can facilitate identification of organisms especially when morphological characters are limited or unobservable. To what extent this potential is realized in specific groups of plants remains to be determined. Libraries of barcode sequences from well-studied authoritatively identified plants represented by herbarium voucher specimens are needed in order for DNA barcodes to serve their intended purpose, where this is possible, and to understand the reasons behind their failure to do so, when this occurs. We evaluated four loci, widely regarded as universal DNA barcodes for plants, for their utility in hawthorn species identification. Three plastid regions, matK, rbcLa and psbA-trnH, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA discriminate only some of the species of Crataegus that can be recognized on the basis of their morphology etc. This is, in part, because in Rosaceae tribe Maleae most individual plastid loci yield relatively little taxonomic resolution and, in part, because the effects of allopolyploidization have not been eliminated by concerted evolution of the ITS regions. Although individual plastid markers provided generally poor resolution of taxonomic groups in Crataegus, a few species were notable exceptions. In contrast, analyses of concatenated sequences of the 3 plastid barcode loci plus 11 additional plastid loci gave a well-resolved maternal phylogeny. In the ITS2 tree, different individuals of some species formed groups with taxonomically unrelated species. This is a sign of lineage sorting due to incomplete concerted evolution in ITS2. Incongruence between the ITS2 and plastid trees is best explained by hybridization between different lineages within the genus. In aggregate, limited between-species variation in plastid loci, hybridization and a lack of concerted evolution in ITS2 all combine to limit the utility of standard barcoding markers in Crataegus. These results have implications for authentication

  7. Lab Practicums: Are We Teaching Sound Taxonomic Principles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Kenneth D.

    1993-01-01

    Presents a series of exercises to help students understand the importance of the limits of taxonomic keys and to identify the appropriate levels. Introductory activities include having students classify screws, "gummy bears," and beans. (PR)

  8. Taxonomic status of the melanistic forms of the Cordylus cordylus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-10-04

    Oct 4, 1988 ... taxonomic status of the melanistic form lack a sound factual basis. Recently ... interpreted as products of the swamping of small remain- ing melanistic ..... light brown lines along side of neck from ear opening to front limbs.

  9. Correct identification of species makes the amoebozoan rRNA tree congruent with morphology for the order Leptomyxida Page 1987; with description of Acramoeba dendroida n. g., n. sp., originally misidentified as 'Gephyramoeba sp.'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Alexey V; Nassonova, Elena S; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Morphological identification of protists remains an expert task, especially for little known and poorly described species. Culture collections normally accept organisms under the name provided by depositors and are not responsible for identification. Uncritical acceptance of these names by molecular phylogeneticists may result in serious errors of interpretation of phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences, making them appear more incongruent with morphology than they really are. Several cases of misidentification in a major culture collection have recently been reported. Here we provide evidence for misidentifications of two more gymnamoebae. The first concerns "Gephyramoeba sp." ATCC 50654; it is not Gephyramoeba, a leptomyxid with lobose pseudopods, but a hitherto undescribed branching amoeba with fine, filamentous subpseudopods named here Acramoeba dendroida gen. et sp. nov. We also sequenced 18S rRNA of Page's strain of Rhizamoeba saxonica (CCAP 1570/2) and show that it is the most deeply branching leptomyxid and is not phylogenetically close to 'Rhizamoeba saxonica' ATCC 50742, which was misidentified. Correcting these misidentifications improves the congruence between morphological diversity of Amoebozoa and their rRNA-based phylogenies, both for Leptomyxida and for the Acramoeba part of the tree. On morphological grounds we transfer Gephyramoebidae from Varipodida back to Leptomyxida and remove Flamella from Leptomyxida; sequences are needed to confirm these two revisions.

  10. Una taxonomía de modelos de desarrollo sustentable

    OpenAIRE

    Darcy Tetreault

    2004-01-01

    Este ensayo pretende ayudar a desenmarañar una parte del discurso sobre desarrollo sustentable mediante la construcción de una taxonomía de modelos de desarrollo sustentable. La misma taxonomía se basa en una revisión literaria extensiva que en cierta medida privilegia la experiencia mexicana. De este modo, el ensayo presenta y compara tanto modelos normativos como positivos. Los modelos incluidos son el modelo dominante, el cual corresponde con la estrategia ...

  11. Developing green supply chain management strategies: A taxonomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Mutingi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this research is to explore the empirical green supply chain activities found in literature, and to develop a taxonomic framework that can be used for formulating appropriate strategies for green supply chains, based on characteristic dimensions for the green supply chain. Design/methodology/approach: The taxonomic framework is developed through (i) analysis of green supply chain activities found in existing empirical work or case studies recorded in literature, (ii)...

  12. Taxonomic diversity and distinctness indices in assessment of weed communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jastrzębska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains an analysis of taxonomic weed biodiversity in the cultivation of spring barley in the period of 1990-2004, grown in crop rotation after potato with a 25% share of this cereal (potato - spring barley - field pea - winter triticale as well as in crop rotation with its 75% share (potato - spring barley - spring barley - spring barley in which barley was grown once and twice after the same barley crop. No weed control was used in the present experiment. Every year in the spring (at full emergence of the cereal crop and before harvest, the species composition and the numbers of individual weed species were determined, as well as weed biomass before harvest. On this basis, the taxonomic diversity and distinctness indices were calculated. Potato/barley crop rotation with a 25% share of this cereal and growing spring barley once and twice after the same barley crop did not differentiate taxonomic weed biodiversity. However, it was positively correlated with rainfall abundance during the growing season and negatively correlated with mean temperature. The taxonomic diversity indices were positively correlated with species richness and species diversity, whereas the taxonomic distinctness indices did not generally show any relationship with these measures. Spring barley grain yield did not depend on taxonomic biodiversity of weed communities.

  13. Segmentation-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance: erroneous tissue identification and its impact on positron emission tomography interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Oergel, Anja; Bezrukov, Ilja; Mueller, Mark; Schraml, Christina; Pfannenberg, Christina; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of artifacts in segmentation-based attenuation correction maps (μ-maps) of positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) and their impact on PET interpretation and the standardized uptake value (SUV) quantification in normal tissue and lesions. The study was approved by the local institutional review board. Attenuation maps of 100 patients with PET/MR and preceding PET/computed tomography examination were retrospectively inspected for artifacts (tracers: 2-deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D-glucose (¹⁸F-FDG), ¹¹C-Choline, ⁶⁸Ga-DOTATOC, ⁶⁸Ga-DOTATATE, ¹¹C-Methionine). The artifacts were subdivided into 9 different groups on the basis of their localization and appearance. The impact of μ-map artifacts in normal tissue and lesions on PET interpretation was evaluated qualitatively via visual analysis in synopsis with the non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) PET as well as quantitatively by comparing the SUV in artifact regions to reference regions. Attenuation map artifacts were found in 72% of the head/neck data sets, 61% of the thoracic data sets, 25% of the upper abdominal data sets, and 26% of the pelvic data sets. The most frequent localizations of the overall 276 artifacts were around metal implants (16%), in the lungs (19%), and outer body contours (31%). Twenty-one percent of all PET-avid lesions (38 of 184 lesions) were affected by artifacts in the majority without further consequences for visual PET interpretation. However, 9 PET-avid lung lesions were masked owing to μ-map artifacts and, thus, were only detectable on the NAC PET or additional MR imaging sequences. Quantitatively, μ-map artifacts led to significant SUV changes in areas with erroneous assignment of air instead of soft tissue (ie, metal artifacts) and of soft tissue instead of lung. Nevertheless, no change in diagnosis would have been caused by μ-map artifacts. Attenuation map artifacts that occur in a

  14. A multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous identification of three mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccaggi, D L; Krüger, K; Pietersen, G

    2008-02-01

    Molecular species identification is becoming more wide-spread in diagnostics and ecological studies, particularly with regard to insects for which morphological identification is difficult or time-consuming. In this study, we describe the development and application of a single-step multiplex PCR for the identification of three mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) associated with grapevine in South Africa: Planococcus ficus (vine mealybug), Planococcus citri (citrus mealybug) and Pseudococcus longispinus (longtailed mealybug). Mealybugs are pests on many commercial crops, including grapevine, in which they transmit viral diseases. Morphological identification of mealybug species is usually time-consuming, requires a high level of taxonomic expertise and usually only adult females can be identified. The single-step multiplex PCR developed here, based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO I) gene, is rapid, reliable, sensitive, accurate and simple. The entire identification protocol (including DNA extraction, PCR and electrophoresis) can be completed in approximately four hours. Successful DNA extraction from laboratory and unparasitized field-collected individuals stored in absolute ethanol was 97%. Specimens from which DNA could be extracted were always correctly identified (100% accuracy). The technique developed is simple enough to be implemented in any molecular laboratory. The principles described here can be extended to any organism for which rapid, reliable identification is needed.

  15. MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of black yeasts of the genus Exophiala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özhak-Baysan, Betil; Öğünç, Dilara; Döğen, Aylin; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the applicability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of Exophiala species. The analysis included a total of 110 Exophiala isolates, including 15 CBS strains representing 4 species, Exophiala dermatitidis (61), E. phaeomuriformis (36), E. crusticola (9), and E. heteromorpha (4), that had been previously identified based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. We also compared the relative efficacies of Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) and Columbia agar (CA) for use in MALDI-TOF MS. Remarkably, we obtained a log-score value ≥2.0 by using either SGA or CA for all 15 CBS strains, indicating species-level identification. The remaining 95 Exophiala strains were identified to the genus or species levels, with identification rates of 96.8% and 90.5%, using SGA or CA, respectively. Most of the E. dermatitidis (100% and 92.9%), E. phaeomuriformis (80.6% and 83.9%), E. crusticola (50% and 100%), and E. heteromorpha (100% and 100%) isolates were correctly identified using SGA or CA, respectively. Furthermore, 58.9% and 26.3% of the strains had log-score values of ≥2.0 by using SGA and CA, respectively. Our results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and reliable technique with high rates of correct taxonomic identification.

  16. TaxCollector: Modifying Current 16S rRNA Databases for the Rapid Classification at Six Taxonomic Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Triplett

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The high level of conservation of 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA in all Prokaryotes makes this gene an ideal tool for the rapid identification and classification of these microorganisms. Databases such as the Ribosomal Database Project II (RDP-II and the Greengenes Project offer access to sets of ribosomal RNA sequence databases useful in identification of microbes in a culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. However, these databases do not contain all of the taxonomic levels attached to the published names of the bacterial and archaeal sequences. TaxCollector is a set of scripts developed in Python language that attaches taxonomic information to all 16S rRNA sequences in the RDP-II and Greengenes databases. These modified databases are referred to as TaxCollector databases, which when used in conjunction with BLAST allow for rapid classification of sequences from any environmental or clinical source at six different taxonomic levels, from domain to species. The TaxCollector database prepared from the RDP-II database is an important component of a new 16S rRNA pipeline called PANGEA. The usefulness of TaxCollector databases is demonstrated with two very different datasets obtained using samples from a clinical setting and an agricultural soil. The six TaxCollector scripts are freely available on http://taxcollector.sourceforge.net and on http://www.microgator.org.

  17. Detection of a Cis [corrected] eQTL controlling BCMO1 gene expression leads to the identification of a QTG for chicken breast meat color.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Le Bihan-Duval

    Full Text Available Classical quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis and gene expression QTL (eQTL were combined to identify the causal gene (or QTG underlying a highly significant QTL controlling the variation of breast meat color in a F2 cross between divergent high-growth (HG and low-growth (LG chicken lines. Within this meat quality QTL, BCMO1 (Accession number GenBank: AJ271386, encoding the β-carotene 15, 15'-monooxygenase, a key enzyme in the conversion of β-carotene into colorless retinal, was a good functional candidate. Analysis of the abundance of BCMO1 mRNA in breast muscle of the HG x LG F2 population allowed for the identification of a strong cis eQTL. Moreover, reevaluation of the color QTL taking BCMO1 mRNA levels as a covariate indicated that BCMO1 mRNA levels entirely explained the variations in meat color. Two fully-linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP located within the proximal promoter of BCMO1 gene were identified. Haplotype substitution resulted in a marked difference in BCMO1 promoter activity in vitro. The association study in the F2 population revealed a three-fold difference in BCMO1 expression leading to a difference of 1 standard deviation in yellow color between the homozygous birds at this haplotype. This difference in meat yellow color was fully consistent with the difference in carotenoid content (i.e. lutein and zeaxanthin evidenced between the two alternative haplotypes. A significant association between the haplotype, the level of BCMO1 expression and the yellow color of the meat was also recovered in an unrelated commercial broiler population. The mutation could be of economic importance for poultry production by making possible a gene-assisted selection for color, a determining aspect of meat quality. Moreover, this natural genetic diversity constitutes a new model for the study of β-carotene metabolism which may act upon diverse biological processes as precursor of the vitamin A.

  18. The taxonomic name resolution service: an online tool for automated standardization of plant names

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Brad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The digitization of biodiversity data is leading to the widespread application of taxon names that are superfluous, ambiguous or incorrect, resulting in mismatched records and inflated species numbers. The ultimate consequences of misspelled names and bad taxonomy are erroneous scientific conclusions and faulty policy decisions. The lack of tools for correcting this ‘names problem’ has become a fundamental obstacle to integrating disparate data sources and advancing the progress of biodiversity science. Results The TNRS, or Taxonomic Name Resolution Service, is an online application for automated and user-supervised standardization of plant scientific names. The TNRS builds upon and extends existing open-source applications for name parsing and fuzzy matching. Names are standardized against multiple reference taxonomies, including the Missouri Botanical Garden's Tropicos database. Capable of processing thousands of names in a single operation, the TNRS parses and corrects misspelled names and authorities, standardizes variant spellings, and converts nomenclatural synonyms to accepted names. Family names can be included to increase match accuracy and resolve many types of homonyms. Partial matching of higher taxa combined with extraction of annotations, accession numbers and morphospecies allows the TNRS to standardize taxonomy across a broad range of active and legacy datasets. Conclusions We show how the TNRS can resolve many forms of taxonomic semantic heterogeneity, correct spelling errors and eliminate spurious names. As a result, the TNRS can aid the integration of disparate biological datasets. Although the TNRS was developed to aid in standardizing plant names, its underlying algorithms and design can be extended to all organisms and nomenclatural codes. The TNRS is accessible via a web interface at http://tnrs.iplantcollaborative.org/ and as a RESTful web service and application programming interface. Source code

  19. The taxonomic name resolution service: an online tool for automated standardization of plant names.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Brad; Hopkins, Nicole; Lu, Zhenyuan; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Mozzherin, Dmitry; Rees, Tony; Matasci, Naim; Narro, Martha L; Piel, William H; McKay, Sheldon J; Lowry, Sonya; Freeland, Chris; Peet, Robert K; Enquist, Brian J

    2013-01-16

    The digitization of biodiversity data is leading to the widespread application of taxon names that are superfluous, ambiguous or incorrect, resulting in mismatched records and inflated species numbers. The ultimate consequences of misspelled names and bad taxonomy are erroneous scientific conclusions and faulty policy decisions. The lack of tools for correcting this 'names problem' has become a fundamental obstacle to integrating disparate data sources and advancing the progress of biodiversity science. The TNRS, or Taxonomic Name Resolution Service, is an online application for automated and user-supervised standardization of plant scientific names. The TNRS builds upon and extends existing open-source applications for name parsing and fuzzy matching. Names are standardized against multiple reference taxonomies, including the Missouri Botanical Garden's Tropicos database. Capable of processing thousands of names in a single operation, the TNRS parses and corrects misspelled names and authorities, standardizes variant spellings, and converts nomenclatural synonyms to accepted names. Family names can be included to increase match accuracy and resolve many types of homonyms. Partial matching of higher taxa combined with extraction of annotations, accession numbers and morphospecies allows the TNRS to standardize taxonomy across a broad range of active and legacy datasets. We show how the TNRS can resolve many forms of taxonomic semantic heterogeneity, correct spelling errors and eliminate spurious names. As a result, the TNRS can aid the integration of disparate biological datasets. Although the TNRS was developed to aid in standardizing plant names, its underlying algorithms and design can be extended to all organisms and nomenclatural codes. The TNRS is accessible via a web interface at http://tnrs.iplantcollaborative.org/ and as a RESTful web service and application programming interface. Source code is available at https://github.com/iPlantCollaborativeOpenSource/TNRS/.

  20. Taxonomic key for the genera of Elmidae (Coleoptera, Byrrhoidea occurring in Goiás State, Brazil, including new records and distributional notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe F. Barbosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic key for the genera of Elmidae (Coleoptera, Byrrhoidea occurring in Goiás State, Brazil, including new records and distributional notes. Despite their great diversity and high abundance in Neotropical aquatic environments, the fauna of Elmidae remains practically unknown in some areas and even entire biomes in this region. In this work we bring, for the first time, faunistic data for the Elmidae of central Brazil. The aim of this work was to inventory the Elmidae fauna in central, southwestern and southeastern Goiás State, Brazil and to produce a taxonomic key, at genus level, for adults from the studied region. The taxonomic key presented herein offers means for the identification of all the 13 genera known to occur in Goiás, 11 of them being new records for the State. Moreover, the number of named species registered for Goiás increased from one to nine.

  1. A taxonomic study of Bali and Lombok Begonia (Begoniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deden Girmansyah

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available GIRMANSYAH, DEDEN. 2009. A taxonomic study of Bali and Lombok Begonia (Begoniaceae. Reinwardtia 12(5: 419–434. — A taxonomic study of Bali and Lombok Begonia was based on an investigation of morphological characters from 60 specimens in Herbarium Bogoriense. This study shows that there are 8 species that can be recognized: three species already in the genus (Begonia coriacea, B. longifolia, and B. tenuifolia and five new (Begonia baliensis, B. lempuyangensis, B. pseudomuricata, B. multibracteata, and B. lombokensis.

  2. Testing Taxonomic Predictivity of Foliar and Tuber Resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Wild Relatives of Potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiutti, A; Spooner, D M; Jansky, S H; Halterman, D A

    2015-09-01

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete phytopathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease found in potato-growing regions worldwide. Long-term management strategies to control late blight include the incorporation of host resistance to predominant strains. However, due to rapid genetic changes within pathogen populations, rapid and recurring identification and integration of novel host resistance traits is necessary. Wild relatives of potato offer a rich source of desirable traits, including late blight resistance, but screening methods can be time intensive. We tested the ability of taxonomy, ploidy, crossing group, breeding system, and geography to predict the presence of foliar and tuber late blight resistance in wild Solanum spp. Significant variation for resistance to both tuber and foliar late blight was found within and among species but there was no discernable predictive power based on taxonomic series, clade, ploidy, breeding system, elevation, or geographic location. We observed a moderate but significant correlation between tuber and foliar resistance within species. Although previously uncharacterized sources of both foliar and tuber resistance were identified, our study does not support an assumption that taxonomic or geographic data can be used to predict sources of late blight resistance in wild Solanum spp.

  3. Heteroploid reticulate evolution and taxonomic status of an endemic species with bicentric geographical distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwe Nierbauer, Kai; Paule, Juraj; Zizka, Georg

    2017-01-24

    Reticulate evolution is considered to be among the main mechanisms of plant evolution, often leading to the establishment of new species. However, complex evolutionary scenarios result in a challenging definition of evolutionary and taxonomic units. In the present study, we aimed to examine the evolutionary origin and revise the species status of Campanula baumgartenii, a rare endemic species from the polyploid complex Campanula section Heterophylla. Morphometry, flow cytometric ploidy estimation, AFLPs, as well as chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequence markers were used to assess the morphological and genetic differentiation among C. baumgartenii, C. rotundifolia and other closely related taxa. Tetra- and hexaploid C. baumgartenii is morphologically and molecularly (AFLP) differentiated from sympatric C. rotundifolia. Contrasting signals from nuclear (ITS) and chloroplast (trnL-rpl32) markers suggest a hybrid origin of C. baumgartenii with C. rotundifolia and a taxon related to the alpine C. scheuchzeri as ancestors. Additionally, hexaploid C. baumgartenii currently hybridizes with co-occurring tetraploid C. rotundifolia resulting in pentaploid hybrids, for which C. baumgartenii serves as both seed and pollen donor. Based on the molecular and morphological differentiation, we propose to keep C. baumgartenii as a separate species. This study exemplifies that detailed population genetic studies can provide a solid basis for taxonomic delimitation within Campanula section Heterophylla as well as for sound identification of conservation targets.

  4. A taxonomic survey of Saudi Arabian Red Sea octocorals (Cnidaria: Alcyonacea)

    KAUST Repository

    Haverkort-Yeh, Roxanne D.

    2013-05-04

    A preliminary survey of Saudi Arabian Alcyonacea is presented, which combines classical taxonomy, multilocus molecular barcodes, and in situ photographs. We explored 14 locations along the west coast of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to assess the regional taxonomic diversity of non-gorgonian alcyonaceans. We collected samples from a total of 74 colonies, distributed among four families: 18 colonies of Alcyoniidae, 14 of Nephtheidae, 9 of Tubiporidae, and 33 of Xeniidae. We sequenced the octocorals using multiple nuclear [ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS) and ATP Synthetase Subunit α (ATPSα)] and mitochondrial [MutS homolog (mtMutS) and Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit one (COI)] loci, providing molecular barcodes which will: (1) allow direct comparison of biodiversity from this location to others for which molecular data are available, and (2) facilitate future identifications of these taxa. Finally, this preliminary phylogeny of sampled taxa provides insights on the resolution of mitochondrial versus nuclear loci, and highlights octocoral taxa that require further taxonomic attention. © 2013 Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. Determinants and taxonomic consequences of extreme egg shell variability in Ramazzottius subanomalus (Biserov, 1985) (Tardigrada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Daniel; Morek, Witold; Gąsiorek, Piotr; Kaczmarek, Łukasz; Michalczyk, Łukasz

    2016-12-15

    Nearly a half of known eutardigrade species lay ornamented eggs. The ornamentation is thought to provide attachment of the egg to the substrate and protection for the developing embryo, but from the taxonomic point of view chorion morphology may also provide key characters for species differentiation and identification, especially between closely related taxa. Nonetheless, despite the evolutionary and taxonomic importance of the egg shell, the determinants of its morphology are very poorly, if at all, understood. Here, we combine morphological, molecular and experimental approaches in an attempt to separate the genetic and environmental factors that shape egg chorion morphology in Ramazzottius subanomalus (Biserov, 1985). Our integrative study, based on a population of R. subanomalus isolated from a single moss sample, revealed (1) remarkable variation in egg shell morphology, but (2) relatively little variation in animal morphometric traits, and (3) genetic differentiation, expressed as two ITS-2 haplotypes, but no parallel polymorphism in COI. Although animals did not differ morphometrically between the haplotypes, eggs laid by haplotype 1 and 2 females exhibited highly statistically significant differences in all measured traits. The study demonstrates, for the first time, a correlation between phenotypic and genetic variability within a tardigrade species. The revealed congruence between genetic and morphological traits might be viewed as an example of incipient speciation that illustrates early evolutionary steps leading to species complexes that differ primarily in terms of egg shell morphology. Moreover, our data confirm the value of the ITS-2 fragment in distinguishing very closely related tardigrade lineages.

  6. A molecular identification system for grasses: a novel technology for forensic botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J; Peakall, R; Gilmore, S R; Robertson, J

    2005-09-10

    Our present inability to rapidly, accurately and cost-effectively identify trace botanical evidence remains the major impediment to the routine application of forensic botany. Grasses are amongst the most likely plant species encountered as forensic trace evidence and have the potential to provide links between crime scenes and individuals or other vital crime scene information. We are designing a molecular DNA-based identification system for grasses consisting of several PCR assays that, like a traditional morphological taxonomic key, provide criteria that progressively identify an unknown grass sample to a given taxonomic rank. In a prior study of DNA sequences across 20 phylogenetically representative grass species, we identified a series of potentially informative indels in the grass mitochondrial genome. In this study we designed and tested five PCR assays spanning these indels and assessed the feasibility of these assays to aid identification of unknown grass samples. We confirmed that for our control set of 20 samples, on which the design of the PCR assays was based, the five primer combinations produced the expected results. Using these PCR assays in a 'blind test', we were able to identify 25 unknown grass samples with some restrictions. Species belonging to genera represented in our control set were all correctly identified to genus with one exception. Similarly, genera belonging to tribes in the control set were correctly identified to the tribal level. Finally, for those samples for which neither the tribal or genus specific PCR assays were designed, we could confidently exclude these samples from belonging to certain tribes and genera. The results confirmed the utility of the PCR assays and the feasibility of developing a robust full-scale usable grass identification system for forensic purposes.

  7. The taxonomic distribution of asteroids from multi-filter all-sky photometric surveys

    CERN Document Server

    DeMeo, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of asteroids across the Main Belt has been studied for decades to understand the compositional distribution and what that tells us about the formation and evolution of our solar system. All-sky surveys now provide orders of magnitude more data than targeted surveys. We present a method to bias-correct the asteroid population observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) according to size, distance, and albedo. We taxonomically classify this dataset consistent with the Bus and Bus-DeMeo systems and present the resulting taxonomic distribution. The dataset includes asteroids as small as 5 km, a factor of three in diameter smaller than in previous works. Because of the wide range of sizes in our sample, we present the distribution by number, surface area, volume, and mass whereas previous work was exclusively by number. While the distribution by number is a useful quantity and has been used for decades, these additional quantities provide new insights into the distribution of total material. W...

  8. Barcoding in the dark? A critical view of the sufficiency of zoological DNA barcoding databases and a plea for broader integration of taxonomic knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, Sebastian

    2013-10-01

    The functionality of standard zoological DNA barcoding practice (the identification of unknown specimens by comparison of COI sequences) is contingent on working barcode databases with sufficient taxonomic coverage. It has already been established that the main barcoding repositories, NCBI and BOLD, are devoid of data for many animal groups but the specific taxonomic coverage of the repositories across animal biodiversity remains unexplored. Here, I shed light on this mystery by contrasting the number of unique taxon labels in the two databases with the number of currently recognized species for each animal phylum. The numbers reveal an overall paucity of COI sequence data in the repositories (15.13% total coverage across the recognized biodiversity on Earth, and 20.76% average taxonomic coverage for each phylum) and, more importantly, bear witness to the idleness towards numerous phyla, rendering current barcoding efforts either ineffective or inaccurate. The importance of further integrating taxonomic expertise into barcoding practice is briefly discussed and some guidelines, previously mentioned in the barcoding literature, are suggested anew. Finally, the asserted values concerning the taxonomic coverage in barcoding databases for Animalia are contrasted with those of Plantae and Fungi.

  9. taxonomic diversity of agamid lizards (reptilia,sauria,acrodonta,agamidae)from china:a comparative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    results of the analysis of taxonomic diversity and representation of different evolutionary lineages of agamid lizards (reptilia,sauria,agamidae)are provided in this article.for comparison with the fauna of china,the following territories were selected:north eurasia,iran and different countries of south and southeast asia.there are 49 agamid species in china,comprising 12 genera and 4 subfamilies.annotated check-list and identification keys to genera are provided.among the 49 species of agamids present in china,the percent of endemic species is relatively high (22 species; 45%).endemic species refer to 4 genera with the genus japalura having the most,10 of 14 species,proceeded by members of tibetan plateau lineage of phrynocephalus,8 of 12 species,and calotes with 1 species and laudakia with 3.

  10. Taxonomía de la literatura oral kuna

    OpenAIRE

    Prestán, Arnulfo

    2016-01-01

    El presente trabajo trata de descifrar, grosso modo, la taxonomía de la literatura oral kuna denominada ikar que significa tratado o camino y se especifica anteponiendo un sustantivo, por ejemplo, pap ikar que significa tratado de Dios; ina ikar, tratado de medicina, etc.

  11. A taxonomic revision of Germainia (Andropogoneae: Poaceae) in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerawatananon, A.; Sungkaew, S.; Boontia, V.; Hodkinson, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the genus Germainia (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) in Thailand is presented based on herbarium and field studies, including evidence from morphology, habitats and geographical distribution. Six of the nine recognized Germainia species are found in Thailand. We include a key to the

  12. A taxonomic revision of Germainia (Andropogoneae: Poaceae) in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerawatananon, A.; Sungkaew, S.; Boontia, V.; Hodkinson, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the genus Germainia (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) in Thailand is presented based on herbarium and field studies, including evidence from morphology, habitats and geographical distribution. Six of the nine recognized Germainia species are found in Thailand. We include a key to the

  13. A Taxonomic Approach to the Gestalt Theory of Perls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raming, Henry E.; Frey, David H.

    1974-01-01

    This study applied content analysis and cluster analysis to the ideas of Fritz Perls to develop a taxonomy of Gestalt processes and goals. Summaries of the typal groups or clusters were written and the implications of taxonomic research in counseling discussed. (Author)

  14. A synopsis of taxonomic changes in Aporosa Blume (Euphorbiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, Anne M.

    1995-01-01

    Some major nomenclatural and taxonomic changes in Aporosa Blume are treated, i.e., the spelling of the genus name, some new combinations, and descriptions of four new species of from West Malesia, six from New Guinea, and two new varieties from West Malesia. Notes on a number of often misunderstood

  15. A taxonomic study of Albizia (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae: Ingeae in Mexico and Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Arce, María de Lourdes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Albizia is economically and environmentally important because many elements are multipurpose trees. A taxonomic study of 12 Central American and Mexican Albizia species is presented. Identification keys, illustrations and ecological information are provided together with some taxonomic comments. Distribution maps and conservation status are given for each native species in the area. Three epithets are lectotypyfied and three new name combinations are made. An interactive identification electronic key is available from the authors if requested. Full specimen records are available at www.kew.org/herbcat .El género Albizia tiene importancia económica y ecológica porque en su mayoría está integrado por árboles con usos múltiples. Se presenta un estudio taxonómico para 12 especies con distribución en México y Centro América, se incluyen claves para la identificación de las especies, ilustraciones, mapas de distribución, estados de conservación de las especies nativas del área y comentarios ecológicos y taxonómicos. Se formaliza la lectipificacion de tres epítetos y se proponen tres nuevas combinaciones. Una clave electrónica interactiva para la identificación de las especies se puede solicitar a los autores. Finalmente el conjunto completo de los ejemplares de herbario puede ser consultado en el sitio Web de los Jardines Reales de Kew: www.kew.org/herbcat.

  16. A rapid MALDI-TOF MS identification database at genospecies level for clinical and environmental Aeromonas strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Benagli

    Full Text Available The genus Aeromonas has undergone a number of taxonomic and nomenclature revisions over the past 20 years, and new (subspecies and biogroups are continuously described. Standard identification methods such as biochemical characterization have deficiencies and do not allow clarification of the taxonomic position. This report describes the development of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS identification database for a rapid identification of clinical and environmental Aeromonas isolates.

  17. The potential of distance-based thresholds and character-based DNA barcoding for defining problematic taxonomic entities by CO1 and ND1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, T; Rach, J; Damm, S; Desalle, R; Schierwater, B; Hadrys, H

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial CO1 gene (cytochrome c oxidase I) is a widely accepted metazoan barcode region. In insects, the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) gene region has proved to be another suitable marker especially for the identification of lower level taxonomic entities such as populations and sister species. To evaluate the potential of distance-based thresholds and character-based DNA barcoding for the identification of problematic species-rich taxa, both markers, CO1 and ND1, were used as test parameters in odonates. We sequenced and compared gene fragments of CO1 and ND1 for 271 odonate individuals representing 51 species, 22 genera and eight families. Our data suggests that (i) the combination of the CO1 and ND1 fragment forms a better identifier than a single region alone; and (ii) the character-based approach provides higher resolution than the distance-based method in Odonata especially in closely related taxonomic entities.

  18. La fauna de caprélidos (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Caprellidea de la costa de Coquimbo, centro-norte de Chile, con una clave taxonómica para la identificación de las especies The caprellid fauna (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Caprellidea from the coast of Coquimbo, Northern-central Chile, with a taxonomic key for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ M. GUERRA-GARCÍA

    2001-12-01

    difficult due to the high degree of intra-specific morphological variability and the fact that literature and specimens from Museums are not easily located. The objective of the present study was to provide the taxonomical tools to identify the most common caprellid species from northern-central Chile. Several habitats were examined (buoys, boulders, algal/seagrass beds and six caprellid species were found: Caprellina longicollis (Nicolet, 1849, Caprella equilibra Say, 1818, C. scaura Templeton, 1836, C. verrucosa Boeck, 1871; Deutella venenosa Mayer, 1890 and Paracaprella pusilla Mayer, 1890. Caprella scaura, C. verrucosa and D. venenosa were most abundant among algae, hydrozoans and bryozoans growing on buoys. Caprella equilibra, also present on buoys, was most abundant underneath boulders in exposed rocky intertidal zones, where additionally D. venenosa and P. pusilla were found. Caprella scaura was dominant in plant beds above sandy subtidal bottom, especially among the alga Gracilaria chilensis and the seagrass Heterozostera tasmanica, where it occurred together with Caprellina longicollis. Paracaprella pusilla represents a new citation for the pacific coasts of S-America, being a new record for Chile. The species D. venenosa, which was recorded for the first time since the original description by Mayer in the year 1890, is considered an endemic species from the central coast of Chile

  19. A taxonomic synopsis of Altingiaceae with nine new combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ickert-Bond

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic synopsis of the Altingiaceae is presented, including the taxonomic enumeration and distribution of 15 recognized species based on studies of 1,500 specimens from 24 herbaria throughout the distributional range of the taxa. Previous phylogenetic analyses based on several molecular markers have shown that Altingia and Semiliquidambar are nested within Liquidambar. All Altingia and Semiliquidambar species are now formally transferred to Liquidambar, which has the nomenclatural priority. The following nine new combinations are herein made: Liquidambar cambodiana (Lecomte Ickert-Bond & J. Wen, L. caudata (H. T. Chang Ickert-Bond & J. Wen, L. chingii (Metcalf Ickert-Bond & J. Wen, L. gracilipes (Hemsl. Ickert-Bond & J. Wen, L. multinervis (Cheng Ickert-Bond & J. Wen, L. obovata (Merrill & Chun Ickert-Bond & J. Wen, L. poilanei (Tardieu Ickert-Bond & J. Wen, L. siamensis (Craib Ickert-Bond & J. Wen, and L. yunnanensis (Rehder & Wilson Ickert-Bond & J. Wen.

  20. Quantifying the taxonomic diversity in real species communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartozo, Cecile Caretta [Laboratoire de Biophysique Statistique, ITP-FSB, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Garlaschelli, Diego [Department of Physics, University of Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Ricotta, Carlo [Department of Plant Biology, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Barthelemy, Marc [School of Informatics and Biocomplexity Center, Indiana University, Eigenmann Hall, 1900 East Tenth Street, Bloomington, IN 47406 (United States); Caldarelli, Guido [INFM-CNR Centro SMC Department of Physics, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: cecile.carettacartozo@epfl.ch, E-mail: garlaschelli@unisi.it, E-mail: carlo.ricotta@uniroma1.it, E-mail: mbarthel@indiana.edu, E-mail: guido.caldarelli@roma1.infn.it

    2008-06-06

    We analyze several florae (collections of plant species populating specific areas) in different geographic and climatic regions. For every list of species we produce a taxonomic classification tree and we consider its statistical properties. We find that regardless of the geographical location, the climate and the environment all species collections have universal statistical properties that we show to be also robust in time. We then compare observed data sets with simulated communities obtained by randomly sampling a large pool of species from all over the world. We find differences in the behavior of the statistical properties of the corresponding taxonomic trees. Our results suggest that it is possible to distinguish quantitatively real species assemblages from random collections and thus demonstrate the existence of correlations between species.

  1. A taxonomic catalogue of Japanese nemerteans (phylum Nemertea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Hiroshi

    2007-04-01

    A literature-based taxonomic catalogue of the nemertean species (Phylum Nemertea) reported from Japanese waters is provided, listing 19 families, 45 genera, and 120 species as valid. Applications of the following species names to forms previously recorded from Japanese waters are regarded as uncertain: Amphiporus cervicalis, Amphiporus depressus, Amphiporus lactifloreus, Cephalothrix filiformis, Cephalothrix linearis, Cerebratulus fuscus, Lineus vegetus, Lineus bilineatus, Lineus gesserensis, Lineus grubei, Lineus longifissus, Lineus mcintoshii, Nipponnemertes pulchra, Oerstedia venusta, Prostoma graecense, and Prostoma grande. The identities of the taxa referred to by the following four nominal species require clarification through future investigations: Cosmocephala japonica, Dicelis rubra, Dichilus obscurus, and Nareda serpentina. The nominal species established from Japanese waters are tabulated. In addition, a brief history of taxonomic research on Japanese nemerteans is reviewed.

  2. Quantifying the taxonomic diversity in real species communities

    CERN Document Server

    Cartozo, C Caretta; Ricotta, C; Barthelemy, M; Caldarelli, G

    2008-01-01

    We analyze several florae (collections of plant species populating specific areas) in different geographic and climatic regions. For every list of species we produce a taxonomic classification tree and we consider its statistical properties. We find that regardless of the geographical location, the climate and the environment all species collections have universal statistical properties that we show to be also robust in time. We then compare observed data sets with simulated communities obtained by randomly sampling a large pool of species from all over the world. We find differences in the behavior of the statistical properties of the corresponding taxonomic trees. Our results suggest that it is possible to distinguish quantitatively real species assemblages from random collections and thus demonstrate the existence of correlations between species.

  3. Identification and typing of free-living Acanthamoeba spp. by MALDI-TOF MS Biotyper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Chierico, Federica; Di Cave, David; Accardi, Cristel; Santoro, Maristella; Masotti, Andrea; D'Alfonso, Rossella; Berrilli, Federica; Urbani, Andrea; Putignani, Lorenza

    2016-11-01

    Over the years, the potential pathogenicity of Acanthamoeba for humans and animals has gained increasing attention from the scientific community. More than 24 species belong to this genus, however only some of them are causative agents of keratitis and encephalitis in humans. Due to technical difficulties in diagnosis, these infections are likely to be under-detected. The introduction of 18S rDNA amplification for the identification of Acanthamoeba has dramatically enhanced diagnosis performances, but the attestation of genotyping requires supplementary sequencing-based procedures. In this study, 15 Acanthamoeba strains were collected and grown on nutrient agar media. Each strain was genotyped by end-point PCR assay for the amplification of the 18S rDNA gene and the genotype was assigned by sequencing analysis through neighbor joining phylogenetic tree. In order to optimize standardization of the MALDI-TOF MS assay, we established the collection time point at the cystic phase. Two strains of each genotype were randomly chosen to customize the biotyper database. For all strains, 24 spectral measurements were acquired and submitted to identification and cluster analysis of spectra. The obtained results highlighted the correct identification of Acanthamoeba strains and the overlapping of spectra dendrogram clusters to the 18S genotype assignations. In conclusion, the MALDI-TOF MS Biotyper revealed the capability to identify and genotype the Acanthamoeba strains, providing a new frontier in the diagnostic identification of amaebae and in taxonomic and phylogenetic studies.

  4. A taxonomic revision of Germainia (Andropogoneae: Poaceae) in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Teerawatananon, A.; Sungkaew, S.; Boontia, V.; Hodkinson, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the genus Germainia (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) in Thailand is presented based on herbarium and field studies, including evidence from morphology, habitats and geographical distribution. Six of the nine recognized Germainia species are found in Thailand. We include a key to the taxa that are currently known from Thailand or may be expected, lists of species synonymies, species descriptions and lists of representative specimens.

  5. Data on taxonomic status and phylogenetic relationship of tits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Juan Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The data in this paper are related to the research article entitled “Taxonomic status and phylogenetic relationship of tits based on mitogenomes and nuclear segments” (X.J. Li et al., 2016 [1]. The mitochondrial genomes and nuclear segments of tits were sequenced to analyze mitochondrial characteristics and phylogeny. In the data, the analyzed results are presented. The data holds the resulting files of mitochondrial characteristics, heterogeneity, best schemes, and trees.

  6. Data on taxonomic status and phylogenetic relationship of tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Juan; Lin, Li-Liang; Cui, Ai-Ming; Bai, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Yang; Xin, Chao; Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Chao; Gao, Rui-Rui; Huang, Yuan; Lei, Fu-Min

    2017-02-01

    The data in this paper are related to the research article entitled "Taxonomic status and phylogenetic relationship of tits based on mitogenomes and nuclear segments" (X.J. Li et al., 2016) [1]. The mitochondrial genomes and nuclear segments of tits were sequenced to analyze mitochondrial characteristics and phylogeny. In the data, the analyzed results are presented. The data holds the resulting files of mitochondrial characteristics, heterogeneity, best schemes, and trees.

  7. La confusa taxonomía de Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Pérez-Cordón

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Los últimos descubrimientos en la biología y filogenética de Cryptosporidium refuerzan la necesidad de una exhaustiva revisión del ciclo de vida y la taxonomía de este parásito. Tanto futuros estudios de cultivo in vitro e in vivo así como estudios moleculares y genéticos permitirán avanzar en el profundo conocimiento de este interesante parásito.

  8. Insights from Zootaxa on potential trends in zoological taxonomic activity

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    Dubois Alain

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An opinion currently shared by taxonomists and non taxonomists alike is that the work of inventorying biodiversity is unbalanced: firstly, in favour of countries in which taxonomy has been studied for a long time, and, secondly, in favour of vertebrates. In the current context of threats of species extinction, access for taxonomists to biological material and information becomes crucial if the scientific community really aims at a better knowledge of biological diversity before it is severely and irreversibly impoverished. We performed an analysis of 748 papers published in Zootaxa in 2006 and 2007, as well as 434 questionnaires sent to their authors to test these opinions. A generalization of these results to zoological taxonomy as a whole is discussed. Discussion We found that the disequilibrium is not exactly what it usually considered to be. The USA, China and Brazil are currently the three leading countries in zoological taxonomy. Each of them presents, however, a different pattern. Taxonomists from Asia and South America are younger and mainly work in universities, not museums. A bias in favour of vertebrates still exists if we refer to the effort invested in each group to produce taxonomic data, but not to the number of papers. Finally, we insist on the idea that "describing a species" is very different from "knowing a species". Summary The taxonomic involvement of a country, in terms of manpower and funding, appears to be a key factor in the development of fruitful taxonomic research. This message seems to have been understood by the countries that recently decided to increase considerably their taxonomic involvement. It still has to be received by those who did not.

  9. Taxonomic notes on Amblycerus Thunberg, 1815 (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Kingsolver, John M.; Cibele S. Ribeiro-Costa

    2011-01-01

    The following changes in nomenclature of some species of Amblyeems Thunberg, 1815, are proposed: A) Elevated to new taxonomic status- A. insuturatus (pic, 1902) from (Spennophagus subflavidus var.insuturatus); A. luteolineatus (pic, 1929) from (Spennophagus luteonotatus var .luteolineatus);A. paulonotatus (pic, 1906) from (Spennophagus luteonotatus var.paulonotatus). B) New synonymy-A. dispar(Sharp, 1885)(=Spermophagus longissimus Pic, 1902; =S. earyoborifonnis Pic, 1910; =S. guyanensis Pic, ...

  10. Taxonomic precision of different hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene and annotation methods for functional bacterial groups in biological wastewater treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Guo

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene leads us into a deeper understanding on bacterial diversity for complex environmental samples, but introduces blurring due to the relatively low taxonomic capability of short read. For wastewater treatment plant, only those functional bacterial genera categorized as nutrient remediators, bulk/foaming species, and potential pathogens are significant to biological wastewater treatment and environmental impacts. Precise taxonomic assignment of these bacteria at least at genus level is important for microbial ecological research and routine wastewater treatment monitoring. Therefore, the focus of this study was to evaluate the taxonomic precisions of different ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene hypervariable regions generated from a mix activated sludge sample. In addition, three commonly used classification methods including RDP Classifier, BLAST-based best-hit annotation, and the lowest common ancestor annotation by MEGAN were evaluated by comparing their consistency. Under an unsupervised way, analysis of consistency among different classification methods suggests there are no hypervariable regions with good taxonomic coverage for all genera. Taxonomic assignment based on certain regions of the 16S rRNA genes, e.g. the V1&V2 regions - provide fairly consistent taxonomic assignment for a relatively wide range of genera. Hence, it is recommended to use these regions for studying functional groups in activated sludge. Moreover, the inconsistency among methods also demonstrated that a specific method might not be suitable for identification of some bacterial genera using certain 16S rRNA gene regions. As a general rule, drawing conclusions based only on one sequencing region and one classification method should be avoided due to the potential false negative results.

  11. Taxonomic and numerical resolutions of nepomorpha (insecta: heteroptera in cerrado streams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubia França da Silva Giehl

    Full Text Available Transformations of natural landscapes and their biodiversity have become increasingly dramatic and intense, creating a demand for rapid and inexpensive methods to assess and monitor ecosystems, especially the most vulnerable ones, such as aquatic systems. The speed with which surveys can collect, identify, and describe ecological patterns is much slower than that of the loss of biodiversity. Thus, there is a tendency for higher-level taxonomic identification to be used, a practice that is justified by factors such as the cost-benefit ratio, and the lack of taxonomists and reliable information on species distributions and diversity. However, most of these studies do not evaluate the degree of representativeness obtained by different taxonomic resolutions. Given this demand, the present study aims to investigate the congruence between species-level and genus-level data for the infraorder Nepomorpha, based on taxonomic and numerical resolutions. We collected specimens of aquatic Nepomorpha from five streams of first to fourth order of magnitude in the Pindaíba River Basin in the Cerrado of the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, totaling 20 sites. A principal coordinates analysis (PCoA applied to the data indicated that species-level and genus-level abundances were relatively similar (>80% similarity, although this similarity was reduced when compared with the presence/absence of genera (R = 0.77. The presence/absence ordinations of species and genera were similar to those recorded for their abundances (R = 0.95 and R = 0.74, respectively. The results indicate that analyses at the genus level may be used instead of species, given a loss of information of 11 to 19%, although congruence is higher when using abundance data instead of presence/absence. This analysis confirms that the use of the genus level data is a safe shortcut for environmental monitoring studies, although this approach must be treated with caution when the objectives include

  12. Carbofuran effects in soil nematode communities: using trait and taxonomic based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelinho, Sónia; Dieter Sautter, Klaus; Cachada, Anabela; Abrantes, Isabel; Brown, George; Costa Duarte, Armando; Sousa, José Paulo

    2011-10-01

    This work intends to implement the use of native soil nematode communities in ecotoxicological tests using a model pesticide and two geographically nematode communities (Mediterranean and sub-tropical) in order to obtain new perspectives on the evaluation of the toxic potential of chemical substances. The environmental condition of the nematode communities was described using a trait-based approach (grouping the organisms according to their feeding traits) and a traditional taxonomic method (identification to family level). Effects on total nematode abundance, number of families and abundance of nematode feeding groups as well as potential shifts in both trophic and family structure were assessed. Agricultural soils from Curitiba (Brazil) and Coimbra (Portugal) were sampled and the corresponding nematode communities were extracted. Part of the collected soil was defaunated and spiked with four doses of a carbofuran commercial formulation. Afterwards each of the replicates was inoculated with a nematode suspension containing ≈200 or 300 nematodes. After 14 and 28 d of exposure the nematodes were extracted, counted and identified at family level and separately classified according to their feeding traits. The patterns of nematode responses revealed a decrease in the total abundance and a reduction in the number of families. Despite the similar effects observed for both communities, statistically significant toxic effects were only found within the Portuguese community. The total nematode abundance was significantly reduced at the highest carbofuran concentrations and significant shifts in the family structure were detected. However, the trophic structure, i.e., the contribution of each feeding group for the overall community structure, did not significantly change along the contamination gradient. Results showed that using such a trait-based approach may increase the ecological relevance of toxicity data, by establishing communalities in the response to a chemical

  13. A taxonomic framework for cable bacteria and proposal of the candidate genera Electrothrix and Electronema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Bjerg, Jesper T; Bøggild, Andreas; Yang, Tingting; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Schramm, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Cable bacteria are long, multicellular filaments that can conduct electric currents over centimeter-scale distances. All cable bacteria identified to date belong to the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfobulbaceae and have not been isolated in pure culture yet. Their taxonomic delineation and exact phylogeny is uncertain, as most studies so far have reported only short partial 16S rRNA sequences or have relied on identification by a combination of filament morphology and 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization with a Desulfobulbaceae-specific probe. In this study, nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences of 16 individual cable bacteria filaments from freshwater, salt marsh, and marine sites of four geographic locations are presented. These sequences formed a distinct, monophyletic sister clade to the genus Desulfobulbus and could be divided into six coherent, species-level clusters, arranged as two genus-level groups. The same grouping was retrieved by phylogenetic analysis of full or partial dsrAB genes encoding the dissimilatory sulfite reductase. Based on these results, it is proposed to accommodate cable bacteria within two novel candidate genera: the mostly marine "Candidatus Electrothrix", with four candidate species, and the mostly freshwater "Candidatus Electronema", with two candidate species. This taxonomic framework can be used to assign environmental sequences confidently to the cable bacteria clade, even without morphological information. Database searches revealed 185 16S rRNA gene sequences that affiliated within the clade formed by the proposed cable bacteria genera, of which 120 sequences could be assigned to one of the six candidate species, while the remaining 65 sequences indicated the existence of up to five additional species.

  14. An evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the identification of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from canine infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcella Braga; Ferreira, Fabienne Antunes; Garcia, Luize Neli Nunes; Silva-Carvalho, Maria Cícera; Botelho, Larissa Alvarenga Batista; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Vieira-da-Motta, Olney

    2015-03-01

    It has been proposed, based on taxonomic and molecular studies, that all canine isolates belonging to Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) should be renamed Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. However, isolates of SIG and other coagulase-positive staphylococci share many phenotypic characteristics, which could lead to misidentification. The accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identifying S. pseudintermedius isolates obtained from canine infections was evaluated, using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based identification as the gold standard. In addition, MALDI-TOF MS was compared with conventional biochemical tests. A central problem was the incorrect identification of S. pseudintermedius isolates as S. intermedius by either MALDI-TOF MS or biochemical identification. From the 49 S. pseudintermedius isolates identified by the molecular method, only 21 could be assigned to this species by the biochemical approach and only 12 by MALDI-TOF MS. The 6 S. aureus isolates were correctly identified by all 3 techniques. However, using biochemical tests, 9 S. pseudintermedius were mistakenly classified as S. aureus, indicating a reduced specificity relative to the MALDI-TOF MS system. Analysis with the MALDI-TOF MS platform allowed rapid and accurate identification of the 49 isolates to the S. intermedius group but the approach was very limited in identifying S. pseudintermedius isolates, as only 12 of 49 isolates were correctly identified, a sensitivity of 0.24 (95% confidence interval: 0.13-0.39).

  15. High-resolution taxonomic profiling of the subgingival microbiome for biomarker discovery and periodontitis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafranski, Szymon P; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Jáuregui, Ruy; Plumeier, Iris; Klawonn, Frank; Tomasch, Jürgen; Meisinger, Christa; Kühnisch, Jan; Sztajer, Helena; Pieper, Dietmar H; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2015-02-01

    The oral microbiome plays a key role for caries, periodontitis, and systemic diseases. A method for rapid, high-resolution, robust taxonomic profiling of subgingival bacterial communities for early detection of periodontitis biomarkers would therefore be a useful tool for individualized medicine. Here, we used Illumina sequencing of the V1-V2 and V5-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. A sample stratification pipeline was developed in a pilot study of 19 individuals, 9 of whom had been diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Five hundred twenty-three operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the V1-V2 region and 432 from the V5-V6 region. Key periodontal pathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia could be identified at the species level with both primer sets. Principal coordinate analysis identified two outliers that were consistently independent of the hypervariable region and method of DNA extraction used. The linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size algorithm (LEfSe) identified 80 OTU-level biomarkers of periodontitis and 17 of health. Health- and periodontitis-related clusters of OTUs were identified using a connectivity analysis, and the results confirmed previous studies with several thousands of samples. A machine learning algorithm was developed which was trained on all but one sample and then predicted the diagnosis of the left-out sample (jackknife method). Using a combination of the 10 best biomarkers, 15 of 17 samples were correctly diagnosed. Training the algorithm on time-resolved community profiles might provide a highly sensitive tool to detect the onset of periodontitis.

  16. Professional Competence of Student Teachers to Implement Species Identification in Schools – A Case Study from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Lindemann-Matthies

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates how well prepared student teachers are to implement species identification in school. Data were collected with the help of a questionnaire and a PowerPoint presentation in which local plant and animal species were presented. Participants (n = 357 correctly identified, on average, 23% of the plants and 44% of the animals. They identified plants mainly by flower characteristics and leaves, and animals mainly by shape and colour. Family and school were key sources of participants’ knowledge of species. The self-estimated competence of participants to identify species was positively correlated with their taxonomic knowledge and the amount of time they had spent on species identification during their own schooldays. The number of correctly identified plant and animal species increased with interest in identifying species and participation in species identification courses. Participants considered learner-centred education and experience-based learning, and the use of living organisms to be most important when identifying species in school.

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws and ... Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by ...

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  20. Historical review of attempts to decrease subjectivity in species identification, with particular regard to algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paul C

    2008-01-01

    The goal of a taxonomist should be to contribute to the construction of a framework that expresses interrelationships among taxa and provides pegs to which information from all possible sources may be attached. It is essential that this information be attached to the correct peg. Throughout the history of taxonomy, attempts have been made to reduce the subjectivity involved in determining the correct peg. Illustrations, which initially were relied on to produce accurate determinations, have maintained their importance, keeping pace with miraculous advances in the technologies of microscopy, electronics, graphics, and communication. The type method was introduced to provide an anchor for each name in a sea of ever-changing circumscriptions. The physical nature of types has kept pace with advances in taxonomic methodology and now includes the possibility of designating a living culture as type if it is preserved in a metabolically inactive state. The number of characters associated with a name has been greatly increased by studying organisms in culture, by using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and by nucleotide sequence analysis. A marked increase in the number of discriminatory characters has resulted in greater assurance that the correct peg has been chosen on which to hang accumulated information. Integration of molecular and morphological data should theoretically strengthen the certainty of identification, but this certainty will always be tempered by some degree of subjectivity. Taxonomists form opinions on the basis of data that are reputedly objective, but that in fact are subject to varying interpretations. Genomic analysis is a very important taxonomic tool, but its application should not be assumed to be free of subjectivity.

  1. System Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesman, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary System Identification Introduction.- Part I: Data-based Identification.- System Response Methods.- Frequency Response Methods.- Correlation Methods.- Part II: Time-invariant Systems Identification.- Static Systems Identification.- Dynamic Systems Identification.- Part III: Time-varying

  2. Identification of bird representations in prehistory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Vojislav F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Figures of birds and bird heads are frequently represented in the Bronze and Iron Age in Europe. Birds are usually represented as amulets, vases and parts of vases, parts of complex objects or compositions and are among the most wide spread symbols that are connected with cult, magic and mythology of that time. There has been much discussion on this topic up to now. There are many assumptions concerning the role of different bird representations in the spiritual life of man of that period, which are still not firmly based. Our goal, in the study of this topic, is not to talk about these assumptions, more or less acceptable, but to pay more attention to the creation of bird figures and heads and to conclude to what extent it is possible to identify ornithological, among these numerous representations, individual birds, characteristics of their morphology and way of life. Namely, if the premise is correct, that the users of these ornithomorphic objects as well as their craftsmen, were able to differentiate bird types, morphologically and bionomically, or more correctly taxonomic groups of bird types (families, subfamilies, tribes genuses, to the extent to which these differences are expressed lexicological (nomenclatorilly, in the majority of classical languages then the attempt to make a further step towards the ornithological identification of motifs of these objects can be considered possible. In cases when it seems that the details on an object and their combination can be used for a more convincing identification, we take the freedom to speculate about the cultural-economic value of the recognized birds. Here we deal with three examples of bird representations from the Bronze and Iron Age of the Central Balkans. These are: the Dupljaja Cart, the Posamenterie Fibula from Dobrinci and the Bronze Cart from Glasinac, with the help of which we will try to demonstrate this new type of collaboration between archaeology and ornithology. We hope that

  3. Taxonomic information exchange and copyright: the Plazi approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egloff Willi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large part of our knowledge on the world's species is recorded in the corpus of biodiversity literature with well over hundred million pages, and is represented in natural history collections estimated at 2 – 3 billion specimens. But this body of knowledge is almost entirely in paper-print form and is not directly accessible through the Internet. For the digitization of this literature, new territories have to be chartered in the fields of technical, legal and social issues that presently impede its advance. The taxonomic literature seems especially destined for such a transformation. Discussion Plazi was founded as an association with the primary goal of transforming both the printed and, more recently, "born-digital" taxonomic literature into semantically enabled, enhanced documents. This includes the creation of a test body of literature, an XML schema modeling its logic content (TaxonX, the development of a mark-up editor (GoldenGATE allowing also the enhancement of documents with links to external resources via Life Science Identifiers (LSID, a repository for publications and issuance of bibliographic identifiers, a dedicated server to serve the marked up content (the Plazi Search and Retrieval Server, SRS and semantic tools to mine information. Plazi's workflow is designed to respect copyright protection and achieves extraction by observing exceptions and limitations existent in international copyright law. Conclusion The information found in Plazi's databases – taxonomic treatments as well as the metadata of the publications – are in the public domain and can therefore be used for further scientific research without any restriction, whether or not contained in copyrighted publications.

  4. Taxonomic and Thematic Organisation of Proper Name Conceptual Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian J. Crutch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the investigation of the organisation of proper names in two aphasic patients (NBC and FBI. The performance of both patients on spoken word to written word matching tasks was inconsistent, affected by presentation rate and semantic relatedness of the competing responses, all hallmarks of a refractory semantic access dysphasia. In a series of experiments we explored the semantic relatedness effects within their proper name vocabulary, including brand names and person names. First we demonstrated the interaction between very fine grain organisation and personal experience, with one patient with a special interest in the cinema demonstrating higher error rates when identifying the names of actors working in a similar film genre (e.g. action movies: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Bruce Willis, Sylvester Stallone, Mel Gibson than those working in different genres (e.g. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Gregory Peck, Robin Williams, Gene Kelly. Second we compared directly two potential principles of semantic organisation – taxonomic and thematic. Furthermore we considered these principles of organisation in the context of the individuals' personal knowledge base. We selected topics matching the interests and experience of each patient, namely cinema and literature (NBC and naval history (FBI. The stimulus items were arranged in taxonomic arrays (e.g. Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Agatha Christie, thematic arrays (e.g. Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Mr Darcy, and unrelated arrays (e.g. Jane Austen, Wuthering Heights, Hercule Poirot. We documented that different patterns of taxonomic and thematic organisation were constrained by whether the individual has limited knowledge, moderate knowledge or detailed knowledge of a particular vocabulary. It is suggested that moderate proper name knowledge is primarily organised by taxonomy whereas extensive experience results in a more detailed knowledge base in which theme is a powerful organising principle.

  5. Taxonomic and thematic organisation of proper name conceptual knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Warrington, Elizabeth K

    2011-01-01

    We report the investigation of the organisation of proper names in two aphasic patients (NBC and FBI). The performance of both patients on spoken word to written word matching tasks was inconsistent, affected by presentation rate and semantic relatedness of the competing responses, all hallmarks of a refractory semantic access dysphasia. In a series of experiments we explored the semantic relatedness effects within their proper name vocabulary, including brand names and person names. First we demonstrated the interaction between very fine grain organisation and personal experience, with one patient with a special interest in the cinema demonstrating higher error rates when identifying the names of actors working in a similar film genre (e.g., action movies: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Bruce Willis, Sylvester Stallone, Mel Gibson) than those working in different genres (e.g., Arnold Schwarzenegger, Gregory Peck, Robin Williams, Gene Kelly). Second we compared directly two potential principles of semantic organisation - taxonomic and thematic. Furthermore we considered these principles of organisation in the context of the individuals' personal knowledge base. We selected topics matching the interests and experience of each patient, namely cinema and literature (NBC) and naval history (FBI). The stimulus items were arranged in taxonomic arrays (e.g., Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Agatha Christie), thematic arrays (e.g., Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Mr Darcy), and unrelated arrays (e.g., Jane Austen, Wuthering Heights, Hercule Poirot). We documented that different patterns of taxonomic and thematic organisation were constrained by whether the individual has limited knowledge, moderate knowledge or detailed knowledge of a particular vocabulary. It is suggested that moderate proper name knowledge is primarily organised by taxonomy whereas extensive experience results in a more detailed knowledge base in which theme is a powerful organising principle.

  6. Taxonomic review of the Neotropical genus Neopachylus (Arachnida, Opiliones, Gonyleptidae

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    Vivian Moreira Montemor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic review of the genus Neopachylus Roewer, 1913 together with keys to the species for both males and females are presented. Gephyropachylus marginatus Mello-Leitão, 1931 is considered a junior subjective synonym of Neopachylus serrinha Soares & Soares, 1947, and Huralvius incertus Mello-Leitão, 1935 is considered a synonym of Neopachylus nebulosus (Mello-Leitão, 1936. This genus is restricted to southern Brazil, occurring in states of Paraná, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul.

  7. Susceptibility of Haemophilus aegyptius to trooleandomycin: lack of taxonomic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, A Y; Sottnek, F O; Thomas, M L; Albritton, W L

    1986-04-01

    Two hundred and nine strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus aegyptius were screened for trooleandomycin susceptibility. Four strains were shown to be sensitive to the drug. Of these four, two were Haemophilus aegyptius (ATCC 11116, NCTC 8134), and the other two were Haemophilus influenzae biotype I (1-605) and IV (80-212. One strain of Haemophilus aegyptius (NCTC 8135) was resistant to trooleandomycin. Restriction enzyme assays and DNA homology were carried out to establish relationships between the strains. It is concluded that trooleandomycin susceptibility has no taxonomic value to differentiate between Haemophilus aegyptius and biotype III Haemophilus influenzae.

  8. Partial migration in fishes: definitions, methodologies and taxonomic distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, B B; Skov, C; Hulthén, K

    2012-01-01

    published. In addition, previous work and synthesis has been hampered by a varied lexicon associated with this phenomenon in fishes. In this review, definitions and important concepts in partial migration research are discussed, and a classification system of the different forms of partial migration...... in fishes introduced. Next, a detailed taxonomic overview of partial migration in this group is considered. Finally, methodological approaches that ichthyologists can use to study this fascinating phenomenon are reviewed. Partial migration is more widespread amongst fishes than previously thought, and given...

  9. Phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision of Physodactylinae (Coleoptera, Elateridae

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    Simone Policena Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogeny based on male morphological characters and taxonomic revision of the Physodactylinae genera are presented. The phylogenetic analysis based on 66 male characters resulted in the polyphyly of Physodactylinae which comprises four independent lineages. Oligostethius and Idiotropia from Africa were found to be sister groups. Teslasena from Brazil was corroborated as belonging to Cardiophorinae clade. The South American genera Physodactylus and Dactylophysus were found to be sister groups and phylogenetically related to Heterocrepidius species. The Oriental Toxognathus resulted as sister group of that clade plus (Dicrepidius ramicornis (Lissomus sp, Physorhynus erythrocephalus. Taxonomic revisions include diagnoses and redescriptions of genera and distributional records and illustrations of species. Key to species of Teslasena, Toxognathus, Dactylophysus and Physodactylus are also provided. Teslasena lucasi is synonymized with T. femoralis. A new species of Dactylophysus is described, D. hirtus sp. nov., and lectotypes are designated to non-conspecific D. mendax sensu Fleutiaux and Heterocrepidius mendax Candèze. Physodactylus niger is removed from synonymy under P. oberthuri; P. carreti is synonymized with P. niger; P. obesus and P. testaceus are synonymized with P. sulcatus. Nine new species are described in Physodactylus: P. asper sp. nov., P. brunneus sp. nov., P. chassaini sp. nov., P. flavifrons sp. nov., P. girardi sp. nov., P. gounellei sp. nov., P. latithorax sp. nov., P. patens sp. nov. and P. tuberculatus sp. nov.

  10. Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analyses of rubber powdery mildew fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, K K; Khan, Sehroon; Brooks, Siraprapa; Mortimer, Peter E; Karunarathna, Samantha C; Xu, Jianchu; Hyde, Kevin D

    2017-02-09

    Powdery mildew is a fungal disease that infects a wide range of plants, including rubber trees, which results in a reduction of latex yields of up to 45%. The causal agent of powdery mildew of rubber was first described as Oidium heveae, but later morpho-molecular research suggested that in the past, O. heveae has been confused with Erysiphe quercicola. However, it is still under debate whether the causal agent should be classified as a species of the genus Erysiphe emend. or Golovinomyces and Podosphaera, respectively. Therefore, the aim of this study was to undertake the morpho-molecular characterization of powdery mildew species associated with rubber trees, thus resolving these taxonomic issues. Morphological observation under light and scanning electron microscopes (SEM) clearly identified two morphotypes of the rubber powdery mildew. With the support of morphological and phylogenetic data, one of the two morphotypes was identified as the asexual morph of E. quercicola, while the second morphotype is still insufficiently known and according to the morphological results obtained we assume that it might belong to the genus Golovinomyces. More collections and additional molecular data are required for final conclusions regarding the exact taxonomic position of the second morphotype of rubber powdery mildew and its relation to the name O. heveae. The haplotype analysis identified eight haplotype groups of E. quercicola indicating the high genetic diversity of the species.

  11. Una taxonomía de modelos de desarrollo sustentable

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    Darcy Tetreault

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este ensayo pretende ayudar a desenmarañar una parte del discurso sobre desarrollo sustentable mediante la construcción de una taxonomía de modelos de desarrollo sustentable. La misma taxonomía se basa en una revisión literaria extensiva que en cierta medida privilegia la experiencia mexicana. De este modo, el ensayo presenta y compara tanto modelos normativos como positivos. Los modelos incluidos son el modelo dominante, el cual corresponde con la estrategia esbozada en el Informe Bruntland y Agenda 21; la ecología política, un modelo desarrollado por el economista francés Alain Lipietz; el modelo comunitario de desarrollo sustentable, cuyas raíces se encuentran en una escuela de pensamiento de la década de los setenta conocida como el “otro desarrollo”; el comercio justo, una experiencia cuyas raíces se encuentran en las comunidades indígenas de Oaxaca; la producción forestal industrial comunitaria, que ha sido puesta en práctica por varias comunidades forestales en el sur y el centro del país; el activismo ambiental, sobre todo respecto a los con- fl ictos locales que giran en torno al control de los recursos naturales; y la conservación basada en la comunidad, cuya manifestación principal es la reserva de la biosfera

  12. Corrections and additions to Catalogue of Neotropical Diptera (Tabanidae of Coscarón & Papavero (2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Loureiro Henriques

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Some corrections and omitted taxonomic information for the "Catalogue of Neotropical Diptera. Tabanidae" are presented. Fifteen recently described species are listed for the Neotropical region. Presently, the Neotropical region has 1,205 Tabanidae species, besides 35 unrecognized species and 29 nomina nuda.

  13. Taxonomía de riesgos de outsourcing de software Software outsourcing risk taxonomy

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    Gloria Piedad Gasca-Hurtado

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Para las organizaciones la estrategia de outsourcing de software (OS se ha constituido en una alternativa estratégica de reducción de costos y mejora de la calidad de software. Sin embargo, la complejidad de la gestión de este tipo de proyectos aumenta, debido a la relación de actores diferentes (cliente y proveedor, de la cual depende en gran medida el éxito de estos proyectos. Identificar, analizar y gestionar los riesgos que afectan este tipo de proyectos, son buenas prácticas que se pueden llevar a cabo para establecer indicadores de gestión claves para el éxito de los proyectos. Es por esta razón que el objetivo de este trabajo es diseñar una taxonomía de riesgos de OS, es decir, una estructura de clasificación jerárquica de riesgos basada en los proyectos de OS que facilite la identificación de riesgos, que contribuya a la realización de un análisis de riesgos ágil y preciso, para su posterior gestión a lo largo de todo el proceso de OS. La taxonomía que se propone ha sido validada en un caso de estudio correspondiente a un proyecto de compra de software preelaborado. Los resultados se muestran en la última parte de este trabajo y se analiza la forma como dichos resultados impacta el proyecto en el cual fue implementada la taxonomía y su utilidad en el refinamiento de los procesos organizacionales de la empresa, a partir de las lecciones aprendidas.In recent years, the software outsourcing (SO strategy for organizations has become a useful and important alternative, as well as SO projects. SO projects have many complexities due to several factors affecting management. These complexities and importance of SO require that successfull projects meet a parameter set: budget, cost, schedule, among others. This requirement can be met through the implementation of methods and techniques of risk management (RM. RM is a process to prevent problems, establish actions to follow, and monitor the project to ensure success. Likewise

  14. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae: Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin A. Stonik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  15. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  16. Integrated taxonomy: traditional approach and DNA barcoding for the identification of filarioid worms and related parasites (Nematoda

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    Bandi Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared here the suitability and efficacy of traditional morphological approach and DNA barcoding to distinguish filarioid nematodes species (Nematoda, Spirurida. A reliable and rapid taxonomic identification of these parasites is the basis for a correct diagnosis of important and widespread parasitic diseases. The performance of DNA barcoding with different parameters was compared measuring the strength of correlation between morphological and molecular identification approaches. Molecular distance estimation was performed with two different mitochondrial markers (coxI and 12S rDNA and different combinations of data handling were compared in order to provide a stronger tool for easy identification of filarioid worms. Results DNA barcoding and morphology based identification of filarioid nematodes revealed high coherence. Despite both coxI and 12S rDNA allow to reach high-quality performances, only coxI revealed to be manageable. Both alignment algorithm, gaps treatment, and the criteria used to define the threshold value were found to affect the performance of DNA barcoding with 12S rDNA marker. Using coxI and a defined level of nucleotide divergence to delimit species boundaries, DNA barcoding can also be used to infer potential new species. Conclusion An integrated approach allows to reach a higher discrimination power. The results clearly show where DNA-based and morphological identifications are consistent, and where they are not. The coherence between DNA-based and morphological identification for almost all the species examined in our work is very strong. We propose DNA barcoding as a reliable, consistent, and democratic tool for species discrimination in routine identification of parasitic nematodes.

  17. Taxonomic review of Physconelloides (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) from the Columbiformes (aves), including descriptions of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R D; Clayton, D H; Hellenthal, R A

    1999-03-01

    We provide a comprehensive taxonomic review of Physconelloides, a genus of ischnoceran chewing lice found on pigeons and doves (Columbiformes). Thirteen previously known Physconelloides species are redescribed and 16 new synonymies are designated: P. rubripes Carriker, P. rubripes longulus Tendeiro, P. piotrowskii Tendeiro and P. auritae Tendeiro are synonyms of P. zenaidurae (McGregor); P. recurvatus Eichler, P. chocoensis Carriker and P. montana Carriker are synonyms of P. ceratoceps Ewing; P. silvestris Tendeiro is a synonym of P. perijae Carriker; P. keleri Kaddou and P. branderi Kaddou are synonyms of P. spenceri Emerson and Ward; P. wolfdietrichi Kaddou is a synonym of P. anolaimae Carriker; and Goniocotacanthus mattogrossensis Guimaraes, P. passerinae Emerson, P. eurysema pretiosa Carriker, P. talpacoti Carriker and P. picuii Tendeiro are synonyms of P. eurysema (Carriker). Three new species are also described: P. moyeri (type host Geotrygon linearis), P. johnsoni (type host Columbina passerina bahamensis), and P. robbinsi (type host Metriopelia ceciliae). A key is provided for identification of the 16 recognized species.

  18. Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Smith

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed.

  19. Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the flightless Mancallinae (Aves, Pan-Alcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil Adam

    2011-04-20

    Although flightless alcids from the Miocene and Pliocene of the eastern Pacific Ocean have been known for over 100 years, there is no detailed evaluation of diversity and systematic placement of these taxa. This is the first combined analysis of morphological and molecular data to include all extant alcids, the recently extinct Great Auk Pinguinus impennis, the mancalline auks, and a large outgroup sampling of 29 additional non-alcid charadriiforms. Based on the systematic placement of Mancallinae outside of crown clade Alcidae, the clade name Pan-Alcidae is proposed to include all known alcids. An extensive review of the Mancallinae fossil record resulted in taxonomic revision of the clade, and identification of three new species. In addition to positing the first hypothesis of inter-relationships between Mancallinae species, phylogenetic results support placement of Mancallinae as the sister taxon to all other Alcidae, indicating that flightlessness evolved at least twice in the alcid lineage. Convergent osteological characteristics of Mancallinae, the flightless Great Auk, and Spheniscidae are summarized, and implications of Mancallinae diversity, radiation, and extinction in the context of paleoclimatic changes are discussed.

  20. Molecular taxonomic analysis of the plant associations of adult pollen beetles (Nitidulidae: Meligethinae), and the population structure of Brassicogethes aeneus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouvrard, Pierre; Hicks, Damien M; Mouland, Molly; Nicholls, James A; Baldock, Katherine C R; Goddard, Mark A; Kunin, William E; Potts, Simon G; Thieme, Thomas; Veromann, Eve; Stone, Graham N

    2016-12-01

    Pollen beetles (Nitidulidae: Meligethinae) are among the most abundant flower-visiting insects in Europe. While some species damage millions of hectares of crops annually, the biology of many species is little known. We assessed the utility of a 797 base pair fragment of the cytochrome oxidase 1 gene to resolve molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) in 750 adult pollen beetles sampled from flowers of 63 plant species sampled across the UK and continental Europe. We used the same locus to analyse region-scale patterns in population structure and demography in an economically important pest, Brassicogethes aeneus. We identified 44 Meligethinae at ∼2% divergence, 35 of which contained published sequences. A few specimens could not be identified because the MOTUs containing them included published sequences for multiple Linnaean species, suggesting either retention of ancestral haplotype polymorphism or identification errors in published sequences. Over 90% of UK specimens were identifiable as B. aeneus. Plant associations of adult B. aeneus were found to be far wider taxonomically than for their larvae. UK B. aeneus populations showed contrasting affiliations between the north (most similar to Scandinavia and the Baltic) and south (most similar to western continental Europe), with strong signatures of population growth in the south.

  1. Effects of land use on taxonomic and functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hevia, Violeta; Carmona, Carlos P.; Azcárate, Francisco M.

    2016-01-01

    Land-use change is the major driver of biodiversity loss. However, taxonomic diversity (TD) and functional diversity (FD) might respond differently to land-use change, and this response might also vary depending on the biotic group being analysed. In this study, we compare the TD and FD of four...... biotic groups (ants, birds, herbaceous, woody vegetation) among four land-use types that represent a gradient of land-use intensity in a Mediterranean landscape (Mediterranean shrublands, dehesas, mixed-pine forests, olive groves). Analyses were performed separately at two different spatial scales......: the sampling unit scale and the site scale. Land-use intensity effects on TD and FD were quite different and highly varied among the four biotic groups, with no single clear pattern emerging that could be considered general for all organisms. Additive partitioning of species diversity revealed clear...

  2. Fast and sensitive taxonomic classification for metagenomics with Kaiju

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Peter; Ng, Kim Lee; Krogh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    and genomes in the reference database. Here, we present the novel metagenome classifier Kaiju for fast assignment of reads to taxa. Kaiju finds maximum exact matches on the protein-level using the Borrows-Wheeler transform, and can optionally allow amino acid substitutions in the search using a greedy......The constantly decreasing cost and increasing output of current sequencing technologies enable large scale metagenomic studies of microbial communities from diverse habitats. Therefore, fast and accurate methods for taxonomic classification are needed, which can operate on increasingly larger...... datasets and reference databases. Recently, several fast metagenomic classifiers have been developed, which are based on comparison of genomic k-mers. However, nucleotide comparison using a fixed k-mer length often lacks the sensitivity to overcome the evolutionary distance between sampled species...

  3. Flora of the city of Podgorica, Montenegro: Taxonomic analysis

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    Stešević Danijela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the taxonomic segment of a floristic study undertaken in the city of Podgorica in the period of 2002-2007. The check-list of spontaneously growing vascular plants includes 1227 species and subspecies belonging to 545 genera and 118 families. The dominant families are Poaceae (11.7%, asteraceae (11.2% and Fabaceae (9.2%. The most abundant genera are Trifolium (2.1%, Euphorbia (1.5%, Carex (1.5%, Bromus (1.3% and Vicia (1.2%. Analysis of the flora of Podgorica in comparison with some other european cities showed that the flora of Podgorica is most similar to that of Rome (Q/S= 0,7.

  4. Fast and sensitive taxonomic classification for metagenomics with Kaiju

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Peter; Ng, Kim Lee; Krogh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The constantly decreasing cost and increasing output of current sequencing technologies enable large scale metagenomic studies of microbial communities from diverse habitats. Therefore, fast and accurate methods for taxonomic classification are needed, which can operate on increasingly larger...... datasets and reference databases. Recently, several fast metagenomic classifiers have been developed, which are based on comparison of genomic k-mers. However, nucleotide comparison using a fixed k-mer length often lacks the sensitivity to overcome the evolutionary distance between sampled species...... and genomes in the reference database. Here, we present the novel metagenome classifier Kaiju for fast assignment of reads to taxa. Kaiju finds maximum exact matches on the protein-level using the Borrows-Wheeler transform, and can optionally allow amino acid substitutions in the search using a greedy...

  5. Is Homo sapiens polytypic? Human taxonomic diversity and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The term race is a traditional synonym for subspecies, however it is frequently asserted that Homo sapiens is monotypic and that what are termed races are nothing more than biological illusions. In this manuscript a case is made for the hypothesis that H. sapiens is polytypic, and in this way is no different from other species exhibiting similar levels of genetic and morphological diversity. First it is demonstrated that the four major definitions of race/subspecies can be shown to be synonymous within the context of the framework of race as a correlation structure of traits. Next the issue of taxonomic classification is considered where it is demonstrated that H. sapiens possesses high levels morphological diversity, genetic heterozygosity and differentiation (F(ST)) compared to many species that are acknowledged to be polytypic with respect to subspecies. Racial variation is then evaluated in light of the phylogenetic species concept, where it is suggested that the least inclusive monophyletic units exist below the level of species within H. sapiens indicating the existence of a number of potential human phylogenetic species; and the biological species concept, where it is determined that racial variation is too small to represent differentiation at the level of biological species. Finally the implications of this are discussed in the context of anthropology where an accurate picture of the sequence and timing of events during the evolution of human taxa are required for a complete picture of human evolution, and medicine, where a greater appreciation of the role played by human taxonomic differences in disease susceptibility and treatment responsiveness will save lives in the future.

  6. Statistical tests for taxonomic distinctiveness from observations of monophyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Noah A

    2007-02-01

    The observation of monophyly for a specified set of genealogical lineages is often used to place the lineages into a distinctive taxonomic entity. However, it is sometimes possible that monophyly of the lineages can occur by chance as an outcome of the random branching of lineages within a single taxon. Thus, especially for small samples, an observation of monophyly for a set of lineages--even if strongly supported statistically--does not necessarily indicate that the lineages are from a distinctive group. Here I develop a test of the null hypothesis that monophyly is a chance outcome of random branching. I also compute the sample size required so that the probability of chance occurrence of monophyly of a specified set of lineages lies below a prescribed tolerance. Under the null model of random branching, the probability that monophyly of the lineages in an index group occurs by chance is substantial if the sample is highly asymmetric, that is, if only a few of the sampled lineages are from the index group, or if only a few lineages are external to the group. If sample sizes are similar inside and outside the group of interest, however, chance occurrence of monophyly can be rejected at stringent significance levels (P < 10(-5)) even for quite small samples (approximately 20 total lineages). For a fixed total sample size, rejection of the null hypothesis of random branching in a single taxon occurs at the most stringent level if samples of nearly equal size inside and outside the index group--with a slightly greater size within the index group--are used. Similar results apply, with smaller sample sizes needed, when reciprocal monophyly of two groups, rather than monophyly of a single group, is of interest. The results suggest minimal sample sizes required for inferences to be made about taxonomic distinctiveness from observations of monophyly.

  7. Extrafloral nectaries in Combretaceae: morphology, anatomy and taxonomic significance

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    P. M. Tilney

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Extrafloral nectaries (EFNs in members of the Combretaceae are nectaries not involved with pollination and occurring on vegetative structures; they are believed to attract ants to protect plants against herbivorv by other insects. In the Combretaceae EFNs are reported in species of Terminalia L. and Pteleopsis Engl., putative EFNs in Meiostemon Exell & Stace and Quisqualis L., and an absence of EFNs in Combretum Loefl. and Lumnitzera Willd. EFNs in the family are generally spherical in shape and may be raised, level with the surface or somewhat concave. They are similar in the Terminalia and  Pteleopsis species where they display varying degrees of internal zonation and are composed of small cells; those species observed in the field were all found to have functional EFNs. In Meiostemon tetrandrum (Exell Exell & Stace, Quisqualis indica L.. Q. littorea (Engl. Exell and Q. paviflora Gerrard ex Sond.. apparent EFNs lack internal zonation and are composed of enlarged cells; confirmation is required as to whether these are functional . The formation of EFNs appears to be highly flexible. They are usually essentially associated with new growth but their occurrence is sporadic and they do not appear on every leaf or every' branch of a plant. The distribution of EFNs on leaves, when present, is of taxonomic significance to separate species of Pteleopsis and Terminalia: otherwise the presence or absence and distribution of EFNs are too variable and sporadic in occurrence to be of taxonomic significance at the species level. Indiscriminate use of the terms gland and domatium instead of EFN. and possible confusion with damage caused by other organisms, has probably con­tributed to many of these structures not previously being recorded as EFNs. Floral and extrafloral nectar samples of T. phanerophlebia Engl. & Diels differed in sugar composition.

  8. Detecting taxonomic and phylogenetic signals in equid cheek teeth: towards new palaeontological and archaeological proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchi, T.; Mohaseb, A.; Peigné, S.; Debue, K.; Orlando, L.; Mashkour, M.

    2017-04-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene evolution of Equus and the subsequent domestication of horses and donkeys remains poorly understood, due to the lack of phenotypic markers capable of tracing this evolutionary process in the palaeontological/archaeological record. Using images from 345 specimens, encompassing 15 extant taxa of equids, we quantified the occlusal enamel folding pattern in four mandibular cheek teeth with a single geometric morphometric protocol. We initially investigated the protocol accuracy by assigning each tooth to its correct anatomical position and taxonomic group. We then contrasted the phylogenetic signal present in each tooth shape with an exome-wide phylogeny from 10 extant equine species. We estimated the strength of the phylogenetic signal using a Brownian motion model of evolution with multivariate K statistic, and mapped the dental shape along the molecular phylogeny using an approach based on squared-change parsimony. We found clear evidence for the relevance of dental phenotypes to accurately discriminate all modern members of the genus Equus and capture their phylogenetic relationships. These results are valuable for both palaeontologists and zooarchaeologists exploring the spatial and temporal dynamics of the evolutionary history of the horse family, up to the latest domestication trajectories of horses and donkeys.

  9. Identification of taxonomic and epidemiological relationships among Campylobacter species by numerical analysis of AFLP profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ona, Stephen L.W.; Harringtona, Clare S.

    2000-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based profiling was performed on 138 strains representing all named Campylobacter species and subspecies. Profiles of 15/16 species comprised 6 to greater than 100 fragments and were subjected to numerical analysis. The mean similarity of 48 duplicate...

  10. In silico Identification and Taxonomic Distribution of Plant Class C GH9 Endoglucanases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Siddhartha; Sharma, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The glycoside hydrolase 9 superfamily, mainly comprising the endoglucanases, is represented in all three domains of life. The current division of GH9 enzymes, into three subclasses, namely A, B, and C, is centered on parameters derived from sequence information alone. However, this classification is ambiguous, and is limited by the paralogous ancestry of classes B and C endoglucanases, and paucity of biochemical and structural data. Here, we extend this classification schema to putative GH9 endoglucanases present in green plants, with an emphasis on identifying novel members of the class C subset. These enzymes cleave the β(1 → 4) linkage between non-terminal adjacent D-glucopyranose residues, in both, amorphous and crystalline regions of cellulose. We utilized non redundant plant GH9 enzymes with characterized molecular data, as the training set to construct Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and train an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The parameters that were used for predicting dominant enzyme function, were derived from this training set, and subsequently refined on 147 sequences with available expression data. Our knowledge-based approach, can ascribe differential endoglucanase activity (A, B, or C) to a query sequence with high confidence, and was used to construct a local repository of class C GH9 endoglucanases (GH9C = 241) from 32 sequenced green plants. PMID:27570528

  11. Extracellular enzymatic profiles and taxonomic identification of endophytic fungi isolated from four plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, R N; Costa, A T; Polonio, J C; Santos, M S; Rhoden, S A; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2016-11-03

    Plants of medicinal and economic importance have been studied to investigate the presence of enzyme-producing endophytic fungi. The characterization of isolates with distinct enzyme production potential may identify suitable alternatives for specialized industry. At Universidade Estadual de Maringá Laboratory of Microbial Biotechnology, approximately 500 isolates of endophytic fungi have been studied over the last decade from various host plants, including medicinally and economically important species, such as Luehea divaricata (Martius et Zuccarini), Trichilia elegans A. Juss, Sapindus saponaria L., Piper hispidum Swartz, and Saccharum spp. However, only a fraction of these endophytes have been identified and evaluated for their biotechnological application, having been initially grouped by morphological characteristics, with at least one representative of each morphogroup tested. In the current study, several fungal strains from four plants (L. divaricata, T. elegans, S. saponaria, and Saccharum spp) were identified by ribosomal DNA typing and evaluated semi-quantitatively for their enzymatic properties, including amylase, cellulase, pectinase, and protease activity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of four genera of endophytic fungi (Diaporthe, Saccharicola, Bipolaris, and Phoma) in the plants examined. According to enzymatic tests, 62% of the isolates exhibited amylase, approximately 93% cellulase, 50% pectinase, and 64% protease activity. Our results verified that the composition and abundance of endophytic fungi differed between the plants tested, and that these endophytes are a potential enzyme production resource of commercial and biotechnological value.

  12. ToxGen: an improved reference database for the identification of type B-trichothecene genotypes in Fusarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Type B trichothecenes, which pose a serious hazard to consumer health, occur worldwide in grains. These mycotoxins are produced mainly by three different trichothecene genotypes/chemotypes: 3ADON (3-acetyldeoxynivalenol), 15ADON (15-acetyldeoxynivalenol) and NIV (nivalenol), named after these three major mycotoxin compounds. Correct identification of these genotypes is elementary for all studies relating to population surveys, fungal ecology and mycotoxicology. Trichothecene producers exhibit enormous strain-dependent chemical diversity, which may result in variation in levels of the genotype’s determining toxin and in the production of low to high amounts of atypical compounds. New high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies promise to boost the diagnostics of mycotoxin genotypes. However, this requires a reference database containing a satisfactory taxonomic sampling of sequences showing high correlation to actually produced chemotypes. We believe that one of the most pressing current challenges of such a database is the linking of molecular identification with chemical diversity of the strains, as well as other metadata. In this study, we use the Tri12 gene involved in mycotoxin biosynthesis for identification of Tri genotypes through sequence comparison. Tri12 sequences from a range of geographically diverse fungal strains comprising 22 Fusarium species were stored in the ToxGen database, which covers descriptive and up-to-date annotations such as indication on Tri genotype and chemotype of the strains, chemical diversity, information on trichothecene-inducing host, substrate or media, geographical locality, and most recent taxonomic affiliations. The present initiative bridges the gap between the demands of comprehensive studies on trichothecene producers and the existing nucleotide sequence databases, which lack toxicological and other auxiliary data. We invite researchers working in the fields of fungal taxonomy, epidemiology and mycotoxicology to join the

  13. A Taxonomic and Ecological Survey of Aquatic Invertebrates

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study consisted of the identification and ecological distribution of macroscopic aquatic invertebrates from a pond, empounded by a beaver dam, located at the...

  14. NWS Corrections to Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Form B-14 is the National Weather Service form entitled 'Notice of Corrections to Weather Records.' The forms are used to make corrections to observations on forms...

  15. Peptide identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  16. Redescription of Phalotris labiomaculatus (Serpentes, Dipsadidae, Elapomorphini), with notes on the taxonomic boundaries within the nasutus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Breno; Da Silva, Nelson Jorge; Silva, Helder Lucio Rodrigues; Cintra, Carlos Eduardo D; De Lema, Thales

    2013-01-01

    Phalotris labiomaculatus Lema, 2002 was described based on a single specimen from Porto Franco, south of the Brazilian state of Maranhão, being rediscovered three years later in Mateiros, a municipality in the north of the state of Tocantins, attesting to its occurrence in the cerrado of both banks of the Tocantins River. The discovery of 28 new specimens from other localities during field expeditions (2009-2011) allowed a redescription of the species, adding new data on meristic and morpho-qualitative traits. These results enable a better diagnosis of intraspecific, ontogenetic and sexual variation, consolidating its taxonomic relationships with other species belonging to the nasutus group. The distribution map of P. labiomaculatus, as well as an identification key to the species of the natusus group, are provided. The type-locality is fixed to the municipality of Porto Franco, state of Maranhão.

  17. Taxonomic updates and descriptions of four new Lophopini planthopper species (Hemiptera, Fulgoroidea, Lophopidae from Yunnan province, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglin Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic updates and descriptions of four new species from Yunnan, China are provided: three new species in the genus Pitambara Distant, 1906: P. triremiprocta Wang & Soulier-Perkins, sp. nov., P. impudica Wang & Bourgoin, sp. nov., P. tricorne Wang & Wang, sp. nov., and one new species in the genus Serida Walker, 1857: Serida parenthesisflexuosa Wang & Soulier-Perkins, sp. nov. A new identification key to Pitambara species is provided, as well as to the species of the genus Lacusa Stål, 1862. Lacusa yunnanensis Chou & Huang, 1985 stat. rev. is not considered as a synonym of the species L. fuscofasciata (Stål, 1854 anymore and Lacusa orientalis (Liang, 2000 is transferred to the genus Acothrura Melichar, 1915 as Acothrura orientalis (Liang, 2000 comb. nov.

  18. Error Correction in Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dr. Grace Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Error correction is an important issue in foreign language acquisition. This paper investigates how students feel about the way in which error correction should take place in a Chinese-as-a foreign-language classroom, based on empirical data of a large scale. The study shows that there is a general consensus that error correction is necessary. In terms of correction strategy, the students preferred a combination of direct and indirect corrections, or a direct only correction. The former choice indicates that students would be happy to take either so long as the correction gets done.Most students didn't mind peer correcting provided it is conducted in a constructive way. More than halfofthe students would feel uncomfortable ifthe same error they make in class is corrected consecutively more than three times. Taking these findings into consideration, we may want to cncourage peer correcting, use a combination of correction strategies (direct only if suitable) and do it in a non-threatening and sensitive way. It is hoped that this study would contribute to the effectiveness of error correction in a Chinese language classroom and it may also have a wider implication on other languages.

  19. "Testing a Poisson counter model for visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks": Correction to Kyllingsbæk, Markussen, and Bundesen (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Søren; Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Markussen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The article “Testing a Poisson Counter Model for Visual Identification of Briefly Presented, Mutually Confusable Single Stimuli in Pure Accuracy Tasks” by Søren Kyllingsbæk, Bo Markussen and Claus Bundesen (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 2012, Vol. 38, No. 3...

  20. Taxonomic history and invasion biology of two Phyllonorycter leaf miners (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) with links to taxonomic and molecular datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Prins, Jurate; De Prins, Willy; De Coninck, Eliane; Kawahara, Akito Y; Milton, Megan A; Hebert, Paul D N

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with two European species, Phyllonorycter mespilella (Hübner, 1805) and P. trifasciella (Haworth, 1828), that have colonized the subtropical Canary Islands. The Rosaceae leaf miner, P. mespilella, is recorded for the first time from Lanzarote and La Palma, while the Caprifoliaceae leaf miner, P. trifasciella, is recorded from Tenerife. We present the diagnoses of these species based on morphology, a preliminary DNA barcode (COI) library of congeneric and con-familial species, and discuss the taxonomic position of the colonizers within the blancardella and trifasciella species groups. The recent intensification of anthropogenic disturbance likely accounts for their range expansion, an event that may impact the relict flora present on the Canary Islands.

  1. Using DNA barcoding to assess Caribbean reef fish biodiversity: expanding taxonomic and geographic coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Lee A; Baldwin, Carole C; Driskell, Amy; Smith, David G; Ormos, Andrea; Reyier, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    This paper represents a DNA barcode data release for 3,400 specimens representing 521 species of fishes from 6 areas across the Caribbean and western central Atlantic regions (FAO Region 31). Merged with our prior published data, the combined efforts result in 3,964 specimens representing 572 species of marine fishes and constitute one of the most comprehensive DNA barcoding "coverages" for a region reported to date. The barcode data are providing new insights into Caribbean shorefish diversity, allowing for more and more accurate DNA-based identifications of larvae, juveniles, and unknown specimens. Examples are given correcting previous work that was erroneous due to database incompleteness.

  2. Using DNA barcoding to assess Caribbean reef fish biodiversity: expanding taxonomic and geographic coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Weigt

    Full Text Available This paper represents a DNA barcode data release for 3,400 specimens representing 521 species of fishes from 6 areas across the Caribbean and western central Atlantic regions (FAO Region 31. Merged with our prior published data, the combined efforts result in 3,964 specimens representing 572 species of marine fishes and constitute one of the most comprehensive DNA barcoding "coverages" for a region reported to date. The barcode data are providing new insights into Caribbean shorefish diversity, allowing for more and more accurate DNA-based identifications of larvae, juveniles, and unknown specimens. Examples are given correcting previous work that was erroneous due to database incompleteness.

  3. Taxonomic Organization Scaffolds Young Children's Learning from Storybooks: A Design Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley M.; Neuman, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this design experiment was to research, test and iteratively design a set of taxonomically-organized storybooks that served to scaffold young children's word learning and concept development. Specifically, Phase 1 of the design experiment asked: (1) What are the effects of taxonomic organization on children's ability to acquire…

  4. Polysemy and the Taxonomic Constraint: Children's Representation of Words That Label Multiple Kinds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Mahesh; Snedeker, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    How do children resolve the problem of indeterminacy when learning a new word? By one account, children adopt a "taxonomic assumption" and expect the word to denote only members of a particular taxonomic category. According to one version of this constraint, young children should represent polysemous words that label multiple kinds--for…

  5. Taxonomic status of the roses (Rosa) described by S.G. Dimitrov from Bulgaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zielinski, J.; Petrova, A; Tan, Kit

    2004-01-01

    The original herbarium vouchers for six species of Rosa (Rosaceae) described by S. G. Dimitrov from Bulgaria are taxonomically evaluated. Two species (R. balcanica, R. orphei) are considered hybrids, four other names (R. bulgarica, R. parilica, R. pontica and R. rhodopaea) are taxonomic synonyms...

  6. Taxonomic and ecological notes on Buenia affinis Iljin 1930 (Pisces: Gobiidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, F.; Giacobbe, S.; Salpietro, L. [S. Agata, Messina, Univ. (Italy). Facolta` di Scienze. Dipt. di Biologia Animale ed Ecologia Marina

    1996-12-31

    Taxonomic and ecological notes on Buenia affinis Iljin 1930 (Pisces: Gobiidae). A population of the rare Teleost Buenia affinis Iljin 1930 has been sampled in a brackish pool along the Sicilian Tyrrhenic coastline. A description of the taxonomic features as well as first observations on the ecology of the species are given in detail.

  7. NODC Standard Product: NODC Taxonomic Code on CD-ROM (NODC Accession 0050418)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The content of the NODC Taxonomic Code, Version 8 CD-ROM (CD-ROM NODC-68) distributed by NODC is archived in this accession. Version 7 of the NODC Taxonomic Code...

  8. Building-up of a DNA barcode library for true bugs (insecta: hemiptera: heteroptera of Germany reveals taxonomic uncertainties and surprises.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Raupach

    Full Text Available During the last few years, DNA barcoding has become an efficient method for the identification of species. In the case of insects, most published DNA barcoding studies focus on species of the Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Hymenoptera and especially Lepidoptera. In this study we test the efficiency of DNA barcoding for true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera, an ecological and economical highly important as well as morphologically diverse insect taxon. As part of our study we analyzed DNA barcodes for 1742 specimens of 457 species, comprising 39 families of the Heteroptera. We found low nucleotide distances with a minimum pairwise K2P distance 2.2% were detected for 16 traditionally recognized and valid species. With a successful identification rate of 91.5% (418 species our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of true bugs and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for true bugs in Germany and Central Europe as well. Our study also highlights the urgent necessity of taxonomic revisions for various taxa of the Heteroptera, with a special focus on various species of the Miridae. In this context we found evidence for on-going hybridization events within various taxonomically challenging genera (e.g. Nabis Latreille, 1802 (Nabidae, Lygus Hahn, 1833 (Miridae, Phytocoris Fallén, 1814 (Miridae as well as the putative existence of cryptic species (e.g. Aneurus avenius (Duffour, 1833 (Aradidae or Orius niger (Wolff, 1811 (Anthocoridae.

  9. The taxonomic distribution of asteroids from multi-filter all-sky photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMeo, F. E.; Carry, B.

    2013-09-01

    The distribution of asteroids across the main belt has been studied for decades to understand the current compositional distribution and what that tells us about the formation and evolution of our Solar System. All-sky surveys now provide orders of magnitude more data than targeted surveys. We present a method to bias-correct the asteroid population observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) according to size, distance, and albedo. We taxonomically classify this dataset consistent with the Bus and Binzel (Bus, S.J., Binzel, R.P. [2002]. Icarus 158, 146-177) and Bus-DeMeo et al. (DeMeo, F.E., Binzel, R.P., Slivan, S.M., Bus, S.J. [2009]. Icarus 202(July), 160-180) systems and present the resulting taxonomic distribution. The dataset includes asteroids as small as 5 km, a factor of three in diameter smaller than in previous work such as by Mothé-Diniz et al. (Mothé-Diniz, T., Carvano, J.M.Á., Lazzaro, D. [2003]. Icarus 162(March), 10-21). Because of the wide range of sizes in our sample, we present the distribution by number, surface area, volume, and mass whereas previous work was exclusively by number. While the distribution by number is a useful quantity and has been used for decades, these additional quantities provide new insights into the distribution of total material. We find evidence for D-types in the inner main belt where they are unexpected according to dynamical models of implantation of bodies from the outer Solar System into the inner Solar System during planetary migration (Levison, H.F., Bottke, W.F., Gounelle, M., Morbidelli, A., Nesvorný, D., Tsiganis, K. [2009]. Nature 460(July), 364-366). We find no evidence of S-types or other unexpected classes among Trojans and Hildas, albeit a bias favoring such a detection. Finally, we estimate for the first time the total amount of material of each class in the inner Solar System. The main belt’s most massive classes are C, B, P, V and S in decreasing order. Excluding the four most massive

  10. Geometric Correction for Braille Document Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathi.S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Braille system has been used by the visually impair ed people for reading.The shortage of Braille books has caused a need for conversion of Braille t o text. This paper addresses the geometric correction of a Braille document images. Due to the standard measurement of the Braille cells, identification of Braille characters could be achie ved by simple cell overlapping procedure. The standard measurement varies in a scaled document an d fitting of the cells become difficult if the document is tilted. This paper proposes a line fitt ing algorithm for identifying the tilt (skew angle. The horizontal and vertical scale factor is identified based on the ratio of distance between characters to the distance between dots. Th ese are used in geometric transformation matrix for correction. Rotation correction is done prior to scale correction. This process aids in increased accuracy. The results for various Braille documents are tabulated.

  11. Use of PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for identification of yeast species isolated from bovine intramammary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, M E; Pisano, M B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Mossa, V; Deplano, M; Moroni, P; Liciardi, M; Cosentino, S

    2013-01-01

    This study reports a rapid PCR-based technique using a one-enzyme RFLP for discrimination of yeasts isolated from bovine clinical and subclinical mastitis milk samples. We analyzed a total of 1,486 milk samples collected over 1 yr in south Sardinia and northern Italy, and 142 yeast strains were preliminarily grouped based on their cultural morphology and physiological characteristics. Assimilation tests were conducted using the identification kit API ID 32C and APILAB Plus software (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). For PCR-RFLP analysis, the 18S-ITS1-5.8S ribosomal(r)DNA region was amplified and then digested with HaeIII, and dendrogram analysis of RFLP fragments was carried out. Furthermore, within each of the groups identified by the API or PCR-RFLP methods, the identification of isolates was confirmed by sequencing of the D1/D2 region using an ABI Prism 310 automatic sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). The combined phenotypic and molecular approach enabled the identification of 17 yeast species belonging to the genera Candida (47.9%), Cryptococcus (21.1%), Trichosporon (19.7%), Geotrichum (7.1%), and Rhodotorula (4.2%). All Candida species were correctly identified by the API test and their identification confirmed by sequencing. All strains identified with the API system as Geotrichum candidum, Cryptococcus uniguttulatus, and Rhodotorula glutinis also produced characteristic restriction patterns and were confirmed as Galactomyces geotrichum (a teleomorph of G. candidum), Filobasidium uniguttulatum (teleomorph of Crypt. uniguttulatus), and R. glutinis, respectively, by D1/D2 rDNA sequencing. With regard to the genus Trichosporon, preliminary identification by API was problematic, whereas the RFLP technique used in this study gave characteristic restriction profiles for each species. Moreover, sequencing of the D1/D2 region allowed not only successful identification of Trichosporon gracile where API could not, but also correct identification of

  12. Anseriform brain and its parts versus taxonomic and ecological categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisińska, Elzbieta

    2005-01-01

    The size of the brain and its macro-anatomical parts in 206 birds representing 19 anseriform species and 4 tribes (Anserini, Anatini, Aythyini and Mergini) was the subject of a comparative analysis. The comparisons involved two aspects: taxonomic (differences among species within tribes and differences among tribes) and ecological (diet composition: vegetation, invertebrates, or fish and the foraging mode: browsing, dabbling, shallow diving, and deep diving). The relative size of the encephalon (E) and its parts (optic tectum, OT; cerebellum, C; brain stem, BS; hemispheres, H) were described using appropriate indices. Five of them, called the cerebral-body indices (E/BW, OT/BW, C/BW, BS/BW, H/BW), involved a ratio between the weight of E or its parts and that of the body (BW). Four intracerebral indices (OT/E, C/E, BS/E, H/E) and allometric equations were used as well. Almost all the indices showed a high intraspecific variability within the Anserini and Mergini; on the other hand, the intracerebral indices did not differ between the species of the Anatini and Aythyini (except for OT/E in the Aythyini). Between-tribe differences were reflected in all 9 indices. The birds feeding on different diets were found to differ in their OT/E and H/E. The herbivorous anserifom OT/E was clearly lower than that of those birds feeding on invertebrates and fish. The highest OT/E was that of the piscivorous birds. In terms of foraging mode, significant differences were revealed in 7 out of the 9 indices used (differences in OT/BW and C/BW proved non-significant). OT/E of the browsing birds was clearly lower than that of the deep diving ducks; BS/E of the browsers was much lower than that of the dabbling and shallow diving ducks. Geese and swans (browsers) showed much higher H/E compared to the deep diving sea ducks. The latter revealed the highest C/E, but significant differences were detected only in comparison with C/E of the shallow diving ducks. The taxonomic (among tribes

  13. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a fast and reliable platform for identification and ecological studies of species from family Rhizobiaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferreira

    Full Text Available Family Rhizobiaceae includes fast growing bacteria currently arranged into three genera, Rhizobium, Ensifer and Shinella, that contain pathogenic, symbiotic and saprophytic species. The identification of these species is not possible on the basis of physiological or biochemical traits and should be based on sequencing of several genes. Therefore alternative methods are necessary for rapid and reliable identification of members from family Rhizobiaceae. In this work we evaluated the suitability of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS for this purpose. Firstly, we evaluated the capability of this methodology to differentiate among species of family Rhizobiaceae including those closely related and then we extended the database of MALDI Biotyper 2.0 including the type strains of 56 species from genera Rhizobium, Ensifer and Shinella. Secondly, we evaluated the identification potential of this methodology by using several strains isolated from different sources previously identified on the basis of their rrs, recA and atpD gene sequences. The 100% of these strains were correctly identified showing that MALDI-TOF MS is an excellent tool for identification of fast growing rhizobia applicable to large populations of isolates in ecological and taxonomic studies.

  14. CORRECTION OF FUNCTIONAL MISARTICULATION UNDER AN AUTOMATED SELF-CORRECTION SYSTEM. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GARRETT, EDGAR RAY

    THE AUTOMATED SPEECH CORRECTION PROGRAM (ASCP) WAS DESIGNED TO TEST THE USE OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION IN THE REMEDIATION OF FUNCTIONAL ARTICULATION ERRORS. A SERIES OF PROGRAMED TAPES WHICH TAKE THE STUDENT THROUGH AUDITORY IDENTIFICATION, AUDITORY DISCRIMINATION, PRODUCTION, AND SELF-EVALUATION WERE DESIGNED. SUB-GOALS OF THE EXPERIMENT WERE A…

  15. Taxonomic Significance of ISTR to Discriminate Species in Agavaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha I. Torres-Moran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Family Agavaceae is endemic of American Continent. From the around 300 species recognized in this family, 217 occur in Mexico. Relevant ethnobotanic relationships among Agavaceae and the several native human cultures of the American Continent have been established since prehispanic times. Agave is one of the most important genus in that family due to its great diversity and abundance, mainly in arid and semiarid regions of Mexico. In this country, near to 15 species of Agave are used to elaborate alcoholic beverages. Agave tequilana weber var. azul is indubitable the most important of them because is the raw material to elaborate a particular worldly famous class of mescal, named tequila. Agave salmiana, A. maximiliana and A. durangensis are species less famous than A. tequilana, but they also have a high quality and level of carbohydrates and in fact, support local mescal industries. In these last species several taxonomic controversies exist concerning their specific delimitation. In this study the molecular characterization of eight species of Agavaceae using ISTR was performed in order to determine the significance of these markers for discriminating among specific taxa. The results suggest that these molecular markers are worthy to typify species of Agavaceae and detect intrapopulation variability.

  16. Taxonomic review of the Sebastes pachycephalus complex (Scorpaeniformes: Scorpaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Yoshiaki; Nakabo, Tetsuji

    2013-01-01

    A taxonomic review of the Sebastes pachycephalus complex established the existence of two valid species, S. pachycephalus and S. nudus. Similarities between them include: cranium armed dorsally with robust preocular, supraocular, postocular, and parietal spines; interorbital space concave; lower jaw lacking scales, shorter than upper jaw; thickened rays in ventral half of pectoral fin; dorsal fin usually with 13 spines and 12 soft-rays; pored lateral line scales 27-35 (usually 29-33). However, S. pachycephalus is distinguishable from the latter in having minute scales below the entire dorsal-fin spine base (vs. lacking minute scales below first to fifth or variously to the posteriormost spine in the latter), dark spots scattered on the dorsal, anal and caudal fins (vs. no distinct dark spots), and lacking distinct colored markings on the dorsum (vs. yellow or reddish-brown markings present). Although both species occur off the southern Korean Peninsula and in the Bohai and Yellow Seas, in Japanese waters, the former is distributed from northern Honshu Is. southward to southern Kyushu Is., whereas the latter extends from southern Hokkaido southward along the Pacific coast of Japan to Kanagawa, and along the Sea of Japan coast to northern Kyushu Is., including the Seto Inland Sea. Sebastes nigricaus, S. nigricans, and S. latus are confirmed as junior synonyms of S. pachycephalus, and S. chalcogrammus as junior synonym of S. nudus, based on the examination of type specimens.

  17. Taxonomic and chemical assessment of exceptionally abundant rock mine biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Tomczyk-Żak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background An exceptionally thick biofilm covers walls of ancient gold and arsenic Złoty Stok mine (Poland in the apparent absence of organic sources of energy. Methods and Results We have characterized this microbial community using culture-dependent and independent methods. We sequenced amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene obtained using generic primers and additional primers targeted at Archaea and Actinobacteria separately. Also, we have cultured numerous isolates from the biofilm on different media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We discovered very high biodiversity, and no single taxonomic group was dominant. The majority of almost 4,000 OTUs were classified above genus level indicating presence of novel species. Elemental analysis, performed using SEM-EDS and X-ray, of biofilm samples showed that carbon, sulphur and oxygen were not evenly distributed in the biofilm and that their presence is highly correlated. However, the distribution of arsenic and iron was more flat, and numerous intrusions of elemental silver and platinum were noted, indicating that microorganisms play a key role in releasing these elements from the rock. Conclusions Altogether, the picture obtained throughout this study shows a very rich, complex and interdependent system of rock biofilm. The chemical heterogeneity of biofilm is a likely explanation as to why this oligotrophic environment is capable of supporting such high microbial diversity.

  18. Biodiscovery from rare actinomycetes: an eco-taxonomical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtböke, D I

    2012-03-01

    Microbial natural products, in particular, the ones produced by the members of the order Actinomycetales, will continue to represent an important route to the discovery of novel classes of bioactive compounds. As a result, the search for and discovery of lesser-known and/or novel actinomycetes is of significant interest to the industry due to a growing need for the development of new and potent therapeutic agents, mainly against drug resistant bacteria. Current advancements in genomics and metagenomics are adding strength to the target-directed search for detection and isolation of bioactive actinomycetes. New discoveries, however, will only stem from a sound understanding and interpretation of knowledge derived from conventional studies conducted since the discovery of streptomycin, on the ecology, taxonomy, physiology and metabolism of actinomycetes, and from a combination of this knowledge with currently available and continuously advancing molecular tools. Such a powerful information platform will then inevitably reveal the whereabouts, taxonomical and chemical identities of previously undetected bioactive actinomycetes including novel species of streptomycetes as potential producers of novel drug candidates.

  19. The epidermis in Passerina/ (Thymelaeaceae: structure, function and taxonomic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Bredenkamp

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal features were studied in all 17 species of Passerina, a genus endemic to southern Africa. Leaves in Passerina are inversely ericoid, the adaxial surface concave and the abaxial surface convex. Leaves are inversely dorsiventral and epistomatic. The adaxial epidermis is villous, with unicellular, uniseriate trichomes and relatively small thin-walled cells, promoting flexibility of leaf margins owing to turgor changes. In common with many other Thymelaeaceae, abaxial epidermal cells are large and tanniniferous with mucilaginous cell walls. The cuticle is adaxially thin, but abaxially well devel­oped, probably enabling the leaf to restrict water loss and to tolerate high light intensity and UV-B radiation. Epicuticular waxes, present in all species, comprise both soft and plate waxes. Epidermal structure proves to be taxonomically impor­tant at family, genus and species levels. Interspecific differences include arrangement of stomata and presence or absence of abaxial epidermal hair. Other diagnostic characters of the abaxial epidermal cells are arrangement,size and shape, cutic- ular ornamentation and presence or absence of wax platelets. Two groups of species on the basis of abaxial epidermal cell orientation are recognised. Many leaf epidermal features in Passerina are interpreted as structural adaptations to the Mediterranean climate of the Cape.

  20. Taxonomic status of the Columbia duskysnail (Truncatelloidea, Amnicolidae, Colligyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Ping Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Undescribed freshwater snails (Amnicolidae: Colligyrus from the Mount Hood region (northwestern United States identified as a new species (commonly known as the Columbia duskysnail in grey literature have been provided federal protection under the “survey and manage” provisions of the Northwest Forest Plan and have been placed on conservation watch lists. However, there are no published studies of the identity of these snails aside from a molecular phylogenetic analysis which delineated a close relationship between the single sampled population and C. greggi, which is distributed more than 750 km to the east of the Mount Hood area. Here we examine the taxonomic status of the Columbia duskysnail based on additional molecular sampling of mitochondrial DNA sequences (COI and morphological evidence. We found that the Columbia duskysnail is not a monophyletic group and forms a strongly supported clade with C. greggi. The COI divergence between these broadly disjunct groups (2.1% was somewhat larger than that within C. greggi (1.0% but considerably less than that among the three currently recognized species of Colligyrus (8.7–12.1%. Additionally we found that the Columbia duskysnail and C. greggi cannot be consistently differentiated by previously reported diagnostic characters (size and shape of shell spire, pigmentation of body and penis and are closely similar in other aspects of morphology. Based on these results we conclude that the Columbia duskysnail is conspecific with C. greggi.

  1. PAMPATHERIIDAE (XENARTHRA, CINGULATA FROM TARIJA VALLEY, BOLIVIA: A TAXONOMIC UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTIAGO RODRIGUEZ-BUALÓ

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pampatheriidae (Middle Miocene-late Pleistocene constitutes an extinct clade of Cingulata widely dispersed in South America, entering in Central and North America during the Great American Biotic Interchange. In the Pleistocene of South America, two genera are recorded: Pampatherium (with three species and Holmesina (with six species. In the Pleistocene palaeofauna of Tarija Valley (Bolivia one of the most conspicuous recorded taxa are the Cingulata, including Pampatheriidae. Until this contribution, all the remains were classified as P. typum and Pampatherium sp. Here we present a modern taxonomic revision of the Pampatheriidae of the Tarija Valley, based on previous collected and published material together with new materials obtained from fieldwork carried out during 2011-2013. The evidence indicates that a single species of Pampatheriidae is present in the Tarija Valley ( Pampatherium humboldtii , whereas the presence of P.  typum in discarded. From a chrono-stratigraphic point of view, the biochron of this species is restricted to the late Pleistocene. This supports previous hypothesis on the age of the sediments of Tarija Valley (Tolomosa Formation.

  2. Taxonomic relationships among Phenacomys voles as inferred by cytochrome b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, M.R.; Haig, S.M.; Forsman, E.D.; Mullins, T.D.

    2005-01-01

    Taxonomic relationships among red tree voles (Phenacomys longicaudus longicaudus, P. l. silvicola), the Sonoma tree vole (P. pomo), the white-footed vole (P. albipes), and the heather vole (P. intermedius) were examined using 664 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Results indicate specific differences among red tree voles, Sonoma tree voles, white-footed voles, and heather voles, but no clear difference between the 2 Oregon subspecies of red tree voles (P. l. longicaudus and P. l. silvicola). Our data further indicated a close relationship between tree voles and albipes, validating inclusion of albipes in the subgenus Arborimus. These 3 congeners shared a closer relationship to P. intermedius than to other arvicolids. A moderate association between porno and albipes was indicated by maximum parsimony and neighbor-joining phylogenetic analyses. Molecular clock estimates suggest a Pleistocene radiation of the Arborimus clade, which is concordant with pulses of diversification observed in other murid rodents. The generic rank of Arborimus is subject to interpretation of data.

  3. Karyotypes of parasitic Hymenoptera: Diversity, evolution and taxonomic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VLADIMIR E. GOKHMAN

    2006-01-01

    Haploid chromosome numbers (n) of parasitic Hymenoptera (= traditional Parasitica + Chrysidoidea) vary from 2 to 23. However, this range can be subdivided into three intervals with n = 14-23 (less derived parasitic wasps, e.g., some Ichneumonidae and Braconidae as well as Gasteruptiidae), 8-13 (many other parasitic Hymenoptera) and 2-7(Dryinidae, the majority of Chalcidoidea and some advanced Braconidae, e.g. Aphidiinae).The symmetric karyotype with a relatively high chromosome number (n = 14-17) and the prevalence of biarmed chromosomes must be considered as a groundplan feature of parasitic Hymenoptera. Independent reductions of chromosome numbers (n ≤ 10-11) occurred in some groups of the superfamily Ichneumonoidea as well as in the common ancestor of the Proctotrupoidea sensu lato, Ceraphronoidea, Cynipoidea and Chalcidoidea. Further multiple decreases in chromosome numbers (n ≤ 4-6) took place in some Braconidae, various lineages of the superfamily Chalcidoidea as well as in the family Dryinidae. Two main trends prevailed in the karyotype evolution of parasitic wasps: the reduction of chromosome numbers (mainly due to tandem fusions and less frequently due to centric ones) and karyotypic dissymmetrization (through an increase in size differentiation of chromosomes and/or in the share of acrocentrics in a chromosome set). Although karyotypic features of parasitic Hymenoptera can be used for solving taxonomic problems at various levels, this method is the most effective at the species level.

  4. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  5. Fast and sensitive taxonomic classification for metagenomics with Kaiju.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Peter; Ng, Kim Lee; Krogh, Anders

    2016-04-13

    Metagenomics emerged as an important field of research not only in microbial ecology but also for human health and disease, and metagenomic studies are performed on increasingly larger scales. While recent taxonomic classification programs achieve high speed by comparing genomic k-mers, they often lack sensitivity for overcoming evolutionary divergence, so that large fractions of the metagenomic reads remain unclassified. Here we present the novel metagenome classifier Kaiju, which finds maximum (in-)exact matches on the protein-level using the Burrows-Wheeler transform. We show in a genome exclusion benchmark that Kaiju classifies reads with higher sensitivity and similar precision compared with current k-mer-based classifiers, especially in genera that are underrepresented in reference databases. We also demonstrate that Kaiju classifies up to 10 times more reads in real metagenomes. Kaiju can process millions of reads per minute and can run on a standard PC. Source code and web server are available at http://kaiju.binf.ku.dk.

  6. The epidermis in Passerina/ (Thymelaeaceae: structure, function and taxonomic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Bredenkamp

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal features were studied in all 17 species of Passerina, a genus endemic to southern Africa. Leaves in Passerina are inversely ericoid, the adaxial surface concave and the abaxial surface convex. Leaves are inversely dorsiventral and epistomatic. The adaxial epidermis is villous, with unicellular, uniseriate trichomes and relatively small thin-walled cells, promoting flexibility of leaf margins owing to turgor changes. In common with many other Thymelaeaceae, abaxial epidermal cells are large and tanniniferous with mucilaginous cell walls. The cuticle is adaxially thin, but abaxially well devel­oped, probably enabling the leaf to restrict water loss and to tolerate high light intensity and UV-B radiation. Epicuticular waxes, present in all species, comprise both soft and plate waxes. Epidermal structure proves to be taxonomically impor­tant at family, genus and species levels. Interspecific differences include arrangement of stomata and presence or absence of abaxial epidermal hair. Other diagnostic characters of the abaxial epidermal cells are arrangement,size and shape, cutic- ular ornamentation and presence or absence of wax platelets. Two groups of species on the basis of abaxial epidermal cell orientation are recognised. Many leaf epidermal features in Passerina are interpreted as structural adaptations to the Mediterranean climate of the Cape.

  7. English Learners Perception on Lecturers’ Corrective Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titien Fatmawaty Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The importance of written corrective feedback (CF has been an issue of substantial debate in the literature and this controversial issue has led to a development in latest studies to draw on foreign language acquisition (FLA research as a way to further comprehend the complexities of this issue particularly how students and teachers perceive the effectiveness of written corrective feedback. This research has largely focused on students’ perception on Lecturers’ corrective feedback, perceives the usefulness of different types of corrective feedback and the reasons they have for their preferences. Qualitative data was collected from 40 EFL students in 6th semester, by means of written questionnaires, interview and observation. Four feedback strategies were employed in this research and ranked each statement by using five-point Likert scale. Findings showed that almost all students 81.43 % want correction or feedback from lecturers for the mistakes on their writing. For the type of written corrective feedback, students prefer lecturers mark their mistakes and give comment on their work with the percentage as follows: 93% students found that giving clues or comment about how to fix errors can improve their writing ability, 76.69% of the students found that error identification is the most useful type of feedback, and 57.50% of students have a positive opinion for the provision of correction which is accompanied by comment. Those percentages of students perspective is supported by students’ explanation in an open ended question of questionnaire. Pedagogical implications of the study are also discussed.

  8. Taxonomic revision of Microstegium s.str. (Andropogoneae, Poaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.-H.; Veldkamp, J.-F.; Kuoh, C.-S.

    2012-01-01

    Microstegium excl. Leptatherum (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) is revised. There are at least 16 species and one variety. By lack of type materials eight names could not be placed, while, moreover, another three were invalidly published. An identification key is provided, synonymy, descriptions, and notes

  9. Diophantine Correct Open Induction

    CERN Document Server

    Raffer, Sidney

    2010-01-01

    We give an induction-free axiom system for diophantine correct open induction. We relate the problem of whether a finitely generated ring of Puiseux polynomials is diophantine correct to a problem about the value-distribution of a tuple of semialgebraic functions with integer arguments. We use this result, and a theorem of Bergelson and Leibman on generalized polynomials, to identify a class of diophantine correct subrings of the field of descending Puiseux series with real coefficients.

  10. A combined sequence-based and fragment-based characterization of microbial eukaryote assemblages provides taxonomic context for the Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Diane Y; Countway, Peter D; Yamashita, Warren; Caron, David A

    2012-12-01

    Microbial eukaryotes in seawater samples collected from two depths (5 m and 500 m) at the USC Microbial Observatory off the coast of Southern California, USA, were characterized by cloning and sequencing of 18S rRNA genes, as well as DNA fragment analysis of these genes. The sequenced genes were assigned to operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and taxonomic information for the sequence-based OTUs was obtained by comparison to public sequence databases. The sequences were then subjected to in silico digestion to predict fragment sizes, and that information was compared to the results of the T-RFLP method applied to the same samples in order to provide taxonomic context for the environmental T-RFLP fragments. A total of 663 and 678 sequences were analyzed for the 5m and 500 m samples, respectively, which clustered into 157 OTUs and 183 OTUs. The sequences yielded substantially fewer taxonomic units as in silico fragment lengths (i.e., following in silico digestion), and the environmental T-RFLP resulted in the fewest unique OTUs (unique fragments). Bray-Curtis similarity analysis of protistan assemblages was greater using the T-RFLP dataset compared to the sequence-based OTU dataset, presumably due to the inability of the fragment method to differentiate some taxa and an inability to detect many rare taxa relative to the sequence-based approach. Nonetheless, fragments in our analysis generally represented the dominant sequence-based OTUs and putative identifications could be assigned to a majority of the fragments in the environmental T-RFLP results. Our empirical examination of the T-RFLP method identified limitations relative to sequence-based community analysis, but the relative ease and low cost of fragment analysis make this method a useful approach for characterizing the dominant taxa within complex assemblages of microbial eukaryotes in large datasets.

  11. Potential of a 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray for analyzing the rhizosphere effects of maize on Agrobacterium spp. and bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguin, Hervé; Remenant, Benoît; Dechesne, Arnaud; Thioulouse, Jean; Vogel, Timothy M; Nesme, Xavier; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Grundmann, Geneviève L

    2006-06-01

    Bacterial diversity is central to ecosystem sustainability and soil biological function, for which the role of roots is important. The high-throughput analysis potential of taxonomic microarray should match the breadth of bacterial diversity. Here, the power of this technology was evidenced through methodological verifications and analysis of maize rhizosphere effect based on a 16S rRNA-based microarray developed from the prototype of H. Sanguin et al. (Environ. Microbiol. 8:289-307, 2006). The current probe set was composed of 170 probes (41 new probes in this work) that targeted essentially the Proteobacteria. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons were carried out on maize rhizosphere and bulk soil DNA. All tested clones that had a perfect match with corresponding probes were positive in the hybridization experiment. The hierarchically nested probes were reliable, but the level of taxonomic identification was variable, depending on the probe set specificity. The comparison of experimental and theoretical hybridizations revealed 0.91% false positives and 0.81% false negatives. The microarray detection threshold was estimated at 0.03% of a given DNA type based on DNA spiking experiments. A comparison of the maize rhizosphere and bulk soil hybridization results showed a significant rhizosphere effect, with a higher predominance of Agrobacterium spp. in the rhizosphere, as well as a lower prevalence of Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, a new taxon of interest in soil. In addition, well-known taxonomic groups such as Sphingomonas spp., Rhizobiaceae, and Actinobacteria were identified in both microbial habitats with strong hybridization signals. The taxonomic microarray developed in the present study was able to discriminate and characterize bacterial community composition in related biological samples, offering extensive possibilities for systematic exploration of bacterial diversity in ecosystems.

  12. Potential of a 16S rRNA-Based Taxonomic Microarray for Analyzing the Rhizosphere Effects of Maize on Agrobacterium spp. and Bacterial Communities†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguin, Hervé; Remenant, Benoît; Dechesne, Arnaud; Thioulouse, Jean; Vogel, Timothy M.; Nesme, Xavier; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Grundmann, Geneviève L.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial diversity is central to ecosystem sustainability and soil biological function, for which the role of roots is important. The high-throughput analysis potential of taxonomic microarray should match the breadth of bacterial diversity. Here, the power of this technology was evidenced through methodological verifications and analysis of maize rhizosphere effect based on a 16S rRNA-based microarray developed from the prototype of H. Sanguin et al. (Environ. Microbiol. 8:289-307, 2006). The current probe set was composed of 170 probes (41 new probes in this work) that targeted essentially the Proteobacteria. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons were carried out on maize rhizosphere and bulk soil DNA. All tested clones that had a perfect match with corresponding probes were positive in the hybridization experiment. The hierarchically nested probes were reliable, but the level of taxonomic identification was variable, depending on the probe set specificity. The comparison of experimental and theoretical hybridizations revealed 0.91% false positives and 0.81% false negatives. The microarray detection threshold was estimated at 0.03% of a given DNA type based on DNA spiking experiments. A comparison of the maize rhizosphere and bulk soil hybridization results showed a significant rhizosphere effect, with a higher predominance of Agrobacterium spp. in the rhizosphere, as well as a lower prevalence of Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, a new taxon of interest in soil. In addition, well-known taxonomic groups such as Sphingomonas spp., Rhizobiaceae, and Actinobacteria were identified in both microbial habitats with strong hybridization signals. The taxonomic microarray developed in the present study was able to discriminate and characterize bacterial community composition in related biological samples, offering extensive possibilities for systematic exploration of bacterial diversity in ecosystems. PMID:16751545

  13. Cassini's Compositae genera: A nomenclatural and taxonomic assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flann, C.M.; Greuter, W.; Hind, D.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Work on the Global Compositae Checklist has highlighted uncertainties and errors in the nomenclatural parameters of many genera and subgenera described by Henri Cassini. Problems concern rank (subgenus vs. genus); type designation; correct place of valid publication; alternative names; and other

  14. Dates of publication of Malaysian phyto-taxonomical literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumée, J.G.B.

    1948-01-01

    Blume, C.L. Museum Botanicum. 2 volumes. The dates given by BLUME for each separate part of volume 1 (1849-1851) seem always to have been considered to be correct. However, those of the 2nd volume are partly wrong: the preface is dated 1852, and may have been printed at that time, but the book was t

  15. Reciclagem de embalagens plásticas flexíveis: contribuição da identificação correta Flexible plastic packaging recycling: the contribution of the correct identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leda Coltro

    2013-01-01

    , folha de alumínio, é proposta a inclusão da identificação destes materiais na embalagem.Packages have high rotation as they become municipal solid waste just after the consumption of the product. Therefore, packages should be labeled with identification of the material they are made of in order to help the recycling chain. Many products made from plastics show a resin identification code - usually from 1 to 7 inside a three-arrow triangle above a monogram - aimed at identifying the type of plastic the product is made of, and help its separation and later recycling. In other words, one aims to facilitate recovery of plastics discarded with the municipal solid waste. In this study we collected data on the resin identification code in flexible plastic packages to assess whether the guidelines for material identification are being followed. The data collection was performed in a total of 509 flexible plastic packages used for packing food and non-food products available in the Brazilian market. Even though the NBR 13230 Brazilian standard is already in its second revision, the resin identification code in plastic packages is still used in a very heterogeneous fashion. Approximately 50% of the packages had the resin identification code. Up to 30% of some packages showed incorrect material identification code. Therefore, misinformation still occurs in the Brazilian market concerning the type of material for plastic packaging - including lack of the resin identification code and incorrect form of identification code in the plastic packaging. Both of these problems have negative effects on the plastic recycling chain. We propose that other materials used in flexible plastic packages, e.g. aluminum foil, should also be identified, in order to make the separation and recycling easier.

  16. A Taxonomic Catalogue of the Nemerteans (Phylum Nemertea) of Spain and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Bachiller, Alfonso; Fernández-Álvarez, Fernando Ángel; Junoy, Juan

    2015-12-01

    A literature-based taxonomic catalogue of nemerteans (phylum Nemertea) from Spain and Portugal is provided, listing 75 species (12 Palaeonemertea, 24 Pilidiophora, and 39 Hoplonemertea) belonging to 34 genera. This is a low species number compared with the approximately 400 species listed in Europe. This lack of knowledge is mainly due to the low number of researchers interested in the phylum and the well-known taxonomic difficulties of its study. Geographic records are indicated for each species, and for some, comments are included on certain biological and taxonomic aspects.

  17. Identification of helminth eggs in wastewater; Identificaciond e huevos por hemintos en aguas residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu Adrian, A.; Geovanny Perez Ortiz, O.; Gomez Vera, D.; Morenilla Martinez, J. J.; Amores Blasco, S.; Bernacer Bonora, I.; Esteban Sanchis, J. G.

    2002-07-01

    The identification of helminth eggs in wastewater is essential for complying with microbiological water quality guidelines. Identification is based on morphological and morphometric criteria; in this sense, experience in parasitology is required, since identification is sometimes so complex that only a tentative diagnosis can be made. The present study details the criteria used for the taxonomic ascription of the helminth eggs detected in the Wastewater Treatment Plant of Alboraia (Valencia, Spain). (Author)

  18. EAU standardised medical terminology for urologic imaging: a taxonomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Tillmann; Carey, Brendan; Walz, Jochen; Fulgham, Pat Fox

    2015-05-01

    The terminology and abbreviations used in urologic imaging have generally been adopted on an ad hoc basis by different speciality groups; however, there is a need for shared nomenclature to facilitate clinical communication and collaborative research. This work reviews the current nomenclature for urologic imaging used in clinical practice and proposes a taxonomy and terminology for urologic imaging studies. A list of terms used in urologic imaging were compiled from guidelines published by the European Association of Urology and the American Urological Association and from the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria. Terms searched were grouped into broad categories based on technology, and imaging terms were further stratified based on the anatomic extent, contrast or phases, technique or modifiers, and combinations or fusions. Terms that had a high degree of utilisation were classified as accepted. We propose a new taxonomy to define a more useful and acceptable nomenclature model acceptable to all health professionals involved in urology. The major advantage of a taxonomic approach to the classification of urologic imaging studies is that it provides a flexible framework for classifying the modifications of current imaging modalities and allows the incorporation of new imaging modalities. The adoption of this hierarchical classification model ranging from the most general to the most detailed descriptions should facilitate hierarchical searches of the medical literature using both general and specific terms. This work is limited in its scope, as it is not currently all-inclusive. This will hopefully be addressed by future modification as others embrace the concept and work towards uniformity in nomenclature. This paper provides a noncomprehensive list of the most widely used terms across different specialties. This list can be used as the basis for further discussion, development, and enhancement. In this paper we describe a classification system

  19. Taxonomic attribution of the La Grive hominoid teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de los Ríos, Miriam; Alba, David M; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2013-08-01

    The two hominoid teeth--a central upper incisor (NMB G.a.9.) and an upper molar (FSL 213981)--from the Middle Miocene site of La Grive-Saint-Alban (France) have been traditionally attributed to Dryopithecus fontani (Hominidae: Dryopithecinae). However, during the last decade discoveries in the Vallès-Penedès Basin (Spain) have shown that several hominoid genera were present in Western Europe during the late Middle Miocene. As a result, the attribution of the dryopithecine teeth from La Grive is not as straightforward as previously thought. In fact, similarities with the upper incisor of Pierolapithecus have led to suggestions that either the latter taxon is present at La Grive, or that it is a junior synonym of Dryopithecus. Here, we re-describe the La Grive teeth and critically revise their taxonomic assignment based on metrical and morphological comparisons with other Middle to Late Miocene hominoids from Europe and Turkey, with particular emphasis on those from the Vallès-Penedès Basin. Our results suggest that the I(1) differs in several respects from those of Pierolapithecus and Hispanopithecus, so that an attribution to either Dryopithecus or Anoiapithecus (for which this tooth is unknown) seems more likely. The molar, in turn, most likely corresponds to the M(1) of a female individual. Compared to other Middle Miocene taxa, its occlusal morphology enables its distinction from Pierolapithecus, whereas relative crown height agrees well with Dryopithecus. Therefore, based on available evidence, we support the traditional attribution of the La Grive hominoid to D. fontani. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. CORRECTING WRITTEN WORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction During the teaching and learning process, teachers often check how much students have understood through written assignments. In this article I’d like to describe one method of correcting students’ written work by using a variety of symbols to indicate where students have gone wrong, then asking students to correct their work themselves.

  1. Description and identification of four species of plant parasitic nematodes associated with grassland, fruit trees and maize in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badi, M; Geraert, E

    2002-01-01

    Three species of plant parasitic nematodes present in two romanian soil samples were described and identified in the present study. The species belong to order tylenchida and to taxonomical families Tylenchidae (Basiria aberrans) and Belonolaimidae (Tylenchorhynchus georgiensis and Merlinius brevidens). The identification of the present specimens was based on the classical taxonomy, following morphological and morphometrical characters in the species specific identification keys.

  2. Partitioning taxonomic diversity of aquatic insect assemblages and functional feeding groups in Neotropical Savanna headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological diversity can be divided into: alpha (α, local), beta (β, difference in assemblage composition among locals), and gamma (γ, total diversity). We assessed the partitioning of taxonomic diversity of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT) and of ...

  3. Taxonomic value of stem anatomical characters in classification of some Adonis (Ranunculaceae species in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghorbani Nohooji

    2011-06-01

    (A. aestivalis, A. flammea and A. dentata were evaluated using numerical taxonomic methods. Obtained results demonstrated that simultaneous application of both qualitative and relative characters offers a better chance in species delimitation in future researches.

  4. Life in Oligotropic Desert Environments: Contrasting Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Two Microbial Mats with Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Rosso, G.; Peimbert, M.; Olmedo, G.; Alcaraz, L. D.; Eguiarte, L. E.; Souza, V.

    2010-04-01

    The metagenomic analysis of two microbial mats from the oligotrophic waters in the Cuatrociéngas basin reveals large differences both at taxonomic and functional level. These are explained in terms of environmental stability and nutrient availability.

  5. Asian longhorned beetle complicates the relationship between taxonomic diversity and pest vulnerability in street tree assemblages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Urban foresters routinely emphasise the importance of taxonomic diversity to reduce the vulnerability of tree assemblages to invasive pests, but it is unclear to...

  6. Correction of chordee. The Nesbit procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, D K

    1986-02-01

    In select patients the Nesbit operation is a useful procedure for the correction of congenital or acquired chordee. This operation results in a deliberate shortening of the convex surface of the corpora cavernosa to counterbalance congenital or acquired shortening on the opposite side. Precise placement of the corrective tuck allows complete correction of the chordee with minimal disturbance of normal tissue. An artificial erection should be created to permit precise identification of the point of maximal curvature on the longer (convex) side of the penis. The transverse elliptical segment to be removed should be placed precisely at this point and should be of sufficient width to result in complete correction of the chordee. Care should be taken to remove only a segment of the tunica albuginea without damaging the underlying erectile tissue. In cases of ventral chordee, the corrective procedure will require elevation of the neurovascular bundle. In cases of dorsal chordee, the procedure will require elevation of the urethra and corpus spongiosum. A repeat artificial erection insures that an adequate correction has been obtained.

  7. Human impacts on functional and taxonomic homogenization of plateau fish assemblages in Yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohuan Su

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human activities and the consequent extinctions of native species and invasions of non-native species have been changing the composition of species assemblages worldwide. These anthropogenic impacts alter not only the richness of assemblages but also the biological dissimilarity among them. However, much of the research effort to date has focused on changes in taxonomic dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for species composition whether assessments of functional dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for the diversity of biological traits are much more scarce, despite revealing important complimentary information by accounting for changes in the diversity of biological traits. Here, we assess the temporal (1950s against 2000s changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarities of freshwater fish assemblages across lakes from the Yunnan Plateau in China. The Jaccard index to quantify the changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarity. We then partitioned dissimilarity to extract its turnover component and measured the changes in the contribution of turnover to dissimilarity. We found that functional and taxonomic homogenization occurred simultaneously. However, patterns between these two processes differed for some lakes. Taxonomic and functional homogenizations were stronger when the historical level of taxonomic dissimilarity among assemblages was high. The impact of extinctions of native species and invasions of non-native species on homogenization was otherwise complex to disentangle with no significant effect of any of the studied environmental factors. In agreement with other studies, our study proved that change in taxonomic dissimilarity cannot be used to predict changes in functional dissimilarity and, as an indicator of ecosystem functioning, functional dissimilarity should be used together with taxonomic dissimilarity to attain a more holistic understanding of human impacts on natural ecosystems.

  8. Evolutionary history of Leishmania killicki (synonymous Leishmania tropica) and taxonomic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Chaara, Dhekra; Ravel, Christophe; Bañuls, Anne- Laure; Haouas, Najoua; Lami, Patrick; Talignani, Loïc; El Baidouri, Fouad; Jaouadi, Kaouther; Harrat, Zoubir; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Babba, Hamouda; Pratlong, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Background: The taxonomic status of Leishmania (L.) killicki, a parasite that causes chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis, is not well defined yet. Indeed, some researchers suggested that this taxon could be included in the L. tropica complex, whereas others considered it as a distinct phylogenetic complex. To try to solve this taxonomic issue we carried out a detailed study on the evolutionary history of L. killicki relative to L. tropica. Methods: Thirty-five L. killicki and 25 L. tropica strain...

  9. Mobile image based color correction using deblurring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Xu, Chang; Boushey, Carol; Zhu, Fengqing; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Dietary intake, the process of determining what someone eats during the course of a day, provides valuable insights for mounting intervention programs for prevention of many chronic diseases such as obesity and cancer. The goals of the Technology Assisted Dietary Assessment (TADA) System, developed at Purdue University, is to automatically identify and quantify foods and beverages consumed by utilizing food images acquired with a mobile device. Color correction serves as a critical step to ensure accurate food identification and volume estimation. We make use of a specifically designed color checkerboard (i.e. a fiducial marker) to calibrate the imaging system so that the variations of food appearance under different lighting conditions can be determined. In this paper, we propose an image quality enhancement technique by combining image de-blurring and color correction. The contribution consists of introducing an automatic camera shake removal method using a saliency map and improving the polynomial color correction model using the LMS color space.

  10. Probabilistic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fern, J; Fern, Jesse; Terilla, John

    2002-01-01

    There are well known necessary and sufficient conditions for a quantum code to correct a set of errors. We study weaker conditions under which a quantum code may correct errors with probabilities that may be less than one. We work with stabilizer codes and as an application study how the nine qubit code, the seven qubit code, and the five qubit code perform when there are errors on more than one qubit. As a second application, we discuss the concept of syndrome quality and use it to suggest a way that quantum error correction can be practically improved.

  11. Avibase – a database system for managing and organizing taxonomic concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Lepage

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific names of biological entities offer an imperfect resolution of the concepts that they are intended to represent. Often they are labels applied to entities ranging from entire populations to individual specimens representing those populations, even though such names only unambiguously identify the type specimen to which they were originally attached. Thus the real-life referents of names are constantly changing as biological circumscriptions are redefined and thereby alter the sets of individuals bearing those names. This problem is compounded by other characteristics of names that make them ambiguous identifiers of biological concepts, including emendations, homonymy and synonymy. Taxonomic concepts have been proposed as a way to address issues related to scientific names, but they have yet to receive broad recognition or implementation. Some efforts have been made towards building systems that address these issues by cataloguing and organizing taxonomic concepts, but most are still in conceptual or proof-of-concept stage. We present the on-line database Avibase as one possible approach to organizing taxonomic concepts. Avibase has been successfully used to describe and organize 844,000 species-level and 705,000 subspecies-level taxonomic concepts across every major bird taxonomic checklist of the last 125 years. The use of taxonomic concepts in place of scientific names, coupled with efficient resolution services, is a major step toward addressing some of the main deficiencies in the current practices of scientific name dissemination and use.

  12. Taxonomic revision of the genus Thereianthus (Iridaceae: Crocoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Manning

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thereianthus G.J.Lewis is revised, with full descriptions and synonomy, distribution maps, and notes on ecology and taxonomic history. All species are illustrated, and capsule and seed morphology are described for many of the species for the first time. Novel characteristics of the bract, seed, and pollen operculum are used to separate the species into two sections: sect. Brevibracteae Goldblatt & J.C.Manning is distinguished by relatively small bracts, 3–8 mm long and uniformly leathery or soft-textured without thickened veins, seeds with filiform chalazal extension, and pollen grains with 1-banded operculum; and sect. Thereianthus by relatively larger bracts, (7–8–15 mm long with prominently sclerified veins, seeds without any extension to the chalazal crest, and pollen grains with ± 2-banded operculum. Species in sect. Thereianthus are further segregated into ser. Thereianthus, with heavily ribbed leaves and suberect flowers with arcuate or erect stamens, and ser. Bracteolatus, with plane, inconspicuously veined leaves and ± spreading flowers with declinate stamens. Eleven species are recognized in the genus, all restricted to the southwestern portion of Western Cape. Two new species are described in sect. Thereianthus: T. bulbiferus Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, known from three populations along the West Coast, is distinguished by the unique development of cormels in the lower leaf axil, and by its actinomorphic perianth with white marks at the base of each tepal and ± declinate stamens; and T. elandsmontanus Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, known from a single population in Elandsberg Nature Reserve near Wellington, has distinctive cream-coloured, moderately long-tubed flowers with unusually narrow, linear tepals heavily marked with purple near the base. In adddition, T. lapeyrousioides [now T. minutus] var. elatior G.J.Lewis in sect. Brevibracteae is raised to species status as T. intermedius Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, differing from typical T

  13. Comparison of dental measurement systems for taxonomic assignment of Neanderthal and modern human lower second deciduous molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzi, Stefano; Fornai, Cinzia; Bayle, Priscilla; Coquerelle, Michael; Kullmer, Ottmar; Mallegni, Francesco; Weber, Gerhard W

    2011-09-01

    Traditional morphometric approaches for taxonomic assignment of Neanderthal and modern human dental remains are mainly characterized by caliper measurements of tooth crowns. Several studies have recently described differences in dental tissue proportions and enamel thickness between Neanderthal and modern human teeth. At least for the lower second deciduous molar (dm(2)), a three-dimensional lateral relative enamel thickness index has been proposed for separating the two taxa. This index has the advantage over other measurements of being applicable to worn teeth because it ignores the occlusal aspect of the crown. Nevertheless, a comparative evaluation of traditional crown dimensions and lateral dental tissue proportion measurements for taxonomic assignment of Neanderthal and modern human dm(2)s has not yet been performed. In this study, we compare various parameters gathered from the lateral aspects of the crown. These parameters include crown diameters, height of the lateral wall of the crown (lateral crown height = LCH), lateral enamel thickness, and dentine volume of the lateral wall, including the volume of the coronal pulp chamber (lateral dentine plus pulp volume = LDPV), in a 3D digital sample of Neanderthal and modern human dm(2)s to evaluate their utility in separating the two taxa. The LDPV and the LCH allow us to discriminate between Neanderthals and modern humans with 88.5% and 92.3% accuracy, respectively. Though our results confirm that Neanderthal dm(2)s have lower relative enamel thickness (RET) index compared with modern humans (p = 0.005), only 70% of the specimens were correctly classified on the basis of the RET index. We also emphasize that results of the lateral enamel thickness method depend on the magnitude of the interproximal wear. Accordingly, we suggest using the LCH or the LDPV to discriminate between Neanderthal and modern human dm(2)s. These parameters are more independent of interproximal wear and loss of lateral enamel.

  14. Taxonomic differences in deciduous upper second molar crown outlines of Homo sapiens, Homo neanderthalensis and Homo erectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Shara E; Benazzi, Stefano; Souday, Caroline; Astorino, Claudia; Paul, Kathleen; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2014-07-01

    A significant number of Middle to Late Pleistocene sites contain primarily (and sometimes only) deciduous teeth (e.g., Grotta del Cavallo, Mezmaiskaya, Blombos). Not surprisingly, there has been a recent renewed interest in deciduous dental variation, especially in the context of distinguishing Homo neanderthalensis and Homo sapiens. Most studies of the deciduous dentition of fossil hominins have focused on standard metrical variation but morphological (non-metric and morphometric) variation also promises to shed light on long standing taxonomic questions. This study examines the taxonomic significance of the crown outline of the deciduous upper second molar through principal components analysis and linear discriminant analysis. We examine whether or not the crown shape of the upper deciduous second molar separates H. neanderthalensis from H. sapiens and explore whether it can be used to correctly assign individuals to taxa. It builds on previous studies by focusing on crown rather than cervical outline and by including a large sample of geographically diverse recent human populations. Our samples include 17 H. neanderthalensis, five early H. sapiens, and 12 Upper Paleolithic H. sapiens. In addition, we include two Homo erectus specimens in order to evaluate the polarity of crown shape differences observed between H. neanderthalensis and H. sapiens. Our results show that crown outline shape discriminates H. sapiens and H. neanderthalensis quite well, but does not do well at distinguishing H. erectus from H. sapiens. We conclude that the crown outline shape observed in H. sapiens is a primitive retention and that the skewed shape observed in H. neanderthalensis is a derived condition. Finally, we explore the phylogenetic implications of the results for the H. erectus molars.

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Corrective Jaw ...

  16. Correction of Neonatal Hypovolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moskalev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of hydroxyethyl starch solution (6% refortane, Berlin-Chemie versus fresh frozen plasma used to correct neonatal hypovolemia.Materials and methods. In 12 neonatal infants with hypoco-agulation, hypovolemia was corrected with fresh frozen plasma (10 ml/kg body weight. In 13 neonates, it was corrected with 6% refortane infusion in a dose of 10 ml/kg. Doppler echocardiography was used to study central hemodynamic parameters and Doppler study was employed to examine regional blood flow in the anterior cerebral and renal arteries.Results. Infusion of 6% refortane and fresh frozen plasma at a rate of 10 ml/hour during an hour was found to normalize the parameters of central hemodynamics and regional blood flow.Conclusion. Comparative analysis of the findings suggests that 6% refortane is the drug of choice in correcting neonatal hypovolemia. Fresh frozen plasma should be infused in hemostatic disorders. 

  17. Corrected Age for Preemies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Corrected Age For Preemies Page Content Article Body If your ...

  18. Correctness is not enough

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The usual aim of spreadsheet audit is to verify correctness. There are two problems with this: first, it is often difficult to tell whether the spreadsheets in question are correct, and second, even if they are, they may still give the wrong results. These problems are explained in this paper, which presents the key criteria for judging a spreadsheet and discusses how those criteria can be achieved

  19. Adaptable DC offset correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  20. The morphological identification ofProtoperidinium (Peridiniales, Dinophyceae) species on the coasts of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ruixiang; PAN Yulong; SUN Huiying; LI Yan; MA Xin; WANG Yan

    2016-01-01

    The classification and identification forProtoperidinium species are the most difficult work during its taxonomic study. In this research, taxonomic status ofProtoperidinium was clarified by tracing its taxonomic history, 23 species belong to genusProtoperidinium on the coasts of China were preliminarily identified, and morphological description and plate patterns were given for each species. The key differences of similar species were also discussed in this study, we believe thatP. oceanicum andP. murry,P. tumidum andP. fatulipes,P. globules andP. majus are separate species;P. diabolum should be treated as the valid name instead of the reported names Peridinium globosum orPeridinium longipes; the taxonomic relationship betweenP. punctulatum andP. subinerme requires further study.

  1. Selection of multiple umbrella species for functional and taxonomic diversity to represent urban biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, T; Pezzatti, G B; Nobis, M P; Obrist, M K; Roth, T; Moretti, M

    2014-04-01

    Surrogates, such as umbrella species, are commonly used to reduce the complexity of quantifying biodiversity for conservation purposes. The presence of umbrella species is often indicative of high taxonomic diversity; however, functional diversity is now recognized as an important metric for biodiversity and thus should be considered when choosing umbrella species. We identified umbrella species associated with high taxonomic and functional biodiversity in urban areas in Switzerland. We analyzed 39,752 individuals of 574 animal species from 96 study plots and 1397 presences of 262 plant species from 58 plots. Thirty-one biodiversity measures of 7 taxonomic groups (plants, spiders, bees, ground beetles, lady bugs, weevils and birds) were included in within- and across-taxa analyses. Sixteen measures were taxonomical (species richness and species diversity), whereas 15 were functional (species traits including mobility, resource use, and reproduction). We used indicator value analysis to identify umbrella species associated with single or multiple biodiversity measures. Many umbrella species were indicators of high biodiversity within their own taxonomic group (from 33.3% in weevils to 93.8% in birds), to a lesser extent they were indicators across taxa. Principal component analysis revealed that umbrella species for multiple measures of biodiversity represented different aspects of biodiversity, especially with respect to measures of taxonomic and functional diversity. Thus, even umbrella species for multiple measures of biodiversity were complementary in the biodiversity aspects they represented. Thus, the choice of umbrella species based solely on taxonomic diversity is questionable and may not represent biodiversity comprehensively. Our results suggest that, depending on conservation priorities, managers should choose multiple and complementary umbrella species to assess the state of biodiversity. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Analyses of the stability and core taxonomic memberships of the human microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kelvin; Bihan, Monika; Methé, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of the taxonomic diversity associated with the human microbiome continue to be an area of great importance. The study of the nature and extent of the commonly shared taxa ("core"), versus those less prevalent, establishes a baseline for comparing healthy and diseased groups by quantifying the variation among people, across body habitats and over time. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored Human Microbiome Project (HMP) has provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine and better define what constitutes the taxonomic core within and across body habitats and individuals through pyrosequencing-based profiling of 16S rRNA gene sequences from oral, skin, distal gut (stool), and vaginal body habitats from over 200 healthy individuals. A two-parameter model is introduced to quantitatively identify the core taxonomic members of each body habitat's microbiota across the healthy cohort. Using only cutoffs for taxonomic ubiquity and abundance, core taxonomic members were identified for each of the 18 body habitats and also for the 4 higher-level body regions. Although many microbes were shared at low abundance, they exhibited a relatively continuous spread in both their abundance and ubiquity, as opposed to a more discretized separation. The numbers of core taxa members in the body regions are comparatively small and stable, reflecting the relatively high, but conserved, interpersonal variability within the cohort. Core sizes increased across the body regions in the order of: vagina, skin, stool, and oral cavity. A number of "minor" oral taxonomic core were also identified by their majority presence across the cohort, but with relatively low and stable abundances. A method for quantifying the difference between two cohorts was introduced and applied to samples collected on a second visit, revealing that over time, the oral, skin, and stool body regions tended to be more transient in their taxonomic structure than the vaginal body region.

  3. Discrimination of marine algal taxonomic groups based on fluorescence excitation emission matrix, parallel factor analysis and CHEMTAX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaona; SURongguo; BAIYing; SHI Xiaoyong; YANG Rujun

    2014-01-01

    An in vivo three-dimensional fluorescence method for the determination of algae community structure was developed by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and CHEMTAX. The PARAFAC model was applied to fluo-rescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) of 60 algae species belonging to five divisions and 11 fluorescent components were identified according to the residual sum of squares and specificity of the composition profiles of fluorescent. By the 11 fluorescent components, the algae species at different growth stages were classified correctly at the division level using Bayesian discriminant analysis (BDA). Then the reference fluo-rescent component ratio matrix was constructed for CHEMTAX, and the EEM–PARAFAC–CHEMTAX method was developed to differentiate algae taxonomic groups. The correct discrimination ratios (CDRs) when the fluorometric method was used for single-species samples were 100% at the division level, except for Bacil-lariophyta with a CDR of 95.6%. The CDRs for the mixtures were above 94.0% for the dominant algae species and above 87.0% for the subdominant algae species. However, the CDRs of the subdominant algae species were too low to be unreliable when the relative abundance estimated was less than 15.0%. The fluorometric method was tested using the samples from the Jiaozhou Bay and the mesocosm experiments in the Xiaomai Island Bay in August 2007. The discrimination results of the dominant algae groups agreed with microscopy cell counts, as well as the subdominant algae groups of which the estimated relative abundance was above 15.0%. This technique would be of great aid when low-cost and rapid analysis is needed for samples in a large batch. The fluorometric technique has the ability to correctly identify dominant species with proper abundance both in vivo and in situ.

  4. Taxonomic review of the superfamily Pyraloidea in Bhutan (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatishwor Singh Irungbam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The result of an investigation of the lepidopteran fauna of Central and Southern Bhutan (Bumthang, Dagana, Trongsa, Tsirang, and Sarpang districts is presented in this study. The investigation was the part of the Invertebrate Documentation Project of Bhutan initiated by the National Biodiversity Center, Thimphu, funded by the Bhutan Trust Fund for Environmental Conservation, Thimphu. The checklist was based on the systematic collections by light trapping at nine locations and the occasional collections from native forest and gardens within the five districts of Central and Southern Bhutan. The specimens were photographed and collected as specimens for future identification and reference. A list of 182 species belonging to families Crambidae and Pyralidae is presented, including 92 species as new records for the country. All the studied specimens are deposited at “Invertebrate Referral Collection Center” at the National Biodiversity Center, Thimphu.

  5. Identification of ethnomedicinal plants (Rauvolfioideae: Apocynaceae through DNA barcoding from northeast India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradosh Mahadani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA barcode-based molecular characterization is in practice for plants, but yet lacks total agreement considering the selection of marker. Plant species of subfamily Rauvolfioideae have long been used as herbal medicine by the majority of tribal people in Northeast (NE India and at present holds mass effect on the society. Hence, there is an urgent need of correct taxonomic inventorization vis-à-vis species level molecular characterization of important medicinal plants. Objective: To test the efficiency of matK in species delineation like DNA barcoding in Rauvolfiadae (Apocynaceae. Materials and Methods: In this study, the core DNA barcode matK and trnH-psbA sequences are examined for differentiation of selected ethnomedicinal plants of Apocynaceae. DNA from young leaves of selected species was isolated, and matK gene (~800 bp and trnH-psbA spacer (~450 bp of Chloroplast DNA was amplified for species level identification. Results: The ~758 bp matK sequence in comparison to the trnH-psbA showed easy amplification, alignment, and high level of discrimination value among the medicinal Rauvolfioidae species. Intergenic spacer trnH-psbA is also exhibited persistent problem in obtaining constant bidirectional sequences. Partial matK sequences exhibited 3 indels in multiple of 3 at 5 end. Evidently, generated matK sequences are clustered cohesively, with their conspecific Genbank sequences. However, repeat structures with AT-rich regions, possessing indels in multiple of 3, could be utilized as qualitative molecular markers in further studies both at the intra-specific and shallow inter-specific levels like the intergenic spacers of CpDNA. Conclusion: matK sequence information could help in correct species identification for medicinal plants of Rauvolfioideae.

  6. CORRECTING STUDENTS’ HOMEWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionI have been teaching English for ten years and like many other teachers in middle schools.I teach threebig classes each year.Before I had the opportunity to further my study in the SMSTT project run jointlyby the British Council and the State Education Commission of China at Southwest China TeachersUniversity.I found it somewhat difficult to correct students homework since I had so many students.Now I still have three big classes.but I have found it casier to correct students homework since I havebeen combining the techniques learned in the project with my own successful experience.In this article.I attempt to discuss my approach to correcting students homework.I hope that it will be of some use tothose who have not vet had the opportunity to further their training.

  7. Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Randrup-Thomsen, Søren; Morsing Johannesen, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    The model correction factor method is proposed as an alternative to traditional polynomial based response surface techniques in structural reliability considering a computationally time consuming limit state procedure as a 'black box'. The class of polynomial functions is replaced by a limit...... statebased on an idealized mechanical model to be adapted to the original limit state by the model correction factor. Reliable approximations are obtained by iterative use of gradient information on the original limit state function analogously to previous response surface approaches. However, the strength...... of the model correction factor method, is that in simpler form not using gradient information on the original limit state function or only using this information once, a drastic reduction of the number of limit state evaluation is obtained together with good approximations on the reliability. Methods...

  8. Correction of ocular dystopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, I P

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine results with elective surgical correction of enophthalmos. The study was a retrospective assessment in a university-based referral practice. A consecutive sample of 10 patients who developed ocular dystopia following orbital trauma was examined. The main outcome measures were a subjective evaluation by patients and objective measurements of patients' eye position. The intervention was three-dimensional orbital reconstruction with titanium plates. It is concluded that satisfactory correction of enophthalmos and ocular dystopia can be achieved with elective surgery using titanium plates. In addition, intraoperative measurements of eye position in three planes increases the precision of surgery.

  9. Biogeographic Variation in Host Range Phenotypes and Taxonomic Composition of Marine Cyanophage Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, China A; Marston, Marcia F; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2016-01-01

    Despite the important role of phages in marine systems, little is understood about how their diversity is distributed in space. Biogeographic patterns of marine phages may be difficult to detect due to their vast genetic diversity, which may not be accurately represented by conserved marker genes. To investigate the spatial biogeographic structure of marine phages, we isolated over 400 cyanophages on Synechococcus host strain WH7803 at three coastal locations in the United States (Rhode Island, Washington, and southern California). Approximately 90% of the cyanophage isolates were myoviruses, while the other 10% were podoviruses. The diversity of isolates was further characterized in two ways: (i) taxonomically, using conserved marker genes and (ii) phenotypically, by testing isolates for their ability to infect a suite of hosts, or their "host range." Because host range is a highly variable trait even among closely related isolates, we hypothesized that host range phenotypes of cyanophage isolates would vary more strongly among locations than would taxonomic composition. Instead, we found evidence for strong biogeographic variation both in taxonomic composition and host range phenotypes, with little taxonomic overlap among the three coastal regions. For both taxonomic composition and host range phenotypes, cyanophage communities from California and Rhode Island were the most dissimilar, while Washington communities exhibited similarity to each of the other two locations. These results suggest that selection imposed by spatial variation in host dynamics influence the biogeographic distribution of cyanophages.

  10. Low functional β-diversity despite high taxonomic β-diversity among tropical estuarine fish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villéger, Sébastien; Ramos Miranda, Julia; Flores Hernandez, Domingo; Mouillot, David

    2012-01-01

    The concept of β-diversity, defined as dissimilarity among communities, has been widely used to investigate biodiversity patterns and community assembly rules. However, in ecosystems with high taxonomic β-diversity, due to marked environmental gradients, the level of functional β-diversity among communities is largely overlooked while it may reveal processes shaping community structure. Here, decomposing biodiversity indices into α (local) and γ (regional) components, we estimated taxonomic and functional β-diversity among tropical estuarine fish communities, through space and time. We found extremely low functional β-diversity values among fish communities (<1.5%) despite high dissimilarity in species composition and species dominance. Additionally, in contrast to the high α and γ taxonomic diversities, α and γ functional diversities were very close to the minimal value. These patterns were caused by two dominant functional groups which maintained a similar functional structure over space and time, despite the strong dissimilarity in taxonomic structure along environmental gradients. Our findings suggest that taxonomic and functional β-diversity deserve to be quantified simultaneously since these two facets can show contrasting patterns and the differences can in turn shed light on community assembly rules.

  11. High resolution taxonomic study of the late Eocene (~34 Ma) Florissant palynoflora, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    The Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument is located in Teller County in central Colorado, at approximate latitude 38°54'N and longitude 105°13'. The lithologies of the Florissant Formation consist of coarse-grained arkosic and volcanoclastic sandstones and conglomerates, finer shale, and tuffaceus mudstone and siltstone. It is divided into six units, mostly of lacustrine and fluvial origin with volcanic sediments interfingering and topping the strata. Volcanic units have been dated using the 40Ar/39Ar single-crystal method, giving an absolute age of ca. 34 Ma for the upper fossiliferous sedimentary unit. This pinpoints the formation of the Florissant sediments at the end of the Eocene, providing fruitful insight into the changing palaeoecosystem of the region at the dawn of the Oligocene. The formation is very well known for its rich fossil insect fauna and well preserved plant macrofossils found in the shale units, and the silicified tree stumps occurring in the lower mudstone unit. The sample used for this study originates from the upper shale unit, the fifth unit from the base of the formation. Previous studies on the plant macrofossils, mesofossils and the palynoflora have shown that during the late Eocene the surroundings of Florissant palaeo-lake were covered by diverse mixed broad-leaved evergreen/deciduous and needle-leafed forests. Until now pollen from the Florissant Formation has mostly been described according to conventional morphological nomenclature, using light microscopy (LM) only. In this study the same individual pollen grains are investigated using both LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), by means of single grain technique. This provides best exploitable results concerning a more detailed resolution regarding taxonomy and more accurate identifications. The main goal of this study is to compile a well resolved taxonomic species list based on the palynoflora, to clarify the generic and species diversity of selected families (e

  12. A preliminary phylogeny of the Palearctic naked-toed geckos (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) with taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Aaron M; Masroor, Rafaqat; Titus-McQuillan, James; Heinicke, Matthew P; Daza, Juan D; Jackman, Todd R

    2013-01-08

    Palearctic naked-toed geckos are a group of gekkonid geckos that range from North Africa to northern India and western China, with their greatest diversity in Iran and Pakistan. Relationships among the constituent genera remain incompletely resolved and the monophyly of key genera remains unverified. Further, competing classifications are in current use and many species have been allocated to different genera by different authors. We used both mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear genes (RAG1, PDC) to explore relationships among representatives of all but one genus in the group (Rhinogecko), including four genera not previously included in phylogenetic analyses (Asiocolotes, Altigekko, Indogekko, and Siwaligekko). Siwaligekko (and presumably other Tibeto-Himalayan species often referred to Cyrtopodion) are more closely related to tropical Asian Cyrtodactylus than to Palearctic naked-toed geckos. Sampled species of Asiocolotes and Altigekko are sister taxa, but both genera are here considered junior subjective synonyms of Altiphylax. Cyrtopodion sensu lato is non-monophyletic; Mediodactylus and Tenuidactylus, which have variably been considered as subgenera or synonyms of Cyrtopodion are both valid genera. Indogekko is embedded within Cyrtopodion and is here treated as a subgenus. Bunopus and Crossobamon are closely related to one-another, and with Agamura are interdigitated among taxa previously assigned to Cyrtopodion. Our data confirm the previous identification of a Saharo-Arabian Stenodactylus/Tropiocolotes/Pseudoceramodactylus clade and verify that Microgecko and Alsophylax are not members of the main clade of Palearctic naked-toed geckos. Osteological differences between Tropiocolotes and Microgecko, formerly treated as congeneric, are discussed and illustrated. The divergence between Cyrtodactylus and the Palearctic naked-toed clade predates the initial collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates, but deeper divergences within both groups are

  13. Highly variable chloroplast markers for evaluating plant phylogeny at low taxonomic levels and for DNA barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenpan Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At present, plant molecular systematics and DNA barcoding techniques rely heavily on the use of chloroplast gene sequences. Because of the relatively low evolutionary rates of chloroplast genes, there are very few choices suitable for molecular studies on angiosperms at low taxonomic levels, and for DNA barcoding of species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We scanned the entire chloroplast genomes of 12 genera to search for highly variable regions. The sequence data of 9 genera were from GenBank and 3 genera were of our own. We identified nearly 5% of the most variable loci from all variable loci in the chloroplast genomes of each genus, and then selected 23 loci that were present in at least three genera. The 23 loci included 4 coding regions, 2 introns, and 17 intergenic spacers. Of the 23 loci, the most variable (in order from highest variability to lowest were intergenic regions ycf1-a, trnK, rpl32-trnL, and trnH-psbA, followed by trnS(UGA-trnG(UCC, petA-psbJ, rps16-trnQ, ndhC-trnV, ycf1-b, ndhF, rpoB-trnC, psbE-petL, and rbcL-accD. Three loci, trnS(UGA-trnG(UCC, trnT-psbD, and trnW-psaJ, showed very high nucleotide diversity per site (π values across three genera. Other loci may have strong potential for resolving phylogenetic and species identification problems at the species level. The loci accD-psaI, rbcL-accD, rpl32-trnL, rps16-trnQ, and ycf1 are absent from some genera. To amplify and sequence the highly variable loci identified in this study, we designed primers from their conserved flanking regions. We tested the applicability of the primers to amplify target sequences in eight species representing basal angiosperms, monocots, eudicots, rosids, and asterids, and confirmed that the primers amplified the desired sequences of these species. SIGNIFICANCE/CONCLUSIONS: Chloroplast genome sequences contain regions that are highly variable. Such regions are the first consideration when screening the suitable loci to resolve

  14. Phylogenetic position of the genus Gonocerca Manter, 1925 (Trematoda, Hemiuroidea), based on partial sequences of 28S rRNA gene and a reconsideration of taxonomic status of Gonocercinae Skrjabin et Guschanskaja, 1955.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Sergey G; Atopkin, Dmitry M; Gordeev, Ilya I; Shedko, Marina B

    2017-03-27

    Adult trematodes of the genus Gonocerca Manter, 1925, are parasites of marine fishes. Identification of the phylogenetic positions and a revision of the taxonomic status of the subfamily Gonocercinae Skrjabin et Guschanskaja, 1955 (Derogenidae) are the main purposes of this research article. Four Gonocerca species were used in the study, including the type-species G. phycidis Manter, 1925. Molecular phylogenetic analysis, based on partial sequences of 28S rRNA gene, revealed that Gonocerca spp. are phylogenetically distant from other hemiuroid trematodes, including Derogenes varicus (Müller, 1784), representative of the type-genus of the family Derogenidae. The taxonomic rank of Gonocercinae should be raised to the family level. The generic composition of the family Gonocercidae Skrjabin et Guschanskaja, 1955 stat. nov., requires further clarification as the molecular data do not support the inclusion of the genus Hemipera Nicoll, 1913, in this family. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Refraction corrections for surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  16. Renormalons and Power Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Even for short-distance dominated observables the QCD perturbation expansion is never complete. The divergence of the expansion through infrared renormalons provides formal evidence of this fact. In this article we review how this apparent failure can be turned into a useful tool to investigate power corrections to hard processes in QCD.

  17. Radiative Corrections and Z'

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Radiative corrections to parity violating deep inelastic electron scattering are reviewed including a discussion of the renormalization group evolution of the weak mixing angle. Recently obtained results on hypothetical Z' bosons - for which parity violating observables play an important role - are also presented.

  18. General forecasting correcting formula

    OpenAIRE

    Harin, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    A general forecasting correcting formula, as a framework for long-use and standardized forecasts, is created. The formula provides new forecasting resources and new possibilities for expansion of forecasting including economic forecasting into the areas of municipal needs, middle-size and small-size business and, even, to individual forecasting.

  19. ERRORS AND CORRECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    To err is human . Since the 1960s, most second language teachers or language theorists have regarded errors as natural and inevitable in the language learning process . Instead of regarding them as terrible and disappointing, teachers have come to realize their value. This paper will consider these values, analyze some errors and propose some effective correction techniques.

  20. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may be dramatically enhanced as a result of their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may indicate the need for corrective jaw surgery: Difficulty chewing, or biting food Difficulty swallowing Chronic jaw or jaw joint (TMJ) ...

  2. Corrections for collaborators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1953-01-01

    In the ”Directions and Hints” for collaborators in Flora Malesiana, which has been forwarded to all collaborators, two corrections should be made, viz: 1) p. 12; Omit the explanatory notes under Jamaica Plain, Mass., and Cambridge, Mass. 2) p. 13; Add as number 12a; Stockholm, Paleobotaniska Avdelni

  3. General forecasting correcting formula

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A general forecasting correcting formula, as a framework for long-use and standardized forecasts, is created. The formula provides new forecasting resources and new possibilities for expansion of forecasting including economic forecasting into the areas of municipal needs, middle-size and small-size business and, even, to individual forecasting.

  4. Taxonomic diversity of anaerobic glycerol dissimilation in the Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, O M; Lenormand, P; Ageron, E; Grimont, P A

    1995-05-01

    A total of 1,123 strains representing 128 taxa in the Enterobacteriaceae (named species or subspecies and genomic species) were screened for the presence of glycerol dehydrogenases and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase. Only eight taxa, Citrobacter freundii sensu stricto, C. youngae, C. braakii, C. werkmanii, Citrobacter genomospecies 10 and 11, Enterobacter gergoviae and Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae could grow fermentatively on glycerol and possessed both glycerol dehydrogenase type I (induced by glycerol and dihydroxyacetone) and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase which are typical enzymes of the anaerobic glycerol dissimilation pathway. Six other species, C. koseri, E. aerogenes, E. intermedium, K. oxytoca, K. planticola and K. terrigena could not grow fermentatively on glycerol and possessed a glycerol dehydrogenase type I but no 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase. Other glycerol dehydrogenases types were found: type II (induced by glycerol and hydroxyacetone), type III (induced by glycerol only) and type IV (induced by hydroxyacetone only). They were widely distributed among the Enterobacteriaceae. Classification and identification may take advantage of tests exploring the dissimilation of glycerol.

  5. Taxonomic revision of deep-sea Ostracoda from the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Stepanova, Anna; Okahashi, Hisayo; Cronin, Thomas M.; Brouwers, Elisabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic revision of deep-sea Ostracoda from the Arctic Ocean was conducted to reduce taxonomic uncertainty that will improve our understanding of species ecology, biogeography and relationship to faunas from other deep-sea regions. Fifteen genera and 40 species were examined and (re-)illustrated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images, covering most of known deep-sea species in the central Arctic Ocean. Seven new species are described: Bythoceratina lomonosovensis n. sp., Cytheropteron parahamatum n. sp., Cytheropteron lanceae n. sp.,Cytheropteron irizukii n. sp., Pedicythere arctica n. sp., Cluthiawhatleyi n. sp., Krithe hunti n. sp. This study provides a robust taxonomic baseline for application to paleoceanographical reconstruction and biodiversity analyses in this climatically sensitive region.

  6. Taxonomic changes in palaeotropical Xyleborini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Hulcr

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Following the recent reclassification of the Palaeotropic xyleborine genera (Hulcr & Cognato 2010a, additional species are transferred to correct genera or synonymized based on analysis of their morphological characters. The following species are given new combinations: Debus amphicranoides (Hagedorn, comb. n., Debus birmanus (Eggers, 1930, comb. n., Debus dolosus (Blandford 1896, comb. n., Debus eximius (Schedl, 1970, comb. n., Debus interponens (Schedl, 1954, comb. n., Debus robustipennis (Schedl, 1954, comb. n., Debus spinatus (Eggers, 1923, comb. n., Microperus alpha (Beeson 1929, comb. n., Microperus corporaali (Eggers, comb. n., Microperus eucalyptica (Schedl, 1938, comb. n., Microperus nugax (Schedl, 1939, comb. n., Pseudowebbia percorthylus (Schedl, 1935, comb. n., Truncaudum circumcinctus (Schedl, 1941, comb. n. The following species are synonymized: Arixyleborus hirtipennis (Eggers, syn. n., with Arixyleborus puberulus (Blandford; Coptoborus palmeri (Hopkins, syn. n., with Debus emarginatus (Eichhoff; Coptoborus terminaliae (Hopkins, syn. n., with Debus emarginatus (Eichhoff; Cyclorhipidion polyodon (Eggers, syn. n., with Truncaudum agnatum (Eggers; Euwallacea artelaevis (Schedl, syn. n., with Planiculus bicolor (Blandford; Xyleborinus perminutissimus (Schedl, syn. n., with Xyleborinus perpusillus (Eggers; Xyleborus exesus Blandford, syn. n., with Debus emarginatus (Eichhoff; Xyleborus fulvulus (Schedl, syn. n., with Microperus corporaali (Eggers; Xyleborus marginicollis (Schedl, syn. n., with Diuncus justus (Schedl; Xyleborus shoreae Stebbing, syn. n., with Debus fallax (Eichhoff. The following species are given new status: Streptocranus superbus (Schedl, 1951, restored name; Webbia divisus Browne 1972, restored name; Webbia penicillatus (Hagedorn 1910, restored name. Genus Taphrodasus Wood (1980 is declared not valid.

  7. Dung Beetles along a Tropical Altitudinal Gradient: Environmental Filtering on Taxonomic and Functional Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Cássio Alencar; Braga, Rodrigo Fagundes; Figueira, José Eugênio Cortes; Neves, Frederico de Siqueira; Fernandes, G. Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Mountains provide an interesting context in which to study the many facets of biodiversity in response to macroclimate, since environmental conditions change rapidly due to elevation. Although the decrease in biodiversity with increasing elevation is generally accepted, our understanding of the variation of functional diversity along altitudinal gradients is still poorly known. The partitioning of diversity into spatial components can help to understand the processes that influence the distribution of species, and these studies are urgently needed in face of the increasing threats to mountain environments throughout the world. We describe the distribution of dung beetle diversity along an altitudinal gradient on a tropical mountain in southeastern Brazil, including the spatial partitioning of taxonomic and functional diversities. The altitudinal gradient ranged from 800 up to 1400 m a.s.l. and we collected dung beetles at every 100 m of altitude. We used the Rao Index to calculate γ, α and β diversity for taxonomic and functional diversity of dung beetles. Climatic, soil and vegetation variables were used to explain variation in community attributes along the altitudinal gradient. Dung beetle richness declined with altitude and was related to climatic and vegetation variables, but functional diversity did not follow the same pattern. Over 50% of γ taxonomic diversity was caused by among altitudes diversity (β), while almost 100% of functional diversity was due to the α component. Contrasting β taxonomic with β functional diversity, we suggest that there is ecological redundancy among communities and that the environment is filtering species in terms of the Grinnellian niche, rather than the Eltonian niche. β taxonomic diversity is caused mainly by the turnover component, reinforcing the hypothesis of environmental filtering. Global warming may have strong effects on mountain communities due to upslope range shifts and extinctions, and these events will

  8. Taxonomic separation of hippocampal networks: principal cell populations and adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roelof Maarten evan Dijk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While many differences in hippocampal anatomy have been described between species, it is typically not clear if they are specific to a particular species and related to functional requirements or if they are shared by species of larger taxonomic units. Without such information, it is difficult to infer how anatomical differences may impact on hippocampal function, because multiple taxonomic levels need to be considered to associate behavioral and anatomical changes. To provide information on anatomical changes within and across taxonomic ranks, we present a quantitative assessment of hippocampal principal cell populations in 20 species or strain groups, with emphasis on rodents, the taxonomic group that provides most animals used in laboratory research. Of special interest is the importance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in species-specific adaptations relative to other cell populations. Correspondence analysis of cell numbers shows that across taxonomic units, phylogenetically related species cluster together, sharing similar proportions of principal cell populations. CA3 and hilus are strong separators that place rodent species into a tight cluster based on their relatively large CA3 and small hilus while non-rodent species (including humans and non-human primates are placed on the opposite side of the spectrum. Hilus and CA3 are also separators within rodents, with a very large CA3 and rather small hilar cell populations separating mole-rats from other rodents that, in turn, are separated from each other by smaller changes in the proportions of CA1 and granule cells. When adult neurogenesis is included, the relatively small populations of young neurons, proliferating cells and hilar neurons become main drivers of taxonomic separation within rodents. The observations provide challenges to the computational modeling of hippocampal function, suggest differences in the organization of hippocampal information streams in rodent and non

  9. Dung Beetles along a Tropical Altitudinal Gradient: Environmental Filtering on Taxonomic and Functional Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Cássio Alencar; Braga, Rodrigo Fagundes; Figueira, José Eugênio Cortes; Neves, Frederico de Siqueira; Fernandes, G Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Mountains provide an interesting context in which to study the many facets of biodiversity in response to macroclimate, since environmental conditions change rapidly due to elevation. Although the decrease in biodiversity with increasing elevation is generally accepted, our understanding of the variation of functional diversity along altitudinal gradients is still poorly known. The partitioning of diversity into spatial components can help to understand the processes that influence the distribution of species, and these studies are urgently needed in face of the increasing threats to mountain environments throughout the world. We describe the distribution of dung beetle diversity along an altitudinal gradient on a tropical mountain in southeastern Brazil, including the spatial partitioning of taxonomic and functional diversities. The altitudinal gradient ranged from 800 up to 1400 m a.s.l. and we collected dung beetles at every 100 m of altitude. We used the Rao Index to calculate γ, α and β diversity for taxonomic and functional diversity of dung beetles. Climatic, soil and vegetation variables were used to explain variation in community attributes along the altitudinal gradient. Dung beetle richness declined with altitude and was related to climatic and vegetation variables, but functional diversity did not follow the same pattern. Over 50% of γ taxonomic diversity was caused by among altitudes diversity (β), while almost 100% of functional diversity was due to the α component. Contrasting β taxonomic with β functional diversity, we suggest that there is ecological redundancy among communities and that the environment is filtering species in terms of the Grinnellian niche, rather than the Eltonian niche. β taxonomic diversity is caused mainly by the turnover component, reinforcing the hypothesis of environmental filtering. Global warming may have strong effects on mountain communities due to upslope range shifts and extinctions, and these events will

  10. Sequencing of 16S rDNA of Klebsiella: taxonomic relations within the genus and to other Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boye, Kit; Hansen, Dennis S

    2003-02-01

    The 16S rDNAs of 20 strains of Klebsiella were sequenced and used for construction of a phylogenetic tree together with already published Enterobacteriaceae 16S rDNA sequences. The taxonomy within the Klebsiella genus, as reflected by the 16S rDNA tree, was in agreement with existing DNA-DNA hybridisation and numerical taxonomy data, indicating that for Klebsiella, 16S rDNA sequencing is a valid method for identification and taxonomical purposes. Five closely related clusters were found in the Klebsiella genus; Cluster I, K. oxytoca; Cluster II, K. terrigena, Cluster III, K. planticola and K. ornithinolytica; Cluster IV, Enterobacter aerogenes (K. mobilis); and Cluster V, K. pneumoniae. The position of Calymmatobacterium granulomatis within the genus and closest to K. pneumoniae was confirmed. For the species K. oxytoca, data seem to indicate a subdivision into two subspecies. In addition, a biochemically aberrant Klebsiella strain (BEC441) that was included in the analysis could not be assigned to any of the known species, but was found to be closest related to K. oxytoca. Furthermore, the high sequence similarity between the two environmental species K. planticola and K. ornithinolytica does not justify a distinction of the two species. Finally, within a 165-bp stretch of the 16S rDNA sequences, species-specific nucleotides were found.

  11. Marine Actinobacteria as a source of compounds for phytopathogen control: An integrative metabolic-profiling / bioactivity and taxonomical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur, Luz A; Naranjo-Gaybor, Sandra J; Vinchira-Villarraga, Diana M; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia C; Maldonado, Luis A; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R; Acosta-González, Alejandro; Padilla-Gonzalez, Gillermo F; Puyana, Mónica; Castellanos, Leonardo; Ramos, Freddy A

    2017-01-01

    Marine bacteria are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In this study, samples of sediment, invertebrate and algae were collected from the Providencia and Santa Catalina coral reef (Colombian Caribbean Sea) with the aim of isolating Actinobateria-like strain able to produce antimicrobial and quorum quenching compounds against pathogens. Several approaches were used to select actinobacterial isolates, obtaining 203 strains from all samples. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequencing, a total of 24 strains was classified within Actinobacteria represented by three genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Gordonia. In order to assess their metabolic profiles, the actinobacterial strains were grown in liquid cultures, and LC-MS-based analyses from ethyl acetate fractions were performed. Based on taxonomical classification, screening information of activity against phytopathogenic strains and quorum quenching activity, as well as metabolic profiling, six out of the 24 isolates were selected for follow-up with chemical isolation and structure identification analyses of putative metabolites involved in antimicrobial activities.

  12. Marine Actinobacteria as a source of compounds for phytopathogen control: An integrative metabolic-profiling / bioactivity and taxonomical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur, Luz A.; Naranjo-Gaybor, Sandra J.; Vinchira-Villarraga, Diana M.; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia C.; Maldonado, Luis A.; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R.; Acosta-González, Alejandro; Padilla-Gonzalez, Gillermo F.; Puyana, Mónica; Castellanos, Leonardo; Ramos, Freddy A.

    2017-01-01

    Marine bacteria are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In this study, samples of sediment, invertebrate and algae were collected from the Providencia and Santa Catalina coral reef (Colombian Caribbean Sea) with the aim of isolating Actinobateria-like strain able to produce antimicrobial and quorum quenching compounds against pathogens. Several approaches were used to select actinobacterial isolates, obtaining 203 strains from all samples. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequencing, a total of 24 strains was classified within Actinobacteria represented by three genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Gordonia. In order to assess their metabolic profiles, the actinobacterial strains were grown in liquid cultures, and LC-MS-based analyses from ethyl acetate fractions were performed. Based on taxonomical classification, screening information of activity against phytopathogenic strains and quorum quenching activity, as well as metabolic profiling, six out of the 24 isolates were selected for follow-up with chemical isolation and structure identification analyses of putative metabolites involved in antimicrobial activities. PMID:28225766

  13. The taxonomic status of Scilla beirana Samp. (Hyacinthaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldas, Francisco B.

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Scilla beirana Samp. were sampled in NW Portugal and compared with its relatives S. ramburei Boiss, and S. peruviana L. Leaf and scape anatomy, morphology, chromosome number and idiogram were identical in S. beirana and S. ramburei, but differed from S. peruviana. Diagnostic characters previously used to discriminate S. beirana (width of leaves and flower number showed continuous, but not clinal, variation, and failed to provide a clear-cut basis for identification and no other morphological attributes were found to separate the taxa. All available evidence suggests that S. beirana should be put into synonymy with S. ramburei, as was earlier suggested by COUTINHO (1935.Se muestreó Scilla beirana Samp. en diversas poblaciones del noroeste de Portugal y se comparó con dos táxones con los que se había relacionado previamente, S. ramburei Boiss, y S. peruviana L. La macromorfología, la anatomía de la hoja y escapo, el número cromosomático y el idiograma de S. beirana y S. ramburei fueron indistinguibles, pero diferentes de los de S. peruviana. Los caracteres diagnósticos que se habían utilizado previamente para discriminar a S. beirana -anchura foliar y número de flores- revelaron una variación continua y no permitieron diferenciarla de S. ramburei, en la cual debería ser incluida como sinónimo, tal como había sugerido COUTINHO (1935.

  14. Taxonomic Notes on Nasutitermes and Bulbitermes (Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae from the Sunda region of Southeast Asia based on morphological and molecular characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syaukani Syaukani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Sunda region of Southeastern Asia is rich in termite fauna, but termites from this region have been poorly described. In this study, we described eight species from two diverse genera from this region, and from the family Termitidae. We describe Bulbitermes 4 spp. and Nasutitermes 4 spp. from new field collections. Where possible we examine original holotype specimens, and describe the essential morphological characters for soldier and worker castes. We devise two new bifurcating keys to guide the field identification of each species. In addition, we develop a nucleotide sequence profile for the COI gene. From this molecular character matrix, we use Neighbour-Joining analysis to test the monophyly of each morphospecies and genus. We find that the morphological and molecular characters are highly concordant, whereby all taxa appear to represent distinct molecular clades. For termites, there is therefore agreement between the morphological taxonomic characters used to sort species from a bifurcating key and the molecular taxonomic characters used to sort species on a bifurcating tree. This joint analysis suggests that DNA barcoding holds considerable promise for termite taxonomy, especially for diverse clades like Bulbitermes and Nasutitermes for which a global morphological key would be intractable.

  15. The application of DNA sequence data for the identification of benthic nematodes from the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Philipp; Miljutina, Maria; Raupach, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    Nematodes or roundworms represent one of the most diverse and dominant taxon in marine benthic habitats. Whereas a morphological identification of many species is challenging, the application of molecular markers represents a promising approach for species discrimination and identification. In this study, we used an integrative taxonomic approach, combining both molecular and morphological methods, to characterize nematodes of distinct sex and ontogenetic stages from three sampling sites of the North Sea. Morphospecies were discriminated after first visual determination, followed by a molecular analysis of the nuclear 28S rDNA: D2-D3 marker. By linking each sequence to a morphological voucher, discordant morphological identification was subjected to a so-called reverse taxonomic approach. Molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) and morphospecies were compared for all of the three sampling sites to assess concordance of methodology. In total, 32 MOTUs and 26 morphospecies were assigned, of which 12 taxa were identified as described species. Both approaches showed high concordance in taxon assignment (84.4 %) except for a cluster comprising various Sabatieria species. Our study revealed the high potential of the analyzed fragment as a useful molecular marker for the identification of the North Sea nematodes and highlighted the applicability of this combined taxonomic approach in general.

  16. Teaching Botanical Identification to Adults: Experiences of the UK Participatory Science Project "Open Air Laboratories"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Taxonomic education and botany are increasingly neglected in schools and universities, leading to a "missed generation" of adults that cannot identify organisms, especially plants. This study pilots three methods for teaching identification of native plant species to forty-three adults engaged in the participatory science project…

  17. Radiative corrections to DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold

    2008-01-01

    Early deep inelastic scattering (DIS) experiments at SLAC discovered partons, identified them as quarks and gluons, and restricted the set of the candidate theories for strong interactions to those exhibiting the asymptotic freedom property. The next generation DIS experiments at FNAL and CERN confirmed the predictions of QCD for the size of the scaling violation effects in the nucleon structure functions. The QCD fits to their data resulted in determining the momentum distributions of the point-like constituents of nucleons. Interpretation of data coming from all these experiments and, in the case of the SLAC experiments, even an elaboration of the running strategies, would not have been possible without a precise understanding of the electromagnetic radiative corrections. In this note I recollect the important milestones, achieved in the period preceding the HERA era, in the high precision calculations of the radiative corrections to DIS, and in the development of the methods of their experimental control. ...

  18. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  19. The current status of species recognition and identification in Aspergillus

    OpenAIRE

    Geiser, D.M.; Klich, M A; Frisvad, J.C.; Peterson, S.W.; Varga, J.; Samson, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    The species recognition and identification of aspergilli and their teleomorphs is discussed. A historical overview of the taxonomic concepts starting with the monograph of Raper & Fennell (1965) is given. A list of taxa described since 2000 is provided. Physiological characters, particularly growth rates and the production of extrolites, often show differences that reflect phylogenetic species boundaries and greater emphasis should be placed on extrolite profiles and growth characteristics in...

  20. LifeCLEF 2015: Multimedia Life Species Identification Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Joly, Alexis; Goëau, Hervé; Glotin, Hervé; Spampinato, Concetto; Bonnet, Pierre; Vellinga, Willem-Pier; Planqué, Robert; Rauber, Andreas; Palazzo, Simone; Fisher, Bob; Müller, Henning

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Using multimedia identification tools is considered as one of the most promising solutions to help bridging the taxonomic gap and build accurate knowledge of the identity, the geographic distribution and the evolution of living species. Large and structured communities of nature observers (e.g. eBird, Xeno-canto, Tela Botanica, etc.) as well as big monitoring equipments have actually started to produce outstanding collections of multimedia records. Unfortunately, the p...

  1. Correcting Duporcq's theorem☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawratil, Georg

    2014-01-01

    In 1898, Ernest Duporcq stated a famous theorem about rigid-body motions with spherical trajectories, without giving a rigorous proof. Today, this theorem is again of interest, as it is strongly connected with the topic of self-motions of planar Stewart–Gough platforms. We discuss Duporcq's theorem from this point of view and demonstrate that it is not correct. Moreover, we also present a revised version of this theorem. PMID:25540467

  2. Congenitally corrected transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debich-Spicer Diane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenitally corrected transposition is a rare cardiac malformation characterized by the combination of discordant atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial connections, usually accompanied by other cardiovascular malformations. Incidence has been reported to be around 1/33,000 live births, accounting for approximately 0.05% of congenital heart malformations. Associated malformations may include interventricular communications, obstructions of the outlet from the morphologically left ventricle, and anomalies of the tricuspid valve. The clinical picture and age of onset depend on the associated malformations, with bradycardia, a single loud second heart sound and a heart murmur being the most common manifestations. In the rare cases where there are no associated malformations, congenitally corrected transposition can lead to progressive atrioventricular valvar regurgitation and failure of the systemic ventricle. The diagnosis can also be made late in life when the patient presents with complete heart block or cardiac failure. The etiology of congenitally corrected transposition is currently unknown, and with an increase in incidence among families with previous cases of congenitally corrected transposition reported. Diagnosis can be made by fetal echocardiography, but is more commonly made postnatally with a combination of clinical signs and echocardiography. The anatomical delineation can be further assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and catheterization. The differential diagnosis is centred on the assessing if the patient is presenting with isolated malformations, or as part of a spectrum. Surgical management consists of repair of the associated malformations, or redirection of the systemic and pulmonary venous return associated with an arterial switch procedure, the so-called double switch approach. Prognosis is defined by the associated malformations, and on the timing and approach to palliative surgical care.

  3. Taxonomic Identity Resolution of Highly Phylogenetically Related Strains and Selection of Phylogenetic Markers by Using Genome-Scale Methods: The Bacillus pumilus Group Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espariz, Martín; Zuljan, Federico A.; Esteban, Luis; Magni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus group strains have been studied due their agronomic, biotechnological or pharmaceutical potential. Classifying strains of this taxonomic group at species level is a challenging procedure since it is composed of seven species that share among them over 99.5% of 16S rRNA gene identity. In this study, first, a whole-genome in silico approach was used to accurately demarcate B. pumilus group strains, as a case of highly phylogenetically related taxa, at the species level. In order to achieve that and consequently to validate or correct taxonomic identities of genomes in public databases, an average nucleotide identity correlation, a core-based phylogenomic and a gene function repertory analyses were performed. Eventually, more than 50% such genomes were found to be misclassified. Hierarchical clustering of gene functional repertoires was also used to infer ecotypes among B. pumilus group species. Furthermore, for the first time the machine-learning algorithm Random Forest was used to rank genes in order of their importance for species classification. We found that ybbP, a gene involved in the synthesis of cyclic di-AMP, was the most important gene for accurately predicting species identity among B. pumilus group strains. Finally, principal component analysis was used to classify strains based on the distances between their ybbP genes. The methodologies described could be utilized more broadly to identify other highly phylogenetically related species in metagenomic or epidemiological assessments. PMID:27658251

  4. Identification of species by multiplex analysis of variable-length sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Filipe; Carneiro, João; Matthiesen, Rune; van Asch, Barbara; Pinto, Nádia; Gusmão, Leonor; Amorim, António

    2010-01-01

    The quest for a universal and efficient method of identifying species has been a longstanding challenge in biology. Here, we show that accurate identification of species in all domains of life can be accomplished by multiplex analysis of variable-length sequences containing multiple insertion/deletion variants. The new method, called SPInDel, is able to discriminate 93.3% of eukaryotic species from 18 taxonomic groups. We also demonstrate that the identification of prokaryotic and viral speci...

  5. Differential Sputtering Correction for Ion Microscopy Using Image Depth Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-22

    Tissue, Raphanus sativus , Radish 20. AUSTRACT (Continue an reee side If neceeesry and Identif by block numb.) >A first-order correction for...chosen on the basis of the primary ion beam species and sample thickness. Sample Preparation: Root tips of Raphanus sativus (radish) seedlings were

  6. A taxonomic guide to the brittle-stars (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea from the State of Paraíba continental shelf, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Gondim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide the first annotated checklist of ophiuroids from the continental shelf of the State of Paraíba, northeastern Brazil. Identification keys and taxonomic diagnoses for 23 species, belonging to 14 genera and 8 families, are provided. The material is deposited in the Invertebrate Collection Paulo Young, at the Federal University of Paraíba. Ophiopsila hartmeyeri represents the first record for the northeastern region of Brazil, while Ophiolepis impressa, O. paucispina, Amphiura stimpsoni, Amphiodia riisei, Ophiactis quinqueradia, Ophiocoma wendtii and Ophionereis olivaceae are new records for the State of Paraíba. The number of species known for the state was increased from 16 to 23, representing approximately 17% of the species known for Brazil and 54% of the species known for northeastern Brazil. The recorded fauna has a large geographical and bathymetrical distribution.

  7. A taxonomic guide to the brittle-stars (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea) from the State of Paraíba continental shelf, Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Anne I.; Alonso, Carmen; Dias, Thelma L. P.; Manso, Cynthia L. C.; Christoffersen, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We provide the first annotated checklist of ophiuroids from the continental shelf of the State of Paraíba, northeastern Brazil. Identification keys and taxonomic diagnoses for 23 species, belonging to 14 genera and 8 families, are provided. The material is deposited in the Invertebrate Collection Paulo Young, at the Federal University of Paraíba. Ophiopsila hartmeyeri represents the first record for the northeastern region of Brazil, while Ophiolepis impressa, Ophiolepis paucispina, Amphiura stimpsoni, Amphiodia riisei, Ophiactis quinqueradia, Ophiocoma wendtii and Ophionereis olivaceae are new records for the State of Paraíba. The number of species known for the state was increased from 16 to 23, representing approximately 17% of the species known for Brazil and 54% of the species known for northeastern Brazil. The recorded fauna has a large geographical and bathymetrical distribution. PMID:23794923

  8. High taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota by Ligase Detection Reaction - Universal Array approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitali Beatrice

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affecting the core functional microbiome, peculiar high level taxonomic unbalances of the human intestinal microbiota have been recently associated with specific diseases, such as obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and intestinal inflammation. Results In order to specifically monitor microbiota unbalances that impact human physiology, here we develop and validate an original DNA-microarray (HTF-Microbi.Array for the high taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota. Based on the Ligase Detection Reaction-Universal Array (LDR-UA approach, the HTF-Microbi.Array enables specific detection and approximate relative quantification of 16S rRNAs from 30 phylogenetically related groups of the human intestinal microbiota. The HTF-Microbi.Array was used in a pilot study of the faecal microbiota of eight young adults. Cluster analysis revealed the good reproducibility of the high level taxonomic microbiota fingerprint obtained for each of the subject. Conclusion The HTF-Microbi.Array is a fast and sensitive tool for the high taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota in terms of presence/absence of the principal groups. Moreover, analysis of the relative fluorescence intensity for each probe pair of our LDR-UA platform can provide estimation of the relative abundance of the microbial target groups within each samples. Focusing the phylogenetic resolution at division, order and cluster levels, the HTF-Microbi.Array is blind with respect to the inter-individual variability at the species level.

  9. New species, nomenclatural changes and recent taxonomic studies in the genus Stylosanthes (Leguminosae: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodardo Calles

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the last taxonomic overview during the 1982 Stylosanthes Symposium in Townsville, Australia, 10 new species: S. falconensis, S. longicarpa, S. maracajuensis, S. nunoi, S. quintanarooensis, S. recta, S. salina, S. seabrana, S. vallsii and S. venezuelensis; and 1 botanical variety: S. guianensis var. pauciflora; have been validly described. Furthermore, 2 nomenclatural changes have been proposed, both being elevations of botanical varieties to the rank of species: S. gracilis and S. rostrata. In the major taxonomic databases, The Plant List and GRIN, the taxonomic status (“accepted” vs. “synonym” vs. “unresolved” of some of these new taxa, however, differs. In addition, this paper reports on Stylosanthes names that can be found in the post-symposium literature but have not been validly published, and on recent regional studies of Stylosanthes taxonomy. Suggested research needs as perceived by non-botanists include an updated Stylosanthes monograph and taxonomic studies within the S. guianensis, S. hamata and S. scabra species complexes. Keywords: Taxonomy, validly published names.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(4122-128

  10. Main functions and taxonomic distribution of virulence genes in Brucella melitensis 16 M.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniel Jessica Leticia Brambila-Tapia

    Full Text Available Many virulence genes have been detected in attenuated mutants of Brucella melitensis 16 M; nevertheless, a complete report of these genes, including the main Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG represented as well as the taxonomical distribution among all complete bacterial and archaeal genomes, has not been analyzed. In this work a total of 160 virulence genes that have been reported in attenuated mutants in B. melitensis were included and analyzed. Additionally, we obtained 250 B. melitensis randomly selected genes as a reference group for the taxonomical comparisons. The COGs and the taxonomical distribution profile for 789 nonredundant bacterial and archaeal genomes were obtained and compared with the whole-genome COG distribution and with the 250 randomly selected genes, respectively. The main COGs associated with virulence genes corresponded to the following: intracellular trafficking, secretion and vesicular transport (U; cell motility (N; nucleotide transport and metabolism (F; transcription (K; and cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis (M. In addition, we found that virulence genes presented a higher proportion of orthologs in the Euryarchaeota and Proteobacteria phyla, with a significant decrease in Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes, Tenericutes, Firmicutes and Thermotogae. In conclusion, we found that genes related to specific functions are more relevant to B. melitensis virulence, with the COG U the most significant. Additionally, the taxonomical distribution of virulence genes highlights the importance of these genes in the related Proteobacteria, being less relevant in distant groups of organisms with the exception of Euryarchaeota.

  11. Cremastosperma (and other evolutionary digressions) : Molecular phylogenetic, biogeographic, and taxonomic studies in Neotropical Annonaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirie, Michael David

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented of research on a family of flowering plants, the Annonaceae, species of which are found in tropical rainforest across the world. The project focussed on one group of species, the genus Cremastosperma, which is found in the South and Central American tropics. A taxonomic revis

  12. Worldwide Analysis of Sedimentary DNA Reveals Major Gaps in Taxonomic Knowledge of Deep-Sea Benthos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinniger, Frédéric; Pawlowski, Jan; Harii, Saki

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea sediments represent the largest but least known ecosystem on earth. With increasing anthropogenic pressure, it is now a matter of urgency to improve our understanding of deep-sea biodiversity. Traditional morpho-taxonomic studies suggest that the ocean floor hosts extraordinarily diverse...

  13. A taxonomic revision of the genus Grammitis Swartz (Grammitidaceae: Filicales) in New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parris, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the fern genus Grammitis Swartz (Grammitidaceae) in New Guinea has been made, in which 64 species belonging to 14 species groups are recognised. Forty-five species are endemic to New Guinea and 21 species are hitherto undescribed. Problems in generic classification are outlin

  14. Taxonomic and functional assignment of cloned sequences from high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montaña, José Salvador; Jiménez Avella, Diego; Angel, Tatiana; Hernández, Mónica; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Total metagenomic DNA was isolated from high Andean forest soil and subjected to taxonomical and functional composition analyses by means of clone library generation and sequencing. The obtained yield of 1.7 μg of DNA/g of soil was used to construct a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clon

  15. COMPARISON OF TAXONOMIC, COLONY MORPHOTYPE AND PCR-RFLP METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE MICROFUNGAL DIVERSITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    We compared three methods for estimating fungal species diversity in soil samples. A rapid screening method based on gross colony morphological features and color reference standards was compared with traditional fungal taxonomic methods and PCR-RFLP for estimation of ecological ...

  16. A taxonomic signature of obesity in the microbiome? Getting to the guts of the matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Mariel M; Sharpton, Thomas J; Laurent, Timothy J; Pollard, Katherine S

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an important and intractable public health problem. In addition to the well-known risk factors of behavior, diet, and genetics, gut microbial communities were recently identified as another possible source of risk and a potential therapeutic target. However, human and animal-model studies have yielded conflicting results about the precise nature of associations between microbiome composition and obesity. In this paper, we use publicly available data from the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and MetaHIT, both surveys of healthy adults that include obese individuals, plus two smaller studies that specifically examined lean versus obese adults. We find that inter-study variability in the taxonomic composition of stool microbiomes far exceeds differences between lean and obese individuals within studies. Our analyses further reveal a high degree of variability in stool microbiome composition and diversity across individuals. While we confirm the previously published small, but statistically significant, differences in phylum-level taxonomic composition between lean and obese individuals in several cohorts, we find no association between BMI and taxonomic composition of stool microbiomes in the larger HMP and MetaHIT datasets. We explore a range of different statistical techniques and show that this result is robust to the choice of methodology. Differences between studies are likely due to a combination of technical and clinical factors. We conclude that there is no simple taxonomic signature of obesity in the microbiota of the human gut.

  17. A taxonomic signature of obesity in the microbiome? Getting to the guts of the matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariel M Finucane

    Full Text Available Obesity is an important and intractable public health problem. In addition to the well-known risk factors of behavior, diet, and genetics, gut microbial communities were recently identified as another possible source of risk and a potential therapeutic target. However, human and animal-model studies have yielded conflicting results about the precise nature of associations between microbiome composition and obesity. In this paper, we use publicly available data from the Human Microbiome Project (HMP and MetaHIT, both surveys of healthy adults that include obese individuals, plus two smaller studies that specifically examined lean versus obese adults. We find that inter-study variability in the taxonomic composition of stool microbiomes far exceeds differences between lean and obese individuals within studies. Our analyses further reveal a high degree of variability in stool microbiome composition and diversity across individuals. While we confirm the previously published small, but statistically significant, differences in phylum-level taxonomic composition between lean and obese individuals in several cohorts, we find no association between BMI and taxonomic composition of stool microbiomes in the larger HMP and MetaHIT datasets. We explore a range of different statistical techniques and show that this result is robust to the choice of methodology. Differences between studies are likely due to a combination of technical and clinical factors. We conclude that there is no simple taxonomic signature of obesity in the microbiota of the human gut.

  18. Taxonomic resolution and Biological Traits Analysis (BTA) approaches in estuarine free-living nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, A. S.; Veríssimo, H.; Costa, M. J.; Marques, J. C.

    2014-02-01

    The taxonomic and functional structure of the subtidal nematode assemblages from a temperate estuary (Mondego estuary, Portugal) was studied, focussing on different taxonomic levels (genus, family and order), on single functional groups and on multiple biological traits. Based on taxonomic levels and on four biological traits (feeding type, life strategy, tail and body shape), the analysis of the nematode assemblage distribution patterns revealed spatial differences but no clear temporal pattern. At the family and genus level, a separation of the upstream sections was observed, while a distinction of polyhaline and euhaline areas was less evident. The use of biological traits added new information regarding the relationships between diversity patterns and the environmental variables. Most nematodes encountered along the estuary were non-selective deposit feeders (1B) and omnivores/predators (2B), colonizer-persisters (score of 2 or 3), with clavate-conicocylindrical tails and slender bodies and with a distribution related essentially to salinity, oxygen and chlorophyll a. Applying a Biological Traits Analysis (BTA) showed the role of oxygen concentration in the distribution of the nematode communities. Although the BTA was no more powerful than the traditional taxonomic approach in detecting spatial differences along the Mondego estuary, it has increased our knowledge of the functional structure and characterization of nematode communities in the estuary.

  19. Multigene phylogeny and taxonomic revision of yeasts and related fungi in the Ustilaginomycotina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Q. -M.; Begerow, D.; Groenewald, M.; Liu, X. -Z.; Theelen, B.; Bai, F. -Y.; Boekhout, T.

    The subphylum Ustilaginomycotina (Basidiomycota, Fungi) comprises mainly plant pathogenic fungi (smuts). Some of the lineages possess cultivable unicellular stages that are usually classified as yeast or yeast-like species in a largely artificial taxonomic system which is independent from and

  20. EEG Theta and Alpha Responses Reveal Qualitative Differences in Processing Taxonomic versus Thematic Semantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Mandy J.; Brier, Matthew R.; Ferree, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of semantic relationships to our understanding of semantic knowledge, the nature of the neural processes underlying these abilities are not well understood. In order to investigate these processes, 20 healthy adults listened to thematically related (e.g., leash-dog), taxonomically related (e.g., horse-dog), or unrelated…

  1. Asian longhorned beetle complicates the relationship between taxonomic diversity and pest vulnerability in street tree assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban foresters routinely emphasise the importance of taxonomic diversity to reduce the vulnerability of tree assemblages to invasive pests, but it is unclear to what extent diversity reduces vulnerability to polyphagous (i.e. generalist) pests. Drawing on field data from seven c...

  2. Macroinvertebrate Taxonomic and Functional Trait Compositions within Lotic Habitats Affected By River Restoration Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. C.; Hill, M. J.; Bickerton, M. A.; Wood, P. J.

    2017-09-01

    The widespread degradation of lotic ecosystems has prompted extensive river restoration efforts globally, but many studies have reported modest ecological responses to rehabilitation practices. The functional properties of biotic communities are rarely examined within post-project appraisals, which would provide more ecological information underpinning ecosystem responses to restoration practices and potentially pinpoint project limitations. This study examines macroinvertebrate community responses to three projects which aimed to physically restore channel morphologies. Taxonomic and functional trait compositions supported by widely occurring lotic habitats (biotopes) were examined across paired restored and non-restored (control) reaches. The multivariate location (average community composition) of taxonomic and functional trait compositions differed marginally between control and restored reaches. However, changes in the amount of multivariate dispersion were more robust and indicated greater ecological heterogeneity within restored reaches, particularly when considering functional trait compositions. Organic biotopes (macrophyte stands and macroalgae) occurred widely across all study sites and supported a high alpha (within-habitat) taxonomic diversity compared to mineralogical biotopes (sand and gravel patches), which were characteristic of restored reaches. However, mineralogical biotopes possessed a higher beta (between-habitat) functional diversity, although this was less pronounced for taxonomic compositions. This study demonstrates that examining the functional and structural properties of taxa across distinct biotopes can provide a greater understanding of biotic responses to river restoration works. Such information could be used to better understand the ecological implications of rehabilitation practices and guide more effective management strategies.

  3. A position paper on the electronic publication of nematode taxonomic manuscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyualem-Abebe; Baldwin, James G; Adams, Byron; Hope, Duane; Gardner, Scott; Huettel, Robin; Mullin, Peter; Powers, Topper; Sharma, Jyotsna; Ye, Weimin; Thomas, William K

    2006-09-01

    Several nematode species have now attained 'model organism' status, yet there remain many niches in basic biological inquiry for which nematodes would be ideal model systems of study. However, furthering the model system approach is hindered by lack of information on nematode biodiversity. The shortage of taxonomic resources to inventory and characterize biodiversity hinders research programs in invasion biology, ecosystem functioning, conservation biology, and many others. The disproportion between numbers of species to be described and numbers of available taxonomic specialists is greater for Nematoda than for any other metazoan phylum. A partial solution to the taxonomic impediment is the adoption of recent advances in electronic publishing. Electronic publishing has the potential to increase the rate at which taxonomic papers are published, the breadth of their distribution, and the type, quantity, quality, and accessibility of data. We propose that the Journal of Nematology implement the advantageous aspects of electronic publication as a means to help ameliorate the limitations of an underdeveloped taxonomy and empower the nematological disciplines currently hindered by it.

  4. Global hotspots and correlates of alien species richness across taxonomic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Wayne; Moser, Dietmar; van Kleunen, Mark; Kreft, Holger; Pergl, Jan; Pysek, Petr; Weigelt, Patrick; Winter, Marten; Lenzner, Bernd; Blackburn, Tim M.; Dyer, Ellie; Cassey, Phillip; Scrivens, Sally-Louise; Economo, Evan P.; Guenard, Benoit; Capinha, Cesar; Seebens, Hanno; Garcia-Diaz, Pablo; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Garcia-Berthou, Emili; Casal, Christine; Mandrak, Nicholas E.; Fuller, Pam; Meyer, Carsten; Essl, Franz

    2017-01-01

    Human-mediated transport beyond biogeographic barriers has led to the introduction and establishment of alien species in new regions worldwide. However, we lack a global picture of established alien species richness for multiple taxonomic groups. Here, we assess global patterns and potential drivers of established alien species richness across eight taxonomic groups (amphibians, ants, birds, freshwater fishes, mammals, vascular plants, reptiles and spiders) for 186 islands and 423 mainland regions. Hotspots of established alien species richness are predominantly island and coastal mainland regions. Regions with greater gross domestic product per capita, human population density, and area have higher established alien richness, with strongest effects emerging for islands. Ants and reptiles, birds and mammals, and vascular plants and spiders form pairs of taxonomic groups with the highest spatial congruence in established alien richness, but drivers explaining richness differ between the taxa in each pair. Across all taxonomic groups, our results highlight the need to prioritize prevention of further alien species introductions to island and coastal mainland regions globally.

  5. Improved taxonomic assignment of human intestinal 16S rRNA sequences by a dedicated reference database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritari, Jarmo; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Lahti, Leo; Vos, de Willem M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current sequencing technology enables taxonomic profiling of microbial ecosystems at high resolution and depth by using the 16S rRNA gene as a phylogenetic marker. Taxonomic assignation of newly acquired data is based on sequence comparisons with comprehensive reference databases to f

  6. Digitising legacy zoological taxonomic literature: Processes, products and using the output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyal, Christopher H C

    2016-01-01

    By digitising legacy taxonomic literature using XML mark-up the contents become accessible to other taxonomic and nomenclatural information systems. Appropriate schemas need to be interoperable with other sectorial schemas, atomise to appropriate content elements and carry appropriate metadata to, for example, enable algorithmic assessment of availability of a name under the Code. Legacy (and new) literature delivered in this fashion will become part of a global taxonomic resource from which users can extract tailored content to meet their particular needs, be they nomenclatural, taxonomic, faunistic or other. To date, most digitisation of taxonomic literature has led to a more or less simple digital copy of a paper original - the output of the many efforts has effectively been an electronic copy of a traditional library. While this has increased accessibility of publications through internet access, the means by which many scientific papers are indexed and located is much the same as with traditional libraries. OCR and born-digital papers allow use of web search engines to locate instances of taxon names and other terms, but OCR efficiency in recognising taxonomic names is still relatively poor, people's ability to use search engines effectively is mixed, and many papers cannot be searched directly. Instead of building digital analogues of traditional publications, we should consider what properties we require of future taxonomic information access. Ideally the content of each new digital publication should be accessible in the context of all previous published data, and the user able to retrieve nomenclatural, taxonomic and other data / information in the form required without having to scan all of the original papers and extract target content manually. This opens the door to dynamic linking of new content with extant systems: automatic population and updating of taxonomic catalogues, ZooBank and faunal lists, all descriptions of a taxon and its children

  7. Chicago aberration correction work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, V.D., E-mail: vnlbeck@earthlink.net [1 Hobby Drive, Ridgefield, CT 06877-01922 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The author describes from his personal involvement the many improvements to electron microscopy Albert Crewe and his group brought by minimizing the effects of aberrations. The Butler gun was developed to minimize aperture aberrations in a field emission electron gun. In the 1960s, Crewe anticipated using a spherical aberration corrector based on Scherzer's design. Since the tolerances could not be met mechanically, a method of moving the center of the octopoles electrically was developed by adding lower order multipole fields. Because the corrector was located about 15 cm ahead of the objective lens, combination aberrations would arise with the objective lens. This fifth order aberration would then limit the aperture of the microscope. The transformation of the off axis aberration coefficients of a round lens was developed and a means to cancel anisotropic coma was developed. A new method of generating negative spherical aberration was invented using the combination aberrations of hexapoles. Extensions of this technique to higher order aberrations were developed. An electrostatic electron mirror was invented, which allows the cancellation of primary spherical aberration and first order chromatic aberration. A reduction of chromatic aberration by two orders of magnitude was demonstrated using such a system. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crewe and his group made significant advances in aberration correction and reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A deeper understanding of the quadrupole octopole corrector was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A scheme to correct spherical aberration using hexapoles was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromatic aberration was corrected using a uniform field mirror.

  8. Combining Taxonomic and Functional Approaches to Unravel the Spatial Distribution of an Amazonian Butterfly Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Márlon B; Morais, José W; Franklin, Elizabeth; Pequeno, Pedro A C L; Souza, Jorge L P; Bueno, Anderson Saldanha

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the spatial distribution of an Amazonian fruit-feeding butterfly assemblage by linking species taxonomic and functional approaches. We hypothesized that: 1) vegetation richness (i.e., resources) and abundance of insectivorous birds (i.e., predators) should drive changes in butterfly taxonomic composition, 2) larval diet breadth should decrease with increase of plant species richness, 3) small-sized adults should be favored by higher abundance of birds, and 4) communities with eyespot markings should be able to exploit areas with higher predation pressure. Fruit-feeding butterflies were sampled with bait traps and insect nets across 25 km(2) of an Amazonian ombrophilous forest in Brazil. We measured larval diet breadth, adult body size, and wing marking of all butterflies. Our results showed that plant species richness explained most of the variation in butterfly taxonomic turnover. Also, community average diet breadth decreased with increase of plant species richness, which supports our expectations. In contrast, community average body size increased with the abundance of birds, refuting our hypothesis. We detected no influence of environmental gradients on the occurrence of species with eyespot markings. The association between butterfly taxonomic and functional composition points to a mediator role of the functional traits in the environmental filtering of butterflies. The incorporation of the functional approach into the analyses allowed for the detection of relationships that were not observed using a strictly taxonomic perspective and provided an extra insight into comprehending the potential adaptive strategies of butterflies. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. HOW CORRECTION CAN MOTIVATE LEARNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionMistakes and their correction generally follow one another in the language classroom.Most teachersthink that correction is a necessary part of teaching;while most students agree that making mistakesis a necessary part of learning.Although both teachers and students maintain that correction andmistakes are necessary,we often find that some correction helps students’ learning and some does not.Correction can make students lose confidence and interest in learning.In order to try and find outmore about why this happens I surveyed students attitudes towards mistakes and correction.

  10. Experimental repetitive quantum error correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Philipp; Barreiro, Julio T; Monz, Thomas; Nebendahl, Volckmar; Nigg, Daniel; Chwalla, Michael; Hennrich, Markus; Blatt, Rainer

    2011-05-27

    The computational potential of a quantum processor can only be unleashed if errors during a quantum computation can be controlled and corrected for. Quantum error correction works if imperfections of quantum gate operations and measurements are below a certain threshold and corrections can be applied repeatedly. We implement multiple quantum error correction cycles for phase-flip errors on qubits encoded with trapped ions. Errors are corrected by a quantum-feedback algorithm using high-fidelity gate operations and a reset technique for the auxiliary qubits. Up to three consecutive correction cycles are realized, and the behavior of the algorithm for different noise environments is analyzed.

  11. Calculating correct compilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Hutton, Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present a new approach to the problem of calculating compilers. In particular, we develop a simple but general technique that allows us to derive correct compilers from high-level semantics by systematic calculation, with all details of the implementation of the compilers...... falling naturally out of the calculation process. Our approach is based upon the use of standard equational reasoning techniques, and has been applied to calculate compilers for a wide range of language features and their combination, including arithmetic expressions, exceptions, state, various forms...

  12. [Correction of hypospadias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M

    1998-12-01

    A thorough evaluation of both urethral and penile malformation are mandatory for the choice of the best surgical treatment of patients with hypospadias. The site and the size of the urethral meatus, the presence of a chordee and of a velamentous distal urethra must be carefully assessed. In distal (glandular and coronal) hypospadias, the meatal advancement with glanduloplasty is the treatment of choice. In proximal hypospadias with chordee, the transverse preputial island flap according to the Duckett's technique allows a one-stage hypospadias repair. The awareness of the possible psychologic impact of genital malformations in childhood recommends an early correction of hypospadias, if possible during the first year of life.

  13. [Correction of paralytic lagophthalmos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskusnykh, N S; Grusha, Y O

    2015-01-01

    Current options for correction of paralytic lagophthalmos are either temporary (external eyelid weight placement, hyaluronic acid gel or botulinum toxin A injection) or permanent (various procedures for narrowing of the palpebral fissure, upper eyelid weights or spring implantation). Neuroplastic surgery (cross-facial nerve grafting, nerve anastomoses) and muscle transposition surgery is not effective enough. The majority of elderly and medically compromised patients should not be considered for such complicated and long procedures. Upper eyelid weight implantation thus appears the most reliable and simple treatment.

  14. Brain Image Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In order to use such devices...... offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype...

  15. Species identification of archaeological skin objects from Danish bogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth; Mannering, Ulla;

    2014-01-01

    microscopy. While it was difficult to obtain reliable results using microscopy, MS enabled the identification of several species-diagnostic peptides, mostly from collagen and keratins, allowing confident species discrimination even among taxonomically close organisms, such as sheep and goat. Unlike previous...... MS-based methods, mostly relying on peptide fingerprinting, the shotgun sequencing approach we describe aims to identify the complete extracted ancient proteome, without preselected specific targets. As an example, we report the identification, in one of the samples, of two peptides uniquely assigned...

  16. Using Online Annotations to Support Error Correction and Corrective Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shiou-Wen; Lo, Jia-Jiunn

    2009-01-01

    Giving feedback on second language (L2) writing is a challenging task. This research proposed an interactive environment for error correction and corrective feedback. First, we developed an online corrective feedback and error analysis system called "Online Annotator for EFL Writing". The system consisted of five facilities: Document Maker,…

  17. How Aphia—The Platform behind Several Online and Taxonomically Oriented Databases—Can Serve Both the Taxonomic Community and the Field of Biodiversity Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leen Vandepitte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Aphia platform is an infrastructure designed to capture taxonomic and related data and information, and includes an online editing environment. The latter allows easy access to experts so they can update the content of the database in a timely fashion. Aphia is the core platform that underpins the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS and its more than 80 related global, regional and thematic species databases, but it also allows the storage of non-marine data. The content of Aphia can be consulted online, either by individual users or via machine-to-machine interactions. Aphia uses unique and stable identifiers for each available name in the database through the use of Life Science Identifiers (LSIDs. The system not only allows the storage of accepted and unaccepted names, but it also documents the relationships between names. This makes it a very powerful tool for taxonomic quality control, and also allows the linking of different pieces of information through scientific names, both within the Aphia platform and in relation to externally hosted databases. Through these LSIDs, Aphia has become an important player in the field of (marine biodiversity informatics, allowing interactions between its own taxonomic data and e.g., biogeographic databases. Some applications in the field of biodiversity informatics encompass the coupling of species traits and taxonomy, as well as the creation of diverse, expert validated data products that can be used by policy makers, for example. Aphia also supplies (part of its content to other data integrators and the infrastructure can be used to host orphan databases in danger of being lost.

  18. Multi-scale functional and taxonomic β-diversity of the macroinvertebrate communities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. CABANA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Benthic macroinvertebrate communities form the basis of the intricate lagoonal food web. Understanding their functional and taxonomic response, from a β-diversity perspective, is essential to disclose underlying patterns with potential applicability in conservation and management actions. Within the central lagoon of Messolonghi we studied the main environmental components structuring the macroinvertebrate community. We analyzed the β-taxonomic and β-functional diversity across the main habitats and seasons, over a year time frame. Our results outline habitat type and vegetation biomass as the major factors structuring the communities. We found environmental variability to have a positive correlation with functional β-diversity, however no correlation was found with taxonomic β-diversity. Across the seasons an asynchronous response of the functional and taxonomic β-diversity was identified. The taxonomic composition displayed significant heterogeneity during the driest period and the functional during the rainy season. Across the habitats the unvegetated presented higher taxonomic homogeneity and functionally heterogeneity, contrary the vegetated habitats present higher taxonomic variability and functional homogeneity. Across the seasons and habitats a pattern of functional redundancy and taxonomic replacement was identified. Besides high functional turnover versus low taxonomic turnover was documented in an anthropogenic organically enriched habitat We conclude that habitats display independent functional and taxonomic seasonal patterns, thus different processes may contribute to their variability. The framework presented here highlights the importance of studying both β-diversity components framed in a multiscale approach to better understand ecological processes and variability patterns. These results are important to understand macroinvertebrate community assembly processes and are valuable for conservation purposes.

  19. Additions and corrections to the check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, J Donald; Schmidt, B Christian

    2015-01-01

    A total of 124 additions and corrections are listed and discussed for the check list of the Noctuoidea of North America north of Mexico published in 2010. Twenty-eight species are added to the list, 16 through new species descriptions, eight as a result of taxonomic splits, and four based on newly recorded species. Forty-eight species are deleted from the list, 41 through synonymy, and seven that were based on misidentifications. Twelve changes are corrections in the spelling of names, or changes in parentheses on dates of publication. Twenty-seven are changes in taxonomy of names where no species are added or deleted; eight changes involve the renumbering of existing species for better taxonomic arrangement. Within the text 2 stat. n., 10 stat. rev., 27 syn. n., 5 syn. rev., and 1 comb. n. are proposed for the first time.

  20. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Identification Parameters and Its Correction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By taking the subsequence out of the input-output sequence of a system polluted by white noise, anindependent observation sequence and its probability density are obtained and then a maximum likelihood estimation of theidentification parameters is given. In order to decrease the asymptotic error, a corrector of maximum likelihood (CML)estimation with its recursive algorithm is given. It has been proved that the corrector has smaller asymptotic error thanthe least square methods. A simulation example shows that the corrector of maximum likelihood estimation is of higherapproximating precision to the true parameters than the least square methods.

  1. Full-waveform static corrections using blind channel identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, R. van; Trampert, J.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface wavefield perturbations can be very complex and completely mask the target reflections. Despite this complexity, conventional methods rely on parameterizations characterized by simple time and amplitude anomalies to compensate for these perturbations. Determining and compensating for ti

  2. Additions and corrections to the check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, J Donald; Schmidt, B Christian

    2011-01-01

    A total of 115 additions and corrections are listed and discussed for the check list of the Noctuoidea of North America north of Mexico published in 2010. Thirty-two of these are changes in authorship and/or date of publication or spelling. Taxonomic changes are 33 new or revised synonymies, three new combinations, and six revisions in status from synonymy to valid species.

  3. 78 FR 34245 - Miscellaneous Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the... office, correcting and adding missing cross-references, correcting grammatical errors, revising language... the name of its human capital office, correcting and adding missing cross-references,...

  4. Power corrections, renormalons and resummation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneke, M.

    1996-08-01

    I briefly review three topics of recent interest concerning power corrections, renormalons and Sudakov resummation: (a) 1/Q corrections to event shape observables in e(+)e(-) annihilation, (b) power corrections in Drell-Yan production and (c) factorial divergences that arise in resummation of large infrared (Sudakov) logarithms in moment or `real` space.

  5. Radiation camera motion correction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  6. 75 FR 16516 - Dates Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Office of the Federal Register Dates Correction Correction In the Notices section... through 15499, the date at the top of each page is corrected to read ``Monday, March 29, 2010''....

  7. A grass molecular identification system for forensic botany: a critical evaluation of the strengths and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jodie; Gilmore, Simon R; Robertson, James; Peakall, Rod

    2009-11-01

    Plant material is frequently encountered in criminal investigations but often overlooked as potential evidence. We designed a DNA-based molecular identification system for 100 Australian grasses that consisted of a series of polymerase chain reaction assays that enabled the progressive identification of grasses to different taxonomic levels. The identification system was based on DNA sequence variation at four chloroplast and two mitochondrial loci. Seventeen informative indels and 68 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were utilized as molecular markers for subfamily to species-level identification. To identify an unknown sample to subfamily level required a minimum of four markers or nine markers for species identification. The accuracy of the system was confirmed by blind tests. We have demonstrated "proof of concept" of a molecular identification system for trace botanical samples. Our evaluation suggests that the adoption of a system that combines this approach with DNA sequencing could assist the morphological identification of grasses found as forensic evidence.

  8. 78 FR 65554 - Exhaust Emission Standards for New Aircraft Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for Aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... Aircraft Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for Aircraft Engines Correction In rule document 2013... for Subsonic Engines'', in the third column, in the last row, the entry ``rO > 26.7'' is corrected...

  9. Anomaly corrected heterotic horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, A.; Gutowski, J. B.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-10-01

    We consider supersymmetric near-horizon geometries in heterotic supergravity up to two loop order in sigma model perturbation theory. We identify the conditions for the horizons to admit enhancement of supersymmetry. We show that solutions which undergo supersymmetry enhancement exhibit an {s}{l}(2,{R}) symmetry, and we describe the geometry of their horizon sections. We also prove a modified Lichnerowicz type theorem, incorporating α' corrections, which relates Killing spinors to zero modes of near-horizon Dirac operators. Furthermore, we demonstrate that there are no AdS2 solutions in heterotic supergravity up to second order in α' for which the fields are smooth and the internal space is smooth and compact without boundary. We investigate a class of nearly supersymmetric horizons, for which the gravitino Killing spinor equation is satisfied on the spatial cross sections but not the dilatino one, and present a description of their geometry.

  10. Anomaly Corrected Heterotic Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Fontanella, A; Papadopoulos, G

    2016-01-01

    We consider supersymmetric near-horizon geometries in heterotic supergravity up to two loop order in sigma model perturbation theory. We identify the conditions for the horizons to admit enhancement of supersymmetry. We show that solutions which undergo supersymmetry enhancement exhibit an sl(2,R) symmetry, and we describe the geometry of their horizon sections. We also prove a modified Lichnerowicz type theorem, incorporating $\\alpha'$ corrections, which relates Killing spinors to zero modes of near-horizon Dirac operators. Furthermore, we demonstrate that there are no AdS2 solutions in heterotic supergravity up to second order in $\\alpha'$ for which the fields are smooth and the internal space is smooth and compact without boundary. We investigate a class of nearly supersymmetric horizons, for which the gravitino Killing spinor equation is satisfied on the spatial cross sections but not the dilatino one, and present a description of their geometry.

  11. Catalytic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T; Hsieh, M H; Brun, Todd; Devetak, Igor; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2006-01-01

    We develop the theory of entanglement-assisted quantum error correcting (EAQEC) codes, a generalization of the stabilizer formalism to the setting in which the sender and receiver have access to pre-shared entanglement. Conventional stabilizer codes are equivalent to dual-containing symplectic codes. In contrast, EAQEC codes do not require the dual-containing condition, which greatly simplifies their construction. We show how any quaternary classical code can be made into a EAQEC code. In particular, efficient modern codes, like LDPC codes, which attain the Shannon capacity, can be made into EAQEC codes attaining the hashing bound. In a quantum computation setting, EAQEC codes give rise to catalytic quantum codes which maintain a region of inherited noiseless qubits. We also give an alternative construction of EAQEC codes by making classical entanglement assisted codes coherent.

  12. EDITORIAL: Politically correct physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pople Deputy Editor, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    If you were a caring, thinking, liberally minded person in the 1960s, you marched against the bomb, against the Vietnam war, and for civil rights. By the 1980s, your voice was raised about the destruction of the rainforests and the threat to our whole planetary environment. At the same time, you opposed discrimination against any group because of race, sex or sexual orientation. You reasoned that people who spoke or acted in a discriminatory manner should be discriminated against. In other words, you became politically correct. Despite its oft-quoted excesses, the political correctness movement sprang from well-founded concerns about injustices in our society. So, on balance, I am all for it. Or, at least, I was until it started to invade science. Biologists were the first to feel the impact. No longer could they refer to 'higher' and 'lower' orders, or 'primitive' forms of life. To the list of undesirable 'isms' - sexism, racism, ageism - had been added a new one: speciesism. Chemists remained immune to the PC invasion, but what else could you expect from a group of people so steeped in tradition that their principal unit, the mole, requires the use of the thoroughly unreconstructed gram? Now it is the turn of the physicists. This time, the offenders are not those who talk disparagingly about other people or animals, but those who refer to 'forms of energy' and 'heat'. Political correctness has evolved into physical correctness. I was always rather fond of the various forms of energy: potential, kinetic, chemical, electrical, sound and so on. My students might merge heat and internal energy into a single, fuzzy concept loosely associated with moving molecules. They might be a little confused at a whole new crop of energies - hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal and tidal - but they could tell me what devices turned chemical energy into electrical energy, even if they couldn't quite appreciate that turning tidal energy into geothermal energy wasn't part of the

  13. Linear colour correction for multiple illumination changes and non-overlapping cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, J.; Schutte, K.; Bouma, H.; Menendez, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Many image processing methods, such as techniques for people re-identification, assume photometric constancy between different images. This paper addresses the correction of photometric variations based upon changes in background areas to correct foreground areas. We assume a multiple light source

  14. An Evaluation of Information Criteria Use for Correct Cross-Classified Random Effects Model Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretvas, S. Natasha; Murphy, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The authors assessed correct model identification rates of Akaike's information criterion (AIC), corrected criterion (AICC), consistent AIC (CAIC), Hannon and Quinn's information criterion (HQIC), and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) for selecting among cross-classified random effects models. Performance of default values for the 5…

  15. Merging Sets of Taxonomically Organized Data Using Concept Mappings under Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thau, David; Bowers, Shawn; Ludäscher, Bertram

    We present a method for using aligned ontologies to merge taxonomically organized data sets that have apparently compatible schemas, but potentially different semantics for corresponding domains. We restrict the relationships involved in the alignment to basic set relations and disjunctions of these relations. A merged data set combines the domains of the source data set attributes, conforms to the observations reported in both data sets, and minimizes uncertainty introduced by ontology alignments. We find that even in very simple cases, merging data sets under this scenario is non-trivial. Reducing uncertainty introduced by the ontology alignments in combination with the data set observations often results in many possible merged data sets, which are managed using a possible worlds semantics. The primary contributions of this paper are a framework for representing aligned data sets and algorithms for merging data sets that report the presence and absence of taxonomically organized entities, including an efficient algorithm for a common data set merging scenario.

  16. What are the taxonomic and evolutionary relationships of the Protozoa to the Protista?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, J O

    1981-01-01

    In order to consider the problems of protist-protozoan interrelationships in proper perspective, a new "packaging" of phyla within the great kingdom Protista is proposed. Although it is based largely on historical groupings and is admittedly "unnatural" (nor are taxonomic names proposed for my five supraphyletic groupings), the arrangement may clarify some long-persisting problems, especially with regard to mixed algal-protozoan groups and/or phylogenies. Some three dozen phyla are recognized as comprising the kingdom, with the number that might be considered as "protozoan" ranging from 10 to 25, depending on one's viewpoint. No taxon should have the formal name "Protozoa", "Phytoflagellate" and "zooflagellate" are also misleading categories. Taxonomic and evolutionary relationships of phyla containing protozoa (with small "p") are inextricably intermeshed with those of other protist phyla, and thus no unified protozoan super-group exists.

  17. Cope's Rule in the Pterosauria, and differing perceptions of Cope's Rule at different taxonomic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, D W E; Benton, M J

    2007-05-01

    The remarkable extinct flying reptiles, the pterosaurs, show increasing body size over 100 million years of the Late Jurassic and Cretaceous, and this seems to be a rare example of a driven trend to large size (Cope's Rule). The size increases continue throughout the long time span, and small forms disappear as larger pterosaurs evolve. Mean wingspan increases through time. Examining for Cope's Rule at a variety of taxonomic levels reveals varying trends within the Pterosauria as a whole, as pterodactyloid pterosaurs increase in size at all levels of examination, but rhamphorhynchoid pterosaurs show both size increase and size decrease in different analyses. These results suggest that analyses testing for Cope's Rule at a single taxonomic level may give misleading results.

  18. A polyphasic taxonomic approach in isolated strains of Cyanobacteria from thermal springs of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravakos, Panos; Kotoulas, Georgios; Skaraki, Katerina; Pantazidou, Adriani; Economou-Amilli, Athena

    2016-05-01

    Strains of Cyanobacteria isolated from mats of 9 thermal springs of Greece have been studied for their taxonomic evaluation. A polyphasic taxonomic approach was employed which included: morphological observations by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis of 16S rDNA sequences, secondary structural comparisons of 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer sequences, and finally environmental data. The 17 cyanobacterial isolates formed a diverse group that contained filamentous, coccoid and heterocytous strains. These included representatives of the polyphyletic genera of Synechococcus and Phormidium, and the orders Oscillatoriales, Spirulinales, Chroococcales and Nostocales. After analysis, at least 6 new taxa at the genus level provide new evidence in the taxonomy of Cyanobacteria and highlight the abundant diversity of thermal spring environments with many potential endemic species or ecotypes.

  19. Different Influences on Lexical Priming for Integrative, Thematic, and Taxonomic Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara L. Jones

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Word pairs may be integrative (i.e., combination of two concepts into one meaningful entity; e.g., fruit - cake, thematically related (i.e., connected in time and place; e.g., party - cake, and/or taxonomically related (i.e., shared features and category co-members; e.g., muffin - cake. Using participant ratings and computational measures, we demonstrated distinct patterns across measures of similarity and co-occurrence, and familiarity for each relational construct in two different item sets. Overall, target RTs and priming magnitudes were consistent across the SOAs for both item sets. However, results of a standard lexical decision task with various delays between prime and target presentation further demonstrated distinct patterns among these three relations on some of the underlying measures influencing target word recognition (LSA, Google, and BEAGLE. These distinct patterns suggest different mechanisms of lexical priming and further demonstrate that integrative relations are distinct from thematic and taxonomic relations.

  20. Taxonomic and Diversity Studies on Odonate Nymphs by Using Their Exuviae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Paul

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic and diversity studies of odonate nymphs are conducted by collecting them from breeding places or by rearing them in the laboratory which is time consuming and affects the natural population of nymphs and adults. The present study attempts to examine the characters of odonate nymphs by using their exuviae (the larval skin of the last instar having all the larval characters. These taxonomic characters can also be used to identify the odonate nymphs up to species level and throw of light on the species diversity of a habitat without affecting the live specimens of odonates (nymphs and adults. Five species belonging to three families were identified by comparing the larval characters present on exuviae, collected from a temporary pond at Ammadam, Thrissur district, Kerala state, India.

  1. Antipatterns identification, refactoring, and management

    CERN Document Server

    Neill, Colin J

    2005-01-01

    AntiPatterns: Identification, Refactoring, and Management catalogs 48 bad management practices and environments common to software development, IT, and other organizations. The authors cover antipatterns of management, along with environmental/cultural antipatterns and personality antipatterns/phenotypes. Through the classification of these harmful practices, you will be able to correctly identify problems in your own work environment, and take action to correct them. The authors apply their extensive work and consultative experience, as well as the experience of the many professionals that t

  2. Can taxonomic richness be used as a surrogate for phylogenetic distinctness indices for ranking areas for conservation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Losada, M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Several methods have been proposed for evaluating area conservation priorities. Here the performance of traditional approaches (taxonomic richness versus newer methods of phylogenetic distinctness is compared using the results and data from three different molecular studies: crayfish from the central United States and Australia, and Aeglidae freshwater crabs from Chile. To a large extent rankings based on species and genus richness agree with rankings based on taxonomic, phylogenetic and genetic diversity, thus suggesting that taxonomic richness methods may be used as a surrogate for the phylogenetic distinctness methods for the purpose of prioritizing reserve areas for conservation.

  3. Taxonomic status and redescription of Magneuptychia nebulosa (Butler, 1867 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae with a lectotype designation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Nakahara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A redescription of Magneuptychia nebulosa (Butler, 1867, a poorly known euptychiine butterfly, is given here, and accurate distributional data are provided for the first time. Taxonomic status of this taxon has been discussed by comparing its morphology against its possible congeners. In addition, lectotype designation for M. nebulosa is provided in order to objectively establish the identity of this taxon and consequently stabilize the nomenclature.

  4. The taxonomic identity of Heliconius melpomene f. pyritosa var. fumigata Zikán (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Victor Lucci Freitas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic identity of the butterfly Heliconius melpomene f. pyritosa var. fumigata Zikán, 1937 (Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae is discussed based on the discovery of the specimen based on which this name was assigned. The specimen is not a variation of Eueides tales surdus Stichel, 1903, as previously stated, but is in fact a variation of H. melpomene f. pyritosa, which is a synonym of Heliconius erato amalfreda Riffarth, 1901.

  5. Taxonomic review of the tribe Junoniini (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae from Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zarchi Win

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides keys to the genera and species for the butterfly species belonging to the tribe Junoniini (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae from Myanmar. Species accounts include taxonomic description, synonymic lists, distributional ranges, and adult illustrations of nine species: Junonia hierta (Fabricius, Junonia orithya (Linnaeus, Junonia almana (Linnaeus, Junonia lemonias (Linnaeus, Junonia atlites (Linnaeus, Junonia iphita (Cramer, Yoma sabina (Cramer, Hypolimnas bolina (Linnaeus, and Hypolimnas misippus (Linnaeus.

  6. Taxonomic position of Pinus uliginosa Neumann as related to other taxa of Pinus mugo complex

    OpenAIRE

    Wiesław Prus-Głowacki; Ewa Bajus; Halina Ratyńska

    2014-01-01

    Studies on taxonomic position of Pinus uliginosa Neumann, P. uncinata Ram. and P. mugo Turra, indicate a significant specificity of P. uliginosa population from Wielkie Torfowisko Batorowskie Peat Bog. Pinus uncinata in respect of genetic similarity is close to Pinus mugo Turra populations from the Tatra Mts. The time of divergence of P. uliginosa from the common ancestor, taking into account Nei's genetic distances, is twice as long as in the case of Pinus uncinata. In the view of the result...

  7. Taxonomic distinctness and richness of helminth parasite assemblages of freshwater fishes in Mexican hydrological basins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamín Quiroz-Martínez

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyse the distributional patterns of adult helminth parasites of freshwater fishes with respect to the main hydrological basins of Mexico. We use the taxonomic distinctness and the variation in taxonomic distinctness to explore patterns of parasite diversity and how these patterns change between zoogeographical regions. We address questions about the factors that determine the variation of observed diversity of helminths between basins. We also investigate patterns of richness, taxonomic distinctness and distance decay of similarity amongst basins. Our analyses suggest that the evolution of the fauna of helminth parasites in Mexico is mostly dominated by independent host colonization events and that intra--host speciation could be a minor factor explaining the origin of this diversity. This paper points out a clear separation between the helminth faunas of northern--nearctic and southern--neotropical components in Mexican continental waters, suggesting the availability of two distinct taxonomic pools of parasites in Mexican drainage basins. Data identifies Mexican drainage basins as unities inhabited by freshwater fishes, hosting a mixture of neotropical and nearctic species, in addition, data confirms neotropical and neartic basins/helminth faunas. The neotropical basins of Mexico are host to a richest and more diversified helminth fauna, including more families, genera and species, compared to the less rich and less diverse helminth fauna in the nearctic basins. The present analysis confirms distance--decay as one of the important factors contributing to the patterns of diversity observed. The hypothesis that helminth diversity could be explained by the ichthyological diversity of the basin received no support from present analysis.

  8. Taxonomic and Phylogenetic Determinants of Functional Composition of Bolivian Bat Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Luis F.; Montaño-Centellas, Flavia A.; Gavilanez, M. Mercedes; Stevens, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding diversity patterns and the potential mechanisms driving them is a fundamental goal in ecology. Examination of different dimensions of biodiversity can provide insights into the relative importance of different processes acting upon biotas to shape communities. Unfortunately, patterns of diversity are still poorly understood in hyper-diverse tropical countries. Here, we assess spatial variation of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity of bat assemblages in one of the least studied Neotropical countries, Bolivia, and determine whether changes in biodiversity are explained by the replacement of species or functional groups, or by differences in richness (i.e., gain or loss of species or functional groups). Further, we evaluate the contribution of phylogenetic and taxonomic changes in the resulting patterns of functional diversity of bats. Using well-sampled assemblages from published studies we examine noctilionoid bats at ten study sites across five ecoregions in Bolivia. Bat assemblages differed from each other in all dimensions of biodiversity considered; however, diversity patterns for each dimension were likely structured by different mechanisms. Within ecoregions, differences were largely explained by species richness, suggesting that the gain or loss of species or functional groups (as opposed to replacement) was driving dissimilarity patterns. Overall, our results suggest that whereas evolutionary processes (i.e., historical connection and dispersal routes across Bolivia) create a template of diversity patterns across the country, ecological mechanisms modify these templates, decoupling the observed patterns of functional, taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity in Bolivian bats. Our results suggests that elevation represents an important source of variability among diversity patterns for each dimension of diversity considered. Further, we found that neither phylogenetic nor taxonomic diversity can fully account for patterns of functional

  9. Taxonomic and Phylogenetic Determinants of Functional Composition of Bolivian Bat Assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F Aguirre

    Full Text Available Understanding diversity patterns and the potential mechanisms driving them is a fundamental goal in ecology. Examination of different dimensions of biodiversity can provide insights into the relative importance of different processes acting upon biotas to shape communities. Unfortunately, patterns of diversity are still poorly understood in hyper-diverse tropical countries. Here, we assess spatial variation of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity of bat assemblages in one of the least studied Neotropical countries, Bolivia, and determine whether changes in biodiversity are explained by the replacement of species or functional groups, or by differences in richness (i.e., gain or loss of species or functional groups. Further, we evaluate the contribution of phylogenetic and taxonomic changes in the resulting patterns of functional diversity of bats. Using well-sampled assemblages from published studies we examine noctilionoid bats at ten study sites across five ecoregions in Bolivia. Bat assemblages differed from each other in all dimensions of biodiversity considered; however, diversity patterns for each dimension were likely structured by different mechanisms. Within ecoregions, differences were largely explained by species richness, suggesting that the gain or loss of species or functional groups (as opposed to replacement was driving dissimilarity patterns. Overall, our results suggest that whereas evolutionary processes (i.e., historical connection and dispersal routes across Bolivia create a template of diversity patterns across the country, ecological mechanisms modify these templates, decoupling the observed patterns of functional, taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity in Bolivian bats. Our results suggests that elevation represents an important source of variability among diversity patterns for each dimension of diversity considered. Further, we found that neither phylogenetic nor taxonomic diversity can fully account for

  10. Taxonomic revision of the olingos (Bassaricyon), with description of a new species, the Olinguito

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present the first comprehensive taxonomic revision and review the biology of the olingos, the endemic Neotropical procyonid genus Bassaricyon , based on most specimens available in museums, and with data derived from anatomy, morphometrics, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, field observations, and geographic range modeling. Species of Bassaricyon are primarily forest-living, arboreal, nocturnal, frugivorous, and solitary, and have one young at a time. We demonstrate that four olingo ...

  11. LCA*: an entropy-based measure for taxonomic assignment within assembled metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Niels W; Konwar, Kishori M; Hallam, Steven J

    2016-12-01

    A perennial problem in the analysis of environmental sequence information is the assignment of reads or assembled sequences, e.g. contigs or scaffolds, to discrete taxonomic bins. In the absence of reference genomes for most environmental microorganisms, the use of intrinsic nucleotide patterns and phylogenetic anchors can improve assembly-dependent binning needed for more accurate taxonomic and functional annotation in communities of microorganisms, and assist in identifying mobile genetic elements or lateral gene transfer events. Here, we present a statistic called LCA* inspired by Information and Voting theories that uses the NCBI Taxonomic Database hierarchy to assign taxonomy to contigs assembled from environmental sequence information. The LCA* algorithm identifies a sufficiently strong majority on the hierarchy while minimizing entropy changes to the observed taxonomic distribution resulting in improved statistical properties. Moreover, we apply results from the order-statistic literature to formulate a likelihood-ratio hypothesis test and P-value for testing the supremacy of the assigned LCA* taxonomy. Using simulated and real-world datasets, we empirically demonstrate that voting-based methods, majority vote and LCA*, in the presence of known reference annotations, are consistently more accurate in identifying contig taxonomy than the lowest common ancestor algorithm popularized by MEGAN, and that LCA* taxonomy strikes a balance between specificity and confidence to provide an estimate appropriate to the available information in the data. The LCA* has been implemented as a stand-alone Python library compatible with the MetaPathways pipeline; both of which are available on GitHub with installation instructions and use-cases (http://www.github.com/hallamlab/LCAStar/). shallam@mail.ubc.caSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. The isolation and characterization of two Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteriophages capable of cross-taxonomic order infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Danielle L; Lynch, Karlene H; Stothard, Paul; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2015-09-03

    A rapid worldwide increase in the number of human infections caused by the extremely antibiotic resistant bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is prompting alarm. One potential treatment solution to the current antibiotic resistance dilemma is "phage therapy", the clinical application of bacteriophages to selectively kill bacteria. Towards that end, phages DLP1 and DLP2 (vB_SmaS-DLP_1 and vB_SmaS-DLP_2, respectively) were isolated against S. maltophilia strain D1585. Host range analysis for each phage was conducted using 27 clinical S. maltophilia isolates and 11 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Both phages exhibit unusually broad host ranges capable of infecting bacteria across taxonomic orders. Transmission electron microscopy of the phage DLP1 and DLP2 morphology reveals that they belong to the Siphoviridae family of bacteriophages. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and complete genome sequencing and analysis indicates that phages DLP1 and DLP2 are closely related but different phages, sharing 96.7 % identity over 97.2 % of their genomes. These two phages are also related to P. aeruginosa phages vB_Pae-Kakheti_25 (PA25), PA73, and vB_PaeS_SCH_Ab26 (Ab26) and more distantly related to Burkholderia cepacia complex phage KL1, which together make up a taxonomic sub-family. Phages DLP1 and DLP2 exhibited significant differences in host ranges and growth kinetics. The isolation and characterization of phages able to infect two completely different species of bacteria is an exciting discovery, as phages typically can only infect related bacterial species, and rarely infect bacteria across taxonomic families, let alone across taxonomic orders.

  13. Taxonomic status and redescription of Magneuptychia nebulosa (Butler, 1867) (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) with a lectotype designation

    OpenAIRE

    Shinichi Nakahara; Mario Marín; Cristóbal Ríos-Málaver

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A redescription of Magneuptychia nebulosa (Butler, 1867), a poorly known euptychiine butterfly, is given here, and accurate distributional data are provided for the first time. Taxonomic status of this taxon has been discussed by comparing its morphology against its possible congeners. In addition, lectotype designation for Magneuptychia nebulosa is provided in order to objectively establish the identity of this taxon and consequently stabilize the nomenclature.

  14. The taxonomic placement and provenance of Hypopyra inconspicua Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Thyrididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor O. Becker

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic placement and provenance of Hypopyra inconspicua Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Thyrididae. Tanyodes inconspicua (Herrich-Schäffer comb. nov. is transferred from Spirama Guenée (Noctuidae, Catocalinae to Striglininae (Thyrididae, as a senior synonym of Ortogramma rufitibia R. Felder & Rogenhofer syn. nov. and Tanyodes ochracea Möschler syn. nov., and from the African to the Neotropical fauna.

  15. How really extensive is the original material of Juncus kochii (Juncaceae? - A taxonomic and nomenclatural revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Proćków

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The identity of the original material of Juncus kochii F. W. Schultz (Juncaceae is discussed. The taxon at present is best regarded as Juncus bulbosus L. subsp. kochii (F. W. Schultz Reichg. The relevant literature (protologue and references therein was searched and details of all original elements were compiled. Nomenclatural and taxonomic remarks are given. Juncus welwitschii Hochst. ex Steud. is here excluded as a synonym of Juncus bulbosus subsp. kochii.

  16. Integrating and visualizing primary data from prospective and legacy taxonomic literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosti, Donat; Penev, Lyubomir; Sautter, Guido; Georgiev, Teodor; Catapano, Terry; Patterson, David; King, David; Pereira, Serrano; Vos, Rutger Aldo; Sierra, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Specimen data in taxonomic literature are among the highest quality primary biodiversity data. Innovative cybertaxonomic journals are using workflows that maintain data structure and disseminate electronic content to aggregators and other users; such structure is lost in traditional taxonomic publishing. Legacy taxonomic literature is a vast repository of knowledge about biodiversity. Currently, access to that resource is cumbersome, especially for non-specialist data consumers. Markup is a mechanism that makes this content more accessible, and is especially suited to machine analysis. Fine-grained XML (Extensible Markup Language) markup was applied to all (37) open-access articles published in the journal Zootaxa containing treatments on spiders (Order: Araneae). The markup approach was optimized to extract primary specimen data from legacy publications. These data were combined with data from articles containing treatments on spiders published in Biodiversity Data Journal where XML structure is part of the routine publication process. A series of charts was developed to visualize the content of specimen data in XML-tagged taxonomic treatments, either singly or in aggregate. The data can be filtered by several fields (including journal, taxon, institutional collection, collecting country, collector, author, article and treatment) to query particular aspects of the data. We demonstrate here that XML markup using GoldenGATE can address the challenge presented by unstructured legacy data, can extract structured primary biodiversity data which can be aggregated with and jointly queried with data from other Darwin Core-compatible sources, and show how visualization of these data can communicate key information contained in biodiversity literature. We complement recent studies on aspects of biodiversity knowledge using XML structured data to explore 1) the time lag between species discovry and description, and 2) the prevelence of rarity in species descriptions

  17. Integrating and visualizing primary data from prospective and legacy taxonomic literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Miller

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Specimen data in taxonomic literature are among the highest quality primary biodiversity data. Innovative cybertaxonomic journals are using workflows that maintain data structure and disseminate electronic content to aggregators and other users; such structure is lost in traditional taxonomic publishing. Legacy taxonomic literature is a vast repository of knowledge about biodiversity. Currently, access to that resource is cumbersome, especially for non-specialist data consumers. Markup is a mechanism that makes this content more accessible, and is especially suited to machine analysis. Fine-grained XML (Extensible Markup Language markup was applied to all (37 open-access articles published in the journal Zootaxa containing treatments on spiders (Order: Araneae. The markup approach was optimized to extract primary specimen data from legacy publications. These data were combined with data from articles containing treatments on spiders published in Biodiversity Data Journal where XML structure is part of the routine publication process. A series of charts was developed to visualize the content of specimen data in XML-tagged taxonomic treatments, either singly or in aggregate. The data can be filtered by several fields (including journal, taxon, institutional collection, collecting country, collector, author, article and treatment to query particular aspects of the data. We demonstrate here that XML markup using GoldenGATE can address the challenge presented by unstructured legacy data, can extract structured primary biodiversity data which can be aggregated with and jointly queried with data from other Darwin Core-compatible sources, and show how visualization of these data can communicate key information contained in biodiversity literature. We complement recent studies on aspects of biodiversity knowledge using XML structured data to explore 1 the time lag between species discovry and description, and 2 the prevelence of rarity in species

  18. Taxonomic distinctness and richness of helminth parasite assemblages of freshwater fishes in Mexican hydrological basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz-Martínez, Benjamín; Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the distributional patterns of adult helminth parasites of freshwater fishes with respect to the main hydrological basins of Mexico. We use the taxonomic distinctness and the variation in taxonomic distinctness to explore patterns of parasite diversity and how these patterns change between zoogeographical regions. We address questions about the factors that determine the variation of observed diversity of helminths between basins. We also investigate patterns of richness, taxonomic distinctness and distance decay of similarity amongst basins. Our analyses suggest that the evolution of the fauna of helminth parasites in Mexico is mostly dominated by independent host colonization events and that intra--host speciation could be a minor factor explaining the origin of this diversity. This paper points out a clear separation between the helminth faunas of northern--nearctic and southern--neotropical components in Mexican continental waters, suggesting the availability of two distinct taxonomic pools of parasites in Mexican drainage basins. Data identifies Mexican drainage basins as unities inhabited by freshwater fishes, hosting a mixture of neotropical and nearctic species, in addition, data confirms neotropical and neartic basins/helminth faunas. The neotropical basins of Mexico are host to a richest and more diversified helminth fauna, including more families, genera and species, compared to the less rich and less diverse helminth fauna in the nearctic basins. The present analysis confirms distance--decay as one of the important factors contributing to the patterns of diversity observed. The hypothesis that helminth diversity could be explained by the ichthyological diversity of the basin received no support from present analysis.

  19. Taxonomic status and redescription of Magneuptychia nebulosa (Butler, 1867) (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) with a lectotype designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinichi; Marín, Mario Alejandro; Ríos-Málaver, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A redescription of Magneuptychia nebulosa (Butler, 1867), a poorly known euptychiine butterfly, is given here, and accurate distributional data are provided for the first time. Taxonomic status of this taxon has been discussed by comparing its morphology against its possible congeners. In addition, lectotype designation for Magneuptychia nebulosa is provided in order to objectively establish the identity of this taxon and consequently stabilize the nomenclature. PMID:26019673

  20. Identification errors in pathology and laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenstein, Paul N; Sirota, Ronald L

    2004-12-01

    Identification errors involve misidentification of a patient or a specimen. Either has the potential to cause patients harm. Identification errors can occur during any part of the test cycle; however, most occur in the preanalytic phase. Patient identification errors in transfusion medicine occur in 0.05% of specimens; for general laboratory specimens the rate is much higher, around 1%. Anatomic pathology, which involves multiple specimen transfers and hand-offs, may have the highest identification error rate. Certain unavoidable cognitive failures lead to identification errors. Technology, ranging from bar-coded specimen labels to radio frequency identification tags, can be incorporated into protective systems that have the potential to detect and correct human error and reduce the frequency with which patients and specimens are misidentified.

  1. Rapid action in the Palaeogene, the relationship between phenotypic and taxonomic diversification in Coenozoic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, P; Carotenuto, F; Passaro, F; Piras, P; Fulgione, D; Werdelin, L; Saarinen, J; Fortelius, M

    2013-01-01

    A classic question in evolutionary biology concerns the tempo and mode of lineage evolution. Considered variously in relation to resource utilization, intrinsic constraints or hierarchic level, the question of how evolutionary change occurs in general has continued to draw the attention of the field for over a century and a half. Here we use the largest species-level phylogeny of Coenozoic fossil mammals (1031 species) ever assembled and their body size estimates, to show that body size and taxonomic diversification rates declined from the origin of placentals towards the present, and very probably correlate to each other. These findings suggest that morphological and taxic diversifications of mammals occurred hierarchically, with major shifts in body size coinciding with the birth of large clades, followed by taxonomic diversification within these newly formed clades. As the clades expanded, rates of taxonomic diversification proceeded independently of phenotypic evolution. Such a dynamic is consistent with the idea, central to the Modern Synthesis, that mammals radiated adaptively, with the filling of adaptive zones following the radiation.

  2. Concordant biogeographic patterns among multiple taxonomic groups in the Mexican freshwater biota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamín Quiroz-Martínez

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the degree of concordance in species richness and taxonomic distinctness (diversity patterns among different freshwater taxonomic groups in order to test three long held patterns described in Mexican freshwater biogeography: 1. The aquatic biota of Mexico includes two distinct faunas, a rich Neotropical component in the south and a south-eastern region and a less rich Nearctic component towards central and northern latitudes of the country. 2. A hotspot of species richness and diversity has been recorded in the Usumacinta, including the Yucatan Peninsula. 3. The presence of two distinct biotas in Mexico, an eastern one distributed along the Gulf of Mexico slope, and a western one associated to the Pacific versant. We use species richness and taxonomic distinctness to explore patterns of diversity and how these patterns change between zoogeographical regions. This paper points out a clear separation between Neotropical and Nearctic drainage basins but also between eastern (Gulf of Mexico and western (Pacific drainage basins. Present data gives additional empirical support from freshwater biota for three long held beliefs regarding distributional patterns of the Mexican biota. The neotropical basins of Mexico are generally host to a richest and more diversified fauna, that includes more families, genera and species, compared to the less rich and less diverse fauna in the nearctic basins.

  3. Taxonomic uncertainty and the loss of biodiversity on Christmas Island, Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Mark D B; Meek, Paul D; Johnson, Rebecca N

    2014-04-01

    The taxonomic uniqueness of island populations is often uncertain which hinders effective prioritization for conservation. The Christmas Island shrew (Crocidura attenuata trichura) is the only member of the highly speciose eutherian family Soricidae recorded from Australia. It is currently classified as a subspecies of the Asian gray or long-tailed shrew (C. attenuata), although it was originally described as a subspecies of the southeast Asian white-toothed shrew (C. fuliginosa). The Christmas Island shrew is currently listed as endangered and has not been recorded in the wild since 1984-1985, when 2 specimens were collected after an 80-year absence. We aimed to obtain DNA sequence data for cytochrome b (cytb) from Christmas Island shrew museum specimens to determine their taxonomic affinities and to confirm the identity of the 1980s specimens. The Cytb sequences from 5, 1898 specimens and a 1985 specimen were identical. In addition, the Christmas Island shrew cytb sequence was divergent at the species level from all available Crocidura cytb sequences. Rather than a population of a widespread species, current evidence suggests the Christmas Island shrew is a critically endangered endemic species, C. trichura, and a high priority for conservation. As the decisions typically required to save declining species can be delayed or deferred if the taxonomic status of the population in question is uncertain, it is hoped that the history of the Christmas Island shrew will encourage the clarification of taxonomy to be seen as an important first step in initiating informed and effective conservation action.

  4. Niche partitioning and biogeography of high light adapted Prochlorococcus across taxonomic ranks in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Alyse A; Blinebry, Sara K; Howes, Caroline; Lin, Yajuan; Loftus, Sarah E; Schmaus, Carrie A; Zinser, Erik R; Johnson, Zackary I

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of major clades of Prochlorococcus tracks light, temperature and other environmental variables; yet, the drivers of genomic diversity within these ecotypes and the net effect on biodiversity of the larger community are poorly understood. We examined high light (HL) adapted Prochlorococcus communities across spatial and temporal environmental gradients in the Pacific Ocean to determine the ecological drivers of population structure and diversity across taxonomic ranks. We show that the Prochlorococcus community has the highest diversity at low latitudes, but seasonality driven by temperature, day length and nutrients adds complexity. At finer taxonomic resolution, some 'sub-ecotype' clades have unique, cohesive responses to environmental variables and distinct biogeographies, suggesting that presently defined ecotypes can be further partitioned into ecologically meaningful units. Intriguingly, biogeographies of the HL-I sub-ecotypes are driven by unique combinations of environmental traits, rather than through trait hierarchy, while the HL-II sub-ecotypes appear ecologically similar, thus demonstrating differences among these dominant HL ecotypes. Examining biodiversity across taxonomic ranks reveals high-resolution dynamics of Prochlorococcus evolution and ecology that are masked at phylogenetically coarse resolution. Spatial and seasonal trends of Prochlorococcus communities suggest that the future ocean may be comprised of different populations, with implications for ecosystem structure and function.

  5. Vitalius nondescriptus comb. nov. (Araneae: Theraphosidae: Theraphosinae: an example of theraphosid taxonomic chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Bertani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The male holotype of Hapalopus nondescriptus Mello-Leitão, 1926 is redescribed, illustrated and compared with freshly collected specimens from the type locality. The only difference noted among the holotype and the new material concerns the development of the subapical keel. Its taxonomic position is reinterpreted and discussed, resulting in its transfer to the genus Vitalius Lucas, Silva Junior & Bertani, 1993, and thus making the new combination Vitalius nondescriptus (Mello-Leitão, 1926 comb. nov. The female is described for the first time and the morphological variations in two males, born from the female used in the description, is presented and illustrated. The male differs from those of other Vitalius species by the palpal bulb with short apical keel and bifid tibial spur with narrow prolateral branch and almost straight retrolateral branch. The female differs from those of other Vitalius species by urticating hair of 'type I' having the region 'a' shorter than region 'b'. Hapalopus nondescriptus has a confusing taxonomic history, since the holotype specimen was also used to describe another theraphosid species (Cyclosternum melloleitaoi Bücherl, Thimoteo & Lucas, 1971 which was, consequently, considered its objective synonym. Thus, we consider it a clear example of theraphosid taxonomical chaos.

  6. A Computational Approach towards Visual Object Recognition at Taxonomic Levels of Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sadeghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that concepts can be perceived at three main levels of abstraction. Generally, in a recognition system, object categories can be viewed at three levels of taxonomic hierarchy which are known as superordinate, basic, and subordinate levels. For instance, “horse” is a member of subordinate level which belongs to basic level of “animal” and superordinate level of “natural objects.” Our purpose in this study is to take an investigation into visual features at each taxonomic level. We first present a recognition tree which is more general in terms of inclusiveness with respect to visual representation of objects. Then we focus on visual feature definition, that is, how objects from the same conceptual category can be visually represented at each taxonomic level. For the first level we define global features based on frequency patterns to illustrate visual distinctions among artificial and natural. In contrast, our approach for the second level is based on shape descriptors which are defined by recruiting moment based representation. Finally, we show how conceptual knowledge can be utilized for visual feature definition in order to enhance recognition of subordinate categories.

  7. Concordant Biogeographic Patterns among Multiple Taxonomic Groups in the Mexican Freshwater Biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz-Martínez, Benjamín; Álvarez, Fernando; Espinosa, Héctor; Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the degree of concordance in species richness and taxonomic distinctness (diversity) patterns among different freshwater taxonomic groups in order to test three long held patterns described in Mexican freshwater biogeography: 1. The aquatic biota of Mexico includes two distinct faunas, a rich Neotropical component in the south and a south-eastern region and a less rich Nearctic component towards central and northern latitudes of the country. 2. A hotspot of species richness and diversity has been recorded in the Usumacinta, including the Yucatan Peninsula. 3. The presence of two distinct biotas in Mexico, an eastern one distributed along the Gulf of Mexico slope, and a western one associated to the Pacific versant. We use species richness and taxonomic distinctness to explore patterns of diversity and how these patterns change between zoogeographical regions. This paper points out a clear separation between Neotropical and Nearctic drainage basins but also between eastern (Gulf of Mexico) and western (Pacific) drainage basins. Present data gives additional empirical support from freshwater biota for three long held beliefs regarding distributional patterns of the Mexican biota. The neotropical basins of Mexico are generally host to a richest and more diversified fauna, that includes more families, genera and species, compared to the less rich and less diverse fauna in the nearctic basins. PMID:25136979

  8. Systematic Characterization and Analysis of the Taxonomic Drivers of Functional Shifts in the Human Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Ohad; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2017-02-08

    Comparative analyses of the human microbiome have identified both taxonomic and functional shifts that are associated with numerous diseases. To date, however, microbiome taxonomy and function have mostly been studied independently and the taxonomic drivers of functional imbalances have not been systematically identified. Here, we present FishTaco, an analytical and computational framework that integrates taxonomic and functional comparative analyses to accurately quantify taxon-level contributions to disease-associated functional shifts. Applying FishTaco to several large-scale metagenomic cohorts, we show that shifts in the microbiome's functional capacity can be traced back to specific taxa. Furthermore, the set of taxa driving functional shifts and their contribution levels vary markedly between functions. We additionally find that similar functional imbalances in different diseases are driven by both disease-specific and shared taxa. Such integrated analysis of microbiome ecological and functional dynamics can inform future microbiome-based therapy, pinpointing putative intervention targets for manipulating the microbiome's functional capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting bee community responses to land-use changes: Effects of geographic and taxonomic biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Adriana; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Aizen, Marcelo A.; Albrecht, Matthias; Basset, Yves; Bates, Adam; Blake, Robin J.; Boutin, Céline; Bugter, Rob; Connop, Stuart; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Cunningham, Saul A.; Darvill, Ben; Diekötter, Tim; Dorn, Silvia; Downing, Nicola; Entling, Martin H.; Farwig, Nina; Felicioli, Antonio; Fonte, Steven J.; Fowler, Robert; Franzén, Markus; Goulson, Dave; Grass, Ingo; Hanley, Mick E.; Hendrix, Stephen D.; Herrmann, Farina; Herzog, Felix; Holzschuh, Andrea; Jauker, Birgit; Kessler, Michael; Knight, M. E.; Kruess, Andreas; Lavelle, Patrick; Le Féon, Violette; Lentini, Pia; Malone, Louise A.; Marshall, Jon; Pachón, Eliana Martínez; McFrederick, Quinn S.; Morales, Carolina L.; Mudri-Stojnic, Sonja; Nates-Parra, Guiomar; Nilsson, Sven G.; Öckinger, Erik; Osgathorpe, Lynne; Parra-H, Alejandro; Peres, Carlos A.; Persson, Anna S.; Petanidou, Theodora; Poveda, Katja; Power, Eileen F.; Quaranta, Marino; Quintero, Carolina; Rader, Romina; Richards, Miriam H.; Roulston, T’ai; Rousseau, Laurent; Sadler, Jonathan P.; Samnegård, Ulrika; Schellhorn, Nancy A.; Schüepp, Christof; Schweiger, Oliver; Smith-Pardo, Allan H.; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stout, Jane C.; Tonietto, Rebecca K.; Tscharntke, Teja; Tylianakis, Jason M.; Verboven, Hans A. F.; Vergara, Carlos H.; Verhulst, Jort; Westphal, Catrin; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Purvis, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Land-use change and intensification threaten bee populations worldwide, imperilling pollination services. Global models are needed to better characterise, project, and mitigate bees' responses to these human impacts. The available data are, however, geographically and taxonomically unrepresentative; most data are from North America and Western Europe, overrepresenting bumblebees and raising concerns that model results may not be generalizable to other regions and taxa. To assess whether the geographic and taxonomic biases of data could undermine effectiveness of models for conservation policy, we have collated from the published literature a global dataset of bee diversity at sites facing land-use change and intensification, and assess whether bee responses to these pressures vary across 11 regions (Western, Northern, Eastern and Southern Europe; North, Central and South America; Australia and New Zealand; South East Asia; Middle and Southern Africa) and between bumblebees and other bees. Our analyses highlight strong regionally-based responses of total abundance, species richness and Simpson's diversity to land use, caused by variation in the sensitivity of species and potentially in the nature of threats. These results suggest that global extrapolation of models based on geographically and taxonomically restricted data may underestimate the true uncertainty, increasing the risk of ecological surprises. PMID:27509831

  10. [Bleaching of Baikalian Sponge Affects The Taxonomic Composition of Symbiotic Microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzhnaya, O V; Itskovich, V B

    2015-11-01

    The diversity of 16S rRNA genes in the microbial community of endemic sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis with bleached patches of tissue was studied. Eight bacterial phyla were identified in the sponge microbiome: Cyanobacteria (27.3%; n = 36; 2 OTU, operational taxonomic unit), Proteobacteria (22.7%; n = 30; 5 OTU), Actinobacteria (16.7%; n = 22; 7 OTU, operation taxonomic unit), Verrucomicrobia (15.2%; n = 20; 4 OTU), Plactomycetes (9%; n = 12; 3 OTU), Bacteroidetes (4.5%; n = 6; 3 OTU), WS5 (3%; n = 4; 1 OTU), and TM7 (1.5%; n = 2; 1 OTU). The basic phyla typical of freshwater sponge microbiomes are present in the community. However, in contrast to previously studied L. baicalensis bacterial associations, a dominance of Cyanobacteria and a low number of representatives of the Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria were observed in the bleached sponge community. Phylotypes exhibiting a high percentage of similarity with the microorganisms inhabiting substrates rich in organic matter were also found. Clearly, the bleaching processes of Baikal sponges affect the composition and the ratio of the major taxonomic groups of sponge-associated bacteria.

  11. Taxonomic identity, phylogeny, climate and soil fertility as drivers of leaf traits across Chinese grassland biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin-Sheng; Wang, Xiangping; Schmid, Bernhard; Flynn, Dan F B; Li, Xuefei; Reich, Peter B; Fang, Jingyun

    2010-07-01

    Although broad-scale inter-specific patterns of leaf traits are influenced by climate, soil, and taxonomic identity, integrated assessments of these drivers remain rare. Here, we quantify these drivers in a field study of 171 plant species in 174 sites across Chinese grasslands, including the Tibetan Plateau, Inner Mongolia, and Xinjiang. General linear models were used to partition leaf trait variation. Of the total variation in leaf traits, on average 27% is due to taxonomic or phylogenetic differences among species within sites (pure species effect), 29% to variation among sites within species (pure site effect), 38% to joint effects of taxonomic and environmental factors (shared effect), and 6.2% to within-site and within-species variation. Examining the pure site effect, climate explained 7.8%, soil explained 7.4%, and climate and soil variables together accounted for 11%, leaving 18% of the inter-site variation due to factors other than climate or soil. The results do not support the hypothesis that soil fertility is the "missing link" to explain leaf trait variation unexplained by climatic factors. Climate- and soil-induced leaf adaptations occur mostly among species, and leaf traits vary little within species in Chinese grassland plants, despite strongly varying climate and soil conditions.

  12. Correcting Reflux Laparoscopically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Poulin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Most operations in the abdominal cavity and chest can be performed using minimally invasive techniques. As yet it has not been determined which laparoscopic procedures are preferable to the same operations done through conventional laparotomy. However, most surgeons who have completed the learning curves of these procedures believe that most minimally invasive techniques will be scientifically recognized soon. The evolution, validation and justification of advanced laparoscopic surgical methods seem inevitable. Most believe that the trend towards procedures that minimize or eliminate the trauma of surgery while adhering to accepted surgical principles is irreversible. The functional results of laparoscopic antireflux surgery in the seven years since its inception have been virtually identical to the success curves generated with open fundoplication in past years. Furthermore, overall patient outcomes with laparoscopic procedures have been superior to outcomes with the traditional approach. Success is determined by patient selection and operative technique. Patient evaluation should include esophagogastroduodenoscopy, barium swallow, 24 h pH study and esophageal motility study. Gastric emptying also should be evaluated. Patients who have abnormal propulsion in the esophagus should not receive a complete fundoplication (Nissen because it adds a factor of obstruction. Dor or Toupet procedures are adequate alternatives. Prokinetic agents, dilation or pyloroplasty are used for pyloric obstruction ranging from little to more severe. Correcting reflux laparoscopically is more difficult in patients with obesity, peptic strictures, paraesophageal hernias, short esophagus, or a history of previous upper abdominal or antireflux surgery.

  13. The history of the USDA Nematode Collection and its database: valuable resources for taxonomic research and identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Department of Agriculture Nematode Collection continues to serve as one of the largest and most comprehensive nematode repositories in the world. Nematology research in the United States began in the late 1800’s, and for many years the collections of the USDA nematologists remained...

  14. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lena; Cromdal, Jakob; Broth, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction...... exchanges. Through detailed multimodal analysis of participants’ actions, it is shown how instructors systematically elaborate their corrective instructions to include relevant information about the trouble and remedial action – a practice we refer to as unpacking corrections. It is proposed...... that the practice of unpacking the local particulars of corrections (i) provides for the instructional character of the interaction, and (ii) is highly sensitive to the relevant physical and mobile contingencies. These findings contribute to the existing literature on the interactional organisation of correction...

  15. Gravitational Correction to Vacuum Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2015-01-01

    We consider the gravitational correction to (electronic) vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational background field. The Dirac propagators for the virtual fermions are modified to include the leading gravitational correction (potential term) which corresponds to a coordinate-dependent fermion mass. The mass term is assumed to be uniform over a length scale commensurate with the virtual electron-positron pair. The on-mass shell renormalization condition ensures that the gravitational correction vanishes on the mass shell of the photon, i.e., the speed of light is unaffected by the quantum field theoretical loop correction, in full agreement with the equivalence principle. Nontrivial corrections are obtained for off-shell, virtual photons. We compare our findings to other works on generalized Lorentz transformations and combined quantum-electrodynamic gravitational corrections to the speed of light which have recently appeared in the literature.

  16. Food systems in correctional settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smoyer, Amy; Kjær Minke, Linda

    Food is a central component of life in correctional institutions and plays a critical role in the physical and mental health of incarcerated people and the construction of prisoners' identities and relationships. An understanding of the role of food in correctional settings and the effective...... management of food systems may improve outcomes for incarcerated people and help correctional administrators to maximize their health and safety. This report summarizes existing research on food systems in correctional settings and provides examples of food programmes in prison and remand facilities......, including a case study of food-related innovation in the Danish correctional system. It offers specific conclusions for policy-makers, administrators of correctional institutions and prison-food-service professionals, and makes proposals for future research....

  17. Nested Quantum Error Correction Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhuo; Fan, Hen; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-01-01

    The theory of quantum error correction was established more than a decade ago as the primary tool for fighting decoherence in quantum information processing. Although great progress has already been made in this field, limited methods are available in constructing new quantum error correction codes from old codes. Here we exhibit a simple and general method to construct new quantum error correction codes by nesting certain quantum codes together. The problem of finding long quantum error correction codes is reduced to that of searching several short length quantum codes with certain properties. Our method works for all length and all distance codes, and is quite efficient to construct optimal or near optimal codes. Two main known methods in constructing new codes from old codes in quantum error-correction theory, the concatenating and pasting, can be understood in the framework of nested quantum error correction codes.

  18. Metric-based method of software requirements correctness improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaremchuk Svitlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The work highlights the most important principles of software reliability management (SRM. The SRM concept construes a basis for developing a method of requirements correctness improvement. The method assumes that complicated requirements contain more actual and potential design faults/defects. The method applies a newer metric to evaluate the requirements complexity and double sorting technique evaluating the priority and complexity of a particular requirement. The method enables to improve requirements correctness due to identification of a higher number of defects with restricted resources. Practical application of the proposed method in the course of demands review assured a sensible technical and economic effect.

  19. Processor register error correction management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Gupta, Meeta S.

    2016-12-27

    Processor register protection management is disclosed. In embodiments, a method of processor register protection management can include determining a sensitive logical register for executable code generated by a compiler, generating an error-correction table identifying the sensitive logical register, and storing the error-correction table in a memory accessible by a processor. The processor can be configured to generate a duplicate register of the sensitive logical register identified by the error-correction table.

  20. Comparison of Topographic Correction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Richter

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of topographic correction methods is conducted for Landsat-5 TM, Landsat-7 ETM+, and SPOT-5 imagery from different geographic areas and seasons. Three successful and known methods are compared: the semi-empirical C correction, the Gamma correction depending on the incidence and exitance angles, and a modified Minnaert approach. In the majority of cases the modified Minnaert approach performed best, but no method is superior in all cases.

  1. Historical assemblage distinctiveness and the introduction of widespread non-native species explain worldwide changes in freshwater fish taxonomic dissimilarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, A.; Beauchard, O.; Oberdorff, T.; Brosse, S.; Villéger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim
    Taxonomic dissimilarity between assemblages can result from two processes - the replacement of species (turnover) and differences in richness - but it remains unclear how anthropogenic drivers (introductions and extirpations) affect these processes. Here, we investigate how historical pattern

  2. Taxonomic turnover and abundance in Cretaceous to Tertiary wood floras of Antarctica: implications for changes in forest ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantrill, David J.; Poole, I.J.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the temporal distribution, abundance, and taxonomic composition of wood floras, four phases of vegetation development are recognized through the Cretaceous to Early Tertiary of the Antarctic Peninsula: (1) Aptian to Albian communities dominated by podocarpaceous, araucarian, and minor

  3. Food systems in correctional settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smoyer, Amy; Kjær Minke, Linda

    Food is a central component of life in correctional institutions and plays a critical role in the physical and mental health of incarcerated people and the construction of prisoners' identities and relationships. An understanding of the role of food in correctional settings and the effective mana......, including a case study of food-related innovation in the Danish correctional system. It offers specific conclusions for policy-makers, administrators of correctional institutions and prison-food-service professionals, and makes proposals for future research....

  4. Bovine Teat Microbiome Analysis Revealed Reduced Alpha Diversity and Significant Changes in Taxonomic Profiles in Quarters with a History of Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falentin, Hélène; Rault, Lucie; Nicolas, Aurélie; Bouchard, Damien S.; Lassalas, Jacques; Lamberton, Philippe; Aubry, Jean-Marc; Marnet, Pierre-Guy; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis is a mammary gland inflammatory disease often due to bacterial infections. Like many other infections, it used to be considered as a host-pathogen interaction driven by host and bacterial determinants. Until now, the involvement of the bovine mammary gland microbiota in the host-pathogen interaction has been poorly investigated, and mainly during the infectious episode. In this study, the bovine teat microbiome was investigated in 31 quarters corresponding to 27 animals, which were all free of inflammation at sampling time but which had different histories regarding mastitis: from no episode of mastitis on all the previous lactations (Healthy quarter, Hq) to one or several clinical mastitis events (Mastitic quarter, Mq). Several quarters whose status was unclear (possible history of subclinical mastitis) were classified as NDq. Total bacterial DNA was extracted from foremilk samples and swab samples of the teat canal. Taxonomic profiles were determined by pyrosequencing on 16s amplicons of the V3-4 region. Hq quarters showed a higher diversity compared to Mq ones (Shannon index: ~8 and 6, respectively). Clustering of the quarters based on their bacterial composition made it possible to separate Mq and Hq quarters into two separate clusters (C1 and C2, respectively). Discriminant analysis of taxonomic profiles between these clusters revealed several differences and allowed the identification of taxonomic markers in relation to mastitis history. C2 quarters were associated with a higher proportion of the Clostridia class (including genera such as Ruminococcus, Oscillospira, Roseburia, Dorea, etc.), the Bacteroidetes phylum (Prevotella, Bacteroides, Paludibacter, etc.), and the Bifidobacteriales order (Bifidobacterium), whereas C1 quarters showed a higher proportion of the Bacilli class (Staphylococcus) and Chlamydiia class. These results indicate that microbiota is altered in udders which have already developed mastitis, even far from the infectious episode

  5. Inventario taxonómico de drosophilidae (Diptera en el Parque Nacional Yasuni, Amazonia Ecuatoriana Taxonomic survey of drosophilidae (Diptera in the Yasuni National Park, Ecuadorian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Elizabeth Acurio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available En el Parque Nacional Yasuní, reconocido como un sector de alto endemismo y biodiversidad, ubicado al noroeste de la Amazonía Ecuatoriana se realizó el inventario taxonómico de la familia Drosophilidae. Para la captura de los individuos se utilizaron trampas con atrayente de banano y solución de levadura de cerveza. La identificación taxonómica se realizó usando caracteres morfológicos y la terminalia de los machos. En total se colectaron 7425 individuos clasificados en 34 especies de los géneros: Drosophila Fallén, 1823, Scaptodrosophila Duda, 1923, Neotanygastrella Duda, 1923 y Zaprionus Coquillett, 1901. Seis de estas especies son nuevos registros para el Ecuador: D. araicas Pavan & Nacrur, 1950, D. equinoxialis Dobzhansky, 1946, D. kikkawai Burla, 1954, D. subsaltans Magalhães, 1956, D. neocordata Magalhães, 1956 y D. peninsularis Patterson & Wheeler, 1942. Estos datos incrementan el número de especies registrados para el país y para la región amazónica.In the Yasuni National Park, a place recognized as a hot spot biodiversity, located in the Northwestern Ecuadorian Amazon was made a taxonomic survey of the Drosophilidae. Individuals were collected using traps with banana and yeast as bait. Taxonomic identifications were made by morphologic characters and male genitalia analysis. We collected 7425 individuals of 34 species, from the genera: Drosophila Fallén, 1823, Scaptodrosophila Duda, 1923, Neotanygastrella Duda, 1923 y Zaprionus Coquillett, 1901. Six of them are new records for Ecuador: D. araicas Pavan & Nacrur, 1950, D. equinoxialis Dobzhansky, 1946, D. kikkawai Burla, 1954, D. subsaltans Magalhães, 1956, D. neocordata Magalhães, 1956 and D. peninsularis Patterson & Wheeler, 1942. This data increase the number of species records to Ecuador and the Amazon Region.

  6. Online identification of linear loudspeakers parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Rubak, Per

    2007-01-01

    Feed forward nonlinear error correction of loudspeakers can improve sound quality. For creating a realistic feed forward strategy identification of the loudspeaker parameters is needed. The strategy of the compensator is that the nonlinear behaviour of the loudspeakers has relatively small drift...... algorithms. Two different identification techniques (ARMA and FIR) are compared. The stability of the nonlinearities and linear loudspeaker parameters are tested in a measurement series....

  7. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  8. Journal of EEA, Vol. 27, 2010 WRITER IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    messy

    generated by a handwriting segmentation method to encode the ... PDF yields very high correct identification rates. Bulacu et al. ... As the main concern of this work is the Ethiopic handwriting .... from one mother wavelet by dilation and rotation.

  9. Functional dominance rather than taxonomic diversity and functional diversity mainly affects community aboveground biomass in the Inner Mongolia grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Buyantuev, Alexander; Li, Frank Yonghong; Jiang, Lin; Niu, Jianming; Ding, Yong; Kang, Sarula; Ma, Wenjing

    2017-03-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and productivity has been a hot topic in ecology. However, the relative importance of taxonomic diversity and functional characteristics (including functional dominance and functional diversity) in maintaining community productivity and the underlying mechanisms (including selection and complementarity effects) of the relationship between diversity and community productivity have been widely controversial. In this study, 194 sites were surveyed in five grassland types along a precipitation gradient in the Inner Mongolia grassland of China. The relationships between taxonomic diversity (species richness and the Shannon-Weaver index), functional dominance (the community-weighted mean of four plant traits), functional diversity (Rao's quadratic entropy), and community aboveground biomass were analyzed. The results showed that (1) taxonomic diversity, functional dominance, functional diversity, and community aboveground biomass all increased from low to high precipitation grassland types; (2) there were significant positive linear relationships between taxonomic diversity, functional dominance, functional diversity, and community aboveground biomass; (3) the effect of functional characteristics on community aboveground biomass is greater than that of taxonomic diversity; and (4) community aboveground biomass depends on the community-weighted mean plant height, which explained 57.1% of the variation in the community aboveground biomass. Our results suggested that functional dominance rather than taxonomic diversity and functional diversity mainly determines community productivity and that the selection effect plays a dominant role in maintaining the relationship between biodiversity and community productivity in the Inner Mongolia grassland.

  10. Improving Contract Performance by Corrective Actions Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowd, A.S., jr.

    2002-06-23

    Corrective Action Plans (CAPs) are required to be developed, submitted, and reported upon by the prime contractors for the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Management and Operations (M and O) contracts. The best known CAP ''type,'' and there are many, is for Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) ''potential noncompliances.'' The M and O contractor fines for PAAA problems have increased from approximately $100,000 in 1996 to almost $2,000,000 in 2000. In order to improve CAP performance at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) site at Y-12 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the contractor chose to centralize the company-wide processes of problem identification and reporting with the PAAA (and other) CAP processes. This directly integrates these functional reports to the contractor General Manager. The functions contained in the M and O contractor central organization, called ''Performance Assurance,'' are: PAAA; Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Liaison; Contract Requirements Management; Issues Management (including the CAP processes); Lessons Learned; Independent and Management Assessments; Internal Audits; and Ethics. By centrally locating and managing these problem identification and problem correction functions, the contractor, BWXT Y-12, L.L.C., has improved PAAA (and other) CAP performance more than 200 percent in the first year of the contract. Much of this improvement (see Table 1 for examples) has been achieved by increasing the knowledge and experience of management and workers in the specific contract and company requirements for CAPs. The remainder of this paper will describe some of the many CAP processes at Y-12 to show the reader the non-trivial scope of the CAP process. Improvements in CAP management will be discussed. In addition, a specific recommendation for CAP management, in a major capital construction project, will be presented.

  11. Error Correction and Long Run Equilibrium in Continuous Time

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    This paper deals with error correction models (ECM's) and cointegrated systems that are formulated in continuous time. Problems of representation, identification, estimation and time aggregation are discussed. It is shown that every ECM in continuous time has a discrete time equivalent model in ECM format. Moreover, both models may be written as triangular systems with stationary errors. This formulation simplifies both the continuous and the discrete time ECM representations and it helps to ...

  12. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lene; Broth, Mathias; Cromdal, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction exchan...

  13. Feature Referenced Error Correction Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A feature referenced error correction apparatus utilizing the multiple images of the interstage level image format to compensate for positional...images and by the generation of an error correction signal in response to the sub-frame registration errors. (Author)

  14. Beta Diversity in a Highly Heterogeneous Area: Disentangling Species and Taxonomic Dissimilarity for Terrestrial Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Patrón, Jaime M; Goyenechea, Irene; Ortiz-Pulido, Raúl; Castillo-Cerón, Jesús; Manriquez, Norma; Ramírez-Bautista, Aurelio; Rojas-Martínez, Alberto E; Sánchez-Rojas, Gerardo; Zuria, Iriana; Moreno, Claudia E

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying differences in species composition among communities provides important information related to the distribution, conservation and management of biodiversity, especially when two components are recognized: dissimilarity due to turnover, and dissimilarity due to richness differences. The ecoregions in central Mexico, within the Mexican Transition Zone, have outstanding environmental heterogeneity and harbor huge biological richness, besides differences in the origin of the biota. Therefore, biodiversity studies in this area require the use of complementary measures to achieve appropriate information that may help in the design of conservation strategies. In this work we analyze the dissimilarity of terrestrial vertebrates, and the components of turnover and richness differences, among six ecoregions in the state of Hidalgo, central Mexico. We follow two approaches: one based on species level dissimilarity, and the second on taxonomic dissimilarity. We used databases from the project "Biodiversity in the state of Hidalgo". Our results indicate that species dissimilarity is higher than taxonomic dissimilarity, and that turnover contributes more than richness differences, both for species and taxonomic total dissimilarity. Moreover, total dissimilarity, turnover dissimilarity and the dissimilarity due to richness differences were positively related in the four vertebrate groups. Reptiles had the highest values of dissimilarity, followed by mammals, amphibians and birds. For reptiles, birds, and mammals, species turnover was the most important component, while richness differences had a higher contribution for amphibians. The highest values of dissimilarity occurred between environmentally contrasting ecoregions (i.e., tropical and temperate forests), which suggests that environmental heterogeneity and differences in the origin of biotas are key factors driving beta diversity of terrestrial vertebrates among ecoregions in this complex area.

  15. Increasing phylogenetic resolution at low taxonomic levels using massively parallel sequencing of chloroplast genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cronn Richard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolutionary studies share the common goal of elucidating historical relationships, and the common challenge of adequately sampling taxa and characters. Particularly at low taxonomic levels, recent divergence, rapid radiations, and conservative genome evolution yield limited sequence variation, and dense taxon sampling is often desirable. Recent advances in massively parallel sequencing make it possible to rapidly obtain large amounts of sequence data, and multiplexing makes extensive sampling of megabase sequences feasible. Is it possible to efficiently apply massively parallel sequencing to increase phylogenetic resolution at low taxonomic levels? Results We reconstruct the infrageneric phylogeny of Pinus from 37 nearly-complete chloroplast genomes (average 109 kilobases each of an approximately 120 kilobase genome generated using multiplexed massively parallel sequencing. 30/33 ingroup nodes resolved with ≥ 95% bootstrap support; this is a substantial improvement relative to prior studies, and shows massively parallel sequencing-based strategies can produce sufficient high quality sequence to reach support levels originally proposed for the phylogenetic bootstrap. Resampling simulations show that at least the entire plastome is necessary to fully resolve Pinus, particularly in rapidly radiating clades. Meta-analysis of 99 published infrageneric phylogenies shows that whole plastome analysis should provide similar gains across a range of plant genera. A disproportionate amount of phylogenetic information resides in two loci (ycf1, ycf2, highlighting their unusual evolutionary properties. Conclusion Plastome sequencing is now an efficient option for increasing phylogenetic resolution at lower taxonomic levels in plant phylogenetic and population genetic analyses. With continuing improvements in sequencing capacity, the strategies herein should revolutionize efforts requiring dense taxon and character sampling

  16. Taxonomic synopsis of Notiospathius Matthews & Marsh, 1973 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Jimenez, Andrea; Sarmiento, Carlos E

    2016-06-29

    Notiospathius Matthews & Marsh, 1973 is the second most diverse genus of Doryctinae in the Neotropical region, however, in Colombia only two species have been reported and no studies on the diversity of the genus have been conducted. We present a taxonomic synopsis of the genus from Colombia. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) allowed the taxonomic evaluation of morphometric characters used by other authors and those proposed in the present study to differentiate the species. Forty seven of 104 characters studied are useful to discriminate the species. Twenty three species are reported. The following new records for Colombia are: Notiospathius angustus Marsh, 2002; N. badius Marsh, 2002; N. bicolor Marsh, 2002; N. ninae Marsh, 2002; N. rugonotum Marsh, 2002; N. shawi Marsh, 2002; N. tinctipennis (Cameron, 1887) and N. venezuelae López-Estrada & Zaldívar-Riverón, 2012. The following 14 new species are described: N. alejandroi sp. nov., N. amazonensis sp. nov., N. carmenae sp. nov., N. cundinamarcensis sp. nov., N. farallonensis sp. nov., N. julianoi sp. nov., N. magdalenensis sp. nov., N. marshi sp. nov., N. payae sp. nov., N. putumayensis sp. nov., N. quimbayensis sp. nov., N. tayronensis sp. nov., N. utriae sp. nov., N. vallensis sp. nov. Notiospathius ugaldei Marsh, 2002 is the junior synonym of N. columbianus (Enderlein, 1912); Notiospathius mariachi Reséndiz-Flores, Nunes and Zaldívar-Riverón, 2014 is the junior synonym of N. carolinae (Marsh, 2002); and N. chinanteco Reséndiz-Flores, Nunes and Zaldívar-Riverón, 2014 is the junior synonym of N. rugonotum Marsh, 2002. A comprehensive taxonomic key with illustrations is presented.

  17. Morphological variations caused by fixation techniques may lead to taxonomic confusion in Laeonereis (Polychaeta: Nereididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica M. Oliveira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The nereidid polychaete Laeonereis acuta (Treadwell, 1923 is either considered to be a valid species, or a synonym of Laeonereis culveri (Webster, 1879. The species epithet, acuta, refers to the acuminate anterior region of the body followed by a widening that is visible up to the 10th setiger. The relative width of the anterior region of the body, however, has been reported in the taxonomic literature as variable for Laeonereis Hartman, 1945, a genus known from the eastern coast of North America to Patagonia (southern South America. To test whether variations in this character are real, or whether they correspond to an artifact, we analyzed morphological changes associated with different anesthesia and fixation techniques regularly used to prepare specimens of Laeonereis from southern Brazil (formerly reported as L. acuta. Six treatments, including combinations of anesthetics and fixative agents, and a control, were evaluated in groups of 25 adult animals. A simple model II regression analysis on living specimens showed that the growth is approximately isometric. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the treatment effect on the ratio of peristome width: setiger 6 width. This ratio was smaller in non-anesthetized individuals, especially when prepared in formalin and freshwater. When anesthetized with menthol and fixed in formalin with sea water, individuals retained a shape that was closest to their in vivo shape. Consequently, our results suggest that fixation without prior anesthesia is not recommended for morphological and taxonomical studies. Since morphology and morphometrics of the anterior region are consistently influenced by preparation techniques, it is likely that inadequate fixation routines have introduced several errors in the taxonomic and ecological literature of Laeonereis.

  18. Taxonomic and systematic revisions to the North American Nimravidae (Mammalia, Carnivora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Z. Barrett

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Nimravidae is a family of extinct carnivores commonly referred to as “false saber-tooth cats.” Since their initial discovery, they have prompted difficulty in taxonomic assignments and number of valid species. Past revisions have only examined a handful of genera, while recent advances in cladistic and morphometric analyses have granted us additional avenues to answering questions regarding our understanding of valid nimravid taxa and their phylogenetic relationships. To resolve issues of specific validity, the phylogenetic species concept (PSC was utilized to maintain consistency in diagnosing valid species, while simultaneously employing character and linear morphometric analyses for confirming the validity of taxa. Determined valid species and taxonomically informative characters were then employed in two differential cladistic analyses to create competing hypotheses of interspecific relationships. The results suggest the validity of twelve species and six monophyletic genera. The first in depth reviews of Pogonodon and Dinictis returned two valid species (P. platycopis, P. davisi for the former, while only one for the latter (D. felina. The taxonomic validity of Nanosmilus is upheld. Two main clades with substantial support were returned for all cladistic analyses, the Hoplophoneini and Nimravini, with ambiguous positions relative to these main clades for the European taxa: Eofelis, Dinailurictis bonali, and Quercylurus major; and the North American taxa Dinictis and Pogonodon. Eusmilus is determined to represent a non-valid genus for North American taxa, suggesting non-validity for Old World nimravid species as well. Finally, Hoplophoneus mentalis is found to be a junior synonym of Hoplophoneus primaevus, while the validity of Hoplophoneus oharrai is reinstated.

  19. Temporal changes in taxonomic and functional diversity of fish assemblages downstream from mountaintop mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Chambers, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    Mountaintop mining (MTM) affects chemical, physical, and hydrological properties of receiving streams, but the long-term consequences for fish-assemblage structure and function are poorly understood. We sampled stream fish assemblages using electrofishing techniques in MTM exposure sites and reference sites within the Guyandotte River basin, USA, during 2010–2011. We calculated indices of taxonomic diversity (species richness, abundance, Shannon diversity) and functional diversity (functional richness, functional evenness, functional divergence) to compare exposure and reference assemblages between seasons (spring and autumn) and across years (1999–2011). We based temporal comparisons on 2 sites that were sampled during 1999–2001 by Stauffer and Ferreri (2002). Exposure assemblages had lower taxonomic and functional diversity than reference assemblages or simulated assemblages that accounted for random variation. Differences in taxonomic composition between reference and exposure assemblages were associated with conductivity and aqueous Se concentrations. Exposure assemblages had fewer species, lower abundances, and less biomass than reference assemblages across years and seasons. Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) and Creek Chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) became numerically dominant in exposure assemblages over time because of their persistence and losses of other taxa. In contrast, species richness increased over time in reference assemblages, a result that may indicate recovery from drought. Mean individual biomass increased as fish density decreased and most obligate invertivores were apparently extirpated at MTM exposure sites. Effects of MTM were not related to physical-habitat conditions but were associated with water-quality variables, which may limit quality and availability of benthic macroinvertebrate prey. Simulations revealed effects of MTM that could not be attributed to random variation in fish assemblage structure.

  20. Defining conservation priorities for freshwater fishes according to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, Angela; Olden, Julian D.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Paukert, Craig P.

    2011-01-01

    To date, the predominant use of systematic conservation planning has been to evaluate and conserve areas of high terrestrial biodiversity. Although studies in freshwater ecosystems have received recent attention, research has rarely considered the potential trade-offs between protecting different dimensions of biodiversity and the ecological processes that maintain diversity. We provide the first systematic prioritization for freshwaters (focusing on the highly threatened and globally distinct fish fauna of the Lower Colorado River Basin, USA) simultaneously considering scenarios of: taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity; contemporary threats to biodiversity (including interactions with nonnative species); and future climate change and human population growth. There was 75% congruence between areas of highest conservation priority for different aspects of biodiversity, suggesting that conservation efforts can concurrently achieve strong complementarity among all types of diversity. However, sizable fractions of the landscape were incongruent across conservation priorities for different diversity scenarios, underscoring the importance of considering multiple dimensions of biodiversity and highlighting catchments that contribute disproportionately to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity in the region. Regions of projected human population growth were not concordant with conservation priorities; however, higher human population abundance will likely have indirect effects on native biodiversity by increasing demand for water. This will come in direct conflict with projected reductions in precipitation and warmer temperatures, which have substantial overlap with regions of high contemporary diversity. Native and endemic fishes in arid ecosystems are critically endangered by both current and future threats, but our results highlight the use of systematic conservation planning for the optimal allocation of limited resources that incorporates

  1. Taxonomía y epidemiología del género aeromonas

    OpenAIRE

    Alperi Vega, Anabel

    2009-01-01

    Durante la presente tesis doctoral se ha establecido la presencia de variabilidad interoperónica en el gen ARNr 16S de Aeromonas y observado que ésta afectaba a la taxonomía del género, limitando la identificación de A. caviae, A. media y A. veronii. La secuenciación del gen rpoD permitió identificar las cepas con variabilidad interoperónica a nivel de especie y reconocer 5 nuevas especies del género: A. fluvialis, A. taiwanensis, A. sanarelii, A. piscicola y A. rivuli. En colaboración con d...

  2. On the Occurrence of Four Diatom Taxa from Eastern India with a Taxonomic Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Prakash Keshri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms were collected from the Kotulpur area of West Bengal. Four diatom taxa, namely, Eunotia minor (Kützing Grunow, Achnanthidium minutissimum (Kützing Czarnecki, Lemnicola hungarica (Grunow Round and Basson, and Navicula radiosa Kützing were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and identified in light of modern diatom taxonomic trends. Except Eunotia minor, all these taxa are new records to Eastern India. A note on the taxonomy of Achnanthes pseudobiasolletiana as described by Gandhi and Eunotia serrata var. diadema (Ehr. R. M. Patrick as reported by Dwivedi and Misra has been added.

  3. Research review: evaluating and reformulating the developmental taxonomic theory of antisocial behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Graeme; van Goozen, Stephanie H M; Calder, Andrew J; Goodyer, Ian M

    2013-09-01

    The developmental taxonomic theory proposes that there are two subtypes of antisocial behaviour. The first is a neurodevelopmental disorder which emerges in early childhood and follows a life-course persistent course, whereas the second emerges in adolescence, remits in early adulthood and reflects peer processes such as mimicry of antisocial peers. The aim of this review was to evaluate the developmental taxonomic theory in the light of recent empirical research. We conducted a comprehensive literature review comparing these subtypes of antisocial behaviour based on searches on PubMed and other scientific databases covering the period from 1993 to 2013. We focused on research encompassing psychiatric epidemiology, personality assessment, neuropsychology, neuroendocrinology, genetics, and structural and functional neuroimaging. Sixty one empirical studies were identified that investigated one of these forms of antisocial behaviour separately or explicitly compared childhood-onset and adolescence-onset forms of antisocial behaviour. Empirical research provides support for the hypothesis that life-course persistent antisocial behaviour is a neurodevelopmental disorder which emerges in the transactions between individual vulnerabilities and environmental adversity. In contrast to the developmental taxonomic theory, however, empirical findings suggest that severe antisocial behaviour that emerges in adolescence frequently has a negative prognosis and is rarely limited to the adolescent period. In addition, both forms of antisocial behaviour are associated with emotion processing deficits, changes in brain structure and function, alterations in cortisol secretion, and atypical personality traits (such as increased callous-unemotional traits). We conclude that the developmental taxonomic theory is in need of revision, as differences between life-course persistent and adolescence-onset forms of antisocial behaviour appear to be quantitative, rather than qualitative, in

  4. Taxonomic significance of inflorescences, floral morphology and anatomy in Passerina (Thymelaeaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Bredenkamp

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies were undertaken on the inflorescence, bracts and floral morphology of all taxa of the genus Passerina L. in southern Africa. Information is given in tabular form and a key based on bract morphology is presented.Floral morphology supported the status of the intrageneric taxa and also proved to be of taxonomic significance in the genus. Controversy surrounding the interpretation of a number of floral morphological structures in  Passerina has been resolved. Morphological and anatomical evidence allowed a re-interpretation of the structure of the receptacle, hypanthium and sepals, ovary type and position, structure of the seed coat, ovule type and position, obturator, fruit and seed. On this basis an authentic generic description of the floral morphology was compiled.  Passerina is distinguished by the following set of characters, a very short floral receptacle, tubular hypanthium, petaloid calyx, absence of petals and petaloid scales, diplostemonous dimorphic androecium, extrorse anthers, superior ovary, anatropous, ventrally epitropous ovule, an obturator of elongated cells, a I-seeded berry or an achene and tegmic seed with nuclear endosperm becoming cellular throughout.On this basis the flower in Passerina is considered a phylogenetically advanced structure, supporting the view that the genus is advanced within the Thymelaeoideae. The proposed taxonomic relationship between Thymelaeaceae and Malvales is confirmed by floral morphological evidence. Comparative studies were undertaken on the inflorescence, bracts and floral morphology of all taxa of the genus Passerina L. in southern Africa. Information is given in tabular form and a key based on bract morphology is presented.Floral morphology supported the status of the intrageneric taxa and also proved to be of taxonomic significance in the genus. Controversy surrounding the interpretation of a number of floral morphological structures in  Passerina has been resolved

  5. Three reciprocally monophyletic mtDNA lineages elucidate the taxonomic status of Grant's gazelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline Deidre; Arctander, Peter; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2008-01-01

    The intraspecific phylogeography of Grant's gazelles Nanger granti was assessed with mitochondrial DNA control region sequences. Samples of 177 individuals from 17 Kenyan and Tanzanian populations were analysed. Three highly divergent, reciprocally monophyletic lineages were found, with among group...... are discussed in reference to the four currently recognised subspecies. We suggest Grant's gazelles be raised to the superspecies Nanger (granti) comprising three taxonomic units corresponding to the three mtDNA lineages. There was no evidence of gene flow between the notata and granti lineages, despite...... (granti) petersii within the Grant's gazelles superspecies....

  6. Taxonomic reassessment of two Indian shieldtail snakes in the Uropeltis ceylanicus species group (Reptilia: Uropeltidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropeltis is the most speciose of all shieldtail snake (uropeltid genera, particularly in India, and has been bedeviled by a complex and intricate taxonomic history, with several weakly established synonyms and widely disjunct geographic ranges. Our present work on two Indian Uropeltis species revealed greater species diversity than what is currently recognised. We elevate Uropeltis arcticeps madurensis to species level, and revive Silybura shorttii (in the combination Uropeltis shorttii from the subjective synonymy of U. ceylanicus. We provide differential diagnoses, descriptions of examined material and comparisons with similar species based on an examination of voucher specimens as well as fresh, uncollected topotypes documented in the field.

  7. Research Review: Evaluating and reformulating the developmental taxonomic theory of antisocial behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Graeme; Goozen, Stephanie HM; Calder, Andrew J; Goodyer, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundThe developmental taxonomic theory proposes that there are two subtypes of antisocial behaviour. The first is a neurodevelopmental disorder which emerges in early childhood and follows a life-course persistent course, whereas the second emerges in adolescence, remits in early adulthood and reflects peer processes such as mimicry of antisocial peers. The aim of this review was to evaluate the developmental taxonomic theory in the light of recent empirical research. MethodsWe conducted a comprehensive literature review comparing these subtypes of antisocial behaviour based on searches on PubMed and other scientific databases covering the period from 1993 to 2013. We focused on research encompassing psychiatric epidemiology, personality assessment, neuropsychology, neuroendocrinology, genetics, and structural and functional neuroimaging. Sixty one empirical studies were identified that investigated one of these forms of antisocial behaviour separately or explicitly compared childhood-onset and adolescence-onset forms of antisocial behaviour. ResultsEmpirical research provides support for the hypothesis that life-course persistent antisocial behaviour is a neurodevelopmental disorder which emerges in the transactions between individual vulnerabilities and environmental adversity. In contrast to the developmental taxonomic theory, however, empirical findings suggest that severe antisocial behaviour that emerges in adolescence frequently has a negative prognosis and is rarely limited to the adolescent period. In addition, both forms of antisocial behaviour are associated with emotion processing deficits, changes in brain structure and function, alterations in cortisol secretion, and atypical personality traits (such as increased callous-unemotional traits). ConclusionsWe conclude that the developmental taxonomic theory is in need of revision, as differences between life-course persistent and adolescence-onset forms of antisocial behaviour appear to be

  8. Taxonomic study of Festuca L. subgenus Schedonorus (P. Beauv. Peterm. in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Zabihollah Hosseini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was based upon a taxonomic review of the subgenus Schedonorus in Iran. A collection of 30 specimens belonging to the herbaria: W, B and HUI (herbarium of the University of Isfahan were studied. Based on the results of this study, this subgenus included three species: Festuca arundinacea, F. gigantea and F. pratensis in Iran. Furthermore, this study showed that F. arundinacea, occured in this country with two subspecies: orientalis (Hack. Tzvelev and fenas (Lag. Arcang. with the greatest area of distribution compared to the other two species. Our examination of the type specimen of F. elatior subsp. pratensis var. elbursiana confirmed its synonymy with F. arundinacea.

  9. Nomenclatural and taxonomic notes on the flora of Serbia and the Balkan Peninsula, I: Caryophyllaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niketić M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The nomenclatural analysis included 12 autochthonous and mostly endemic species from the genera Atocion Adans., Cerastium L., Heliosperma (Rchb. Rchb., and Silene L. (Caryophyllaceae. In conformity with ICBN, 12 new infra­specific taxa are described with locus classicus on the territory of Serbia. Also presented are 24 new nomenclatural combi­nations, including several for endemic taxa not present in Serbia. The nomenclature of certain taxa is supplemented by a short taxonomic-chorological review. Results of these studies will be incorporated in the next volume of "Flora of Serbia".

  10. [Taxonomic characteristics and physiological properties of microorganisms from the gut of pike (Esox lucius)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izveskova, G I; Nemtseva, N V; Plotnikov, A O

    2008-01-01

    The taxonomic composition and distribution of microorganisms differing in the degree of association with the intestinal mucosa of the pike (Lucius lucius) has been studied. Microorgansism of the families Enterobacteriaceae, Aeromonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae dominate in the gut microflora. Numerically prevailing bacterial species are characterized by high proteolytic and amylolytic enzyme activities as well as by high persistence accounted for by antilysozyme and antihistone activities. The results of this study show that Hafnia alvei, Yersinia ruckeri, Vibrio vulnificus, V. furnissii, Aeromonas salmonicida, and Shewanella putrefaciens may be regarded as normal components of the pike gut microflora.

  11. Gram-positive bacteria of marine origin: a numerical taxonomic study on Mediterranean isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigosa, M; Garay, E; Pujalte, M J

    1997-12-01

    A numerical taxonomic study was performed on 65 Gram-positive wild strains of heterotrophic, aerobic, marine bacteria, and 9 reference strains. The isolates were obtained from oysters and seawater sampled monthly over one year, by direct plating on Marine Agar. The strains were characterized by 96 morphological, biochemical, physiological and nutritional tests. Clustering yielded 13 phena at 0.62 similarity level (Sl coefficient). Only one of the seven phena containing wild isolates could be identified (Bacillus marinus). A pronounced salt requirement was found in most isolates.

  12. e-DNA meta-barcoding: from NGS raw data to taxonomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Fosso; Marinella, Marzano; Santamaria, Monica

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, thanks to the essential support provided by the Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, Metagenomics is enabling the direct access to the taxonomic and functional composition of mixed microbial communities living in any environmental niche, without the prerequisite to isolate or culture the single organisms. This approach has already been successfully applied for the analysis of many habitats, such as water or soil natural environments, also characterized by extreme physical and chemical conditions, food supply chains, and animal organisms, including humans. A shotgun sequencing approach can lead to investigate both organisms and genes diversity. Anyway, if the purpose is limited to explore the taxonomic complexity, an amplicon-based approach, based on PCR-targeted sequencing of selected genetic species markers, commonly named "meta-barcodes", is desirable. Among the genomic regions most widely used for the discrimination of bacterial organisms, in some cases up to the species level, some hypervariable domains of the gene coding for the 16S rRNA occupy a prominent place. The amplification of a certain meta-barcode from a microbial community through the use of PCR primers able to work in the entire considered taxonomic group is the first task after the extraction of the total DNA. Generally, this step is followed by the high-throughput sequencing of the resulting amplicons libraries by means of a selected NGS platform. Finally, the interpretation of the huge amount of produced data requires appropriate bioinformatics tools and know-how in addition to efficient computational resources. Here a computational methodology suitable for the taxonomic characterization of 454 meta-barcode sequences is described in detail. In particular, a dataset covering the V1-V3 region belonging to the bacterial 16S rRNA coding gene and produced in the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) from a palatine tonsils sample is analyzed. The proposed exercise includes the

  13. Changes of taxonomical composition of Late Jurassic Early Cretaceous palynofloras of Bureya Basin,Russia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The changes of taxonomical composition of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous palynofloras are revealed,in the upper stream of Bureya River in Bureya Basin.The palynofloras are dominated as follows:the Berriasian one by ferns (Cyatheaceae,Dicksoniaceae,Osmundaceae), Classopollis and bisaccate pollen;the Valanginian-Hauterivian one by ferns (Cyatheaceae,Dicksoniaceae), Ginkgocycadophytus and bisaccate pollen;the Barremian one by ferns(Cyatheaceae,Dieksoniaceae);the Aptian one by ferns(Cyatheaceae,Dieksoniaceae,Gleicheniaceae)and Ginkgocycadophytus;and the Albian one by ferns(Schizaeaceae)and bisaccate pollen.In the Albian the floral diversity raises with the angiosperms appearing.

  14. Taxonomic position of Eunapius subterraneus (Porifera, Spongillidae) inferred from molecular data--a revised classification needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcet, Matija; Bilandzija, Helena; Bruvo-Madarić, Branka; Cetković, Helena

    2010-03-01

    The freshwater sponge Eunapius subterraneus was described in 1984 on the basis of its morphology and unique ecological features. It inhabits caves in the Ogulin karst area as the only known stygobitic sponge, and an endangered karst species. We used three genetic markers with different evolutionary rates in phylogenetic analyses of E. subterraneus. All of the markers exclude this sponge from the genus Eunapius. Based on our results, we emphasize the need for revision of the taxonomic classification of E. subterraneus as well as the need for a thorough re-evaluation of freshwater sponge systematics.

  15. Una taxonomía de la primera persona del plural

    OpenAIRE

    Puertas Pino, Silvio Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    En este artículo se busca elaborar filosóficamente el concepto nosotros. Metodológicamente, se utiliza al constructivismo filosófico de Deleuze y Guattari. Se parte de una taxonomía comprensiva de la pragmática del pronombre de primera persona plural ‘nosotros’, y luego señalando juegos de oposiciones que brindan consistencia interna y externa al concepto. Se muestra que el pronombre implica múltiples usos que permiten tratarlo como una herramienta discursiva que afecta el campo de lo social....

  16. Subspace Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2002-01-01

    Subspace identification algorithms are user friendly, numerical fast and stable and they provide a good consistent estimate of the deterministic part of a system. The weak point is the stochastic part. The uncertainty on this part is discussed below and methods to reduce it is derived....

  17. Subspace Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    Subspace identification algorithms are user friendly, numerical fast and stable and they provide a good consistent estimate of the deterministic part of a system. The weak point is the stochastic part. The uncertainty on this part is discussed below and methods to reduce it is derived....

  18. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Runnoe, Jessie C; Shang, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Bolometric corrections are used in quasar studies to quantify total energy output based on a measurement of a monochromatic luminosity. First, we enumerate and discuss the practical difficulties of determining such corrections, then we present bolometric luminosities between 1 \\mu m and 8 keV rest frame and corrections derived from the detailed spectral energy distributions of 63 bright quasars of low to moderate redshift (z = 0.03-1.4). Exploring several mathematical fittings, we provide practical bolometric corrections of the forms L_iso=\\zeta \\lambda L_{\\lambda} and log(L_iso)=A+B log(\\lambda L_{\\lambda}) for \\lambda= 1450, 3000, and 5100 \\AA, where L_iso is the bolometric luminosity calculated under the assumption of isotropy. The significant scatter in the 5100 \\AA\\ bolometric correction can be reduced by adding a first order correction using the optical slope, \\alpha_\\lambda,opt. We recommend an adjustment to the bolometric correction to account for viewing angle and the anisotropic emission expected fr...

  19. Corrections in clinical Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Nijs, Robin

    to the known mean and median filtering. The data comes from non-anesthetized preterm infants, where motion during scanning is a common problem. Both the novel outlier identification and the independent component analysis (ICA) perform satisfactory and better than the common mean and median filtering. ICA...... a detrimental effect of the extra-uterine environment on brain development. Paper II describes a method to correct for downscatter in low count Iodine-123 SPECT with a broad energy window above the normal imaging window. Both spatial dependency and weight factors were measured. As expected, the implicitly...... of the striatum due to downscatter correction. This makes the difference between healthy subjects and patients more profound. Downscatter in Iodine-123 SPECT is not the only deteriorating mechanism. Normal scatter compromises the images quality as well. Since scatter correction of SPECT-images also can...

  20. A software pipeline for processing and identification of fungal ITS sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiansson Erik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungi from environmental samples are typically identified to species level through DNA sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS region for use in BLAST-based similarity searches in the International Nucleotide Sequence Databases. These searches are time-consuming and regularly require a significant amount of manual intervention and complementary analyses. We here present software – in the form of an identification pipeline for large sets of fungal ITS sequences – developed to automate the BLAST process and several additional analysis steps. The performance of the pipeline was evaluated on a dataset of 350 ITS sequences from fungi growing as epiphytes on building material. Results The pipeline was written in Perl and uses a local installation of NCBI-BLAST for the similarity searches of the query sequences. The variable subregion ITS2 of the ITS region is extracted from the sequences and used for additional searches of higher sensitivity. Multiple alignments of each query sequence and its closest matches are computed, and query sequences sharing at least 50% of their best matches are clustered to facilitate the evaluation of hypothetically conspecific groups. The pipeline proved to speed up the processing, as well as enhance the resolution, of the evaluation dataset considerably, and the fungi were found to belong chiefly to the Ascomycota, with Penicillium and Aspergillus as the two most common genera. The ITS2 was found to indicate a different taxonomic affiliation than did the complete ITS region for 10% of the query sequences, though this figure is likely to vary with the taxonomic scope of the query sequences. Conclusion The present software readily assigns large sets of fungal query sequences to their respective best matches in the international sequence databases and places them in a larger biological context. The output is highly structured to be easy to process, although it still needs

  1. Generalised geometry for string corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Coimbra, André; Triendl, Hagen; Waldram, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present a general formalism for incorporating the string corrections in generalised geometry, which necessitates the extension of the generalised tangent bundle. Not only are such extensions obstructed, string symmetries and the existence of a well-defined effective action require a precise choice of the (generalised) connection. The action takes a universal form given by a generalised Lichnerowitz--Bismut theorem. As examples of this construction we discuss the corrections linear in $\\alpha'$ in heterotic strings and the absence of such corrections for type II theories.

  2. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming M., E-mail: fmpoulsen@bio.ku.dk [University of Copenhagen, Department of Biology (Denmark)

    2011-06-15

    Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues. The contributions from the neighboring residues are typically removed by using neighbor correction factors determined based on each residue's effect on glycine chemical shifts. Due to its unusual conformational freedom, glycine may be particularly unrepresentative for the remaining residue types. In this study, we use random coil peptides containing glutamine instead of glycine to determine the random coil chemical shifts and the neighbor correction factors. The resulting correction factors correlate to changes in the populations of the major wells in the Ramachandran plot, which demonstrates that changes in the conformational ensemble are an important source of neighbor effects in disordered proteins. Glutamine derived random coil chemical shifts and correction factors modestly improve our ability to predict {sup 13}C chemical shifts of intrinsically disordered proteins compared to existing datasets, and may thus improve the identification of small populations of transient structure in disordered proteins.

  3. [DNA barcoding of animal and plant species as an approach for their molecular identification and describing of diversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneer, V S

    2009-01-01

    DNA barcoding was recently developed as a method of species identification across a broad range of eucaryotes taxa by sequencing a standardized short DNA fragment. Due to modern technologies, it is possible to do this with a tiny piece of any tissue taken from an organism at any developmental phase, often without damaging it. A variable 5' half of mitochondial gene CO1 is suggested as a standard region for most of animals; it is not identified yet for fungi and plants. "The Barcode of Life Initiative" implies creating and developing the barcode library for all the species on Earth to facilitate both assigning of newly obtained specimens to the known species and for discovering new and cryptic species or at least their provisional recognition. This approach has a great potential for the use in global biodiversity studies, especially in the case of poorly investigated taxa and environments. The initiative in question involves accomplish of a new web-based sequence database with rigorous rules for taxonomic information on the specimens and records of their storage as well as for standards of sequence quality and their entry. Critical objections of opponents to DNA barcoding are reviewed as well as limitations of the approach, the problems to be taken into consideration, and the fields where it can be used. Numerous recent studies on different animal groups convincingly demonstrate the efficacy of DNA barcoding and its potentials. The latter depends on availability of comprehensive and unbiased reference database implying correct identification of the source specimens and adequate knowledge of intraspecies variation, so the Barcode Initiative would be more successful as a part of the integrative analysis of the taxs being barcoded.

  4. Improved metagenome assemblies and taxonomic binning using long-read circular consensus sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, J A; Pan, Y; Tooming-Klunderud, A; Eijsink, V G H; McHardy, A C; Nederbragt, A J; Pope, P B

    2016-05-09

    DNA assembly is a core methodological step in metagenomic pipelines used to study the structure and function within microbial communities. Here we investigate the utility of Pacific Biosciences long and high accuracy circular consensus sequencing (CCS) reads for metagenomic projects. We compared the application and performance of both PacBio CCS and Illumina HiSeq data with assembly and taxonomic binning algorithms using metagenomic samples representing a complex microbial community. Eight SMRT cells produced approximately 94 Mb of CCS reads from a biogas reactor microbiome sample that averaged 1319 nt in length and 99.7% accuracy. CCS data assembly generated a comparative number of large contigs greater than 1 kb, to those assembled from a ~190x larger HiSeq dataset (~18 Gb) produced from the same sample (i.e approximately 62% of total contigs). Hybrid assemblies using PacBio CCS and HiSeq contigs produced improvements in assembly statistics, including an increase in the average contig length and number of large contigs. The incorporation of CCS data produced significant enhancements in taxonomic binning and genome reconstruction of two dominant phylotypes, which assembled and binned poorly using HiSeq data alone. Collectively these results illustrate the value of PacBio CCS reads in certain metagenomics applications.

  5. Statistical object data analysis of taxonomic trees from human microbiome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Patricio S; Shands, Berkley; Deych, Elena; Zhou, Yanjiao; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George; Shannon, William D

    2012-01-01

    Human microbiome research characterizes the microbial content of samples from human habitats to learn how interactions between bacteria and their host might impact human health. In this work a novel parametric statistical inference method based on object-oriented data analysis (OODA) for analyzing HMP data is proposed. OODA is an emerging area of statistical inference where the goal is to apply statistical methods to objects such as functions, images, and graphs or trees. The data objects that pertain to this work are taxonomic trees of bacteria built from analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences (e.g. using RDP); there is one such object for each biological sample analyzed. Our goal is to model and formally compare a set of trees. The contribution of our work is threefold: first, a weighted tree structure to analyze RDP data is introduced; second, using a probability measure to model a set of taxonomic trees, we introduce an approximate MLE procedure for estimating model parameters and we derive LRT statistics for comparing the distributions of two metagenomic populations; and third the Jumpstart HMP data is analyzed using the proposed model providing novel insights and future directions of analysis.

  6. Taxonomic richness and abundance of cryptic peracarid crustaceans in the Puerto Morelos Reef National Park, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Veronica Monroy-Velázquez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims Cryptic peracarids are an important component of the coral reef fauna in terms of diversity and abundance, yet they have been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the taxonomic richness and abundance of cryptic peracarids in coral rubble in the Puerto Morelos Reef National Park, Mexico (PMRNP, and their relationship with depth. Methods Three reef sites were selected: (1 Bonanza, (2 Bocana, and (3 Jardines. At each site six kilograms of coral rubble were collected over four sampling periods at three depths: 3 m (back-reef, 6–8 m (fore-reef, and 10–12 m (fore-reef. Results A total of 8,887 peracarid crustaceans belonging to 200 taxa distributed over five orders and 63 families was obtained; 70% of the taxa were identified to species and 25% to genus level. Fifty species of those collected represent new records for the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Isopoda was the most speciose order while Tanaidacea was the most abundant. Discussion Cryptic peracarid taxonomic richness and abundance were related to depth with higher values of both parameters being found in the shallow (3 m back-reef, possibly due to a higher reef development and a greater accumulation of coral rubble produced during hurricanes. Peracarid data obtained in the present study can be used as a baseline for future monitoring programs in the PMRNP.

  7. WebCARMA: a web application for the functional and taxonomic classification of unassembled metagenomic reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jünemann Sebastian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics is a new field of research on natural microbial communities. High-throughput sequencing techniques like 454 or Solexa-Illumina promise new possibilities as they are able to produce huge amounts of data in much shorter time and with less efforts and costs than the traditional Sanger technique. But the data produced comes in even shorter reads (35-100 basepairs with Illumina, 100-500 basepairs with 454-sequencing. CARMA is a new software pipeline for the characterisation of species composition and the genetic potential of microbial samples using short, unassembled reads. Results In this paper, we introduce WebCARMA, a refined version of CARMA available as a web application for the taxonomic and functional classification of unassembled (ultra-short reads from metagenomic communities. In addition, we have analysed the applicability of ultra-short reads in metagenomics. Conclusions We show that unassembled reads as short as 35 bp can be used for the taxonomic classification of a metagenome. The web application is freely available at http://webcarma.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de.

  8. Putative Effect of Aquifer Recharge on the Abundance and Taxonomic Composition of Endemic Microbial Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee J Smith

    Full Text Available Drought events and the overexploitation of freshwater resources have led to the increased need to manage groundwater reserves. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR, whereby artificial water is injected into aquifers for storage, is one of the proposed methods by which freshwater supplies can be increased. Microbial clogging following injection, however, is a major issue. Here, during laboratory simulations of ASR, we used flow cytometry and bar-coded pyrosequencing to investigate changes in microbial abundance and community dynamics. Bacterial abundance ranged from 5.0 × 104 to 1.4 × 107 cells ml-1 before the addition of synthetic wastewater. Following wastewater addition, a 25-fold decrease in abundance was observed, coinciding with a 12-fold increase in viral abundance. Taxa shifted from an overrepresentation of Sphingomonadales, Sphingobacteriales, Rhodospirillales, Caulobacterales, Legionellales, Bacillales, Fusobacteriales and Verrucomicrobiales prior to the addition of synthetic wastewater to Burkholderiales, Actinomycetales, Pseudomonadales, Xanthomonadales, Rhodobacterales, Thizobiales and Thiotrichales following the addition of synthetic wastewater. Furthermore, a significant difference in overall taxonomic composition between the groundwater samples before and after the addition of synthetic wastewater was observed, with water samples exhibiting more similarity to sediment samples after wastewater was added. Collectively, these results suggest that ASR may alter the taxonomic composition of endemic microbial communities and that complete profiles of groundwater properties, including microbial community abundance and composition need to be taken into consideration when selecting aquifers for ASR practices.

  9. Putative Effect of Aquifer Recharge on the Abundance and Taxonomic Composition of Endemic Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Renee J; Paterson, James S; Sibley, Cally A; Hutson, John L; Mitchell, James G

    2015-01-01

    Drought events and the overexploitation of freshwater resources have led to the increased need to manage groundwater reserves. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), whereby artificial water is injected into aquifers for storage, is one of the proposed methods by which freshwater supplies can be increased. Microbial clogging following injection, however, is a major issue. Here, during laboratory simulations of ASR, we used flow cytometry and bar-coded pyrosequencing to investigate changes in microbial abundance and community dynamics. Bacterial abundance ranged from 5.0 × 104 to 1.4 × 107 cells ml-1 before the addition of synthetic wastewater. Following wastewater addition, a 25-fold decrease in abundance was observed, coinciding with a 12-fold increase in viral abundance. Taxa shifted from an overrepresentation of Sphingomonadales, Sphingobacteriales, Rhodospirillales, Caulobacterales, Legionellales, Bacillales, Fusobacteriales and Verrucomicrobiales prior to the addition of synthetic wastewater to Burkholderiales, Actinomycetales, Pseudomonadales, Xanthomonadales, Rhodobacterales, Thizobiales and Thiotrichales following the addition of synthetic wastewater. Furthermore, a significant difference in overall taxonomic composition between the groundwater samples before and after the addition of synthetic wastewater was observed, with water samples exhibiting more similarity to sediment samples after wastewater was added. Collectively, these results suggest that ASR may alter the taxonomic composition of endemic microbial communities and that complete profiles of groundwater properties, including microbial community abundance and composition need to be taken into consideration when selecting aquifers for ASR practices.

  10. Do different populations of Aphanius dispar in Southern Iran form Operational Taxonomic Units (OUTs?

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    Azad Teimori

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering the exact fundamental relations of morphological differentiation among isolated populations of animal species is generally difficult. Usually changes in morphology are resulted from adaptation to different environmental conditions (ecoplasticity or represent an expression of genetic differences and/or gene pool pauperization, and in most instances, however, changes in morphology are the result of the interplay between environmental factors and genetic plasticity. In this study, the morphology and molecular phylogenies of common tooth-carp populations (Aphanius dispar were studied in three basins in Southern part of Iran to discuss an important aspect relate to the question whether morphologically differentiated populations of a single species function as Operational Taxonomic Units. All morphological analyses were revealed significant and strong morphological differentiation between the populations that corresponds well with their zoogeography and their molecular phylogeny in geographically isolated basins. Therefore, it can be concluded that when the interaction between gene flow among populations and natural selection is resulted owing to a long evolutionary history, then the observed morphological differences can be functioned as different Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs in subspecies or even species levels. In addition, biological characteristics of the A. dispar, its high tolerance, geological and ecological conditions in Southern Iran are the main factors that increase chance of reproductive isolation and genetic diversity in this region.

  11. Reference sequence (RefSeq) database at NCBI: current status, taxonomic expansion, and functional annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Nuala A.; Wright, Mathew W.; Brister, J. Rodney; Ciufo, Stacy; Haddad, Diana; McVeigh, Rich; Rajput, Bhanu; Robbertse, Barbara; Smith-White, Brian; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Astashyn, Alexander; Badretdin, Azat; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga; Brover, Vyacheslav; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Choi, Jinna; Cox, Eric; Ermolaeva, Olga; Farrell, Catherine M.; Goldfarb, Tamara; Gupta, Tripti; Haft, Daniel; Hatcher, Eneida; Hlavina, Wratko; Joardar, Vinita S.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Li, Wenjun; Maglott, Donna; Masterson, Patrick; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Murphy, Michael R.; O'Neill, Kathleen; Pujar, Shashikant; Rangwala, Sanjida H.; Rausch, Daniel; Riddick, Lillian D.; Schoch, Conrad; Shkeda, Andrei; Storz, Susan S.; Sun, Hanzhen; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Tolstoy, Igor; Tully, Raymond E.; Vatsan, Anjana R.; Wallin, Craig; Webb, David; Wu, Wendy; Landrum, Melissa J.; Kimchi, Avi; Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Kitts, Paul; Murphy, Terence D.; Pruitt, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    The RefSeq project at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) maintains and curates a publicly available database of annotated genomic, transcript, and protein sequence records (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). The RefSeq project leverages the data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) against a combination of computation, manual curation, and collaboration to produce a standard set of stable, non-redundant reference sequences. The RefSeq project augments these reference sequences with current knowledge including publications, functional features and informative nomenclature. The database currently represents sequences from more than 55 000 organisms (>4800 viruses, >40 000 prokaryotes and >10 000 eukaryotes; RefSeq release 71), ranging from a single record to complete genomes. This paper summarizes the current status of the viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic branches of the RefSeq project, reports on improvements to data access and details efforts to further expand the taxonomic representation of the collection. We also highlight diverse functional curation initiatives that support multiple uses of RefSeq data including taxonomic validation, genome annotation, comparative genomics, and clinical testing. We summarize our approach to utilizing available RNA-Seq and other data types in our manual curation process for vertebrate, plant, and other species, and describe a new direction for prokaryotic genomes and protein name management. PMID:26553804

  12. Epicuticular chemistry reinforces the new taxonomic classification of the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae, Dacinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Nagy, Radka; Pompeiano, Antonio; Kalinová, Blanka

    2017-01-01

    Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White, Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, have been recently synonymized under the name Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The closely related Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock remains as a discrete taxonomic entity. Although the synonymizations have been accepted by most researchers, debate about the species limits remains. Because of the economic importance of this group of taxa, any new information available to support or deny the synonymizations is valuable. We investigated the chemical epicuticle composition of males and females of B. dorsalis, B. invadens, B. papayae, B. philippinensis, and B. carambolae by means of one- and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, followed by multiple factor analyses and principal component analysis. Clear segregation of complex cuticule profiles of both B. carambolae sexes from B. dorsalis (Hendel) was observed. In addition to cuticular hydrocarbons, abundant complex mixtures of sex-specific oxygenated lipids (three fatty acids and 22 fatty acid esters) with so far unknown function were identified in epicuticle extracts from females of all species. The data obtained supports both taxonomic synonymization of B. invadens, B. papayae, and B. philippinensis with B. dorsalis, as well as the exclusion of B. carambolae from B. dorsalis.

  13. Characterization of Prunus-infecting apricot latent virus-like Foveaviruses: evolutionary and taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Fater; Marais, Armelle; Faure, Chantal; Barone, Maria; Gentit, Pascal; Candresse, Thierry

    2011-02-01

    The complete genomic sequences of four Prunus-infecting Apricot latent virus (ApLV) like isolates were determined and used to analyze the taxonomic position and variability of these viruses. The results indicate that all isolates show a typical Foveavirus genetic organization. Despite an average 23% nucleotide divergence, they show strong colinearity with only three regions of significant indel variability, in the internal and 3' non-coding regions and variable N-terminal half of the coat protein (CP). Sequence comparisons using the polymerase (Pol) and CP genes provide a conflicting taxonomic picture, with divergence level in the Pol and CP genes suggesting the existence of a single or of two species, respectively. However, a range of considerations argue that all four isolates should likely be considered as belonging to the ApLV species. ApLV is closely related to Apple stem pitting virus and could be considered a sister species to it, with ASPV being specialized to infect members of the Maloideae family and ApLV members of the Prunoideae. Analysis of selection pressures affecting the five open reading frames of ApLV and ASPV identified two regions under strong purifying selection, that coding for the conserved C-terminal half of the CP and the gene coding for the first protein of the triple gene block (TGBp1).

  14. Taxonomic richness and abundance of cryptic peracarid crustaceans in the Puerto Morelos Reef National Park, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Velázquez, Luz Veronica; Rodríguez-Martínez, Rosa Elisa; Alvarez, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Cryptic peracarids are an important component of the coral reef fauna in terms of diversity and abundance, yet they have been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the taxonomic richness and abundance of cryptic peracarids in coral rubble in the Puerto Morelos Reef National Park, Mexico (PMRNP), and their relationship with depth. Three reef sites were selected: (1) Bonanza, (2) Bocana, and (3) Jardines. At each site six kilograms of coral rubble were collected over four sampling periods at three depths: 3 m (back-reef), 6-8 m (fore-reef), and 10-12 m (fore-reef). A total of 8,887 peracarid crustaceans belonging to 200 taxa distributed over five orders and 63 families was obtained; 70% of the taxa were identified to species and 25% to genus level. Fifty species of those collected represent new records for the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Isopoda was the most speciose order while Tanaidacea was the most abundant. Cryptic peracarid taxonomic richness and abundance were related to depth with higher values of both parameters being found in the shallow (3 m) back-reef, possibly due to a higher reef development and a greater accumulation of coral rubble produced during hurricanes. Peracarid data obtained in the present study can be used as a baseline for future monitoring programs in the PMRNP.

  15. Taxonomic assessment of seaweed community from the coastal areas of Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Mohd Hafizbillah Zawawi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic taxonomic information forms the important basis for the documentation, resource management and utilization of marine biodiversity such as seaweeds. A taxonomic assessment of seaweeds in the coastal areas of Bintulu, Sarawak, East Malaysia, was conducted monthly from May 2011 to May 2012. Species composition was recorded following NaGISA protocols, direct observation, and SCUBA and snorkeling techniques. A total of 54 species were identified, classified into Rhodophyta (23 species, Chlorophyta (16 species and Phaeophyta (15 species. The highest abundance was recorded at Kuala Similajau (25 species while the lowest was recorded at Kuala Nyalau (12 species. As the present study was conducted by examining species collected from both rocky shores and the reef area for the first time, a higher number of species was documented compared to previous studies conducted in the same general area but focusing only on particular habitats. Thirty species found in the current survey represent new records for the locality including some with economic potentials.

  16. The Bornean genus Hypobathrum (Rubiaceae. An investi-gation of its characters and taxonomic status

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    Tri - Mulyaningsih

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available MULYANINGSIH, TRI. & RIDSDALE, C. E. 2002. The Bornean genus Hypobathrum (Rubiaceae. An investi-gation of its characters and taxonomic status. Reinwardtia 12(1: 95–116. ⎯ The investigation on the characters and taxonomic status of the Bornean genus Hypobathrum was based on morphological observations of 140 specimens in Herbarium Borgoriense. The present study shows that there are 24 species that can be recognised. There are six species already placed in the genus (H. frutescens, H. longifolium, H. microcarpum, H. racemosum, H. salicinum and H. venulosum, three species require new combinations (H. coniocarpum, H. gracile, and H. rufidulum, one species requires a new combination and a new status (H. hirtum, a new name in Hypobathrum is required for one species (H. lancifolium. In the present study twelve new species are proposed (H. bangueyense, H. caudifolium, H. collinum, H. ellipticifolium, H. glaberrimum, H. glabrum, H. lithophilum, H. palustre, H. rheophy-ticum, H. riparium, H. sampitense, and H. subulatum. In addition, one incompletely known species is mentioned.

  17. Foliar anatomy and micromorphology of Festuca L. and its taxonomic applications

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    Fatemeh Zarinkamar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, leaf micromorphological structure of eight species of Festuca (F. akhanii, F. elwendiana, F. heterophylla, F. sulcata, F. valesiaca, F. arundinacea, F. gigantean and F. drymeia and leaf anatomy structure of three species of Festuca (F. arundinacea, F. gigantean and F. drymeia belonging to the four subgenera were examined with different repeations. About 40 quantitative and qualitative anatomical features of the leaves were statistically analyzed for several times from superficial view and on transversal section. These characters included observation of ribs and furrows in epidermis, the density of stomata and trichome, and the arrangement of vascular bundles. Sclerenchyma and bulliform cells were studied and their taxonomic value was verified in order to classify different species. The micromorphology data and anatomy characteristics of the species were used for multivariate analysis, which partly supported the taxonomic treatment of the genus Festuca in the flora of Iran. In order to group the species studied on the basis of similarity in their anatomical features as well as their micro morphological characteristics, different clustering methods of Between Groups, Single Linkage and WARD were observed. The first cluster composed of F. sulcata, F. valesiaca, F. elwendiana, F. heterophylla and F. akhanii. The species of F. arundinacea, F. gigantea and F. drymeia were positioned in clusters two.

  18. Reference sequence (RefSeq) database at NCBI: current status, taxonomic expansion, and functional annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Nuala A; Wright, Mathew W; Brister, J Rodney; Ciufo, Stacy; Haddad, Diana; McVeigh, Rich; Rajput, Bhanu; Robbertse, Barbara; Smith-White, Brian; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Astashyn, Alexander; Badretdin, Azat; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga; Brover, Vyacheslav; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Choi, Jinna; Cox, Eric; Ermolaeva, Olga; Farrell, Catherine M; Goldfarb, Tamara; Gupta, Tripti; Haft, Daniel; Hatcher, Eneida; Hlavina, Wratko; Joardar, Vinita S; Kodali, Vamsi K; Li, Wenjun; Maglott, Donna; Masterson, Patrick; McGarvey, Kelly M; Murphy, Michael R; O'Neill, Kathleen; Pujar, Shashikant; Rangwala, Sanjida H; Rausch, Daniel; Riddick, Lillian D; Schoch, Conrad; Shkeda, Andrei; Storz, Susan S; Sun, Hanzhen; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Tolstoy, Igor; Tully, Raymond E; Vatsan, Anjana R; Wallin, Craig; Webb, David; Wu, Wendy; Landrum, Melissa J; Kimchi, Avi; Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Kitts, Paul; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D

    2016-01-04

    The RefSeq project at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) maintains and curates a publicly available database of annotated genomic, transcript, and protein sequence records (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). The RefSeq project leverages the data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) against a combination of computation, manual curation, and collaboration to produce a standard set of stable, non-redundant reference sequences. The RefSeq project augments these reference sequences with current knowledge including publications, functional features and informative nomenclature. The database currently represents sequences from more than 55,000 organisms (>4800 viruses, >40,000 prokaryotes and >10,000 eukaryotes; RefSeq release 71), ranging from a single record to complete genomes. This paper summarizes the current status of the viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic branches of the RefSeq project, reports on improvements to data access and details efforts to further expand the taxonomic representation of the collection. We also highlight diverse functional curation initiatives that support multiple uses of RefSeq data including taxonomic validation, genome annotation, comparative genomics, and clinical testing. We summarize our approach to utilizing available RNA-Seq and other data types in our manual curation process for vertebrate, plant, and other species, and describe a new direction for prokaryotic genomes and protein name management.

  19. Long-term warming alters richness and composition of taxonomic and functional groups of arctic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geml, József; Morgado, Luis N; Semenova, Tatiana A; Welker, Jeffrey M; Walker, Marilyn D; Smets, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Fungi, including symbionts, pathogens and decomposers, play crucial roles in community dynamics and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Despite their ecological importance, the response of most arctic fungi to climate warming is unknown, so are their potential roles in driving the observed and predicted changes in tundra communities. We carried out deep DNA sequencing of soil samples to study the long-term effects of experimental warming on fungal communities in dry heath and moist tussock tundra in Arctic Alaska. The data presented here indicate that fungal community composition responds strongly to warming in the moist tundra, but not in the dry tundra. While total fungal richness was not significantly affected by warming, there were clear correlations among operational taxonomic unit richness of various ecological and taxonomic groups and long-term warming. Richness of ectomycorrhizal, ericoid mycorrhizal and lichenized fungi generally decreased with warming, while richness of saprotrophic, plant and animal pathogenic, and root endophytic fungi tended to increase in the warmed plots. More importantly, various taxa within these functional guilds followed opposing trends that highlight the importance of species-specific responses to warming. We recommend that species-level ecological differences be taken into account in climate change and nutrient cycling studies that involve arctic fungi. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Statistical object data analysis of taxonomic trees from human microbiome data.

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    Patricio S La Rosa

    Full Text Available Human microbiome research characterizes the microbial content of samples from human habitats to learn how interactions between bacteria and their host might impact human health. In this work a novel parametric statistical inference method based on object-oriented data analysis (OODA for analyzing HMP data is proposed. OODA is an emerging area of statistical inference where the goal is to apply statistical methods to objects such as functions, images, and graphs or trees. The data objects that pertain to this work are taxonomic trees of bacteria built from analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences (e.g. using RDP; there is one such object for each biological sample analyzed. Our goal is to model and formally compare a set of trees. The contribution of our work is threefold: first, a weighted tree structure to analyze RDP data is introduced; second, using a probability measure to model a set of taxonomic trees, we introduce an approximate MLE procedure for estimating model parameters and we derive LRT statistics for comparing the distributions of two metagenomic populations; and third the Jumpstart HMP data is analyzed using the proposed model providing novel insights and future directions of analysis.